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  1. Decrease of CD4-lymphocytes and apoptosis of CD14-monocytes are characteristic alterations in sepsis caused by ventilator-associated pneumonia: results from an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The present study aimed to investigate changes of the immune response between sepsis due to ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and sepsis due to other types of infections. Methods Peripheral venous blood was sampled from 68 patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis; 36 suffered from VAP; 32 from other nosocomial infections, all well-matched for severity, age and sex. Blood monocytes were isolated and cultured with/without purified endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). Estimation of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in cultures' supernatants was done by an enzyme immunoassay. Flow cytometry was used to determine subpopulations of mononuclear cells and apoptosis. To mimic pathogenesis of VAP, mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were progressively stimulated with increased inocula of pathogens; apoptosis was determined. Results In patients with VAP, the absolute number of CD3(+)/CD4(+) lymphocytes was significantly lower (P = 0.034) and apoptosis of isolated monocytes was increased (P = 0.007) compared to other infections. TNFα and IL-6 production from LPS-stimulated monocytes was lower in patients with VAP-related sepsis than with sepsis due to other infections. Apoptosis of monocytes was induced after in vitro stimulation of mononuclear cells by a mechanism mimicking VAP. Conclusions Decrease of CD4-lymphocytes and immunoparalysis of monocytes are characteristic alterations of sepsis arising in the field of VAP. PMID:19883512

  2. HIV-1 Infection and First Line ART Induced Differential Responses in Mitochondria from Blood Lymphocytes and Monocytes: The ANRS EP45 “Aging” Study

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Sophie; Cremer, Jonathan; Roll, Patrice; Faucher, Olivia; Ménard, Amélie; Reynes, Jacques; Dellamonica, Pierre; Naqvi, Alissa; Micallef, Joëlle; Jouve, Elisabeth; Tamalet, Catherine; Solas, Caroline; Pissier, Christel; Arnoux, Isabelle; Nicolino-Brunet, Corine; Espinosa, Léon; Lévy, Nicolas; Kaspi, Elise; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Cau, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background The ANRS EP45 “Aging” study investigates the cellular mechanisms involved in the accelerated aging of HIV-1 infected and treated patients. The data reported focus on mitochondria, organelles known to be involved in cell senescence. Methods 49 HIV-1 infected patients untreated with antiretroviral therapy, together with 49 seronegative age- and sex-matched control subjects and 81 HIV-1 infected and treated patients, were recruited by 3 AIDS centres (Marseille, Montpellier, Nice; France; http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01038999). In more than 88% of treated patients, the viral load was <40 copies/ml and the CD4+ cell count was >500/mm3. ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and ΔΨm (inner membrane potential) were measured by flow cytometry in blood lymphocytes and monocytes (functional parameters). Three mitochondrial network quantitative morphological parameters were computed using confocal microscopy and image analysis. Three PBMC mitochondrial proteins (porin and subunits 2 and 4 of cytochrome C oxidase encoded by mtDNA or nuclear DNA, respectively) were analysed by western blotting. Results Quantitative changes in PBMC mitochondrial proteins were not induced by either HIV-1 infection or ART. Discriminant analysis integrating functional (ROS production and ΔΨm) or morphological (network volume density, fragmentation and branching) parameters revealed HIV-1 infection and ART differential effects according to cell type. First line ART tended to rescue lymphocyte mitochondrial parameters altered by viral infection, but induced slight changes in monocytes. No statistical difference was found between the effects of three ART regimens on mitochondrial parameters. Correlations between functional parameters and viral load confirmed the damaging effects of HIV-1 in lymphocyte mitochondria. Conclusions In patients considered to be clinically stable, mitochondria exhibited functional and morphological modifications in PBMCs resulting from either direct or indirect effects of HIV-1 infection (lymphocytes), or from first line ART (monocytes). Together with other tissue impairments, these changes may contribute to global aging. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01038999 NCT01038999 PMID:22829920

  3. Monocyte suppression of Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced human polyclonal B-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, D F; Won, T; Lopatin, D E

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies reported that Fusobacterium nucleatum induced polyclonal B-lymphocyte activation (PBA) as determined by immunoglobulin M production in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the PBA response was greatly enhanced when the cells were depleted of esterase-positive, adherent cells (i.e., monocytes). The purpose of this study was to confirm and further examine the suppression of F. nucleatum-induced PBA (F. nucleatum-PBA) by blood monocytes. For comparison, PBA induced by pokeweed mitogen (PWM-PBA), which is enhanced by monocytes, was assessed in some experiments. We found the removal of monocytes from unfractionated cells by (i) Sephadex G-10, (ii) anti-monocyte specific OM-1 monoclonal antibody plus complement, or (iii) L-leucine methyl ester, a compound which selectively kills lysosome-rich cells, resulted in a population of cells responsive to F. nucleatum-PBA and unresponsive to PWM-PBA. The addition of double adherence-purified monocytes (greater than 85% esterase-positive cells), particularly in concentrations of greater than 10%, to lymphocytes depleted of monocytes by G-10, OM-1, or L-leucine methyl ester treatments, suppressed F. nucleatum-PBA and enhanced PWM-PBA. Monocytes also suppressed a mixture of isolated T and B cells combined in a T/B cell ratio of 3:1, which is an optimal ratio for F. nucleatum-PBA. Allogeneic monocytes suppressed F. nucleatum-PBA, although at low numbers these cells were not as suppressive as autologous monocytes. Heating at 56 degrees C for 15 min, sonicating, or freeze-thawing the monocyte preparations resulted in an abrogation of monocyte-induced suppression of F. nucleatum-PBA. Kinetic studies in which fresh monocytes were added daily to lymphocytes stimulated with F. nucleatum or PWM showed that the monocytes must be added within the first 2 days of culture to suppress F. nucleatum-PBA or enhance PWM-PBA. Monocytes incubated with F. nucleatum for 48 h released into the culture medium a soluble factor that suppressed F. nucleatum-PBA. The results from this study demonstrate a potent mechanism by which the host might prevent exaggerated nonspecific immunoglobulin responses when exposed to PBA-inducing concentrations of F. nucleatum. On the other hand, the induction of suppressive monocytes (or monocyte-mediated suppressive factors) by interaction with F. nucleatum might result in the inhibition of host protective immune reactions. PMID:6334029

  4. Distinct Transcriptional and Anti-Mycobacterial Profiles of Peripheral Blood Monocytes Dependent on the Ratio of Monocytes: Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Fletcher, Helen A.; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K.; McShane, Helen; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Hill, Adrian V.S.

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of monocytes and lymphocytes (ML ratio) in peripheral blood is associated with tuberculosis and malaria disease risk and cancer and cardiovascular disease outcomes. We studied anti-mycobacterial function and the transcriptome of monocytes in relation to the ML ratio. Mycobacterial growth inhibition assays of whole or sorted blood were performed and mycobacteria were enumerated by liquid culture. Transcriptomes of unstimulated CD14 + monocytes isolated by magnetic bead sorting were characterised by microarray. Transcript expression was tested for association with ML ratio calculated from leucocyte differential counts by linear regression. The ML ratio was associated with mycobacterial growth in vitro (β = 2.23, SE 0.91, p = 0.02). Using sorted monocytes and lymphocytes, in vivo ML ratio (% variance explained R2 = 11%, p = 0.02) dominated over in vitro ratios (R2 = 5%, p = 0.10) in explaining mycobacterial growth. Expression of 906 genes was associated with the ML ratio and 53 with monocyte count alone. ML-ratio associated genes were enriched for type-I and -II interferon signalling (p = 1.2 × 10− 8), and for genes under transcriptional control of IRF1, IRF2, RUNX1, RELA and ESRRB. The ML-ratio-associated gene set was enriched in TB disease (3.11-fold, 95% CI: 2.28–4.19, p = 5.7 × 10− 12) and other inflammatory diseases including atopy, HIV, IBD and SLE. The ML ratio is associated with distinct transcriptional and anti-mycobacterial profiles of monocytes that may explain the disease associations of the ML ratio. PMID:26870787

  5. The monocytic population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia shows altered composition and deregulation of genes involved in phagocytosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Rossana; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Fiorcari, Stefania; Bertoncelli, Linda; Martinelli, Silvia; Guarnotta, Carla; Castelli, Ilaria; Deaglio, Silvia; Debbia, Giulia; De Biasi, Sara; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Zucchini, Patrizia; Narni, Franco; Tripodo, Claudio; Luppi, Mario; Cossarizza, Andrea; Marasca, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    Macrophages reside in tissues infiltrated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells and the extent of infiltration is associated with adverse prognostic factors. We studied blood monocyte population by flow cytometry and whole-genome microarrays. A mixed lymphocyte reaction was performed to evaluate proliferation of T cells in contact with monocytes from patients and normal donors. Migration and gene modulation in normal monocytes cultured with CLL cells were also evaluated. The absolute number of monocytes increased in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients compared to the number in normal controls (792 86 cells/?L versus 485 46 cells/?L, P=0.003). Higher numbers of non-classical CD14(+)CD16(++) and Tie-2-expressing monocytes were also detected in patients. Furthermore, we performed a gene expression analysis of monocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, showing up-regulation of RAP1GAP and down-regulation of tubulins and CDC42EP3, which would be expected to result in impairment of phagocytosis. We also detected gene alterations such as down-regulation of PTGR2, a reductase able to inactivate prostaglandin E2, indicating immunosuppressive activity. Accordingly, the proliferation of T cells in contact with monocytes from patients was inhibited compared to that of cells in contact with monocytes from normal controls. Finally, normal monocytes in vitro increased migration and up-regulated CD16, RAP1GAP, IL-10, IL-8, MMP9 and down-regulated PTGR2 in response to leukemic cells or conditioned media. In conclusion, altered composition and deregulation of genes involved in phagocytosis and inflammation were found in blood monocytes obtained from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, suggesting that leukemia-mediated "education" of immune elements may also include the establishment of a skewed phenotype in the monocyte/macrophage population. PMID:23349302

  6. Purification of Human Monocytes and Lymphocyte Populations by Counter Current Elutriation– A Short Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Benoit, Marie E.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the activation processes involved in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells often required large numbers of cells that have not been possibly altered or activated by adherence to surfaces, by binding of antibodies to surface antigens during positive selection, or by release of activators by platelets or other non myeloid cells during isolation or co-culture. Human peripheral blood monocytes as well as lymphocytes from the same blood donor can be isolated by counterflow elutriation using a modification of the technique of Lionetti et al., 1980 as described previously (Bobak et al., 1986). From a unit of blood drawn into anticoagulant, 60-120 million monocytes can be obtained. These cells are not activated and have been shown to be appropriately capable of differential activation in multiple studies.

  7. Classical scrapie prions are associated with peripheral blood monocytes and T-lymphocytes from naturally infected sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. As detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay, previous studies suggested scrapie prions in the blood of sheep might be associated with B lymphocytes but not with monocytes or T lymphocytes. The association of sc...

  8. Innate Lymphocyte/Ly6C(hi) Monocyte Crosstalk Promotes Klebsiella Pneumoniae Clearance.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huizhong; Keith, James W; Samilo, Dane W; Carter, Rebecca A; Leiner, Ingrid M; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-04-21

    Increasing antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens has rendered some infections untreatable with available antibiotics. Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterial pathogen that has acquired high-level antibiotic resistance, is a common cause of pulmonary infections. Optimal clearance of K. pneumoniae from the host lung requires TNF and IL-17A. Herein, we demonstrate that inflammatory monocytes are rapidly recruited to the lungs of K. pneumoniae-infected mice and produce TNF, which markedly increases the frequency of IL-17-producing innate lymphoid cells. While pulmonary clearance of K. pneumoniae is preserved in neutrophil-depleted mice, monocyte depletion or TNF deficiency impairs IL-17A-dependent resolution of pneumonia. Monocyte-mediated bacterial uptake and killing is enhanced by ILC production of IL-17A, indicating that innate lymphocytes engage in a positive-feedback loop with monocytes that promotes clearance of pneumonia. Innate immune defense against a highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogen depends on crosstalk between inflammatory monocytes and innate lymphocytes that is mediated by TNF and IL-17A. PMID:27040495

  9. Association between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and the mortality of HBV-related liver cirrhosis: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Feng, Guofang; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Juanwen; Feng, Limin; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major cause of liver cirrhosis (LC) in China. Recent reports suggest that the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a potential biomarker for predicting clinical outcomes. In our study, we investigated if LMR can be used as a prognostic marker of mortality in patients with HBV-related LC. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting HBV-infected patients with LC and patients with chronic hepatitis B infection (CHB) from the Department of Infectious Disease were enrolled and 240 healthy individuals were recruited from the healthcare centre at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University. Participants 479 HBV-infected patients with LC, 134 patients with CHB and 240 healthy individuals were enrolled. Primary and secondary outcome measures The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and multivariable logistic regression analysis after adjusting for total protein, albumin, total bilirubin and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were used to evaluate the power of LMR for predicting 1 year mortality in patients with LC. Results The LMR was statistically lower in patients with LC. The MELD score and mortality were statistically higher in patients with LC compared with the CHB and control groups. The area under the ROC curve, cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity of LMR for predicting mortality LC in the training cohort were 0.817 (95% CI 0.746 to 0.888; p<0.001), 2.10, 82.6 and 78.8%, and these data were confirmed in the validation cohort. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that LMR was an independent predictive factor of mortality in LC (OR 2.370, 95% CI (1.070 to 5.249); p=0.033). Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that low LMR can be considered as an independent biomarker for predicting mortality in patients with LC. PMID:26297362

  10. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) enhances monocyte- and lymphocyte-mediated bladder tumour cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, K.; Goddard, J.; Goldstein, D.; Stricker, P.; Russell, P.; Golovsky, D.; Penny, R.

    1995-01-01

    A cytotoxicity assay was used to study the action of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and cytokines on four human bladder cancer cell lines. Monocytes and lymphocytes from peripheral blood were incubated with or without BCG or cytokines for 24 h, after which [3H]thymidine-labelled target cells were added and the 72 h percentage specific release determined. BCG had a direct cytotoxic effect against tumour cells and significantly enhanced monocyte/macrophage and enhanced lymphocyte cytotoxicity against one cell line (UCRU-BL-17). Supernatants (SNs) from BCG-activated monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes increased the percentage specific release of [3H]thymidine from UCRU-BL-17 cells. Interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were cytotoxic towards UCRU-BL-17. No synergy occurred between BCG and cytokines at the concentrations tested. The results suggest that BCG is superior to IFN-alpha, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-2 in enhancing cell-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:7710947

  11. Differential Activation of Human Monocytes and Lymphocytes by Distinct Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luísa M. D.; Viana, Agostinho; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia M. C.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi strains are currently classified into six discrete typing units (DTUs) named TcI to VI. It is known that these DTUs have different geographical distribution, as well as biological features. TcI and TcII are major DTUs found in patients from northern and southern Latin America, respectively. Our hypothesis is that upon infection of human peripheral blood cells, Y strain (Tc II) and Col cl1.7 (Tc I), cause distinct immunological changes, which might influence the clinical course of Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the infectivity of CFSE-stained trypomastigotes of Col cl1.7 and Y strain in human monocytes for 15 and 72 hours, and determined the immunological profile of lymphocytes and monocytes exposed to the different isolates using multiparameter flow cytometry. Our results showed a similar percentage and intensity of monocyte infection by Y and Col cl1.7. We also observed an increased expression of CD80 and CD86 by monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain. IL-10 was significantly higher in monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, as compared to Y strain. Moreover, infection with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain, led to an increased expression of IL-17 by CD8+ T cells. On the other hand, we observed a positive correlation between the expression of TNF-alpha and granzyme A only after infection with Y strain. Conclusion/Significance Our study shows that while Col cl1.7 induces higher monocyte activation and, at the same time, production of IL-10, infection with Y strain leads to a lower monocyte activation but higher inflammatory profile. These results show that TcI and TcII have a distinct immunological impact on human cells during early infection, which might influence disease progression. PMID:26147698

  12. Interaction of lactoferrin, monocytes, and T lymphocyte subsets in the regulation of steady-state granulopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, G C; Rigas, V D; Bennett, R M; Vandenbark, A A; Garewal, H S

    1981-01-01

    Colony-stimulating activities (CSA) are potent granulopoietic stimulators in vitro. Using clonogenic assay techniques, we analyzed the degree to which mononuclear phagocytes and T lymphocytes cooperate in the positive (production/release of CSA) and feedback (inhibition of CSA production/release) regulation of granulopoiesis. We measured the effect of lactoferrin (a putative feedback regulator of CSA production) on CSA provision in three separate assay systems wherein granulocyte colony growth of marrow cells from 22 normal volunteers was stimulated by (a) endogenous CSA-producing cells in the marrow cells suspension, (b) autologous peripheral blood leukocytes in feeder layers, and (c) medium conditioned by peripheral blood leukocytes. The CSA-producing cell populations in each assay were varied by using cell separation techniques and exposure of isolated T lymphocytes to methylprednisolone or to monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens and complement. We noted that net CSA production increased more than twofold when a small number of unstimulated T lymphocytes were added to monocyte cultures. Lactoferrin's inhibitory effect was also T lymphocyte dependent. The T lymphocytes that interact with monocytes and lactoferrin to inhibit CSA production are similar to those that augment CSA production because their activities are neither genetically restricted not glucocorticoid sensitive, and both populations express HLA-DR (Ia-like) and T3 antigens but not T4 or T8 antigens. These findings are consistent with results of our studies on the mechanism of lactoferrin's inhibitory effect with indicate that mononuclear phagocytes produce both CSA and soluble factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA, and that lactoferrin does not suppress monocyte CSA production, but does completely suppress production or release by monocytes of those factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA. We conclude that mononuclear phagocytes and a subset of T lymphocytes exhibit important complex interactions in the regulation of granulopoiesis. PMID:6972953

  13. Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio, Lymphocyte/Monocyte Ratio, and Absolute Lymphocyte Count/Absolute Monocyte Count Prognostic Score in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ching-Liang; Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Chen, Jia-Hong; Chen, Yu-Guang; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Wu, Yi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR), and absolute lymphocyte count/absolute monocyte count prognostic score (ALC/AMC PS) have been described as the most useful prognostic tools for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We retrospectively analyzed 148 Taiwanese patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma under rituximab (R)-CHOP-like regimens from January 2001 to December 2010 at the Tri-Service General Hospital and investigated the utility of these inexpensive tools in our patients. In a univariate analysis, the NLR, LMR, and ALC/AMC PS had significant prognostic value in our DLBCL patients (NLR: 5-year progression-free survival [PFS], P = 0.001; 5-year overall survival [OS], P = 0.007. LMR: PFS, P = 0.003; OS, P = 0.05. ALC/AMC PS: PFS, P < 0.001; OS, P < 0.001). In a separate multivariate analysis, the ALC/AMC PS appeared to interact less with the other clinical factors but retained statistical significance in the survival analysis (PFS, P = 0.023; OS, P = 0.017). The akaike information criterion (AIC) analysis produced scores of 388.773 in the NLR, 387.625 in the LMR, and 372.574 in the ALC/AMC PS. The results suggested that the ALC/AMC PS appears to be more reliable than the NLR and LMR and may provide additional prognostic information when used in conjunction with the International Prognostic Index. PMID:26091479

  14. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  15. Lymphocyte-conditioned medium protects human monocyte-macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelman, A M; Seager, J; Haberland, M E; Hokom, M; Tanaka, R; Edwards, P A

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of human monocyte-macrophages to as little as 50 microliters of cultured medium from lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in a dramatic decrease in the activities of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor pathway, the LDL-dextran sulfate pathway, and the scavenger receptor pathway. This effect was not seen when the monocyte-macrophages were exposed to culture medium from lymphocytes cultured without Con A or with Con A together with alpha-methyl mannoside or control medium without lymphocytes. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase also decreased in monocyte-macrophages exposed to culture medium from stimulated lymphocytes. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase activity, protein synthesis, protein content, phagocytosis of heat-killed yeast, and non-receptor-mediated endocytosis were not inhibited. Monocyte-macrophages exposed to malondialdehyde altered-LDL in the presence of stimulated lymphocyte culture medium accumulated substantially less cholesteryl esters than did cells in control medium. We propose that substances produced by stimulated lymphocytes may be useful in protecting macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation. Images PMID:6278500

  16. Lymphocyte and monocyte flow cytometry immunophenotyping as a diagnostic tool in uncharacteristic inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with uncharacteristic inflammatory symptoms such as long-standing fatigue or pain, or a prolonged fever, constitute a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of the present study was to determine if an extended immunophenotyping of lymphocytes and monocytes including activation markers can define disease-specific patterns, and thus provide valuable diagnostic information for these patients. Methods Whole blood from patients with gram-negative bacteraemia, neuroborreliosis, tuberculosis, acute mononucleosis, influenza or a mixed connective tissue disorders, as diagnosed by routine culture and serology techniques was analysed for lymphocyte and monocyte cell surface markers using a no-wash, no-lyse protocol for multi-colour flow cytometry method. The immunophenotyping included the activation markers HLA-DR and CD40. Plasma levels of soluble TNF alpha receptors were analysed by ELISA. Results An informative pattern was obtained by combining two of the analysed parameters: (i), the fractions of HLA-DR-expressing CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, respectively, and (ii), the level of CD40 on CD14+ CD16- monocytes. Patients infected with gram-negative bacteria or EBV showed a marked increase in monocyte CD40, while this effect was less pronounced for tuberculosis, borrelia and influenza. The bacterial agents could be distinguished from the viral agents by the T cell result; CD4+ T cells reacting in bacterial infection, and the CD8+ T cells dominating for the viruses. Patients with mixed connective tissue disorders also showed increased activation, but with similar engagement of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Analysis of soluble TNF alpha receptors was less informative due to a large inter-individual variation. Conclusion Immunophenotyping including the combination of the fractions of HLA-DR expressing T cell subpopulations with the level of CD40 on monocytes produces an informative pattern, differentiating between infections of bacterial and viral origin. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis of these parameters revealed the novel finding of characteristic patterns indicating a subacute bacterial infection, such as borreliosis or tuberculosis, or a mixed connective tissue disorder. The employed flow cytometric method is suitable for clinical diagnostic laboratories, and may help in the assessment of patients with uncharacteristic inflammatory symptoms. PMID:20626864

  17. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Gurin, Coralie; Vilar, Jos; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sbastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cellselective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  18. Monocyte function in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holm, G; Bjrkholm, M; Johansson, B; Mellstedt, H; Lindemalm, C

    1982-01-01

    Monocyte functions were studied in 16 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 11 untreated and five in unmaintained complete remission. Eleven untreated patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 21 healthy persons were used as controls. Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood and enriched to greater than 90%. Lymphoma monocytes showed normal ability to lyse human RBC coated with anti-D IgG antibodies as evaluated by a 51Cr-release assay. The ability of monocytes to augment or suppress concanavalin A stimulation of lymphocytes purified to greater than 98% was studied by incubation of a number of lymphocytes with increasing amounts of purified monocytes. The incorporation of 14C-thymidine was potentiated by a factor of 10 in the presence of equal amounts of monocytes. There was no difference between monocytes from Hodgkin, non-Hodgkin or healthy controls to augment patients' autologous or normal lymphocytes. Patient monocytes also suppressed the response at the same monocyte-lymphocyte ratio as normal monocytes. Stimulation of patient lymphocytes without the addition of monocytes was usually lower than that of normal control lymphocytes. The difference between patient and control lymphocyte stimulation was preserved in the presence of monocytes. It is concluded that monocytes from patients with active Hodgkin's disease or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have normal helper and suppressor effects on patient or normal lymphocytes stimulated by Con A and normal antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. PMID:7094420

  19. Association between lymphocyte and monocyte subsets and cognition in children with HIV

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study assesses the relationships between lymphocyte and monocyte subsets and intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, HIV-infected Thai children without advanced HIV disease. Findings Sixty-seven ART-naive Thai children with CD4 between 15-24% underwent cognitive testing by Weschler intelligence scale and had 13 cell subsets performed by flow cytometry including naive, memory and activated subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, activated and perivascular monocytes and B cells. Regression modelling with log10 cell count and cell percentage transformation was performed. Median age (IQR) was 9 (7–10) years, 33% were male, CDC stages N:A:B were 1:67:31%, median CD4% and count (IQR) were 21 (18–24)%, 597 (424–801) cells/mm3 and HIV RNA (IQR) was 4.6 (4.1-4.9) log10 copies/ml. Most (82%) lived at home, 45% had a biological parent as their primary caregiver, and 26 (49%) had low family income. The mean (SD) scores were 75 (13) for full scale IQ (FIQ), 73 (12) for verbal IQ (VIQ) and 80 (14) for performance IQ (PIQ). Adjusted multivariate regression analysis showed significant negative associations between B cell counts and FIQ, VIQ and PIQ (p < 0.01 for all); similar associations were found for B cell percentages (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusions High B cell counts and percentages were strongly associated with poorer FIQ, VIQ and PIQ scores. Prospective, long-term assessment of cell subsets and determination of relevant B cell subpopulations could help further elucidate associations between lymphocyte subsets and neurocognitive development. PMID:24450991

  20. A functional (pro)renin receptor is expressed in human lymphocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Kaori; Hirose, Takuo; Sato, Emiko; Mori, Takefumi; Kisu, Kiyomi; Ishikawa, Mayuko; Totsune, Kazuhito; Ishii, Tomonori; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Nguyen, Genevieve; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in inflammation. The signaling via the ANG II type 1 receptor in human lymphocytes and monocytes, which play key roles in pathophysiology of glomerulonephritis (GN), can enhance inflammation. However, the role of the (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR], a component of the RAS, in inflammatory reactions is unknown. We assessed whether (P)RR is expressed in human lymphocytes and monocytes by RT-PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry, and whether (P)RR functions in inflammation. (P)RR mRNA and protein were expressed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Flow cytometric analysis revealed high expression of (P)RR on monocytes. (P)RR was present on PBMCs, infiltrating lymphocytes, and macrophages around glomeruli with a crescent in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated GN. Renin stimulation of PBMCs from healthy subjects in the presence of the ANG II type 1 receptor and ANG II type 2 receptor blockers induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and release of IL-6 and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The increases in cytokine release and COX-2 expression were inhibited in the presence of an ERK1/2 inhibitor. (P)RR knockdown by small interfering RNA in U937 cells, a human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line, significantly decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation after renin stimulation. Thus (P)RR expressed in human inflammatory cells might contribute to inflammation in ANCA-associated GN. PMID:25503726

  1. GST-M1 is transcribed moreso than AKR7A2 in AFB₁-exposed human monocytes and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Abbas; Mehrzad, Jalil; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Bassami, Mohammad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) and aldo-keto reductases (AKR) are key aflatoxin (AF)-detoxifying enzymes. In this study, the expression of GST-M1, GST-T1, AKR-7A2, and AKR-7A3 genes in human monocytes and lymphocytes was analyzed after in vitro exposure to 10 or 100 ng AFB1/ml for 2 h. Unlike in pilot studies that showed that all four examined genes were present in HepG2 cells, in lymphocytes and monocytes, only GST-M1 and AKR-7A2 were detected. In fact, the induced expression of both GST-M1 and AKR-7A2 genes in human monocytes was moreso than that seen in AFB1-exposed lymphocytes. In addition, analyses of the effects of the exposures on cell cycle status were performed as, in cells lacking adequate detoxification capacities, it would be expected the cells would arrest at checkpoints in the cell cycle or progress to apoptotic/necrotic states. The results here indicated that only the high dose of AFB1 led to a change in cell cycle profiles and only in the monocytes (i.e. cells in S phase were significantly reduced). In general, the results here strongly suggest that human immune cell lineages appear to be able to increase their expression of AFB1-detoxifying enzymes (albeit to differing degrees) and, as a result, are able to counter potential toxicities from AFB1 and (likely) its metabolites. PMID:25027672

  2. Use of the Monocyte-to-Lymphocyte Ratio to Predict Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Song; Zhang, Jiahua; Wu, Jingyang; Teng, Weiping; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the leading cause of blindness in adults. DR pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but inflammation is widely accepted to play an important role. Emerging evidence suggests that the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR), and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) are novel potential markers of inflammatory responses. The present study aimed to evaluate the associations between DR and the PLR, MLR, and NLR. Patients and Methods: We performed a case-control study involving 247 patients with T2DM. The patients were divided into three groups: 125 control subjects with T2DM, 63 diabetic subjects with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), and 59 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Results: The mean PLR and NLR were significantly higher in patients with DR compared with patients without DR (p < 0.01, p = 0.02, respectively). The mean MLR in the NPDR group was higher than that of patients without DR, but there were no significant differences among the three groups (p = 0.07). Logistic regression showed that the MLR was an independent risk factor for DR (odds ratio [OR]: 54.574, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.7081099.907). Based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, use of the MLR as an indicator for DR diagnosis was projected to be 2.25, and yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 47.1% and 69.6%, respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.581 (95% CI: 0.5100.653). Conclusions: The PLR and NLR are significantly increased in the setting of DR. After correcting for possible confounding factors, the MLR was found to be a risk factor for DR. Although the MLR may be pathophysiologically and clinically relevant in DR, its predictive ability was limited. PMID:26308022

  3. HIV infection of monocytes inhibits the T-lymphocyte proliferative response to recall antigens, via production of eicosanoids.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, P; Kazazi, F; Biti, R; Sorrell, T C; Cunningham, A L

    1992-01-01

    Human monocytes infected in vitro with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) soon after adherence to plastic substrate demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to restimulate autologous immune T-lymphocyte proliferation after exposure to soluble (tetanus toxoid) and particulate [herpes simplex virus (HSV)] antigen. Incubation with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (2-5 microM), prevented inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The inhibitory activity was identified in ultrafiltrates containing the low molecular weight fraction (less than 3000 MW) of supernatants from HIV-infected monocyte cultures. This activity was significantly and markedly reduced in similar ultrafiltrates prepared from indomethacin-treated cultures. Increased concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were detected in ultrafiltrates from HIV-infected monocyte cultures compared with uninfected cultures and cultures preincubated with indomethacin. Ultrafiltrates were inhibitory when added during the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes but not when removed from monocyte cultures prior to the addition of lymphocytes. In addition, ultrafiltrates inhibited antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation and PHA-induced lymphocyte proliferation to the same extent. These data indicate that cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid, including PGE2, are produced in excess by HIV-infected monocytes and that PGE2 and perhaps other cyclo-oxygenase products are implicated in the inhibition of antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation via a direct effect on T lymphocytes. PMID:1572689

  4. Prognostic significance of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prognostic significance of the lymphocyte to monocyte ratio (LMR) in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer who received palliative chemotherapy. METHODS: A total of 104 patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer who underwent palliative chemotherapy were enrolled. The LMR was calculated from blood samples by dividing the absolute lymphocyte count by the absolute monocyte count. Pre-treatment LMR values were measured within one week before the initiation of chemotherapy, while post-treatment LMR values were measured eight weeks after the initiation of chemotherapy. RESULTS: The median pre-treatment LMR was 4.16 (range: 0.58-14.06). We set 3.38 as the cut-off level based on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Based on the cut-off level of 3.38, 66 patients were classified into the high pre-treatment LMR group and 38 patients were classified into the low pre-treatment LMR group. The low pre-treatment LMR group had a significantly worse overall survival rate (P = 0.0011). Moreover, patients who demonstrated low pre-treatment LMR and normalization after treatment exhibited a better overall survival rate than the patients with low pre-treatment and post-treatment LMR values. CONCLUSION: The lymphocyte to monocyte ratio is a useful prognostic marker in patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer who receive palliative chemotherapy. PMID:26379401

  5. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts survival after radiofrequency ablation for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Del Prete, Valentina; Crucinio, Nicola; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the correlation between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and survival after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for colorectal liver metastasis (CLMs). METHODS: From July 2003 to Feb 2012, 127 consecutive patients with 193 histologically-proven unresectable CLMs were treated with percutaneous RFA at the University of Foggia. All patients had undergone primary colorectal tumor resection before RFA and received systemic chemotherapy. LMR was calculated by dividing lymphocyte count by monocyte count assessed at baseline. Treatment-related toxicity was defined as any adverse events occurred within 4 wk after the procedure. Overall survival (OS) and time to recurrence (TTR) were estimated from the date of RFA by Kaplan-Meier with plots and median (95%CI). The inferential analysis for time to event data was conducted using the Cox univariate and multivariate regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95%CI. Statistically significant variables from the univariate Cox analysis were considered for the multivariate models. RESULTS: Median age was 66 years (range 38-88) and patients were prevalently male (69.2%). Median LMR was 4.38% (0.79-88) whereas median number of nodules was 2 (1-3) with a median maximum diameter of 27 mm (10-45). Median OS was 38 mo (34-53) and survival rate (SR) was 89.4%, 40.4% and 33.3% at 1, 4 and 5 years respectively in the whole cohort. Running log-rank test analysis found 3.96% as the most significant prognostic cut-off point for LMR and stratifying the study population by this LMR value median OS resulted 55 mo (37-69) in patients with LMR > 3.96% and 34 (26-39) mo in patients with LMR ≤ 3.96% (HR = 0.53, 0.34-0.85, P = 0.007). Nodule size and LMR were the only significant predictors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median TTR was 29 mo (22-35) with a recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate of 72.6%, 32.1% and 21.8% at 1, 4 and 5 years, respectively in the whole study group. Nodule size and LMR were confirmed as significant prognostic factors for TTR in multivariate Cox regression. TTR, when stratified by LMR, was 35 mo (28-57) in the group > 3.96% and 25 mo (18-30) in the group ≤ 3.96% (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Our study provides support for the use of LMR as a novel predictor of outcome for CLM patients. PMID:27122671

  6. Diallyl disulfide reduced dose-dependently the number of lymphocyte subsets and monocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Yoko; Shirato, Ken; Abe, Ikumi; Kobayashi, Ayumu; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Shiono, Chikako; Sato, Shogo; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a major sulfur compound of garlic, and exerts anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory, and enhancing sympathetic activity effects. However, it still remains unclear how DADS affects the distribution of white blood cell subsets, which is essential to execute effective immune responses and partially regulated by adrenal glucocorticoids. Therefore, we examined the dose-dependent effects of DADS administration on the circulating number of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocyte subsets, and plasma corticosterone concentration in rats. Male 10-wk-old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the DADS-free and DADS-orally administered (dose=10, 20, and 40 mg/kg BW) groups. Blood samples were collected from the tail vein at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after the administration. DADS administration decreased dose- and time-dependently the circulating number of total WBCs, total lymphocytes, and monocytes. Within the lymphocyte subsets, the circulating number of T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes was significantly reduced 4 h after DADS administration in a dose-dependent manner, although that of natural killer (NK) cells was not affected. On the other hand, although DADS administration did not significantly change the circulating number of neutrophils, the circulating number of eosinophils and basophils showed a decreasing tendency after DADS administration. In contrast, plasma corticosterone concentration was increased 2 h after DADS administration in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that DADS administration reduces the circulating number of monocytes and lymphocytes, including especially acquired immune cells, via the action of corticosterone, and the effects are induced in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:23132314

  7. Prognostic value of preoperative lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-Jun; Xu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Juan-Juan; Yang, Fang; Gao, Bao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immunity have an important role in the development of cancer. The lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) has been shown to be of prognostic value in several malignant forms. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic significance of preoperative LMR in post-curative resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods A total of 144 patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent curative operation were enrolled in this retrospective study. The correlation between preoperative LMR and survival was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results In the univariate analysis, an elevated preoperative LMR was significantly associated with an increased overall survival (OS) (19 months vs 12 months, P=0.000), and this result remained significant in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.148; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.085–0.252; P=0.000). Furthermore, patients with high LMR also had higher median recurrence-free survival (RFS) than patients with low LMR in univariate (18 months vs 10 months, P=0.000) and multivariate analyses (HR: 0.148; 95% CI: 0.085–0.252; P=0.000). Subgroup analyses showed that both patients with stage III cancer and patients with stage I+II cancer can obtain OS and RFS benefits from high LMR. Conclusion LMR can be considered as an independent prognostic biomarker for operable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27042101

  8. Unique pattern of interleukin 2 receptor expression by lymphocytes in response to anti-LEU 4: relationship to monocyte accessory cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, H.E.; John, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    The relationship between early interleukin 2 receptor (IL2R) expression and subsequent DNA synthesis by mitogen-stimulated human mononuclear cells (MC) was studied. For serial dilutions of a given mitogen, the percentage of lymphocytes expressing IL2R after 1 day of culture was plotted vs /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation on day 3, and the IL2R value associated with 50,000 counts per minute (IL2R-50K) determined. A mean IL2R-50K value of 7 characterized PHA, Con A, and OKT3 responses, while a higher value of 29 characterized anti-Leu 4 (L4) responses. As tested on OKT3 and L4 systems, exogenous IL2 did not alter IL2R-50K values. Because OKT3 and L4 both recognize the lymphocyte CD3 antigen, but react with different monocyte Fc receptors, the role of monocytes in producing elevated L4 IL2R-50K values was explored. MC from healthy L4 nonresponders (NR), induced to proliferate by L4 in the presence of responder (R) monocytes, also yielded an elevated mean IL2R-50K value of 31. In contrast, direct stimulation of R-MC, NR-MC, or NR-MC plus R monocytes by L4-coated sepharose beads produced mean IL2R-50K values of 12 or 13. These findings suggest that crosslinking of lymphocyte-bound soluble L4 by R monocytes leads to uniquely elevated pattern of lymphocyte IL2R expression. Crosslinking mediated by L4-beads, however, leads to a more conventional pattern of IL2R expression, even though R monocytes may be present.

  9. Monocyte and Lymphocyte Activation in Bipolar Disorder: A New Piece in the Puzzle of Immune Dysfunction in Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Natália Pessoa; Assis, Frankcinéia; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Soares, Jair C; Bauer, Moises Evandro; Teixeira,, Antônio Lúcio

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study tested the hypothesis that the low-grade inflammation presented in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with expansion of activated T cells, and this activated state may be due to a lack of peripheral regulatory cells. Methods: Specifically, we investigated the distribution of monocytes and lymphocyte subsets, and investigated Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in plasma by flow cytometry. Twenty-one BD type I patients and 21 age- and sex-matched controls were recruited for this study. Results: BD patients had increased proportions of monocytes (CD14+). Regarding lymphocyte populations, BD patients presented reduced proportions of T cells (CD3+) and cytotoxic T cells (CD3+CD8+). BD patients also exhibited a higher percentage of activated T CD4+CD25+ cells, and a lower percentage of IL-10 expressing Treg cells. Conclusions: Our data shed some light into the underlying mechanisms involved with the chronic low-grade inflammatory profile described in BD patients. PMID:25539506

  10. C1q Binding to and Uptake of Apoptotic Lymphocytes by Human Monocyte-derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Marie E.; Clarke, Elizabeth V.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize macrophage gene expression profiles during the uptake of autologous apoptotic cells, we developed a unique, more physiologic system using primary human monocyte derived macrophages purified via a nonactivating isolation procedure (and in the absence of contaminating platelets, which can release stimulating signals if activated) and autologous lymphocytes as a source of apoptotic cells. The use of autologous cells as the apoptotic target rather than transformed cell lines avoids antigenic stimulation from “nonself” structures at the HLA level but also from “altered self” signals due to the transformation inherent in cell lines.

  11. Desialylation of T lymphocytes overcomes the monocyte dependency of pokeweed mitogen-induced T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gallart, T; Angel de la Fuente, M; Josep Barceló, J; Alberola-Ila, J; Lozano, F

    1997-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by pokeweed mitogen (PWM) is strictly monocyte (Mo)-dependent and results in T-cell mitogenesis and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, coupled with an inability to utilize IL-2 due to an impaired expression of functional IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). Such IL-2R impairment could arise in PWM-activated T cells themselves or, alternatively, be the result of Mo-derived influences, as it is known that PWM binds Mo strongly and does not or poorly binds lymphocytes, and Mo becomes rapidly destroyed in PWM-stimulated cultures of blood mononuclear cells or T cells plus Mo. The present study investigated these possibilities. The results show for the first time that desialylation of T lymphocytes strongly increases their PWM-binding capacity and, in addition, overcomes the Mo requirement for PWM to induce T-cell mitogenesis and IL-2 secretion. Such secreted IL-2 levels were even higher that those found in cultures of Mo-dependent PWM-activated T lymphocytes but similarly to the latter, PWM-activated desialylated purified T lymphocytes exhibited negligible high-affinity IL-2 binding capacity and an inability to utilize the IL-2 they produced. These effects were not due to desialylation itself, as indicated by data obtained with peanut agglutinin, a lectin that becomes strongly reactive with desialylated T lymphocytes. The data clearly indicate the existence of PWM-related events capable of impairing the expression of functional IL-2R without affecting IL-2 secretion, and indicate that such events are due to mechanisms arising at the level of PWM-activated T cells themselves. Images Figure 3 PMID:9038713

  12. The Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Predicts Patient Survival and Aggressiveness of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Kwon, Sang Hoon; Koh, Suk Bong; Kim, Young Ok; Ji, Yong Il; Kim, Hong-Bae; Lee, Ji Young; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Chang, Ik Jin; Kim, Heung Yeol; Chang, Suk Choo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure the prognostic value of the lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: We retrospectively examined the LMR as a prognosticator in a cohort of 234 patients with EOC who underwent surgical resection. Patients were categorized into two different groups based on the LMR (LMR-low and LMR-high) using cut-off values determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of the LMR on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and to validate the LMR as an independent predictor of survival. Results: Using the data collected from the whole cohort, the optimized LMR cut-off value selected on the ROC curve was 2.07 for both PFS and OS. The LMR-low and LMR-high groups included 48 (20.5%) and 186 patients (79.5%), respectively. The 5-year PFS rates in the LMR-low and LMR-high groups were 40.0 and 62.5% (P < 0.0001), respectively, and the 5-year OS rates in these two groups were 42.2 and 67.2% (P < 0.0001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, we identified age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and cancer antigen 125 levels to be the strongest valuable prognostic factors affecting PFS (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0012, and P = 0.0313, respectively) and age, FIGO stage, and the LMR as the most valuable prognostic factors predicting OS (P = 0.0064, P = 0.0029, and P = 0.0293, respectively). Conclusion: The LMR is an independent prognostic factor affecting the survival of patients with EOC. PMID:26918042

  13. Dietary supplementation with purified citrus limonin glucoside does not alter ex vivo functions of circulating T lymphocytes or monocytes in overweight/obese human adults.

    PubMed

    Zunino, Susan J; Storms, David H; Freytag, Tammy L; Adkins, Yuriko C; Bonnel, Ellen L; Woodhouse, Leslie R; Breksa, Andrew P; Manners, Gary D; Mackey, Bruce E; Kelley, Darshan S

    2016-01-01

    Overweight/obesity is associated with chronic inflammation and impairs both innate and adaptive immune responses. Limonoids found in citrus fruits decreased cell proliferation and inflammation in animal studies. We hypothesized that limonin glucoside (LG) supplementation in vivo will decrease the ex vivo proliferation of T cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes and T cells. In a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study, 10 overweight/obese human subjects were served purified LG or placebo drinks for 56 days each to determine the effects of LG on immune cell functions. The percentage of CD14+CD36+ cells in whole blood was analyzed by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies (T-lymphocyte activation) or lipopolysaccharide (monocyte activation). Interferon ?, tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin (IL) 2, IL-4, and IL-10 were measured in supernatants from activated T cells. Supernatants from activated monocytes were analyzed for the production of tumor necrosis factor ?, IL-1?, and IL-6. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prestained with PKH dye and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies to determine the proliferative responses of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes by flow cytometry. No differences were observed for CD14+CD36+ monocyte populations, T-cell proliferation, or the production of T cell and monocyte cytokines between the 2 treatments. Thus, LG supplementation in vivo did not affect ex vivo functions of T cells and monocytes, whereas it decreased several circulating markers of hepatic inflammation as we previously reported. PMID:26773778

  14. Pre-operative lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio as a predictor of overall survival in patients suffering from osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Fang, Xuan-Cheng; Ding, Zhen; Sun, Ze-Gan; Sun, Li-Ming; Wang, Yi-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory markers have been proposed to predict clinical outcomes in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) on clinical prognosis of patients with osteosarcoma. This study collected 327 patients who underwent surgical treatment for osteosarcoma during the period 2006–2010. LMR was calculated from pre-operative peripheral blood cells counts. The optimal cut-off value of LMR was determined based on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Overall survival (OS) and event free survival (EFS) was plotted using the Kaplan–Meier method and evaluated by the log-rank test. A predictive model was established to predict clinical prognosis for OS, and the predictive accuracy of this model was determined by concordance index (c-index). Our results showed that young age, elevated alkaline phosphatase, metastasis at diagnosis, chemotherapy, lymphocyte and monocyte counts were significantly associated with LMR. Low LMR was associated with shorter OS and EFS (P < 0.001), and was an independent predictor of both OS and EFS (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.14–2.60, P = 0.010; HR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.32–2.57, P = 0.009). The nomogram performed well in the prediction of overall survival in patients with osteosarcoma (c-index 0.630). In conclusion, low pre-operative LMR is associated with a poor prognosis in patients suffering from osteosarcoma. A prospective study is warranted for further validation of our results. PMID:26380812

  15. Comparison of preoperative neutrophil–lymphocyte, lymphocyte–monocyte, and platelet–lymphocyte ratios in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma undergoing radical nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xin; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Ma, Xiao-Cheng; Luo, Lei; Li, Bin; Chai, Dong-Yue; Sun, Li-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of preoperative neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and lymphocyte–monocyte ratio (LMR) in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 140 patients with UUTUC who underwent radical nephroureterectomy from January 2005 to December 2011. We plotted receiver operating characteristic curves of NLR, PLR, and LMR for the diagnosis of tumor recurrence. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Independent risk factor analysis was performed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that NLR was superior to PLR and LMR as a predictive factor in patients with UUTUC undergoing radical nephroureterectomy. Univariate analysis revealed that NLR (P<0.001 and P<0.001), PLR (P=0.01 and P<0.001), and LMR (P<0.001 and P<0.001) were significantly associated with disease-free survival and progression-free survival (PFS), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified NLR and LMR as independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival (P=0.035 and P=0.002) and PFS (P=0.005 and P=0.002), respectively. Conclusion NLR and LMR could be independent predictors of disease-free survival and PFS, and NLR is a superior predictive factor to LMR. PMID:27042108

  16. The cytotoxic activity of Aplidin in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is mediated by a direct effect on leukemic cells and an indirect effect on monocyte-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Morande, Pablo E; Zanetti, Samanta R; Borge, Mercedes; Nannini, Paula; Jancic, Carolina; Bezares, Raimundo F; Bitsmans, Alicia; González, Miguel; Rodríguez, Andrea L; Galmarini, Carlos M; Gamberale, Romina; Giordano, Mirta

    2012-10-01

    Aplidin is a novel cyclic depsipeptide, currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for solid and hematologic malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Aplidin in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in the adult. Although there have been considerable advances in the treatment of CLL over the last decade, drug resistance and immunosuppression limit the use of current therapy and warrant the development of novel agents. Here we report that Aplidin induced a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from CLL patients. Interestingly, Aplidin effect was markedly higher on monocytes compared to T lymphocytes, NK cells or the malignant B-cell clone. Hence, we next evaluated Aplidin activity on nurse-like cells (NLC) which represent a cell subset differentiated from monocytes that favors leukemic cell progression through pro-survival signals. NLC were highly sensitive to Aplidin and, more importantly, their death indirectly decreased neoplasic clone viability. The mechanisms of Aplidin-induced cell death in monocytic cells involved activation of caspase-3 and subsequent PARP fragmentation, indicative of death via apoptosis. Aplidin also showed synergistic activity when combined with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide. Taken together, our results show that Aplidin affects the viability of leukemic cells in two different ways: inducing a direct effect on the malignant B-CLL clone; and indirectly, by modifying the microenvironment that allows tumor growth. PMID:21887502

  17. Suppressive effect of hydroquinone, a benzene metabolite, on in vitro inflammatory responses mediated by macrophages, monocytes, and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Youl

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of hydroquinone on cytokine release, phagocytosis, NO production, ROS generation, cell-cell/cell fibronectin adhesion, and lymphocyte proliferation. We found that hydroquinone suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6], secretion of toxic molecules [nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS)], phagocytic uptake of FITC-labeled dextran, upregulation of costimulatory molecules, U937 cell-cell adhesion induced by CD18 and CD29, and the proliferation of lymphocytes from the bone marrow and spleen. Considering that (1) environmental chemical stressors reduce the immune response of chronic cigarette smokers and children against bacterial and viral infections and that (2) workers in petroleum factories are at higher risk for cancer, our data suggest that hydroquinone might pathologically inhibit inflammatory responses mediated by monocytes, macrophages, and lymphocytes. PMID:19148301

  18. An Elevated Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte-to-Monocyte Ratio Predicts Favorable Response and Prognosis in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guo-Wei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Sheng; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Wu, Jiong; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is a standard treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer. However, the lack of an efficient method to predict treatment response and patient prognosis hampers the clinical evaluation of patient eligibility for NCT. An elevated lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) has been reported to be associated with a favorable prognosis for certain hematologic malignancies and for nasopharyngeal carcinoma; however, this association has not been investigated in breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-NCT LMR analysis could predict the prognosis of patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort of 542 locally advanced breast cancer patients (T3/T4 and/or N2/N3 disease) receiving NCT followed by radical surgery was recruited between May 2002 and August 2011 at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Counts for pre-NCT peripheral absolute lymphocytes and monocytes were obtained and used to calculate the LMR. Results Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that higher LMR levels (?4.25) were significantly associated with favorable DFS (P?=?0.009 and P?=?0.011, respectively). Additionally, univariate analysis revealed that a higher lymphocyte count (?1.5109/L) showed borderline significance for improved DFS (P?=?0.054), while a lower monocyte count (<0.4109/L) was associated with a significantly better DFS (P?=?0.010). Conclusions An elevated pre-NCT peripheral LMR level was a significantly favorable factor for locally advanced breast cancer patient prognosis. This easily obtained variable may serve as a valuable marker to predict the outcomes of locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:25372468

  19. The Lymphocyte-Monocyte Ratio Predicts Patient Survival and Aggressiveness of Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Kwon, Sanghoon; Koh, Suk Bong; Kim, Min Jeong; Ji, Yong Il; Lee, Ji Young; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hyung; Kim, Heung Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prognostic implications of preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) in patients with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods: We retrospectively examined the LMR as a prognostic variable in a cohort of 255 patients with EC who underwent surgical resection. Patients were categorized into two groups according to the LMR (LMR-low and LMR-high) using cutoff points determined by receiving operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The primary objective was to correlate the LMR to clinicopathological factors; the secondary objective was to determine the survival significance of the LMR in patients with EC. Results: Using data from the entire cohort, the most discriminative LMR cutoff value selected on the ROC curve was 3.28 for both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The LMR-low and LMR-high groups included 33 (12.9%) and 222 patients (87.1%), respectively. The 5-year DFS rates in the LMR-low and LMR-high groups were 64.5 and 93.9% (P < 0.0001), respectively, and the 5-year OS rates in the two groups were 76.7 and 96.5% (P < 0.0001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, we identified histologic grade, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and LMR levels as the strongest prognostic factors affecting DFS (P = 0.0037, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively), and FIGO stage and the LMR as the strongest prognostic factors predicting OS (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: The LMR is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS after surgical resection, and it provides additional prognostic value beyond standard clinicopathological parameters. PMID:27053952

  20. Prognostic value of peripheral blood lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in patients with solid tumors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Shu; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests peripheral blood lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) could act as a prognosis predictor in various tumors, the prognostic value of LMR still remains controversial. We carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the association of pretreatment LMR with survival outcomes in patients with solid tumors. Methods Eligible studies were collected and extracted by searching PubMed and Embase databases up to June 3, 2015. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed to assess the prognostic value of LMR quantitatively. Results Eighteen studies with a total of 8,377 participants were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Our findings indicated that elevated pre-treatment LMR predicted a significantly favorable overall survival (HR=0.59, 95% CI: 0.53–0.67) and disease-free survival (HR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.68–0.80) in solid tumor patients. Subgroup analyses revealed that enhanced LMR was significantly associated with favorable overall survival in patients with digestive system cancers (HR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.49–0.81), urinary tract tumors (HR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.52–0.84), lung cancer (HR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.54–0.72), and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (HR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.43–0.57). Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that enhanced LMR may indicate a favorable prognosis in patients with solid tumors. PMID:26730202

  1. Lymphocyte subpopulations of workers in a plant producing plastic materials (preliminary study).

    PubMed

    Boscolo, P; Di Gioacchino, M; Cervone, M; Di Giacomo, F; Bavazzano, P; Giuliano, G

    1995-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 31 men working in a plant producing plastic materials in relation with control groups of similar age and smoking habit. 8 workers (group A) were exposed to solvents (mainly methylethylketone and dimethylformamide), 8 men (group B) to dust containing particles of calcium carbonate, polyvinylchloride, phtalates, unsaturated oils, paraffin wax, iron oxides, titanium bioxides, barium, zinc and lead and 15 men (group C), working in the same department as group B, were studied after a period of 16 months during which lead chromate was employed in the preparation of colors. The lymphocyte subpopulations were normal in group A, while in B there was a significant increase of HLA-DR + cells (monocytes, B and activated T lymphocytes). In group C, T helper/inducer lymphocytes (mainly CD4(+)-CD45RO- "virgin" lymphocytes), CD19+ B lymphocytes, CD3-HLADR+ and CD3-CD25+ (activated B lymphocytes and monocytes) were significantly reduced without changes of serum IgM, IgG and IgA. Highly significant correlation was found between B lymphocytes (reduced in the workers about 40%) and CD4(+)-CD45R0+ "memory" lymphocytes (reduced about 20%). Moreover, blood lead (correlated with urinary chromium) showed a highly significant negative correlation with the B lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that combined exposure to toxic agents produces specific modifications in the lymphocyte subsets without changes in immunoglobulins and confirms the results of previous researches showing that the exposure to lead or chromate induces reduction of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. PMID:8940654

  2. A Low Lymphocyte-to-Monocyte Ratio Predicts Unfavorable Prognosis in Pathological T3N0 Rectal Cancer Patients Following Total Mesorectal Excision.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Lu-Ning; You, Kai-Yun; Huang, Rong; Yu, Xin; Ding, Pei-Rong; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment option for stage II and III rectal cancer. However, for pT3N0 rectal cancer patients who receive upfront TME, the lack of an efficient method to predict their prognosis hampers postoperative treatment. A low lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis for certain malignancies; however, this association has not been investigated in rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether LMR can predict the prognosis of pT3N0 rectal cancer patients following TME. Rectal cancer patients who received radical TME without preoperative treatment between June 2004 and Nov. 2011 at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were retrospectively reviewed. Counts for pre-surgery peripheral absolute lymphocytes and monocytes were obtained and used to calculate the LMR. A retrospective cohort of 280 pT3N0 rectal cancer patients who received TME was recruited. Significantly worse disease-free survival can be observed in patients with lower LMR levels (<3.78) using univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.01 and P=0.015, respectively). Subgroup analysis in patients with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and LMR <3.78 exhibited an accumulated 5-year disease failure rate of approximately 40%, whereas patients with normal CEA regardless of LMR and patients with LMR ?3.78 exhibited accumulated 5-year disease failure rates of only approximately 15%. Low pre-surgery peripheral LMR was significantly unfavorable for pT3N0 rectal cancer patient prognosis, especially in patients with elevated CEA. This easily obtained variable might serve as a valuable marker to predict the outcomes of pT3N0 rectal cancer and indicate appropriate postoperative management. PMID:26078791

  3. PU.1 as an essential activator for the expression of gp91phox gene in human peripheral neutrophils, monocytes, and B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Kumatori, Atsushi; Haagen, Inez-Anne; Fujii, Yoshito; Sadat, Mohamed Anowar; Jun, Hao Li; Tsuji, Yoshiro; Roos, Dirk; Nakamura, Michio

    1998-01-01

    We have reported a deficiency of a 91-kDa glycoprotein component of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (gp91phox) in neutrophils, monocytes, and B lymphocytes of a patient with X chromosome-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Sequence analysis of his gp91phox gene revealed a single-base mutation (C → T) at position −53. Electrophoresis mobility-shift assays showed that both PU.1 and hematopoietic-associated factor 1 (HAF-1) bound to the inverted PU.1 consensus sequence centered at position −53 of the gp91phox promoter, and the mutation at position −53 strongly inhibited the binding of both factors. It was also indicated that a mutation at position −50 strongly inhibited PU.1 binding but hardly inhibited HAF-1 binding, and a mutation at position −56 had an opposite binding specificity for these factors. In transient expression assay using HEL cells, which express PU.1 and HAF-1, the mutations at positions −53 and −50 significantly reduced the gp91phox promoter activity; however, the mutation at position −56 did not affect the promoter activity. In transient cotransfection study, PU.1 dramatically activated the gp91phox promoter in Jurkat T cells, which originally contained HAF-1 but not PU.1. In addition, the single-base mutation (C → T) at position −52 that was identified in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease inhibited the binding of PU.1 to the promoter. We therefore conclude that PU.1 is an essential activator for the expression of gp91phox gene in human neutrophils, monocytes, and B lymphocytes. PMID:9600921

  4. Respective roles and interactions of T-lymphocyte and PGE2-mediated monocyte suppressive activities in human newborns and mothers at the time of delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Mamas, S.; Dray, F.; Griscelli, C.

    1982-06-01

    Recently the concept of a poorly functional humoral immune response in the newborn was proposed. Data have been presented indicating that the impaired newborn B cell maturation, as shown in vitro in a pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation system, is due both to an immaturity of lymphocyte subsets and to an increased suppressive T activity. In the present work, we present evidence that there exists a predominance of a naturally occurring T lymphocyte suppressive activity in the cord blood in that the removal of the suppressive activity by irradiation allows a normal maturation of newborn B cells. Such normal maturation of newborn B cells can also be obtained using mixed cultures of adult T cells and newborn B cells. Newborn suppressor T cells belong to both EA gamma (+) and EA gamma (-) fractions, and it is not known whether these two groups do or do not belong to different subsets. The PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity does not play any role in the suppression observed in newborns since newborn monocytes are poorly suppressive and since they produce a smaller amount of PGE2 than adult monocytes. Some observations suggest, on the contrary, that the suppressive T lymphocytes can regulate the level of the PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity. It should be noticed that similar observations about T lymphocyte and PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activities have been made at the same time using mothers' cells. These observations suggest the possibility that such changes in B cell immune regulation may result from an interaction between maternal and fetal lymphoid cells.

  5. The Peripheral Blood Neutrophil-To-Lymphocyte Ratio Is Superior to the Lymphocyte-To-Monocyte Ratio for Predicting the Long-Term Survival of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaping; Zhang, Xiaolan; Chen, Kai; Su, Fengxi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The peripheral hematologic parameters of patients can be prognostic for many malignant tumors, including breast cancer, although their value has not been investigated among the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1570 operable breast cancer patients was recruited between January 2000 and December 2010. The counts of peripheral neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and platelets were collected and applied to calculate the NLR and the LMR. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to assess the relationship of the NLR and the LMR with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in all patients and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Results Univariate analysis revealed that lower NLR (?2.0) and higher LMR (>4.8) were significantly associated with superior DFS in all patients (NLR, P = 0.005; LMR, P = 0.041) and in TNBC patients (NLR, p = 0.007; LMR, P = 0.011). However, multivariate analysis revealed that only lower NLR was a significant independent predictor of superior DFS and OS in all breast cancer patients (DFS, HR = 1.50 95% CI: 1.141.97, P = 0.004; OS, HR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.072.49, P = 0.022) and in TNBC patients (DFS, HR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.235.42, P = 0.012; OS, HR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.088.61, P = 0.035). Both univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that neither the NLR nor the LMR significantly predicted DFS and OS among the patients with other molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Conclusions A higher pretreatment peripheral NLR significantly and independently indicated a poor prognosis for breast cancer and TNBC, and this measurement exhibited greater prognostic value than a lower LMR. The NLR was not a prognostic factor for other breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26580962

  6. Induction of PD-L1 on monocytes: a new mechanism by which IVIg inhibits mixed lymphocyte reactions.

    PubMed

    Padet, Lauriane; Loubaki, Lionel; Bazin, Renée

    2014-09-01

    Allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) are frequent complications following solid organ or stem cell transplantation in which T cell activation plays a central role. Despite the development of new immunosuppressive drugs that improve the success rate of transplantation, allograft survival continues to be a challenge. Recently, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been proposed as prophylaxis and post-transplant treatment to reduce acute rejection episodes. IVIg is a therapeutic agent that is known to down-modulate T cell functions in patients with autoimmune disorders. To test the hypothesis that this immunomodulatory effect could be beneficial in the context of transplantation, we used mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) as an in vitro model of allograft rejection and GvHD. Our results show that IVIg strongly inhibits the MLR as evaluated by IL-2 secretion, a well-known marker of T cell activation. IVIg also modulates the secretion of other pro-(IL-6, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-1RA) cytokines. More importantly, we show that IVIg induces monocytes with a CD80(low) PD-L1(high) phenotype and that blockade of PD-L1 partially abrogates the inhibitory effect of IVIg. We have thus identified a new mechanism by which IVIg inhibits T cell functions in the context of transplantation, supporting the potential usefulness of IVIg in the prevention or treatment of graft rejection and GvHD. PMID:24875729

  7. The association between the ratio of monocytes:lymphocytes at age 3 months and risk of tuberculosis (TB) in the first two years of life

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent transcriptomic studies revived a hypothesis suggested by historical studies in rabbits that the ratio of peripheral blood monocytes to lymphocytes (ML) is associated with risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease. Recent data confirmed the hypothesis in cattle and in adults infected with HIV. Methods We tested this hypothesis in 1,336 infants (540 HIV-infected, 796 HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU)) prospectively followed in a randomized controlled trial of isoniazid prophylaxis in Southern Africa, the IMPAACT P1041 study. We modeled the relationship between ML ratio at enrollment (91 to 120 days after birth) and TB disease or death in HIV-infected children and latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, TB disease or death in HEU children within 96 weeks (with 12 week window) of randomization. Infants were followed-up prospectively and routinely assessed for MTB exposure and outcomes. Cox proportional hazards models allowing for non-linear associations were used; in all cases linear models were the most parsimonious. Results Increasing ML ratio at baseline was significantly associated with TB disease/death within two years (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.17 per unit increase in ML ratio; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.34; P = 0.03). Neither monocyte count nor lymphocyte counts alone were associated with TB disease. The association was not statistically dissimilar between HIV infected and HEU children. Baseline ML ratio was associated with composite endpoints of TB disease and death and/or TB infection. It was strongest when restricted to probable and definite TB disease (HR 1.50; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.89; P = 0.006). Therefore, per 0.1 unit increase in the ML ratio at three to four months of age, the hazard of probable or definite TB disease before two years was increased by roughly 4% (95% CI 1.7% to 6.6%). Conclusion Elevated ML ratio at three- to four-months old is associated with increased hazards of TB disease before two years among children in Southern Africa. While significant, the modest effect size suggests that the ML ratio plays a modest role in predicting TB disease-free survival; its utility may, therefore, be limited to combination with existing tools to stratify TB risk, or to inform underlying pathophysiologic determinants of TB disease. PMID:25034889

  8. Monocytes become macrophages; they do not become microglia: a light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study using 125-iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Schelper, R.L.; Adrian, E.K. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study of stab injuries in the spinal cord of mice evaluated the ultrastructural characteristics of cells labeled by incorporation of the thymidine analogue /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (I-UdR), injected one day prior to injury. I-UdR was used instead of tritiated thymidine (H-TdR) because H-TdR can be reutilized and is therefore not a suitable pulse label for long-term studies of cell migration. Using serial thick and thin sections for autoradiography 614 labeled cells were identified. Labeled cells included 545 monocytes/macrophages, 50 lymphocytes, 17 pericytes, one endothelial cell, and one arachnoid cell. No labeled cell had the morphology of microglia. We concluded that macrophages in stab injuries of the spinal cord of mice are derived from blood monocytes. Blood-derived lymphocytes are also involved in the reaction to spinal cord stab injury. Microglia are not blood-derived and are not seen as a transitional form in the differentiation of monocytes to macrophages.

  9. Circulating monocytes: an appropriate model for bone-related study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Deng, H-W; Shen, H

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) are an important source of precursors of osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells and the cytokines produced by PBMs that have profound effects on osteoclast differentiation, activation, and apoptosis. So PBMs represent a highly valuable and unique working cell model for bone-related study. Finding an appropriate working cell model for clinical and (epi-)genomic studies of human skeletal disorders is a challenge. Peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) can give rise to osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells. Particularly, PBMs provide the sole source of osteoclast precursors for adult peripheral skeleton where the bone marrow is normally hematopoietically inactive. PBMs can secrete potent pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, which are important for osteoclast differentiation, activation, and apoptosis. Reduced production of PBM cytokines represents a major mechanism for the inhibitory effects of sex hormones on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Abnormalities in PBMs have been linked to various skeletal disorders/traits, strongly supporting for the biological relevance of PBMs with bone metabolism and disorders. Here, we briefly review the origin and further differentiation of PBMs. In particular, we discuss the close relationship between PBMs and osteoclasts, and highlight the utility of PBMs in study the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying various skeletal disorders. PMID:26194495

  10. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  11. Monocytic AML cells inactivate antileukemic lymphocytes: role of NADPH oxidase/gp91phox expression and the PARP-1/PAR pathway of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Aurelius, Johan; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Akhiani, Ali A.; Brune, Mats; Palmqvist, Lars; Hansson, Markus; Martner, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells has been proposed to determine the course of disease in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but only limited information is available on the mechanisms of lymphocyte inhibition. We aimed to evaluate to what extent human malignant AML cells use NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an immune evasion strategy. We report that a subset of malignant myelomonocytic and monocytic AML cells (French-American-British [FAB] classes M4 and M5, respectively), recovered from blood or BM of untreated AML patients at diagnosis, expressed the NADPH oxidase component gp91phox. Highly purified FAB M4/M5 AML cells produced large amounts of ROS on activation and triggered poly-[ADP-ribose] polymerase-1−dependent apoptosis in adjacent NK cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells. In contrast, immature (FAB class M1) and myeloblastic (FAB class M2) AML cells rarely expressed gp91phox, did not produce ROS, and did not trigger NK or T-cell apoptosis. Microarray data from 207 AML patients confirmed a greater expression of gp91phox mRNA by FAB-M4/M5 AML cells than FAB-M1 cells (P < 10−11) or FAB-M2 cells (P < 10−9). Our data are suggestive of a novel mechanism by which monocytic AML cells evade cell-mediated immunity. PMID:22550344

  12. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: very long-chain fatty acid metabolism is severely impaired in monocytes but not in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Franziska D; Wiesinger, Christoph; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Regelsberger, Günther; Einwich, Angelika; Weber, Willi H A; Köhler, Wolfgang; Stockinger, Hannes; Berger, Johannes

    2014-05-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, encoding a member of the peroxisomal ABC transporter family. The ABCD1 protein transports CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) into peroxisomes for degradation via β-oxidation. In the severest form, X-ALD patients suffer from inflammatory demyelination of the brain. As the extent of the metabolic defect in the main immune cells is unknown, we explored their phenotypes concerning mRNA expression pattern of the three peroxisomal ABC transporters, VLCFA accumulation and peroxisomal β-oxidation. In controls, ABCD1 expression was high in monocytes, intermediate in B cells and low in T cells; ABCD2 expression was extremely low in monocytes, intermediate in B cells and highest in T cells; ABCD3 mRNA was equally distributed. In X-ALD patients, the expression patterns remained unaltered; accordingly, monocytes, which lack compensatory VLCFA transport by ABCD2, displayed the severest biochemical phenotype with a 6-fold accumulation of C26:0 and a striking 70% reduction in peroxisomal β-oxidation activity. In contrast, VLCFA metabolism was close to control values in B cells and T cells, supporting the hypothesis that sufficient ABCD2 is present to compensate for ABCD1 deficiency. Thus, the vulnerability of the main immune cell types is highly variable in X-ALD. Based on these results, we propose that in X-ALD the halt of inflammation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation relies particularly on the replacement of the monocyte lineage. Additionally, these findings support the concept that ABCD2 is a target for pharmacological induction as an alternative therapeutic strategy. PMID:24363066

  13. The fine structure of normal lymphocyte subpopulations--a study with monoclonal antibodies and the immunogold technique.

    PubMed Central

    Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of normal lymphocyte subpopulations, identified by monoclonal antibodies and visualized by a colloidal gold labelled anti-mouse IgG were analysed. Our study demonstrates: (1) the major T lymphocyte subsets (OKT4+ and OKT8+) have distinct ultrastructural morphology. The majority of OKT4+ cells have a high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio (N/C) and few cytoplasmic organelles whilst most OKT8+ cells have a low N/C ratio and numerous organelles, namely a well developed Golgi apparatus, lysosomal granules and parallel tubular arrays (PTA); (2) a unique subtype with irregular nuclear outline that resembles Sézary cells was seen in 5-10% of OKT4+ lymphocytes; (3) OKM1, a reagent that reacts with monocytes and granulocytes, is positive in a small lymphocyte subset which appears to be negative with the OKT reagents and is morphologically identical to OKT8+ cells; (4) 'hand-mirror' cells were only seen labelled with OKT8 and OKM1; (5) B lymphocytes labelled with FMC4 (anti-IA) could be distinguished from OKT3+ lymphocytes by having numerous profiles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and ribosomes; these were particularly prominent in lymphoplasmacytoid cells. Morphological similarities between normal T lymphocyte subsets and T neoplasias of the same membrane phenotype suggest that these disorders arise from specific T cell types present in normal peripheral blood or from common precursors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:6185261

  14. Modulation of human monocyte/macrophage activity by tocilizumab, abatacept and etanercept: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Obeng, Joyce Afrakoma; Amoruso, Angela; Camaschella, Gian Luca Ermanno; Sola, Daniele; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Fresu, Luigia Grazia

    2016-06-01

    Tocilizumab, etanercept and abatacept are biological drugs used in the therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Their mechanism of action is well documented but their direct effects on human monocytes/macrophages have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of these drugs on monocytes/macrophages from healthy volunteers. Human monocytes were isolated from healthy anonymous volunteers and cultured as such or differentiated to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). The effect of tocilizumab, etanercept and abatacept (at concentrations similar to those in plasma of patients) on superoxide anion production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene expression and activity, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)γ expression and cell phenotype was evaluated. Exposure of monocytes/macrophages to tocilizumab, etanercept or abatacept resulted in a significant decrease of the PMA-induced superoxide anion production. Interestingly, the expression of PPARγ was significantly increased only by tocilizumab, while etanercept was the only one able to significantly reduce MMP-9 gene expression and inhibit the LPS-induced MMP-9 activity in monocytes. When etanercept and abatacept were added to the differentiating medium, both significantly reduced the amount of CD206(+)MDM. This study demonstrates that etanercept, abatacept and tocilizumab affect differently human monocytes/macrophages. In particular, the IL-6 antagonist tocilizumab seems to be more effective in inducing an anti-inflammatory phenotype of monocytes/macrophages compared to etanercept and abatacept, also in light of the up-regulation of PPARγ whose anti-inflammatory effects are well recognised. PMID:26997366

  15. Phosphatidylcholine metabolism is altered in a monocyte-derived macrophage model of Gaucher disease but not in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Trajkovic-Bodennec, Selena; Bodennec, Jacques; Futerman, Anthony H

    2004-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by defective activity of acid-beta-glucosidase (GlcCerase), resulting in accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer) mainly in macrophages. We now demonstrate that secondary biochemical pathways regulating levels of phospholipid metabolism are altered in a Gaucher disease macrophage model. Upon treatment of macrophages with the GlcCerase inhibitor, conduritol-B-epoxide, phosphatidylcholine (PC) labeling with the metabolic precursor, [methyl-14C]choline, was elevated after 6 or 12 days in macrophages but not in lymphocytes. These changes correlated with increases in the cytoplasmic/nuclear ratio and with levels of [3H]GlcCer accumulation. Moreover, metabolic labeling with L-[3-3H]serine and L-[methyl-3H]methionine demonstrated that PC synthesis via the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine is also increased in CBE-treated macrophages. Since PC is a major structural component of biological membranes and the source of various second messengers, we suggest that changes in its metabolism in macrophages may be relevant for understanding Gaucher disease pathology. PMID:15223015

  16. Cyclic dinucleotides modulate human T-cell response through monocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Pont, Frédéric; Verhoeyen, Els; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides, a class of microbial messengers, have been recently identified in bacteria, but their activity in humans remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the function of cyclic dinucleotides in humans. We found that c-di-AMP and cGAMP, two adenosine-based cyclic dinucleotides, activated T lymphocytes in an unusual manner through monocyte cell death. c-di-AMP and cGAMP induced the selective apoptosis of human monocytes, and T lymphocytes were activated by the direct contact with these dying monocytes. The ensuing T-cell response comprised cell-cycle exit, phenotypic maturation into effector memory cells and proliferation arrest, but not cell death. This quiescence was transient since T cells remained fully responsive to further restimulation. Together, our results depict a novel activation pattern for human T lymphocytes: a transient quiescence induced by c-di-AMP- or cGAMP-primed apoptotic monocytes. PMID:26460927

  17. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03884g

  18. Longitudinal studies of blood lymphocyte capacity in Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkholm, M.; Wedelin, C.; Holm, G.; Johansson, B.; Mellstedt, H.

    1981-11-01

    Blood lymphocyte functional capacity and serum immunoglobulins were studied in 40 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, before treatment and in complete remission 2-56 months following termination of radiotherapy (total nodal irradiation (TNI); n . 29) or chemotherapy (MOPP; n . 11). Lymphocyte studies included determination of total lymphocyte and T-cell counts and evaluation of spontaneous DNA synthesis during the first day of culture and mitogen-(concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen) and antigen (purified protein derivative, PPD)-induced activation on the third day. Blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts decreased dramatically following TNI. A slow restitution was seen, but pretreatment levels were not reached even four years following therapy. The responses to ConA and PPD but not PWM were significantly reduced shortly after TNI. The mitogen response did not increase with time as did the PPD response. Lymphocyte counts and lymphocyte stimulation, which were severely depressed before treatment of patients in the chemotherapy group, remained unchanged 2-36 months after termination of therapy. A significant reduction of IgM levels was observed regardless of the mode of treatment. Splenectomy prevented the profound reduction of blood lymphocyte and T-cell counts following therapy but did not influence the other immunologic variables under study.

  19. Altered monocyte activation markers in Tourette’s syndrome: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections and immunological processes are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of Tourette’s syndrome (TS). To determine possible common underlying immunological mechanisms, we focused on innate immunity and studied markers of inflammation, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cytokines. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we used current methods to determine the number of monocytes and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in 46 children, adolescents, and adult patients suffering from TS and in 43 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), soluble CD14 (sCD14), IL1-receptor antagonist (IL1-ra), and serum neopterin were detected by immunoassays. Results We found that CRP and neopterin levels and the number of monocytes were significantly higher in TS patients than in healthy controls. Serum concentrations of TNF-alpha, sIL1-ra, and sCD14 were significantly lower in TS patients. All measured values were within normal ranges and often close to detection limits. Conclusions The present results point to a monocyte dysregulation in TS. This possible dysbalance in innate immunity could predispose to infections or autoimmune reactions. PMID:22471395

  20. Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya; Liu, Der-Zen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2010-08-01

    It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

  1. Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya; Liu, Der-Zen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2010-08-01

    It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells. PMID:20471992

  2. Impact of Human Granulocyte and Monocyte Isolation Procedures on Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lu; Somasundaram, Rajesh; Nederhof, Rosa F.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Faber, Klaas Nico; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the first lines of defense against infection is the activation of the innate immune system. It is becoming clear that autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease, may be caused by disturbed innate immunity, and relating granulocyte and monocyte functions to the patient genotype has become an important part of contemporary research. Although it is essential to move this field forward, a systematic study comparing the efficacy and suitability for functional studies of the various available protocols for the isolation of these immune cells has not been performed. Here, we compare human granulocyte functionality under three enrichment protocols: (i) Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, (ii) anti-CD15 antibody-conjugated microbeads (positive selection), and (iii) Polymorphoprep. Primary monocytes were isolated in parallel using (i) anti-CD14 magnetic microbeads, (ii) non-monocyte depletion by antibody-conjugated magnetic microbeads (negative selection), (iii) RosetteSep antibody cocktail, and (iv) the classical adherence protocol. The best results in terms of purity and cell functionality were obtained with positive selection by magnetic microbeads for both human granulocytes and monocytes. Whereas phagocytosis of Escherichia coli bacteria was identical in all isolation procedures tested, the granulocyte respiratory burst was higher in positively selected cells. In addition, different granulocyte enrichment procedures affect cell surface receptor expression to different extents. In toto, we propose that positive selection of granulocytes and monocytes be adopted as the procedure of choice for studies of human granulocyte and monocyte functions but caution investigators to be aware of possible alterations in cell phenotypes with different isolation procedures. PMID:22552601

  3. Comparison of two different strategies for human monocyte subsets gating within the large-scale prospective CARE FOR HOMe Study.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Fell, Lisa H; Untersteller, Kathrin; Seiler, Sarah; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Fliser, Danilo; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Heine, Gunnar H

    2015-08-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous cells consisting of (at least) three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Correct enumeration of cell counts necessitates well-defined gating strategies, which are essentially based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. For the delineation of intermediate from nonclassical monocytes, a "rectangular gating (RG) strategy" and a "trapezoid gating (TG) strategy" have been proposed. We compared the two gating strategies in a well-defined clinical cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Within the ongoing CARE FOR HOMe study, monocyte subsets were reanalyzed in 416 CKD patients, who were followed 3.6 ± 1.6 years for the occurrence of a cardiovascular event. Gating was performed by either RG or TG. We analyzed the expression of surface markers, and compared the predictive role of cell counts of monocyte subsets, as defined by RG and TG, respectively. With both gating strategies, higher intermediate monocyte counts predicted the cardiovascular endpoint in Kaplan-Meier analyses (P < 0.001 with RG; P < 0.001 with TG). After correction for confounders, intermediate monocyte counts remained independent predictors in Cox-Regression analyses (HR = 1.013 [95% CI: 1.006-1.020; P < 0.001] with RG; HR = 1.015 [95% CI: 1.006-1.024; P = 0.001] with TG). NRI was 3.9% when reclassifying patients from quartiles of intermediate monocyte counts with RG strategy toward quartiles of intermediate monocytes counts with TG strategy. In expression analysis, those monocytes which are defined as intermediate monocytes by the RG strategy and as nonclassical monocytes by the TG strategy share characteristics of both subsets. In conclusion, intermediate monocytes were independent predictors of cardiovascular outcome irrespective of the applied gating strategy. Future studies should aim to identify markers that allow for an unequivocal definition of intermediate monocytes, which may further improve their power to predict cardiovascular events. PMID:26062127

  4. Lymphocyte Migration into Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but the recruitment of T and B lymphocytes to atherosclerotic lesions is not as well studied as that of monocytes. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of lymphocyte subsets in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and discuss chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in lymphocyte homing to atherosclerotic lesions. We review evidence for involvement of the chemokines CCL5, CCL19, CCL21, CXCL10, CXCL16 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in lymphocyte homing in atherosclerosis. Also, we review the role of their receptors CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CXCR3, CXCR6, CXCR2/CXCR4 and the role of the L-selectin in mouse models of atherosclerosis. PMID:25301842

  5. Altered T Lymphocyte Proliferation upon Lipopolysaccharide Challenge Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poujol, Fanny; Monneret, Guillaume; Pachot, Alexandre; Textoris, Julien; Venet, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Context Sepsis is characterized by the development of adaptive immune cell alterations, which intensity and duration are associated with increased risk of health-care associated infections and mortality. However, pathophysiological mechanisms leading to such lymphocyte dysfunctions are not completely understood, although both intrinsic lymphocyte alterations and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) dysfunctions are most likely involved. Study The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS, mimicking initial Gram negative bacterial challenge) could directly impact lymphocyte function after sepsis. Therefore, we explored ex-vivo the effect of LPS priming on human T lymphocyte proliferation induced by different stimuli. Results We showed that LPS priming of PBMCs reduced T cell proliferative response and altered IFN? secretion after stimulation with OKT3 but not with phytohaemagglutinin or anti-CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads stimulations. Interestingly only LPS priming of monocytes led to decreased T cell proliferative response as opposed to LPS priming of lymphocytes. Importantly, LPS priming was associated with reduced expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD64 on monocytes but not with the modification of CD3, CTLA4, PD-1 and CD28 expressions on lymphocytes. Finally, IFN? stimulation restored monocytes accessory functions and T cell proliferative response to OKT3. Conclusion We conclude that LPS priming does not directly impact lymphocyte functions but reduces APCs capacity to activate T cells. This recapitulates ex vivo indirect mechanisms participating in sepsis-induced lymphocyte alterations and suggests that monocyte-targeting immunoadjuvant therapies in sepsis may also help to improve adaptive immune dysfunctions. Direct mechanisms impacting lymphocytes being also at play during sepsis, the respective parts of direct versus indirect sepsis-induced lymphocyte alterations remain to be evaluated in clinic. PMID:26642057

  6. Cell surface antigens and function of monocytes and a monocyte-like cell line before and after infection with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; Gartner, S; LeSane, F; Blattner, W A; Popovic, M

    1990-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) preferentially infects cells that express the CD4 molecule, including monocytes and cells of the monocyte lineage. The monocyte-like cell line U937 and monocytes isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were infected with HIV-1. Cell surface antigen expression was determined in infected and noninfected cells as was the ability to stimulate in mixed lymphocyte reaction. The CD4 antigen decreased in infected cells U937 and PBL monocytes. MHC class II antigens HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP increased in HIV-1 infected U937 cells. In infected PBL-derived monocytes, HLA-DR increased, HLA-DQ decreased, and HLA-DP was unchanged. Infected U937 and PBL monocytes were capable of stimulating allogeneic lymphocytes, thus demonstrating retention of the alloantigen presentation function of HIV-1-infected monocytes. PMID:1967231

  7. Calorimetric studies of the state of water in deeply frozen human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Hirsh, A

    1985-01-01

    Intra- and extracellular phase transitions in human peripheral blood monocyte suspensions with and without the cryoprotectant 1 M dimethylsulfoxide were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. Using an fluorescence diacetate/ethidium bromide assay for membrane integrity and a phagocytosis assay for cell function, it was found that mortality was correlated with several phase transitions under a variety of cooling and warming regimens. As a result of these studies we concluded that: intracellular freezing is lethal, but avoidance of freezing during fast cooling is not sufficient to provide complete protection; a subtle freezing injury in the cryoprotected monocytes can be correlated with a measurable increase in devitrification on warming; and the cell contents form more stable glasses than the Hanks' balanced salt solution with fetal calf serum used as the extracellular medium. PMID:3978207

  8. Studies on blood lymphocytes of patients with nodular poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, A S; Dewar, A E

    1981-01-01

    T and B lymphocytes were measured in pretreatment blood samples from patients wih nodular poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma (NPDLL). There were significant differences in T cell values between control groups and patients with NPDLL. In 13 out of 20 cases of NPDLL blood lymphocytes showed abnormalities of immunoglobulin light chain expression and were considered to show an abnormal clonal expansion of B lymphocytes. The abnormal clone of B cells in the blood reflected that found in lymph nodes and could be detected in the absence of bone marrow involvement or blood lymphocytosis. PMID:6792242

  9. Mitogenic signal transduction in T lymphocytes in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.; Bechler, B.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.; Criswell, S. B.; Joller, H.; Joller, P.; Hunzinger, E.; Muller, O.

    1993-01-01

    The activation by concanavalin A Con A of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in the presence of monocytes as accessory cells was investigated in cultures exposed to microgravity conditions in Spacelab. Activation of T cells was measured as incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, secretion of interleukin-2 (IL-2), and interferon-gamma, and expression of IL-2 receptors. Whereas, as discovered in earlier experiments, the activation of resuspended T cells is strongly inhibited, activation of cells attached to microcarrier beads is more than doubled in microgravity. The results suggest that the depression of the activation in resuspended cells may be attributed to a malfunction of monocytes acting as accessory cells. In fact, although the ultrastructure of resuspended monocytes is not altered in microgravity, the secretion of IL-1 is strongly inhibited. Our data suggest that (1) IL-2 is produced independently of IL-1, (2) IL-1 production is triggered only when monocytes (and lymphocytes?) adhere to microcarriers, (3) the expression of IL-2 receptors depends on IL-1, and (4) provided sufficient IL-1 is available, activation is enhanced in microgravity. Finally, cultures of resuspended PBLs and monocytes in microgravity constitute a complete and natural system in which monocytes are not operational. This may be useful for studies of the role of accessory cells and cell-cell interactions in T lymphocyte activation.

  10. In vitro studies of human monocyte migration across endothelium in response to leukotriene B4 and f-Met-Leu-Phe.

    PubMed Central

    Migliorisi, G.; Folkes, E.; Pawlowski, N.; Cramer, E. B.

    1987-01-01

    Relatively little is known about monocyte emigration from the vasculature or about the factors that regulate this process. In this study, a human in vitro model of a blood vessel wall was used for examination of monocyte transendothelial migration. Umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluency on amnion connective tissue, and human monocytes were stimulated to cross the monolayer in response to the chemoattractants leukotriene B4 or f-Met-Leu-Phe. The pattern and time course of monocyte migration were similar for the two chemotactic factors. In both cases, approximately 40-50% of the adherent monocytes extended single or multiple pseudopods into the apical endothelial surface. This indenting behavior was also observed in the absence of chemotactic factors. It was not affected by the medium (M199 or Gey's) or method of monocyte isolation. Neutrophils also displayed this behavior, but only about half as many neutrophils as monocytes indented the endothelial surface. The integrity of the endothelium remained intact as the monocytes traversed the monolayer. When the monocytes reached the basal surface of the endothelium, they frequently wedged themselves between the basal surface of the endothelium and its basal lamina. The monocytes then invaded the basal lamina and accumulated in the connective tissue. In response to both f-Met-Leu-Phe and leukotriene B4, monocyte migration across the endothelium began as early as 10 minutes. The average rate of accumulation in the connective tissue peaked at 30 minutes; and by 60 minutes, 25-35% of the monocytes had traversed the monolayer. Approximately two to three times as many monocytes traversed the endothelium under conditions of chemotaxis as under conditions of chemokinesis or random migration. These studies provide the basis for understanding the process of monocyte migration out of the bloodstream and lay the foundation for the study of their differentiation into macrophages in the connective tissue. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3031985

  11. Recombinant Brugia malayi pepsin inhibitor (rBm33) induced monocyte function and absence of apoptotic cell death: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivas, Kirthika; Vijayan, Kamalakannan; Babu, Subash; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recombinant Brugia malayi pepsin inhibitor (rBm33) on human monocytes/macrophages has been examined using THP-1 cells. THP-1 cells stimulated with rBm33 showed enhanced levels of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and diminished levels of IL-12, iNOS and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) expression suggesting the predominant features of Th1 response. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) treated THP-1 cells stimulated with rBm33 and subsequent incubation with GFP expressing Escherichia coli (E. coli) for 2 h enhanced the uptake of E. coli. Nitric oxide (NO) levels measured in the supernatants of these cultures did not show significant changes. Apoptotic studies with Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from normal individuals stimulated with rBm33 did not induce apoptosis of monocytes or lymphocytes. These observations suggest that rBm33 stimulates macrophages to induce Th1 response and does not promote apoptosis. PMID:22484090

  12. A New Prognostic Score for Elderly Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with R-CHOP: The Prognostic Role of Blood Monocyte and Lymphocyte Counts Is Absent

    PubMed Central

    Procházka, Vít; Pytlík, Robert; Janíková, Andrea; Belada, David; Šálek, David; Papajík, Tomáš; Campr, Vít; Fürst, Tomáš; Furstova, Jana; Trněný, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and absolute monocyte count (AMC) have been documented as independent predictors of survival in patients with newly diagnosed Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). Analysis of the prognostic impact of ALC and AMC in the context of International Prognostic Index (IPI) and other significant variables in elderly population treated in the R-CHOP regime has not been carried out yet. Methodology/Principal Findings In this retrospective study, a cohort of 443 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients with age ≥60 was analyzed. All patients were treated with the R-CHOP therapy. An extensive statistical analysis was performed to identify risk factors of 3-year overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, only three predictors proved significant: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG), age and bulky disease presence. These predictors were dichotomized (ECOG ≥1, age ≥70, bulk ≥7.5) to create a novel four-level score. This score predicted 3-year OS of 94.0%, 77.4%, 62.7% and 35.4% in the low-, low-intermediate, high-intermediate and high-risk groups, respectively (P<0.001). Further, a three-level score was tested which stratifies the population better (3-year OS: 91.9%, 67.2%, 36.2% in the low, intermediate and high-risk groups, respectively) but is more difficult to interpret. Both the 3- and 4-level scores were compared to standard scoring systems and, in our population, were shown to be superior in terms of patients risk stratification with respect to 3-year OS prediction. The results were successfully validated on an independent cohort of 162 patients of similar group characteristics. Conclusions The prognostic role of baseline ALC, AMC or their ratio (LMR) was not confirmed in the multivariate context in elderly population with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP. The newly proposed age-specific index stratifies the elderly population into risk groups more precisely than the conventional IPI and its existing variants. PMID:25058337

  13. Retrospective Single Center Study of Granulocyte Monocyte Adsorption Apheresis Treatment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Kajsa; Sthlberg, Dagny; Sderman, Charlotte

    2016-02-01

    Patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have elevated and activated myeloid leukocytes, which infiltrate the intestinal mucosa. A significant proportion of IBD patients do not respond adequately to conventional treatment regimes. Studies have suggested that treatment with granulocyte monocyte apheresis (GMA) could be a safe and efficacious alternative for these patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of granulocyte/monocyte apheresis in patients with IBD in a retrospective cohort study, conducted from a single center in Stockholm. Clinical details from consecutive apheresis treated patients were retrospectively reviewed from 2004 to 2012. A total of 37 patients were included, 23 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 14 with Crohn's disease (CD). Clinical response was seen in 11 patients (30%) and complete remission in 11 patients (30%). The remission rate was higher in UC patients compared to CD patients, 39% (N = 9) and 14% (N = 2) respectively. A total of 9 patients experienced adverse events. Most frequently reported was headache (N = 4). GMA seems to be a valuable adjuvant treatment regime in the care of patients with refractory IBD. PMID:26841133

  14. Gene expression studies of a human monocyte cell line identify dissimilarities between differently manufactured glatiramoids

    PubMed Central

    Kolitz, Sarah; Hasson, Tal; Towfic, Fadi; Funt, Jason M.; Bakshi, Shlomo; Fowler, Kevin D.; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Grinspan, Augusto; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Birnberg, Tal; Schwartz, Rivka; Komlosh, Arthur; Hayardeny, Liat; Ladkani, David; Hayden, Michael R.; Zeskind, Benjamin; Grossman, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Glatiramer Acetate (GA) has provided safe and effective treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients for two decades. It acts as an antigen, yet the precise mechanism of action remains to be fully elucidated, and no validated pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic biomarkers exist. In order to better characterize GA’s biological impact, genome-wide expression studies were conducted with a human monocyte (THP-1) cell line. Consistent with previous literature, branded GA upregulated anti-inflammatory markers (e.g. IL10), and modulated multiple immune-related pathways. Despite some similarities, significant differences were observed between expression profiles induced by branded GA and Probioglat, a differently-manufactured glatiramoid purported to be a generic GA. Key results were verified using qRT-PCR. Genes (e.g. CCL5, adj. p < 4.1 × 10−5) critically involved in pro-inflammatory pathways (e.g. response to lipopolysaccharide, adj. p = 8.7 × 10−4) were significantly induced by Probioglat compared with branded GA. Key genes were also tested and confirmed at the protein level, and in primary human monocytes. These observations suggest differential biological impact by the two glatiramoids and warrant further investigation. PMID:25998228

  15. Genotoxicity study in lymphocytes of offset printing workers.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Hseyin; Yilmaz, Serkan; Celik, Mustafa; Yzba?ioglu, Deniz; Unal, Fatma

    2006-01-01

    The potential cytogenetic damage in offset printing workers was evaluated using sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosome aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MN) as biomarkers in peripheral lymphocytes of 26 volunteers (14 workers, 12 controls). The CA, SCE and MN frequency of offset printing workers was significantly higher than in their controls. The replication index (RI) was not affected while the mitotic index (MI) was affected most in the workers. It can be concluded from this study that chronic occupational exposure to printing dyes and thinner may lead to a slightly increased risk of genetic damage among offset printing workers. PMID:16158391

  16. The clinical usefulness of lymphocyte:monocyte ratios in differentiating influenza from viral non-influenza-like illnesses in hospitalized adults during the 2015 influenza A (H3N2) epidemic: the uniqueness of HPIV-3 mimicking influenza A.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Connolly, J J; Irshad, N

    2016-01-01

    During influenza epidemics, influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) viruses cocirculate with influenza strains. If positive, rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) identify influenza A/B, but false-negative RIDTs require retesting by viral polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Patient volume limits testing during influenza epidemics, and non-specific laboratory findings have been used for presumptive diagnosis pending definitive viral testing. In adults, the most useful laboratory abnormalities in influenza include relative lymphopenia, monocytosis, and thrombocytopenia. Lymphocyte:monocyte (L:M) ratios may be even more useful. L:M ratios <2 have been used as a surrogate marker for influenza, but there are no longitudinal data on L:M ratios in hospitalized adults with viral ILIs. During the 2015 influenza A (H3N2) epidemic at our hospital, we reviewed our experience with L:M ratios in 37 hospitalized adults with non-influenza viral ILIs. In hospitalized adults with non-influenza A ILIs, the L:M ratios were >2 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses/enteroviruses (R/E), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but not human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3), which had L:M ratios <2. HPIV-3, like influenza, was accompanied by L:M ratios <2, mimicking influenza A (H3N2). In influenza A admitted adults, L:M ratios <2 did not continue for >3 days, whereas with HPIV-3, L:M ratios <2 persisted for >3 days of hospitalization. PMID:26563893

  17. Value of lymphocyte marker studies in diagnostic cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Robey, S S; Cafferty, L L; Beschorner, W E; Gupta, P K

    1987-01-01

    The separation of lymphoreticular neoplasms from poorly differentiated epithelial and mesenchymal tumors and reactive processes can be a difficult problem in cytopathology. Immunodiagnostic techniques can be applied to cytologic specimens to detect cellular antigens, which may aid in their proper identification. We have reviewed 67 cytologic specimens in which immunoperoxidase techniques were employed using antibodies to common leukocyte antigen (HLE1), B-cell markers (B1, Leu 12 and kappa and lambda light chains), T-cell markers (Leu 1, OKT11, Leu 12 and kappa and lambda light chains), T-cell markers (Leu 1, OKT11, OKT4 and OKT8) and monocytes (OKM1 and LeuM1). These specimens included 33 body cavity fluids (21 pleural, 8 ascitic and 4 pericardial), 22 cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) and 12 fine needle aspirates (4 brain, 1 adrenal, 2 liver, 1 kidney, 3 retroperitoneal masses and 1 lymph node). The marker studies confirmed the initial cytomorphologic diagnoses in 31 specimens and modified the final diagnoses in 16 specimens. Markers in 20 specimens were noncontributory due to low cellularity or technical difficulties. Two problems may limit the usefulness of these procedures. First, many of the CSF specimens contained too few cells for adequate processing. Second, the mesothelial cells from pleural specimens often stained with HLE1. Our findings indicate that marker studies are of value in the diagnosis of problematic cases presenting as undifferentiated tumors in cytopathology. PMID:3300124

  18. Legionnaires' Disease Bacterium (Legionella pneumophila) Multiplies Intracellularly in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marcus A.; Silverstein, Samuel C.

    1980-01-01

    We have studied the interaction between virulent egg yolk-grown Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia 1 and human blood monocytes in vitro. The leukocytes were cultured in antibiotic-free tissue culture medium supplemented with 15% autologous human serum. L. pneumophila multiplied several logs, as measured by colony-forming units, when incubated with monocytes or mononuclear cells; the mid-log phase doubling time was 2 h. The level to which L. pneumophila multiplied was proportional to the number of mononuclear cells in the culture. L. pneumophila multiplied only in the adherent fraction of the mononuclear cell population indicating that monocytes but not lymphocytes support growth of the bacteria. Peak growth of L. pneumophila was correlated with destruction of the monocyte monolayer. By fluorescence microscopy using fluorescein conjugated rabbit anti-L. pneumophila antiserum, the number of monocytes containing L. pneumophila increased in parallel with bacterial growth in the culture. At the peak of infection, monocytes were packed full with organisms. By electron microscopy, L. pneumophila in such monocytes were found in membrane-bound cytoplasmic vacuoles studded with structures resembling host cell ribosomes. Several lines of evidence indicate that L. pneumophila grows within monocytes. (a) In the absence of leukocytes, L. pneumophila did not grow in tissue culture medium with or without serum even if the medium was conditioned by monocytes. (b) L. pneumophila did not grow in sonicated mononuclear cells. Lysis of these cells at various times during logarithmic growth of L. pneumophila was followed by cessation of bacterial multiplication. Growth resumed when intact mononuclear cells were added back to the culture. (3) In parabiotic chambers separated by 0.1-μm Nuclepore filters, L. pneumophila multiplied only when placed on the same side of the filter as mononuclear cells. These findings indicate that L. pneumophila falls into a select category of bacterial pathogens that evade host defenses by parasitizing monocytes. It remains to be determined whether cell-mediated immunity plays a dominant role in host defense against L. pneumophila as it does against other intracellular pathogens. Images PMID:7190579

  19. Subpopulations of human T lymphocytes. I. Studies in immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Good, R A

    1977-01-01

    T lymphocytes with receptors for IgM(Tmu) and IgG(Tgamma) were examined in thirty patients with primary immunodeficiency and autoimmune disorders. Six out of twenty-seven patients with primary immunodeficiency had a low proportion of Tmu cells when compared with normal controls. Eight out of twenty-seven patients with primary immunodeficiency had an increased proportion of Tgamma cells. Two out of twenty-seven patients had both a low proportion of Tmu cells and a high proportion of Tgamma cells. The patient studied with severe combined immunodeficiency had a low proportion of both Tmu and Tgamma cells. Patients with Bruton-type agammaglobulinaemia, common variable immunodeficiency, thymoma and immunodeficiency syndrome and selective IgA deficiency demonstrated heterogeneity with regard to alterations in T-cell subpopulations. PMID:304782

  20. Preliminary studies on the synthesis of alpha2-macroglobulin by human lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Anita M.; James, K.

    1974-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation studies with antisera to alpha2-macroglobulin (α2M) were undertaken on the supernatants and extracts of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in serum free medium containing [14C]glutamine. These studies revealed that an appreciable amount of the [14C]glutamine was recovered in the α2M precipitate, suggesting that this protein was synthesized by lymphocytes. PMID:4143252

  1. Glutamine May Repress the Weak LPS and Enhance the Strong Heat Shock Induction of Monocyte and Lymphocyte HSP72 Proteins but May Not Modulate the HSP72 mRNA in Patients with Sepsis or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Briassouli, Efrossini; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Goukos, Dimitris; Routsi, Christina; Nanas, Serafim; Vardas, Kostas; Apostolou, Kleovoulos; Kanariou, Maria; Daikos, George; Briassoulis, George

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We assessed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or heat shock (HS) induction of heat shock protein-72 (HSP72) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with severe sepsis (SS) or trauma-related systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compared to healthy individuals (H); we also investigated any pre- or posttreatment modulating glutamine (Gln) effect. Methods. SS (11), SIRS (10), and H (19) PBMCs were incubated with 1 μg/mL LPS or 43°HS. Gln 10 mM was either added 1 h before or 1 h after induction or was not added at all. We measured monocyte (m), lymphocyte (l), mRNA HSP72, HSP72 polymorphisms, interleukins (ILs), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cortisol levels. Results. Baseline lHSP72 was higher in SS (p < 0.03), and mHSP72 in SIRS (p < 0.02), compared to H. Only HS induced l/mHSP72/mRNA HSP72; LPS induced IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1. Induced mRNA was related to l/mHSP72, and was related negatively to cytokines. Intracellular l/mHSP72/HSP72 mRNA was related to serum ILs, not being influenced by cortisol, illness severity, and HSP72 polymorphisms. Gln did not induce mRNA in any group but modified l/mHSP72 after LPS/HS induction unpredictably. Conclusions. HSP72 mRNA and l/mHSP72 are higher among critically ill patients, further induced by HS, not by LPS. HSP72 proteins and HSP72 mRNA are related to serum ILs and are negatively related to supernatant cytokines, not being influenced by HSP72 polymorphisms, cortisol, or illness severity. Gln may depress l/mHSP72 after LPS exposure and enhance them after HS induction, but it may not affect early induced HSP72 mRNA. PMID:26550577

  2. Properties of Human Blood Monocytes I. CD91 expression and log orthogonal light scatter provide a robust method to identify monocytes that is more accurate than CD14 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hudig, Dorothy; Hunter, Kenneth W.; Diamond, W. John; Redelman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to improve identification of human blood monocytes by using antibodies to molecules that occur consistently on all stages of monocyte development and differentiation. Methods We examined blood samples from 200 healthy adults without clinically diagnosed immunological abnormalities by flow cytometry (FCM) with multiple combinations of antibodies and with a hematology analyzer (Beckman LH750). Results CD91 (α2-macroglobulin receptor) was expressed only by monocytes and to a consistent level among subjects (mean MFI = 16.2±3.2). Notably, only 85.7±5.82% of the CD91+ monocytes expressed high levels of the classical monocyte marker CD14, with some CD91+ CD16+ cells having negligible CD14, indicating that substantial FCM under-counts will occur when monocytes are identified by high CD14. CD33 (receptor for sialyl conjugates) was co-expressed with CD91 on monocytes but CD33 expression varied by nearly ten-fold among subjects (mean MFI =17.4±7.7). In comparison to FCM analyses, the hematology analyzer systematically over-counted monocytes and eosinophils while lymphocyte and neutrophil differential values generally agreed with FCM methods. Conclusions CD91 is a better marker to identify monocytes than CD14 or CD33. Furthermore, FCM (with anti-CD91) identifies monocytes better than a currently used clinical CBC instrument. Use of anti-CD91 together with anti-CD14 and anti-CD16 supports the identification of the diagnostically significant monocyte populations with variable expression of CD14 and CD16. PMID:24591168

  3. Phenotypic and functional characterization of macrophages with therapeutic potential generated from human cirrhotic monocytes in a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joanna K.; Mackinnon, Alison C.; Wojtacha, Dvina; Pope, Caroline; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Burgoyne, Paul; Bailey, Laura; Pass, Chloe; Atkinson, Anne; Mcgowan, Neil W.A.; Manson, Lynn; Turner, Mark L.; Campbell, John D.M.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Background aims Macrophages have complex roles in the liver. The aim of this study was to compare profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages between controls and cirrhotic patients, to determine whether chronic inflammation affects precursor number or the phenotype, with the eventual aim to develop a cell therapy for cirrhosis. Methods Infusion of human macrophages in a murine liver fibrosis model demonstrated a decrease in markers of liver injury (alanine transaminase, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β, α-smooth muscle actin, phosphatidylserine receptor) and an increase in markers of liver regeneration (matrix metalloproteinases [MMP]-9, MMP-12 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). CD14+ monocytes were then isolated from controls. Monocytes were matured into macrophages for 7 days using a Good Manufacturing Practice–compatible technique. Results There was no significant difference between the mean number of CD14+ monocytes isolated from cirrhotic patients (n = 9) and controls (n = 10); 2.8 ± SEM 0.54 × 108 and 2.5 ± 0.56 × 108, respectively. The mean yield of mature macrophages cultured was also not significantly different between cirrhotic patients and controls (0.9 × 108 ± 0.38 × 108, with more than 90% viability and 0.65 × 108 ± 0.16 × 108, respectively. Maturation to macrophages resulted in up-regulation of a number of genes (MMP-9, CCL2, interleukin [IL]-10 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). A cytokine and chemokine polymerase chain reaction array, comparing the control and cirrhotic macrophages, revealed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions Macrophages can be differentiated from cirrhotic patients' apheresis-derived CD14 monocytes and develop the same pro-resolution phenotype as control macrophages, indicating their suitability for clinical therapy. PMID:26342993

  4. Baseline and Trend of Lymphocyte-to-Monocyte Ratio as Prognostic Factors in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with First-Line Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Mu; Lai, Chien-Hao; Chang, Huang-Chih; Chao, Tung-Ying; Tseng, Chia-Cheng; Fang, Wen-Feng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Yu-Hsiu; Wang, Yi-Hsi; Su, Mao-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Tung; Chen, Hung-Chen; Chang, Ya-Chun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with early-stage lung cancer who have a high baseline lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) have a favorable prognosis. However, the prognostic significance of LMR in patients with advanced-stage EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving first-line epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has not been established. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the influence of LMR on clinical outcomes including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in EGFR-mutant patients with NSCLC. Materials and Methods Of 1310 lung cancer patients diagnosed between January 2011 and October 2013, 253 patients receiving first-line EGFR-TKIs for EGFR-mutant NSCLC were included. The cut-off values for baseline and the 1-month-to-baseline ratio of LMR (MBR), determined by using receiver operating characteristic curves, were 3.29 and 0.63, respectively. Patients were divided into 3 prognostic groups: high LMR and MBR, high LMR or MBR, and low LMR and MBR. Results The mean patient age was 65.2 years, and 41% were men. The median PFS and OS were 10.3 and 22.0 months, respectively. The PFS in patients with high LMR and MBR, high LMR or MBR, and low LMR and MBR were 15.4, 7.1, and 2.0 months, respectively (p < 0.001), whereas the OS were 32.6, 13.7, and 5.1 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion A combination of baseline and trend of LMR can be used to identify patients with a high mortality risk in EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients receiving first-line EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26313661

  5. T lymphocyte function in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sabbe, L J; Meijer, C J; Jansen, J

    1980-01-01

    The high incidence of infections characteristic of impaired cell-mediated immunity in patients with hairy cell leukemia led us to study T lymphocyte function in sixteen patients with the lymphocyte transformation test. All patients showed imparied responses to mitogens, attributable to one or more of the following causes: dilution of responsive T cells by inert hairy cells, shortage of monocytes to give adequate interaction with the T cells and a significant decrease in the number of T cells with Fcmu receptors proportional to the percentage of hairy cells in the peripheral blood. The response to antigens was severely depressed; PPD was one of the few antigens that induced positive reactions in half the cases. We conclude that in patients with hairy cell leukaemia, T lymphocyte function, as tested in a proliferative assay, is severely impaired and that this may contribute to the deficient resistance to infection. PMID:6970640

  6. Study of splenic irradiation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Guiney, M.J.; Liew, K.H.; Quong, G.G.; Cooper, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to assess the effect of splenic irradiation (SI) on splenomegaly, splenic pain, anemia, and thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Twenty-two patients received 32 courses of SI. Of 31 courses of SI given for splenomegaly there were 19 responders (61%). Ten courses of SI were given for splenic pain resulting in partial relief of pain in 4 courses and complete relief in 4 courses. Only 4 of 16 courses given for anemia resulted in elevations of hemoglobin of 2 g/dL or more. Of the 14 courses of SI given for thrombocytopenia there were only 2 responses with platelet counts decreasing further in another 9 courses. The median duration of response was 14 months (range: 3-116 months). There was no dose-response relationship detected for SI in CLL. Treatment related toxicity was hematologic and secondary to leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. We recommend the use of small fraction sizes of 25 cGy to 50 cGy and close monitoring of hematological parameters. Splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenomegaly and reduces spleen size in CLL. It was of limited value in correcting anemia and thrombocytopenia in this patient population.

  7. Circadian variation of lymphocyte subpopulations: a study with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, A W; Oswald, I; Micklem, H S; Boyd, J E; Elton, R A; Jazwinska, E; James, K

    1983-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies to identify subpopulations of circulating lymphocytes in healthy adults showed pronounced circadian variations in total T cells, the two major T cell subsets, and HLA-DR+ lymphocytes. When the results for the T cell subsets were expressed as a ratio (helper:suppressor) no significant rhythmic variation was observed. Lymphocytes bearing a surface antigen identified by the HNK-1 antibody (a population containing the natural killer and antibody dependent killer activity) did not show significant rhythmic variation. There was an inverse relation between plasma cortisol concentration and numbers of T and B cells. These observations have therapeutic implications and should be considered in the course of immunological monitoring. PMID:6407561

  8. Gene expression study of monocytes/macrophages during early foreign body reaction and identification of potential precursors of myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mesure, Lindsay; De Visscher, Geofrey; Vranken, Ilse; Lebacq, An; Flameng, Willem

    2010-01-01

    Foreign body reaction (FBR), initiated by adherence of macrophages to biomaterials, is associated with several complications. Searching for mechanisms potentially useful to overcome these complications, we have established the signaling role of monocytes/macrophages in the development of FBR and the presence of CD34(+) cells that potentially differentiate into myofibroblasts. Therefore, CD68(+) cells were in vitro activated with fibrinogen and also purified from the FBR after 3 days of implantation in rats. Gene expression profiles showed a switch from monocytes and macrophages attracted by fibrinogen to activated macrophages and eventually wound-healing macrophages. The immature FBR also contained a subpopulation of CD34(+) cells, which could be differentiated into myofibroblasts. This study showed that macrophages are the clear driving force of FBR, dependent on milieu, and myofibroblast deposition and differentiation. PMID:20886081

  9. Changes in Monocyte Functions of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaur, I.; Simons, E.; Castro, V.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2004-01-01

    Monocyte cell numbers and functions, including phagocytosis, oxidative burst capacity, and degranulation and expression of related surface molecules, were studied in blood specimens from 25 astronauts and 9 healthy control subjects. Blood samples were obtained 10 days before a space flight, 3 hours after landing and 3 days after landing. The number of monocytes in astronauts did not change significantly among the three sample collection periods. Following space flight, the monocytes ability to phagocytize Escherichia coli, to exhibit an oxidative burst, and to degranulate was reduced as compared to monocytes from control subjects. These alterations in monocyte functions after space flight correlated with alterations in the expression of CD32 and CD64.

  10. Activation by mitogens and superantigens of axolotl lymphocytes: functional characterization and ontogenic study.

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, F; Tournefier, A

    1996-01-01

    Urodele amphibians have weak and slow immune responses compared to mammals and anuran amphibians. Using new culture conditions, we tested the ability of lymphocytes of a well-studied salamander, the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) to proliferate in vitro with diverse mitogenic agents. We demonstrated that the axolotl has a population of B lymphocytes that proliferate specifically and with a high stimulation index to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) known as a B-cell mitogen in mammals. This proliferative capacity is observed without significant changes throughout ontogenesis. In the presence of LPS, axolotl B lymphocytes are able to synthesize and secrete both isotopes of immunoglobulin described in this species, IgM and IgY. Moreover, a distinct lymphocyte subpopulation is able to poliferate significantly in response to the mitogens usually known as T-cell specific in mammals, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A). The activated cells are T lymphocytes, as shown by depletion experiments performed in vitro with monoclonal antibodies, and in vivo by thymectomy. Splenic T lymphocytes of young axolotls (before 10 months) do not have this functional ability, which suggests maturation and/or migration phenomena during T-cell ontogenesis in this species. Axolotl lymphocytes are able to proliferate in vitro with a significant stimulation index to staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB). These products act on mammalian lymphocytes as superantigens: in combination with products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), they bind T-cell receptors with particular V beta elements. The fact that these superantigens are able to activate lymphocytes of a primitive vertebrate suggests a striking conservation of molecular structures implied in superantigen presentation and recognition. PMID:8881761

  11. Orthodontic Force Induces Systemic Inflammatory Monocyte Responses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, M; Kou, X; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Song, Y; Zhang, J; Yan, Y; Liu, F; He, D; Gan, Y; Zhou, Y

    2015-09-01

    Periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement are considered regional reactions. However, how systemic immune responses are involved in this regional reaction remains unclear. In this study, we explored the systemic effects of orthodontic force by focusing on the mononuclear phagocyte system. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the percentage of inflammatory monocytes, in peripheral blood and in the monocyte reservoir spleen, decreased on days 1 and 3 and then recovered on day 7 after force application. Along with the systemic decrease of inflammatory monocyte percentage, the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts increased in the compression side of the periodontal tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. Systemic transfusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled inflammatory monocytes showed recruitment of these monocytes to the orthodontic force compression side of periodontal tissues. These monocytes were colocalized with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts. In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that orthodontic force could upregulate the expression of pivotal monocyte chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in periodontal tissues or cultured periodontal ligament cells, which may contribute to monocyte recruitment to regional sites. These data suggest that orthodontic force induces systemic immune responses related to inflammatory monocytes and that systemic inflammatory monocytes can be recruited to periodontal tissues by orthodontic force stimulus. PMID:26130260

  12. Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma: a Lymphoma Study Association retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lazarovici, Julien; Dartigues, Peggy; Brice, Pauline; Obric, Lucie; Gaillard, Isabelle; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Broussais-Guillaumot, Florence; Gyan, Emmanuel; Bologna, Serge; Nicolas-Virelizier, Emmanuelle; Touati, Mohamed; Casasnovas, Olivier; Delarue, Richard; Orsini-Piocelle, Frdrique; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Gabarre, Jean; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Gastinne, Thomas; Peyrade, Frderic; Roland, Virginie; Bachy, Emmanuel; Andr, Marc; Mounier, Nicolas; Ferm, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma represents a distinct entity from classical Hodgkin lymphoma. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the management of patients with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of adult patients with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma were collected in Lymphoma Study Association centers. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed, and the competing risks formulation of a Cox regression model was used to control the effect of risk factors on relapse or death as competing events. Among 314 evaluable patients, 82.5% had early stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Initial management consisted in watchful waiting (36.3%), radiotherapy (20.1%), rituximab (8.9%), chemotherapy or immuno-chemotherapy (21.7%), combined modality treatment (12.7%), or radiotherapy plus rituximab (0.3%). With a median follow-up of 55.8 months, the 10-year PFS and OS estimates were 44.2% and 94.9%, respectively. The 4-year PFS estimates were 79.6% after radiotherapy, 77.0% after rituximab alone, 78.8% after chemotherapy or immuno-chemotherapy, and 93.9% after combined modality treatment. For the whole population, early treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy, but not rituximab alone (Hazard ratio 0.695 [0.3201.512], P=0.3593) significantly reduced the risk of progression compared to watchful waiting (HR 0.388 [0.2340.643], P=0.0002). Early treatment appears more beneficial compared to watchful waiting in terms of progression-free survival, but has no impact on overall survival. Radiotherapy in selected early stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and combined modality treatment, chemotherapy or immuno-chemotherapy for other patients, are the main options to treat adult patients with a curative intent. PMID:26430172

  13. Mycobacterial 65-kD heat shock protein induces release of proinflammatory cytokines from human monocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, J S; Shattock, R; Remick, D G; Griffin, G E

    1993-01-01

    Monocytes having phagocytosed mycobacteria are known to present the bacterial 65-kD heat shock protein (hsp) on their cell surface to alpha beta and gamma delta T lymphocytes. Cytotoxic CD4+ cells may then lyse monocytes expressing mycobacterial 65-kD hsp. However, it is not known whether 65-kD hsp directly stimulates monocyte functions other than antigen presentation. This study has demonstrated that following extraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, purified recombinant mycobacterial 65-kD hsp may directly activate THP-1 cells, a human monocytic line, to accumulate mRNA for and secrete tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine important in granuloma formation, the characteristic host immune response to mycobacterial infection. TNF gene expression and secretion following stimulation by hsp was dose-dependent and abolished by heat-induced proteolysis. Subsequently, THP-1 cells secreted IL-6 and IL-8, cytokines involved in recruitment and differentiation of T lymphocytes. The data indicate that secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from monocytes activated by mycobacterial 65-kD hsp may be important in the host immune response and in the development of antigen-specific T cell-mediated immunity. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8419086

  14. Different stimulating capacity of B and T lymphocytes in primary and secondary allogeneic reactions: cellular detection of HLA-D products on T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wollman, E E; Cohen, D; Fradelizi, D; Sasportes, M; Dausset, J

    1980-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to define the best way to produce and to test primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) cells using B- and T-enriched lymphocyte suspensions. Intrafamilial PLT cells were produced with primed unseparated and T purified lymphocytes against haplo-identical donors' T and B cells. These PLT cells were then restimulated with a panel of related or unrelated individuals' T and B cells and with allogeneic in vitro activated T cells. The best discrimination was obtained when PLT reagents, regardless of the production method, were restimulated by a B-enriched population of peripheral lymphocytes. Furthermore, the results have shown that enriched primed or unprimed T cell suspensions stimulated by enriched T lymphocytes did not give any proliferation. Experiments performed to explain the results led us to distinguish 2 different phenomena: in primary cultures, the addition of monocytes autologous to the responder cell restored the proliferation of enriched T cells stimulated by T lymphocytes. In secondary cultures, the addition of monocytes autologous to the PLT cell did not restore the proliferation of PLT lymphocytes stimulated by enriched T cells. This was shown to be due to the lack of Dr antigen on the stimulating cell: if allogeneically activated T cells were used as stimulating lymphocytes, a DR-specific proliferative response appeared. This correlates with serologic findings were DR determinants are found on activated T cells and not on unprimed T lymphocytes. However, this difference might be only quantitative, since peripheral lymphocytes could be primed by T cells and be DR specifically restimulated. PMID:6968771

  15. Therapeutic granulocyte and monocyte apheresis (GMA) for treatment refractory sarcoidosis: a pilot study of clinical effects and possible mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, H H; Muratov, V; Cederlund, K; Lundahl, J; Eklund, A; Grunewald, J

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic, inflammatory disorder, which in a proportion of patients runs a chronic progressive course despite immunosuppressive treatment. Therapeutic granulocyte and monocyte apheresis (GMA) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for other systemic inflammatory disorders, but has not yet been investigated in sarcoidosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to GMA in sarcoidosis. Seven patients with sarcoidosis refractory to standard immunosuppressive therapy received 10 GMA sessions. All patients underwent chest X-ray, spirometry, a Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ-SAS), blood tests and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) before treatment and at 2–4 weeks and 3 months (except bronchoscopy) after the last treatment session. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell differential counts were recorded and T cells from blood and BALF were analysed for markers of activity, differentiation and T regulatory function. Compared to baseline, five of seven patients reported an improvement in dyspnoea score. In BALF there was an increase in the percentage of macrophages and a decrease in the percentage of lymphocytes and CD4+/FoxP3+ T cells. Furthermore, the decrease in BALF CD4+/FoxP3+ T cells correlated significantly with an improvement in dyspnoea score. In peripheral blood there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of CD4+/CD27− T cells and a trend towards an initial increase in the percentage of CD4+/FoxP3+ T cells, followed by a statistically significant decrease. The effects of GMA on regulatory T cells are consistent with those observed in other inflammatory disorders and could potentially translate into a clinical benefit. PMID:24773420

  16. Lack of prostaglandin E2-mediated monocyte suppressive activity in newborn and mothers.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, A; Durandy, A; Mamas, S; McCall, E; Dray, F; Griscelli, C

    1982-01-01

    An excess of adult blood adherent cells (monocytes) inhibits mitogen, antigen and allogeneic cell-induced lymphocyte proliferations. This inhibition is dependent on the number of the adherent monocytes in the cultures and is substantially reduced (by 60%) by indomethacin or anti-PGE2 antiserum. Newborn monocytes exert only a weak inhibitory effect and produce about eight times less PGE2 than adult monocytes. The production of PGE2 and the suppression can be induced by incubating newborn monocytes with mixed leucocyte culture supernatants. Both monocytes from mothers at the time of delivery and from newborn infants, usually exert a poor suppressive activity related to a low production of PGE2. We strongly suggest that the expression of the PGE2-mediated suppression by monocytes is under the control of activated short-lived suppressor lymphocytes. PMID:6215198

  17. Monocyte-Mediated Defense Against Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Serbina, Natalya V.; Jia, Ting; Hohl, Tobias M.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating blood monocytes supply peripheral tissues with macrophage and dendritic cell (DC) precursors and, in the setting of infection, also contribute directly to immune defense against microbial pathogens. In humans and mice, monocytes are divided into two major subsets that either specifically traffic into inflamed tissues or, in the absence of overt inflammation, constitutively maintain tissue macrophage/DC populations. Inflammatory monocytes respond rapidly to microbial stimuli by secreting cytokines and antimicrobial factors, express the CCR2 chemokine receptor, and traffic to sites of microbial infection in response to monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (CCL2) secretion. In murine models, CCR2-mediated monocyte recruitment is essential for defense against Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans infection, implicating inflammatory monocytes in defense against bacterial, protozoal, and fungal pathogens. Recent studies indicate that inflammatory monocyte recruitment to sites of infection is complex, involving CCR2-mediated emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow into the bloodstream, followed by trafficking into infected tissues. The in vivo mechanisms that promote chemokine secretion, monocyte differentiation and trafficking, and finally monocyte-mediated microbial killing remain active and important areas of investigation. PMID:18303997

  18. Increased metallothionein gene expression, zinc, and zinc-dependent resistance to apoptosis in circulating monocytes during HIV viremia.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Andrea D; Gekonge, Bethsebah; Giri, Malavika S; Hancock, Aidan; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Chehimi, Jihed; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Kossevkov, Andrew V; Nicols, Calen; Yousef, Malik; Mounzer, Karam; Shull, Jane; Kostman, Jay; Showe, Louise; Montaner, Luis J

    2010-09-01

    Circulating monocytes exhibit an apoptotic resistance phenotype during HIV viremia in association with increased MT expression. MTs are known to play an important role in zinc metabolism and immune function. We now show, in a cross-sectional study using peripheral monocytes, that expression of MT1 isoforms E, G, H, and X is increased significantly in circulating monocyte cells from HIV+ subjects during chronic viremic episodes as compared with uninfected subjects. This increase in expression is also observed during acute viremia following interruption of suppressive ART. Circulating monocytes from HIV+ donors were also found to have elevated zinc importer gene Zip8 expression in conjunction with elevated intracellular zinc levels in contrast to CD4(+)T-lymphocytes. In vitro HIV-1 infection studies with elutriated MDM confirm a direct relation between HIV-1 infection and increased MDM MT1 (isoform G) gene expression and increased intracellular zinc levels. A direct link between elevated zinc levels and apoptosis resistance was established using a cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, which reversed apoptosis resistance effectively in monocytes from HIV-infected to levels comparable with uninfected controls. Taken together, increases in MT gene expression and intracellular zinc levels may contribute directly to maintenance of an immune-activated monocyte by mediating an increased resistance to apoptosis during active HIV-1 viremia. PMID:20551211

  19. Prognostic impact of platelet/lymphocyte and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios in patients with gastric cancer: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Gunaldi, Meral; Goksu, Sema; Erdem, Dilek; Gunduz, Seyda; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Tiken, Eda; Kahraman, Sibel; Inan, Yesim Ozdem; Genc, Tugrul Burak; Yildirim, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increasing amounts of evidence suggest patient-related systemic inflammatory response (SIR) as a powerful prognostic factor in cancer and applicability of SIR as a prognostic factor has been investigated. Aim: To evaluate the prognostic significance of SIR, which is among routinely analysed blood parameters in patients with all stages of gastric cancer (GC). Methods: A total of 245 patients with gastric cancer who were followed up and treated in four clinics of medical oncology were included in the study. At first admission of the patients, from routinely determined whole blood cell counts in medical oncology clinics, their neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) values were estimated and recorded before initiating chemo- or radiotherapy. A univariate non-parametric analytical method and chi-square test examined the correlation between prognostic factors, and survival rates. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-eight (27.8%) female and 177 (72.2) male patients (total n=245) were included in the study. When NLR was used as an indicator of SIR, 108 (44.1%) patients were SIR negative and 137 (55.9%) patients were SIR positive. When PLR was used as an indicator of SIR, SIR negativity and positivity were detected in 93(38%) and 152 (62%) patients, respectively. A statistically significant correlation was found between status of lymph node metastasis, stage of the disease and NLR (P=0.001, P=0.017). SIR determined with PLR was found to be correlated with the depth of tumor invasion and stage of the disease (P=0.016, P=0.033). A significant correlation was not detected between PLR and survival (P=0.405). Conclusion: According to our study, parameters of NLR and PLR calculated preoperatively from peripheral blood samples can be used in patients with various sizes of tumours in different disease stages. Still based on our results, NLR calculated during diagnostic workup is a parameter with a prognostic value. In addition, NLR is a determinative factor in the selection of surgical method and chemotherapeutic modalities, which also functions as a potential contributory marker in effective immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26131188

  20. Autophagy Protects Monocytes from Wolbachia Heat Shock Protein 60–Induced Apoptosis and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakannan, Vijayan; Shiny, Abijit; Babu, Subash; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2015-01-01

    Monocyte dysfunction by filarial antigens has been a major mechanism underlying immune evasion following hyporesponsiveness during patent lymphatic filariasis. Recent studies have initiated a paradigm shift to comprehend the immunological interactions of Wolbachia and its antigens in inflammation, apoptosis, lymphocyte anergy, etc. Here we showed that recombinant Wolbachia heat shock protein 60 (rWmhsp60) interacts with TLR-4 and induces apoptosis in monocytes of endemic normal but not in chronic patients. Higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced after TLR-4 stimulation resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase cascade activation, which are the plausible reason for apoptosis. Furthermore, release in ROS owing to TLR-4 signaling resulted in the activation of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation which leads to inflammation and apoptosis via TNF receptor pathway following the increase in IL-6 and TNF-α level. Here for the first time, we report that in addition to apoptosis, rWmhsp60 antigen in filarial pathogenesis also induces molecular senescence in monocytes. Targeting TLR-4, therefore, presents a promising candidate for treating rWmhsp60-induced apoptosis and senescence. Strikingly, induction of autophagy by rapamycin detains TLR-4 in late endosomes and subverts TLR-4-rWmhsp60 interaction, thus protecting TLR-4–mediated apoptosis and senescence. Furthermore, rapamycin-induced monocytes were unresponsive to rWmhsp60, and activated lymphocytes following PHA stimulation. This study demonstrates that autophagy mediates the degradation of TLR-4 signaling and protects monocytes from rWmhsp60 induced apoptosis and senescence. PMID:25849993

  1. Autophagy protects monocytes from Wolbachia heat shock protein 60-induced apoptosis and senescence.

    PubMed

    Kamalakannan, Vijayan; Shiny, Abijit; Babu, Subash; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2015-04-01

    Monocyte dysfunction by filarial antigens has been a major mechanism underlying immune evasion following hyporesponsiveness during patent lymphatic filariasis. Recent studies have initiated a paradigm shift to comprehend the immunological interactions of Wolbachia and its antigens in inflammation, apoptosis, lymphocyte anergy, etc. Here we showed that recombinant Wolbachia heat shock protein 60 (rWmhsp60) interacts with TLR-4 and induces apoptosis in monocytes of endemic normal but not in chronic patients. Higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced after TLR-4 stimulation resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase cascade activation, which are the plausible reason for apoptosis. Furthermore, release in ROS owing to TLR-4 signaling resulted in the activation of NF-?B p65 nuclear translocation which leads to inflammation and apoptosis via TNF receptor pathway following the increase in IL-6 and TNF-? level. Here for the first time, we report that in addition to apoptosis, rWmhsp60 antigen in filarial pathogenesis also induces molecular senescence in monocytes. Targeting TLR-4, therefore, presents a promising candidate for treating rWmhsp60-induced apoptosis and senescence. Strikingly, induction of autophagy by rapamycin detains TLR-4 in late endosomes and subverts TLR-4-rWmhsp60 interaction, thus protecting TLR-4-mediated apoptosis and senescence. Furthermore, rapamycin-induced monocytes were unresponsive to rWmhsp60, and activated lymphocytes following PHA stimulation. This study demonstrates that autophagy mediates the degradation of TLR-4 signaling and protects monocytes from rWmhsp60 induced apoptosis and senescence. PMID:25849993

  2. In vivo labelling of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes with fluorescein isothiocyanate for lymphocyte migration studies.

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, R; Binns, R M

    1981-01-01

    Lymphocytes in normal young pigs were labelled in vivo with fluorescein isothiocyanate in the spleen using an extracorporeal perfusion system and in mesenteric lymph nodes by direct injection into the nodes. Labelled lymphocytes leave the spleen at a high rate via the splenic vein and migrate to different lymphoid organs. Emigrants from mesenteric lymph nodes left the nodes more slowly and revealed a different homing pattern. Evidence is presented that a considerable number of lymphocytes from the parenchyma leave the nodes via the vein and not by the classical route of recirculating lymphocytes via the efferent lymphatics. Fluorescein labelling of lymphocytes in their normal micro-environment is a suitable method for lymphocyte migration studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6795108

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication is blocked prior to reverse transcription and integration in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sonza, S; Maerz, A; Deacon, N; Meanger, J; Mills, J; Crowe, S

    1996-06-01

    Peripheral blood monocytes are resistant to productive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vitro immediately after isolation. No viral cDNA (either early or late transcripts) was detected by PCR in monocytes exposed to virus on the day of isolation. In contrast, in monocytes cultured for as little as 1 day, initiated and completed reverse transcripts were readily detectable within 24 h of infection with both HIV-1(Ba-L) and primary isolates. The levels of initiated, partially completed, and completed viral DNA copies found 24 h after infection increased progressively with time in culture before infection. Unlike quiescent T lymphocytes, there appeared to be no block or delay in the integration of viral DNA into the genome of susceptible cultured monocytes. With an Alu-PCR method designed to specifically detect proviral DNA being used, integration events were found within 24 h of infection in monocytes cultured for a day or more after isolation. No integration signal was found in freshly isolated monocytes up to 7 days following exposure to the virus. Cloning and sequencing of Alu-PCR-amplified DNA confirmed integration in HIV-1-infected cultured monocytes. Our finding that in vitro replication of HIV-1 is clearly blocked prior to the initiation of reverse transcription in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytes suggests that these cells may not be susceptible to infection in vivo. Further studies to clarify this possibility and the nature of the block to infection should provide useful information for treatment strategies against HIV-1. PMID:8648722

  4. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  5. Activation of lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pulvertaft, R. J. V.; Pulvertaft, Isobel

    1967-01-01

    The technique involved in studying the activation of lymphocytes in the resting form, and their recognition as dividing and functional cells was studied, using phase contrast and agar as well as fluid culture. Standardization of technical methods was found to be essential, and the effect of variables was studied. Lymphocytes from human umbilical cord vein blood were found to be spontaneously activated. Infestation by microfilaria either diminished or entirely inhibited activation. The significance of lymphocytic cohesion was considered and the formation of colonies of activated lymphocytes on agar is described. The effects of non-human vertebrate lymphocytes and of human cells other than lymphocytes were studied. Spontaneous activation of abnormal lymphocytes was noted. Images PMID:4972989

  6. Early Dynamics of Cerebrospinal CD14+ Monocytes and CD15+ Granulocytes in Patients after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Postl, Lukas Kurt; Bogner, Viktoria; van Griensven, Martijn; Beirer, Marc; Kanz, Karl Georg; Egginger, Christoph; Schmitt-Sody, Markus; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) the analysis of neuroinflammatory mechanisms gained increasing interest. In this context certain immunocompetent cells might play an important role. Interestingly, in the actual literature there exist only a few studies focusing on the role of monocytes and granulocytes in TBI patients. In this regard it has recently reported that the choroid plexus represents an early, selective barrier for leukocytes after brain injury. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the very early dynamics of CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocyte in CSF of patients following severe TBI with regard to the integrity of the BBB. Cytometric flow analysis was performed to analyze the CD14+ monocyte and CD15+ granulocyte population in CSF of TBI patients. The ratio of CSF and serum albumin as a measure for the BBB's integrity was assessed in parallel. CSF samples of patients receiving lumbar puncture for elective surgery were obtained as controls. Overall 15 patients following severe TBI were enrolled. 10 patients were examined as controls. In patients, the monocyte population as well as the granulocyte population was significantly increased within 72 hours after TBI. The BBB's integrity did not have a significant influence on the cell count in the CSF. PMID:26568661

  7. Monocyte activation on polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jason J; Jelacic, Sandra; Samuel, Newton T; Maier, Ronald V; Campbell, Charles T; Castner, David G; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S

    2005-01-01

    The adherence and activation of primary human monocytes was investigated on a polyelectrolyte multilayer film containing hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly-L-lysine (PLL). The sequential layer-by-layer deposition of the multilayer film was characterized by surface plasmon resonance. Eight alternating bilayers displayed an effective thickness of 16.15 nm with a total polymer coverage of 2.10 microg/cm2. For cell studies, HA-PLL multilayers were constructed on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) substrates and characterized by time of flight second ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis. Principal component analysis of the ToF-SIMS spectra resolved no significant difference in surface chemistry between PLL-terminated and HA-terminated multilayer surfaces. Monocyte adhesion on PLL- and HA-terminated surfaces was measured by the lactate dehydrogenase assay and showed a significant decrease in cell adhesion after 24 h incubation. Cell viability measured by Live/Dead fluorescent staining showed significant cell death in the adherent cell population over these 24 h. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production, a measure of monocyte activation, was quantified by ELISA and normalized to the number of adherent monocytes. The activation of monocytes on PLL-terminated and HA-terminated surfaces was nearly identical, and both surfaces had TNF-alpha levels that were 8-fold higher than TCPS. These results demonstrate that sufficient PLL had diffused into the surface layer to direct monocyte adherence and to induce cytokine activation and cell death on the HA-terminated multilayer films. The diffusion of the second multilayer component to the coating surface should, thus, be taken into account in the design of polyelectrolyte-based biomaterial coating strategies. PMID:15794488

  8. Inflammatory Monocyte Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lauvau, Gregoire; Chorro, Laurent; Spaulding, Emily; Soudja, Saidi M'Homa

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes are blood-derived mononuclear phagocytic cells that traffic throughout the body and can provide rapid innate immune effector responses in response to microbial pathogen infections. Amongst blood monocytes, the most abundant subset in mice is represented by inflammatory Ly6C+ CCR2+ monocytes and is the functional equivalent of the CD14+ monocytes in humans. Herein we focus on published evidence describing the exquisite functional plasticity of these cells, and we extend this overview to their multiples roles in vivo during host immune defenses against microbial pathogen infections, as antigen-presenting cells, inflammatory cells or Trojan horse cells. PMID:25205002

  9. Characterization of canine monocyte-derived dendritic cells with phenotypic and functional differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Liu, Cheng-Chi; Cheng, Chiao-Lei; Lin, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Chu, Rea-Min

    2007-01-01

    For therapeutic purposes, large numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) are essential. In this study, we used 2% autologous canine plasma, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in generating monocyte-derived DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs. The plasma enriched the population of CD14-positive monocytes by greatly enhancing the efficiency of monocyte adherence, the proportion of adherent cells increasing from 6.6% with 10% fetal bovine serum to 15.3% with 2% autologous canine plasma. Culturing the adherent monocytes for 6 d with human GM-CSF, canine IL-4, and human Flt3L significantly increased the yield of DCs, more than 90% of which were CD14-negative. Because, in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), monocytes that were CD14-positive expressed tumor necrosis factor α much more than DCs with low levels of CD14, it is important to decrease the numbers of CD14-positive cells in generating monocyte-derived DCs. With flow cytometry and real-time reverse-transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction assays, we found that in canine immature DCs (iDCs) the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD1a, CD11c, CD40, and CD86 was high and the expression of CD80, CD83, and CD14 either low or negative. During maturation (stimulated by LPS), the expression of CD1a, CD40, CD83, and CD80 was upregulated. However, the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD11c, and CD86 was not increased in mature DCs. Incubating the iDCs with LPS decreased antigen uptake and increased the cells’ immunostimulatory capacity (assessed by the allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reaction), indicating that LPS accelerates the functional maturation of DCs. This protocol may facilitate the use of DCs in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:17695590

  10. Liver myofibroblasts regulate the phenotype and function of monocytes through soluble factors in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MIN; WANG, FENG-LAN; ZHU, JIAN-YUN; ZHENG, YU-BAO; ZHAO, QI-YI; GU, YU-RONG; ZHANG, QI; CHONG, YU-TIAN; GAO, ZHI-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lymphocytes and macrophage-derived cytokines and chemokines to modulate the activation of stromal cells during immune responses is well-documented, but few studies have investigated whether liver myofibroblasts shape the phenotype and function of monocytes in liver disease. In the present study, Kupffer cells were demonstrated to be activated in the inflamed livers of patients with cirrhosis and be in close contact with liver myofibroblasts. The Kupffer cells from cirrhotic livers expressed significantly elevated levels of PD-L1 (also termed B7-H1), TLR4, CD80, CD32 and CD64 relative to those from normal livers. Consistent with this finding, the expression of these surface molecules was significantly upregulated in monocytes following exposure to liver myofibroblasts originating from inflamed livers. Accordingly, the liver myofibroblast-exposed monocytes exhibited a significant increase in dextran endocytosis. These data reveal that bidirectional interactions between liver myofibroblasts and Kupffer cells may function as an ‘amplification loop’ to enhance inflammation further in the liver. Liver myofibroblasts are central in the pathogenesis of liver diseases and should be considered as targets for the rational design of effective immune-based anti-inflammation therapies. Furthermore, it was also demonstrated that skin fibroblasts were as effective as liver myofibroblasts at inducing monocyte activation, suggesting that fibroblasts, which are numerous in the body, may represent an underrated cell population that is actively involved in immunomodulatory functions. PMID:23251256

  11. Gene rearrangement study for minimal residual disease monitoring in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Paula, Francisco Danilo Ferreira; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; Murao, Mitiko; de Aguirre, Joaquim Caetano; Dutra, Álvaro Pimenta; Lima, Eduardo Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect markers for minimal residual disease monitoring based on conventional polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin, T-cell receptor rearrangements and the Sil-Tal1 deletion in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia. Methods Fifty-nine children with acute lymphocytic leukemia from three institutions in Minas Gerais, Brazil, were prospectively studied. Clonal rearrangements were detected by polymerase chain reaction followed by homo/heteroduplex clonality analysis in DNA samples from diagnostic bone marrow. Follow-up samples were collected on Days 14 and 28-35 of the induction phase. The Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox methods were used for survival analysis. Results Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangements were not detected in 5/55 children screened (9.0%). For precursor-B acute lymphocytic leukemia, the most frequent rearrangement was IgH (72.7%), then TCRG (61.4%), and TCRD and IgK (47.7%); for T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, TCRG (80.0%), and TCRD and Sil-Tal deletion (20.0%) were the most common. Minimal residual disease was detected in 35% of the cases on Day 14 and in 22.5% on Day 28-35. Minimal residual disease on Day 28-35, T-acute lymphocytic leukemia, and leukocyte count above 50 x 109/L at diagnosis were bad prognostic factors for leukemia-free survival in univariate analysis. Relapse risk for minimal residual disease positive relative to minimal residual disease negative children was 8.5 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.02-70.7). Conclusion Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor rearrangement frequencies were similar to those reported before. Minimal residual disease is an independent prognostic factor for leukemia-free survival, even when based on a non-quantitative technique, but longer follow-ups are needed. PMID:24255617

  12. Urine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 and Lupus Nephritis Disease Activity: Preliminary Report of a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Alharazy, Sabah; Kong, Norella C. T.; Mohd, Marlyn; Shah, Shamsul A.; Ba'in, Arbaiyah; Abdul Gafor, Abdul Halim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This longitudinal study aimed to determine the urine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (uMCP-1) levels in patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN) at various stages of renal disease activity and to compare them to current standard markers. Methods. Patients with LN—active or inactive—had their uMCP-1 levels and standard disease activity markers measured at baseline and 2 and 4 months. Urinary parameters, renal function test, serological markers, and renal SLE disease activity index-2K (renal SLEDAI-2K) were analyzed to determine their associations with uMCP-1. Results. A hundred patients completed the study. At each visit, uMCP-1 levels (pg/mg creatinine) were significantly higher in the active group especially with relapses and were significantly associated with proteinuria and renal SLEDAI-2K. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that uMCP-1 was a potential biomarker for LN. Whereas multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only proteinuria and serum albumin and not uMCP-1 were independent predictors of LN activity. Conclusion. uMCP-1 was increased in active LN. Although uMCP-1 was not an independent predictor for LN activity, it could serve as an adjunctive marker when the clinical diagnosis of LN especially early relapse remains uncertain. Larger and longer studies are indicated. PMID:26246906

  13. Monocyte-dependent stimulation of human T cells by zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, H; Kirchner, H

    1978-01-01

    Subpopulations of human peripheral blood leucocytes were isolated by nylon filtration or E-rosette separation and tested for functional activity. As shown previously, zinc ions induce DNA synthesis in unfractionated lymphocyte cultures. E-rosette-forming cells (E-RFC), obtained either by nylon wool filtration or E-rosette separation, responded well to PHA but showed only low levels of proliferative reactivity to zinc and Con A. These dminished responses could be completely restored by the addition of small numbers of autologous, mitomycin-treated monocytes; further experiments suggested that a monocyte-derived soluble factor can substitute for monocytes in this function. B lymphocyte-enriched cell populations, containing less than 1% E-RFC, did not respond to zinc and showed only marginal reactivity to PHA and Con A. PMID:308423

  14. Comparative Study on the Effects of Ceftriaxone and Monocytes on Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tajkey, Javad; Biglari, Alireza; Habibi Asl, Bohlol; Ramazani, Ali; Mazloomzadeh, Saeideh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison between the efficacy of ceftriaxone and monocytes on improvement of neuron protection and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rat. Methods: Rats were randomly divided into three groups of ten. Spinal cord injury was performed on rats under general anesthesia using the weight dropping method. Ceftriaxone was injected intraperitoneally 200 mg/kg/day for seven days after SCI. Monocytes were injected 2 × 105 cells 4 days after SCI. Hind limb motor function was assessed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale. Corticospinal tract (CST) axons were traced by injection of biotin dextran amine (BDA) into the sensorimotor cortex. Results: There were statistically significant differences in BBB scores in ceftriaxone in comparison to both monocytes receiving and control groups. On the other hand there were statistically significant differences in axon counting in both ceftriaxone and monocytes receiving groups in comparison to control group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that ceftriaxone improves functional recovery more effective than monocytes in rats after SCI. These results are from an experimental model and validation is required for further investigation. PMID:26236656

  15. Immunologic studies in two patients with persistent lymphocytic thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis, and low radioactive iodine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, I.; Gupta, M.; Hostetter, A.; Sheeler, L.; Skillern, P.; Tubbs, R.

    1984-08-01

    Two patients with persistent lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyrotoxicosis were studied. Both patients presented with severe hyperthyroidism of nine months' duration and had nontender, small thyroid glands. Uptake of radioactive iodine (131I) was consistently low. Serum thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels remained elevated without remission until thyroidectomy. The serum thyroglobulin level was normal, but testing for microsomal antibody gave weakly positive results in one case. Thyroglobulin and thyroid stimulatory antibodies were not found. The ratio of helper to suppressor T cells was elevated in one case. Neither patient showed response to propranolol, prednisone, or iodine. Light microscopic and immunohistologic studies showed severe lymphocytic thyroiditis with formation of secondary lymphoid follicles. Lymphocytes were predominately T cells (OKT11-positive), primarily helper/inducer T cells (OKT4-positive). Hyperplastic nodules contained high immunoreactive thyroglobulin and thyroxine levels. Aberrant thymus was seen within the thyroid. These studies suggest the possibility of intrathyroidal stimulation and hydrolysis of thyroglobulin within thyroid cells and also support the hypothesis that T and B cell immunoregulatory defects are important in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  16. Studies on the differentiation of T lymphocytes in sheep. II. Two monoclonal antibodies that recognize all ovine T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beya, M F; Miyasaka, M; Dudler, L; Ezaki, T; Trnka, Z

    1986-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal cytotoxic antibodies (ST-1a and ST-1b) recognize an antigen present on the large majority of thymocytes and all T cells in the periphery, but not B cells or other haemopoietic cells in sheep. Examination of frozen sections of various fetal tissues revealed that the cells expressing this antigen first appeared in the thymus, and these cells markedly increase in numbers in the peripheral lymphoid tissues after mid-gestation. Large accumulations of positive cells were located in the paracortex of lymph nodes, the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath of the spleen, and interfollicular areas of jejunal Peyer's patches, all of which are known to be T-dependent areas. Treatment of lymphocytes with ST-1a and complement resulted in the abrogation of T-proliferative responses, but the response to a B-cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide, was not reduced. Neither ST-1a nor ST-1b cross-reacted to lymphocytes obtained from other species of animals (man, monkey, mouse, rat, guinea-pig, chicken, frog, pig, horse, goat and cattle). Based on these findings, it was concluded that the expression of the antigen recognized by ST-1a and ST-1b is restricted to the T-cell lineage of sheep, and that all ovine T cells express this antigen. Furthermore, ST-1a and ST-1b were determined to recognize the same antigen by reciprocal blocking experiments. Images Figure 3 PMID:3484719

  17. Central and peripheral markers of neurodegeneration and monocyte activation in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jennifer L; Gill, Alexander J; Douglas, Steven D; Kolson, Dennis L

    2015-08-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) affect up to 50 % of HIV-infected adults, independently predict HIV morbidity/mortality, and are associated with neuronal damage and monocyte activation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament subunits (NFL, pNFH) are sensitive surrogate markers of neuronal damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. In HIV, CSF NFL is elevated in individuals with and without cognitive impairment, suggesting early/persistent neuronal injury during HIV infection. Although individuals with severe cognitive impairment (HIV-associated dementia (HAD)) express higher CSF NFL levels than cognitively normal HIV-infected individuals, the relationships between severity of cognitive impairment, monocyte activation, neurofilament expression, and systemic infection are unclear. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 48 HIV-infected adults with varying levels of cognitive impairment, not receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), enrolled in the CNS Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. We quantified NFL, pNFH, and monocyte activation markers (sCD14/sCD163) in paired CSF/plasma samples. By examining subjects off ART, these correlations are not confounded by possible effects of ART on inflammation and neurodegeneration. We found that CSF NFL levels were elevated in individuals with HAD compared to cognitively normal or mildly impaired individuals with CD4+ T-lymphocyte nadirs ≤200. In addition, CSF NFL levels were significantly positively correlated to plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and negatively correlated to plasma CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, suggesting a link between neuronal injury and systemic HIV infection. Finally, CSF NFL was significantly positively correlated with CSF pNFH, sCD163, and sCD14, demonstrating that monocyte activation within the CNS compartment is directly associated with neuronal injury at all stages of HAND. PMID:25776526

  18. From proliferation to proliferation: monocyte lineage comes full circle

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S.

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear circulating phagocytes that originate in the bone marrow and give rise to macrophages in peripheral tissue. For decades, our understanding of monocyte lineage was bound to a stepwise model that favored an inverse relationship between cellular proliferation and differentiation. Sophisticated molecular and surgical cell tracking tools have transformed our thinking about monocyte topo-ontogeny and function. Here, we discuss how recent studies focusing on progenitor proliferation and differentiation, monocyte mobilization and recruitment, and macrophage differentiation and proliferation are reshaping knowledge of monocyte lineage in steady state and disease. PMID:24435095

  19. Making a difference: Monocyte Heterogeneity in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hilgendorf, Ingo; Swirski, Filip K

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes are frequently described as bone marrow-derived precursors of macrophages. Although many studies support this view, we now appreciate that monocytes neither develop exclusively in the bone marrow nor give rise to all macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition to differentiating to specific leukocyte populations, monocytes, as monocytes, are functionally and ontogenically heterogeneous. In this review we will focus on the development and activity of monocytes and their subsets in mice (Ly-6Chigh/low) and humans (CD14+/dim/− CD16+/−) in the context of atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:22847772

  20. Radiation effects on cultured human monocytes and on monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, E.S.; Gallin, J.I.

    1984-06-01

    Prior to administration, leukocyte transfusions are commonly irradiated with up to 5,000 R to eliminate lymphocytes and thereby prevent graft-versus-host disease in the recipient. It has been widely believed that phagocytes are resistant to this irradiation. In a recent report, it was noted that phagocyte oxidative metabolism was compromised during preparation of white cells for transfusion. As part of the effort to examine the basis for this inhibition of phagocyte function during white cell preparation, an assessment was made of the effects of irradiation on the long-lived monocytes that have been shown to persist at inflammatory foci posttransfusion. Human monocytes were irradiated for up to 3 min, receiving 2,500-5,000 R. This irradiation damaged human monocytes, significantly decreasing their in vitro survival for the first 3 wk of culture, and growth as assessed by two-dimensional cell size measurements during the first 2 wk of culture. Despite smaller cell size, total cell protein was significantly increased over time in irradiated cultures. Extracellular release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase per cell was not affected by irradiation, but extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was significantly increased after irradiation. Irradiated monocytes killed Listeria monocytogenes at a slower rate than the nonirradiated controls. Thus, the data indicate that irradiation in doses used to prevent graft-versus-host disease in leukocyte transfusion recipients has a deleterious effect on in vitro human monocyte survival and function.

  1. Isoprinosine stimulates granulocyte chemiluminescence and inhibits monocyte chemiluminescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flø, R W; Naess, A; Albrektsen, G; Solberg, C O

    1994-04-01

    Isoprinosine may delay disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus infection, presumably through modulation of lymphocyte function. However, the influence of isoprinosine on phagocyte function is largely unknown. This study describes the effects of isoprinosine and azidothymidine on phagocyte chemiluminescence and migration. Incubation with isoprinosine concentrations of 250 micrograms/ml and above increased the chemiluminescence of granulocytes. Random migration of granulocytes was decreased at isoprinosine concentrations of 50 micrograms/ml and higher, but chemotaxis was not affected. Azidothymidine exerted no effect on the chemiluminescence or migration of granulocytes. For monocytes, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence was reduced at isoprinosine concentrations of 250 micrograms/ml and above, whereas migration was not affected. These findings suggest that the immunomodulatory properties of isoprinosine may extend to phagocytic cells. This may be of significance in the treatment of immunodeficiency states. PMID:7516672

  2. Honeybee apisimin and plant arabinogalactans in honey costimulate monocytes.

    PubMed

    Gannabathula, Swapna; Krissansen, Geoffrey W; Skinner, Margot; Steinhorn, Gregor; Schlothauer, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Here we determined whether immunostimulatory plant-derived arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and the honeybee-derived protein apisimin are present in varieties of New Zealand honey. Apisimin is a protein of unknown function secreted from the glands of honeybees into Royal Jelly, forming a complex with apalbumin1 capable of stimulating lymphocyte proliferation. AGPs were abundant in kanuka honey with lesser amounts in manuka, kowhai and clover honeys, but absent from Royal Jelly. Apisimin was present in all honeys, as well as Royal Jelly. We report that apisimin shares with honey AGPs the ability to stimulate the release of TNF-α from blood monocytes. Further, it synergizes with AGPs to enhance the release of TNF-α, via a mechanism not involving the formation of a complex with AGPs. In summary, this study provides evidence that AGPs and apisimin are commonly present in different floral varieties of honey, and hence contribute to their immunostimulatory properties. PMID:25172680

  3. Combined Cytogenotoxic Effects of Bee Venom and Bleomycin on Rat Lymphocytes: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elhakim, Yasmina M.; Khalil, Samah R.; Awad, Ashraf; AL-Ayadhi, Laila Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of bee venom (BV) and/or the chemotherapeutic agent bleomycin (BLM) on healthy isolated rat lymphocytes utilizing morphometric and molecular techniques. Using the Ficoll-Histopaque density gradient centrifugation technique, lymphocytes were isolated, divided into groups, and subjected to BV and/or BLM at incubation medium concentrations of 10 or 20??g/mL respectively for 24 and 72?hrs. An MTT assay and fluorescent microscopy examinations were used to assess the cytotoxic effects. To determine the predominant type of BV and/or BLM-induced cell death, LDH release assay was employed beside quantitative expression analyses of the apoptosis-related genes (Caspase-3 and Bcl-2). The genotoxic effects of the tested compounds were evaluated via DNA fragmentation assay. The results of these assays demonstrated that BV potentiates BLM-induced cytotoxicity through increased LDH release and diminished cell viability. Nevertheless, BV significantly inhibited the BLM-induced DNA damage. The results verify that BV significantly attenuates the genotoxic effects of BLM on noncancerous isolated rat lymphocytes but does not diminish BLM cytotoxicity. PMID:24822179

  4. Study of lymphocyte subpopulations in normal humans and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus by fractionation of peripheral blood lymphocytes on a discontinuous Ficoll gradient.

    PubMed

    Glinski, W; Gershwin, M E; Budman, D R; Steinberg, A D

    1976-11-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of thirty normal volunteers and fifty-two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were fractionated using a discontinuous (5-30 percent) Ficoll gradient. Such fractionation permitted the isolation, identification of study of null cells, T cells and B cells. Patients with inactive SLE were found to have a cell distribution and responsiveness to PHA, Con A and Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) similar to controls. In contrast, patients with active SLE showed a significant decrease in T-cell fractions as well as a relative increase in null cells, a normal distribution of B cells, a marked reduction in responsiveness to Con A, a lesser reduction to PHA and only a minor reduction to PWM. With increasing disease activity, the number of null cells increased despite lymphopenia. Spontaneous lymphocyte transformation was observed in patients with SLE. This occurred predominantly in the fractions enriched in B cells and was observed both early (0-16 hr) and late (68-72 hr) in the lymphocyte cultures. The method of discontinuous Ficoll gradients is both versatile and reproducible with good correlations between isolated lymphoid subpopulations and disease activity. PMID:1086753

  5. Inflammatory Monocytes Recruited to the Liver within 24 Hours after Virus-Induced Inflammation Resemble Kupffer Cells but Are Functionally Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Movita, Dowty; Biesta, Paula; Kreefft, Kim; Haagmans, Bart; Zuniga, Elina; Herschke, Florence; De Jonghe, Sandra; Janssen, Harry L. A.; Gama, Lucio; Boonstra, Andre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to a scarcity of immunocompetent animal models for viral hepatitis, little is known about the early innate immune responses in the liver. In various hepatotoxic models, both pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of recruited monocytes have been described. In this study, we compared the effect of liver inflammation induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with that of a persistent virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13, on early innate intrahepatic immune responses in mice. LCMV infection induces a remarkable influx of inflammatory monocytes in the liver within 24 h, accompanied by increased transcript levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in whole liver. Importantly, while a single LPS injection results in similar recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the liver, the functional properties of the infiltrating cells are dramatically different in response to LPS versus LCMV infection. In fact, intrahepatic inflammatory monocytes are skewed toward a secretory phenotype with impaired phagocytosis in LCMV-induced liver inflammation but exhibit increased endocytic capacity after LPS challenge. In contrast, F4/80high-Kupffer cells retain their steady-state endocytic functions upon LCMV infection. Strikingly, the gene expression levels of inflammatory monocytes dramatically change upon LCMV exposure and resemble those of Kupffer cells. Since inflammatory monocytes outnumber Kupffer cells 24 h after LCMV infection, it is highly likely that inflammatory monocytes contribute to the intrahepatic inflammatory response during the early phase of infection. Our findings are instrumental in understanding the early immunological events during virus-induced liver disease and point toward inflammatory monocytes as potential target cells for future treatment options in viral hepatitis. IMPORTANCE Insights into how the immune system deals with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV are scarce due to the lack of adequate animal model systems. This knowledge is, however, crucial to developing new antiviral strategies aimed at eradicating these chronic infections. We model virus-host interactions during the initial phase of liver inflammation 24 h after inoculating mice with LCMV. We show that infected Kupffer cells are rapidly outnumbered by infiltrating inflammatory monocytes, which secrete proinflammatory cytokines but are less phagocytic. Nevertheless, these recruited inflammatory monocytes start to resemble Kupffer cells on a transcript level. The specificity of these cellular changes for virus-induced liver inflammation is corroborated by demonstrating opposite functions of monocytes after LPS challenge. Overall, this demonstrates the enormous functional and genetic plasticity of infiltrating monocytes and identifies them as an important target cell for future treatment regimens. PMID:25673700

  6. Characterization of the adhesion of the human monocytic cell line U937 to cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    DiCorleto, P E; de la Motte, C A

    1985-01-01

    Adhesion of blood-borne monocytes to the vascular endothelium is the first step in the infiltration of this leukocyte into the vessel wall or the interstitial space during inflammation. A significant role for the monocyte in both wound healing and atherogenesis is now well accepted. The molecular interactions involved in monocyte attachment to the endothelium are unknown. To study this phenomenon we have developed an in vitro system that uses the human monocytic tumor cell line U937 as a model for the blood-borne monocyte. 51Cr-labeled U937 cells were found to adhere with high affinity to cultured endothelial cells (ECs) from several sources. Much less binding was observed to either smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts from several species. Conditioned medium and cocultivation experiments ruled out the possibility that target cells could affect U937 cell binding by secretion of factors. Binding of U937 cells to porcine aortic ECs reached equilibrium after 30 min at 37 degrees C and 90 min at 4 degrees C with similar extent of binding at the two temperatures. Binding of U937 to the endothelium reached saturation at 9-12 U937 per porcine aortic EC (semi-confluent) with half-maximal binding at 1.5 X 10(6) U937 cells/ml. Bound cells dissociated with a half-life of 20 h at 37 degrees C. Adhesion of U937 cells was blocked by prior incubation of ECs with normal monocytes but not with platelets, lymphocytes, or neutrophils. Trypsin treatment or detergent solubilization of ECs inhibited U937 cell binding. A striking effect of EC density on monocytic cell adhesion was observed with bovine, rat, and porcine ECs. Confluent cultures of these cells exhibited negligible binding of U937, but when plated sparsely, the same cells were excellent targets for U937 cell adhesion. In addition, when confluent cultures of bovine aortic ECs were "wounded" with a cotton swab and then allowed to recover for 24 h at 37 degrees C, U937 cells were found to adhere most readily to the ECs migrating into the wound and neighboring the wound but not to ECs in the confluent monolayer away from the wound edge. These latter results may have implications for the focal adhesion of monocytes to the vessel wall in vivo. Images PMID:3988935

  7. Monocyte B7 and Sialyl Lewis X modulates the efficacy of IL-10 down-regulation of LPS-induced monocyte tissue factor in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Warnes, G; Biggerstaff, J P; Francis, J L

    1998-07-01

    Recent studies have investigated the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 10 (IL-10) to control the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in sepsis by down-regulation of monocyte tissue factor (MTF) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the initial phase of the disease. In vitro and in vivo human studies have shown that a minimal (<1 h) delay in IL-10 treatment significantly reduces the cytokines ability to inhibit LPS-induced MTF expression and the end products of coagulation. In this whole blood in vitro study we investigated the role of lymphocyte and platelet interactions with monocytes to up-regulate MTF expression in the presence of IL-10 in the initial phase of exposure to LPS. Individual blockade of monocyte B7 or platelet P-selectin significantly (35%) reduced MTF expression (P<0.05). IL-10 showed a dose-dependent inhibition of LPS (0.1 microg/ml) induced MTF expression, with 56% inhibition at 1 ng/ml, maximizing at 5 ng/ml IL-10 (75%; P<0.05). Simultaneous exposure to LPS and IL-10 (1 ng/ml) or addition of IL-10 1 h after LPS, with individual B7 and P-selectin blockade significantly enhanced the inhibition of MTF expression by IL-10 (P<0.05). We conclude that the efficacy of IL-10 to control DIC could be enhanced by a simultaneous B7 and P-selectin blockade. PMID:9695978

  8. Effects of flavonoids on human lymphocyte proliferative responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mookerjee, B.K.; Lee, T.P.; Logue, G.P.; Lippes, H.A.; Middleton, E.

    1986-01-01

    Flavonoids reversibly inhibit lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytomitogens, soluble antigens and phorbol esters by blocking an early event or events that follow stimulation. Quercetin and tangeretin inhibit thymidine transport in stimulated lymphocytes. These flavonoids reversibly inhibit antigen processing by monocytes and inhibit the expression of class II histocompatibility (DR) antigens in PBM cells.

  9. Metformin Changes the Relationship between Blood Monocyte Toll-Like Receptor 4 Levels and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease—Ex Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zwolak, Agnieszka; Słabczyńska, Olga; Semeniuk, Justyna; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) contributes to the development of NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) and MetS (metabolic syndrome). It is unclear whether anti-diabetic metformin affects TLR4 expression on blood monocytes, thereby protecting or improving inflammatory parameters. Therefore, we investigated TLR4 in patients with NAFLD meeting different sets of MetS criteria and linked the results with the disease burden. Methods 70 subjects were characterized and divided into three groups: (I) healthy individuals, (II) nonobese with NAFLD and without MetS, and (III) prediabetic, obese with NAFLD and MetS. We determined the concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and monocyte TLR4 levels in fresh blood as well as in blood cultures with or without metformin supplementation. Results The characteristics of the study groups revealed a significant association between NAFLD and BMI, MetS and inflammatory parameters, and TLR4. In ex vivo studies, 100 μM of metformin decreased the TLR4 level by 19.9% (II group) or by 35% (III group) as well as IL-1β and TNFα production. A stepwise multiple regression analysis highlighted a strong effect of metformin on attenuation of the link between TLR4 and NAFLD, and TNFα. Conclusion We concluded that, by attenuation of the blood monocyte TLR4 level, metformin reduced their inflammatory potential—critical after recruitment these cells into liver. However, this finding should be confirmed after in vivo metformin administration. PMID:26930651

  10. The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis: granulocyte-monocyte apheresis in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. A multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Stefano; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Bresci, Giampaolo; D'Ovidio, Valeria; Astegiano, Marco; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Testa, Roberto; D'Incà, Renata; Valpiani, Daniela; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Sablich, Renato; Cavallaro, Flaminia; Costa, Francesco; Di Leo, Vincenza; Colombo, Elisabetta; Santini, Alessia; Aratari, Annalisa; Lecis, Pierenrico; Saladino, Valeria; Riegler, Gabriele; Marco, Marino; Calella, Francesca; Ricci, Chiara; Guidi, Maria Luisa; Repaci, Giuseppe; Silla, Michele

    2011-12-01

    Leukocytes are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases; granulocyte-monocyte adsorptive (GMA) apheresis, an extracorporeal technique aimed at removing activated circulating leukocytes from the blood, may represent a safe and effective therapeutic tool in these patients. The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis performed an observational, multicentric study involving 24 Gastroenterology Units. In this study, laboratory data and clinical outcomes of 230 patients (148 males, mean age 43.5 years) affected with ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 194) or Crohn's disease (CD, n = 36) who underwent one or more cycles of GMA were analyzed. Each cycle consisted of five GMA treatments. The patients were followed up for a mean of 8.7 (min. 3 to max. 12) months. At 3 months, positive outcome was achieved in 77.7% of UC patients (72.0% remission, 5.7% clinical response) and 61.3% of CD patients (54.8% remission, 6.5% clinical response). The cumulative proportion of positive outcome at 12 months was 87.1% for UC patients (83.7% remission, 3.4% clinical response) and 77.4% for CD patients (74.2% remission, 3.2% clinical response). No single clinical or laboratory parameter among those analyzed (age, sex, disease characteristics, history of smoking, medication history, baseline values of clinical activity index (CAI)/Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), hemoglobin, white blood cells count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) was independently associated with clinical outcome. The procedure was well tolerated with no significant adverse effects registered. PMID:22072543

  11. Monocytes in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Partha; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Though timely revascularization of the ischemic myocardium and current standard therapy reduce acute mortality after MI, long-term morbidity and mortality remain high. During the first 1 to 2 weeks after MI, tissues in the infarcted myocardium undergo rapid turnover, including digestion of extracellular matrix and fibrosis. Post-MI repair is crucial to survival. Monocytes recruited to the infarcted myocardium remove debris and facilitate the repair process. However, exaggerated inflammation may also impede healing, as demonstrated by the association between elevated white blood cell count and in-hospital mortality after MI. Monocytes produced in the bone marrow and spleen enter the blood after MI and are recruited to the injured myocardium in 2 phases. The first phase is dominated by Ly-6c(high) monocytes and the second phase by Ly-6c(low) monocytes. Yet the number of Ly6C(low) monocytes recruited to the infarct is much lower, and Ly6C(high) monocytes can differentiate to Ly6C(low) macrophages in later healing stages. Understanding the signals regulating monocytosis after MI will help design new therapies to facilitate cardiac healing and limit heart failure. PMID:25792449

  12. Human monocytes constitutively express membrane-bound, biologically active, and interferon-gamma-upregulated interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Musso, T; Calosso, L; Zucca, M; Millesimo, M; Ravarino, D; Giovarelli, M; Malavasi, F; Ponzi, A N; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    1999-05-15

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a potent regulator of T-, B-, and natural killer cell proliferation and displays unusually tight controls of secretion. Even though IL-15 mRNA is constitutively expressed in monocytes/macrophages and is upregulated by a variety of stimuli, evidence for IL-15 cytokine secretion is only found exceptionally, eg, conditions of pathological, chronic inflammation. This raises the possibility that monocytes express membrane-bound IL-15 rather than secrete it. The current study explores this hypothesis. We demonstrate here that biologically active IL-15 is indeed detectable in a constitutively expressed, membrane-bound form on normal human monocytes, as well as on monocytic cell lines (MONO-MAC-6, THP-1, and U937), but not on human T or B cells (MT4, M9, C5966, JURKAT, DAUDI, RAJI, and Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-cell clones). Furthermore, cell surface-bound IL-15 is upregulated upon interferon-gamma stimulation. Interestingly, monocyte/macrophage inhibitory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 fail to downregulate both constitutive and induced cell-surface expression of IL-15. Membrane-bound IL-15 does not elute with acetate buffer or trypsin treatment, suggesting that it is an integral membrane protein and that it is not associated with the IL-15 receptor complex. Finally, membrane-bound IL-15 stimulates T lymphocytes to proliferate in vitro, indicating that it is biologically active. These findings enlist IL-15 in the fairly small family of cytokines for which the presence of a biologically active membrane-bound form has been demonstrated (eg, IL-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-10) and invites the speculation that most of the biological effects of IL-15 under physiological conditions are exerted by the cell surface-bound form. PMID:10233906

  13. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2013-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are innate immune cells that reside and accumulate in the healthy and injured heart. The cells and their subsets pursue distinct functions in steady state and disease, and their tenure may range between hours to months. Some subsets are highly inflammatory, while others support tissue repair. This review discusses current concepts of lineage relationships and systems’ cross talk, highlights open questions, and describes tools for studying monocyte and macrophage subsets in the murine and human heart. PMID:23743228

  14. Clonal expansion under the microscope: studying lymphocyte activation and differentiation using live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Polonsky, Michal; Chain, Benjamin; Friedman, Nir

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of lymphocytes is a hallmark of vertebrate adaptive immunity. A small number of precursor cells that recognize a specific antigen proliferate into expanded clones, differentiate and acquire various effector and memory phenotypes, which promote effective immune responses. Recent studies establish a large degree of heterogeneity in the level of expansion and in cell state between and within expanding clones. Studying these processes in vivo, while providing insightful information on the level of heterogeneity, is challenging due to the complex microenvironment and the inability to continuously track individual cells over extended periods of time. Live cell imaging of ex vivo cultures within micro fabricated arrays provides an attractive methodology for studying clonal expansion. These experiments facilitate continuous acquisition of a large number of parameters on cell number, proliferation, death and differentiation state, with single-cell resolution on thousands of expanding clones that grow within controlled environments. Such data can reveal stochastic and instructive mechanisms that contribute to observed heterogeneity and elucidate the sequential order of differentiation events. Intercellular interactions can also be studied within these arrays by following responses of a controlled number of interacting cells, all trapped within the same microwell. Here we describe implementations of live-cell imaging within microwell arrays for studies of lymphocyte clonal expansion, portray insights already gained from these experiments and outline directions for future research. These tools, together with in vivo experiments tracking single-cell responses, will expand our understanding of adaptive immunity and the ways by which it can be manipulated. PMID:26606974

  15. Studies of the stimulation and desensitization of beta adrenergic receptors in the human lymphocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes, were employed in radioligand binding studies of beta-adrenergic receptor density and affinity for agonists and in studies of isoproterenol stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Studies of isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity demonstrated a role for extracellular calcium ions but not for extracellular magnesium ions in this process. Responses were diminished by chelation or by removal of extracellular calcium, as well as by lanthanum ion which competes with calcium for membrane binding sites. Initial studies using /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol (/sup 3/H-DHA) indicated that 40% of cell surface beta receptors are lost during exposure of lymphocytes to isoproterenol and that the remaining receptors have a reduced affinity for beta agonists. Results from studies with /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICYP) are consistent with the view that beta receptors lost from the cell surface during isoproterenol treatment are present in a internal compartment of the cell. In mild asthmatic patients receiving a three week regimen of oral terbutaline a 40% reduction in the total receptor population was observed, suggesting that degradation of internalized receptors had occurred.

  16. Influence of fingolimod on basic lymphocyte subsets frequencies in the peripheral blood of multiple sclerosis patients – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Julia; Czerwiec, Michał; Siwicka-Gieroba, Dorota; Walankiewicz, Monika; Grafka, Agnieszka; Zgurski, Michał; Surdacka, Agata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background Fingolimod is a drug administered orally to adult patients treated for relapsing remitting course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mode of action of fingolimod is based on intense S1P1 receptor stimulation and “arresting” lymphocytes in lymphatic organs. Objective of the research was to assess changes in the frequencies of basic lymphocyte subsets in patients treated for multiple sclerosis with the use of fingolimod. Material and methods Study group comprised of 25 previously untreated adult patients with MS. Venous blood samples were collected from each patient before and one month, three months and six months after treatment initiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotype was assessed with a set of monoclonal antibodies bounded to appropriate fluorochromes and flow cytometer FACSC alibur. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0 software. Results Before fingolimod administration median of lymphocyte subsets percentage in each patient was in reference range. After 1 month of treatment we noticed significant changes in frequencies of following lymphocyte subsets: NK cells – 51.22% (p = 0.016), T CD4+ cells – 11.58% (p = 0.01), T CD4+:T CD8+ cells ratio – 0.61 (p = 0.005). After 3 and 6 months of treatment there was further increase of deviation from normal state. Conclusions The use of fingolimod is associated with profound changes in lymphocyte subsets distribution, which might bear a risk of the development of cellular immune deficiency symptoms. PMID:26648781

  17. Effects of environmental toxins on lymphocyte function: studies in rhesus and man

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, R. )

    1991-06-01

    The immune system is a potential target of environmental toxins. Impairment of immune function could have a disastrous effect upon the affected individual. We had the unique opportunity to study the results of a prolonged exposure to TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-P-dioxin) in rhesus monkeys and their offspring. Subsequently, we performed similar studies on humans exposed to the nematode pesticide, Aldicarb. This report summarizes those previous studies. In the monkeys, no major deficits of the immune system were found and the animals did not have excessive numbers of infections. However, at higher doses of dietary TCDD (25 ppt), only 22% of the offspring survived to 1 year of age. Thus, the failure to demonstrate effects on the young may simply relate to the essential equivalence of the lethal to an immunosuppressive dose. In humans, exposure to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, Aldicarb, was received through contaminated well water. The known exposure was for at least 1 year and could have been as long as 5 years. Various tests of the immune system, including lymphocyte subset counts, proliferative responses, total immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody responses did not reveal immunodeficiency. Increases in the numbers of CD8 positive T lymphocytes was observed. There was no evidence of any increase in clinical illness in the exposed compared with the control group.

  18. Ofatumumab in poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a Phase IV, non-interventional, observational study from the European Research Initiative on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Carol; Montillo, Marco; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Dimou, Maria; Bloor, Adrian; Dupuis, Jehan; Schuh, Anna; Norin, Stefan; Geisler, Christian; Hillmen, Peter; Doubek, Michael; Trněný, Marek; Obrtlikova, Petra; Laurenti, Luca; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Smolej, Lukas; Ghia, Paolo; Cymbalista, Florence; Jaeger, Ulrich; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stavroyianni, Niki; Carrington, Patrick; Zouabi, Hamadi; Leblond, Veronique; Gomez-Garcia, Juan C.; Rubio, Martin; Marasca, Roberto; Musuraca, Gerardo; Rigacci, Luigi; Farina, Lucia; Paolini, Rossella; Pospisilova, Sarka; Kimby, Eva; Bradley, Colm; Montserrat, Emili

    2015-01-01

    We report the largest retrospective, phase IV non-interventional, observational study of ofatumumab therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Total number of patients was 103; median age was 65 years (range 39–85). Median number of prior lines of therapy was 4 (range 1–13), including, in most cases, rituximab-, fludarabine- and alemtuzumab-based regimens; 13 patients had been allografted. Of 113 adverse events, 28 (29%) were considered to be directly related to ofatumumab. Grade 3–4 toxicities included neutropenia (10%), thrombocytopenia (5%), anemia (3%), pneumonia (17%), and fever (3%). Two heavily pre-treated patients developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. On an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 22% (3 complete response, 1 incomplete complete response). Median progression-free and overall survival times were 5 and 11 months, respectively. This study confirms in a daily-life setting the feasibility and acceptable toxicity of ofatumumab treatment in advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The complete response rate, however, was low. Therefore, treatment with ofatumumab should be moved to earlier phases of the disease. Ideally, this should be done in combination with other agents, as recently approved for ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as front-line treatment for patients unfit for fludarabine. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01453062. PMID:25596264

  19. Ofatumumab in poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a phase IV, non-interventional, observational study from the European Research Initiative on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Carol; Montillo, Marco; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Dimou, Maria; Bloor, Adrian; Dupuis, Jehan; Schuh, Anna; Norin, Stefan; Geisler, Christian; Hillmen, Peter; Doubek, Michael; Trněný, Marek; Obrtlikova, Petra; Laurenti, Luca; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Smolej, Lukas; Ghia, Paolo; Cymbalista, Florence; Jaeger, Ulrich; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stavroyianni, Niki; Carrington, Patrick; Zouabi, Hamadi; Leblond, Veronique; Gomez-Garcia, Juan C; Rubio, Martin; Marasca, Roberto; Musuraca, Gerardo; Rigacci, Luigi; Farina, Lucia; Paolini, Rossella; Pospisilova, Sarka; Kimby, Eva; Bradley, Colm; Montserrat, Emili

    2015-04-01

    We report the largest retrospective, phase IV non-interventional, observational study of ofatumumab therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with poor-prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Total number of patients was 103; median age was 65 years (range 39-85). Median number of prior lines of therapy was 4 (range 1-13), including, in most cases, rituximab-, fludarabine- and alemtuzumab-based regimens; 13 patients had been allografted. Of 113 adverse events, 28 (29%) were considered to be directly related to ofatumumab. Grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia (10%), thrombocytopenia (5%), anemia (3%), pneumonia (17%), and fever (3%). Two heavily pre-treated patients developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. On an intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 22% (3 complete response, 1 incomplete complete response). Median progression-free and overall survival times were 5 and 11 months, respectively. This study confirms in a daily-life setting the feasibility and acceptable toxicity of ofatumumab treatment in advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The complete response rate, however, was low. Therefore, treatment with ofatumumab should be moved to earlier phases of the disease. Ideally, this should be done in combination with other agents, as recently approved for ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as front-line treatment for patients unfit for fludarabine. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01453062. PMID:25596264

  20. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Sara; Meledin, Valery; Bar, Iris; Fabricant, Jacob; Gandelman, Gera; George, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between circulating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features. Methods We assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry. Results There was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls. Patients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9% vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%, P = 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes were inversely related to aortic valve area. Conclusions Patients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe. PMID:26918018

  1. Synergistic interactions between overlapping binding sites for the serum response factor and ELK-1 proteins mediate both basal enhancement and phorbol ester responsiveness of primate cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoters in monocyte and T-lymphocyte cell types.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y J; Chiou, C J; Huang, Q; Hayward, G S

    1996-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is nonpermissive or persistent in many lymphoid and myeloid cell types but can be activated in differentiated macrophages. We have shown elsewhere that both the major immediate-early gene (MIE) and lytic cycle infectious progeny virus expression can be induced in otherwise nonpermissive monocyte-like U-937 cell cultures infected with either human CMV (HCMV) or simian CMV (SCMV) by treatment with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Two multicopy basal enhancer motifs within the SCMV MIE enhancer, namely, 11 copies of the 16-bp cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and 3 copies of novel 17-bp serum response factor (SRF) binding sites referred to as the SNE (SRF/NFkappaB-like element), as well as four classical NFkappaB sites within the HCMV version, contribute to TPA responsiveness in transient assays in monocyte and T-cell types. The SCMV SNE sites contain potential overlapping core recognition binding motifs for SRF, Rel/NFkappaB, ETS, and YY1 class transcription factors but fail to respond to either serum or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Therefore, to evaluate the mechanism of TPA responsiveness of the SNE motifs and of a related 16-bp SEE (SRF/ETS element) motif found in the HCMV and chimpanzee CMV MIE enhancers, we have examined the functional responses and protein binding properties of multimerized wild-type and mutant elements added upstream to the SCMV MIE or simian virus 40 minimal promoter regions in the U-937, K-562, HL-60, THP-1, and Jurkat cell lines. Unlike classical NFkappaB sites, neither the SNE nor the SEE motif responded to phosphatase inhibition by okadaic acid. However, the TPA responsiveness of both CMV elements proved to involve synergistic interactions between the core SRF binding site (CCATATATGG) and the adjacent inverted ETS binding motifs (TTCC), which correlated directly with formation of a bound tripartite complex containing both the cellular SRF and ELK-1 proteins. This protein complex was more abundant in U-937, K-562, and HeLa cell extracts than in Raji, HF, BALB/c 3T3, or HL-60 cells, but the binding activity was altered only twofold after TPA treatment. A 40-fold stimulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity mediated by four tandem repeats of the SNE could be induced within 2 h (and up to 250-fold within 6 h) after addition of TPA in DNA-transfected U-937 cells, indicating that the stimulation appeared likely to be a true protein kinase C-mediated signal transduction event rather than a differentiation response. Slight differences in the sequence of the core SRF binding site compared with that of the classical c-Fos promoter serum response element, together with differences in the spacing between the SRF and ETS motifs, appear to account for the inability of the SCMV SNEs to respond to serum induction. PMID:8970984

  2. Lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein proteoforms analyzed using monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Filatov, Alexander; Kruglova, Natalia; Meshkova, Tatiana; Mazurov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase CD45 regulates the activation of lymphocytes by controlling the level of receptor and signal molecule phosphorylation. However, it remains unknown which molecules mediate the phosphatase activity of CD45. A candidate for such a molecule is a small transmembrane adapter protein called lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP). LPAP forms a supramolecular complex that consists of not only CD45 molecule but also CD4 and Lck kinase. The function of LPAP has not been defined clearly. In our study, we determined the pattern of LPAP expression in various cell types and characterized its proteoforms using new monoclonal antibodies generated against the intracellular portion of the protein. We show that LPAP is a pan-lymphocyte marker, and its expression in cells correlates with the expression of CD45. The majority of T, B and NK cells express high levels of LPAP, whereas monocytes, granulocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, platelets and red blood cells are negative for LPAP. Using one- and two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis, we demonstrate that LPAP has at least four sites of phosphorylation. The resting cells express at least six different LPAP phosphoforms representing mono-, di- and tri-phosphorylated LPAP. T and B cells differ in the distribution of the protein between phosphoforms. The activation of lymphocytes with PMA reduces the diversity of phosphorylated forms. Our experiments on Lck-deficient Jurkat cells show that Lck kinase is not involved in LPAP phosphorylation. Thus, LPAP is a dynamically phosphorylated protein, the function of which can be understood, when all phosphosites and kinases involved in its phosphorylation will be identified. PMID:26682052

  3. Production of C-reactive protein by human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuta, A.E.; Baum, L.L.

    1986-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute phase serum protein in humans; it is detectable at very high concentrations during infection and tissue trauma. This protein is a pentame composed of five identical, 21,500 MW subunits. CRP is detectable on the surface of approximately 4% of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). CRP binds its physiological ligands in a Ca/sup + +/ dependent manner; removal of Ca/sup + +/ does not alter the expression of CRP on the lymphocyte surface. Recently, investigators in this laboratory reported substantial inhibition of natural killer cell (NK) activity with anti-CRP antibodies. The following studies were undertaken to determine the origin of surface-CRP (S-CRP) found on normal PBL. Cells were incubated in methionine-free DMEM supplemented with /sup 35/S-methionine. Cells were lysed and subjected to immunoprecipitation with anti-CRP and Staphylococcus aureus; immunoprecipitates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Data presented here suggested that lymphocytes, in particular, LGL produce small amounts of CRP and express it on their surface. Lymphocytes do not appear to secrete CRP since no CRP could be detected in culture supernatants. In addition, preliminary evidence indicates that peripheral blood monocytes produce no detectable CRP. Present studies utilizing Northern blot analysis are underway in order to detect CRP-mRNA.

  4. MIF inhibition reverts the gene expression profile of human melanoma cell line-induced MDSCs to normal monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Waigel, Sabine; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth; Richie, Jamaal; Mitchell, Robert A.; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are potently immunosuppressive innate immune cells that accumulate in advanced cancer patients and actively inhibit anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses [1]. Increased numbers of circulating MDSCs directly correlate with melanoma patient morbidity and reduced anti-tumor immune responses [2], [3]. Previous studies have revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immune suppressive function of MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma [4], [5]. To investigate whether MIF participates in human melanoma-induced MDSC differentiation and/or suppressive function, we have established an in vitro MDSC induction model using primary, normal human monocytes co-cultured with human melanoma cell lines in the presence or absence of the MIF antagonist—4-IPP [4], [6], [7], [8], [9]. To identify potential mechanistic effectors, we have performed transcriptome analyses on cultured monocytes and on melanoma-induced MDSCs obtained from either untreated or 4-IPP-treated A375:monocyte co-cultures. Here, we present a detailed protocol, which can facilitate easy reproduction of the microarray results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE73333) published by Yaddanapudi et al. (2015) in Cancer Immunology Research [10].

  5. MIF inhibition reverts the gene expression profile of human melanoma cell line-induced MDSCs to normal monocytes.

    PubMed

    Waigel, Sabine; Rendon, Beatriz E; Lamont, Gwyneth; Richie, Jamaal; Mitchell, Robert A; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha

    2016-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are potently immunosuppressive innate immune cells that accumulate in advanced cancer patients and actively inhibit anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses [1]. Increased numbers of circulating MDSCs directly correlate with melanoma patient morbidity and reduced anti-tumor immune responses [2], [3]. Previous studies have revealed that monocyte-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is necessary for the immune suppressive function of MDSCs in mouse models of melanoma [4], [5]. To investigate whether MIF participates in human melanoma-induced MDSC differentiation and/or suppressive function, we have established an in vitro MDSC induction model using primary, normal human monocytes co-cultured with human melanoma cell lines in the presence or absence of the MIF antagonist-4-IPP [4], [6], [7], [8], [9]. To identify potential mechanistic effectors, we have performed transcriptome analyses on cultured monocytes and on melanoma-induced MDSCs obtained from either untreated or 4-IPP-treated A375:monocyte co-cultures. Here, we present a detailed protocol, which can facilitate easy reproduction of the microarray results (NCBI GEO accession number GSE73333) published by Yaddanapudi et al. (2015) in Cancer Immunology Research [10]. PMID:26981417

  6. Molecular analyses of in vivo hprt mutations in human T-lymphocytes: IV. Studies in newborns

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Nicklas, J.A.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to characterize in vivo gene mutations that occur during fetal development, molecular analyses were undertaken of mutant 6-thioguanine resistant T-lymphocytes isolated from placental cord blood samples of 13 normal male newborns. These mutant T-cells were studied to define hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene structural alterations and to determine T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns. Structural hprt alterations, as shown by Southern blot analyses, occurred in 85% of these mutant clones. These alterations consisted mostly of deletion of exons 2 and 3. These findings contrast with the 10-20% of gross structural alterations occurring randomly across the entire gene previously reported for T-cell mutants isolated from normal young adults. Iterative analyses of hprt structural alterations and TCR gene rearrangement patterns show that approximately one-third of the newborn derived mutants may have originated as pre- or intrathymic hprt mutations. This too contrasts with previous findings in adults where the background in vivo hprt mutations appeared to originate in postthymic T-lymphocytes.

  7. Immune surveillance of the lung by migrating tissue monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Poupel, Lucie; Loyher, Pierre-Louis; Hamon, Pauline; Licata, Fabrice; Pessel, Charlotte; Hume, David A; Combadière, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are phagocytic effector cells in the blood and precursors of resident and inflammatory tissue macrophages. The aim of the current study was to analyse and compare their contribution to innate immune surveillance of the lung in the steady state with macrophage and dendritic cells (DC). ECFP and EGFP transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r and Cx3cr1 distinguish monocytes from resident mononuclear phagocytes. We used these transgenes to study the migratory properties of monocytes and macrophages by functional imaging on explanted lungs. Migratory monocytes were found to be either patrolling within large vessels of the lung or locating at the interface between lung capillaries and alveoli. This spatial organisation gives to monocytes the property to capture fluorescent particles derived from both vascular and airway routes. We conclude that monocytes participate in steady-state surveillance of the lung, in a way that is complementary to resident macrophages and DC, without differentiating into macrophages. PMID:26167653

  8. Bendamustine + rituximab chemoimmunotherapy and maintenance lenalidomide in relapsed, refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma: A Wisconsin Oncology Network Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Julie E; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Eickhoff, Jens; Traynor, Anne M; Kirby-Slimp, Rachel; Volk, Lynn M; Werndli, Jae; Go, Ronald S; Weiss, Matthias; Blank, Jules; Kahl, Brad S

    2016-04-01

    Bendamustine + rituximab (BR) has demonstrated high response rates in relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). However, progression-free survival (PFS) after BR is <18 months. This study was designed to determine if maintenance lenalidomide after BR induction could improve PFS in R/R CLL/SLL. Thirty-four patients with R/R CLL/SLL who had received 1-5 prior chemotherapy regimens were treated with 6 cycles of BR induction. Patients achieving at least a minor response received twelve 28-d cycles of lenalidomide 5-10 mg/d. The primary endpoint was PFS. The median age was 67 years, with a median of 2 prior therapies. Eleven patients had confirmed presence of 17p and/or 11q deletions. Twenty-five (74%) completed 6 cycles of induction BR (response rate 56%). Nineteen (56%) patients received maintenance lenalidomide; only 6 patients completed the intended 12 cycles, highlighting the limited feasibility of lenalidomide in this setting, primarily due to haematological and infectious toxicities. The observed median PFS of 18·3 months is not significantly different from that of BR induction in R/R CLL/SLL without maintenance therapy (15·2 months). It is possible that lenalidomide maintenance may be more feasible and effective in the front-line setting, which is being tested in an ongoing trial (NCT01754857). PMID:26913697

  9. Lack of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: evidence for autoreactive T-cell dysfunction not correlated with phenotype, karyotype, or clinical status

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T.; Bloom, M.L.; Dadey, B.; Bennett, G.; Minowada, J.; Sandberg, A.A.; Ozer, H.

    1982-11-01

    In the present study, there was a complete lack of autologous MLR between responding T cells or T subsets and unirradiated or irradiated leukemic B cells or monocytes in all 20 patients with CLL, regardless of disease status, stage, phenotype, or karyotype of the disease. The stimulating capacity of unirradiated CLL B cells and CLL monocytes or irradiated CLL B cells was significantly depressed as compared to that of respective normal B cells and monocytes in allogeneic MLR. The responding capacity of CLL T cells was also variably lower than that of normal T cells against unirradiated or irradiated normal allogeneic B cells and monocytes. The depressed allogeneic MLR between CLL B cells or CLL monocytes and normal T cells described in the present study could be explained on the basis of a defect in the stimulating antigens of leukemic B cells or monocytes. The decreased allogeneic MLR of CLL T cells might simply be explained by a defect in the responsiveness of T lymphocytes from patients with CLL. However, these speculations do not adequately explain the complete lack of autologous MLR in these patients. When irradiated CLL B cells or irradiated CLL T cells were cocultured with normal T cells and irradiated normal B cells, it was found that there was no suppressor cell activity of CLL B cells or CLL T cells on normal autologous MLR. Our data suggest that the absence or dysfunction of autoreactive T cells within the Tnon-gamma subset account for the lack of autologous MLR in patients with CLL. The possible significance of the autologous MLR, its relationship to in vivo immunoregulatory mechanisms, and the possible role of breakdown of autoimmunoregulation in the oncogenic process of certain lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases in man are discussed.

  10. Novel function of C4a anaphylatoxin. Release from monocytes of protein which inhibits monocyte chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsubara, S.; Nagasawa, S.; Tanase, S.; Tanaka, J.; Takagi, K.; Kambara, T.

    1993-01-01

    The complement C4-derived anaphylatoxin, C4a, possesses a strong chemotaxis inhibitory capacity to blood monocytes at concentrations as low as 10(-16) mol/L. In our study, treatment with carboxypeptidase B to convert it to C4a des Arg77 decreased the inhibitory activity to less than 1/1,000. The extraordinary inhibitory capacity of C4a suggests the presence of an amplification mechanism in this inhibition. Indeed, we found that the conditioned media of peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocyte/macrophage lineage cell lines (U937 and THP-1 cells) preincubated with 10(-16) mol/L C4a for 5 minutes or more at 37 C possessed the inhibitory capacity 100,000-fold stronger than the original activity of C4a. The monocyte-derived chemotaxis inhibitory factor seemed monocyte-specific. This cell-derived factor was sensitive to treatment with trypsin and chymotrypsin and immunologically distinct from C4a. The apparent molecular size of the monocyte factor was estimated to be approximately 20 kd by gel filtration. These results indicate that C4a anaphylatoxin induces the release from monocytes of a protein with inhibitory activity for monocyte chemotaxis. PMID:8506953

  11. Decreased Splenic CD4+ T-Lymphocytes in Apolipoprotein M Gene Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhigang; Luo, Guanghua; Feng, Yuehua; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Hongyao; Liang, Yun; Liu, Zhonghua; Shao, Peng; Berggren-Söderlund, Maria; Zhang, Xiaoying; Xu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Spleen T-lymphocytes, especially CD4+ T-cells, have been demonstrated to be involved in broad immunomodulation and host-defense activity in vivo. Apolipoprotein M gene (apoM) may have an important role in the regulation of immunoprocess and inflammation, which could be hypothesized to the apoM containing sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). In the present study we demonstrate that the splenic CD4+ T-lymphocytes were obviously decreased in the apoM gene deficient (apoM−/−) mice compared to the wild type (apoM+/+). Moreover, these mice were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and it was found that even more pronounced decreasing CD4+ T-lymphocytes occurred in the spleen compared to the apoM+/+ mice. The similar phenomena were found in the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocytes. After administration of LPS, the hepatic mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were markedly increased; however, there were no statistical differences observed between apoM+/+ mice and apoM−/− mice. The present study demonstrated that apoM might facilitate the maintenance of CD4+ T-lymphocytes or could modify the T-lymphocytes subgroups in murine spleen, which may further explore the importance of apoM in the regulation of the host immunomodulation, although the detailed mechanism needs continuing investigation. PMID:26543853

  12. Induction of autophagy is essential for monocyte-macrophage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Morgan, Michael J.; Chen, Kun; Choksi, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes are programmed to undergo apoptosis in the absence of stimulation. Stimuli that promote monocyte-macrophage differentiation not only cause cellular changes, but also prevent the default apoptosis of monocytes. In the present study, we demonstrate that autophagy is induced when monocytes are triggered to differentiate and that the induction of autophagy is pivotal for the survival and differentiation of monocytes. We also show that inhibition of autophagy results in apoptosis of cells that are engaged in differentiation. We found that the differentiation signal releases Beclin1 from Bcl-2 by activating JNK and blocks Atg5 cleavage, both of which are critical for the induction of autophagy. Preventing autophagy induction hampers differentiation and cytokine production; therefore, autophagy is an important transition from monocyte apoptosis to differentiation. PMID:22223827

  13. Regulation of ICAM-1 in Cells of the Monocyte/Macrophage System in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M.; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.; Thiel, Cora S.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:25654110

  14. Regulation of ICAM-1 in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Katrin; Tauber, Svantje; Dumrese, Claudia; Bradacs, Gesine; Simmet, Dana M; Gölz, Nadine; Hauschild, Swantje; Raig, Christiane; Engeli, Stephanie; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Biskup, Josefine; Unverdorben, Felix; Rieder, Gabriela; Hofmänner, Daniel; Mutschler, Lisa; Krammer, Sonja; Buttron, Isabell; Philpot, Claudia; Huge, Andreas; Lier, Hartwin; Barz, Ines; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Thiel, Cora S; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are highly sensitive to altered gravity, and the monocyte as well as the macrophage function is proven to be impaired under microgravity conditions. In our study, we investigated the surface expression of ICAM-1 protein and expression of ICAM-1 mRNA in cells of the monocyte/macrophage system in microgravity during clinostat, parabolic flight, sounding rocket, and orbital experiments. In murine BV-2 microglial cells, we detected a downregulation of ICAM-1 expression in clinorotation experiments and a rapid and reversible downregulation in the microgravity phase of parabolic flight experiments. In contrast, ICAM-1 expression increased in macrophage-like differentiated human U937 cells during the microgravity phase of parabolic flights and in long-term microgravity provided by a 2D clinostat or during the orbital SIMBOX/Shenzhou-8 mission. In nondifferentiated U937 cells, no effect of microgravity on ICAM-1 expression could be observed during parabolic flight experiments. We conclude that disturbed immune function in microgravity could be a consequence of ICAM-1 modulation in the monocyte/macrophage system, which in turn could have a strong impact on the interaction with T lymphocytes and cell migration. Thus, ICAM-1 can be considered as a rapid-reacting and sustained gravity-regulated molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:25654110

  15. Endothelial cells from human umbilical vein inhibit generation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Lin; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Su, Yong-Feng; Huo, Si-Wei; Zhu, Heng; Wu, Ying; Mao, Ning; Zhang, Yi

    2011-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on dendritic cell (DC) development. First, HUVEC were isolated from human umbilical cord by collagenase digestion, and then the morphology, immunophenotypes and functions were identified. Furthermore, the HUVEC were cocultured with CD14(+) monocytes under the cytokine condition for detecting the influence of HUVEC on differentiation of CD14(+) cells to DC. The phenotype of dendritic cells derived from CD14(+) cells was analyzed by flow cytometry, the immunoregulatory function of DC was tested by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The change of IL-6 and VEGF as well as EPK and p38 signal pathway were analyzed by neutral antibody experiment and Western blot. The results showed that HUVEC isolated from human umbilical cord were characterized by spindle-shaped morphology, homogenous immunophenotypes (vWF(+)CD31(+)CD73(+)CD45(-)HLA-DR(-)CD86(-)CD34(low)), Dil-Ac-LDL incorporation ability and forming capillary-like structures. Following stimulation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plus interleukin-4 (IL-4), HUVEC cocultures could inhibit the initial differentiation of CD14(+) monocyte to DC. Interestingly, IL-6 and VEGF enhanced the suppression effect of HUVEC on generation of DC via activation of the ERK or p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. It is concluded that HUVEC are involved in DC development and can suppress the differentiation of monocyte to DC. PMID:21518513

  16. Defects in Mitochondrial Clearance Predispose Human Monocytes to Interleukin-1β Hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgh, Robert; Nijhuis, Lotte; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Compeer, Ewoud B.; Jongeneel, Lieneke H.; van Gijn, Marielle; Coffer, Paul J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Mastroberardino, Pier G.; Frenkel, Joost; Boes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Most hereditary periodic fever syndromes are mediated by deregulated IL-1β secretion. The generation of mature IL-1β requires two signals: one that induces synthesis of inflammasome components and substrates and a second that activates inflammasomes. The mechanisms that mediate autoinflammation in mevalonate kinase deficiency, a periodic fever disease characterized by a block in isoprenoid biosynthesis, are poorly understood. In studying the effects of isoprenoid shortage on IL-1 β generation, we identified a new inflammasome activation signal that originates from defects in autophagy. We find that hypersecretion of IL-1β and IL-18 requires reactive oxygen species and is associated with an oxidized redox status of monocytes but not lymphocytes. IL-1β hypersecretion by monocytes involves decreased mitochondrial stability, release of mitochondrial content into the cytosol and attenuated autophagosomal degradation. Defective autophagy, as established by ATG7 knockdown, results in prolonged cytosolic retention of damaged mitochondria and increased IL-1β secretion. Finally, activation of autophagy in healthy but not mevalonate kinase deficiency patient cells reduces IL-1β secretion. Together, these results indicate that defective autophagy can prime monocytes for mitochondria-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation, thereby contributing to hypersecretion of IL-1β in mevalonate kinase deficiency. PMID:24356959

  17. Modulation of TREM2 by CD33: a protein QTL study integrates Alzheimer loci in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gail; White, Charles C.; Winn, Phoebe A.; Cimpean, Maria; Replogle, Joseph M.; Glick, Laura R.; Cuerdon, Nicole E.; Ryan, Katie J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report results from a protein quantitative trait analysis in monocytes from 226 individuals to evaluate cross-talk between Alzheimer loci. We find that the NME8 locus influences PTK2B and that the CD33 risk allele leads to greater TREM2 expression. Further, we observe (1) a decreased TREM1/TREM2 ratio with a TREM1 risk allele, (2) decreased TREM2 expression with CD33 suppression, and (3) elevated cortical TREM2 mRNA expression with amyloid pathology. PMID:26414614

  18. Ebola Virus Exploits a Monocyte Differentiation Program To Promote Its Entry

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Osvaldo; Johnson, Joshua C.; Honko, Anna; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are critical targets of Ebola virus (EBOV) infection in vivo. However, the susceptibility of monocytes to infection is controversial. Studies indicate productive monocyte infection, and yet monocytes are also reported to be resistant to EBOV GP-mediated entry. In contrast, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells are permissive for both EBOV entry and replication. Here, freshly isolated monocytes are demonstrated to indeed be refractory to EBOV entry. However, EBOV binds monocytes, and delayed entry occurs during monocyte differentiation. Cultured monocytes spontaneously downregulate the expression of viral entry restriction factors such as interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins, while upregulating the expression of critical EBOV entry factors cathepsin B and NPC1. Moreover, these processes are accelerated by EBOV infection. Finally, ectopic expression of NPC1 is sufficient to rescue entry into an undifferentiated, normally nonpermissive monocytic cell line. These results define the molecular basis for infection of APCs and suggest means to limit APC infection. PMID:23345511

  19. Results of a phase 1 study utilizing monocyte-derived dendritic cells pulsed with tumor RNA in children and young adults with brain cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Denise A.; Orme, Lisa M.; Neale, Alana M.; Radcliff, Fiona J.; Amor, Gerlinda M.; Maixner, Wirginia; Downie, Peter; Hassall, Timothy E.; Tang, Mimi L.K.; Ashley, David M.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a phase 1 study of 9 pediatric patients with recurrent brain tumors using monocyte-derived dendritic cells pulsed with tumor RNA to produce antitumor vaccine (DCRNA) preparations. The objectives of this study included (1) establishing safety and feasibility and (2) measuring changes in general, antigen-specific, and tumor-specific immune responses after DCRNA. Dendritic cells were derived from freshly isolated monocytes after 7 days of culture with IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor, pulsed with autologous tumor RNA, and then cryopreserved. Patients received at least 3 vaccines, each consisting of an intravenous and an intra-dermal administration at biweekly intervals. The study showed that this method for producing and administering DCRNA from a single leukapheresis product was both feasible and safe in this pediatric brain tumor population. Immune function at the time of enrollment into the study was impaired in all patients tested. While humoral responses to recall antigens (diphtheria and tetanus) were intact in all patients, cellular responses to mitogen and recall antigens were below normal. Following DCRNA vaccine, 2 of 7 patients showed stable clinical disease and 1 of 7 showed a partial response. Two of 7 patients who were tested showed a tumor-specific immune response to DCRNA. This study showed that DCRNA vaccines are both safe and feasible in children with tumors of the central nervous system with a single leukapheresis. PMID:15279716

  20. Sex Differences in Monocyte Activation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Lumin; Lang, Ren; Li, Zihai; Gilkeson, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction TLR7/8 and TLR9 signaling pathways have been extensively studied in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as possible mediators of disease. Monocytes are a major source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are understudied in SLE. In the current project, we investigated sex differences in monocyte activation and its implications in SLE disease pathogenesis. Methods Human blood samples from 27 healthy male controls, 32 healthy female controls, and 25 female patients with SLE matched for age and race were studied. Monocyte activation was tested by flow cytometry and ELISA, including subset proportions, CD14, CD80 and CD86 expression, the percentage of IL-6-producing monocytes, plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-6, and urine levels of creatinine. Results Monocytes were significantly more activated in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls in vivo. We observed increased proportions of non-classic monocytes, decreased proportions of classic monocytes, elevated levels of plasma sCD14 as well as reduced surface expression of CD14 on monocytes comparing women to men and lupus patients to controls. Plasma levels of IL-6 were positively related to sCD14 and serum creatinine. Conclusion Monocyte activation and TLR4 responsiveness are altered in women compared to men and in patients with SLE compared to controls. These sex differences may allow persistent systemic inflammation and resultant enhanced SLE susceptibility. PMID:25485543

  1. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the bowel in primary hypogammaglobulinaemia: study of in vivo and in vitro lymphocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A D; Kenwright, S; Ballard, J; Shiner, M; Slavin, G; Levi, A J; Loewi, G; Asherson, G L

    1977-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo lymphocyte function was studied in six patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia (NLH) of the bowel. Lymphocyte transformation, numbers of circulating T and B lymphocytes, and delayed hypersensitivity skin tests did not significantly differ when compared with hypogammaglobulinaemic patients without NLH. However, patients with NLH had higher jejunal juice IgM concentrations and a tendency to higher serum IgM concentrations than those without NLH. The morphological features of NLH are similar to the germinal centres of lymph nodes but more closely resemble the follicle zone of Peyer's patches. These findings suggest that NLH represents a local immune response to antigens originating in the gut lumen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3(a)-3(b) Fig. 3(c) Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:873321

  2. A dose escalation feasibility study of lenalidomide for treatment of symptomatic, relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Kami; Ruppert, Amy S; Browning, Rebekah; Jones, Jeffrey; Flynn, Joseph; Kefauver, Cheryl; Gao, Yue; Jiang, Yao; Rozewski, Darlene M; Poi, Ming; Phelps, Mitch A; Harper, Erica; Johnson, Amy J; Byrd, John C; Andritsos, Leslie A

    2014-09-01

    Adequate dosing of lenalidomide in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) remains unclear. This study determined maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in relapsed CLL patients (Cohort A) and patients achieving a partial response (PR) or better to recent therapy (Cohort B). Thirty-seven patients were enrolled. MTD was 2.5mg followed by 5.0mg continuous. In Cohort A, tumor flare grade 1-2 occurred in 15 patients (50%) and grade 3 in 1 patient (3%). Cohort A had 19 of 23 evaluable (83%) patients, 4 PR (17%) and 15 (65%) stable disease (SD), Cohort B had 6 of 7 patients (86%) with SD. Despite overall response rate not being high, many patients remained on therapy several months with SD. PMID:25082342

  3. Studies on mouse auto-reactive cells. II. Cytotoxicity exerted by mouse lymphocytes against syngeneic erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Charreire, J; Bach, J F

    1982-07-01

    In mice, an in vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity is directed towards syngeneic erythrocytes used as targets. This phenomenon occurs in lymphoid organs of normal, non-immunized mice. Its intensity is greater in the thymus than in spleen or lymph nodes. The study of the nature of the cell responsible for this spontaneous syngeneic cytotoxicity ruled out the role of macrophages. The involvement of T cells in this phenomenon is assessed by its disappearance after the lymphoid cells had been treated with anti-theta serum plus complement, by its disappearance from lymphoid organs of mice previously treated by hydrocortisone, and by its decrease in the presence of synthetic thymic factor. Moreover, spontaneous syngeneic cytotoxicity is lost when lymphoid cells are depleted at autologous rosettes by centrifugation on a Ficoll-Hypaque gradient after rosette formation. Cytotoxic lymphocytes might belong to the population of auto-rosettes previously characterized as a population of immature T cells. PMID:6981840

  4. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. Therapeutic depletion of monocyte-derived cells protects from long-term axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Monica A; Burns, Travis; Yao, Pamela; Miers, Laird; Pleasure, David; Soulika, Athena M

    2016-01-15

    Studies in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) suggest that peripheral monocyte-derived cells (MDCs) are instrumental for disease initiation. MDCs, however, are plastic, and may exert various functions once in the central nervous system (CNS) for prolonged periods. Furthermore, the long-term effect of MDC depletion on continuing axon loss is not known. We show that long-lasting depletion of MDCs, after onset of EAE clinical deficits, is accompanied by decreased CNS infiltration by pathogenic T lymphocytes. Although this treatment does not reverse clinical disease, it prevents worsening of neurological deficits and long-term axonal loss. PMID:26711567

  6. Increased monocyte tissue factor expression in coronary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Leatham, E. W.; Bath, P. M.; Tooze, J. A.; Camm, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether monocyte expression of tissue factor is increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes and chronic stable angina. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of monocyte tissue factor expression in patients with ischaemic heart disease and control subjects. BACKGROUND--Unstable angina and myocardial infarction are associated with enhanced mononuclear cell procoagulant activity. Procoagulant activity of blood monocytes is principally mediated by tissue factor expression. Tissue factor initiates the coagulation cascade and monocyte tissue factor expression may therefore be increased in these syndromes. METHODS--Monocyte tissue factor expression was measured cytometrically in whole blood flow using a polyclonal rabbit antihuman tissue factor antibody. PATIENTS--30 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 17 with unstable angina, 13 with chronic stable angina, and 11 normal control subjects. RESULTS--Increased proportions of monocytes expressing tissue factor (> 2.5%) were found in none of 11 (0%) normal subjects, five 13 (38%) patients with stable angina, 11 of 17 (64%) patients with unstable angina, and 16 of 30 (53%) patients with myocardial infarction (2P = 0.006). Blood from all subjects showed similar monocyte tissue factor expression similar monocyte tissue factor expression (46.1 (15.1)%) after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. CONCLUSION--Hypercoagulability associated with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and chronic stable angina may be induced by tissue factor expressed on circulating monocytes. PMID:7888247

  7. A longitudinal study of in vitro tests for lymphocyte function in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Percy, John S.; Davis, Paul; Russell, Anthony S.; Brisson, Estelle

    1978-01-01

    In vitro tests of lymphocyte function have been performed in 61 patients with `classical' or `definite' rheumatoid arthritis. In vitro lymphocyte function was assessed by lymphocyte transformation responses to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), Pokeweed mitogen (PWM), Candida antigen, and herpes simplex type I (HSV1). Follow up data were available after 6 months of treatment in 32 of these patients. Spontaneous lymphocyte transformation was assessed in all patients. Results obtained in patients with rheumatoid arthiritis were compared to those seen in a normal control population. Disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was assessed using standard clinical methods. Lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed a similar degree of spontaneous transformation to that seen in normal subjects. In contrast, lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis responded less well to PHA and Candida and HSV1 antigens when compared to normal patients. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the response to PWM was markedly enhanced compared to normals. Clinical improvement was noted in 19 of the 32 patients seen at follow up, all of whom had received gold or penicillamine therapy. The abnormal responses of PHA and PWM seen before treatment became normal in those patients who improved clinically. The responses to Candida and HSV1 antigens not only returned to normal following treatment but were increased above those seen in normal controls. A statistically significant association was seen between clinical improvement and improvement of in vitro tests of lymphocyte function. PMID:214047

  8. A longitudinal study of in vitro tests for lymphocyte function in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Percy, J S; Davis, P; Russell, A S; Brisson, E

    1978-10-01

    In vitro tests of lymphocyte function have been performed in 61 patients with ;classical' or ;definite' rheumatoid arthritis. In vitro lymphocyte function was assessed by lymphocyte transformation responses to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), Pokeweed mitogen (PWM), Candida antigen, and herpes simplex type I (HSV1). Follow up data were available after 6 months of treatment in 32 of these patients. Spontaneous lymphocyte transformation was assessed in all patients. Results obtained in patients with rheumatoid arthiritis were compared to those seen in a normal control population. Disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was assessed using standard clinical methods. Lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed a similar degree of spontaneous transformation to that seen in normal subjects. In contrast, lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis responded less well to PHA and Candida and HSV1 antigens when compared to normal patients. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis the response to PWM was markedly enhanced compared to normals. Clinical improvement was noted in 19 of the 32 patients seen at follow up, all of whom had received gold or penicillamine therapy. The abnormal responses of PHA and PWM seen before treatment became normal in those patients who improved clinically. The responses to Candida and HSV1 antigens not only returned to normal following treatment but were increased above those seen in normal controls. A statistically significant association was seen between clinical improvement and improvement of in vitro tests of lymphocyte function. PMID:214047

  9. Prognostic Significance of Retroperitoneal Lymphadenectomy, Preoperative Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet Lymphocyte Ratio in Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Gungorduk, Kemal; Ertas, Ibrahim E.; Ozdemir, Aykut; Akkaya, Emrah; Telli, Elcin; Taskin, Salih; Gokcu, Mehmet; Guzel, Ahmet Baris; Oge, Tufan; Akman, Levent; Toptas, Tayfun; Solmaz, Ulas; Dogan, Askın; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Sanci, Muzaffer; Ozsaran, Aydin; Simsek, Tayyup; Vardar, Mehmet Ali; Yalcin, Omer Tarik; Ozalp, Sinan; Yildirim, Yusuf; Ortac, Firat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic role of preoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the need for para-aortic lymphadectomy in patients with primary fallopian tube carcinoma (PFTC). Materials and Methods Ninety-one patients with a diagnosis of PFTC were identified through the gynecologic oncology service database of six academic centers. Clinicopathological, surgical, and complete blood count data were collected. Results In univariate analysis, advanced stage, suboptimal surgery, and NLR > 2.7 were significant prognostic factors for progression-free survival, whereas in multivariate analysis, only advanced stage and suboptimal surgery were significant. In addition, in univariate analysis, cancer antigen 125 ≥ 35 U/mL, ascites, advanced stage, suboptimal surgery, NLR > 2.7, PLR > 233.3, platelet count ≥ 400,000 cells/mm3, staging type, and histological subtype were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (OS); however, in multivariate analysis, only advanced stage, suboptimal surgery, NLR > 2.7, and staging type were significant. Inclusion of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy in surgery showed significant association with longer OS, with a mean and median OS of 42.0 months and 35.5 months (range, 22 to 78 months), respectively, vs. 33.5 months and 27.5 months (range, 14 to 76 months), respectively, for patients who underwent surgery without para-aortic lymphadenectomy (hazard ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 5.7; p=0.002). Conclusion NLR (in both univariate and multivariate analysis) and PLR (only in univariate analysis) were prognostic factors in PFTC. NLR and PLR are inexpensive and easy tests to perform. In addition, patients with PFTC who underwent bilateral pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy had longer OS. PMID:25622588

  10. Elevated HMGB1-related interleukin-6 is associated with dynamic responses of monocytes in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Lin, Dong-Zi; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Liu, Gan-Bin; Kong, Bin; Gao, Yu-Chi; Lu, Yuan-Bin; Wu, Xian-Jing; Yi, Lai-Long; Zhong, Ji-Xin; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2015-01-01

    There were limited studies assessing the role of HMGB1 in TB infection. In this prospective study, we aimed to assess the levels of HMGB1 in plasma or sputum from active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) patients positive for Mtb culture test, and to evaluate its relationship with inflammatory cytokines and innate immune cells. A total of 36 sputum Mtb culture positive APTB patients and 32 healthy volunteers (HV) were included. Differentiated THP-1 cells were treated for 6, 12 and 24 hrs with BCG at a multiplicity of infection of 10. The absolute values and percentages of white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes were detected by an automatic blood analyzer. Levels of HMGB1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α in plasma, sputum, or cell culture supernatant were measured by ELISA. The blood levels of HMGB1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, the absolute values of WBC, monocytes and neutrophils, and the percentage of monocytes were significant higher in APTB patients than those in HV groups (P<0.05). The sputum levels of HMGB1, IL-10, and TNF-α were also significantly higher in APTB patients than those in HV groups (P<0.05). Meanwhile, plasma level of HMGB1, IL-6, and IL-10 in APTB patients were positively correlated with those in sputum (P<0.05), respectively. IL-6 was positively correlated with HMGB1 both in plasma and sputum of APTB patients (P<0.05). HMGB1 and IL-6 is positively correlated with the absolute number of monocytes in APTB patients (P<0.05). BCG induced HMGB1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α production effectively in PMA-treated THP-1 cells. HMGB1 may be used as an attractive biomarker for APTB diagnosis and prognosis and may reflect the inflammatory status of monocytes in patients with APTB. PMID:25973018

  11. Histiocytic differentiation in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yong-Xin; Dong, Shu-Xu; Zhao, Shi-Xuan; Liang, Hao-Yue; Wang, Hui-Jun; Hu, Xiao; Mi, Ying-Chang; Wang, Jian-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid histocytes of dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), and macrophages in varied tissues, as leukemic blasts in acute monoblastic and monocytic leukemia (AML-M5a and M5b), are derived from monocyte progenitors in bone marrow. Based on DC induction from hematopoietic stem cells, myeloid progenitors, and monocytes, and occasional expressions of histocyte-related antigens (HRAs) in M5, we presume some M5 cases share histiocytic phenotypes originally. To clarify the conception, 93 M5 cases were tested with antibodies for HRAs, CD1a, CD163, S100, fascin, and langerin by immunostaining, and their morphologic characteristics were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. The study revealed that 23 M5 cases were positive for two or more kinds of HRAs and shared a serial of histocytic immunophenotype and morphologic features, which were closely associated with M5b subtype and expression of CD14 in M5. PMID:26771450

  12. Changes in monocyte functions of astronauts.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indreshpal; Simons, Elizabeth R; Castro, Victoria A; Ott, C Mark; Pierson, Duane L

    2005-11-01

    As part of the systematic evaluation of the innate immune system for long duration missions, this study focused on the antimicrobial functions of monocytes in astronauts participating in spaceflight. The study included four space shuttle missions and 25 astronauts. Nine non-astronauts served as controls. Blood specimens were collected 10 days before launch, within 3h after landing, and again 3 days after landing. The number of monocytes did not differ significantly over the interval sampled in both the astronaut or control groups. However, following 5-11 days of spaceflight, the astronauts' monocytes exhibited reductions in ability to engulf Escherichia coli, elicit an oxidative burst, and degranulate. The phagocytic index was significantly reduced following spaceflight when compared to control values. This reduction in phagocytosis was accompanied by changes in the expression of two surface markers involved in phagocytosis, CD32 and CD64. Levels of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine after spaceflight did not increase over preflight values. PMID:15908177

  13. Upregulation of Monocyte Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor during Human Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Pascale E. P.; ten Hove, Tessa; te Velde, Anje A.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; van der Poll, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) (CD87) plays an important role in leukocyte adhesion and migration. To assess the effect of endotoxin on cellular uPAR, uPAR expression was determined on leukocytes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in seven healthy subjects following intravenous injection of endotoxin (lot G; 4 ng/kg). Endotoxin induced a transient increase in uPAR expression on monocytes, reaching a 92% ± 46% increase over baseline expression after 6 h (P < 0.05). Endotoxin did not influence uPAR expression on granulocytes, while uPAR remained undetectable on lymphocytes. Endotoxin also increased soluble uPAR levels in plasma (P < 0.05). Stimulation of human whole blood with endotoxin or gram-positive stimuli in vitro also resulted in an upregulation of monocyte uPAR expression. Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) upregulated monocyte uPAR expression, anti-TNF did not influence the endotoxin-induced increase in monocyte uPAR expression. These data suggest that infectious stimuli may influence monocyte function in vivo by enhancing the expression of uPAR. PMID:10722614

  14. Pivotal Role for CD16+ Monocytes in Immune Surveillance of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Waschbisch, Anne; Schrder, Sina; Schraudner, Dana; Sammet, Laura; Weksler, Babette; Melms, Arthur; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Stadelmann, Christine; Schwab, Stefan; Linker, Ralf A

    2016-02-15

    Monocytes represent a heterogeneous population of primary immune effector cells. At least three different subsets can be distinguished based on expression of the low-affinity Fc?RIII: CD14(++)CD16 -: classical monocytes, CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes, and CD14(+)CD16 ++: non-classical monocytes. Whereas CD16 -: classical monocytes are considered key players in multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known on CD16(+) monocytes and how they contribute to the disease. In this study, we examined the frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and brain biopsy material derived from MS patients and controls. Furthermore, we addressed a possible monocyte dysfunction in MS and analyzed migratory properties of monocyte subsets using human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Our ex vivo studies demonstrated that CD16(+) monocyte subpopulations are functional but numerically reduced in the peripheral blood of MS patients. CD16(+) monocytes with an intermediate-like phenotype were found to be enriched in CSF and dominated the CSF monocyte population under noninflammatory conditions. In contrast, an inversed CD16(+) to CD16 -: CSF monocyte ratio was observed in MS patients with relapsing-remitting disease. Newly infiltrating, hematogenous CD16(+) monocytes were detected in a perivascular location within active MS lesions, and CD16(+) monocytes facilitated CD4(+) T cell trafficking in a blood -: brain barrier model. Our findings support an important role of CD16(+) monocytes in the steady-state immune surveillance of the CNS and suggest that CD16(+) monocytes shift to sites of inflammation and contribute to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:26746191

  15. Mycobacterium leprae upregulates IRGM expression in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Degang; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Linglin; Cha, Zhanshan; Han, Song; Shi, Weiwei; Ding, Ru; Ma, Lan; Xiao, Hong; Shi, Chao; Jing, Zhichun; Song, Ningjing

    2014-08-01

    Leprosy is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium leprae, which evokes a strong inflammatory response and leads to nerve damage. Immunity-related GTPase family M protein (IRGM) plays critical roles in controlling inflammation. The objective of the study was to investigate whether IRGM is involved in the infection of M. leprae. Levels of IRGM were assessed in M. leprae-infected CD4(+) T cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Data revealed that both protein and mRNA levels of IRGM were increased in monocytes after M. leprae infection. Interestingly, monocyte-derived macrophages showed more prominent IRGM expression with M. leprae infection, whereas the bacteria did not affect IRGM in CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we assessed levels of IRGM in CD4(+) T cells and monocytes from 78 leprosy patients and 40 healthy controls, and observed upregulated protein level of IRGM in the monocytes from leprosy patients. Also, IRGM expression was inversely correlated with the severity of the disease. These findings suggested a close involvement of IRGM in M. leprae infection and indicated a potential mechanism of defending M. leprae infection. PMID:24469081

  16. Electron microscopic study of lymphocytes in a freshwater teleost (Pimelodus maculatus) epidermis.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S

    1983-01-01

    Small lymphocytes were identified in a freshwater teleost (Pimelodus maculatus) epidermis at the ultrastructural level. Although they were the most abundant, the medium and the large lymphocytes were also present. They were found at all levels of the epidermis, specially in small spaces between the cells of the basal layer. They appeared in contact only with filament-containing cells. Intercellular junctions, however, were never observed. They were negative to the histochemical test used to detect the present of acid phosphatase. PMID:6650847

  17. The influence of aminophylline on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes: an AFM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xun; He, Jiexiang; Liu, Mingxian; Zhou, Changren

    2014-09-01

    Although much progress has been made in the illustration of the mechanism of aminophylline (AM) treating asthma, there is no data about its effect on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes. Here, we presented atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based investigations at the nanoscale level to address the above fundamental biophysical questions. As increasing AM treatment time, T lymphocytes' volume nearly double increased and then decreased. The changes of nanostructural features of the cell membrane, i.e., mean height of particles, root-mean-square roughness (Rq), crack and fragment appearance, increased with AM treatment time. T lymphocytes were completely destroyed with 96-h treatment, and they existed in the form of small fragments. Analysis of force-distance curves showed that the adhesion force of cell surface decreased significantly with the increase of AM treatment time, while the cell stiffness increased firstly and then decreased. These changes were closely correlated to the characteristics and process of cell oncosis. In total, these quantitative and qualitative changes of T lymphocytes' structure and nanomechanical properties suggested that AM could induce T lymphocyte oncosis to exert anti-inflammatory effects for treating asthma. These findings provide new insights into the T lymphocyte oncosis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism and immune regulation actions of AM.

  18. The influence of aminophylline on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes: an AFM study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the illustration of the mechanism of aminophylline (AM) treating asthma, there is no data about its effect on the nanostructure and nanomechanics of T lymphocytes. Here, we presented atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based investigations at the nanoscale level to address the above fundamental biophysical questions. As increasing AM treatment time, T lymphocytes' volume nearly double increased and then decreased. The changes of nanostructural features of the cell membrane, i.e., mean height of particles, root-mean-square roughness (Rq), crack and fragment appearance, increased with AM treatment time. T lymphocytes were completely destroyed with 96-h treatment, and they existed in the form of small fragments. Analysis of force-distance curves showed that the adhesion force of cell surface decreased significantly with the increase of AM treatment time, while the cell stiffness increased firstly and then decreased. These changes were closely correlated to the characteristics and process of cell oncosis. In total, these quantitative and qualitative changes of T lymphocytes' structure and nanomechanical properties suggested that AM could induce T lymphocyte oncosis to exert anti-inflammatory effects for treating asthma. These findings provide new insights into the T lymphocyte oncosis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism and immune regulation actions of AM. PMID:25258618

  19. Study on the cytogenetic changes induced by benzene and hydroquinone in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, D; Jiaxing, W; Chunhui, H; Weiyi, P; Xiaomin, W

    2012-04-01

    Benzene (BN) is a prototypical hematotoxicant, genotoxic carcinogen, and ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Although the molecular mechanisms of BN-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxic damage are poorly understood in humans, previous studies suggested that bioactivated BN metabolites are capable of oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA damage. The objective of the current study was to investigate the BN-induced cytogenetic changes and underlying mechanisms based on these hypotheses. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) might be the targets for BN-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, and therefore DNA damage responses of PBLs after exposure to different concentrations of BN (0.25, 3.5, 50 μmol/L) or BN metabolite, hydroquinone (HQ; 50, 150, 450 μmol/L) were studied in vitro. Microculture tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein-diacetate assay, comet assay, micronuclei assay, and attenuated total reflectance microspectroscope were chosen for this study. Based on the results, we reached the conclusion that different concentrations of BN or HQ significantly inhibited cell growth, induced the arrest of S phase and G2/M phase, and increased late apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, evidence was also provided to support the conclusion that BN and HQ induced DNA strand breaks and chromosomal mutations in PBL, which indicated the genotoxicity of BN and HQ. Current evidence has indicated that multiple mechanisms including dysfunction of cell cycle, programmed cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA lesions are likely to contribute to BN-induced cytogenetic changes. PMID:22297702

  20. Automated image analysis in the study of lymphocyte subpopulation in eosinophilic oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by the presence of eosinophils in oesophageal mucosa. Other inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and mast cells may also play an important role in this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the inflammatory pattern of the mucosa between EoE and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), using automatic image analysis in digital slides, and to assess treatment response after elimination diet and food challenge test. Methods From 2010 to 2013, 35 oesophageal biopsies from EoE and GERD patients were randomly selected. In six EoE biopsies, patients had been treated with selective food exclusion diet. Immunohistochemical study with CD3, CD20, CD4, and CD8 for lymphocyte populations, CD1a for dendritic cells, and CD117/c-kit for mast cells was performed. Slides were scanned using Leica Aperio Scanscope XT with 40× magnification. Immunohistochemical expression was quantified in 245 immunohistochemistry digital slides with Leica Aperio positive pixel count algorithm using two different approaches: whole slide analysis versus selection of a 2 mm2 hot spot area. Results Average eosinophil cell count was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the first biopsy of EoE patients before treatment (30.75 eosinophils per high power field - HPF) than in GERD patients (0.85 eosinophils/HPF) or in EoE patients after treatment with elimination diet (1.60 eosinophils/HPF). In the immunohistochemical study, manual count and automatic image analysis showed a significant increase in the number of CD3 and CD8 cells in EoE patients, compared with GERD patients. However, the increase of CD117/c-kit was only statistically significant when manual counting procedures were used. CD20 positive cell count also showed a non-statistically significant tendency to reduce after elimination diet treatment. Manual eosinophil count correlated much better with CD3 and CD8 count using hot spot approach than with a whole slide approach. Conclusions Positive pixel count algorithm can be a useful tool to quantify the immunohistochemical expression of inflammatory cells in the diagnosis and follow up of eosinophilic oesophagitis. PMID:25565117

  1. [Alterations in populations of T-lymphocytes in the rats blood during experimental preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Sharashenidze, A; Kikalishvili, L; Sanikidze, T

    2015-04-01

    Immune tolerance to the fetus is predetermined mainly by HLA-G expression in trophoblasts, varying the ratio of Th1 / Th2, decrease in the content of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells (NK cells) and fusion "tread" of antibodies. The aim of the study was to establish the role of the placental hypoxia in regulation of expression of -lymphocytes populations in the blood of rats at different stages of pregnancy. For the purpose of modeling of PE in pregnant rats, at10-th day of gestation the lumen of the abdominal aorta below the renal artery was narrowed by the silk thread a third of its diameter (0.2 mm). In blood serum was defined the relative content of leukocyte subpopulations by indirect immunofluorescence in cytotoxic assay using monoclonal antibodies to CD4, CD8, CD14, CD16 leukocytes (ICN Pharmaceutical, USA). The study found that in the blood of animals of control group (phisiological pregnancy) within the 2nd 3rd trimester of gestation of CD4, CD8 subpopulations of lymphocytes did not change. The animals of the experimental group (pregnancy complicated by placental hypoxia) content of CD8 subpopulations and CD16 (NK cells) in the blood did not change significantly compared with those in the blood of animals in the control group, whereas CD4 T cell subpopulation in the second and in the third trimester statistical significantly decreased compared with those in control group (p<0.001). The ratio of immunoregulatory subpopulations lymphocytes CD4/CD8 decreased, number of CD14 (monocytes) phenotypes leukocytes increased. It is concluded that the placental hypoxia promotes disorder of the regulation of the immune balance of the mother's body during pregnancy, which is manifested in decrease ratio immunoregulatory subpopulations of lymphocyte, increasing the intensity of local expression of monocytes. PMID:25953947

  2. The invention of lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lamprey and hagfish are surviving representatives of the most ancient vertebrates. They possess adaptive immune systems based on a vast, somatically diversified repertoire of lymphocyte-bound antigen receptors. Despite these similarities to antibody and T cell receptors (TCR) of later vertebrates, the variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) are not related to the immunoglobulin (Ig)-superfamily of genes; and instead of V(D)J recombination VLR are somatically assembled by a gene conversion process. However, recent studies have revealed two lamprey lymphocyte subsets so closely resembling B cells and T cells that separate lymphocyte lineages must have already existed in the ancestral vertebrate, before Ig/TCR emergence. VLR and Ig/TCR arose independently, but the convergent evolution they display actually reflects their selection in cells with specialized functions. PMID:21227671

  3. Study of response of thymic and submaxillary lymph node lymphocytes to administration of lead by different routes.

    PubMed

    Teijón, César; Blanco, María Dolores; Romero, Carlos Santiago; Beneit, Juan Vicente; Villarino, Antonio Luis; Guerrero, Sandra; Olmo, Rosa

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have reported that heavy metals are not only toxic for the organism but they may modulate immune responses. In the current study, the effect of 4-week administration of 200 ppm of PbAc(2), using different routes of administration (orally and intraperitoneal injection), on lymphatic organs was evaluated. In the thymus, the number of lymphocyte cells and the cellularity diminished significantly for both routes of treatment. Regarding the submaxillary lymph nodes, no significant variations took place. Cell-mediated immune response is commonly evaluated by cell proliferation assays. Mitogens are known to induce a vigorous proliferative response in lymphoid cells from mammals. An increase in the proliferation of T lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A and the proliferation of B lymphocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharides was found in thymus for both routes of administration, whereas in the lymph nodes, there was a decrease in proliferation of T lymphocytes. Furthermore, lead administration by intraperitoneal route caused an effect on B and T lymphocyte subpopulations. Thus, there was an increase in B+ cells and a decrease in T+ cells. Regarding CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, there were only variations, concretely a drop in both subpopulations, in lymph nodes when lead was administered intraperitoneally. It is important to emphasize that an increase in apoptosis was found in this tissue. At the histological level, evident alterations were described in thymus both for the oral and for the intraperitoneal route. Therefore, it is possible to show that lead administered by both routes generated effects on an immunological level. PMID:19756406

  4. Serial characterisation of monocyte and neutrophil function after lung resection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard O; Brittan, Mairi; Anderson, Niall H; Conway Morris, Andrew; Murchison, John T; Walker, William S; Simpson, A John

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this prospective study was to perform a comprehensive serial characterisation of monocyte and neutrophil function, circulating monocyte subsets, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid after lung resection. A secondary aim was to perform a pilot, hypothesis-generating evaluation of whether innate immune parameters were associated with postoperative pneumonia. Methods Forty patients undergoing lung resection were studied in detail. Blood monocytes and neutrophils were isolated preoperatively and at 6, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. BAL was performed preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. Monocyte subsets, monocyte responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophil phagocytic capacity were quantified at all time points. Differential cell count, protein and cytokine concentrations were measured in BAL. Pneumonia evaluation at 72 h was assessed using predefined criteria. Results After surgery, circulating subsets of classical and intermediate monocytes increased significantly. LPS-induced release of proinflammatory cytokines from monocytes increased significantly and by 48 h a more proinflammatory profile was found. Neutrophil phagocytosis demonstrated a small but significant fall. Factors associated with postoperative pneumonia were: increased release of specific proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines from monocytes; preoperative neutrophilia; and preoperative BAL cell count. Conclusions We conclude that postoperative lung inflammation is associated with specific changes in the cellular innate immune response, a better understanding of which may improve patient selection and prediction of complications in the future. PMID:25478189

  5. Bloodstream infections in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a longitudinal single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Björkholm, Magnus; Källman, Owe; Giske, Christian G; Weibull, Caroline E; Löve, Thorvardur J; Landgren, Ola; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y

    2016-05-01

    Infectious complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate temporal trends in bloodstream infections (BSIs) among patients with CLL. Individuals with blood cultures were linked to Swedish Cancer Registry and divided into three time periods (1988-1993, 1994-1999, and 2000-2006) according to year of CLL diagnosis. CLL patients (n = 275) with 1092 blood culture episodes were identified and linked to the nationwide Cause of Death Registry and Swedish Patient Registry (to retrieve information on splenectomies). The most common causes of BSI among CLL patients were Escherichia coli (11/43, 15/78, and 9/33), Streptococcus pneumoniae (7/43, 13/78, and 6/33), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/43, 8/78, and 3/33), Staphylococcus aureus (1/43, 6/78, and 6/33), and Viridans streptococci (5/43, 6/78, and 2/33). Coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most frequent microorganism found in blood cultures (22/70, 23/106, and 5/41, respectively) but is a frequent contaminant. Based on the largest study to date on BSI in CLL patients, we found a stable proportion of Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria and no temporal change of distribution was observed for BSIs 1988-2006. PMID:26976017

  6. Prognostic Significance of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Patients with Sepsis: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Shen, Yong; Wang, Hairong; Ge, Qinmin; Fei, Aihua; Pan, Shuming

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an easily accessible biological marker that has been reported to represent disease severity. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between NLR and mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods. A total of 333 consecutive adult patients with sepsis were screened for eligibility in this prospective, observational study cohort. Severity scores and leukocyte counts were prospectively recorded upon entry to the intensive care unit (ICU). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and binary logistic regression models were used to assess the performance of NLR in predicting unfavorable outcome. Correlations between variables and disease severity were analyzed through Spearman correlation tests. Results. Median NLR levels were significantly higher in patients who died than in survivors. NLR had a modest power for predicting poor outcome as suggested by area under the curve (AUC) of 0.695 ± 0.036. Multivariate linear regression indicated that increased NLR levels were related to unfavorable outcome independently of the effect of possible confounders. Spearman correlation tests showed that there was a positive correlation between NLR levels and disease severity. Conclusions. Increased NLR levels were independently associated with unfavorable clinical prognosis in patients with sepsis. Further investigation is required to increase understanding of the pathophysiology of this relationship. PMID:27110067

  7. Fluctuations in the affinity and concentration of insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients: effects of starvation, refeeding, and dieting.

    PubMed Central

    Bar, R S; Gorden, P; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; De Meyts, P

    1976-01-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients and normal volunteers has been determined under various dietary states. In the basal, fed state the monocytes of obese patients with clinical insulin resistance (n= 6) bound less insulin than normals (n =10) because of a decrease in insulin receptor concentration (obese = 6,000-13,000 sites per monocyte versus normals 15,000-28,000 sites per monocyte). The single obese patient without evidence of clinical insulin resistance demonstrated normal binding of insulin with 16,000 sites per monocyte. In all patients, the total receptor concentration was inversely related to the circulating levels of insulin measured at rest after an overnight fast. For the obese patients with basally depressed insulin binding, a 48-72-h fast lowered circulating insulin and increased binding to normal levels but only at low hormone concentrations; this limited normalization of 125I-insulin binding was associated with increased receptor affinity for insulin without change in receptor concentration. Refeeding after the acute fasting periods resulted in return to the elevated plasma insulin levels, the basal receptor affinity, and the depressed insulin binding observed in the basal, fed state. Chronic diet restored plasma insulin levels, insulin binding, and receptor concentration to normal without change in affinity. When the data from this study are coupled with previous in vivo and in vitro findings they suggest that the insulin receptor of human monocytes is more sensitive to regulation by ambient insulin than the receptors of obese mice and cultured human lymphocytes. The results further indicate than an insulin receptor undergoes in vivo modulation of its interaction with insulin by changing receptor concentration and by altering the affinity of existing receptors. Images PMID:993336

  8. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Methods Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37C and 5% CO2 saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 ?g/ml) as positive control and combined treatment of ox-LDL (10 ?g/ml) and (140 ng/ml) Nigella sativa oil. The growth progression was monitored every 24 hours for 3 days. Results Macrophages showed reduced growth in comparison to monocytes 24 hours after treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The mean cell diameter was significantly different between untreated and treated condition in monocytes and macrophages (p < 0.001). Similarly, intracellular lipid accumulation was hindered in combined treatment with Nigella sativa oil. This was further supported by cell surface expression analysis, where CD11b was markedly reduced in cells treated with combination oxLDL and Nigella sativa oil compared to oxLDL alone. More cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells when monocytes were supplemented with oxidized LDL alone. Conclusions The finding provides preliminary evidence on regulation of cell growth and differentiation in monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages by Nigella sativa oil. Further investigations need to be conducted to explain its mechanism in human monocyte. PMID:22104447

  9. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme in human circulating mononuclear cells: genetic polymorphism of expression in T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Costerousse, O; Allegrini, J; Lopez, M; Alhenc-Gelas, F

    1993-01-01

    The expression of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) in human circulating mononuclear cells was studied. T-lymphocytes contained the highest level of enzyme, approx. 28 times more per cell than monocytes. No activity was detected in B-lymphocytes. ACE was present mainly in the microsomal fraction, where it was found to be the major membrane-bound bradykinin-inactivating enzyme. An mRNA for ACE was detected and characterized after reverse transcription and amplification by PCR in T-lymphocytes and several T-cell leukaemia cell lines. We have previously observed that the interindividual variability in the levels of ACE in plasma is, in part, genetically determined and influenced by an insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the regulation of ACE biosynthesis, the ACE levels of T-lymphocytes from 35 healthy subjects having different ACE genotypes were studied. These levels varied widely between individuals but were highly reproducible and influenced by the polymorphism of the ACE gene. T-lymphocyte levels of ACE were significantly higher in subjects who were homozygote for the deletion than in the other subjects. These results show that ACE is expressed in T-lymphocytes and indicate that the level of ACE expression in cells synthesizing the enzyme is genetically determined. Images Figure 3 PMID:8382480

  10. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  12. Potent Fluorinated Agelastatin Analogues for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Design, Synthesis, and Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common lymphoid neoplasia in Western societies and is currently incurable. Multiple treatment options are practiced, but the available small molecule drugs suffer from dose-limiting toxicity and undesirable side effects. The need for new, less toxic treatments is a pressing concern. Here, we demonstrate that (−)-agelastatin A (1a), a pyrrole-imidazole alkaloid obtained from a marine sponge, exhibits potent in vitro activity against primary cell lines of CLL and disclose the synthesis of several analogues that are equipotent or exceed the potency of the natural product. The novel synthetic analogue, 13-debromo-13-trifluoromethyl agelastatin A (1j), showed higher activity than the natural product when tested against the same cell lines and is the most potent agelastatin derivative reported to date. A detailed in vitro structure–activity relationship of 1a in CLL compared to that of 22 synthetic analogues is described along with preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies on the most potent compounds. PMID:24673739

  13. Reverse genetic studies of homologous DNA recombination using the chicken B-lymphocyte line, DT40.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, E; Morrison, C; Yamashita, Y M; Takata, M; Takeda, S

    2001-01-29

    DT40 is an avian leucosis virus-transformed chicken B-lymphocyte line which exhibits high ratios of targeted to random integration of transfected DNA constructs. This efficient targeted integration may be related to the ongoing diversification of the variable segment of the immunoglobulin gene through homologous DNA recombination-controlled gene conversion. DT40s are a convenient model system for making gene-targeted mutants. Another advantage is the relative tractability of these cells, which makes it possible to disrupt multiple genes in a single cell and to generate conditionally gene-targeted mutants including temperature-sensitive mutants. There are strong phenotypic similarities between murine and DT40 mutants of various genes involved in DNA recombination. These similarities confirm that the DT40 cell line is a reasonable model for the analysis of vertebrate DNA recombination, despite obvious concerns associated with the use of a transformed cell line, which may have certain cell-line-specific characteristics. Here we describe our studies of homologous DNA recombination in vertebrate somatic cells using reverse genetics in DT40 cells. PMID:11205323

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10(-11)), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10(-8)) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10(-8)), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10(-11)) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10(-7)) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10(-8)) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10(-7)). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  15. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Speedy, Helen E; Di Bernardo, Maria Chiara; Sava, Georgina P; Dyer, Martin J S; Holroyd, Amy; Wang, Yufei; Sunter, Nicola J; Mansouri, Larry; Juliusson, Gunnar; Smedby, Karin E; Roos, Göran; Jayne, Sandrine; Majid, Aneela; Dearden, Claire; Hall, Andrew G; Mainou-Fowler, Tryfonia; Jackson, Graham H; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J; Pettitt, Andrew R; Allsup, David J; Bailey, James R; Pratt, Guy; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; Rosenquist, Richard; Catovsky, Daniel; Allan, James M; Houlston, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of CLL. To identify additional CLL susceptibility loci, we conducted a GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with a published GWAS totaling 1,739 individuals with CLL (cases) and 5,199 controls with validation in an additional 1,144 cases and 3,151 controls. A combined analysis identified new susceptibility loci mapping to 3q26.2 (rs10936599, P = 1.74 × 10(-9)), 4q26 (rs6858698, P = 3.07 × 10(-9)), 6q25.2 (IPCEF1, rs2236256, P = 1.50 × 10(-10)) and 7q31.33 (POT1, rs17246404, P = 3.40 × 10(-8)). Additionally, we identified a promising association at 5p15.33 (CLPTM1L, rs31490, P = 1.72 × 10(-7)) and validated recently reported putative associations at 5p15.33 (TERT, rs10069690, P = 1.12 × 10(-10)) and 8q22.3 (rs2511714, P = 2.90 × 10(-9)). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CLL. PMID:24292274

  16. A study of the potential nephrotoxicity of heterologous anti-lymphocyte serum

    PubMed Central

    Orr, W. McN.; Birtch, A. G.; Diethelm, A. G.; Dubernard, J. M.; Duquella, J.; Glassock, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Nephrotoxic serum nephritis as a potential effect of the administration of heterologous anti-lymphocyte serum was investigated in dogs. Horse anti-dog lymphocyte serum, prepared using lymph node cells, was demonstrated by immunofluorescent techniques to possess both in-vitro and in-vivo anti-glomerular antibody activity. Experiments were designed to eliminate as far as possible conditions which would allow a serum sickness type of nephritis to develop, while permitting expression of the putative anti-glomerular antibody activity. While none of the animals receiving anti-lymphocyte serum either subcutaneously or intravenously showed clinical evidence of glomerular injury, in some cases early histological changes were apparent and the reasons for their non-progressive nature are discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4985162

  17. "Prostatic acid phosphatase?" A comparison of acid phosphatase activities in epithelial cells, granulocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets purified by velocity sedimentation in isokinetic gradients of Ficoll in tissue culture medium.

    PubMed Central

    Helms, S. R.; Brattain, M. G.; Pretlow, T. G.; Kreisberg, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Numerous investigators have found several substrates and inhibitors to be particularly suited for the demonstration of acid phosphatase of prostatic origin. There has been much controversy over the specificity or lack of specificity of several substrates and inhibitors. We have investigated acid phosphatase activities obtained from several kinds of purified cells. None of the substrates or inhibitors which we studied permitted us to discriminate "prostatic" acid phosphatase from acid phosphatase activities obtained from other kinds of cells. PMID:560800

  18. Lymphocyte transformation and interferon production in human mononuclear cell microcultures for assay of cellular immunity to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Haahr, S; Rasmussen, L; Merigan, T C

    1976-07-01

    Interferon production and transformation in response to herpes simplex virus antigen were studied in microcultures of human mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells consisting of monocytes and both T and B lymphocytes were purified by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Lymphocytes, predominantly T with 5% B, were obtained by passage of buffy-coat cells through nylon fiber columns. For some experiments, autochthonous macrophages and column-purified lymphocytes were stimulated with herpesvirus antigen. The effect of specific antibody and cell concentration on reactivity is described. Crude and purified antigens were compared as cell culture stimulants. Significant differences in transformation and interferon were observed between donors with a history of herpes labialis and donors with no detectable antibody, both in cultures prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients and by column purification of lymphocytes. Cultures from seronegative donors prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients produced interferon but did not transform when stimulated by herpes simplex antigen. "Immune" interferon production, that is, type II as opposed to type I, occurred only with autochthonous macrophage and column-purified lymphocyte cultures. Interferon produced by Ficoll-Hypaque-purified mononuclear cultures was type I, and its production was unrelated to immune status. Similarly, column-purified lymphocytes responded to herpes simplex virus antigen with type I interferon if obtained from a seropositive donor. PMID:181328

  19. Influence of methisoprinol (isoprinosine) on HIV-infected human lymphocytes: in vitro immunological, virological, and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    De Simone, C; De Marco, F; Arancia, G; Tzantzoglou, S; Paradisi, S; Sorice, F

    1989-01-01

    Methisoprinol (isoprinosine) is a synthetic compound with reported antiviral and immunomodulating properties. Results of the present study showed that methisoprinol at concentrations greater than or equal to 200 micrograms/ml reduces the p24 and gp120 viral antigen expression on the surface of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected lymphocytes and the reverse transcriptase levels. In addition, cell viability, the number of the CD4+ cells, and the CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio are higher in methisoprinol-pretreated cell suspensions than in untreated HIV-infected cell cultures. A quantitative freeze-fracture study on the density of the intramembranous particles (IMP) present on both fracture faces of the plasma membrane of lymphocytes has shown that pretreatment with methisoprinol induces a different molecular organization resulting in a nearly three times increase of IMP density. PMID:2469781

  20. Inability of newborns' or pregnant women's monocytes to suppress pokeweed mitogen-induced responses

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Griscelli, C.

    1982-02-01

    Although an excess of human adult blood adherent cells inhibits the pokeweed mitogen- (PWM) induced normal adult lymphocyte proliferation and B cell maturation into immunoglobulin-containing cells (ICC), adherent cells collected from newborn infants or pregnant women at time of delivery were unable to exert a similar suppressor activity. After activation by Concanavalin A (Con A), newborns' and pregnant women's adherent cells acquired a suppressor activity comparable to that of control adult adherent cells. The adherent suppressor cell was shown to be radioresistant (3000 rad), indicating its probable monocytic orgin. Both monocyte-suppressor activities (MSA) observed in adulthood (spontaneously) and in the neonatal period (after activation) were dependent on prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/) secretion, because they were abolished by indomethacin or a specific anti-PGE/sub 2/ anti-serum. Expression of MSA appeared to be under a negative regulation exerted by naturally occurring T suppressor lymphocytes present in the blood of newborns or pregnant women, because incubation of adult monocytes or Con A-activated newborn monocytes with newborns' or pregnant women's T lymphocytes resulted in a dramatic decrease of their MSA. These results strongly suggest that the lack of MSA in the neonatal period and in late pregnancy is a consequence of activation of T suppressor lymphocytes.

  1. Randomized phase 2 study of obinutuzumab monotherapy in symptomatic, previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph M.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Boxer, Michael; Kolibaba, Kathryn S.; Carlile, David J.; Fingerle-Rowson, Guenter; Tyson, Nicola; Hirata, Jamie; Sharman, Jeff P.

    2016-01-01

    Obinutuzumab is a glycoengineered, type 2 anti-CD20 humanized antibody with single-agent activity in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). With other CD20 antibodies, a dose-response relationship has been shown. We therefore performed a randomized phase 2 study in symptomatic, untreated CLL patients to evaluate if an obinutuzumab dose response exists. Obinutuzumab was given at a dose of 1000 mg (100 mg IV day 1, 900 mg day 2, 1000 mg day 8 and day 15 of cycle 1; 1000 mg day 1 of cycles 2-8) or 2000 mg (100 mg IV day 1, 900 mg day 2, 1000 mg day 3, 2000 mg day 8 and day 15 of cycle 1; 2000 mg day 1 of cycles 2-8). The primary end point was overall response rate (ORR). Eighty patients were enrolled with similar demographics: median age 67 years, 41% high-risk Rai disease, and 10% del(17p)(13.1). ORR (67% vs 49%, P = .08) and complete response (CR) or CR with incomplete cytopenia response (20% vs 5%) favored 2000 mg obinutuzumab. Overall, therapy was well tolerated, and infusion events were manageable. This study demonstrates significant efficacy of obinutuzumab monotherapy, for 1000 mg as well as for 2000 mg, in untreated CLL patients with acceptable toxicity. Although exploratory, a dose-response relationship may exist, but its relevance to improving progression-free survival is uncertain and will require further follow-up. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01414205. PMID:26472752

  2. Comparison of hprt variant frequencies and chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Ammenheuser, M.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Belli, J.A.; Ward, J.B. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    The autoradiographic 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant lymphocyte assay and a chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the time-course of appearance and persistence of elevated frequencies of hprt variants and dicentric chromosomes in patients receiving x-irradiation therapy. The hprt mutation assays were done with frozen/thawed lymphocytes isolated from aliquots of the same blood samples used for the chromosome aberration assays. Five multiple sclerosis patients were also studied before and at 2 and 4 wk intervals after treatment with monthly i.v. doses of 750 mg/m{sup 2} of cyclophosphamide (CP). There were no significant elevations in chromosome aberrations at these post-treatment sample times. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of these two human monitoring assays and emphasize the importance of careful selection of optimal sampling times.

  3. A study of the Interaction Between Cetirizine and Plasma Membrane of Eosinophils, Neutrophils, Platelets and Lymphocytes using A fluorescence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oggiano, N.; Giorgi, P. L.; Rihoux, J-P.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cetirizine on plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of human eosinophils, neutrophils, platelets and lymphocytes was investigated using a fluorescence technique. Membrane fluidity and heterogeneity were studied by measuring the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence decay of 1-(4- trimethylammonium-phenyl)-6-phenyl-1, 3, 5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) incorporated in the membrane. The results demonstrate that cetirizine (1 μg/ml) induced a significant increase in the Hpid order in the exterior part of the membrane and a decrease in membrane heterogeneity in eosinophils, neutrophils and platelets. Moreover, cetirizine blocked the PAF induced changes in membrane fluidity in these cells. Cetirizine did not influence significantly the plasma membrane of lymphocytes. These data may partially explain the effect ofcetirizine on inflammatory cell activities. PMID:18472948

  4. Proliferation and cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Mohan, N; Meltz, M L; Wittler, M A

    1997-12-01

    Aliquots of human peripheral blood collected from two healthy human volunteers were exposed in vitro to continuous wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR), either continuously for a period of 90 min or intermittently for a total exposure period of 90 min (30 min on and 30 min off, repeated three times). Blood aliquots which were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to 150 cGy gamma radiation served as controls. The continuous wave 2450 MHz RFR was generated with a net forward power of 34.5 W and transmitted from a standard gain rectangular antenna horn in a vertically downward direction. The mean power density at the position of the cells was 5.0 mW/cm2. The mean specific absorption rate calculated by Finite Difference Time Domain analysis was 12.46 W/kg. Immediately after exposure, lymphocytes were cultured for 48 and 72 h to determine the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, respectively. Proliferation indices were also recorded. There were no significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to; (a) mitotic indices; (b) incidence of cells showing chromosome damage; (c) exchange aberrations; (d) acentric fragments; (e) binucleate lymphocytes, and (f) micronuclei, for either the continuous or intermittent RFR exposures. In contrast, the response of positive control cells exposed to 150 cGy gamma radiation was significantly different from RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes. Thus, there is no evidence for an effect on mitogen-stimulated proliferation kinetics or for excess genotoxicity within 72 h in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz RFR. PMID:9416798

  5. Further studies on progeny T lymphocytes after in utero insult by benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Urso, P.; Johnson, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    Reasons are sought for early and sustained immunodeficiency in benzo(a)pyrene (BP) exposed progeny. Quantitative assay of lymphoid tissue at 15-19 days gestation and 0-5 postnatal (PN) days showed; a striking depletion of thymic cell numbers (CN) at day 19 and PN, normal CN in fetal liver (FL) and spleen, but depression in PN spleen. Depleted THETA/sup +/ and Ly 1/sup +/ cells reflected subnormal thymic CN, while reduced amounts of Ly 2/sup +/ cells did not initiate until after birth. Spleens revealed: a) reductions in THETA/sup +/ and Ly 1/sup +/ cells at gestation, b) enhanced THETA/sup +/ cells PN and c) elevated Ly 2/sup +/ pre- and postnatally. In FL, THETA/sup +/ cells decreased, Ly 1/sup +/ did not change; in contrast, Ly 2/sup +/ were markedly elevated. The thymic Ly 1/Ly 2 ratio was > 1, while it was < 1 for spleen and FL indicating increased Ly 1/sup -/2/sup +/ cells. These data suggest disruptions in T cell ontogenesis. In preliminary experiments analysis of T cell function shows FL cells from BP-exposed progeny either as deficient in supporting in vitro proliferation of syngeneic normal spleen cells, or to induce a 3-fold inhibition of the one-way mixed lymphocyte response. Further studies should reveal: a) evidence for T suppressors (by the elevated Ly 2/sup +/ cells.); b) other suppressor action, if any; and c) capabilities of Ly 1/sup +/ cells. The data should help explain the deficiency of progeny in combatting syngeneic tumor growth after sc or iv transfers.

  6. Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Childhood Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukemia: Findings from the SETIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Methods Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998–2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Results Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01–3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97–3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. Conclusions This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates. PMID:25401754

  7. Microscopic colitis: a descriptive clinical cohort study of 795 patients with collagenous and lymphocytic colitis.

    PubMed

    Mellander, Marie-Rose; Ekbom, Anders; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Löfberg, Robert; Öst, Åke; Björk, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Objective Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic diarrhoea in the Scandinavian countries. This report comprises demographic data, clinical and endoscopic features, and occurrence of coeliac and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a large urban cohort of patients with lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC). Materials and methods A total of 795 patients with microscopic colitis from two hospitals in Stockholm were included. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data, including endoscopic and histological findings, were compiled. Results Forty-three percent had CC (female:male ratio 3.7:1) and 57% had LC (female:male ratio 2.7:1). The mean age at diagnosis of CC was 63 years and of LC was 59 years (p = 0.005). Clinical features were similar in both entities, but the intensity of symptoms differed. Watery diarrhoea was reported in 55% in CC patients versus in 43% in LC patients (p = 0.0014), and nocturnal diarrhoea in 28% versus 18% (p = 0.002). Subtle endoscopic mucosal findings were reported in 37% of the CC patients and in 25% of the LC patients (p = 0.0011). Colorectal adenomatous polyps were found in 5.3% of all patients. Coeliac disease occurred in 6% and IBD occurred in 2.1% of all patients. Conclusions Clinical features of LC and CC are similar but not identical. CC seems to be a more severe type of bowel inflammation and LC tends to occur earlier in life. Both forms might indeed feature endoscopic findings despite the designation 'microscopic'. Our study confirms the strong association with coeliac disease. PMID:26679722

  8. Proteomic analysis of circulating human monocytes in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Aruna; Bahl, Ajay; Talwar, Kewal K; Khullar, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Monocytes play an important role in inflammation and atherosclerosis; however, the molecular details underlying these diverse functions are not completely understood. Proteomic analysis of monocytes can provide new insights into their biological role in coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty angiographically confirmed male, CAD patients (≥50% stenosis) attending cardiology clinic of Nehru Hospital, PGIMER, Chandigarh, and who were not receiving any lipid lowering therapy and 20 TMT negative subjects who served as controls were enrolled in the study. Circulating monocytes isolated from overnight fasting blood samples were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis (pH 4-7), and differentially expressed protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometry and identification of proteins. We observed 333 ± 40 protein spots in monocytes from patients and 312 ± 20 in controls; out of which 63 protein spots showed altered intensity in CAD patients. Thirteen spots showed fivefold increased and two protein spots showed fivefold decreased expression in CAD group as compared to control group, respectively. Two proteins showing decreased expression in monocytes from CAD patients were identified as: (i) glutathione transferase and (ii) heat shock protein 70 KDa. Proteins showing increased expression in CAD patients were identified as: (i) vimentin, (ii) mannose binding lectin receptor protein, and (iii) S100A8 calcium-binding protein. The results of our study offer identification of several proteins in monocytes which can provide new perspectives in role of monocytes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:21938407

  9. Study of Radioprotective Effect of Green Tea against Gamma Irradiation Using Micronucleus Assay on Binucleated Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Hafezeh; Haddad, Farhang; Moghimi, Ali; Farhad Rahimi, Mohammad; Ghavamnasiri, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of green tea against genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation in cultured blood lymphocytes from 5 human volunteers. Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from volunteers before and 1, 3 and 5 hr after drinking a decoction 4 g green tea in 280 ml boiling water for 5 constitutive days with the same quantity. At each time point, the whole blood samples were exposed to 200 cGy of 60 Co gamma irradiation and then were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the chromosomal aberration in micronucleus assay on cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results As expected, for each volunteer, the results showed a significant increase in the incidence of micronuclei after exposure to gamma irradiation as compared to non-irradiated control samples. Only lymphocytes blood sample collected 3 hr after drinking green tea exhibited a significant decrease in incidence of micronuclei compared to non-treated irradiated samples. Conclusion These results suggest the radioprotective ability of green tea against ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes, at specified time after consumptior. PMID:23493517

  10. An in vitro study on suppressive effects of Leishmania major on IL-2Rα expression on peripheral human T lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Khodadadi, A; Rahdar, M; Hossainpour, A; Khademvatan, S

    2013-09-01

    Leishmania sp. is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes significant morbidity and mortality in many parts of the world. The parasite can escape from host immune system by several mechanisms. Understanding biological behavior of the parasite can help us to control and treatment leishmaniasis. Therefore current study was conducted to determine suppresive effect of Leishmania major on IL-2Rα expression in the human peripheral T Lymphocytes. Human peripheral T Lymphocyte were co-cultured with standard strain of Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/EK) in RPMI1640 medium. Infected cells were stained with FITC-labelled anti-CD25 (IL-2Rα chain MAb) and Picoerithrin-labelled anti-CD4 (CD4 MAb) and analyzed by flow cytometry. The results showed that L. major suppressed IL- 2Rα expression in activated T cells as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation 6h after infection and was increased up to 36 hour later. This finding also indicated that suppressed IL- 2R expression was increased when the number of promastigote was added up to 7.5×10(6) cells/ml. Inhibition of IL-2R expression by the parasite might play a critical role for escaping from host immune system. Understanding biological characterization of the Leishmania can be useful for vaccine development and also cytokine therapy. PMID:24189682

  11. Wolbachia heat shock protein 60 induces pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in monocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakannan, Vijayan; Kirthika, Sreenivas; Haripriya, Kalyanaraman; Babu, Subash; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant Wolbachia heat shock protein 60 (rWmhsp60) induces gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in human monocytic cell line THP-1. In addition, it inhibits the phagocytic activity and does not alter the nitric oxide production by differentiated THP-1 macrophages, which corroborates with no significant change in inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in rWmhsp60 treated THP-1 monocytes. Further, 24 h stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal individuals by rWmhsp60 reveals that monocytes enter the late apoptotic stage, while lymphocytes do not show apoptosis. Thus these findings suggest that rWmhsp60 may contribute to inflammation mediated monocyte dysfunction in filarial pathogenesis. PMID:22326972

  12. Anti-human IG and B lymphocytes reconstitute the proliferative response to Con A of T lymphocytes depleted of accessory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, T.; Kim, Y.T.; Schwab, R.; Siskind, G.W.; Weksler, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The requirements for the induction of proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) by low concentrations of Concanavalin A (Con A) were studied using /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to assay DNA synthesis. Removal of plastic-adherent cells from PBM reduced the proliferative response of lymphocytes to Con A by 80%. Passage of these cells over nylon wool columns totally eliminated their response to Con A. Addition of adherent monocytes or rabbit anti-human IgG conjugated to polyacrylamide beads (anti-IgG beads) to the non-adherent lymphocyte population reconstituted the proliferative response. The lymphoblasts activated in these cultures were more than 90% T11 positive. Anti-IgG beads did not activate lymphocyte proliferation in the absence of Con A. The response of non-adherent lymphocytes to Con A could also be reconstituted by unconjugated rabbit anti-human IgG antiserium. Purified T cells could only be activated by anti-IgG beads and low concentrations of Con A in the presence of irradiated B cells. These results suggest that /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by T cells induced by anti-IgG beads and a low concentration of Con A depends on the interaction of anti-IgG and B cells. The authors suggest that B cell produce growth factors for T cells after interacting with anti-IgG.

  13. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  14. Ingramon, a Peptide Inhibitor of MCP-1 Chemokine, Reduces Migration of Blood Monocytes Stimulated by Glioma-Conditioned Medium.

    PubMed

    Krasnikova, T L; Arefieva, T I; Pylaeva, E A; Sidorova, M V

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are most common and fatal primary brain tumors. In addition to neoplastic cells, the tumor tissue contains microglial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. It is an established fact that monocyte recruiting promotes the tumor growth and dissemination. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is the major attractant for monocytes. We have previously synthesized an MCP-1 antagonist ingramon, a synthetic peptide fragment (65-76) of this chemokine. In the present study, we demonstrated that glioma-conditioned medium contains MCP-1 and stimulates migration of blood monocytes. Ingramon inhibited the effect of glioma-conditioned medium on monocyte migration. PMID:26906197

  15. Monocyte transplantation for neural and cardiovascular ischemia repair

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Cruz, Eduardo; Hossne Jr, Nelson Americo; Buffolo, Enio; Willing, Alison E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Neovascularization is an integral process of inflammatory reactions and subsequent repair cascades in tissue injury. Monocytes/macrophages play a key role in the inflammatory process including angiogenesis as well as the defence mechanisms by exerting microbicidal and immunomodulatory activity. Current studies have demonstrated that recruited monocytes/macrophages aid in regulating angiogenesis in ischemic tissue, tumours and chronic inflammation. In terms of neovascularization followed by tissue regeneration, monocytes/macrophages should be highly attractive for cell-based therapy compared to any other stem cells due to their considerable advantages: non-oncogenic, non-teratogenic, multiple secretary functions including pro-angiogenic and growth factors, straightforward cell harvesting procedure and non-existent ethical controversy. In addition to adult origins such as bone marrow or peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood (UCB) can be a potential source for autologous or allogeneic monocytes/macrophages. Especially, UCB monocytes should be considered as the first candidate owing to their feasibility, low immune rejection and multiple characteristic advantages such as their anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of their unique immune and inflammatory immaturity, and their pro-angiogenic ability. In this review, we present general characteristics and potential of monocytes/macrophages for cell-based therapy, especially focusing on neovascularization and UCB-derived monocytes. PMID:19754667

  16. Phenotypic and Functional Heterogeneity of Bovine Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussen, Jamal; Düvel, Anna; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David; Sheldon, Iain Martin; Zieger, Peter; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Murine and human peripheral blood monocytes are heterogeneous in size, granularity, nuclear morphology, phenotype and function. Whether and how bovine blood monocytes follow this pattern was analyzed in this study. Flow cytometrically, classical monocytes (cM) CD14+ CD16−, intermediate monocytes (intM) CD14+ CD16+ and nonclassical monocytes (ncM) CD14+ CD16+ were identified, with cM being the predominant subset (89%). cM showed a significant lower expression of CD172a, intM expressed the highest level of MHC class II molecules, and ncM were low positive for CD163. Compared to cM and intM, ncM showed a significantly reduced phagocytosis capacity, a significantly reduced generation of reactive oxygen species, and reduced mRNA expression of CXCL8, CXCL1 and IL-1β after LPS stimulation. Based on IL-1β secretion after LPS/ATP stimulation, the inflammasome could be activated in cM and intM, but not in ncM. IFNγ increased the expression of CD16 selectively on cM and induced a shift from cM into intM in vitro. In summary, bovine CD172a-positive mononuclear cells define three monocyte subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional differences. Bovine cM and intM share homologies with their human counterparts, whereas bovine ncM are not inflammatory monocytes. PMID:23967219

  17. Human Brucellosis Is Characterized by an Intense Th1 Profile Associated with a Defective Monocyte Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J.; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A.; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-01-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4+ CD3+ and CD8+ CD3+ T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-γ levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:20404074

  18. Human brucellosis is characterized by an intense Th1 profile associated with a defective monocyte function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-07-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4(+) CD3(+) and CD8(+) CD3(+) T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-gamma levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:20404074

  19. Chromosome studies in human lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to metal salts.

    PubMed

    Deknudt, G; Deminatti, M

    1978-05-01

    The toxic concentration of different heavy metal salts was determined in normal stimulated human lymphocyte cultures and was found to be 3 X 10(-3), 1 X 10(-2) and 5 X 10(-4) for zinc chloride, lead acetate and cadmium chloride respectively. Furthermore 3 subtoxic doses of each salt (2, 10 and 100 times less than the toxic dose) were added to 48- and 72-h cultures at 0 h and 24 h after initiation. Chromosome preparations were made and 100 well spread metaphases from each culture were analysed for the presence of numerical and structural aberrations. The most common aberration found for all tested metal salts was the occurrence of chromosome fragments. Dicentric chromosomes were only recorded in lymphocyte cultures treated with the lowest concentration of zinc chloride (3 X 10(-5) M) added at time 0, regardless whether the cultures were fixed after 48 or 72 h. PMID:675717

  20. [Study of lymphocyte membrane antigens and receptors with antibodies to beta2-microglobulin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Robert, M; Vincent, C; Brochier, J; Revillard, J P

    1978-09-01

    Anti-beta 2 microglobulin sera (beta2m AS) rendered specific after extensive absorptions were obtained following immunization of rabbits with highly purified beta2m prepared from urine of tubular proteinuria. beta2m AS were cytotoxic upon addition of selected rabbit complement for human T and B lymphocytes. Partial inhibition of sheep red blood cells receptor recognition on T lymphocytes (E rosettes) and C3 component recognition on B lymphocytes (EAC rosettes) was obtained only with high concentrations of Fab'2 anti-beta2m, eliminating a direct association of beta2m and those receptors. Fab'2 anti-beta2 induced very little inhibition of Fc portion receptor recognition (EA rosettes), but they had no effect on lysis of targets covered with IgG anti-targets (ADCC), a function mediated through that receptor. Anti-beta2m antibodies in excess inhibited antigen-induced proliferation (PPD) and the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) performed in AB serum and fetal calf serum containing media ; whereas a potentiation of the response occurred in the presence of an antigen excess (beta2m) brought by the culture medium (AB serum) suggesting involvement of immune complexes. Pretreatment of responding cells with beta2m AS did block unilateral MLR ; conversely, treatement of stimulating cells had no effect. Independent migration of T cell membrane antigens (HTLA) and beta2m upon addition of suitable ligands, as well as the lack of inhibition by Fab'2 anti-beta2m of complement dependent lysis with IgG anti-HTLA, excluded possible association of HTLA and beta2m. PMID:83567

  1. Mechanism of transfer of immune complexes from red blood cell CR1 to monocytes.

    PubMed

    Emlen, W; Carl, V; Burdick, G

    1992-07-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) on primate red blood cells (RBC) binds most complement-fixing immune complexes in the circulation. It has been postulated that by binding them, RBC keep immune complexes in the intravascular space and deliver them to the tissue macrophages of the mononuclear phagocyte system. We have developed an in vitro model to study the transfer of RBC-bound immune complexes (heat-aggregated IgG and DNA-anti-DNA) to phagocytic cells (human monocytes). Transfer of immune complexes from RBC to monocytes occurred significantly more rapidly than monocyte uptake of the same immune complexes from solution. In the transfer process, complex-bearing RBC were not bound or sequestered by the monocytes. To define the monocyte receptors involved in binding immune complexes from the RBC surface, monocyte receptors were blocked with MoAbs (anti-CR1, anti-FcRII) or EDTA (to block CR3). Monocyte binding of immune complexes primarily used CR1 with a small contribution from FcRII, and with little or no contribution from CR3 and FcRI. Uptake of immune complexes from solution employed the same monocyte receptors as binding of complexes from the RBC surface. Immune complexes in solution bound to RBC and to monocytes with equally high avidity (approximately 1 x 10(11) l/M), but monocytes expressed a 15-20-fold greater number of immune complex binding sites. We propose that immune complexes distribute between RBC and monocytes according to the binding capacity of these cells, such that at equal or high RBC/monocyte ratios as would be seen in the circulation immune complexes bind to RBC, but at low RBC/monocyte ratios (as would be seen in the sinusoidal circulation of the liver and spleen), most immune complexes bind to monocytes. To define the pathway by which immune complexes move from RBC to monocytes, their release from RBC CR1 was examined. Under various conditions, the dissociation rate was extremely slow, and did not increase with the addition of monocyte supernatants. To examine whether factor I-mediated processing of immune complexes enhances binding of immune complexes to monocytes, RBC-bound complexes were released with factor I, and binding of these 'processed' immune complexes to monocytes was examined. Monocyte binding of these processed immune complexes was slower than of control ones; furthermore, performance of transfer experiments at 4 degrees C, which significantly shows enzymatic processes, did not decrease the rate of immune complex transfer from RBC to monocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1385769

  2. [Glucocorticoid receptors in normal human lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Sasu, B I; Liashko, V N

    1983-11-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) receptors were studied in intact lymphocytes from 11 donors. GC binding parameters were found to be highly reproducible in repeated experiments with lymphocytes. It was shown that GC receptors in donors' lymphocytes could be distributed into two different classes similarly to the pattern seen in skin fibroblasts. Human lymphocytes are an adequate object for studying genetically determined variability of GC receptors and its clinical importance. PMID:6640089

  3. Differential lipid metabolism in monocytes and macrophages: influence of cholesterol loading.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Irene; Puchalska, Patrycja; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the hypercholesterolemia associated with atherosclerosis on monocytes is poorly understood. Monocytes are exposed to high concentrations of lipids, particularly cholesterol and lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC). Indeed, in line with recent reports, we found that monocytes accumulate cholesteryl esters (CEs) in hypercholesterolemic mice, demonstrating the need for studies that analyze the effects of lipid accumulation on monocytes. Here we analyze the effects of cholesterol and lyso-PC loading in human monocytes and macrophages. We found that cholesterol acyltransferase and CE hydrolase activities are lower in monocytes. Monocytes also showed a different expression profile of cholesterol influx and efflux genes in response to lipid loading and a different pattern of lyso-PC metabolism. In monocytes, increased levels of CE slowed the conversion of lyso-PC into PC. Interestingly, although macrophages accumulated glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine was the main water-soluble choline metabolite being generated in monocytes, suggesting a role for mono- and diacylglycerol in the chemoattractability of these cells. In summary, monocytes and macrophages show significant differences in lipid metabolism and gene expression profiles in response to lipid loading. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and suggest potentials for targeting monocyte chemotactic properties not only in atherosclerosis but also in other diseases. PMID:26839333

  4. Effect of dexamethasone on bacteriostatic activity of turkey monocytes and implications for food safety.

    PubMed

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Rath, N C

    2015-08-15

    Stress has been shown to affect the immune system of turkeys making them more susceptible to bacterial infections. Five-week-old male and female turkeys were treated with 3 intra-muscular injections of dexamethasone (Dex) at 0, 0.5 and 2.0mg/kg body weight. Twenty-four hours after the third injection birds were bled and white blood cell (WBC) differentials and bacteriostatic activity of monocytes were measured. Dex at both 0.5 and 2.0mg/kg decreased phagocytic activity in females only. Bacteriostatic activity was decreased at both concentrations of Dex at 8 and 16 h post-infection in both sexes and was lower in males as compared to females. Total WBC counts were increased in females at both concentrations of Dex whereas male total WBC counts were unaffected. Both males and females had an increase in the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio. Within the same study, replicate pens of turkeys were challenged with intra-air sac inoculation of 100 cfu of Escherichia coli. Isolation of E. coli was significantly increased by both Dex and E. coli challenge, but there were no differences between sexes. These results suggest that stress can compromise the bacteriostatic activity of turkey monocytes and increase bacterial colonization of blood and tissues, potentially affecting food safety. PMID:26099808

  5. Regulation of interleukin 6 receptor expression in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Comparison with the expression in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Bauer, T M; Kalb, T; Taga, T; Lengyel, G; Hirano, T; Kishimoto, T; Acs, G; Mayer, L; Gerok, W

    1989-11-01

    IL-6 is a cytokine with pleiotropic biological functions, including induction of the hepatic acute phase response and differentiation of activated B cells into Ig-secreting plasma cells. We found that human peripheral blood monocytes express the IL-6-R, which is undetectable on the large majority of lymphocytes of healthy individuals. Stimulation of monocytes by endotoxin or IL-1 causes a rapid downregulation of IL-6-R mRNA levels and a concomitant enhancement of IL-6 mRNA expression. IL-6 itself was found to suppress the IL-6-R at high concentrations. A gradual decrease of IL-6-R mRNA levels was observed along in vitro maturation of monocytes into macrophages. We show that downregulation of IL-6-R mRNA levels by IL-1 and IL-6 is monocyte specific, since IL-6-R expression is stimulated by both IL-1 and IL-6 in cultured human primary hepatocytes. Our data indicate that under noninflammatory conditions, monocytes may play a role in binding of trace amounts of circulating IL-6. Repression of monocytic IL-6-R and stimulation of hepatocytic IL-6-R synthesis may represent a shift of the IL-6 tissue targets under inflammatory conditions. PMID:2809509

  6. Novel biphasic role for lymphocytes revealed during resolving inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajakariar, Ravindra; Lawrence, Toby; Bystrom, Jonas; Hilliard, Mark; Colville-Nash, Paul; Bellingan, Geoff; Fitzgerald, Desmond; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.

    2008-01-01

    Acute inflammation is traditionally described as the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) followed by monocyte-derived macrophages, leading to resolution. This is a classic view, and despite subpopulations of lymphocytes possessing innate immune-regulatory properties, seldom is their role in acute inflammation and its resolution discussed. To redress this we show, using lymphocyte-deficient RAG1−/− mice, that peritoneal T/B lymphocytes control PMN trafficking by regulating cytokine synthesis. Once inflammation ensues in normal mice, lymphocytes disappear in response to DP1 receptor activation by prostaglandin D2. However, upon resolution, lymphocytes repopulate the cavity comprising B1, natural killer (NK), γ/δ T, CD4+/CD25+, and B2 cells. Repopulating lymphocytes are dispensable for resolution, as inflammation in RAG1−/− and wild-type mice resolve uniformly. However, repopulating lymphocytes are critical for modulating responses to superinfection. Thus, in chronic granulomatous disease using gp91phox−/− mice, not only is resolution delayed compared with wild-type, but there is a failure of lymphocyte re-appearance predisposing to exaggerated immune responses upon secondary challenge that is rescued by resolution-phase lymphocytes. In conclusion, as lymphocyte repopulation is also evident in human peritonitis, we hereby describe a transition in T/B cells from acute inflammation to resolution, with a central role in modulating the severity of early onset and orchestrating responses to secondary infection. PMID:18218853

  7. Decreased deformability of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Wen, Jun; Nguyen, John; Cachia, Mark A.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first study of stiffness/deformability changes of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, demonstrating that at the single cell level, leukemic metastasis progresses are accompanied by biophysical property alterations. A microfluidic device was utilized to electrically measure cell volume and transit time of single lymphocytes from healthy and CLL patients. The results from testing thousands of cells reveal that lymphocytes from CLL patients have higher stiffness (i.e., lower deformability), as compared to lymphocytes in healthy samples, which was also confirmed by AFM indentation tests. This observation is in sharp contrast to the known knowledge on other types of metastatic cells (e.g., breast and lung cancer cells) whose stiffness becomes lower as metastasis progresses. PMID:25573422

  8. Decreased deformability of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Wen, Jun; Nguyen, John; Cachia, Mark A.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first study of stiffness/deformability changes of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, demonstrating that at the single cell level, leukemic metastasis progresses are accompanied by biophysical property alterations. A microfluidic device was utilized to electrically measure cell volume and transit time of single lymphocytes from healthy and CLL patients. The results from testing thousands of cells reveal that lymphocytes from CLL patients have higher stiffness (i.e., lower deformability), as compared to lymphocytes in healthy samples, which was also confirmed by AFM indentation tests. This observation is in sharp contrast to the known knowledge on other types of metastatic cells (e.g., breast and lung cancer cells) whose stiffness becomes lower as metastasis progresses.

  9. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by monocytes and endothelial cells exposed to thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Colotta, F.; Sciacca, F. L.; Sironi, M.; Luini, W.; Rabiet, M. J.; Mantovani, A.

    1994-01-01

    Thrombin, in addition to being a key enzyme in hemostasis, affects a series of endothelial and leukocyte functions and thus may be involved in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. Because leukocyte recruitment and activation are important events in inflammatory and thrombotic processes, in this study we have examined the possibility that thrombin induces the production of a cytokine chemotactic for mononuclear phagocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to thrombin expressed transcripts of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; alternative acronyms: JE, monocyte chemotactic and activating factor, tumor-derived chemotactic factor). Thrombin was two- to threefold less effective than endotoxin in inducing MCP-1 transcripts in PBMC. Among circulating mononuclear cells, monocytes were identified as the cells expressing MCP-1 in response to thrombin. Monocytes expressed thrombin receptor transcripts. Boiling, hirudin, antithrombin III, and mutation of the catalytic site serine 205 into alanine) blocked the capacity of thrombin to induce MCP-1 expression. The thrombin receptor-activating peptide mimicked the effect of thrombin in inducing MCP-1 expression. Induction of MCP-1 transcript by thrombin was not reduced by blocking interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that these mediators are not involved in thrombin-induced expression of MCP-1. In addition to monocytes, endothelial cells (EC) also expressed MCP-1 in response to thrombin, although at lower levels compared with monocytes. Actinomycin D experiments indicated that induction of MCP-1 by thrombin in PBMC and EC was gene transcription dependent. The inhibition of protein synthesis blocked thrombin-induced MCP-1 expression in PBMC, whereas it superinduced both constitutive and thrombin-inducible expression of MCP-1 in EC, indicating different mechanisms of regulation of this gene in mononuclear phagocytes versus endothelial cells. Thrombin stimulated mononuclear cells and EC to release chemotactic activity for monocytes that could be inhibited by absorption with anti-MCP-1 antibodies. Induction of a chemotactic cytokine for monocytes by thrombin points to the importance of this enzyme in regulating inflammatory processes and further indicates that hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity are strictly interconnected processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8178946

  10. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by monocytes and endothelial cells exposed to thrombin.

    PubMed

    Colotta, F; Sciacca, F L; Sironi, M; Luini, W; Rabiet, M J; Mantovani, A

    1994-05-01

    Thrombin, in addition to being a key enzyme in hemostasis, affects a series of endothelial and leukocyte functions and thus may be involved in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. Because leukocyte recruitment and activation are important events in inflammatory and thrombotic processes, in this study we have examined the possibility that thrombin induces the production of a cytokine chemotactic for mononuclear phagocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to thrombin expressed transcripts of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; alternative acronyms: JE, monocyte chemotactic and activating factor, tumor-derived chemotactic factor). Thrombin was two- to threefold less effective than endotoxin in inducing MCP-1 transcripts in PBMC. Among circulating mononuclear cells, monocytes were identified as the cells expressing MCP-1 in response to thrombin. Monocytes expressed thrombin receptor transcripts. Boiling, hirudin, antithrombin III, and mutation of the catalytic site serine 205 into alanine) blocked the capacity of thrombin to induce MCP-1 expression. The thrombin receptor-activating peptide mimicked the effect of thrombin in inducing MCP-1 expression. Induction of MCP-1 transcript by thrombin was not reduced by blocking interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor, suggesting that these mediators are not involved in thrombin-induced expression of MCP-1. In addition to monocytes, endothelial cells (EC) also expressed MCP-1 in response to thrombin, although at lower levels compared with monocytes. Actinomycin D experiments indicated that induction of MCP-1 by thrombin in PBMC and EC was gene transcription dependent. The inhibition of protein synthesis blocked thrombin-induced MCP-1 expression in PBMC, whereas it superinduced both constitutive and thrombin-inducible expression of MCP-1 in EC, indicating different mechanisms of regulation of this gene in mononuclear phagocytes versus endothelial cells. Thrombin stimulated mononuclear cells and EC to release chemotactic activity for monocytes that could be inhibited by absorption with anti-MCP-1 antibodies. Induction of a chemotactic cytokine for monocytes by thrombin points to the importance of this enzyme in regulating inflammatory processes and further indicates that hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity are strictly interconnected processes. PMID:8178946

  11. HIV-mediated immunodepression: in vitro inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferative response by ultraviolet-inactivated virus

    SciTech Connect

    Amadori, A.; Faulkner-Valle, G.P.; De Rossi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.; Chieco-Bianchi, L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to assess whether the human retrovirus HIV, like other animal retroviruses, is endowed with intrinsic immunosuppressive activity, we studied the effects of noninfectious, uv-irradiated virus on in vitro lymphocyte function. uvHIV preparations inhibited T-cell proliferation to mitogens and alloantigens, as well as mitogen-driven IL-2 production. The inhibitory effect, which was not exerted by uv-irradiated HTLV-I, was apparently not due to a decrease in cell viability and was likely associated with thermoresistant viral component(s). The suppression proved to be selective for T-cell responses, while sparing other lymphocyte functions, such as the B-cell proliferative response to a selective B-cell mitogen. The inhibitory effect of uvHIV was not counteracted by a substantial reduction in the number of monocytes or by indomethacin. Moreover, IL-1 production by monocytes was not affected upon virus incubation. On the other hand, the proliferative response of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones was inhibited by uvHIV, suggesting that T cells represent the actual target for the inhibitory effect. Although a sizeable decrease in IL-2 production was observed following uvHIV incubation, exogenous IL-2 was not capable of reversing the virus-induced suppression of the proliferation. The possibility that the immunosuppressive activity of noninfectious HIV contributes to the T-cell defect in infected patients by mechanisms other than the cytopathic effect on CD4+ T lymphocytes is discussed.

  12. Serial study of the effect of radiotherapy on semen parameters, hamster egg penetration rates, and lymphocyte chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Barnes, M.; Arthur, K.; Ringrose, T.; Douglas, G.

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the long-term effects of radiotherapy (RT) on male fertility and the induction of lymphocyte and sperm chromosome abnormalities. This preliminary report provides information on 11 cancer patients (mainly seminomas) treated by RT (testicular dose, 44 to 499 rads). All 11 men were studied pre-RT and at intervals post-RT. The pre-RT semen profile varied considerably, but, in general, the profile was poor with a mean sperm concentration of 19.4 x 10/sup 6/ ml and a mean hamster egg penetration rate of 5%. One month after RT, the sperm concentration decreased and hamster egg penetration was 0% in all men. At 3 and 12 months post-RT, all but two patients were azoospermic. By 24 months post-RT, 9 of 11 patients had regained sperm production and 5 had sperm capable of hamster egg penetration. The three men who have been studied 36 months post-RT had a mean sperm concentration of 45.3 x 10/sup 6/ ml, and all had positive hamster egg penetration tests, although two of the three men had very low penetration rates (2% and 4%). Lymphocyte chromosome analysis demonstrated a striking frequency of chromosome abnormalities post-RT which decreased with time (pre-RT, 0%; 1 month, 42.4%; 3 months, 24.7%; 12 months, 13.8%; 24 months, 11.2%; and 36 months, 10.0%). Thus, it appears that sperm production starts to recover 2 to 3 years after RT when the frequency of lymphocyte chromosome abnormalities has decreased, but the sperm may not be fully functional at this time, as evidenced by poor rates of hamster egg penetration. Future studies of sperm chromosome analysis in these men will determine whether this impairment of the sperm is associated with meiotic chromosome abnormalities.

  13. Evaluation of an optimized protocol using human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cells for the in vitro detection of sensitizers: Results of a ring study in five laboratories.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Hendrik; Gerlach, Silke; Spieker, Jochem; Ryan, Cindy; Bauch, Caroline; Mangez, Claire; Winkler, Petra; Landsiedel, Robert; Templier, Marie; Mignot, Aurelien; Gerberick, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Aeby, Pierre; Schepky, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed T-cell mediated allergic response associated with relevant social and economic impacts. Animal experiments (e.g. the local lymph node assay) are still supplying most of the data used to assess the sensitization potential of new chemicals. However, the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetic Directive have introduced a testing ban for cosmetic ingredients after March 2013. We have developed and optimized a stable and reproducible in vitro protocol based on human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cells to assess the sensitization potential of chemicals. To evaluate the transferability and the predictivity of this PBMDCs based test protocol, a ring study was organized with five laboratories using seven chemicals with a known sensitization potential (one none-sensitizer and six sensitizers, including one pro-hapten). The results indicated that this optimized test protocol could be successfully transferred to all participating laboratories and allowed a correct assessment of the sensitization potential of the tested set of chemicals. This should allow a wider acceptance of PBMDCs as a reliable test system for the detection of human skin sensitizers and the inclusion of this protocol in the toolbox of in vitro methods for the evaluation of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. PMID:25868915

  14. Wear particles from studded tires and granite pavement induce pro-inflammatory alterations in human monocyte-derived macrophages: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Helen; Lindbom, John; Ghafouri, Bijar; Lindahl, Mats; Tagesson, Christer; Gustafsson, Mats; Ljungman, Anders G

    2011-01-14

    Airborne particulate matter is considered to be one of the environmental contributors to the mortality in cancer, respiratory, and cardiovascular diseases. For future preventive actions, it is of major concern to investigate the toxicity of defined groups of airborne particles and to clarify their pathways in biological tissues. To expand the knowledge beyond general inflammatory markers, this study examined the toxicoproteomic effects on human monocyte derived macrophages after exposure to wear particles generated from the interface of studded tires and a granite-containing pavement. As comparison, the effect of endotoxin was also investigated. The macrophage proteome was separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Detected proteins were quantified, and selected proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Among analyzed proteins, seven were significantly decreased and three were increased by exposure to wear particles as compared to unexposed control cells. Endotoxin exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of six proteins: four decreased and two increased. For example, macrophage capping protein was significantly increased after wear particle exposure only, whereas calgizzarin and galectin-3 were increased by both wear particle and endotoxin exposure. Overall, proteins associated with inflammatory response were increased and proteins involved in cellular functions such as redox balance, anti-inflammatory response, and glycolysis were decreased. Investigating the effects of characterized wear particles on human macrophages with a toxicoproteomic approach has shown to be useful in the search for more detailed information about specific pathways and possible biological markers. PMID:21117676

  15. Inducibility of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase in cultured human lymphocytes: a study of repeatability.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, K A; Evans, D A; Canning, M V

    1978-01-01

    Modifications to the method for estimating aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity in cultured human lymphocytes are described. Despite the improvements to the technique it was not possible to show significant 'repeatability' of values for AHH induction over a period of 2 weeks or more. Significant repeatability could be seen when a blood sample from each subject was split into duplicates. However, this level of repeatability was low when considered for quantitative genetics purposes. Possible reasons for the poor repeatability have been discussed. PMID:353284

  16. Experimental animals and in vitro systems in the study of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus*

    PubMed Central

    Hotchin, J.

    1977-01-01

    The history of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) research is reviewed from the point of view of whether the main discoveries concerning LCM pathogenesis have stemmed from animal or in vitro research methods. Most of the results initially stemmed from animal experiments, but in recent years recourse has increasingly been made to in vitro techniques to confirm and amplify the animal-based conclusions. Different research approaches are discussed and an attempt is made to assess the role of in vitro versus animal methods in obtaining knowledge on this virus. The same analysis is applied to the future needs and trends in arenavirus research. PMID:338190

  17. Fluorescent methods in the study of UV-induced changes in structural and functional state of human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Artyukhov, V G; Putintseva, O V; Vdovina, V A; Pashkov, M V; Vasilenko, D V

    2012-10-01

    Structural and functional state of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to UV light (240-390 nm) in doses of 151-1359 J/m(2) was studied by methods of laser flow cytofluorometry, indirect immunofluorescence, and fluorescent probes. Using a combination of these methods, we have showed that UV light in the specified doses induced changes in the surface phenotype of T cells: stimulation or suppression of the expression of antigen-recognizing receptor complex molecules (CD3, CD4, and CD8 markers) and their redistribution on the surface of immunocompetent cells (capping effect) with the formation of receptor clusters of various types. PMID:23113315

  18. Analysis of FeLV-FAIDS provirus burden and productive infection in lymphocyte subsets in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quackenbush, S L; Dean, G A; Mullins, J I; Hoover, E A

    1996-09-01

    To help elucidate the immunopathogenesis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-induced immunodeficiency we studied the tropism of viruses derived from the FeLV-FAIDS isolate for lymphocyte subpopulations in cats. FeLV-FAIDS is composed of a replication-competent virus typical of subgroup A FeLV (prototype, clone 61E) and a family of replication-defective but immunopathogenic variant viruses (prototype, clone 61C). We sorted CD4+, CD8+, and IgG+ lymphocytes to > or = 97% purity and analyzed viral load in each cell population via genome-specific semiquantitative PCR. Both the 61E and 61C viruses were tropic for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as IgG+ B lymphocytes in blood and lymph node. High provirus burden were established for both virus genomes-ranging from 0.3 to > 2 copies/cell. To identify the fraction of circulating cells which expressed viral antigen in vivo, we developed a flow cytometric method to simultaneously label blood leukocytes for surface immunophenotype and intracytoplasmic FeLV CA (p27 Gag). These experiments established that 20 to 60% of CD4+, CD8+, and IgG+ lymphocytes and > 85% of monocytes and granulocytes expressed FeLV p27 intracellularly. Thus the in vivo target cells for FeLV-FAIDS infection are manifold and include CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells. PMID:8806534

  19. [The changes of the function of lymphocytes natural killers in schizophrenics].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, E F; Kushner, S G; Abramova, L I; Kaleda, V G; Tsutsul'kovskaia, M Iu

    2002-01-01

    Cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte natural killers (NK) number as well as gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) production were studied in patients with paranoid (22 patients) and progressive attack-like (39 patients) schizophrenia (47 male and 14 female patients aged 16-62 years). Compared to controls, a decrease of NK activity and a trend towards gamma-IFN production decrease were found. In the patients, NK lymphocytes number was not changed. Cytotoxic activity was reduced only in the male patients, a frequency of cases with lower activity level being the highest in those with more severe form of paranoid schizophrenia. A significant difference of both indices was detected between men and women. In the men, the longer was the disease duration, the higher was cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte number increase. It was shown in vitro that monocytes are not involved in mechanisms changing the level of lymphocyte cytotoxicity in the patients and immune modulator enkad stimulats cytotoxic activity in the male patients. PMID:12233256

  20. The effects of prednisone and azathioprine on circulating immunoglobulin levels and lymphocyte subpopulations in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Rinkardt, N E; Kruth, S A; Kaushik, A

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates serum immunoglobulin (SIg) levels and lymphocyte subpopulations in normal dogs in response to putative immunosuppressive doses of prednisone and/or azathioprine. The objectives were to quantify SIg levels and lymphocyte subpopulations, including Thy-1+, CD4+, CD8+ and B cells, in normal dogs both before and after the administration of prednisone and/or azathioprine at 2 mg/kg, PO, each. Eighteen beagles were divided into 3 groups of 6 dogs each. Blood samples for radial immunodiffusion assay of IgG, IgM and IgA, complete blood count (CBC)and flow cytometry were collected prior to the administration of any drugs and again after 14 d of azathioprine, prednisone or azathioprine and prednisone. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated using density centrifugation and were incubated with monoclonal antibodies reacting with CD4+, CD8+, Thy-1+ and membrane immunoglobulin. Lymphocyte subsets were quantified using flow cytometry. Azathioprine-treated dogs had no significant changes in SIg levels or lymphocyte subpopulations. Prednisone-treated dogs had significant (P < 0.05) decreases in all SIg levels, all lymphocyte subpopulations and erythrocyte numbers, and had an increase in neutrophil counts. Prednisone and azathioprine-treated dogs had significant (P < 0.05) decreases in serum IgG levels and Thy-1+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subpopulations, with an increase in the CD4:CD8. These dogs also had a significant decrease in erythrocyte number and a significant increase in the monocyte count. These findings suggest that azathioprine and prednisone in combination or prednisone alone may be useful for the treatment of T cell-mediated diseases since decreased circulating T cell levels were demonstrated following treatment. The combination of drugs or azathioprine alone may not be appropriate for treatment of acute or autoantibody-mediated immune disease, because SIg levels were minimally affected by treatment. PMID:9918329

  1. Expression of DNAM-1 (CD226) on inflammatory monocytes.

    PubMed

    Vo, Anh Van; Takenaka, Eri; Shibuya, Akira; Shibuya, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    DNAM-1 is an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and T cells and plays an important role in cytotoxicity of these cells against target cells. Although the role of DNAM-1 in the function of T cells and NK cells has been well studied, the expression and function of DNAM-1 on myeloid cells have been incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated expression of DNAM-1 on monocyte subsets in mouse peripheral blood and found that only inflammatory monocytes (iMos), but not patrolling monocytes (pMos), expressed high levels of DNAM-1. In addition, we found that DNAM-1 was highly expressed on iMos, rather than pMos, also in human. Furthermore, we found that DNAM-1 on inflammatory monocytes was involved in cell adhesion to CD155-expressing cells. Therefore, we propose that expression of DNAM-1 on inflammatory monocytes are evolutionally conserved and act as an adhesion molecule on blood inflammatory monocytes. PMID:26675069

  2. A phase 2 study of idelalisib plus rituximab in treatment-naïve older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Susan M; Lamanna, Nicole; Kipps, Thomas J; Flinn, Ian; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Burger, Jan A; Keating, Michael; Mitra, Siddhartha; Holes, Leanne; Yu, Albert S; Johnson, David M; Miller, Langdon L; Kim, Yeonhee; Dansey, Roger D; Dubowy, Ronald L; Coutre, Steven E

    2015-12-17

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class oral inhibitor of PI3Kδ that has shown substantial activity in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as initial therapy, 64 treatment-naïve older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic leukemia (median age, 71 years; range, 65-90) were treated with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) weekly ×8 and idelalisib 150 mg twice daily continuously for 48 weeks. Patients completing 48 weeks without progression could continue to receive idelalisib on an extension study. The median time on treatment was 22.4 months (range, 0.8-45.8+). The overall response rate (ORR) was 97%, including 19% complete responses. The ORR was 100% in patients with del(17p)/TP53 mutations and 97% in those with unmutated IGHV. Progression-free survival was 83% at 36 months. The most frequent (>30%) adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (including colitis) (64%), rash (58%), pyrexia (42%), nausea (38%), chills (36%), cough (33%), and fatigue (31%). Elevated alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase was seen in 67% of patients (23% grade ≥3). The combination of idelalisib and rituximab was highly active, resulting in durable disease control in treatment-naïve older patients with CLL. These results support the further development of idelalisib as initial treatment of CLL. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01203930. PMID:26472751

  3. A phase 2 study of idelalisib plus rituximab in treatment-naïve older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Nicole; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Burger, Jan A.; Keating, Michael; Mitra, Siddhartha; Holes, Leanne; Yu, Albert S.; Johnson, David M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Kim, Yeonhee; Dansey, Roger D.; Dubowy, Ronald L.; Coutre, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class oral inhibitor of PI3Kδ that has shown substantial activity in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as initial therapy, 64 treatment-naïve older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic leukemia (median age, 71 years; range, 65-90) were treated with rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly ×8 and idelalisib 150 mg twice daily continuously for 48 weeks. Patients completing 48 weeks without progression could continue to receive idelalisib on an extension study. The median time on treatment was 22.4 months (range, 0.8-45.8+). The overall response rate (ORR) was 97%, including 19% complete responses. The ORR was 100% in patients with del(17p)/TP53 mutations and 97% in those with unmutated IGHV. Progression-free survival was 83% at 36 months. The most frequent (>30%) adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (including colitis) (64%), rash (58%), pyrexia (42%), nausea (38%), chills (36%), cough (33%), and fatigue (31%). Elevated alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase was seen in 67% of patients (23% grade ≥3). The combination of idelalisib and rituximab was highly active, resulting in durable disease control in treatment-naïve older patients with CLL. These results support the further development of idelalisib as initial treatment of CLL. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01203930. PMID:26472751

  4. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induces Differentiation and Adhesion of Human Monocytes and the Monocytic Cell Line U937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostegard, Johan; Nilsson, Jan; Haegerstrand, Anders; Hamsten, Anders; Wigzell, Hans; Gidlund, Magnus

    1990-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animals fed a high-cholesterol diet, monocytes adhere to the arterial endothelium and penetrate into the intima where they differentiate into macrophages and ingest lipids thus giving rise to fatty streaks, the earliest type of atherosclerotic plaque. Macrophages express few receptors for normal low density lipo-protein (LDL) but can take up oxidized LDL by way of a scavenger receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of oxidized LDL in recruitment of resident intimal macrophages. We found that oxidized LDL induced enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on human monocytes and U937 cells, a well-established system for studies of monocytic differentiation. Oxidized LDL also induced enhanced expression of the surface antigen LEuM3 but caused decreased expression of CD4 antigen, a pattern compatible with expression of a more differentiated macrophage-like phenotype. Oxidized LDL also initiated aggregation of monocytes and U937 cells and stimulated adhesion of U937 cells to cultured endothelial cells. The results indicate that oxidized LDL may contribute to development of atherosclerosis by inducing adhesion of monocytes to the arterial intima and by stimulating intimal monocytes to differentiate into resident macrophages.

  5. Pediatric Nodular Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma: Treatment Recommendations of the GPOH-HD Study Group.

    PubMed

    Mauz-Körholz, C; Lange, T; Hasenclever, D; Burkhardt, B; Feller, A C; Dörffel, W; Kluge, R; Vordermark, D; Körholz, D

    2015-11-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL) is a very rare disease in childhood and adolescence. In Germany, about 15 newly diagnosed patients present with this disease annually; this number comprises less than 10% of all pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma cases. Since the EuroNet-PHL-LP1 trial for early stage nLPHL patients stopped recruiting in Germany in October 2014, the GPOH-HD writing committee reviewed the literature and decided to deliver treatment recommendations for childhood and adolescent nLPHL patients. These guidelines shall be applicable to young nLPHL patients in European countries that will no longer be able to participate in nLPHL trials for young patients. Therefore, the EuroNet-PHL-nLPHL-registry will be installed to provide quality assured central review of staging and response assessment for registered patients by the Central Review Board of EuroNet-PHL in Halle/Leipzig, Germany. PMID:26356319

  6. Glucose transporter expression differs between bovine monocyte and macrophage subsets and is influenced by milk production.

    PubMed

    Eger, M; Hussen, J; Koy, M; Dänicke, S; Schuberth, H-J; Breves, G

    2016-03-01

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is characterized by negative energy balance and higher incidences of infectious diseases such as mastitis or metritis. With the onset of lactation, milk production is prioritized and large amounts of glucose are transported into the mammary gland. Decreased overall energy availability might impair the function of monocytes acting as key innate immune cells, which give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells and link innate and adaptive immunity. Information on glucose requirements of bovine immune cells is rare. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate glucose transporter expression of the 3 bovine monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) and monocyte-derived macrophages and to identify influences of the peripartal period. Blood samples were either collected from nonpregnant healthy cows or from 16 peripartal German Holstein cows at d -14, +7, and +21 relative to parturition. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to determine mRNA expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 in monocyte subsets and monocyte-derived macrophages. The low GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in nonclassical monocytes was unaltered during differentiation into macrophages, whereas in classical and intermediate monocytes GLUT expression was downregulated. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages consumed more glucose compared with classically activated M1 macrophages. The GLUT4 mRNA was only detectable in unstimulated macrophages. Neither monocytes nor macrophages were insulin responsive. In the peripartum period, monocyte GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression and the GLUT3/GLUT1 ratio were negatively correlated with lactose production. The high-affinity GLUT3 transporter appears to be the predominant glucose transporter on bovine monocytes and macrophages, especially in the peripartal period when blood glucose levels decline. Glucose transporter expression in monocytes is downregulated as a function of lactose production, which might impair monocyte to macrophage differentiation. PMID:26723114

  7. Evidence for specific annexin I-binding proteins on human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, N J; Pan, L; Wardwell, K; Guyre, V C; Guyre, P M

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant human annexin I and a monoclonal antibody specific for this protein (mAb 1B) were used to investigate surface binding of this member of the annexin family of proteins to peripheral blood monocytes. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated trypsin-sensitive, saturable binding of annexin I to human peripheral blood monocytes but not to admixed lymphocytes. A monoclonal antibody that blocks the anti-phospholipase activity of annexin I also blocked its binding to monocytes. These findings suggest the presence of specific binding sites on monocytes. Furthermore, surface iodination, immunoprecipitation and SDS/PAGE analysis were used to identify two annexin I-binding proteins on the surface of monocytes with molecular masses of 15 kDa and 18 kDa respectively. The identification and characterization of these annexin I-binding molecules should help us to better understand the specific interactions of annexin I with monocytes that lead to down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cell functions. PMID:8687405

  8. Automotive airborne brake wear debris nanoparticles and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kazimirova, Alena; Peikertova, Pavlina; Barancokova, Magdalena; Staruchova, Marta; Tulinska, Jana; Vaculik, Miroslav; Vavra, Ivo; Kukutschova, Jana; Filip, Peter; Dusinska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Motor vehicle exhaust and non-exhaust processes play a significant role in environmental pollution, as they are a source of the finest particulate matter. Emissions from non-exhaust processes include wear-products of brakes, tires, automotive hardware, road surface, and traffic signs, but still are paid little attention to. Automotive friction composites for brake pads are composite materials which may consist of potentially hazardous materials and there is a lack of information regarding the potential influence of the brake wear debris (BWD) on the environment, especially on human health. Thus, we focused our study on the genotoxicity of the airborne fraction of BWD using a brake pad model representing an average low-metallic formulation available in the EU market. BWD was generated in the laboratory by a full-scale brake dynamometer and characterized by Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy showing that it contains nano-sized crystalline metal-based particles. Genotoxicity tested in human lymphocytes in different testing conditions showed an increase in frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNCs) exposed for 48h to BWD nanoparticles (NPs) (with 10% of foetal calf serum in culture medium) compared with lymphocytes exposed to medium alone, statistically significant only at the concentration 3µg/cm(2) (p=0.032). PMID:27131798

  9. Safety and activity of BTK inhibitor ibrutinib combined with ofatumumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a phase 1b/2 study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Nagar, Veena; Flynn, Joseph M.; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami J.; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Blum, Kristie A.; Grever, Michael R.; Smucker, Kelly; Ruppert, Amy S.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lozanski, Gerard; Stefanos, Mona; Munneke, Brian; West, Jamie-Sue; Neuenburg, Jutta K.; James, Danelle F.; Hall, Nathan; Johnson, Amy J.; Byrd, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib represents a therapeutic advance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but as monotherapy produces few complete remissions in previously treated patients. Anti-CD20 antibodies have improved response and progression-free survival (PFS) when combined with chemotherapy. We evaluated the safety and activity of adding ofatumumab to ibrutinib in 3 different administration sequences. Patients with CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), prolymphocytic leukemia, or Richter’s transformation who failed ≥2 prior therapies were enrolled. Patients received ibrutinib 420 mg daily and 12 doses of ofatumumab 300/2000 mg in 3 schedules: ibrutinib lead-in (group 1; n = 27), concurrent start (group 2; n = 20), or ofatumumab lead-in (group 3; n = 24). Seventy-one patients were treated; most had high-risk disease including del(17)(p13.1) (44%) or del(11)(q22.3) (31%). The most frequent adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (70%), infusion-related reaction (45%), and peripheral sensory neuropathy (44%). Overall response rates in CLL/SLL patients (n = 66) were 100%, 79%, and 71% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Estimated 12-month PFSs for all patients were 89%, 85%, and 75%, respectively. Four patients in group 3 progressed prior to receiving ibrutinib. This study demonstrates the tolerability and clinical activity of this combination with quicker time to best response than single-agent ibrutinib and with durable responses. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01217749. PMID:26116658

  10. A role for KMT1c in monocyte to dendritic cell differentiation: Epigenetic regulation of monocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Rutger J; Goedhart, Marieke; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; Muggen, Alice F; Miggelbrink, Xanne M; Geutskens, Sacha B; van Zwet, Erik; Haasnoot, Geert W; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Monocytes play a key role in immune system function. Chromatin remodeling is crucial for various differentiation and gene regulation processes and is rather well studied in T cells. However, for monocytes not much is known regarding how the epigenetic machinery influences the differentiation into various effector cell types. In the work presented here, we explore the epigenetic underpinnings of monocyte differentiation. By transcriptional profiling we show that transcription of lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and in particular KMT1c is markedly up regulated after differentiation of monocytes into immature dendritic cells (iDCs). Specifically inhibiting KMT1c function, using the small-molecule inhibitor BIX-01294, changes the transcription levels of the DC marker DC-SIGN, but does not affect surface protein expression. Blocking global KMT activity, using DZNep, does influence monocyte differentiation into iDCs, indicated by a loss of DC-SIGN surface expression. When BIX-01294 and DZNep treatment was combined DC-SIGN expression was almost lost completely. This work shows that the activities of KMTs are required for successful differentiation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore it shows the importance of KMT inhibitors in the field of epigenetic immune therapy, which is still much focused around HDAC inhibitors. PMID:25843229

  11. Antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation as a marker of immune response in guinea pigs with sustained Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Karolina; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacteria are human pathogens causing symptomatic gastritis, peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Little is known about the kinetics of immune responses in H. pylori infected patients because the initial moment of infection has not been identified. Various animal models are used to investigate the immune processes related to H. pylori infection. In this study we checked whether H. pylori infection in guinea pigs, mimicking natural H. pylori infection in humans, resulted in the development of specific immune responses to H. pylori antigens by measuring the proliferation of lymphocytes localized in mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and peripheral blood. The maturity of macrophages and cytokines, delivered by monocyte-macrophage lineage or lymphocytes, were considered as mediators, which might influence the lymphocyte blastogenic response. The obtained results showed the activation of T cells localized in mesenteric lymph nodes by H. pylori antigens in H. pylori infected guinea pigs four weeks postinfection. The blastogenic activity of lymphocytes was shaped by their interaction with antigen presenting cells, which were present in the cell cultures during the whole culture period. Moreover, the balance between cytokines derived from adherent leukocytes including interleukin 8--IL-8 as well as interferon gamma--IFN-γ, and transforming growth factor beta--TGF-β delivered by lymphocytes, was probably important for the successful proliferation of lymphocytes. The H. pylori specific lymphocytes were not propagated in peripheral blood and spleen of H. pylori infected animals. The modulation of immunocompetent cells by H. pylori antigens or their different distribution cannot be excluded. PMID:24918491

  12. Subpopulations of human T lymphocytes. XV. T lymphocytes with receptors for IgA (T alpha), a distinct subpopulation of T lymphocytes. Studies in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Good, R A

    1980-01-01

    A receptor for IgA was observed on a subset of T cells (T alpha) that is distinct from other T lymphocyte subsets, T mu or T gamma cells. IgA receptor on T alpha cells is blocked by IgA from human serum through its cytophilic attachment. Neither T mu nor T gamma cells, following an in vitro interaction with insoluble immune complexes during the process of purification and further incubation at 37 degrees C, changed their phenotypes to T alpha cells. However, some T gamma cells demonstrated transition to T mu cells. The numbers and proportion of T alpha cells in patients with selective IgA deficiency were either normal, increased or decreased. The significance of T alpha cell analysis in thirty-one patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders including those with selective IgA deficiency is discussed. PMID:6969155

  13. Assessments of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and platelet to lymphocyte ratio in Korean patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Suk; Shin, Dongyun; Lee, Min Seok; Kim, Hee Ju; Kim, Do Young; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Min-Geol

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this retrospective study is to assess neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) as inflammatory markers in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A hundred and eleven psoriasis patients and 25 PsA patients were compared with 94 healthy controls. Demographic, clinical and laboratory information were collected and analyzed. NLR and PLR were calculated. White blood cell (WBC), neutrophils, eosinophils and NLR were increased in psoriasis patients compared with controls. WBC, neutrophils, NLR, monocytes, platelets and PLR were increased in PsA patients compared with both controls and psoriasis patients. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein were significantly higher in PsA patients compared with psoriasis patients. Among psoriasis patients, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score correlated positively with platelets, NLR and PLR. These parameters were all significantly higher in moderate to severe psoriasis patients (PASI ≥ 10) compared with mild patients (PASI < 10). Elevated platelets, NLR and PLR were significantly associated with the increased PASI scores in multivariate analysis. NLR, PLR and ESR were statistically significant predictors for the presence of PsA in psoriasis patients. NLR was the strongest predictor (odds ratio = 3.351, P = 0.005). In conclusion, elevated NLR and PLR were significantly associated with psoriasis and PsA. Both NLR and PLR were strong predictors for the presence of PsA among psoriasis patients. PMID:26381893

  14. Identification and quantification of phosphodiesterase 4 subtypes in CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes from healthy and asthmatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Landells, L J; Szilagy, C M; Jones, N A; Banner, K H; Allen, J M; Doherty, A; O'Connor, B J; Spina, D; Page, C P

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, for the first time, PDE4 subtypes were identified and semi-quantified in both CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes from healthy and asthmatic individuals. CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes from healthy and mild asymptomatic asthmatic subjects (receiving ?-agonist therapy only) were isolated from peripheral venous blood using appropriate antibody coated paramagnetic beads. PDE4 subtypes and ?-actin were identified by digoxigenin (DIG)-labelling reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and semi-quantified by DIG-detection enzyme-linked immunosorbance assay. In CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes PDE4A, PDE4B and PDE4D were detected, with no significant differences observed between healthy and asthmatic groups. In CD8 lymphocytes, enzyme subtype expression was lower and showed more intersubject variability. In functional studies investigating the effects of various PDE inhibitors on PHA-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells from healthy and asthmatic subjects, CDP840 (0.0310??M), rolipram (0.110??M) and theophylline (10??M1?mM) inhibited PHA-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells from healthy and asthmatic subjects in a concentration-dependent manner, although no significant difference was observed between the groups investigated. In additional studies, total monocyte cyclic AMP PDE activity was investigated in cells isolated from asthmatic subjects both prior to and 24?h after allergen challenge. Total monocyte cyclic AMP PDE activity remained unaffected following challenge of asthmatic subjects with either house dust mite or cat dander and was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by rolipram (0.01100??M) both before and after allergen challenge. PMID:11429397

  15. Human lymphocyte repertoires in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Scott D; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Martin, Victoria; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of adaptive immunity with ageing may reflect changes in the repertoire of T cells and B cells available to respond to antigenic challenges, due to altered proportions and absolute numbers of lymphocyte subpopulations as well as changes in the repertoire of antigen receptor genes expressed by these cells. High-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) now facilitates examination of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene rearrangements, and initial studies using these methods to study immune system ageing in humans have demonstrated age-related alterations in the receptor populations within lymphocyte subsets, as well as in repertoires responding to vaccination. Accurate measurement of repertoire diversity remains an experimental challenge. Studies of larger numbers of human subjects, analysis of defined lymphocyte subpopulations including antigen-specific populations, and controlling for factors such as chronic viral infections, will be important for gaining additional understanding of the impact of ageing on human lymphocyte populations. PMID:23992996

  16. Comparing methods for ex vivo characterization of human monocyte phenotypes and in vitro responses.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa; Harding, Scott A; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2015-12-01

    Monocytes are key innate effector cells and their phenotype and function may be a useful biomarker of disease state or therapeutic response. However, for such an assay to be clinically feasible it needs to be simple and reproducible, which this study aimed to address. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)(2) isolated from whole blood using Histopaque-1077 or cell preparation tubes (CPT) showed no difference in the ex vivo monocyte activation marker expression or in vitro responses; however, a delayed isolation using CPT significantly altered ex vivo and in vitro phenotypes and responses. Furthermore, purification of monocytes using CD14(+) microbeads resulted in a loss of CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes compared to PBMC samples. Thus, the use of CPT reduced complexity and time compared to Histopaque, and PBMC isolation allowed the analysis of all 3 major monocyte subsets. Finally, because the delayed isolation of PBMC from CPT significantly altered monocytes, time delays should be standardized. PMID:26256247

  17. Lenalidomide interferes with tumor-promoting properties of nurse-like cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Audrito, Valentina; Zucchini, Patrizia; Colaci, Elisabetta; Potenza, Leonardo; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario; Deaglio, Silvia; Marasca, Roberto; Maffei, Rossana

    2015-02-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent clinically active in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. The specific mechanism of action is still undefined, but includes modulation of the microenvironment. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, nurse-like cells differentiate from CD14(+) mononuclear cells and protect chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells from apoptosis. Nurse-like cells resemble M2 macrophages with potent immunosuppressive functions. Here, we examined the effect of lenalidomide on the monocyte/macrophage population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. We found that lenalidomide induces high actin polymerization on CD14(+) monocytes through activation of small GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Rap1 that correlated with increased adhesion and impaired monocyte migration in response to CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL12. We observed that lenalidomide increases the number of nurse-like cells that lost the ability to nurture chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, acquired properties of phagocytosis and promoted T-cell proliferation. Gene expression signature, induced by lenalidomide in nurse-like cells, indicated a reduction of pivotal pro-survival signals for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, such as CCL2, IGF1, CXCL12, HGF1, and supported a modulation towards M1 phenotype with high IL2 and low IL10, IL8 and CD163. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of action of lenalidomide that mediates a pro-inflammatory switch of nurse-like cells affecting the protective microenvironment generated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia into tissues. PMID:25398834

  18. Lenalidomide interferes with tumor-promoting properties of nurse-like cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Martinelli, Silvia; Bulgarelli, Jenny; Audrito, Valentina; Zucchini, Patrizia; Colaci, Elisabetta; Potenza, Leonardo; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario; Deaglio, Silvia; Marasca, Roberto; Maffei, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory agent clinically active in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. The specific mechanism of action is still undefined, but includes modulation of the microenvironment. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, nurse-like cells differentiate from CD14+ mononuclear cells and protect chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells from apoptosis. Nurse-like cells resemble M2 macrophages with potent immunosuppressive functions. Here, we examined the effect of lenalidomide on the monocyte/macrophage population in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. We found that lenalidomide induces high actin polymerization on CD14+ monocytes through activation of small GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Rap1 that correlated with increased adhesion and impaired monocyte migration in response to CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL12. We observed that lenalidomide increases the number of nurse-like cells that lost the ability to nurture chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, acquired properties of phagocytosis and promoted T-cell proliferation. Gene expression signature, induced by lenalidomide in nurse-like cells, indicated a reduction of pivotal pro-survival signals for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, such as CCL2, IGF1, CXCL12, HGF1, and supported a modulation towards M1 phenotype with high IL2 and low IL10, IL8 and CD163. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of action of lenalidomide that mediates a pro-inflammatory switch of nurse-like cells affecting the protective microenvironment generated by chronic lymphocytic leukemia into tissues. PMID:25398834

  19. A Miniature Couette to Generate Shear for Flow Cytometry: Studying Real-Time Modulation of Intracellular Calcium in Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zwartz, Gordon J.; Chigaev, Alexandre; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular hydrodynamic forces may be transmitted to the interior of cells through the alteration of integrin conformation and affinity. Integrin activation regulates leukocyte recruitment, cell activation, and transmigration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for integrin activation are not precisely known, although intracellular calcium signaling is involved. Flow cytometry offers a versatile way to study intracellular calcium signaling in real-time. We report a novel method to generate defined shear by using a miniature Couette. Testing involved measuring shear induced intracellular calcium signals of human monoblastoid U937 cells in suspension. The Couette was connected externally to a flow cytometer and pressurized at 6 PSI (4.1 N/m2). Cells were subjected to well-defined shear between 0 and 1000 s−1 and delivered continuously within 10 s to a FACScan at 1 μl/s. Intracellular calcium levels and the percentage of cells activated increased as shear increased in duration and intensity. PMID:22045643

  20. Use of whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls.

    PubMed

    Redig, P T; Dunnette, J L; Sivanandan, V

    1984-11-01

    Mitogen-induced whole blood lymphocyte stimulation tests for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were developed. Combinations of incubation times, blood dilutions, concentrations of [3H]thymidine and [125I]2-deoxyuridine, antibiotics, phytohemagglutinin-P, and concanavalin A were tested for their effects on the stimulation index (SI). An antibiotic combination of gentamicin plus amphotericin B yielded low SI with lymphocytes from bald eagles, but not with lymphocytes from great horned owls or red-tailed hawks. Penicillin plus streptomycin caused no such depression of SI. Lymphocytes from all 3 species yielded maximum responses with a 48-hour prelabel and 12- to- 16 hour postlabel incubation period at 41 C and 1:20 blood dilution. Optimal mitogen concentrations for lymphocytes from bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls were 25 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of phytohemagglutinin-P/well, respectively, and 2.5 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of concanavalin A/well, respectively. Differences in SI were not seen between the 2 radioactive labels. The optimal concentration of the [3H]thymidine label ranged from 0.06 to 0.125 microCi/well. PMID:6524727

  1. Hypergravity-induced immunomodulation in a rodent model: lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Green, Lora M.; Miller, Glen M.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to quantify changes in lymphoid organs and cells over time due to centrifugation-induced hypergravity. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1, 2 and 3 G and the following assays were performed on days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 21: spleen, thymus, lung, and liver masses; total leukocyte, lymphocyte, monocyte/macrophage, and granulocyte counts; level of splenocyte apoptosis; enumeration of CD3+ T, CD3+/CD4+ T helper, CD3+/CD8+ T cytotoxic, B220+ B, and NK1.1+ natural killer cells; and quantification of cells expressing CD25, CD69, and CD71 activation markers. The data show that increased gravity resulted in decreased body, spleen, thymus, and liver, but not lung, mass. Significant reductions were noted in all three major leukocyte populations (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocyte/macrophages) [correction of macrphages] with increased gravity; persistent depletion was noted in blood but not spleen. Among the various lymphocyte populations, the CD3+/CD8+ T cells and B220+ B cells were the most affected and NK1.1+ NK cells the least affected. Overall, the changes were most evident during the first week, with a greater influence noted for cells in the spleen. A linear relationship was found between some of the measurements and the level of gravity, especially on day 4. These findings indicate that hypergravity profoundly alters leukocyte number and distribution in a mammalian model and that some aberrations persisted throughout the three weeks of the study. In certain cases, the detected changes were similar to those observed after whole-body irradiation. In future investigations we hope to combine hypergravity with low-dose rate irradiation and immune challenge.

  2. A miniature Couette to generate shear for flow cytometry: studying real-time modulation of intracellular calcium in monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Zwartz, Gordon J; Chigaev, Alexandre; Foutz, Terry D; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry A

    2011-03-01

    Extracellular hydrodynamic forces may be transmitted to the interior of cells through the alteration of integrin conformation and affinity. Integrin activation regulates leukocyte recruitment, cell activation, and transmigration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for integrin activation are not precisely known, although intracellular calcium signaling is involved. Flow cytometry offers a versatile way to study intracellular calcium signaling in real-time. We report a novel method to generate defined shear by using a miniature Couette. Testing involved measuring shear-induced intracellular calcium signals of human monoblastoid U937 cells in suspension. The Couette was connected externally to a flow cytometer and pressurized at 6 PSI (4.1 N/m(2) ). Cells were subjected to a well-defined shear between 0 and 1,000 s(-1) and delivered continuously within 10 s to a FACScan at 1 μl/s. Intracellular calcium levels and the percentage of cells activated increased as shear increased in duration and intensity. PMID:22045643

  3. Expression of interleukin 2 receptors by monocytes from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and induction of monocyte interleukin 2 receptors by human immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J B; McCartney-Francis, N; Smith, P D; Simon, G; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Popovic, M; Wahl, S M

    1990-01-01

    A population of circulating mononuclear cells from patients with AIDS was identified which expressed interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R). By dual-fluorescence flow microfluorometry, the patients' IL-2R+ cells were further identified as Leu M3+ monocytes (29.4 +/- 5.2% of the Leu M3+ cells were IL-2R+, n = 15), whereas Leu M3+ monocytes from normal subjects were IL-2R negative (2.0 +/- 0.42%; P less than 0.001). By Northern analysis, monocytes from AIDS patients, but not control subjects, constitutively expressed steady-state levels of IL-2R mRNA. Functionally, the IL-2R+ monocytes were capable of depleting IL-2 from culture supernatants, suggesting a mechanism for the reduced IL-2 levels commonly seen in AIDS patients. IL-2R+ monocytes also expressed increased levels of surface HLA-DR which may favor monocyte T-cell interactions and the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In additional studies, normal monocytes were infected with a macrophage-tropic HIV isolate in vitro and monitored for IL-2R and HLA-DR expression. Within 24-48 h after exposure to HIV in vitro, but before evidence of productive infection, greater than 25% of the monocytes became IL-2R+ with increasing numbers of IL-2R+ cells and HLA-DR levels through day 6. These early signaling effects of HIV could be mimicked by adding purified HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the monocytes. This stimulation of monocytes before or independent of productive infection of the cells by HIV is consistent with in vivo observations of activated and/or abnormal functions by monocytes that do not appear to be infected with HIV in AIDS patients. Images PMID:2295695

  4. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  5. Identification of Distinct Monocyte Phenotypes and Correlation with Circulating Cytokine Profiles in Acute Response to Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wan; Vodovotz, Yoram; Kusturiss, Mary B.; Barclay, Derek; Greenwald, Karen; Boninger, Michael L.; Coen, Paul M.; Brienza, David; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Macrophage infiltration to the injury site during the acute response to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is not uniform. Macrophage phenotype has been characterized as either pro-inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Animal studies suggest that M1/M2 dominance at the site of injury relates to spontaneous recovery following SCI. Objective To investigate whether the phenotype of circulating macrophage precursors-monocytes (MOs), is altered in the acute phase of SCI and corresponds to circulating inflammatory cytokines. Study Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting A single academic medical center in Pennsylvania, US. Patients A cohort of 27 complete or incomplete traumatic SCI subjects enrolled within 7 days post-SCI injury. Methods MO phenotype was defined within the first week post-SCI, using flow cytometry, and compared to historical uninjured controls. Concentrations of 25 cytokines/chemokines were assessed using Luminex in serial blood samples up to two weeks post-SCI. ANOVA was used to determine the correlations between the phenotypes and the cytokine profiles. Results Patients subsets were identified with either M1 dominant or M2 dominant circulating MOs distinct from the uninjured controls. The M1-dominant was associated with higher circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12p70 and IP-10, and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-15 and IL-7, whereas the M2-dominant exhibited the opposite cytokine profiles with significantly higher IL-10 and IL-7. Conclusion In the acute phase after SCI, at comparable injury severity, subgroups of patients exhibit distinct M1/M2 MOs dominance and the phenotype is correlated with M1 or M2-specific cytokine/chemokine profiles. Though further studies are needed to determine how these observed phenotypic differences relate to functional recovery, our findings 1) provide the first evidence indicating the possible individual differences in the immune responses to the comparable traumatic SCI, with potential implications for management of acute SCI and rehabilitation; 2) may represent easily accessible biomarkers with prognostic utility. PMID:24140737

  6. Caffeine sensitization of cultured mammalian cells and human lymphocytes irradiated with gamma rays and fast neutrons: a study of relative biological effectiveness in relation to cellular repair

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, M.A.; Gibson, D.P.

    1985-10-01

    The sensitizing effects of caffeine were studied in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells and human lymphocytes following irradiation with gamma rays and fast neutrons. Caffeine sensitization occurred only when log-phase BHK cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were exposed to the two radiations. Noncycling (confluent) cells of BHK resulted in a shouldered survival curve following gamma irradiation while a biphasic curve was obtained with the log-phase cells. Survival in the case of lymphocytes was estimated by measurement of (TH)thymidine uptake. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons was found to be greater at survival levels corresponding to the resistant portions of the survival curves (shoulder or resistant tail). In both cell types, no reduction in RBE was observed when caffeine was present, because caffeine affected both gamma and neutron survival by the same proportion.

  7. HCV-infected cells and differentiation increase monocyte immunoregulatory galectin-9 production.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Noah M K; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Cheng, Linling; Rosen, Hugo R; Mengshol, John A

    2016-03-01

    The lectin galectin-9 may help establish and maintain chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Galectin-9 is elevated in the liver and sera of hepatitis C virus patients, induces apoptosis of hepatitis C virus-specific T cells, and increases inhibitory regulatory T cells. Kupffer cells stain strongly for galectin-9 protein in hepatitis C virus patients. In the current study, we determined stimuli that induce galectin-9 production by monocytes and macrophages in hepatitis C virus infection. With the use of real-time PCR and flow cytometry, we analyzed galectin-9 mRNA and protein from human monocytes cocultured with hepatitis C virus-infected cells or noninfectious hepatitis C virus subgenomic replicon cells. We focused on finding the stimuli for galectin-9 production. Additionally, we measured galectin-9 during monocyte-to-macrophage maturation. Finally, we examined galectin-9 in peripheral monocytes from hepatitis C virus patients using flow cytometry. Galectin-9 mRNA increased 8-fold when primary monocytes were exposed to hepatitis C virus--infected cells. Maximum induction required proximity or contact and did not require IFN-? or hepatitis C virus virions. Coculture of monocytes with subgenomic replicon cells increased galectin-9 5-fold, and purified exosomes from infected cells stimulated galectin-9 production. Stimulation of monocyte TLR3, -7, and -8 increased galectin-9 production. Differentiation of monocytes to macrophages increased galectin-9, and nonclassic monocytes from hepatitis C virus patients had the highest levels of galectin-9. Hepatitis C virus-infected cells stimulated monocytes to produce galectin-9 in close proximity, possibly, in part, as a result of exosomes and endosomal TLRs. Differentiation of monocytes to macrophages increased galectin-9. Nonclassic monocytes from hepatitis C virus patients express the highest galectin-9 levels, suggesting they may contribute to elevated galectin-9 and adaptive immune inhibition in hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:26475932

  8. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4+ T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface–retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes. PMID:25957306

  9. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes. PMID:25957306

  10. BUPRENORPHINE DECREASES THE CCL2-MEDIATED CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSE OF MONOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo; Williams, Dionna W.; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M.; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite successful cART, approximately 60% of HIV infected people exhibit HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9, were identified and had not been shown previously be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  11. Buprenorphine decreases the CCL2-mediated chemotactic response of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Williams, Dionna W; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W

    2015-04-01

    Despite successful combined antiretroviral therapy, ∼ 60% of HIV-infected people exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV-infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9 were identified and had not been shown previously to be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  12. Hypoxia-inducible C-to-U coding RNA editing downregulates SDHB in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Bora E; De Jong, Kitty; Liu, Biao; Wang, Jianmin; Patnaik, Santosh K; Wallace, Paul K; Taggart, Robert T

    2013-01-01

    Background. RNA editing is a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can alter the coding sequences of certain genes in response to physiological demands. We previously identified C-to-U RNA editing (C136U, R46X) which inactivates a small fraction of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH; mitochondrial complex II) subunit B gene (SDHB) mRNAs in normal steady-state peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). SDH is a heterotetrameric tumor suppressor complex which when mutated causes paraganglioma tumors that are characterized by constitutive activation of hypoxia inducible pathways. Here, we studied regulation, extent and cell type origin of SDHB RNA editing. Methods. We used short-term cultured PBMCs obtained from random healthy platelet donors, performed monocyte enrichment by cold aggregation, employed a novel allele-specific quantitative PCR method, flow cytometry, immunologic cell separation, gene expression microarray, database analysis and high-throughput RNA sequencing. Results. While the editing rate is low in uncultured monocyte-enriched PBMCs (average rate 2.0%, range 0.4%-6.3%, n = 42), it is markedly upregulated upon exposure to 1% oxygen tension (average rate 18.2%, range 2.8%-49.4%, n = 14) and during normoxic macrophage differentiation in the presence of serum (average rate 10.1%, range 2.7%-18.8%, n = 17). The normoxic induction of SDHB RNA editing was associated with the development of dense adherent aggregates of monocytes in culture. CD14-positive monocyte isolation increased the percentages of C136U transcripts by 1.25-fold in normoxic cultures (n = 5) and 1.68-fold in hypoxic cultures (n = 4). CD14-negative lymphocytes showed no evidence of SDHB editing. The SDHB genomic DNA remained wild-type during increased RNA editing. Microarray analysis showed expression changes in wound healing and immune response pathway genes as the editing rate increased in normoxic cultures. High-throughput sequencing of SDHB and SDHD transcripts confirmed the induction of C136U RNA editing in normoxic cultures but showed no additional verifiable coding edits. Analysis of SDHB RNA sequence data from 16 normal human tissues from the Illumina Body Map and from 45 samples representing 23 different cell types from the ENCODE projects confirmed the occurrence of site-specific C136U editing in whole blood (1.7%) and two primary CD14+ monocyte samples (1.9% and 2.6%). In contrast, the other cell types showed an average of 0.2% and 0.1% C136U editing rates in the two databases, respectively. Conclusions. These findings demonstrate that C-to-U coding RNA editing of certain genes is dynamically induced by physiologically relevant environmental factors and suggest that epigenetic downregulation of SDHB by site-specific RNA editing plays a role in hypoxia adaptation in monocytes. PMID:24058882

  13. Aliphatic alcohols in spirits inhibit phagocytosis by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pál, László; Árnyas, Ervin M; Bujdosó, Orsolya; Baranyi, Gergő; Rácz, Gábor; Ádány, Róza; McKee, Martin; Szűcs, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    A large volume of alcoholic beverages containing aliphatic alcohols is consumed worldwide. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of ethanol-induced immunosuppression in heavy drinkers, thereby increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, the aliphatic alcohols contained in alcoholic beverages might also impair immune cell function, thereby contributing to a further decrease in microbicidal activity. Previous research has shown that aliphatic alcohols inhibit phagocytosis by granulocytes but their effect on human monocytes has not been studied. This is important as they play a crucial role in engulfment and killing of pathogenic microorganisms and a decrease in their phagocytic activity could lead to impaired antimicrobial defence in heavy drinkers. The aim of this study was to measure monocyte phagocytosis following their treatment with those aliphatic alcohols detected in alcoholic beverages. Monocytes were separated from human peripheral blood and phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan particles by monocytes treated with ethanol and aliphatic alcohols individually and in combination was determined. It was shown that these alcohols could suppress the phagocytic activity of monocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and when combined with ethanol, they caused a further decrease in phagocytosis. Due to their additive effects, it is possible that they may inhibit phagocytosis in a clinically meaningful way in alcoholics and episodic heavy drinkers thereby contribute to their increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, further research is needed to address this question. PMID:25689949

  14. Carbon Black Particle Exhibits Size Dependent Toxicity in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, G. M.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased levels of particulate air pollution are associated with increased respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Some epidemiologic and toxicological researches suggest ultrafine particles (<100 nm) to be more harmful per unit mass than larger particles. In the present study, the effect of particle size (nano and micro) of carbon black (CB) particle on viability, phagocytosis, cytokine induction, and DNA damage in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, was analysed. The cells were incubated with nanosize (~50 nm) and micron (~500 nm) size of CB particles in a concentration range of 50–800 µg/mL. The parameters like MTT assay, phagocytosis assay, ELISA, gene expression, and DNA analysis were studied. Exposure to nano- and micron-sized CB particles showed size- and concentration dependent decrease in cell viability and significant increase in proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 as well as chemokine IL-8 release. Gene expression study showed upregulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene while cyclooxygenase-2 gene remained unaffected. Nano CB particles altered the phagocytic capacity of monocytes although micron CB had no significant effect. CB particles did not show any significant effect on DNA of monocytes. The investigations indicate that CB particles in nanosize exhibit higher propensity of inducing cytotoxicity, inflammation, and altered phagocytosis in human monocytes than their micron size. PMID:24669321

  15. Increase of infiltrating monocytes in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Pan, Zhiyun; Xia, Juan; Xiong, Yali; Wang, Guiyang; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Jun; Yan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhaoping; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes have been demonstrated to contribute to tissue damage in experimental models of liver injury and fibrosis. However, less is known about monocyte infiltration in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In the present study, we demonstrated that CD68+ hepatic macrophages and MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies as compared with normal liver tissue. In addition, CLD patients with higher inflammatory grading scores had more CD68+ macrophages and MAC387+ monocytes infiltration in their livers compared to those with lower scores. Significantly more MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were found in the liver tissue of CLD patients with higher fibrotic staging scores compared to those with lower scores. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression was significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies. MCP-1 staining scores were significantly positively associated with the numbers of MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes in CLD patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that infiltrating monocytes may play a pathological role in exacerbating chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. MCP-1 may be involved in the monocyte infiltration and progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. PMID:26896599

  16. Modulation of the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in stimulated human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Eskeland, T.; Kolset, S.O. )

    1989-09-05

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis was studied in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after exposure to typical activators of the monocyte/macrophage system: interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). By morphological examination, both monocytes and MDM were stimulated by these activators. Treatment with IFN-gamma resulted in a slight decrease in the expression of (35S)chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) in both monocytes and MDM, whereas LPS treatment increased the (35S)CSPG expression 1.8 and 2.2 times, respectively. PMA, in contrast, decreased the CSPG expression 0.4 times in monocytes, whereas MDM were stimulated to increase the biosynthesis 1.9 times. An increase in the sulfate density of the chondroitin sulfate chains was evident following differentiation of monocytes into MDM due to the expression of disulfated disaccharide units of the chondroitin sulfate E type (CS-E). However, monocytes exposed to PMA did also express disaccharides of the chondroitin sulfate E type. Furthermore, the expression of CS-E in MDM was increased 2 times following PMA treatment. An inactive phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-diacetate, did not affect the expression of CS-E in either monocytes or MDM when compared with control cultures, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways may be involved in the regulation of sulfation of CSPG. Exposure to LPS or IFN-gamma did not lead to any changes in the sulfation of the chondroitin sulfate chains.

  17. Attractin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26-like enzyme, is expressed on human peripheral blood monocytes and potentially influences monocyte function.

    PubMed

    Wrenger, Sabine; Faust, Jürgen; Friedrich, Daniel; Hoffmann, Torsten; Hartig, Roland; Lendeckel, Uwe; Kähne, Thilo; Thielitz, Anja; Neubert, Klaus; Reinhold, Dirk

    2006-09-01

    The ectoenzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV; CD26) was shown to play a crucial role in T cell activation. Several compounds inhibiting DP IV-like activity are currently under investigation for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis ulcerosa, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. In the present study, we show that human peripheral blood monocytes express a DP IV-like enzyme activity, which could be inhibited completely by the synthetic DP IV inhibitor Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide. DP IV immunoreactivity was not detectable on monocytes, and DP IV transcript levels of monocytes were near the detection limit of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, monocytes exhibit a strong mRNA expression of the multifunctional DP IV-like ectoenzyme attractin and were highly positive for attractin in flow cytometric analysis. Fluorescence microscopy clearly demonstrated that attractin is located on the cell surface of monocytes. Attractin immunoprecipitates hydrolyzed Gly-Pro-pNA, indicating that monocyte-expressed attractin possesses DP IV-like activity. Inhibitor kinetic studies with purified human plasma attractin revealed that Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide not only inhibits DP IV but also attractin (50% inhibition concentration=8.45 x 10(-9) M). Studying the influence of this inhibitor on monocyte functions, we observed a clear reduction of cell adhesion to fibronectin-coated culture plates in the presence of Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide. Moreover, this inhibitor significantly modulates the production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-beta1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte cultures. In summary, here, we demonstrate for the first time expression of attractin on monocytes and provide first data suggesting that drugs directed to DP IV-like enzyme activity could affect monocyte function via attractin inhibition. PMID:16835316

  18. Hydrodynamic Regulation of Monocyte Inflammatory Response to an Intracellular Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Mareedu, Naresh; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation. PMID:21249123

  19. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    PubMed

    Evani, Shankar J; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Mareedu, Naresh; Montgomery, Robbie K; Arulanandam, Bernard P; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2011-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation. PMID:21249123

  20. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by parainfluenza virus type 3-infected bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Basaraba, R J; Brown, P R; Laegreid, W W; Silflow, R M; Evermann, J F; Leid, R W

    1993-01-01

    Lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) or antigen in the presence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) infected bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) or monocytes, had depressed [3H]thymidine incorporation. This failure of lymphocytes to incorporate radiolabel required live virus, was time dependent and was most pronounced when BAM were infected for 48 hr prior to the addition of lymphocytes. The rate of infection of alveolar macrophages and the release of infectious virus into culture supernatants paralleled suppression of lymphocyte mitogenesis by PIV-3. However, the peak titre of exogenous, live or inactivated virus was not suppressive when added to lymphocyte macrophage cultures just prior to Con A stimulation. Neither the loss of viable alveolar macrophages nor a shift in antigen or mitogen dose response in virally infected cultures could account for the deficit in [3H]thymidine incorporation by lymphocytes. Despite the presence of lymphocyte-associated virus antigen detected by direct immunofluorescence, no increase in PIV-3 titre above baseline was seen from infected lymphocytes, irrespective of mitogen stimulation. Likewise, lymphocytes did not contribute to the extracellular virus pool in lymphocyte-macrophage cultures as the increases in viral titre above basal levels in supernatants were equal to levels released by macrophages alone. The expression of viral antigen on lymphocytes stimulated in the presence of PIV-3-infected BAM suggests a non-productive or abortive infection of lymphocytes mediated through contact with infected macrophages. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8393834

  1. Basis for defective responses of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid lymphocytes to anti-CD3 (T3) antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, M; Tsoukas, C D; Robinson, C A; Dinarello, C A; Carson, D A; Vaughan, J H

    1986-01-01

    Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis characteristically respond poorly to mitogens. In this study, mitogenic antibodies reactive with the CD3(T3) antigen on human T lymphocytes were used to analyze the basis for the deficiency. OKT3-induced proliferation and release of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) from SFMC were depressed in all patients. Purified IL-1 or recombinant IL-2 restored proliferative responses in SFMC and increased IL-2 receptor density. Exogenous IL-1 also enhanced IL-2 release. Fractionation of SFMC supernatants on phosphocellulose columns revealed the presence of IL-1 and a potent IL-1 inhibitor. The monocyte-derived IL-1 inhibitor blocked IL-1-dependent responses of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes to OKT3, but had no effect on IL-2-dependent events. These results suggest that IL-1 inhibitor(s) in SFMC impair(s) OKT3-induced mitogenesis by interfering with the effects of IL-1 on T lymphocytes. The net result is deficient IL-2 secretion, IL-2 receptor expression, and impaired cellular proliferation. This novel inhibitory circuit provides a rational explanation for the diminished function of synovial fluid T lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:3091636

  2. Bacille Calmette-Guerin induces NOD2-dependent nonspecific protection from reinfection via epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Quintin, Jessica; Preijers, Frank; Joosten, Leo A B; Ifrim, Daniela C; Saeed, Sadia; Jacobs, Cor; van Loenhout, Joke; de Jong, Dirk; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Xavier, Ramnik J; van der Meer, Jos W M; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G

    2012-10-23

    Adaptive features of innate immunity, recently described as "trained immunity," have been documented in plants, invertebrate animals, and mice, but not yet in humans. Here we show that bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in healthy volunteers led not only to a four- to sevenfold increase in the production of IFN-γ, but also to a twofold enhanced release of monocyte-derived cytokines, such as TNF and IL-1β, in response to unrelated bacterial and fungal pathogens. The enhanced function of circulating monocytes persisted for at least 3 mo after vaccination and was accompanied by increased expression of activation markers such as CD11b and Toll-like receptor 4. These training effects were induced through the NOD2 receptor and mediated by increased histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation. In experimental studies, BCG vaccination induced T- and B-lymphocyte-independent protection of severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice from disseminated candidiasis (100% survival in BCG-vaccinated mice vs. 30% in control mice). In conclusion, BCG induces trained immunity and nonspecific protection from infections through epigenetic reprogramming of innate immune cells. PMID:22988082

  3. Functional aspects of fish lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Scapigliati, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    After almost 40 years of studies in comparative immunology, some light has been shed on the evolutive immunobiology of vertebrates, and experimental evidences have shown that acquired immunity, defined by somatic recombination of antigen-binding molecules and memory, is an achievement as ancient as jawless vertebrates. However, the molecular processes generating antigen receptors evolved independently between jawless and jawed fishes, and produced lymphocytic cells with similar functions but employing different sets of genes. In recent years, data have been provided describing some in vitro and in vivo functional responses of fish lymphocytes. After a long gap, the number of specific markers for fish lymphocytes is increasing, thus allowing a first characterisation of lymphocyte subsets. Overall, in the near future it will be possible to open a new chapter in fish immunology and investigate functional immunity of lymphocyte responses by combining the extensive knowledge on immune gene products with markers for molecules and cells. The present review summarizes current knowledge on functional features of fish lymphocytes. PMID:23707785

  4. Increased monocyte chemotactic protein-1 concentration and monocyte count independently associate with a poor prognosis in dogs with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Perry, J A; Thamm, D H; Eickhoff, J; Avery, A C; Dow, S W

    2011-03-01

    Overexpression of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) has been associated with a poor prognosis in many human cancers. Increased MCP-1 concentrations may promote tumour progression by increasing mobilization of myeloid derived suppressor cells such as immature monocytes and neutrophils. We hypothesized that increased numbers of peripheral neutrophils or monocytes and increased MCP-1 concentrations would predict a worse outcome in dogs with multicentric lymphoma. In this retrospective study involving 26 client-owned dogs diagnosed with lymphoma, we show that peripheral neutrophil and monocyte counts as well as serum MCP-1 concentrations were significantly elevated relative to healthy control animals, and that such increases were associated with a decreased disease-free interval in dogs treated with chemotherapy based on cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone (CHOP). To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that pretreatment evaluation of monocyte and neutrophil counts can provide important prognostic information in dogs with lymphoma. The mechanisms underlying these observations remain to be determined. PMID:21303454

  5. Analysis of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1-mediated lung injury using rat lung organ cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. S.; Jones, M. L.; Flory, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    Using a rat lung organ culture system, we analyzed the role of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP 1) in leukocyte to lung adhesive interactions and monocyte-mediated lung injury. Quantitative leukocyte to lung adhesive interactions were examined using an adaptation of the Woodruff-Stamper frozen section binding assay. Pretreatment of organ cultures with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF alpha) resulted in a protein synthesis-dependent increase in the adhesiveness of lung tissue for peripheral blood monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to lung tissue was not increased above baseline after 7 hours but increased more than twofold by 24 hours and persisted through 48 hours. Binding of monocyte to lung tissue was further increased when recombinant rat MCP 1 was added to monocyte suspensions immediately before being layered onto lung sections derived from either TNF alpha-treated or untreated organ cultures. Addition of antibody directed against rat CD11b/c resulted in a moderate reduction in monocyte binding. TNF or lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of mononuclear cells in the presence of [3H]leucine-labeled organ cultures resulted in lung injury as assessed by radioisotope release. Mononuclear cell-mediated organ culture injury could be partially inhibited with anti-rat MCP 1 antibody, anti-rat CD11b/c antibody, or antioxidants including catalase and deferoxamine. Anti-MCP 1 and anti-CD11b/c increased the absolute numbers of monocytes that could be retrieved from monocyte-lung co-cultures while catalase and deferoxamine did not. In vitro studies revealed that isolated rat peripheral blood monocytes produce O2- in response to MCP 1. These data provide a functional correlate for recent in vitro studies which suggest that MCP 1 may mediate leukocyte adhesive processes by up-regulating beta 2 integrin expression on monocytes. This study provides evidence that monocytes activated by MCP 1 can damage lung tissue through an oxidant-mediated mechanism. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 may participate in the pathogenesis of monocyte-mediated lung injury by modulating inflammatory cell adhesion as well as through monocyte activation. Images Figure 2 PMID:8103296

  6. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in rats exposed to 60-Hz magnetic fields: Preliminary studies and protocol. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Sasser, L.B.; Morris, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    An animal model was evaluated and characterized to study the clinical progression of leukemia as affected by physical and chemical agents. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia, a spontaneous disease in aged Fischer 344 rats, can readily be transplanted to young rats who subsequently develop LGL leukemia in a few weeks. In the model, spleen cells from leukemic rats are injected (intraperitoneally) into recipient rats. Clinical progression (time course) of the disease follows a rather consistent pattern with clinical signs, including splenomegaly, metastasis of cells to other tissues (liver, lymph nodes, thymus), hematological changes in white and red cell populations, and loss of body weight. In the process of adapting this transplantation model to the study of 60-Hz magnetic fields, several major components were identified that could influence clinical progression, including number of cells injected, health of the animal, and effects of chemical and physical agents. This Interim Report concerns preliminary studies conducted to establish and characterize the LGL model in preparation for subsequent magnetic field exposure studies. The protocol for the first 60-Hz magnetic field exposure study is included as Appendix A.

  7. Homocysteine mediated expression and secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8 in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaokun; Dai, Jing; Remick, Daniel G; Wang, Xian

    2003-08-22

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are major chemokines for leukocyte trafficking and have been identified in atheromatous plaques. MCP-1 and IL-8 have been found to express mainly by macrophages in human lesion. We undertook this study to determine whether Hcy could induce the secretion of chemokines from human monocytes and, if so, to explore the mediating mechanism. We found that clinically relevant levels of Hcy (10 to 1000 micromol/L) increased the protein secretion and mRNA expression as well as activity of MCP-1 and IL-8 in cultured primary human monocytes. These effects of Hcy were primarily mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) through NAD(P)H oxidase, because Hcy could upregulate the production of ROS and the inhibitors of protein kinase C, calmodulin, free radical scavengers, or NAD(P)H oxidase abolished Hcy-induced ROS production and MCP-1 and IL-8 secretion in these cells. Furthermore, the inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and nuclear factor-kappaB or the activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) significantly decreased Hcy-induced MCP-1 and IL-8 secretion in these cells. These data indicate that pathophysiological levels of Hcy can alter human monocyte function by upregulating MCP-1 and IL-8 expression and secretion via enhanced formation of intracellular ROS originated from NAD(P)H oxidase source via calmodulin or protein kinase C signaling pathways and that Hcy-induced ROS subsequently activates mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 and ERK1/2) and nuclear factor-kappaB in a PPARgamma activator-sensitive manner. Thus, activation of PPARgamma may become a therapeutic target for preventing Hcy-induced proatherogenic effects. PMID:12881478

  8. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  10. RECOMBINANT CD36 INHIBITS OXLDL-INDUCED ICAM-1-DEPENDENT MONOCYTE ADHESION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key event in atherosclerosis is the interaction between monocytes and endothelial cells. Binding of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to CD36 on endothelial cells results in activation and subsequent monocyte adhesion. In this study, a recombinant soluble CD36 molecule was expressed to deli...

  11. Phagocytosis-enhancing effect of lactoferrin on bovine peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szuster-Ciesielska, A; Kamińska, T; Kandefer-Szerszeń, M

    1995-01-01

    The effect of lactoferrin (LF) on in vitro and in vivo phagocytic ability of bovine blood monocytes was studied. It was demonstrated that bovine LF enhanced in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria and ovine erythrocyte-antibody complexes and increased intracellular killing of Staphylococcus albus. Monocytes of colostrum deprived calves, which were intravenously injected with LF, also exhibited elevated phagocytic properties. PMID:9071453

  12. Increased Migratory and Activation Cell Markers of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes in an Experimental Model of Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Wagner de Fátima; Brito-Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio Alvim; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Melo, Dirceu de Sousa; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Guimarães, Fábio Lourenço Tadeu; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of CD80 and CD18 in subpopulations of peripheral blood leukocytes and oxidative kidney damage in rats with nephrotic syndrome (NS) induced by doxorubicin (Dox) in comparison to control animals at different time points. Male adult Wistar rats were submitted to 24-hour urine and blood collection for biochemical and immunological analysis at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after Dox injection. After euthanasia, the kidneys were removed for histological analysis and the evaluation of oxidative stress. The phenotypic characterization of leukocytes was performed using flow cytometry. Dox-injected animals exhibited increased CD18 expression in cytotoxic T lymphocytes, NK cells, and monocytes and high CD80 expression in monocytes. Kidney oxidative damage was positively correlated with CD80 expression in monocytes and serum levels of creatinine. These results suggest that phagocytic and cytotoxic cells are preferentially recruited to the tissue injury site, which may contribute to kidney dysfunction in this animal model of NS. The blockade of integrin and costimulatory molecules may provide new therapeutic opportunities for NS. PMID:26063968

  13. Increased Migratory and Activation Cell Markers of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes in an Experimental Model of Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Wagner de Fátima; Brito-Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio Alvim; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Melo, Dirceu de Sousa; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Guimarães, Fábio Lourenço Tadeu; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; Vieira, Érica Leandro Marciano; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of CD80 and CD18 in subpopulations of peripheral blood leukocytes and oxidative kidney damage in rats with nephrotic syndrome (NS) induced by doxorubicin (Dox) in comparison to control animals at different time points. Male adult Wistar rats were submitted to 24-hour urine and blood collection for biochemical and immunological analysis at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after Dox injection. After euthanasia, the kidneys were removed for histological analysis and the evaluation of oxidative stress. The phenotypic characterization of leukocytes was performed using flow cytometry. Dox-injected animals exhibited increased CD18 expression in cytotoxic T lymphocytes, NK cells, and monocytes and high CD80 expression in monocytes. Kidney oxidative damage was positively correlated with CD80 expression in monocytes and serum levels of creatinine. These results suggest that phagocytic and cytotoxic cells are preferentially recruited to the tissue injury site, which may contribute to kidney dysfunction in this animal model of NS. The blockade of integrin and costimulatory molecules may provide new therapeutic opportunities for NS. PMID:26063968

  14. Stimulation of human tonsillar lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Oettgen, H. F.; Silber, R.; Miescher, P. A.; Hirschhorn, K.

    1966-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro behaviour of cultured human tonsillar lymphocytes. In comparison with peripheral blood lymphocytes these cells show a higher degree of formation of large cells and mitoses in control cultures without any additive. They behave in a manner similar to peripheral blood lymphocytes when cultured with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), streptolysin S (SLS) and specific antigens. The only exception is a lack of response to streptolysin O (SLO). PMID:5916348

  15. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Foro, Palmira; Algara, Manuel; Lozano, Joan; Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier; Torres, Erica; Carles, Joan; Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael; Quera, Jaume; Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar; Lacruz, Marti; Bellosillo, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of CD8+ T lymphocytes was associated with overall survival, although larger series are needed to confirm this finding.

  16. Increased risk of melanoma in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Lane, Steven W; Green, Adèle C

    2016-04-01

    An increased risk of melanoma has been variously reported in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), analogous with other immunosuppressed populations. To fully assess this association, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available evidence from observational cohort studies. All such longitudinal studies of patients diagnosed with CLL that enabled quantitative assessment of the risk of melanoma compared with the general population were eligible. We identified seven studies from a search of all published literature to July 2014 in Medline, Embase and ISI science citation index databases. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. There was an almost four-fold increase in the risk of melanoma in patients with CLL compared with the general population (pooled standardized incidence ratio 3.88 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.08-7.22]), although significant heterogeneity was evident among studies (I=96.0%, Phet<0.001). The risk of melanoma was higher for men with CLL (3.41; 95% CI 1.49-7.80) than women (2.61; 95% CI 1.13-6.01). CLL patients are at high risk of developing melanoma and the magnitude of the risk is higher than that found in other immunosuppressed populations. Our findings suggest that patients with CLL, as they are also at a higher risk of developing the more common skin cancers, would benefit from regular skin examinations. PMID:26630660

  17. Generation of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes by immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of requirements for human cytolytic T-lymphocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    De Jong, R; Brouwer, M; Rebel, V I; Van Seventer, G A; Miedema, F; Van Lier, R A

    1990-01-01

    Requirements for the induction of human cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity were studied in a monocyte-free T-cell activation system that uses immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as a stimulus. Alloreactive CTL with specificity for HLA-A and -B locus antigens could be demonstrated within 2 days after the initiation of activation. CTL induction in purified T cells initiated by an optimal concentration of immobilized anti-CD3 mAb was not enhanced by the addition of monocytes or exogeneous cytokines, whereas addition of anti-CD25 mAb largely blocked the response. Upon suboptimal anti-CD3 mAb stimulation, addition of recombinant interleukin (rIL)-2, rIL-1 and rIL-4, but not recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or rIL-6, potentiated the development of CTL activity. Finally it was shown that immobilized anti-CD3 mAb induced significant levels of CTL activity in both purified CD4+ and CD8+ cells. This study indicates that the requirement for cytokines in the differentiation of CTL precursors depends on the strength of the activation signal delivered through the T-cell receptor. PMID:2143171

  18. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-? concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-?B activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-? signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-?B/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  19. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    León, Beatriz; Ardavín, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Monocytes have been classically considered essential elements in relation with innate immune responses against pathogens, and inflammatory processes caused by external aggressions, infection and autoimmune disease. However, although their potential to differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs) was discovered 14 years ago, their functional relevance with regard to adaptive immune responses has only been uncovered very recently. Studies performed over the last years have revealed that monocyte-derived DCs play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, due to their microbicidal potential, capacity to stimulate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and ability to regulate Immunoglobulin production by B cells. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs not only constitute a subset of DCs formed at inflammatory foci, as previously thought, but also comprise different subsets of DCs located in antigen capture areas, such as the skin and the intestinal, respiratory and reproductive tracts. PMID:18362945

  20. High-Affinity Fc Receptor Expression Indicates Relative Immaturity in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Clanchy, Felix I L

    2016-05-01

    Within monocyte heterogeneity, subsets represent discrete, well-characterized phenotypes. Although many studies have highlighted differences between subsets, there is evidence that subpopulations represent contiguous stages in a maturational series. As CD14(hi)CD64(hi) monocytes have higher proliferative potential than CD14(hi)CD64(lo) monocytes, the surface marker profile on 4 subsets defined by CD14 and CD64 was measured. The profiles were compared to that of subsets defined by the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRIα), CD16, and CD14; further differences in size, granularity, and buoyancy were measured in subsets delineated by these markers. There was a positive correlation between proliferative monocyte (PM) prevalence and CD64 expression on the classical monocyte subset, and also between PM prevalence and circulating FcɛRIα(+) monocytes. The expression of CD64, the high-affinity IgG receptor, on canonical human monocyte subsets was determined before and after short-term culture, and in response to interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interferon-γ; the influence of these cytokines on monocyte subset transition was also measured. The loss of FcɛRIα expression preceded an increase in CD16 expression in whole blood cultures. These data indicate that high-affinity Fc receptors are expressed on less mature monocytes and that FcɛRIα(+) monocytes are developmentally antecedent to the canonical classical and intermediate monocyte subsets. PMID:26714112

  1. Human monocytes and macrophages differ in their mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory arthritis is a progressive disease with chronic inflammation of joints, which is mainly characterized by the infiltration of immune cells and synovial hyperproliferation. Monocytes migrate towards inflamed areas and differentiate into macrophages. In inflamed tissues, much lower oxygen levels (hypoxia) are present in comparison to the peripheral blood. Hence, a metabolic adaptation process must take place. Other studies suggest that Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) may regulate this process, but the mechanism involved for human monocytes is not yet clear. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and function of HIF-1α in monocytes and macrophages, but also considered alternative pathways involving nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB). Methods Isolated human CD14+ monocytes were incubated under normoxia and hypoxia conditions with or without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation, respectively. Nuclear and cytosolic fractions were prepared in order to detect HIF-1α and NFκB by immunoblot. For the experiments with macrophages, primary human monocytes were differentiated into human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) using human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hM-CSF). The effects of normoxia and hypoxia on gene expression were compared between monocytes and hMDMs using quantitative PCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Results We demonstrate, using primary human monocytes and hMDM, that the localization of transcription factor HIF-1α during the differentiation process is shifted from the cytosol (in monocytes) into the nucleus (in macrophages), apparently as an adaptation to a low oxygen environment. For this localization change, protein kinase C alpha/beta 1 (PKC-α/β1 ) plays an important role. In monocytes, it is NFκB1, and not HIF-1α, which is of central importance for the expression of hypoxia-adjusted genes. Conclusions These data demonstrate that during differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, crucial cellular adaptation mechanisms are decisively changed. PMID:22870988

  2. Bacterial Ghosts of Escherichia coli Drive Efficient Maturation of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Dar, Pervaiz Ahmad; Appavoo, Elamurugan; Kishore, Subodh; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Ganesh, Kondabattula

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. They not only represent a potential platform for development of novel vaccines but also provide a tool for efficient adjuvant and antigen delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between BGs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). MoDCs are highly potent antigen-presenting cells and have the potential to act as a powerful tool for manipulating the immune system. We generated bovine MoDCs in vitro from blood monocytes using E. coli expressed bovine GM-CSF and IL-4 cytokines. These MoDCs displayed typical morphology and functions similar to DCs. We further investigated the E. coli BGs to induce maturation of bovine MoDCs in comparison to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed the maturation marker molecules such as MHC-II, CD80 and CD86 were induced early and at higher levels in BG stimulated MoDCs as compared to the LPS stimulated MoDCs. BG mediated stimulation induced significantly higher levels of cytokine expression in bovine MoDCs than LPS. Both pro-inflammatory (IL-12 and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were induced in MoDCs after BGs stimulation. We further analysed the effects of BGs on the bovine MoDCs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). We found the BG-treated bovine MoDCs had significantly (p<0.05) higher capacity to stimulate allogenic T cell proliferation in MLR as compared to the LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the E. coli BGs induce a strong activation and maturation of bovine MoDCs. PMID:26669936

  3. Evaluation of a method for murine monocyte isolation by bone marrow depletion.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Martin, María José; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Carrillo-Jiménez, Alejandro; Pérez-Simón, José A; Venero, Jose L

    2015-07-01

    The study of monocyte activation and differentiation has great applications in sepsis, chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer studies. However, despite the existence of well-established protocols for monocyte purification from human blood, the isolation of murine monocytes that can be subsequently activated has not yet been fully optimized. Here we evaluate a recently developed commercial procedure for obtaining monocytes from the bone marrow based on immunomagnetic depletion of non-monocytic cells. Moreover, we compare the advantages and disadvantages of this approach relative to other existing procedures. We found that monocytes isolates generated using this technique had equal purity to those attained via depletion from peripheral blood; however, higher yields were achieved. Furthermore, isolates from this technique have lower levels of macrophage contamination than those reported in samples generated by culturing bone marrow extracts with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). In addition, we demonstrate that the purified monocytes are sensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated activation and, therefore, are useful for studies aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in monocyte activation and differentiation. PMID:25892220

  4. Comparative study of the sensitivity of lymphoblastoid and transformed monocytic cell lines to the cytotoxic effects of Viscum album extracts of different origin.

    PubMed

    Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Delignat, Sandrine; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Kaveri, Srini V

    2003-12-01

    Viscum album (VA) preparations consist of aqueous extracts of V. album, the European mistletoe. VA extracts contain mistletoe lectins, which are members of the ribosome-inactivating protein type II family. VA preparations have cytotoxic and immunomodulatory properties. Cytotoxicity induced by VA extracts may differ greatly according to the origin of the preparation (host tree, fermented extract) and the cell type. This work was performed to assess the cytotoxicity of various VA preparations, i.e. VA Qu FrF, Qu Spez, M Spez and VA P, in lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines. VA Qu FrF, Qu Spez and M Spez induced dose-dependent cell death and inhibition of cell proliferation in lymphoblastoid T cell lines and in transformed monocytic lines. In contrast, the majority of B cell lines tested were resistant to cytotoxicity induced by VA extracts. While VA Qu FrF, Qu Spez and M Spez were potent inducers of cell death, extracts of VA P, derived from mistletoe plants growing on pine trees, failed to induce any cell death in any of the cell lines examined. PMID:14671430

  5. Bovine lymphocytic leukemia: studies of etiology, pathogenesis and mode of transmission. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, D.K.

    1980-06-01

    The primary project objectives are to elucidate the cause(s) and early pathogenesis of the adult form of lymphosarcoma in cattle. This goal is to be accomplished through experimental transmission of the disease. For these studies large quantities of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) were propagated in short-term, mitogen stimulated, lymphocyte cultures. Cultures containing abundant BLV particles were pooled (33 liters total) and further processed by continuous flow, density gradient, ultracentrifugation. This higly concentrated, cell free, BLV preparation was then used as inoculum for 12 late stage bovine fetuses (inoculated in utero) and two newborn calves. Extensive monitoring studies have been carrid out on these inoculated animals to detect precancerous changes and to obtain a detailed description of the events preceding the development of lymphosarcoma. These extensive records on lymphosarcoma associated blood parameters have established that all of the inoculated animals became persistently BLV infected. However, after more than five years of incubation, no cases of lymphosarcoma developed. Consequently, during the past seven months, five of these well characterized animals have been subjected to frequent BLV re-exposure in order to study BLV-host interactions in previously infected adults and to potentially accelerate tumor formation in these animals.

  6. Final results of a multicenter phase 1 study of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Hillmen, Peter; Mahadevan, Daruka; Bühler, Andreas; Uharek, Lutz; Coutré, Steven; Frankfurt, Olga; Bloor, Adrian; Bosch, Francesc; Furman, Richard R; Kimby, Eva; Gribben, John G; Gobbi, Marco; Dreisbach, Luke; Hurd, David D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Shah, Sheetal; Zhang, Jennie; Moutouh-de Parseval, Laure; Hallek, Michael; Heerema, Nyla A; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Chanan-Khan, Asher A

    2012-03-01

    Based on clinical activity in phase 2 studies, lenalidomide was evaluated in a phase 2/3 study in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Following tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) complications, the protocol was amended to a phase 1 study to identify the maximum tolerated dose-escalation level (MTDEL). Fifty-two heavily pretreated patients, 69% with bulky disease and 48% with high-risk genomic abnormalities, initiated lenalidomide at 2.5 mg/day, with dose escalation until the MTDEL or the maximum assigned dose was attained. Lenalidomide was safely titrated to 20 mg/day; the MTDEL was not reached. Most common grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; TLS was mild and rare. The low starting dose and conservative dose escalation strategy resulted in six partial responders and 30 patients obtaining stable disease. In summary, lenalidomide 2.5 mg/day is a safe starting dose that can be titrated up to 20 mg/day in patients with CLL. PMID:21879809

  7. Lymphocyte Subsets Show Different Response Patterns to In Vivo Bound Natalizumab—A Flow Cytometric Study on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Einhaeupl, Max; Oppermann, Katrin; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Wipfler, Peter; Sellner, Johann; Golaszewski, Stefan; Afazel, Shahrzad; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Trinka, Eugen; Kraus, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Natalizumab is an effective monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of relapsing- remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and interferes with immune cell migration into the central nervous system by blocking the α4 subunit of very-late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4). Although well tolerated and very effective, some patients still suffer from relapses in spite of natalizumab therapy or from unwanted side effects like progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). In search of a routine-qualified biomarker on the effectiveness of natalizumab therapy we applied flow cytometry and analyzed natalizumab binding to α4 and α4 integrin surface levels on T-cells, B-cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells from 26 RRMS patients under up to 72 weeks of therapy. Four-weekly infusions of natalizumab resulted in a significant and sustained increase of lymphocyte-bound natalizumab (p<0.001) which was paralleled by a significant decrease in detectability of the α4 integrin subunit on all lymphocyte subsets (p<0.001). We observed pronounced natalizumab accumulations on T and B cells at single measurements in all patients who reported clinical disease activity (n = 4). The natalizumab binding capacity of in vitro saturated lymphocytes collected during therapy was strongly diminished compared to treatment-naive cells indicating a therapy-induced reduction of α4. Summing up, this pilot study shows that flow cytometry is a useful method to monitor natalizumab binding to lymphocytes from RRMS patients under therapy. Investigating natalizumab binding provides an opportunity to evaluate the molecular level of effectiveness of natalizumab therapy in individual patients. In combination with natalizumab saturation experiments, it possibly even provides a means of studying the feasability of patient-tailored infusion intervals. A routine-qualified biomarker on the basis of individual natalizumab saturation on lymphocyte subsets might be an effective tool to improve treatment safety. PMID:22363732

  8. Exercise Induced Alterations in Rat Monocyte Number, Morphology, and Function

    PubMed Central

    GUERESCHI, MARCIA G.; PRESTES, JONATO; DONATTO, FELIPE F.; DIAS, RODRIGO; FROLLINI, ANELENA B.; FERREIRA, CLÍLTON KO.; CAVAGLIERI, CLAUDIA R.; PALANCH, ADRIANNE C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the histophysiological alterations in monocytes and macrophages induced by short periods of exercise. Male Wistar rats (age = 2 months, body weight = 200g) were divided into seven groups (N = 6 each): sedentary control (C), groups exercised (swimming) at low intensity for 5 (5L), 10 (10L), and 15 minutes (15L), and groups exercised at moderate intensity for 5 (5M), 10 (10M) or 15 minutes (15M). At moderate intensity the animals carried a load of 5% of body weight on their backs. Blood monocytes were evaluated for quantity and morphology, and peritoneal macrophages were analyzed for quantity and phagocytic activity. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (p ≤ 0.05). Low intensity groups and 5M exhibited an increase in monocyte levels when compared with the control. There was an increase in monocyte cellular area for the 5L, 10L, 5M and 10M groups; monocyte nuclear area increased for the 10L, 5M and 10M groups in comparison with the control. There was an increase in peritoneal macrophages for the 15L, 10M, 15M and decrease for the 5M group. Macrophage phagocytic capacity increased for low intensity groups and for 10M group. The exercise performed for short periods modulated macrophage levels and function, and monocyte levels and morphology, in an intensity-dependent manner. The sum of acute responses observed in this study may exert a protective effect against sickness and may be used to improve health and lifespan.

  9. The blood-brain barrier induces differentiation of migrating monocytes into Th17-polarizing dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ifergan, Igal; Kébir, Hania; Bernard, Monique; Wosik, Karolina; Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Cayrol, Romain; Arbour, Nathalie; Prat, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    Trafficking of antigen-presenting cells into the CNS is essential for lymphocyte reactivation within the CNS compartment. Although perivascular dendritic cells found in inflammatory lesions are reported to polarize naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into interleukin-17-secreting-cells, the origin of those antigen-presenting cells remains controversial. We demonstrate that a subset of CD14+ monocytes migrate across the inflamed human blood-brain barrier (BBB) and differentiate into CD83+CD209+ dendritic cells under the influence of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We also demonstrate that these dendritic cells secrete interleukin-12p70, transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6 and promote the proliferation and expansion of distinct populations of interferon-gamma-secreting Th1 and interleukin-17-secreting Th17 CD4+ T lymphocytes. We further confirmed the abundance of such dendritic cells in situ, closely associated with microvascular BBB-endothelial cells within acute multiple sclerosis lesions, as well as a significant number of CD4+ interleukin-17+ T lymphocytes in the perivascular infiltrate. Our data support the notion that functional perivascular myeloid CNS dendritic cells arise as a consequence of migration of CD14+ monocytes across the human BBB, through the concerted actions of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. PMID:18156156

  10. Ly6C(+) monocyte efferocytosis and cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Larson, S R; Atif, S M; Gibbings, S L; Thomas, S M; Prabagar, M G; Danhorn, T; Leach, S M; Henson, P M; Jakubzick, C V

    2016-06-01

    Recently it was shown that circulating Ly6C(+) monocytes traffic from tissue to the draining lymph nodes (LNs) with minimal alteration in their overall phenotype. Furthermore, in the steady state, Ly6C(+) monocytes are as abundant as classical dendritic cells (DCs) within the draining LNs, and even more abundant during inflammation. However, little is known about the functional roles of constitutively trafficking Ly6C(+) monocytes. In this study we investigated whether Ly6C(+) monocytes can efferocytose (acquire dying cells) and cross-present cell-associated antigen, a functional property particularly attributed to Batf3(+) DCs. We demonstrated that Ly6C(+) monocytes intrinsically efferocytose and cross-present cell-associated antigen to CD8(+) T cells. In addition, efferocytosis was enhanced upon direct activation of the Ly6C(+) monocytes through its corresponding TLRs, TLR4 and TLR7. However, only ligation of TLR7, and not TLR4, enhanced cross-presentation by Ly6C(+) monocytes. Overall, this study outlines two functional roles, among others, that Ly6C(+) monocytes have during an adaptive immune response. PMID:26990659

  11. Distinct Responses of Human Monocyte Subsets to Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia1

    PubMed Central

    Serbina, Natalya V.; Cherny, Mathew; Shi, Chao; Bleau, Sharon A.; Collins, Nancy H.; Young, James W.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental fungus that causes life-threatening infections in neutropenic patients. In the absence of intact innate immunity, inhaled A. fumigatus spores (conidia) germinate in the lung, forming hyphae that invade blood vessels and disseminate to other tissues. Although macrophages and neutrophils are postulated to provide defense against invasive fungal infection, animal models and human studies suggest that circulating monocytes also contribute to antifungal immunity. Although human monocyte subsets, defined as either CD14+CD16− or CD14+ CD16+, have been extensively characterized, their respective roles during fungal infection remain undefined. We isolated CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes from healthy allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and compared their ability to phagocytose and inhibit A. fumigatus conidia. Both monocyte subsets efficiently phagocytose conidia, but only CD14+CD16− monocytes inhibit conidial germination yet secrete little TNF. In contrast CD14+CD16+ do not inhibit conidial germination and secrete large amounts of TNF. Although CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes differ in their response to dormant conidia, responses are similar if conidia are already germinated at the time of monocyte uptake. Our study demonstrates that functional CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes can be isolated from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and that these subsets differ in their response to A. fumigatus conidia. PMID:19635902

  12. Fibroblasts regulate monocyte response to ECM-derived matrix: The effects on monocyte adhesion and the production of inflammatory, matrix remodeling, and growth factor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy S.; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2013-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages and fibroblasts are recruited to the injury site and orchestrate the host response and tissue repair. We have previously shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence grafted onto an extracellular matrix (ECM)-based semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) enhances monocyte adhesion, and modulates subsequent gene expression and release of inflammatory and matrix remodeling factors. In this study, we investigate the direct influence of fibroblasts on monocyte response to this ECM mimic. Key wound-healing factors in inflammation, matrix remodeling, and regeneration were analyzed to gain insight into the interrelated role of regulation in fibroblast-monocyte interaction. Interleukin-1alpha/−1beta (IL-1α/−1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte inflammatory protein-1alpha/−1beta (MIP-1α/−1β), transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α), monocyte chemoattractant factor (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-2/−9 (MMP-2/−9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were analyzed. Fibroblasts decreased monocyte adhesion onto the RGD-grafted sIPN while increasing monocyte GM-CSF on all surfaces over time except for on RGD and PHSRN-grafted sIPN at 96 h. Monocytes decreased initial fibroblast IL-1α and TGF-α, but drastically increased fibroblast MMP-2 and GM-CSF. Monocyte IL-1β, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, MMP-9, and GM-CSF expression was increased over time in the presence of all sIPNs, and when the sIPNs were immobilized with ligands, a down-regulation of fibroblast IL-1β, MIP-1α, MIP-1β compared with unmodified sIPN was observed. When the ligand immobilized was RGD, monocyte TGF-α, MIP-1β, and VEGF expression was increased while monocyte GM-CSF was decreased at selected time points. These results showed a dynamic monocyte response to selected ECM components in the presence of fibroblasts. PMID:19437738

  13. Phase II Study of Lenalidomide and Rituximab As Salvage Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan; Sargent, Rachel; Burger, Jan A.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug active as salvage therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We combined lenalidomide with rituximab to improve response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine adult patients (age 42 to 82 years) with relapsed or refractory CLL were enrolled onto a phase II study of lenalidomide and rituximab. Patients had received prior fludarabine-based therapy or chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously) was administered weekly during cycle one and on day 1 of cycles three to 12. Lenalidomide was started on day 9 of cycle one at 10 mg orally and administered daily continuously. Each cycle was 28 days. Rituximab was administered for 12 cycles; lenalidomide could continue indefinitely if patients benefitted clinically. Results The overall response rate was 66%, including 12% complete responses and 12% nodular partial remissions. Time to treatment failure was 17.4 months. Median overall survival has not been reached; estimated survival at 36 months is 71%. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia (73% of patients). Fourteen patients (24%) experienced a grade 3 to 4 infection or febrile episode. There was one episode of grade 3 tumor lysis; one patient experienced renal failure during the first cycle of therapy, and one venous thromboembolic event occurred during the study. Conclusion The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab is active in patients with recurrent CLL and warrants further investigation. PMID:23270003

  14. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted. PMID:26389849

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of Alliums and Ipomoea batata extracts on lymphocytes and macrophages functions in White Leghorn chickens: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hanieh, Hamza; Narabara, Kiyoaki; Tanaka, Yuji; Gu, Zhigang; Abe, Asaki; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We previously described that supplementary garlic, onion and purple sweet potato (PSP) enhance humoral immune response in White Leghorn chickens. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the effects of garlic (GE), onion (OE) and PSP (PSPE) extracts on proliferation, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (INF)-γ gene expression of stimulated lymphocytes. The effects on microbicidal activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) productions of stimulated peritoneal macrophages were studied as well. The results showed that GE augmented Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocytes (4, 8 and 16µg/mL) and thymocytes (2, 4 and 8µg/mL) proliferations, and gene expression of IL-2 (8 and 16µg/mL) and INF-γ (16µg/mL). None of the examined extracts had mitogenic effect nor stimulated bursacytes response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Macrophages exhibited superior microbicidal activity and ROS production with GE at 4 and 8µg/mL and with OE at 25.6µg/mL. None of the extracts showed stimulatory effects on NO production. The extracts showed concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on all measured parameters at higher concentrations. Taken together, it is likely that garlic has direct stimulatory effects on immune cell functions, whereas the in vitro inhibitory effects of onion and PSP were likely attributed to high flavonoid contents. PMID:22250742

  16. Increased Expression of CD169 on Blood Monocytes and Its Regulation by Virus and CD8 T Cells in Macaque Models of HIV Infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong-Ki; McGary, Christopher M; Holder, Gerard E; Filipowicz, Adam R; Kim, Michael M; Beydoun, Hind A; Cai, Yanhui; Liu, Xianhong; Sugimoto, Chie; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2015-07-01

    Increased expression of CD169 on monocytes has been reported in HIV-1-infected humans. Using rhesus macaque models of HIV infection, we sought to investigate whether simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection upregulates CD169 expression on monocytes/macrophages. We also sought to determine whether CD8 T cells and plasma viral load directly impact the expression of CD169 on monocytes during SIV infection. We longitudinally assessed monocyte expression of CD169 during the course of SIV infection by flow cytometry, and examined the expression of CD169 on macrophages by immunohistochemistry in the spleen and lymph nodes of uninfected and infected macaques. CD169 expression on monocytes was substantially upregulated as early as 4 days during the hyperacute phase and peaked by 5-15 days after infection. After a transient decrease following the peak, its expression continued to increase during progression to AIDS. Monocyte CD169 expression was directly associated with plasma viral loads. To determine the contribution of CD8(+) T lymphocytes and virus to the control of monocyte CD169 expression, we used experimental CD8(+) lymphocyte depletion and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in SIV-infected macaques. Rapid depletion of CD8 T cells during acute infection of rhesus macaques induced an abrupt increase in CD169 expression. Importantly, levels of CD169 expression plummeted following initiation of ART and rebounded upon cessation of therapy. Taken together, our data reveal independent roles for virus and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in controlling monocyte CD169 expression, which may be an important link in further investigating the host response to viral infection. PMID:25891017

  17. The monocyte to macrophage transition in the murine sterile wound.

    PubMed

    Crane, Meredith J; Daley, Jean M; van Houtte, Olivier; Brancato, Samielle K; Henry, William L; Albina, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    The origin of wound repair macrophages is incompletely defined and was examined here in sterile wounds using the subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponge implantation model in mice. Phenotypic analysis identified F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi)CD64(+)MerTK(-) monocytes and F4/80(+)Ly6C(low)CD64(+)MerTK(+) macrophages in the wound. Circulating monocytes were the precursors of inflammatory Ly6C(hi) wound monocytes. Ly6C(low)MerTK(+) macrophages appeared later, expressed CD206, CD11c, and MHC class II, produced cytokines consistent with repair function, and lacked a gene expression profile compatible with mesenchymal transition or fibroblastic transdifferentiation. Data also demonstrated that Ly6C(hi) wound cells were precursors of Ly6C(low) macrophages, although monocytes did not undergo rapid maturation but rather persisted in the wound as Ly6C(hi)MerTK(-) cells. MerTK-deficient mice were examined to determine whether MerTK-dependent signals from apoptotic cells regulated the maturation of wound macrophages. MerTK-deficient mice had day 14 cell compositions that resembled more immature wounds, with a smaller proportion of F4/80(+) cells and higher frequencies of Ly6G(+) neutrophils and Ly6C(hi) monocytes. The cytokine profile and number of apoptotic cells in day 14 wounds of MerTK-deficient mice was unaffected despite the alterations in cell composition. Overall, these studies identified a differentiation pathway in response to sterile inflammation in which monocytes recruited from the circulation acquire proinflammatory function, persist in the wound, and mature into repair macrophages. PMID:24466192

  18. The Monocyte to Macrophage Transition in the Murine Sterile Wound

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Meredith J.; Daley, Jean M.; van Houtte, Olivier; Brancato, Samielle K.; Henry, William L.; Albina, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of wound repair macrophages is incompletely defined and was examined here in sterile wounds using the subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponge implantation model in mice. Phenotypic analysis identified F4/80+Ly6ChiCD64+MerTK– monocytes and F4/80+Ly6ClowCD64+MerTK+ macrophages in the wound. Circulating monocytes were the precursors of inflammatory Ly6Chi wound monocytes. Ly6ClowMerTK+ macrophages appeared later, expressed CD206, CD11c, and MHC class II, produced cytokines consistent with repair function, and lacked a gene expression profile compatible with mesenchymal transition or fibroblastic transdifferentiation. Data also demonstrated that Ly6Chi wound cells were precursors of Ly6Clow macrophages, although monocytes did not undergo rapid maturation but rather persisted in the wound as Ly6ChiMerTK– cells. MerTK-deficient mice were examined to determine whether MerTK-dependent signals from apoptotic cells regulated the maturation of wound macrophages. MerTK-deficient mice had day 14 cell compositions that resembled more immature wounds, with a smaller proportion of F4/80+ cells and higher frequencies of Ly6G+ neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes. The cytokine profile and number of apoptotic cells in day 14 wounds of MerTK-deficient mice was unaffected despite the alterations in cell composition. Overall, these studies identified a differentiation pathway in response to sterile inflammation in which monocytes recruited from the circulation acquire proinflammatory function, persist in the wound, and mature into repair macrophages. PMID:24466192

  19. Transport of cargo from periphery to brain by circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cintron, Amarallys F; Dalal, Nirjari V; Dooyema, Jeromy; Betarbet, Ranjita; Walker, Lary C

    2015-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the Aβ peptide - a fundamental event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer׳s disease - can be instigated in the brains of experimental animals by the intracranial infusion of brain extracts that are rich in aggregated Aβ. Recent experiments have found that the peripheral (intraperitoneal) injection of Aβ seeds induces Aβ deposition in the brains of APP-transgenic mice, largely in the form of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Macrophage-type cells normally are involved in pathogen neutralization and antigen presentation, but under some circumstances, circulating monocytes have been found to act as vectors for the transport of pathogenic agents such as viruses and prions. The present study assessed the ability of peripheral monocytes to transport Aβ aggregates from the peritoneal cavity to the brain. Our initial experiments showed that intravenously delivered macrophages that had previously ingested fluorescent nanobeads as tracers migrate primarily to peripheral organs such as spleen and liver, but that a small number also reach the brain parenchyma. We next injected CD45.1-expressing monocytes from donor mice intravenously into CD45.2-expressing host mice; after 24h, analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histology confirmed that some CD45.1 monocytes enter the brain, particularly in the superficial cortex and around blood vessels. When the donor monocytes are first exposed to Aβ-rich brain extracts from human AD cases, a subset of intravenously delivered Aβ-containing cells migrate to the brain. These experiments indicate that, in mouse models, circulating monocytes are potential vectors by which exogenously delivered, aggregated Aβ travels from periphery to brain, and more generally support the hypothesis that macrophage-type cells can participate in the dissemination of proteopathic seeds. PMID:26168900

  20. A Nonclassical Monocyte Phenotype in Peripheral Blood is Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Report from an EMIL Subcohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Oeztuerk, S; Kratzer, W; Boehm, B O

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as the prototypic hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Our study was designed to investigate the association between NAFLD and alteration in monocyte subsets as hallmark of cardiovascular disease. Seventy-three "Echinococcus Multilocularis and other medical diseases in Leutkirch" (EMIL) population-based cohort participants (mean observation period 11 years) were selected to study their monocyte phenotype by multiparameter flow cytometry. NAFLD was diagnosed using standard ultrasound based criteria excluding other causes of fatty liver disease. Three monocyte subsets ("classical" CD14++?CD16-, "intermediate" CD14++? CD16+, "nonclassical" CD14+CD16++? monocytes), and surface markers (CD36 and CD9) were determined. Classical risk markers covering inflammatory and dysmetabolic characters were also determined. Forty-three out of 73 subjects revealed a stable clinical phenotype, namely 17 subjects revealed NAFLD, whereas 26 subjects showed no fatty liver disease. Compared to the nonfatty liver group, the nonclassical monocyte fraction (p=0.049), total monocyte fraction and count were increased in NAFLD probands (p=0.028, and 0.035, respectively), while classical monocyte fraction (p=0.034) was decreased. Total monocyte fraction, nonclassical monocyte fraction, and waist circumstance were independent risk factors for NAFLD. The nonclassical monocyte fraction and classical monocyte fraction were significantly correlated with waist-to-hip ratio. This pilot long-term follow-up study suggests that nonclassical monocyte fraction and total monocyte fraction might have potential as a prognostic and modifiable biomarker in NFALD patients. This novel marker set might therefore be of interest to monitor druggable inflammatory pathways in individuals with hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25853894

  1. Monocytes Do Not Transdifferentiate into Proper Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Andreas; Ehnert, Sabrina; Schyschka, Lilianna; Buschner, Peter; Kühnl, Andreas; Döbele, Stefan; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Lucke, Martin; Stöckle, Ulrich; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent publications suggested that monocytes might be an attractive cell type to transdifferentiate into various cellular phenotypes. Aim was, therefore, to evaluate the potential of blood monocytes to transdifferentiate into osteoblasts. Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood were subjected to two previously published treatments to obtain unique, multipotent cell fractions, named programmable cells of monocytic origin (PCMOs) and monocyte-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MOMPs). Subsequently, MOMPs and PCMOs were treated with osteogenic differentiation medium (including either vitamin D or dexamethasone) for 14 days. Regarding a variety of surface markers, no differences between MOMPs, PCMOs, and primary monocytes could be detected. The treatment with osteogenic medium neither resulted in loss of hematopoietic markers nor in adoption of mesenchymal phenotype in all cell types. No significant effect was observed regarding the expression of osteogenic transcription factors, bone-related genes, or production of mineralized matrix. Osteogenic medium resulted in activation of monocytes and appearance of osteoclasts. In conclusion, none of the investigated monocyte cell types showed any transdifferentiation characteristics under the tested circumstances. Based on our data, we rather see an activation and maturation of monocytes towards macrophages and osteoclasts. PMID:22623892

  2. Monocyte subset accumulation in the human heart following acute myocardial infarction and the role of the spleen as monocyte reservoir

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Anja M.; ter Horst, Ellis N.; Delewi, Ronak; Begieneman, Mark P.V.; Krijnen, Paul A.J.; Hirsch, Alexander; Lavaei, Mehrdad; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Horrevoets, Anton J.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Piek, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes are critical mediators of healing following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), making them an interesting target to improve myocardial repair. The purpose of this study was a gain of insight into the source and recruitment of monocytes following AMI in humans. Methods and results Post-mortem tissue specimens of myocardium, spleen and bone marrow were collected from 28 patients who died at different time points after AMI. Twelve patients who died from other causes served as controls. The presence and localization of monocytes (CD14+ cells), and their CD14+CD16 and CD14+CD16+ subsets, were evaluated by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses. CD14+ cells localized at distinct regions of the infarcted myocardium in different phases of healing following AMI. In the inflammatory phase after AMI, CD14+ cells were predominantly located in the infarct border zone, adjacent to cardiomyocytes, and consisted for 85% (7892%) of CD14+CD16 cells. In contrast, in the subsequent post-AMI proliferative phase, massive accumulation of CD14+ cells was observed in the infarct core, containing comparable proportions of both the CD14+CD16 [60% (3167%)] and CD14+CD16+ subsets [40% (3369%)]. Importantly, in AMI patients, of the number of CD14+ cells was decreased by 39% in the bone marrow and by 58% in the spleen, in comparison with control patients (P = 0.02 and <0.001, respectively). Conclusions Overall, this study showed a unique spatiotemporal pattern of monocyte accumulation in the human myocardium following AMI that coincides with a marked depletion of monocytes from the spleen, suggesting that the human spleen contains an important reservoir function for monocytes. PMID:23966310

  3. Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio Is Associated with Non-Calcified Plaque Burden in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Lennart; Wieringa, Wouter G.; Pundziute, Gabija; Gjerde, Marcus; Engvall, Jan; Swahn, Eva; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevations in soluble markers of inflammation and changes in leukocyte subset distribution are frequently reported in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Lately, the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio has emerged as a potential marker of both CAD severity and cardiovascular prognosis. Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate whether neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and other immune-inflammatory markers were related to plaque burden, as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in patients with CAD. Methods Twenty patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and 30 patients with stable angina (SA) underwent CCTA at two occasions, immediately prior to coronary angiography and after three months. Atherosclerotic plaques were classified as calcified, mixed and non-calcified. Blood samples were drawn at both occasions. Leukocyte subsets were analyzed by white blood cell differential counts and flow cytometry. Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin(IL)-6 were measured in plasma. Blood analyses were also performed in 37 healthy controls. Results Plaque variables did not change over 3 months, total plaque burden being similar in NSTE-ACS and SA. However, non-calcified/total plaque ratio was higher in NSTE-ACS, 0.25(0.09–0.44) vs 0.11(0.00–0.25), p<0.05. At admission, levels of monocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios, CD4+ T cells, CRP and IL-6 were significantly elevated, while levels of NK cells were reduced, in both patient groups as compared to controls. After 3 months, levels of monocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios and CD4+ T cells remained elevated in patients. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios and neutrophil counts correlated significantly with numbers of non-calcified plaques and also with non-calcified/total plaque ratio (r = 0.403, p = 0.010 and r = 0.382, p = 0.024, respectively), but not with total plaque burden. Conclusions Among immune-inflammatory markers in NSTE-ACS and SA patients, neutrophil counts and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratios were significantly correlated with non-calcified plaques. Data suggest that these easily measured biomarkers reflect the burden of vulnerable plaques in CAD. PMID:25268632

  4. Microarray analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected monocytes reveals IL26 as a new candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Laso, José M; Raposo-García, Sara; García-García, Silvia; Diez-Tascón, Cristina; Rivero-Lezcano, Octavio M

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the activity of monocytes/macrophages, important target cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, might influence tuberculosis progression. With the purpose of identifying candidate genes for tuberculosis susceptibility we infected monocytes from both healthy elderly individuals (a tuberculosis susceptibility group) and elderly tuberculosis patients with M. tuberculosis, and performed a microarray experiment. We detected 78 differentially expressed transcripts and confirmed these results by quantitative PCR of selected genes. We found that monocytes from tuberculosis patients showed similar expression patterns for these genes, regardless of whether they were obtained from younger or older patients. Only one of the detected genes corresponded to a cytokine: IL26, a member of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family which we found to be down-regulated in infected monocytes from tuberculosis patients. Non-infected monocytes secreted IL-26 constitutively but they reacted strongly to M. tuberculosis infection by decreasing IL-26 production. Furthermore, IL-26 serum concentrations appeared to be lower in the tuberculosis patients. When whole blood was infected, IL-26 inhibited the observed pathogen-killing capability. Although lymphocytes expressed IL26R, the receptor mRNA was not detected in either monocytes or neutrophils, suggesting that the inhibition of anti-mycobacterial activity may be mediated by lymphocytes. Additionally, IL-2 concentrations in infected blood were lower in the presence of IL-26. The negative influence of IL-26 on the anti-mycobacterial activity and its constitutive presence in both serum and monocyte supernatants prompt us to propose IL26 as a candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility. PMID:25157980

  5. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kffel, Ren; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jrgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly transdifferentiate into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signalinduced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factordependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSFpretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivoisolated G-CSFmobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBP?, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  6. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Gerrit M.; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Teebken, Omke E.; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P.; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  7. Fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induce lipid droplet accumulation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    den Hartigh, Laura J; Connolly-Rohrbach, Jaime E; Fore, Samantha; Huser, Thomas R; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which monocytes become activated postprandially is by exposure to triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) at the blood-endothelial cell interface, releasing free fatty acids. In this study, we examined postprandial monocyte activation in more detail, and found that lipolysis products generated from postprandial VLDL induce the formation of lipid-filled droplets within cultured THP-1 monocytes, characterized by coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy. Organelle-specific stains revealed an association of lipid droplets with the endoplasmic reticulum, confirmed by electron microscopy. Lipid droplet formation was reduced when LpL-released fatty acids were bound by bovine serum albumin, which also reduced cellular inflammation. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids induced more lipid droplet formation in monocytes compared to mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monocytes treated with postprandial VLDL lipolysis products contained lipid droplets with more intense saturated Raman spectroscopic signals than monocytes treated with fasting VLDL lipolysis products. In addition, we found that human monocytes isolated during the peak postprandial period contain more lipid droplets compared to those from the fasting state, signifying that their development is not limited to cultured cells but also occurs in vivo. In summary, circulating free fatty acids can mediate lipid droplet formation in monocytes and potentially be used as a biomarker to assess an individuals risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20208007

  8. Adipose tissue lymphocytes: types and roles.

    PubMed

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Cousin, B; Bour, S; Casteilla, L; Castiella, L; Penicaud, L; Carpéné, C

    2009-12-01

    Besides adipocytes, specialized in lipid handling and involved in energy balance regulation, white adipose tissue (WAT) is mainly composed of other cell types among which lymphocytes represent a non-negligible proportion. Different types of lymphocytes (B, alphabetaT, gammadeltaT, NK and NKT) have been detected in WAT of rodents or humans, and vary in their relative proportion according to the fat pad anatomical location. The lymphocytes found in intra-abdominal, visceral fat pads seem representative of innate immunity, while those present in subcutaneous fat depots are part of adaptive immunity, at least in mice. Both the number and the activity of the different lymphocyte classes, except B lymphocytes, are modified in obesity. Several of these modifications in the relative proportions of the lymphocyte classes depend on the degree of obesity, or on leptin concentration, or even fat depot anatomical location. Recent studies suggest that alterations of lymphocyte number and composition precede the macrophage increase and the enhanced inflammatory state of WAT found in obesity. Lymphocytes express receptors to adipokines while several proinflammatory chemokines are produced in WAT, rendering intricate crosstalk between fat and immune cells. However, the evidences and controversies available so far are in favour of an involvement of lymphocytes in the control of the number of other cells in WAT, either adipocytes or immune cells and of their secretory and metabolic activities. Therefore, immunotherapy deserves to be considered as a promising approach to treat the endocrino-metabolic disorders associated to excessive fat mass development. PMID:20358356

  9. Maternal molecular features and gene profiling of monocytes during first trimester pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, Michael; Cierna, Barbara; Steckel, Nina K; Beelen, Dietrich W; Elmaagacli, Ahmet H

    2013-09-01

    We examined the molecular characteristics of monocytes of pregnant and non-pregnant women to investigate the molecular effects that are associated with immunoregulation at the maternal-fetal interface. We analyzed molecular features and target genes in monocytes of pregnant women using flow cytometry, real-time PCR and oligonucleotide microarray technology. CD14(high) monocytes and several immune gene members including CD200, CD200R, IDO, IFI27, IL-10 and G0S2 were found to be differentially expressed in monocytes throughout pregnancy. In addition, transcripts within components of the signaling cascade of immune cells (HLA-DRB4, HBEGF, IL-8, CD3D, CCL5), and of several transcription factors (SOCS1, CXCL10, ID1, ID2) were altered in the monocytes of pregnant women. Further studies will be needed to elucidate the biological significance of our observation. PMID:23958292

  10. Blood Monocyte Subsets and Selected Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Rheumatoid Arthritis of Short Duration in relation to Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Sulicka, Joanna; Kwaśny-Krochin, Beata; Korkosz, Mariusz; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Guzik, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate blood monocyte subsets and functional monocyte properties in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of short duration in the context of cardiovascular (CV) risk and disease activity. Methods. We studied conventional markers of CV risk, intima media thickness (IMT), and blood monocyte subsets in 27 patients aged 41 ± 10 years with RA of short duration (median 12 months) and 22 healthy controls. The RA subjects were divided into low (DAS28: 2.6–5.1) and high (DAS28 > 5.1) disease activity. Results. RA patients exhibited increased levels of intermediate (CD14++CD16+) monocytes with decreased CD45RA expression compared to controls, increased counts of classical (CD14++CD16−) monocytes, and decreased percentages of nonclassical (CD14+CD16++) monocytes. Patients with high disease activity had lower HLA DR expression on classical monocytes compared to low disease activity patients. There were no differences in monocyte subsets between subjects with DAS > 5.1 and DAS ≤ 5.1. There were no significant intergroup differences in IMT and the majority of classical CV risk factors. Conclusions. Patients with RA of short duration show alteration in peripheral blood monocyte subsets despite the fact that there is no evidence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Disease activity assessed with DAS28 was associated with impaired functional properties but not with a shift in monocyte subpopulations. PMID:25126574

  11. Inhibition of antigen- and mitogen-induced human lymphocyte proliferation by gold compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, P E; Ziff, M

    1977-01-01

    Gold sodium thiomalate (GST) inhibited in vitro antigen- and mitogen-triggered human lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Inhibition of responsiveness was observed with concentrations of GST equivalent to gold levels found in serum or tissues of patients receiving chrysotherapy, Inhibition was dependent upon the gold ion itself since GST and gold chloride were both inhibitory whereas thiomalic acid was not. Inhibition could not be explained by nonspecific killing of cells or by an alteration in the kinetics of the responses. GST inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation most effectively when present from the initiation of culture and could not inhibit the responsiveness of cells which previously had been activated by concanvalin A. These findings indicated that GST blocked a critical early step in lymphocyte activation. The degree of GST-induced inhibition of proliferation was increased in cultures of cells partially depleted of monocytes. Moreover, inhibition was reversed by supplementation of these cultures with purified monocytes. These observations suggested that GST blocked thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte activation by interfering with a requisite function of the monocyte population in initiating such responses. Prolonged incubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with GST resulted in diminished mitogen responsiveness upon subsequent culture in the absence of gold. The addition of fresh monocytes restored responsiveness to these populations. Furthermore, preincubation of purified monocytes with GST rendered them deficient in their ability to support mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation on subsequent culture. These observations indicate that the major effect of GST results from interference with the functional capability of the monocyte population. PMID:838859

  12. Nucleic acid distribution pattern as a possible biomarker for metabolic activities of neoplastic cells: a digitally-aided fluorescence microscopy study on normal and neoplastic lymphocytes of acute and chronic canine lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Isitor, Godwin N; Campbell, Mervyn; Nayak, Shivananda B

    2009-01-01

    Background Metabolic states of neoplastic cells are increasingly being relied upon for diagnostic and prognostic assessment of neoplastic conditions. The nucleic acid distribution pattern of cells in general, in terms of degree of condensation of the nuclear chromatin and overall spread of the nucleic acid within the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, can reflect the metabolic state of the cell. This simple but logical concept appears not be put into consideration to date as numerous attempts are being made towards formulating reliable biomarkers for rapid diagnosis, prognosis and subsequent therapeutic interventions for neoplastic conditions. We comparatively evaluated nucleic acid distribution patterns of normal lymphocytes and neoplastic cells of lymphocytic lineage, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. Results The results demonstrate distinctiveness in the pattern of nucleic acid distribution for the normal lymphocytes and three lymphocytic neoplastic cell-types of canine lymphocytic leukemia that are categorized as small, intermediate and large neoplastic lymphocytes. Variably-shaped cytoplasmic processes laden with single-stranded nucleic acids (SSNA) were observed for the small and intermediate-sized neoplastic lymphocytes, compared with large neoplastic lymphocytes and the normal lymphocytes; the latter two categories of cells being virtually devoid of similar processes. Prominent cytoplasmic and nuclear clumps of SSNA, indicative of a higher rate of metabolic activity, were also observed within the neoplastic cells compared with fewer and narrower SSNA of the normal cells. Conclusion The comparative relative increases of SSNA in cytoplasmic processes and other cellular areas of small and intermediate-sized neoplastic lymphocytes is reflective of greater metabolic activity in neoplastic cells in general compared with their normal cellular counterparts. PMID:19432993

  13. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Successful Treatment of Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis with Rifampin.

    PubMed

    Abusaada, Khalid; Ajmal, Saira; Hughes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Currently recommended treatment regimens for human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) include doxycycline or tetracycline. Antibiotic susceptibility studies demonstrate that rifampin has in vitro bactericidal activity against Ehrlichia. Case reports have suggested clinical response with rifampin treatment of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). We report the first case of HME successfully treated with rifampin. PMID:26918212

  15. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  16. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-..beta.. and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1/sup +/ cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 ..mu..m nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML(/sup 3/H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide.

  17. Arsenic Exposure Increases Monocyte Adhesion to the Vascular Endothelium, a Pro-Atherogenic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lemari, Catherine A.; Bolt, Alicia M.; Flores Molina, Manuel; Krohn, Regina M.; Smits, Judit E.; Lehoux, Stphanie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure increases atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unknown. Monocytes, macrophages and platelets play an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Circulating monocytes and macrophages bind to the activated vascular endothelium and migrate into the sub-endothelium, where they become lipid-laden foam cells. This process can be facilitated by platelets, which favour monocyte recruitment to the lesion. Thus, we assessed the effects of low-to-moderate arsenic exposure on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, platelet activation and platelet-monocyte interactions. We observed that arsenic induces human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro. These findings were confirmed ex vivo using a murine organ culture system at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. We found that both cell types need to be exposed to arsenic to maximize monocyte adhesion to the endothelium. This adhesion process is specific to monocyte/endothelium interactions. Hence, no effect of arsenic on platelet activation or platelet/leukocyte interaction was observed. We found that arsenic increases adhesion of mononuclear cells via increased CD29 binding to VCAM-1, an adhesion molecule found on activated endothelial cells. Similar results were observed in vivo, where arsenic-exposed mice exhibit increased VCAM-1 expression on endothelial cells and increased CD29 on circulating monocytes. Interestingly, expression of adhesion molecules and increased binding can be inhibited by antioxidants in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data suggest that arsenic might enhance atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, a process that is inhibited by antioxidants. PMID:26332580

  18. SLC11A1 is expressed by innate lymphocytes and augments their activation1

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, Jodi F.; Kimmel, Emily; Snyder, Deann T.; Jerome, Maria; Jutila, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    SLC11A1 is a divalent ion transporter formerly known as the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP1) and the Bcg/Lsh/Ity locus. SLC11A1 was thought to be exclusively expressed in monocyte/macrophages and to have roles in phagosome maturation and cell activation. We characterized the expression of SLC11A1 in the majority of human and bovine γδ T cells and NK cells, and in human CD3+CD45RO+ T cells. Consistent with a role for iron-dependent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases, SLC11A1+ lymphocytes were moreprone to activation and retained tyrosine phosphorylation. Transfection of SLC11A1 into a human γδ T cell-like line rendered the cells more prone to activation. Non-adherent splenocytes from wild type mice expressed significantly greater IFN-γ compared to cells from Sv/129 (SLC11A1−/−) mice. Our data suggest that SLC11A1 has a heretofore unknown role in activation of a large subset of innate lymphocytes that are critical sources of IFN-γ. SLC11A1+ animals have enhanced innate IFN-γ expression in response to Salmonella infection compared to SLC11A1−mice, which includes commonly used inbred laboratory mice. Expression of SLC11A1 in innate lymphocytes and its role in augmenting their activation may account for inconsistencies in studies of innate lymphocytes in different animal models. PMID:23509347

  19. Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio and Cardiovascular Disease Incidence in HIV-Infected Patients: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Raffetti, Elena; Donato, Francesco; Magoni, Michele; Pezzoli, Chiara; Ferraresi, Alice; Brianese, Nigritella; Castelnuovo, Filippo; Focà, Emanuele; Castelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been shown to predict occurrence of cardiovascular events in the general population. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NLR to predict major cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in HIV-infected subjects. We performed a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients residing in the Local Health Authority (LHA) of Brescia, northern Italy, from 2000 to 2012. The incidence of CVD events in HIV-positive patients was compared with that expected in the general population living in the same area, computing standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). To evaluate the predictive role of NLR, univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were applied, computing hazard ratios (HRs). A total of 3766 HIV-infected patients (mean age 38.1 years, 71.3% males) were included (person-years 28768.6). A total of 134 CVD events occurred in 119 HIV-infected patients. A 2-fold increased risk (SIR 2.02) of CVD was found in HIV-infected patients compared to the general population. NLR levels measured at baseline and during follow-up were independently associated with CVD incidence, when also adjusting for both traditional CVD risk factors and HIV-related factors (HR 3.05 for NLR≥ 1.2). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve showed a modest, not statistically significant, increase, from 0.81 to 0.83, with addition of NLR to Framingham risk score model covariates. In conclusion an elevated NLR is a predictor of risk CVD in HIV-infected patients, independently from the traditional CVD risk factors. PMID:27148878

  20. Associations of Circulating Lymphocyte Subpopulations with Type 2 Diabetes: Cross-Sectional Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels C.; Doyle, Margaret F.; de Boer, Ian H.; Huber, Sally A.; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Kronmal, Richard A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tracy, Russell P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Distinct lymphocyte subpopulations have been implicated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and obesity-associated inflammation in mouse models of insulin resistance. Information on the relationships of lymphocyte subpopulations with type 2 diabetes remain limited in human population-based cohort studies. Methods Circulating levels of innate (γδ T, natural killer (NK)) and adaptive immune (CD4+ naive, CD4+ memory, Th1, and Th2) lymphocyte subpopulations were measured by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 929 free-living participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Cross-sectional relationships of lymphocyte subpopulations with type 2 diabetes (n = 154) and fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were evaluated by generalized linear models. Results Each standard deviation (SD) higher CD4+ memory cells was associated with a 21% higher odds of type 2 diabetes (95% CI: 1–47%) and each SD higher naive cells was associated with a 22% lower odds (95% CI: 4–36%) (adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and BMI). Among participants not using diabetes medication, higher memory and lower naive CD4+ cells were associated with higher fasting glucose concentrations (p<0.05, adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity). There were no associations of γδ T, NK, Th1, or Th2 cells with type 2 diabetes, glucose, or insulin. Conclusions A higher degree of chronic adaptive immune activation, reflected by higher memory and lower naive CD4+ cells, was positively associated with type 2 diabetes. These results are consistent with a role of chronic immune activation and exhaustion augmenting chronic inflammatory diseases, and support the importance of prospective studies evaluating adaptive immune activation and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26458065

  1. Novel Teleost CD4-Bearing Cell Populations Provide Insights into the Evolutionary Origins and Primordial Roles of CD4+ Lymphocytes and CD4+ Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Fumio; Magadan, Susana; Parra, David; Xu, Zhen; Korytář, Tomáš; Boudinot, Pierre; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-06-01

    Tetrapods contain a single CD4 coreceptor with four Ig domains that likely arose from a primordial two-domain ancestor. Notably, teleost fish contain two CD4 genes. Like tetrapod CD4, CD4-1 of rainbow trout includes four Ig domains, whereas CD4-2 contains only two. Because CD4-2 is reminiscent of the prototypic two-domain CD4 coreceptor, we hypothesized that by characterizing the cell types bearing CD4-1 and CD4-2, we would shed light into the evolution and primordial roles of CD4-bearing cells. Using newly established mAbs against CD4-1 and CD4-2, we identified two bona-fide CD4(+) T cell populations: a predominant lymphocyte population coexpressing surface CD4-1 and CD4-2 (CD4 double-positive [DP]), and a minor subset expressing only CD4-2 (CD4-2 single-positive [SP]). Although both subsets produced equivalent levels of Th1, Th17, and regulatory T cell cytokines upon bacterial infection, CD4-2 SP lymphocytes were less proliferative and displayed a more restricted TCRβ repertoire. These data suggest that CD4-2 SP cells represent a functionally distinct population and may embody a vestigial CD4(+) T cell subset, the roles of which reflect those of primeval CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, we also describe the first CD4(+) monocyte/macrophage population in a nonmammalian species. Of all myeloid subsets, we found the CD4(+) population to be the most phagocytic, whereas CD4(+) lymphocytes lacked this capacity. This study fills in an important gap in the knowledge of teleost CD4-bearing leukocytes, thus revealing critical insights into the evolutionary origins and primordial roles of CD4(+) lymphocytes and CD4(+) monocytes/macrophages. PMID:27183628

  2. Cytometric analysis of perforin expression in NK cells, CD8+, and CD4+ lymphocytes in children with autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Popko, Katarzyna; Osińska, Iwona; Kucharska, Anna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-07-01

    Perforin plays an essential role in cytotoxicity of natural killers (NK) and CD8+ lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity of T and NK cells is one of the mechanisms of destruction of cells in Hashimoto's disease (HD). The aim of this study was analysis of the expression of perforin in CD8+, CD4+, and NK cells and cytotoxic abilities of these cells in children with HD compared to healthy controls. The expression of perforin and surface antigens, as well as cytotoxicity were analyzed with a flow cytometry. Lower expression of perforin in CD8+ and NK was found in HD compared to controls (p=0.01; p=0.004). A significant correlation between perforin expression in CD8+ lymphocytes and in NK was observed (p=0.05). The spontaneous cytotoxicity of NK was significantly higher in HD compared to controls (p=0.04). Our results suggest that perforin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis. PMID:26167976

  3. A comparison of monocyte oxidative responses in leprosy patients and healthy subjects as influenced by mycobacterial lipid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Vachula, M; Worobec, S; Andersen, B R

    1990-09-01

    Superoxide anion (O2-) release by monocytes from leprosy patients in a paired study was lower than that released by monocytes from healthy controls. Pretreatment of healthy control monocytes with phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) of Mycobacterium leprae resulted in the release of less O2- than released by buffer-treated cells or cells pretreated with structurally similar lipids. However, pretreatment of patient monocytes with PGL-I did not affect the O2- generation, perhaps because the cells already had a lower capacity to produce O2-. Upon further examination of the data from the patient population, monocytes from lepromatous patients released significantly less O2- than cells from normal controls, while tuberculoid patient cells released O2- in amounts similar to that generated by cells from normal controls. In addition, monocytes from patients with a high bacterial index had a lower capacity to generate O2- when compared to cells from healthy individuals. PMID:2169513

  4. Polyamines in lymphocyte activation

    SciTech Connect

    Canellakis, Z.N.; Marsh, L.L.; Bondy, P.K.

    1987-05-01

    New features of polyamine metabolism have been identified in both the acid-soluble and the acid-insoluble fraction of activated murine splenic lymphocytes. Lymphocytes activated by the B cell mitogen LPS and simultaneously exposed to either 3H-putrescine or /sup 3/H-spermidine show a differential level of metabolism of the two radioactive polyamines. The percent uptake of isotope from the medium is the same for either putrescine or spermidine during the 48 hour activation period. Intracellularly, only 12% of the label take up as putrescine remains as putrescine and the rest is primarily metabolized to spermidine (47%) and spermine (22%). By contrast, 69% of the initial radioactive spermidine remains as spermidine, again a similar percentage is metabolized to spermine (22%), and a small amount appears as putrescine (2.5%). In these studies the authors have demonstrated the presence of two new small radioactive conjugates (5-7%). Radioactive spermidine is 3 times more effective than radioactive putrescine as a precursor of label in acid-insoluble material. Acid-insoluble label derived from putrescine represents 1.8% of the total cell-associated radioactivity whereas that derived from spermidine is 6.0%. HPLC molecular sieving reveals three distinct radioactive macromolecules.

  5. Association between Chemotherapy-Response Assays and Subsets of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Gastric Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn; Son, Taeil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assays (ATP-CRAs) and subsets of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In total, 15 gastric cancer tissue samples were obtained from gastrectomies performed between February 2007 and January 2011. Chemotherapy response assays were performed on tumor cells from these samples using 11 chemotherapeutic agents, including etoposide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, methotrexate, and cisplatin. TILs in the tissue samples were evaluated using antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3, and Granzyme B. Results The highest cancer cell death rates were induced by etoposide (44.8%), 5-FU (43.1%), and mitomycin (39.9%). Samples from 10 patients who were treated with 5-FU were divided into 5-FU-sensitive and -insensitive groups according to median cell death rate. No difference was observed in survival between the two groups (P=0.216). Only two patients were treated with a chemotherapeutic agent determined by an ATP-CRA and there was no significant difference in overall survival compared with that of patients treated with their physician's choice of chemotherapeutic agent (P=0.105). However, a high number of CD3 TILs was a favorable prognostic factor (P=0.008). Pearson's correlation analyses showed no association between cancer cell death rates in response to chemotherapeutic agents and subsets of TILs. Conclusions Cancer cell death rates in response to specific chemotherapeutic agents were not significantly associated with the distribution of TIL subsets. PMID:26819801

  6. Alemtuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: final results of a large observational multicenter study in mostly pretreated patients.

    PubMed

    Fiegl, M; Stauder, R; Steurer, M; Mian, M; Hopfinger, G; Brychtova, Y; Skrabs, C; Zabernigg, A; Schmid, F; Haslbaur, F; Winder, G; Walder, A; Lang, A; Voskova, D; Greil, R; Mayer, J; Gastl, G

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the benefit of alemtuzumab monotherapy in unselected patients with advanced B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) to definitely describe the impact of this antibody in clinical routine use. Data were collected from 208 consecutive, mainly pretreated, patients with CLL (n = 202), and B-PLL (n = 6) who had received alemtuzumab. Response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in various settings were assessed, and toxicities were documented. In these routine patients, a comparably low cumulative dose of alemtuzumab (median, 403 mg) was applied. In CLL, overall response rate was 32 %, and various pre-therapeutic parameters were predictive for inferior response, among them, the prior administration of ≥3 therapy lines (P < 0.001), refractoriness to fludarabine (P = 0.002), and bulky lymphadenopathy (P = 0.003). PFS and OS after start of alemtuzumab were 6.2 and 21.0 months, respectively. Bulky lymphadenopathy was the prominent risk factor for both inferior PFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.002). In B-PLL, four patients experienced a fatal outcome, whereas two patients had some benefit with alemtuzumab. The main adverse effects were CMV reactivation (20 %) and a broad spectrum of infections, which together were the main reasons for treatment interruption and/or premature termination. In conclusion, alemtuzumab administered even at low dose levels was effective but overall considerably toxic in routine CLL patients. We emphasize that alemtuzumab remains an important therapeutic option in subsets of CLL patients. PMID:24292560

  7. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio as a predictor of systemic inflammation - A cross-sectional study in a pre-admission setting.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Tan, Tze Ping; Mehta, Jigesh; Arekapudi, Anil; Govindarajulu, Arun; Siu, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio (NLR)  is an emerging biomarker that is used to predict postoperative mortality and morbidity in cardiac and cancer surgeries. The association of this biomarker with systemic illness and its usefulness in risk assessment of preoperative patients has not been fully elucidated. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of elevated NLR in preoperative patients and to examine the relationship between elevated NLR and the presence of systemic illnesses as well as anaesthesia risk indices such as American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) and the revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) scores.   Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: Anaesthesia pre-admission clinic, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Canada Patients: We evaluated 1117 pre-operative patients seen at an anesthesia preadmission clinic. Results: NLR was elevated (>3.3) in 26.6% of target population. In multivariate analysis, congestive cardiac failure, diabetes mellitus and malignancy were independent risk factors predicting raised NLR. After regression analysis, a relationship between NLR and ASA score (Odds Ratio 1.78; 95% CI: 1.42-2.24) and revised cardiac risk index (RCRI, odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI: 1.09-1.64, p-value: 0.0063) was observed. Conclusions:  NLR was elevated (> 3.3) in 26.6% of patients. Congestive cardiac failure and malignancy were two constant predictors of elevated NLR at >3.3 and > 4.5. There was a strong association between NLR and anesthesia risk scoring tools of ASA and RCRI. PMID:26213612

  8. Neutron-induced adaptive response studied in go human lymphocytes using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gajendiran, N; Tanaka, K; Kumaravel, T S; Kamada, N

    2001-03-01

    This study demonstrates that cells adapted to ionizing radiation developed reduced initial DNA damage when compared to non-adapted cells. The results were obtained by subjecting in vitro irradiated whole blood from 10 healthy volunteers (including 2 A-bomb survivors carrying 1.5-2 Gy in vivo exposure) in an unstimulated condition (G0) using the comet assay. The intensity of DNA damage was assessed by computing the 'tail moment'. Adaptive response (AR) was noticed in only donor 3, as indicated by reduced tail moment when the blood samples received priming + challenging doses over a 4 h interval. The priming dose was either 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays or 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The delivered challenging dose was either 1 Gy 60Co g-rays or 0.25 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The irradiation was conducted using the HIRRAC facility. A prior exposure to 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons nullified the excess tail moment caused by 0.25 Gy neutrons given during a 4 h gap. In a similar way, 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays offered a cross-adaptive response to the neutron challenging dose. The tail moment of A-bomb survivors after in vitro irradiation was less than that of the age-matched control and, at the same time, was not influenced by the priming dose. An altered subset and the immunological status of blood after A-bomb exposure were cited as possible factors. Because AR can affect the outcome of RBE, its individual variability only emphasizes the need to have individual biodosimetry for better risk assessment, especially in planning for a long space voyage. PMID:11393893

  9. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. Characterization of lymphocyte subsets over a 24-hour period in Pineal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (PALT) in the chicken

    PubMed Central

    Mosenson, Jeffrey A; McNulty, John A

    2006-01-01

    Background Homeostatic trafficking of lymphocytes in the brain has important relevance to the understanding of CNS disease processes. The pineal gland of the chicken contains large accumulations of lymphocytes that suggest an important role related to homeostatic circadian neuro-immune interactions. The purpose of this initial study was to characterize the lymphocyte subsets in the pineal gland and quantitate the distribution and frequency of lymphocyte phenotypes at two time points over the 24-hour light:dark cycle. Results PALT comprised approximately 10% of the total pineal area. Image analysis of immunocytochemically stained sections showed that the majority of lymphocytes were CD3+ (80%) with the remaining 20% comprising B-cells and monocytes (Bu-1+), which tended to distribute along the periphery of the PALT. T-cell subsets in PALT included CD4+ (75–80%), CD8+ (20–25%), TCRαβ/Vβ1+ (60%), and TCRγδ+ (15%). All of the T-cell phenotypes were commonly found within the interfollicular septa and follicles of the pineal gland. However, the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ within the pineal tissue were each 1:1, in contrast to the PALT where the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ each approximated 1:4. Bu-1+ cells were only rarely seen in the pineal interstitial spaces, but ramified Bu-1+ microglia/macrophages were common in the pineal follicles. Effects of the 24-h light:dark cycle on these lymphocyte-pineal interactions were suggested by an increase in the area of PALT, a decline in the density of TCRαβ/Vβ1+ cells, and a decline in the area density of Bu-1+ microglia at the light:dark interphase (1900 h) compared to the dark:light interphase (0700 h). Conclusion The degree of lymphocyte infiltration in the pineal suggests novel mechanisms of neuro-immune interactions in this part of the brain. Our results further suggest that these interactions have a temporal component related to the 24-hour light:dark cycle and that CD8+ and TCRγδ+ T-cells are preferentially recruited to the pineal follicles. Pineal microglia/macrophages were common and represent an important candidate for mediating these lymphocyte-pineal interactions via secretion of cytokines and chemokines. PMID:16405726

  11. Response of lymphocytes to a mitogenic stimulus during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Several studies were performed that demonstrate that immunological activities of lymphocytes can be affected by spaceflight or by models that attempt to simulate some aspects of weightlessness. Included among these are the responses of lymphocytes to external stimuli such as mitogens and viruses. When cultures of lymphocytes were flown in space, the ability of the lymphocytes to respond to mitogens was inhibited. Similar results were obtained when lymphocytes from astronauts or animals just returned from space were placed into culture immediately upon return to earth, and when models of hypogravity were used. Lymphocytes placed in culture during spaceflights produced enhanced levels of interferon compared to control cultures. When cultures of lymphocytes were prepared for cosmonauts or rodents immediately upon return to earth, interferon production was inhibited. These results suggest that space flight can have profound effects on lymphocyte function, and that effects on isolated cells may be different from that on cells in the whole organism.

  12. Selective recruitment of lymphocyte subsets to the inflamed appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Soo, K S; Michie, C A; Baker, S R; Wyllie, J H; Beverley, P C

    1995-01-01

    Total lymphocyte counts and the distribution of lymphocyte subsets were determined in peripheral venous blood and appendiceal mononuclear cells from 60 patients who underwent appendicectomy for the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis. A significant peripheral lymphopenia was observed in the 46 patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis which was accompanied by an increase in the appendiceal lymphocyte concentration. There was an even greater depletion of CD45RO+ (memory) T lymphocytes in peripheral blood and an increase in the inflamed appendix. Reciprocal changes were observed in the CD45RA+ (naive) T lymphocyte subset. These changes were reflected in the local arterial and venous CD45RA and CD45RO T lymphocyte subsets. Proliferation studies showed an expanded functional repertoire of T lymphocytes in the inflamed appendix. Selective recruitment of memory T lymphocytes from the peripheral blood to the inflamed appendix was demonstrated. PMID:7697912

  13. Interleukin-7 induces recruitment of monocytes/macrophages to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongying; Paul, Antoni; Ko, Kerry W.S.; Sheldon, Michael; Rich, Benjamin E.; Terashima, Tomoya; Dieker, Carrie; Cormier, Shelley; Li, Lan; Nour, Elie A.; Chan, Lawrence; Oka, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Aims Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a master regulator of T-cell development and homoeostasis. Increased IL-7 levels are associated with inflammatory diseases. The aims of this study were to determine whether IL-7 is a biomarker for inflammatory conditions or an active participant in atherogenesis. Methods and results Advanced atherosclerotic lesions in Apoe?/? mice were regressed by long-term cholesterol lowering through treatment with a helper-dependent adenovirus expressing apolipoprotein E (n= 610). Using this model, gene expression patterns in the aorta were analysed at an early phase of regression by microarray. After stringent statistical analysis, we found that IL-7 expression is significantly reduced in response to lowering of cholesterol (n= 6). To understand the importance of IL-7 down-regulation for atherosclerotic regression, we studied the effects and mechanisms of action of IL-7 on endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro as well as in vivo. Our major findings are: (i) IL-7 up-regulates cell adhesion molecules and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in ECs and promotes monocyte adhesion to ECs; (ii) this regulation is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT-dependent and -independent activation of NF-?B; (iii) elevation of plasma IL-7 induces recruitment of monocytes/macrophages to endothelium without affecting plasma cholesterol (n= 5, 6); and (4) lack of IL-7 in bone marrow-derived cells reduces migration of monocytes/macrophages to the lesions (n= 5, 6). Conclusion These results suggest that IL-7 inflames endothelium via PI3K/AKT-dependent and -independent activation of NF-?B and recruits monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium, thus playing an active role in atherogenesis. PMID:21804111

  14. Glucocorticoids enhance the in vivo migratory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Mark P; Pioli, Patricia A; Collins, Jane; Barr, Fiona; Metzler, Sara; Sites, Brian D; Guyre, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are best known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, an emerging model for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of in vivo inflammation also includes a delayed, preparatory effect that manifests as enhanced inflammation following exposure to an inflammatory stimulus. When GCs are transiently elevated in vivo following exposure to a stressful event, this model proposes that a subsequent period of increased inflammatory responsiveness is adaptive because it enhances resistance to a subsequent stressor. In the present study, we examined the migratory response of human monocytes/macrophages following transient in vivo exposure to stress-associated concentrations of cortisol. Participants were administered cortisol for 6h to elevate in vivo cortisol levels to approximate those observed during major systemic stress. Monocytes in peripheral blood and macrophages in sterile inflammatory tissue (skin blisters) were studied before and after exposure to cortisol or placebo. We found that exposure to cortisol induced transient upregulation of monocyte mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) as well as for the chemokine receptor CX3CR1. At the same time, mRNA for the transcription factor IκBα was decreased. Monocyte surface expression of CCR2 but not CX3CR1 increased in the first 24h after cortisol exposure. Transient exposure to cortisol also led to an increased number of macrophages and neutrophils in fluid derived from a sterile inflammatory site in vivo. These findings suggest that the delayed, pro-inflammatory effects of cortisol on the human inflammatory responses may include enhanced localization of effector cells at sites of in vivo inflammation. PMID:26790757

  15. Preliminary studies of the effects of psychological stress on circulating lymphocytes analyzed by synchrotron radiation based-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Caraveo, Alejandra; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Mejia-Carmona, Gloria Erika; Pérez-Ishiwara, David Guillermo; Cotte, Marine; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Psychological stress is a condition that not only generates behavioral disorders but also disrupts homeostasis and immune activity that can exacerbate or lead to inflammatory diseases. The aim of this work was to study biochemical changes in circulating immune cells from rats under psychological stress by using vibrational spectroscopy. A stress model was used, where exposure to a stressor was repeated for 5 days. Subsequently, circulating lymphocytes were examined for their biomolecular vibrational fingerprints with synchrotron radiation based-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The results showed an increased absorption at the ester lipid region (1720-1755 cm-1) in lymphocytes from stressed rats, suggesting lipid peroxidation. Statistical significant changes in wavenumber peak position and absorbance in the nucleic acid region were also observed (915-950 cm-1 Z-DNA, 1090-1150 cm-1 symmetric stretching of Psbnd Osbnd C, 1200-1260 cm-1 asymmetric PO2 and 1570-1510 cm-1 methylated nucleotides) which suggest a reduction of transcriptional activity in lymphocytes from stressed rat. These results unravel part of the mechanisms by which psychological stress may affect the immune system leading to systemic consequences.

  16. In vivo imaging reveals a pioneer wave of monocyte recruitment into mouse skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Licata, Fabrice; Poupel, Lucie; Hamon, Pauline; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Combadiere, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are essential for the correct healing of adult skin wounds, but their specific functions remain ill-defined. The absence of granulation tissue immediately after skin injury makes it challenging to study the role of mononuclear phagocytes at the initiation of this inflammatory stage. To study their recruitment and migratory behavior within the wound bed, we developed a new model for real-time in vivo imaging of the wound, using transgenic mice that express green and cyan fluorescent proteins and specifically target monocytes. Within hours after the scalp injury, monocytes invaded the wound bed. The complete abrogation of this infiltration in monocyte-deficient CCR2(-/-) mice argues for the involvement of classical monocytes in this process. Monocyte infiltration unexpectedly occurred as early as neutrophil recruitment did and resulted from active release from the bloodstream toward the matrix through microhemorrhages rather than transendothelial migration. Monocytes randomly scouted around the wound bed, progressively slowed down, and stopped. Our approach identified and characterized a rapid and earlier than expected wave of monocyte infiltration and provides a novel framework for investigating the role of these cells during early stages of wound healing. PMID:25272047

  17. Activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by muramyl dipeptide requires specific intracellular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.; Fidler, I.J.

    1986-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism by which muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates antitumor cytotoxic properties in normal and interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..)-primed human peripheral blood monocytes. The structurally and functionally active MDP analog, nor-muramyl dipeptide (nor-MDP), and (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP were used as reference glycopeptides. Direct activation of normal, noncytotoxic monocytes by nor-MDP was enhanced its encapsulation within multilamellar vesicles (MLV). Studies with (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP revealed that the activation of monocytes by nor-MDP was not attributable to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor, nor did it result merely from the internalization by monocytes of glycopeptide. Subthreshold concentrations of nor-MDP could activate tumor cytotoxic properties in IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes. The intracellular interaction of (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP with IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes was specific in that intracellular levels of radiolabeled material could be displaced and recovered as intact molecules by unlabeled nor-MDP, but not by a biologically inactive MDP stereoisomer. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by MDP occurs subsequent to intracellular interaction with specific MDP receptors.

  18. slan-defined subsets of CD16-positive monocytes: impact of granulomatous inflammation and M-CSF receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas P; Zawada, Adam M; Frankenberger, Marion; Skokann, Kerstin; Satzl, Anna A; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Schuberth, Madeleine; Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian; Rotter, Björn; Heine, Gunnar H; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems

    2015-12-10

    Human monocytes are subdivided into classical, intermediate, and nonclassical subsets, but there is no unequivocal strategy to dissect the latter 2 cell types. We show herein that the cell surface marker 6-sulfo LacNAc (slan) can define slan-positive CD14(+)CD16(++) nonclassical monocytes and slan-negative CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Gene expression profiling confirms that slan-negative intermediate monocytes show highest expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II genes, whereas a differential ubiquitin signature is a novel feature of the slan approach. In unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the slan-positive nonclassical monocytes cluster with monocytes and are clearly distinct from CD1c(+) dendritic cells. In clinical studies, we show a selective increase of the slan-negative intermediate monocytes to >100 cells per microliter in patients with sarcoidosis and a fivefold depletion of the slan-positive monocytes in patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS), which is caused by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor mutations. These data demonstrate that the slan-based definition of CD16-positive monocyte subsets is informative in molecular studies and in clinical settings. PMID:26443621

  19. CD14++CD16+ Monocytes Are Enriched by Glucocorticoid Treatment and Are Functionally Attenuated in Driving Effector T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoying; Dhanda, Ashwin; Hirani, Sima; Williams, Emily L; Sen, H Nida; Martinez Estrada, Fernando; Ling, Diamond; Thompson, Ian; Casady, Megan; Li, Zhiyu; Si, Han; Tucker, William; Wei, Lai; Jawad, Shayma; Sura, Amol; Dailey, Jennifer; Hannes, Susan; Chen, Ping; Chien, Jason L; Gordon, Siamon; Lee, Richard W J; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Human peripheral monocytes have been categorized into three subsets based on differential expression levels of CD14 and CD16. However, the factors that influence the distribution of monocyte subsets and the roles that each subset plays in autoimmunity are not well studied. In this study, we show that circulating monocytes from patients with autoimmune uveitis exhibit a skewed phenotype toward intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) cells, and that this is associated with glucocorticoid therapy. We further demonstrate that CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes from patients and healthy control donors share a similar cell-surface marker and gene expression profile. Comparison of the effects of intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes with classical CD14(++)CD16(-) and nonclassical CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes revealed that the intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) subset had an attenuated capacity to promote both naive CD4(+) T cell proliferation and polarization into a Th1 phenotype, and memory CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IL-17 expression. Furthermore, CD14(++)CD16(+) cells inhibit CD4(+) T cell proliferation induced by other monocyte subsets and enhance CD4(+) T regulatory cell IL-10 expression. These data demonstrate the impact of glucocorticoids on monocyte phenotype in the context of autoimmune disease and the differential effects of monocyte subsets on effector T cell responses. PMID:25911752

  20. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research.

    PubMed

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  2. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research

    PubMed Central

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  3. Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-03

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. Mutagenicity of inhalation anaesthetics studied by the sister chromatid exchange test in lymphocytes of patients and operating room personnel.

    PubMed

    Husum, B

    1987-06-01

    Retrospective studies have indicated that operating room personnel may have increased risks of spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations in offspring, and cancer (Cohen et al 1980, Buring et al 1985). Occupational exposure to waste anaesthetic gases may be responsible for these possible adverse health effects, but a cause-effect relationship has never been proved. Induction of changes in the DNA in the chromosomes leading to mutations may play a role in teratogenicity and carcinogenicity. Along with an increasing concern in society regarding occupational diseases and working and living environment in general, cytogenetic methods have been developed for rapid detection of potential mutagenicity in vitro of chemical agents. One such method is the SCE test, which is based on examination of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), i.e. exchanges of chromatid-segments between the two chromatids in a chromosome, during cell replication. SCEs are not mutations, but an increased frequency of SCE is a sensitive indicator of exposure to agents that are capable of producing damage to the DNA and thus possibly mutations. In vitro tests like the SCE test are very useful for evaluation of specific chemical agents, which may be added to the culture in known concentrations. In studies of possible hazards from chemical agents in the working or living environment, the exposure is often poorly defined. Also, biotransformation may be different in different species, and the duration and the level of the exposure may play a role. Examination of SCEs is, therefore, increasingly performed directly on human lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Thus, although the examination of SCEs is still performed in vitro, the exposure has taken place in vivo. Increased SCE levels are then regarded as a non-specific indicator that the donor has been exposed to potentially mutagenic agents in the environment. The author and his associates used the SCE test to investigate the possible mutagenicity of anaesthetic gases after exposure in vivo. From extensive methodologic studies of possible confounding factors it was concluded that each of the factors sex, age, and smoking habits contributed significantly to the interpersonal variation of SCE frequencies, whereas use of oral contraceptives did not influence the SCE rates. The potential mutagenicity of inhalation anaesthetics was studied after exposure in vivo in two settings: (1) Acute exposure to anaesthetic concentrations, and (2) Chronic occupational exposure to trace concentrations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3297512

  5. Non-Classical Monocytes and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) Correlate with Coronary Artery Calcium Progression in Chronically HIV-1 Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Tello, Raquel R.; Zhang, Guangxiang; Mitchell, Brooks I.; Budoff, Matthew; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Keating, Sheila M.; Norris, Philip J.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Souza, Scott A.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Chow, Dominic C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent inflammation and immune activation has been hypothesized to contribute to increased prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in patients with chronic HIV infection. In this study, we examined the correlation of peripheral monocyte subsets and soluble biomarkers of inflammation to coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression, as measured by cardiac computed tomography scan. Methods We conducted a longitudinal analysis utilizing baseline data of 78 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular study who had available baseline monocyte subset analysis as well as CAC measurement at baseline and at 2-year follow up. Monocyte phenotypes were assessed from cryopreserved blood by flow cytometry and plasma was assayed for soluble biomarkers using antibody-coated beads in a high sensitivity Milliplex Luminex platform. Change in CAC over 2 years was analyzed as the primary outcome variable. Results Of all monocyte subsets and biomarkers tested, higher non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.259, p = 0.022), interleukin (IL)-6 (ρ = 0.311, p = 0.012), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (ρ = 0.524, p = <0.001) were significantly correlated to higher 2-year CAC progression in unadjusted Spearman’s correlation. Non-classical monocyte percentage (ρ = 0.247, p = 0.039), and MCP-1 (ρ = 0.487, p = <0.001), remained significantly correlated to 2-year CAC progression, while IL-6 was not (ρ = 0.209, p = 0.120) after adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, smoking history, and BMI. Conclusion The percentage of non-classical monocytes and plasma MCP-1 levels were independently associated with CAC progression and may be related to the progression of atherosclerosis and increased CVD risk associated with chronic HIV infection on stable ART. PMID:26867220

  6. Tumors induce a subset of inflammatory monocytes with immunosuppressive activity on CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Giovanna; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Santo, Carmela De; Marigo, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Brombacher, Frank; Borrello, Ivan; Zanovello, Paola; Bicciato, Silvio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the efficacy of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. While tumor-recruited CD11b+ myeloid cells are known mediators of tumor-associated immune dysfunction, the true nature of these suppressive cells and the fine biochemical pathways governing their immunosuppressive activity remain elusive. Here we describe a population of circulating CD11b+IL-4 receptor α+ (CD11b+IL-4Rα+), inflammatory-type monocytes that is elicited by growing tumors and activated by IFN-γ released from T lymphocytes. CD11b+IL-4Rα+ cells produced IL-13 and IFN-γ and integrated the downstream signals of these cytokines to trigger the molecular pathways suppressing antigen-activated CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analogous immunosuppressive circuits were active in CD11b+ cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These suppressor cells challenge the current idea that tumor-conditioned immunosuppressive monocytes/macrophages are alternatively activated. Moreover, our data show how the inflammatory response elicited by tumors had detrimental effects on the adaptive immune system and suggest novel approaches for the treatment of tumor-induced immune dysfunctions. PMID:17016559

  7. Lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor synthesis in initial genital herpesvirus infection: correlation with lymphocyte transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, M C; Peterman, G M; Altman, L C; Corey, L; Holmes, K K

    1980-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation and production of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor in response to herpes simplex virus antigen were studied in 15 patients with initial genital herpes and 10 controls. The patients underwent frequent genital examinations, viral cultures, and weekly immunological studies for a period of 11 weeks. The production of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor was maximal in week 1 of the disease and declined to control levels by week 6. In contrast, lymphocyte transformation was lowest in week 1, reached a maximum by week 4, and declined to control levels by week 11. Production of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor in week 1 was significantly lower in nine patients who developed signs or symptoms of systemic herpes infection than in six who had localized disease. In addition, a marked but transient decline in the production of this lymphokine was observed in patients at the time of clinical recurrence. Virus-specific lymphocyte transformation correlated inversely with the duration of genital pain and lesions and did not correlate with the presence of systemic signs or symptoms. These findings indicate that during initial genital herpes infection the dynamics of lymphocyte transformation and those of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor production are different, and that the generation of this lymphokine is an early component of the cellular immune response in this disease. Furthermore, adequate produce of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor may be important in restricting herpes simplex virus to the genital area and preventing disease recurrence. PMID:6254875

  8. Acidosis differently modulates the inflammatory program in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Anne; Wuling, Hanna; Loppnow, Harald; Fu, Hang; Reime, Sarah; Thews, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, ischemia or the microenvironment of solid tumors is often accompanied by a reduction of extracellular pH (acidosis) that stresses the cells and acts on cellular signaling and transcription. The effect of acidosis on the expression of various inflammatory markers, on functional parameters (migration, phagocytic activity) and on signaling pathways involved was studied in monocytic cells and macrophages. In monocytic cell lines acidosis led to a reduction in expression of most of the inflammatory mediators, namely IL-1, IL-6, TNF-?, MCP-1, COX-2 and osteopontin. In primary human monocytes MCP-1 and TNF-? were reduced but COX-2 and IL-6 were increased. In RAW264.7 macrophage cell line IL-1, COX-2 and iNOS expression was increased, whereas MCP-1 was reduced similar to the effect in monocytic cells. For primary human monocyte-derived macrophages the regulation of inflammatory markers by acidosis depended on activation state, except for the acidosis-induced downregulation of MCP-1 and TNF-?. Acidosis affected functional immune cell behavior when looking at phagocytic activity which was increased in a time-dependent manner, but cellular motility was not changed. Neither ERK1/2 nor CREB signaling was stimulated by the reduction of extracellular pH. However, p38 was activated by acidosis in RAW264.7 cells and this activation was critical for the induction of IL-1, COX-2 and iNOS expression. In conclusion, acidosis may impede the recruitment of immune cells, but fosters inflammation when macrophages are present by increasing the level of COX-2 and iNOS and by functionally forcing up the phagocytic activity. PMID:26499398

  9. Interactions between stainless steel, shear stress, and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Mickalonis, John; Lewis, Jill B; Omata, Yo; Davis, Cortney M; Brown, Yolanda; Wataha, John C

    2008-10-01

    Angioplasty with stent placement is commonly used to treat coronary atherosclerosis. However, 20-40% of stainless steel stents restenose within 6 months via a prolonged inflammatory response mediated by monocytic infiltration and cytokine secretion. In the current study, we tested a hypothesis that blood flow and monocytes interact to alter stent corrosion. We assessed the effects of THP1 monocytes on the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel (316LSS) under shear stress (0.5-50 dyn/cm(2)). In addition, THP1 cytokine secretion was determined using cytokine arrays and ELISA analyses. Data were compared using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). Monocytes significantly lowered 316LSS corrosion rates without limiting current density. However, shear stress alone did not alter the corrosion rate of 316LSS. THP1 cells adhered to the 316LSS surface at all flow rates. Exposure to the 316LSS/corrosion test under high fluid flow rates increased (>twofold) the secretion of 7 of the 42 cytokines tested (angeogenin, GRO, I309, interleukin 8, interleukin 6, interleukin 1beta, and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1). Each of these cytokines play a role in wound healing, macrophage differentiation, and cell proliferation, all hallmarks of in-stent restenosis. Furthermore, only IL8 levels were significantly higher than any of the system controls during the 316LSS/corrosion test conditions. The IL8 levels from the 316LSS/corrosion tests were not significantly different from the +LPS control. Together, these data suggest that monocytic cells maybe activated by exposure to 316LSS stents and could contribute to in-stent restenosis and altered corrosion of the stent. PMID:18092353

  10. PD-1 function in apoptosis of T lymphocytes in canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chiku, Vanessa Marim; Silva, Kathlenn Liezbeth Oliveira; de Almeida, Breno Fernando Martins; Venturin, Gabriela Lovizutto; Leal, Aline Aparecida Correa; de Martini, Cleber Costa; de Rezende Eugênio, Flavia; Dos Santos, Paulo Sergio Patto; de Lima, Valéria Marçal Felix

    2016-08-01

    Dogs infected with Leishmania infantum have a reduced number of T lymphocytes. PD-1 (Programmed cell death 1) a new member of the B7-CD28 family that is expressed by immune cells, and its binding to PD-L1 (CD274) or PD-L2 (CD273) induces the deactivation or apoptosis of T cells. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of PD-1 and its ligands, as well as blocking in the induction of apoptosis in T lymphocytes, TNF-α, IL-4 and nitric oxide production by leucokocytes from PBMC and spleen and the parasite load in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Our results showed that the expression of PD1 and its ligands was increased in CD3(+) T cells and CD21(+) B lymphocytes within the peripheral blood and splenic mononuclear cells of dogs with VL. In peripheral blood monocytes, only PD-1 ligands exhibited increased expression; however, in spleen macrophages, increased expression of both PD-1 and its ligands was observed. Levels of apoptosis in peripheral blood and splenic T lymphocytes were higher in dogs with VL compared to healthy dogs. Blocking monoclonal antibodies to PD-1 and its ligands in the culture of mononuclear cells from the peripheral blood and spleen decreased the amount of CD3(+) T lymphocyte apoptosis. The concentration of nitric oxide, TNF-α and IL-4 increased in the culture supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with a blocking monoclonal antibody against PD-1. The TNF-α concentration increased in the culture supernatants of splenic cells following all treatments with antibodies blocking PD-1 and its ligands; however, the amount of IL-4 increased only in the presence of a PD-1 blocking agent. Treatment with a PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibody in the mononuclear peripheral blood of dogs with VL reduced the parasite burden while increased TNF-α. We conclude that in canine visceral leishmaniasis, PD-1 and its ligands are involved in the induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis and in regulating the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, and IL-4, as well as the parasitic load. PMID:27016050

  11. Restricted dendritic cell and monocyte progenitors in human cord blood and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeyop; Breton, Gaëlle; Oliveira, Thiago Yukio Kikuchi; Zhou, Yu Jerry; Aljoufi, Arafat; Puhr, Sarah; Cameron, Mark J.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In mice, two restricted dendritic cell (DC) progenitors, macrophage/dendritic progenitors (MDPs) and common dendritic progenitors (CDPs), demonstrate increasing commitment to the DC lineage, as they sequentially lose granulocyte and monocyte potential, respectively. Identifying these progenitors has enabled us to understand the role of DCs and monocytes in immunity and tolerance in mice. In humans, however, restricted monocyte and DC progenitors remain unknown. Progress in studying human DC development has been hampered by lack of an in vitro culture system that recapitulates in vivo DC hematopoiesis. Here we report a culture system that supports development of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell progenitors into the three major human DC subsets, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK and B cells. Using this culture system, we defined the pathway for human DC development and revealed the sequential origin of human DCs from increasingly restricted progenitors: a human granulocyte-monocyte-DC progenitor (hGMDP) that develops into a human monocyte-dendritic progenitor (hMDP), which in turn develops into monocytes, and a human CDP (hCDP) that is restricted to produce the three major DC subsets. The phenotype of the DC progenitors partially overlaps with granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs). These progenitors reside in human cord blood and bone marrow but not in the blood or lymphoid tissues. PMID:25687283

  12. On the prediction of monocyte deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, David; Doyle, Barry J; Semple, Scott I K; Richards, Jennifer M J; Newby, David E; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm disease, the aortic wall is exposed to intense biological activity involving inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes are orchestrated by monocytes and rather than affecting the aorta uniformly, damage and weaken focal areas of the wall leaving it vulnerable to rupture. This study attempts to model numerically the deposition of monocytes using large eddy simulation, discrete phase modelling and near-wall particle residence time. The model was first applied to idealised aneurysms and then to three patient-specific lumen geometries using three-component inlet velocities derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a novel, variable wall shear stress-limiter based on previous experimental data significantly improved the results. Simulations identified a critical diameter (1.8 times the inlet diameter) beyond which significant monocyte deposition is expected to occur. Monocyte adhesion occurred proximally in smaller abdominal aortic aneurysms and distally as the sac expands. The near-wall particle residence time observed in each of the patient-specific models was markedly different. Discrete hotspots of monocyte residence time were detected, suggesting that the monocyte infiltration responsible for the breakdown of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall occurs heterogeneously. Peak monocyte residence time was found to increase with aneurysm sac size. Further work addressing certain limitations is needed in a larger cohort to determine clinical significance. PMID:23886969

  13. Exposure of Monocytes to Lipoarabinomannan Promotes Their Differentiation into Functionally and Phenotypically Immature Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Ocaña-Guzmán, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; García-de-Alba, Carolina; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a lipid virulence factor secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. LAM can be measured in the urine or serum of tuberculosis patients (TB-patients). Circulating monocytes are the precursor cells of alveolar macrophages and might be exposed to LAM in patients with active TB. We speculated that exposing monocytes to LAM could produce phenotypically and functionally immature macrophages. To test our hypothesis, human monocytes were stimulated with LAM (24–120 hours) and various readouts were measured. The study showed that when monocytes were exposed to LAM, the frequency of CD68+, CD33+, and CD86+ macrophages decreased, suggesting that monocyte differentiation into mature macrophages was affected. Regarding functionality markers, TLR2+ and TLR4+ macrophages also decreased, but the percentage of MMR+ expression did not change. LAM-exposed monocytes generated macrophages that were less efficient in producing proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ; however, their phagocytic capacity was not modified. Taken together, these data indicate that LAM exposure influenced monocyte differentiation and produced poorly functional macrophages with a different phenotype. These results may help us understand how mycobacteria can limit the quality of the innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:26347897

  14. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Modulate Bone Marrow-Derived Pro-Inflammatory Monocyte Production and Survival

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Stéphanie; Jiang, Wei; Roy, Patrick; Champigny, Camille; LeBlanc, Éric; Morley, Barbara J.; Hao, Junwei; Simard, Alain R.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in immune regulation, and that their activation can protect against inflammatory diseases. Previous data have shown that nicotine diminishes the numbers of peripheral monocytes and macrophages, especially those of the pro-inflammatory phenotype. The goal of the present study was to determine if nicotine modulates the production of bone marrow -derived monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we first found that murine bone marrow cells express multiple nAChR subunits, and that the α7 and α9 nAChRs most predominant subtypes found in immune cells and their precursors. Using primary cultures of murine bone marrow cells, we then determined the effect of nicotine on monocyte colony-stimulating factor and interferon gamma (IFNγ)-induced monocyte production. We found that nicotine lowered the overall number of monocytes, and more specifically, inhibited the IFNγ-induced increase in pro-inflammatory monocytes by reducing cell proliferation and viability. These data suggested that nicotine diminishes the ratio of pro-inflammatory versus anti-inflammatory monocyte produced in the bone marrow. We thus confirmed this hypothesis by measuring cytokine expression, where we found that nicotine inhibited the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-12, while stimulating the secretion of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Finally, nicotine also reduced the number of pro-inflammatory monocytes in the bone marrow of LPS-challenged mice. Overall, our data demonstrate that both α7 and α9 nAChRs are involved in the regulation of pro-inflammatory M1 monocyte numbers. PMID:26925951

  15. Detection and quantification methods of monocyte homing in coronary vasculature with an imaging cryomicrotome.

    PubMed

    Hakimzadeh, Nazanin; van Horssen, Pepijn; van Lier, Monique G J T B; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; Belterman, Charly; Coronel, Ruben; Piek, Jan J; Verberne, Hein J; Spaan, Jos A E; Siebes, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Cellular imaging modalities are important for revealing the behavior and role of monocytes in response to neovascularization progression in coronary artery disease. In this study we aimed to develop methods for high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging and quantification of monocytes relative to the entire coronary artery network using a novel episcopic imaging modality. In a series of ex vivo experiments, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and CD14+ monocytes were labeled with fluorescent live cell tracker probes and infused into the coronary artery network of excised rat hearts by a Langendorff perfusion method. Coronary arteries were subsequently infused with fluorescent vascular cast material and processed with an imaging cryomicrotome, whereby each heart was consecutively cut (5 ?m slice thickness) and block face imaged at appropriate excitation and emission wavelengths. The resulting image stacks yielded 3D reconstructions of the vascular network and the location of cells administered. Successful detection and quantification of single cells and cell clusters were achieved relative to the coronary network using customized particle detection software. These methods were then applied to an in vivo rabbit model of chronic myocardial ischemia in which autologous monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, labeled with a fluorescent live cell tracker probe and re-infused into the host animal. The processed 3D image stacks revealed homing of monocytes to the ischemic myocardial tissue. Monocytes detected in the ischemic tissue were predominantly concentrated in the mid-myocardium. Vessel segmentation identified coronary collateral connections relative to monocyte localization. This study established a novel imaging platform to efficiently determine the localization of monocytes in relation to the coronary microvascular network. These techniques are invaluable for investigating the role of monocyte populations in the progression of coronary neovascularization in animal models of chronic and sub-acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:25179912

  16. Analysis using canine peripheral blood for establishing in vitro conditions for monocyte differentiation into macrophages for Leishmania chagasi infection and T-cell subset purification.

    PubMed

    Viana, Kelvinson Fernandes; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian Oliveira; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Resende, Lucilene Aparecida; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Moura, Sandra Lima; Zanini, Marcos Santos; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro

    2013-11-15

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a parasitic disease endemic in many countries, and dogs present as the major natural reservoir of the parasite, Leishmania chagasi (syn. L. infantum). Biomarkers in the canine immune system is an important technique in the course of developing vaccines and treatment strategies against CVL. New methodologies for studying the immune response of dogs during Leishmania infection and after receiving vaccines and treatments against CVL would be useful. In this context, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy dogs to evaluate procedures related to (i) establishment of in vitro conditions of monocytes differentiated into macrophages infected with L. chagasi and (ii) purification procedures of T-cell subsets (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) using microbeads. Our data demonstrated that after 5 days of differentiation, macrophages were able to induce significant phagocytic and microbicidal activity after L. chagasi infection and also showed increased frequency of parasitism and a higher parasite load. Although N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) levels presented similar levels of macrophage culture and L. chagasi infection, a progressive decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels was a hallmark over 5 days of culture. High purity levels (>90%) of CD4 and CD8 T cells were obtained on a magnetic separation column. We concluded that monocytes differentiated into macrophages at 5 days and displayed an intermediate frequency of parasitism and parasite load 72 h after L. chagasi infection. Furthermore, the purification system using canine T-lymphocyte subsets obtained after 5 days of monocyte differentiation proved efficient for CD4 or CD8 T-cell purification (≥90%). The in vitro analysis using L. chagasi-infected macrophages and purified T cells presented a prospective methodology that could be incorporated in CVL vaccine and treatment studies that aim to analyze the microbicidal potential induced by specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells. PMID:24018185

  17. Comparison between magnetic activated cell sorted monocytes and monocyte adherence techniques for in vitro generation of immature dendritic cells: an Egyptian trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Sahrigy, Sally Ahmed; Talkhan, Hala Ahmed; Rahman, Azza M. Abdel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen presenting cells, which are considered a central component of the immune system for their extraordinary capacity to initiate and modulate the immune responses elicited upon recognition of infectious agents. This has made them a major focus of interest in the conception of immunotherapeutic vaccine strategies. Aim of the study To standardise a protocol for in vitro differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) upon treatment with specific growth factors and to compare two monocyte isolation methods including magnetic activated cell sorted (MACS) monocytes by CD14+ immuno-magnetic beads and monocytes separated by adherence. Material and methods Immature DCs were generated from monocytes of human peripheral blood in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-4 after in vitro culture for seven days. Cultured cells were stained with surface markers of iDCs: FITC-anti-CD14, PE-anti-CD11c, PE-anti-CD1a, PE-Cy5-anti-HLA-DR, and PE-anti-CD83 for flow cytometry analysis. Results We found that the viability of MACS-DCs was higher than DCs derived from monocytes separated by adherence (median 50 and interquartile range 45-50 vs. 25 and 10-30, respectively; p < 0.001). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the median interquartile percentages of MACS-DCs expressing CD14– was significantly higher compared to the DCs derived from monocytes separated by adherence (median 80.2 and interquartile range 77.7-80.7 vs. 40.2 and 30.4-40.6, respectively; p < 0.001). However, MACS-DCs expressed the same levels of CD11c, CD1a, and HLA-DR as well as CD83 compared to the DCs derived from monocytes separated by adherence with p value > 0.05. Conclusions Both positively selected monocytes and monocytes separated by adherence procedure gave the same results as regards cell surface marker expression, although the DCs purity and viability using MACS separated monocytes were better. PMID:26155179

  18. Interleukin-6 gene expression and production induced in human monocytes by membrane proteoglycans from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sironi, M; Sica, A; Riganti, F; Licciardello, L; Colotta, F; Mantovani, A

    1990-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of membrane proteoglycans (MPG) from Klebsiella pneumoniae on IL-6 production by human peripheral blood monocytes. Exposure in vitro to MPG induced release of IL-6 activity from human monocytes, as assessed by the 7TD1 hybridoma assay. MPG-induced hybridoma growth factor activity was blocked by anti-IL-6 antibodies. MPG induced expression in human monocytes of IL-6 mRNA transcripts as assessed by Northern blot analysis. Induction of IL-6 in mononuclear phagocytes may play a role in the immunomodulatory activity of MPG. PMID:2202691

  19. Effect of Bacillus firmus and other sporulating aerobic microorganisms on in vitro stimulation of human lymphocytes. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Prokesová, L; Nováková, M; Julák, J; Mára, M

    1994-01-01

    B. firmus activates human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Bacteria inactivated by heat or by formaldehyde were about equally effective, stimulating the blastic transformation of lymphocytes at doses of 10-200 mg/L and Ig formation in the culture at 10-500 mg/L. The action of formaldehyde treated B. firmus was compared with that of analogously inactivated B. subtilis, B. polymyxa, B. coagulans, B. megaterium, B. pumilus, B. cereus and B. lentus at a concentration of 100 mg/L. All these bacilli mildly stimulated blastic transformation and most of them substantially stimulated Ig formation, but B. firmus was the most efficient in stimulating the formation of Ig of all classes, in particular IgM and IgA. Its effect on Ig formation was comparable with that of PWM and was unusually high as compared with that of other bacteria. B. firmus is apparently a strong polyclonal activator of B lymphocytes. Its cells or their components could be potentially used for modulating immune reactions. PMID:8549999

  20. Cellular pharmacokinetics and intracellular activity of the novel peptide deformylase inhibitor GSK1322322 against Staphylococcus aureus laboratory and clinical strains with various resistance phenotypes: studies with human THP-1 monocytes and J774 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peyrusson, Frédéric; Butler, Deborah; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-09-01

    GSK1322322 is a peptide deformylase inhibitor active against Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to currently marketed antibiotics. Our aim was to assess the activity of GSK1322322 against intracellular S. aureus using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model and, in parallel, to examine its cellular pharmacokinetics and intracellular disposition. For intracellular activity analysis, we used an established model of human THP-1 monocytes and tested one fully susceptible S. aureus strain (ATCC 25923) and 8 clinical strains with resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, macrolides, clindamycin, linezolid, or moxifloxacin. Uptake, accumulation, release, and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) of [(14)C]GSK1322322 were examined in uninfected murine J774 macrophages and uninfected and infected THP-1 monocytes. GSK1322322 demonstrated a uniform activity against the intracellular forms of all S. aureus strains tested, disregarding their resistance phenotypes, with a maximal relative efficacy (E max) of a 0.5 to 1 log10 CFU decrease compared to the original inoculum within 24 h and a static concentration (C s) close to its MIC in broth. Influx and efflux were very fast (<5 min to equilibrium), and accumulation was about 4-fold, with no or a minimal effect of the broad-spectrum eukaryotic efflux transporter inhibitors gemfibrozil and verapamil. GSK1322322 was recovered in the cell-soluble fraction and was dissociated from the main subcellular organelles and from bacteria (in infected cells). The results of this study show that GSK1322322, as a typical novel deformylase inhibitor, may act against intracellular forms of S. aureus. They also suggest that GSK1322322 has the ability to freely diffuse into and out of eukaryotic cells as well as within subcellular compartments. PMID:26169402

  1. Cellular Pharmacokinetics and Intracellular Activity of the Novel Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor GSK1322322 against Staphylococcus aureus Laboratory and Clinical Strains with Various Resistance Phenotypes: Studies with Human THP-1 Monocytes and J774 Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peyrusson, Frédéric; Butler, Deborah; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    GSK1322322 is a peptide deformylase inhibitor active against Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to currently marketed antibiotics. Our aim was to assess the activity of GSK1322322 against intracellular S. aureus using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model and, in parallel, to examine its cellular pharmacokinetics and intracellular disposition. For intracellular activity analysis, we used an established model of human THP-1 monocytes and tested one fully susceptible S. aureus strain (ATCC 25923) and 8 clinical strains with resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, macrolides, clindamycin, linezolid, or moxifloxacin. Uptake, accumulation, release, and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) of [14C]GSK1322322 were examined in uninfected murine J774 macrophages and uninfected and infected THP-1 monocytes. GSK1322322 demonstrated a uniform activity against the intracellular forms of all S. aureus strains tested, disregarding their resistance phenotypes, with a maximal relative efficacy (Emax) of a 0.5 to 1 log10 CFU decrease compared to the original inoculum within 24 h and a static concentration (Cs) close to its MIC in broth. Influx and efflux were very fast (<5 min to equilibrium), and accumulation was about 4-fold, with no or a minimal effect of the broad-spectrum eukaryotic efflux transporter inhibitors gemfibrozil and verapamil. GSK1322322 was recovered in the cell-soluble fraction and was dissociated from the main subcellular organelles and from bacteria (in infected cells). The results of this study show that GSK1322322, as a typical novel deformylase inhibitor, may act against intracellular forms of S. aureus. They also suggest that GSK1322322 has the ability to freely diffuse into and out of eukaryotic cells as well as within subcellular compartments. PMID:26169402

  2. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma involving the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Chist, Marcela; Vrotsos, Elena; Zamora, Carlos; Martinez, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is a neoplasm composed of monomorphic small B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes, forming proliferation centers in tissue infiltrates (Muller-Hermelink HK, Montserrat E, Catovsky D, et al. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, in Swerdlow SH (ed). WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Lyon, France, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2008, pp. 180-182). We report a case of a 77-year-old man with a medical history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia who presented with worsening chest pain over 8 weeks. Imaging studies revealed severe aortic stenosis and moderate mitral regurgitation. He subsequently underwent minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and mitral repair at our institution. Grossly, the specimen consisted of a trileaflet valve with multiple yellow-white focally hemorrhagic and calcified nodules over its surface. Histologically, a lymphocytic infiltrate composed of monotonous small cells with scant cytoplasm was seen as well as calcification and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD20, PAX5, CD5, and CD23. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an immunohistochemically documented chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma to involve a cardiac valve. PMID:22683202

  3. [Granulocyte-monocyte apheresis for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Stefano; Ferraro, Pietro Manuel

    2012-01-01

    We review the available literature on granulocyte-monocyte apheresis for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and report the outcome data of a multicenter observational study from the Italian registry for therapeutic apheresis. PMID:22388832

  4. COPD and levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes among coal workers: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiuqing; Xing, Jingcai; Liu, Yuewei; Zhou, Yun; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Zhihong; Han, Wenhui; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    This case-control study aimed to investigate whether the levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes were associated with the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among coal workers. A total of 76 COPD cases and 48 age-matched healthy controls from a group of coal workers were included. The case group consisted of 35 COPD patients whose condition was complicated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and 41 COPD patients without CWP. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) in plasma and lymphocytes were detected by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to estimate the association between Hsp levels and COPD risk. Our results showed that plasma Hsp70 and lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were significantly higher and plasma Hsp27 levels were significantly lower in COPD cases than in controls (p < 0.01). No significant differences in lymphocyte Hsp70 levels were found between COPD cases and the matched subjects. Higher plasma Hsp70 levels (odds ratio (OR) = 13.8, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 5.7-33.5) and lower plasma Hsp27 levels (OR = 4.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-10.5) were significantly associated with an increased risk of COPD after adjusting for confounders. Higher lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were only associated with an increased risk of COPD with CWP (OR = 6.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-22.1) but not with an increased risk of COPD without CWP (OR = 3.0, 95 % CI = 0.9-8.9). Additionally, there were strong joint effects of different Hsps on COPD risk. These results showed that higher levels of plasma Hsp70 and lower levels of plasma Hsp27 might be associated with an increased risk of COPD among coal workers. They may have the potential to serve as monitoring markers for COPD in coal workers. PMID:25620081

  5. New therapy via targeting androgen receptor in monocytes/macrophages to battle atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Pang, Haiyan; Wang, Lin; Niu, Yuanjie; Luo, Jie; Chang, Eugene; Sparks, Janet D; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    The male sex has a higher risk to develop coronary artery diseases, including atherosclerosis. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in several atherosclerosis-associated cell types, including monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), but its pathophysiological role in each cell type during the development of atherosclerotic lesions remains unclear. Using the Cre-loxP system, we selectively knocked out AR in these 3 cell types and the resultant AR knockout (ARKO) mice, monocyte/macrophage ARKO, EC-ARKO, and SMC-ARKO, were then crossed with the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice to develop monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-), EC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-), and SMC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice for the study of atherosclerosis. The results showed that the monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice had reduced atherosclerosis compared with the wild-type-LDLR(-/-) control mice. However, no significant difference was detected in EC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) and SMC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice compared with wild-type-LDLR(-/-) mice, suggesting that the AR in monocytes/macrophages, and not in ECs and SMCs, plays a major role to promote atherosclerosis. Molecular mechanism dissection suggested that AR in monocytes/macrophages upregulated the tumor necrosis factor-α, integrin β2, and lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor 1 molecules that are involved in 3 major inflammation-related processes in atherosclerosis, including monocytes/macrophages migration and adhesion to human umbilical vein ECs, and subsequent foam cell formation. Targeting AR via the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, in wild-type-LDLR(-/-) mice showed similar effects as seen in monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice with little influence on lipid profile. In conclusion, the AR in monocytes/macrophages plays key roles in atherosclerosis and targeting AR with ASC-J9 may represent a new potential therapeutic approach to battle atherosclerosis. PMID:24688120

  6. Increased expression and occupancy of receptors for tumour necrosis factor on blood monocytes from tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cadranel, J; Philippe, C; Philippe, B; Milleron, B; Fouqueray, B; Mayaud, C; Baud, L

    1993-01-01

    Blood monocytes from tuberculosis patients release high amounts of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Because the biological efficiency of TNF-alpha would depend on the expression of TNF-alpha receptors on target cells, we thought to analyse the capacity of blood monocytes from a group of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis to bind 125I-TNF-alpha. We report a slight but not significant enhancement in specific binding of 125I-TNF-alpha on monocytes of 15 consecutively studied patients compared with 10 controls. Per cent cell surface bound and internalized 125I-TNF-alpha was identical in the two groups. To evaluate the receptor occupancy by endogenously generated TNF-alpha, similar experiments were performed after cell exposure to low-pH glycine buffer. Under these conditions, specific binding of 125I-TNF-alpha was significantly higher on tuberculosis monocytes compared with control monocytes. Moreover, the occupancy of TNF-alpha receptors by endogenously generated TNF-alpha that was found to be significantly higher on tuberculosis monocytes than on control monocytes, was directly related to the enhanced capacity of mononuclear cells to generate TNF-alpha in vitro. It normalized after 3 months of antituberculous therapy. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed that tuberculosis infection caused a significant increase in high affinity 125I-TNF-alpha binding to monocytes without any significant change in the dissociation constant. Collectively, these results indicate an up-regulation of TNF-alpha generation and binding to blood monocytes in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. They provide support to the hypothesis that TNF-alpha is of critical importance in the pathogenesis of this infection. PMID:8403517

  7. Labeling monocytes with gold nanoparticles to track their recruitment in atherosclerosis with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chhour, Peter; Naha, Pratap C; O'Neill, Sean M; Litt, Harold I; Reilly, Muredach P; Ferrari, Victor A; Cormode, David P

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes are actively recruited from the circulation into developing atherosclerotic plaques. In the plaque, monocytes differentiate into macrophages and eventually form foam cells. Continued accumulation of foam cells can lead to plaque rupture and subsequent myocardial infarction. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is the best modality to image the coronary arteries non-invasively, therefore we have sought to track the accumulation of monocytes into atherosclerotic plaques using CT. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and stabilized with a variety of ligands. Select formulations were incubated with an immortalized monocyte cell line in vitro and evaluated for cytotoxicity, effects on cytokine release, and cell uptake. These data identified a lead formulation, 11-MUDA capped gold nanoparticles, to test for labeling primary monocytes. The formulation did not the affect the viability or cytokine release of primary monocytes and was highly taken up by these cells. Gold labeled primary monocytes were injected into apolipoprotein E deficient mice kept on Western diet for 10 weeks. Imaging was done with a microCT scanner. A significant increase in attenuation was measured in the aorta of mice receiving the gold labeled cells as compared to control animals. Following the experiment, the biodistribution of gold was evaluated in major organs. Additionally, plaques were sectioned and examined with electron microscopy. The results showed that gold nanoparticles were present inside monocytes located within plaques. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles as effective cell labeling contrast agents for non-invasive imaging of monocyte accumulation within plaques with CT. PMID:26914700

  8. Monocyte trafficking across the vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Teresa; Ley, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Monocytes fundamentally contribute to immune surveillance and the inflammatory response in immunoinflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis. Recruitment of these cells to the site of injury requires their trafficking across the blood vessel wall. A series of events, including capture, rolling, slow rolling, arrest, adhesion strengthening, and lateral locomotion, precede monocyte transmigration. Recent investigations have revealed new aspects of this cascade. This article revisits some conventional paradigms and selectively highlights new findings, including novel insights into monocyte differentiation and recently identified functional mediators, signalling pathways, and new structural aspects of monocyte extravasation. The emerging roles of endothelial junctional molecules like vascular endothelial-cadherin and the junctional adhesion molecule family, adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1, molecules localized to the lateral border recycling compartment like cluster of differentiation 99, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, and poliovirus receptor (CD155), as well as other cell surface molecules such as cluster of differentiation 146 and ephrins in transendothelial migration are discussed. PMID:25990461

  9. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Found?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? What ... acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Treating Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? ...

  10. Fluorescent bacterial rosetting of lymphocyte subpopulations. II. Identification of human lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Niemetz, A H; Mayr, W R

    1981-01-01

    In a previous study, fluorochrome-labelled bacteria were found to be a very objective tool to investigate human lymphocyte heterogeneity with regard to bacterial rosette formation. The application of these assay systems (mono-, double- and anti-Ig/bacterial rosetting test) to identify lymphocyte subpopulations is given. PMID:7034372

  11. Role of macrophages and monocytes in hepatitis C virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Revie, Dennis; Salahuddin, Syed Zaki

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies conducted over many years have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) can infect a variety of cell types. In vivo infection of monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells by HCV has been frequently shown by a number of researchers. These studies have demonstrated replication of HCV by detecting the presence of both negative genomic strands and a variety of non-structural HCV proteins in infected cells. In addition, analyses of genome sequences have also shown that different cell types can harbor different HCV variants. Investigators have also done preliminary studies of which cellular genes are affected by HCV infection, but there have not yet been a sufficient number of these studies to understand the effects of infection on these cells. Analyses of in vitro HCV replication have shown that monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells can be infected by HCV from patient sera or plasma. These studies suggest that entry and cellular locations may vary between different cell types. Some studies suggest that macrophages may preferentially allow HCV genotype 1 to replicate, but macrophages do not appear to select particular hypervariable regions. Overall, these studies agree with a model where monocytes and macrophages act as an amplification system, in which these cells are infected and show few cytopathic effects, but continuously produce HCV. This allows them to produce virus over an extended time and allows its spread to other cell types. PMID:24659871

  12. Spread of Infection and Lymphocyte Depletion in Mice Depends on Polymerase of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Gülsah; Klingel, Karin; Planz, Oliver; Bier, Katja; Herwig, Astrid; Sauter, Martina; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2009-01-01

    SC35M is a mouse-adapted variant of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus SC35. We have previously shown that interspecies adaptation is mediated by mutations in the viral polymerase and that it is paralleled by the acquisition of high pathogenicity for mice. In the present study, we have compared virus spread and organ tropism of SC35 and SC35M in mice. We show that SC35 virus causes mild bronchiolitis in these animals, whereas infection with the mouse-adapted SC35M virus leads to severe hemorrhagic pneumonia with dissemination to other organs, including the brain. In SC35M-infected animals, viral RNA and viral antigen were detected in monocytes and macrophages, and SC35M, unlike SC35, replicated in lymphocyte and macrophage cultures in vitro. SC35M did not induce an adequate cytokine response but, unlike SC35, caused severe lymphopenia in mice. These observations suggest that the high efficiency of the SC35M polymerase is responsible for infection and depletion of lymphocytes and other white blood cells, which results in immune suppression and systemic virus spread. PMID:19700749

  13. Proteomic profiling of lymphocytes in autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes play important roles in the balance between body defense and noxious agents involved in a number of diseases, e.g. autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer. The proteomic analyses have been applied to identify and validate disease-associated and disease-specific biomarkers for therapeutic strategies of diseases. The proteomic profiles of lymphocytes may provide more information to understand their functions and roles in the development of diseases, although proteomic approaches in lymphocytes are still limited. The present review overviewed the proteomics-based studies on lymphocytes to headlight the proteomic profiles of lymphocytes in diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer, with a special focus on lung diseases. We will explore the potential significance of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets from the current status in proteomic studies of lymphocytes and discuss the value of the currently available proteomic methodologies in the lymphocytes research. PMID:24397796

  14. Morphological heterogeneity of Leu7, Leu11 and OKM1 positive lymphocyte subsets: an ultrastructural study with the immunogold method.

    PubMed Central

    Polli, N; Matutes, E; Robinson, D; Catovsky, D

    1987-01-01

    The morphological features of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes reactive with three monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against natural killer (NK) cells, Leu7, OKM1 (CD11b) and Leu11 (CD16) and with two anti-T cell MoAb, CD4 and CD8, have been analysed at ultrastructural level by an indirect immunogold method. Cells having the features of large granular lymphocytes (LGL) but also lymphocytes displaying different morphological characteristics (non LGL; e.g. high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles) were seen reactive with each of the MoAb investigated. Leu7 identified a higher proportion of LGL (60-80%) than OKM1 (10-95%) and Leu11 (20-48%), and with a stronger binding. A distinct granular structure, recognized as parallel tubular arrays, was more characteristic of the Leu7+, CD8+ LGL and was less frequently seen in the OKM1 and Leu11 positive LGL subpopulation in four out of the five donors investigated. It is of interest that the Leu11 and OKM1 positive subsets, which correspond functionally to cells with greater NK function, had relatively less LGL than the Leu7 positive subsets, raising the issue of the true morphology of NK cells in man. The existence of a minority of CD4 positive LGL was confirmed. Our findings demonstrate that there is a degree of morphological heterogeneity within the normal NK lymphoid population as defined by the membrane phenotype and that certain variability among normal individuals regarding the proportion and structural features of the NK subpopulations may be present. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3498572

  15. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  16. Immunoregulatory T cells in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: evidence of a unique phenotype a flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, R H; Sewell, H F; Dawson, A A; Ratcliffe, M A; Bennett, N B; King, D J

    1990-01-01

    CD4+ T cells of 57 patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) were analysed for expression of CD45RA and CD29. The majority of CLL patients (33 cases) showed a novel coexpression of these markers on a significant proportion of CD4+ T cells; however, analysis of a single blood sample revealed no apparent prognostic value associated with the markers. Expression of CD45RA and CD29 correlated with parameters of immune function consistent with the known attributes of these markers. PMID:1703059

  17. [Study of morphological types of nephrotic glomerulonephritis and the number of glucocorticoid receptors of lymphocytes for prognosis of the effectiveness of glucocorticoid therapy].

    PubMed

    Sasu, B I; Mukhin, N A; Serov, V V; Varshavskiĭ, V A

    1984-01-01

    The study of the glucocortocoid receptors (GCR) level of blood lymphocytes in 31 patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) of the nephrotic type revealed the lack of a clear parallelism between the morphological type of GN and GCR level. A relatively low GCR level correlates with the resistance of nephrotic GN patients regardless of the GN morphological type. The patients with a relatively low GCR level did not respond to the glucocorticoid (GC) therapy even if they had morphological types of nephrotic GN considered to be "favourable" for this therapy (mesangio-proliferative and membranous GN). It is stated that the GC therapy for such patients is not justified. PMID:6383286

  18. Cell-contact dependent inhibition of monocytes by airway epithelial cells and reversion by infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Oumouna, Mustapha; Weitnauer, Michael; Mijošek, Vedrana; Schmidt, Lotte M; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2015-11-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are the first line of defense against airborne infectious microbes and play an important role in regulating the local immune response. However, the interplay of epithelial cells and professional immune cells during both homeostasis and infection has only been partially studied. The present study was performed to determine how bronchial epithelial cells affect the activation of monocytes. Under healthy conditions, AECs were shown to inhibit reactivity of monocytes. We hypothesized that upon infection, monocytes might be released from inhibition by AECs. We report that direct contact of monocytes with unstimulated BEAS2B epithelial cells results in inhibition of TNF secretion by activated monocytes. In addition to the known soluble modulators, we show that cell contacts between epithelial cells and monocytes or macrophages also contribute to homeostatic inhibitory actions. We find AECs to express the inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and blockade of PD-L1 results in increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from monocytes. Contrary to the inhibitory activities during homeostasis, epithelial cells infected with Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) induce a significant release of inhibition. However, release of inhibition was not due to modulation of PD-L1 expression in AECs. We conclude that airway epithelial cells control the reactivity of monocytes through direct and indirect interactions; however tonic inhibition can be reverted upon stimulation of AECs with RSV and thereof derived molecular patterns. The study confirms the important role of airway epithelial cells for local immune reactions. PMID:26153873

  19. Blockade of leucocyte function‐associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) decreases lymphocyte trapping in the normal pulmonary vasculature: studies in the isolated buffer-perfused rat lung

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, A; Tschernig, T; Ermert, L; Althoff, A; Merkle, M; Gebert, A; Ermert, M; Seeger, W; Pabst, R

    2000-01-01

    Adhesion molecules regulate the migration of lymphocytes in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. In the lung, little is known about lymphocyte sticking and migration through the pulmonary vascular endothelium in physiological or pathological situations. Therefore the isolated buffer-perfused rat lung was used to investigate the mobilization of lymphocytes out of the normal lung into the venous effluent and to the bronchoalveolar space. The lymphocyte subset composition was characterized in the venous effluent, the lung tissue and the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) using immunocytology. Lymphocytes continuously left the normal lung at a total of 5·0 ± 0·7 × 106 cells within the first hour of perfusion. The injection of 200 × 106 lymphocytes via the pulmonary trunk increased the venous release of lymphocytes by 170%. To investigate the effect of LFA-1 and CD44 on the adhesion of lymphocytes to the pulmonary endothelium, lymphocytes preincubated with an anti-LFA-1 MoAb, which blocks the interaction of LFA-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), or lymphocytes preincubated with an anti-CD44 MoAb, were injected. The injection of LFA-1-blocked lymphocytes led to an increase by 70% of injected cells recovered in the perfusate within the first hour, whereas anti-CD44 treatment of injected lymphocytes had no effect. The LFA-1-blocked lymphocytes showed higher numbers of T and B cells in the effluent. Thus, the present experiments demonstrate that LFA-1 influences the trapping of lymphocytes in the vasculature of the healthy rat lung. PMID:10931156

  20. Effects of PCBs and PBDEs on thyroid hormone, lymphocyte proliferation, hematology and kidney injury markers in residents of an e-waste dismantling area in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiwei; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Gangqiang; Shen, Haitao; Wu, Lizhi; Chen, Zhijian; Han, Jianlong; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are two typical categories of contaminants released from e-waste dismantling environments. In China, the body burdens of PCBs and PBDEs are associated with abnormal thyroid hormones in populations from e-waste dismantling sites, but the results are limited and contradictory. In this study, we measured the serum levels of PCBs and PBDEs and the thyroid hormone free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in 40 residents in an e-waste dismantling area and in 15 residents in a control area. Additionally, we also measured some lymphocyte proliferation indexes, hematologic parameters and kidney injury markers, including white blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, platelets, serum creatinine and beta 2-microglobulin (β2-MG). The results indicated that the mean level of ΣPCBs in the exposure group was significantly higher than that in the control group (964.39 and 67.98 ng g(-1), p<0.0001), but the mean level of ΣPBDEs in the exposure group was not significantly higher than that in the controls (139.32 vs. 75.74 ng g(-1), p>0.05). We determined that serum levels of FT3, FT4, monocytes and lymphocytes were significantly lower, whereas the levels of neutrophils, hemoglobin, platelets and serum creatinine were significantly higher in the exposed group (p<0.05). The mean level of ΣPCBs was negatively correlated with levels of FT3, FT4, monocytes and lymphocytes (p<0.05) and positively correlated with levels of neutrophils, hemoglobin, serum creatinine and β2-MG (p<0.05). Additionally, the mean level of ΣPBDEs was positively correlated with levels of white blood cells, hemoglobin and platelets (p<0.05). Our data suggest that exposure to an e-waste dismantling environment may increase the body burdens of PCBs and the specific PBDEs congeners in native residents and that the contaminants released from e-waste may contribute to abnormal changes in body levels of thyroid hormone, hematology and kidney injury markers. PMID:26218560

  1. [Subpopulations and phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, E V; Malanicheva, T G; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    There was conducted a study of the phagocytic activity, immunophenotype and peripheral blood monocytes by flow cytometry in children with chronic gastroduodenitis associated with Helicobacter pylori, as well as the association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida and markers of secondary immune deficiency. The differential changes in the structure of circulating profile of monocytes were revealed, that indicate the pathogenetic significance of these disorders in chronic gastroduodenitis with H. pylori etiology, as well as at association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida. Violations of the phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children are associated with depression of different stages of phagocytosis--capture functions, mobilization, killing, intracellular biocidity. A severe depression in phagocytic activity of monocytes occurs in CGD associated with Hp and fungi of the genus Candida. PMID:24501955

  2. Cytogenetic study of metronidazole and three metronidazole analogues in cultured human lymphocytes with and without metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Melchor-Castro, Sara; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Camargo, Estela Meléndez; Salgado-Zamora, Héctor; Campos Aldrete, Maria Elena

    2004-06-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ) and other nitroimidazole derivatives have been extensively used to treat infections caused by protozoa and anaerobic bacteria. However, the need for new derivatives with similar therapeutic activity but lower toxicity to human beings prevails. On this purpose, three metronidazole analogues were synthesized, namely: 1-(p-methylphenacyl)-2-methyl-4-nitro imidazole (CPMe), 1-(p-methoxyphenacyl)-2-methyl-4-nitroimidazole (CPMeO), and 1-(p-fluorphenacyl)-2-methyl-4-nitroimidazole (CPF), which at low concentrations (0.5-2 microg/ml) showed a higher activity against Entamoeba histolytica than MTZ (3-6 microg/ml). The aim of this work was to investigate the cytogenetic effect of the three MTZ analogues on human lymphocyte cultures with and without metabolic activation in vitro, using the sister chromatid exchange test (SCE), comparatively with MTZ. The effect of the compounds on the cell proliferation kinetics (CPK) measured by the replication index (RI) and the cytotoxic effect in the mitotic index (MI) was evaluated as well. The SCE frequencies with and without S9 metabolic activation in treated and control lymphocytes showed no significant statistical differences. However when metabolic activation was involved a significant increase in the amount of third division metaphases provoked the CPK increased significantly with all the tested compounds. The RI showed similar behaviour, except for compound CPF. PMID:15046779

  3. Technical Advance: Liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Reed, Jason S.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ohme, Merete A.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  4. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  5. First Demonstration of Antigen Induced Cytokine Expression by CD4-1+ Lymphocytes in a Poikilotherm: Studies in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Wyse, Cathy; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Zou, Jun; Weerdenburg, Eveline M.; M. van der Sar, Astrid; Wang, Difei; Secombes, Christopher J.; Bird, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in homeotherms depends greatly on CD4+ Th cells which release cytokines in response to specific antigen stimulation. Whilst bony fish and poikilothermic tetrapods possess cells that express TcR and CD4-related genes (that exist in two forms in teleost fish; termed CD4-1 and CD4-2), to date there is no unequivocal demonstration that cells equivalent to Th exist. Thus, in this study we determined whether CD4-1+ lymphocytes can express cytokines typical of Th cells following antigen specific stimulation, using the zebrafish (Danio rerio). Initially, we analyzed the CD4 locus in zebrafish and found three CD4 homologues, a CD4-1 molecule and two CD4-2 molecules. The zfCD4-1 and zfCD4-2 transcripts were detected in immune organs and were most highly expressed in lymphocytes. A polyclonal antibody to zfCD4-1 was developed and used with an antibody to ZAP70 and revealed double positive cells by immunohistochemistry, and in the Mycobacterium marinum disease model CD4-1+ cells were apparent surrounding the granulomas typical of the infection. Next a prime-boost experiment, using human gamma globulin as antigen, was performed and revealed for the first time in fish that zfCD4-1+ lymphocytes increase the expression of cytokines and master transcription factors relevant to Th1/Th2-type responses as a consequence of boosting with specific antigen. PMID:26083432

  6. First Demonstration of Antigen Induced Cytokine Expression by CD4-1+ Lymphocytes in a Poikilotherm: Studies in Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sohye; Mitra, Suman; Wyse, Cathy; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Zou, Jun; Weerdenburg, Eveline M; van der Sar, Astrid M; Wang, Difei; Secombes, Christopher J; Bird, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in homeotherms depends greatly on CD4+ Th cells which release cytokines in response to specific antigen stimulation. Whilst bony fish and poikilothermic tetrapods possess cells that express TcR and CD4-related genes (that exist in two forms in teleost fish; termed CD4-1 and CD4-2), to date there is no unequivocal demonstration that cells equivalent to Th exist. Thus, in this study we determined whether CD4-1+ lymphocytes can express cytokines typical of Th cells following antigen specific stimulation, using the zebrafish (Danio rerio). Initially, we analyzed the CD4 locus in zebrafish and found three CD4 homologues, a CD4-1 molecule and two CD4-2 molecules. The zfCD4-1 and zfCD4-2 transcripts were detected in immune organs and were most highly expressed in lymphocytes. A polyclonal antibody to zfCD4-1 was developed and used with an antibody to ZAP70 and revealed double positive cells by immunohistochemistry, and in the Mycobacterium marinum disease model CD4-1+ cells were apparent surrounding the granulomas typical of the infection. Next a prime-boost experiment, using human gamma globulin as antigen, was performed and revealed for the first time in fish that zfCD4-1+ lymphocytes increase the expression of cytokines and master transcription factors relevant to Th1/Th2-type responses as a consequence of boosting with specific antigen. PMID:26083432

  7. Regulation of epithelial and lymphocyte cell adhesion by adenosine deaminase-CD26 interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ginés, Silvia; Mariño, Marta; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Morimoto, Chikao; Callebaut, Christian; Hovanessian, Ara; Casadó, Vicent; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The extra-enzymic function of cell-surface adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme mainly localized in the cytosol but also found on the cell surface of monocytes, B cells and T cells, has lately been the subject of numerous studies. Cell-surface ADA is able to transduce co-stimulatory signals in T cells via its interaction with CD26, an integral membrane protein that acts as ADA-binding protein. The aim of the present study was to explore whether ADA-CD26 interaction plays a role in the adhesion of lymphocyte cells to human epithelial cells. To meet this aim, different lymphocyte cell lines (Jurkat and CEM T) expressing endogenous, or overexpressing human, CD26 protein were tested in adhesion assays to monolayers of colon adenocarcinoma human epithelial cells, Caco-2, which express high levels of cell-surface ADA. Interestingly, the adhesion of Jurkat and CEM T cells to a monolayer of Caco-2 cells was greatly dependent on CD26. An increase by 50% in the cell-to-cell adhesion was found in cells containing higher levels of CD26. Incubation with an anti-CD26 antibody raised against the ADA-binding site or with exogenous ADA resulted in a significant reduction (50-70%) of T-cell adhesion to monolayers of epithelial cells. The role of ADA-CD26 interaction in the lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion appears to be mediated by CD26 molecules that are not interacting with endogenous ADA (ADA-free CD26), since SKW6.4 (B cells) that express more cell-surface ADA showed lower adhesion than T cells. Adhesion stimulated by CD26 and ADA is mediated by T cell lymphocyte function-associated antigen. A role for ADA-CD26 interaction in cell-to-cell adhesion was confirmed further in integrin activation assays. FACS analysis revealed a higher expression of activated integrins on T cell lines in the presence of increasing amounts of exogenous ADA. Taken together, these results suggest that the ADA-CD26 interaction on the cell surface has a role in lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion. PMID:11772392

  8. Function of blood monocytes among patients with orofacial infections.

    PubMed

    Tzermpos, Fotios; Iatrou, Ioannis; Papadimas, Christos; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Georgitsi, Marianna; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2013-03-01

    Few data are available on the significance of the integrity of the innate immune system among patients with orofacial infections. This was assessed in the present study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 23 patients with orofacial infections before surgical debridement and from 12 healthy volunteers. PBMCs were stimulated with bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and with Pam3Cys. Concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were estimated in supernatants by an enzyme immunoassay. Concentrations of estimated cytokines released from PBMCs of healthy volunteers and of patients did not differ. Intensity of cytokine release after stimulation was related with the time until complete resolution of the infection (p: 0.046). It is concluded that adequate functions of blood monocytes are associated with favorable outcome after surgery for orofacial abscesses. It seems, however, that impairment of monocyte function predisposes to infection persistence. PMID:22542474

  9. Involvement of leukocyte (beta 2) integrins (CD18/CD11) in human monocyte tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, S; Peri, G; Sironi, M; Mantovani, A

    1991-09-01

    Appropriately activated mononuclear phagocytes mediate contact-dependent tumoricidal activity. Adhesion structures involved in contact-dependent tumor cytotoxicity have not been defined. The present study was aimed at identifying the adhesion structures involved in the tumoricidal activity of activated (IFN-gamma + LPS) human monocytes. Tumor cells of different histological origin were used as targets in a 48-hr cytolysis assay. Anti-CD18 (integrin beta 2 chain) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) substantially (50-80%) inhibited human monocyte cytotoxicity. When the role of different a-chains was studied, anti-alpha L (CD11a, LFA1), anti-alpha M (CD11b, Mac-1) and anti-alpha X (CD11c, p150,95) caused marginal inhibition, but the effect of the 3 combined was comparable to that of anti-CD18. Anti-CD18 MAb did not affect the release of various cytotoxic molecules (e.g. TNF) by activated human monocytes. Activated monocytes showed augmented binding to target cells and anti-CD18 MAb inhibited the binding of resting and activated monocytes to tumor target cells. While IFN-gamma alone augmented expression of leukocyte integrins and LPS had no effect, the 2 activation signals, combined for optimal stimulation of tumoricidal activity, resulted in no appreciable increase in these leukocyte adhesion molecules, as assessed by flow cytometry. Our results suggest that the augmented CD18-dependent binding of activated monocytes on tumor cells depends mainly upon changes in the adhesive properties of these molecules rather than upon increased numbers on the cell surface. Anti-ICAM-1 MAb significantly reduced monocyte cytotoxicity on tumor cells, which is consistent with a role of the CD11/CD18 adhesion pathway. These results implicate "activated" leukocyte (beta 2) integrins (CD11/CD18) as important adhesion molecules in the contact-dependent tumoricidal activity of human monocytes. PMID:1679046

  10. Mouse blood monocytes: standardizing their identification and analysis using CD115.

    PubMed

    Breslin, W L; Strohacker, K; Carpenter, K C; Haviland, D L; McFarlin, B K

    2013-04-30

    Monocytes have been used to assess immune dysfunction and disease. While mouse models are a useful longitudinal analog, few researchers have assessed changes in mouse monocytes. The purpose of this study was to provide recommendations for the sample processing and flow cytometric analysis of mouse blood monocytes. Blood was drawn in a non-lethal manner from CD-1 male mice to be used in three experiments. Experiment 1 compared commonly used mouse monocyte markers. Experiment 2 compared the stability of CD115 expression after immediate (0h) and delayed (2 and 4h) processing following blood collection under various experimental conditions (laser strength, anticoagulant, and storage temp.). Experiment 3 compared the consistency of CD115(+) monocyte and subset concentrations using decreasing (40, 20, 10 and 5μL) volumes of blood. In experiment 1, >95% of CD115(+) events co-expressed CD11b; >85% co-expressed CD14. 70% of CD14(+) and 50% of CD11b(+) events co-expressed CD115. In experiment 2, CD115 expression decreased by 33% between 0 and 4h when stored at room temperature. Blood treated with EDTA and refrigerated maintained CD115 stability. In experiment 3, calculated concentrations for total monocyte events varied by <10% when 40, 20 and 10μL of blood were stained. While CD115 staining provides the most distinct monocyte population, it is important to treat blood with EDTA and refrigerate if sample processing will be delayed over 2h. Collectively, the findings of the present study outline important considerations that must be addressed when examining mouse monocytes in small, non-lethal blood samples. PMID:21466808

  11. Modulation of monocyte activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis by leukapheresis therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, G; Stuhlmüller, B; Hain, N; Kalden, J R; Pfizenmaier, K; Burmester, G R

    1993-01-01

    One of the hallmarks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the intense activation of the monocyte-macrophage system. In the present investigation, the modulation of blood monocyte activation was studied with regard to the secretion of cytokines and inflammatory mediators, and to the expression of cytokine receptors. Patients with severe active RA underwent repeated leukapheresis procedures that removed all circulating monocytes. Highly enriched monocyte preparations from the first and third leukapheresis were studied. There were striking differences between the two monocyte populations. Cells obtained from the first leukapheresis constitutively released large amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), neopterin, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In particular, IL-1 beta and neopterin production were further enhanced by stimulation with either interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or TNF-alpha without a synergistic effect. In contrast, cells derived from the third leukapheresis procedure showed a close to normal activation status with only low levels of cytokine and mediator production as well as a reduced response to cytokine stimulation. The number of the receptors for IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha was not changed between first and third leukapheresis. However, TNF-binding capacity was only detectable upon acid treatment of freshly isolated monocytes. A further upregulation was noted upon 24 h in vitro culture, suggesting occupation of membrane receptors and receptor down-regulation by endogenously produced TNF-alpha. Northern blot analysis of cytokine gene expression was in good correlation with the amount of mediators determined on the protein level. These data indicate that cells of the monocyte-macrophage system are already highly activated in the peripheral blood in RA patients with active disease. These cells can be efficiently removed by repeated leukapheresis and are replenished by monocytes that have, with respect to cytokine and mediator production, a considerably lower activation status. Images PMID:8450066

  12. Differential Oxidative Stress Induced by Dengue Virus in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Adult and Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Añez, Germán; Levy, Alegria; Marcucci, Rafael; de Mon, Melchor Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Changes in immune response during lifespan of man are well known. These changes involve decreased neonatal and elderly immune response. In addition, it has been shown a relationship between immune and oxidative mechanisms, suggesting that altered immune response could be associated to altered oxidative response. Increased expression of nitric oxide (NO) has been documented in dengue and in monocyte cultures infected with different types of dengue virus. However, there is no information about the age-dependent NO oxidative response in humans infected by dengue virus. In this study, monocyte cultures from neonatal, elderly and adult individuals (n = 10 each group) were infected with different dengue virus types (DENV- 1 to 4) and oxidative/antioxidative responses and apoptosis were measured at days 1 and 3 of culture. Increased production of NO, lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic anti-oxidative responses in dengue infected monocyte cultures were observed. However, neonatal and elderly monocytes had lower values of studied parameters when compared to those in adult-derived cultures. Apoptosis was present in infected monocytes with higher values at day 3 of culture. This reduced oxidant/antioxidant response of neonatal and elderly monocytes could be relevant in the pathogenesis of dengue disease. PMID:24069178

  13. The CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocyte subset displays increased mitochondrial activity and effector function during acute Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Leoratti, Fabiana M S; Costa, Pedro A C; Rocha, Bruno C; Diniz, Suelen Q; Tada, Mauro S; Pereira, Dhelio B; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Golenbock, Douglas T; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2014-09-01

    Infection with Plasmodium vivax results in strong activation of monocytes, which are important components of both the systemic inflammatory response and parasite control. The overall goal of this study was to define the role of monocytes during P. vivax malaria. Here, we demonstrate that P. vivax-infected patients display significant increase in circulating monocytes, which were defined as CD14(+)CD16- (classical), CD14(+)CD16(+) (inflammatory), and CD14loCD16(+) (patrolling) cells. While the classical and inflammatory monocytes were found to be the primary source of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the CD16(+) cells, in particular the CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes, expressed the highest levels of activation markers, which included chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules. Morphologically, CD14(+) were distinguished from CD14lo monocytes by displaying larger and more active mitochondria. CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes were more efficient in phagocytizing P. vivax-infected reticulocytes, which induced them to produce high levels of intracellular TNF-α and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, antibodies specific for ICAM-1, PECAM-1 or LFA-1 efficiently blocked the phagocytosis of infected reticulocytes by monocytes. Hence, our results provide key information on the mechanism by which CD14(+)CD16(+) cells control parasite burden, supporting the hypothesis that they play a role in resistance to P. vivax infection. PMID:25233271

  14. c-Met identifies a population of matrix metalloproteinase 9-producing monocytes in peritumoural stroma of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lan; Wu, Yan; Xie, Xu-Dong; Chu, Yi-Fan; Li, Jin-Qing; Zheng, Limin

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages (Mϕ) are prominent components of solid tumours and exhibit distinct phenotypes in different microenvironments. Previously, we found that tumours could alter the normal developmental process of Mϕ to trigger transient activation of monocytes in the peritumoural stroma of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we showed that a fraction of monocytes in the peritumoural stroma, but not in HCC cancer nests, expressed surface c-Met molecules. Monocytes exposed to tumours strongly expressed c-Met proteins with kinetics similar to their activation status, and significant correlations were found between c-Met levels and HLA-DR expression on tumour-infiltrating monocytes. NF-κB-mediated autocrine TNF-α stimulated the expression of c-Met on activated monocytes, and by interacting with its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), c-Met increased the motility and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9-producing capacity of tumour-associated monocytes. The intensity of c-Met expression on tumour-infiltrating monocytes was associated with high mortality and reduced survival of patients with HCC. Therefore, the expression of c-Met on activated monocytes/Mϕ may represent a novel mechanism by which a tumour actively and precisely regulates the distribution and functions of these cells to facilitate disease progression. PMID:26108200

  15. The CD14+CD16+ Inflammatory Monocyte Subset Displays Increased Mitochondrial Activity and Effector Function During Acute Plasmodium vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Lis R. V.; Leoratti, Fabiana M. S.; Costa, Pedro A. C.; Rocha, Bruno C.; Diniz, Suelen Q.; Tada, Mauro S.; Pereira, Dhelio B.; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium vivax results in strong activation of monocytes, which are important components of both the systemic inflammatory response and parasite control. The overall goal of this study was to define the role of monocytes during P. vivax malaria. Here, we demonstrate that P. vivax–infected patients display significant increase in circulating monocytes, which were defined as CD14+CD16− (classical), CD14+CD16+ (inflammatory), and CD14loCD16+ (patrolling) cells. While the classical and inflammatory monocytes were found to be the primary source of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the CD16+ cells, in particular the CD14+CD16+ monocytes, expressed the highest levels of activation markers, which included chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules. Morphologically, CD14+ were distinguished from CD14lo monocytes by displaying larger and more active mitochondria. CD14+CD16+ monocytes were more efficient in phagocytizing P. vivax-infected reticulocytes, which induced them to produce high levels of intracellular TNF-α and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, antibodies specific for ICAM-1, PECAM-1 or LFA-1 efficiently blocked the phagocytosis of infected reticulocytes by monocytes. Hence, our results provide key information on the mechanism by which CD14+CD16+ cells control parasite burden, supporting the hypothesis that they play a role in resistance to P. vivax infection. PMID:25233271

  16. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Sun, Mingyi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyan; Hamilton, John A; Bjørkdahl, Olle; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an activating receptor expressed by human myeloid cells. Collagen type I (ColI) and collagen type II (ColII) serve as ligands for OSCAR. OSCAR-collagen interaction stimulates RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis. We have recently reported that OSCAR promotes functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR-collagen interaction on monocytes. We show that OSCAR-ColII signaling promoted the survival of monocytes. Moreover, ColII stimulated the release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from healthy donors, which could be completely blocked by an anti-OSCAR monoclonal antibody. Mononuclear cells from the synovial fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis. PMID:26786702

  17. The impact of ranitidine on monocyte responses in the context of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Rogers, Dakota; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-03-01

    Monocytes and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been implicated on the regulation of tumor growth. Histamine is also important for regulating MDSC responses. Oral administration of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine can inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis. In the current study, we examined the impact of oral ranitidine treatment, at a clinically relevant dose, on multiple murine tumor models. The impact of ranitidine on monocyte responses and the role of CCR2 in ranitidine-induced tumor growth inhibition were also investigated. Oral ranitidine treatment did not reduce tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma, LLC1 lung cancer and EL4 thymoma models. However, it consistently reduced E0771 primary tumor growth and metastasis in the 4T1 model. Ranitidine had no impact on E0771 tumor growth in mice deficient in CCR2, where monocyte recruitment to tumors was limited. Analysis of splenic monocytes also revealed an elevated ratio of H2 versus H1 expression from tumor-bearing compared with naïve mice. More detailed examination of the role of ranitidine on monocyte development demonstrated a decrease in monocyte progenitor cells following ranitidine treatment. Taken together, these results reveal that H2 signaling may be a novel target to alter the monocyte population in breast tumor models, and that targeting H2 on monocytes via oral ranitidine treatment impacts effective tumor immunity. Ranitidine is widely used for control of gastrointestinal disorders. The potential role of ranitidine as an adjunct to immunotherapies for breast cancer and the potential impact of H2 antagonists on breast cancer outcomes should be considered. PMID:26863636

  18. NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia of monocytic or myeloid origin exhibit distinct immunophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Ruan, Guo-Rui; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Shi, Hong-Xia; Lai, Yue-Yun; Chang, Yan; Wang, Ya-Zhe; Lu, Dan; Hao, Le; Li, Jin-Lan; Li, Ling-Di; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1m+AML) is a heterogeneous entity. We investigated whether NPM1m+AML with monocytic or myeloid differentiation have distinct immunophenotype. The study included 160 NPM1m+AMLpatients and 178 AML patients without NPM1 mutation and recurrent cytogenetic abnormality (NPM1wt-AML). We analyzed the immunophenotype by flow cytometry. NPM1 mutation was detected by PCR. Compared with NPM1wt-AML patients, NPM1m+AML patients showed higher positive rates of CD33 and CD9 and lower positive rates of CD34, HLA-DR, CD7, CD15 and CD117 (all P<0.05). HLA-DR, CD64, CD14, CD11b, CD15, CD4, CD9 and CD10 were higher (P<0.001) and CD117 was lower (P<0.01) in monocytic NPM1m+AML compared with myeloid NPM1m+AML. Similar rates of lymphoid antigen (CD19, CD2, and CD7) and myeloid antigen (CD13, CD33) positivity were detected in monocytic and myeloid NPM1m+AML. Compared with NPM1wt-AML, CD34 expression was lower both in myeloid and monocytic NPM1m+AML subgroups, although HLA-DR was lower in NPM1m+AML compared with NPM1wt-AML only in myeloid subgroup. Comparisons of NPM1m+AML and NPM1wt-AML showed no differences in monocyte-associated markers such as CD14 and CD11b in myeloid and monocytic subgroup. Myeloid NPM1m+AML correlated with the female gender (P=0.001), lower WBC counts (P=0.04) and higher WT1 transcripts (P=0.006) compared with monocytic NPM1m+AML.These results suggested monocytic and myeloid-derived NPM1m+AML exhibit distinct immunophenotypes. PMID:23601747

  19. Involvement of the MAPK and RhoA/ROCK pathways in PGE2-mediated CCR7-dependent monocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Marc-André; Dumais, Nancy

    2012-08-30

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) induces the expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) on human monocytes, thereby enabling their subsequent migration in response to CCL19 and CCL21, the natural ligands for CCR7. To date, important mediators of PGE(2)-mediated monocyte migration remain unknown. In this study, we explored the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and the RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway in CCR7-dependent monocyte migration in the presence of PGE(2). Our results indicate that CCL19 binding to CCR7 promotes the activation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and leads to monocyte migration. Moreover, the RhoA/ROCK pathway was essential for PGE(2)-mediated CCR7-dependent monocyte migration. PMID:22659045

  20. Monocyte Trafficking, Engraftment, and Delivery of Nanoparticles and an Exogenous Gene into the Acutely Inflamed Brain Tissue – Evaluations on Monocyte-Based Delivery System for the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen; Davy, Philip M. C.; Shi, Yingli; Sun, Si; Allsopp, Richard C.; Lu, Yuanan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) to travel towards chemotactic gradient, traverse tissue barriers, and accumulate precisely at diseased sites makes them attractive candidates as drug carriers and therapeutic gene delivery vehicles targeting the brain, where treatments are often hampered by the blockade of the blood brain barrier (BBB). This study was designed to fully establish an optimized cell-based delivery system using monocytes and MDM, by evaluating their homing efficiency, engraftment potential, as well as carriage and delivery ability to transport nano-scaled particles and exogenous genes into the brain, following the non-invasive intravenous (IV) cell adoptive transfer in an acute neuroinflammation mouse model induced by intracranial injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides. We demonstrated that freshly isolated monocytes had superior inflamed-brain homing ability over MDM cultured in the presence of macrophage colony stimulating factor. In addition, brain trafficking of IV infused monocytes was positively correlated with the number of adoptive transferred cells, and could be further enhanced by transient disruption of the BBB with IV administration of Mannitol, Bradykinin or Serotonin right before cell infusion. A small portion of transmigrated cells was detected to differentiate into IBA-1 positive cells with microglia morphology in the brain. Finally, with the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles SHP30, the ability of nanoscale agent-carriage monocytes to enter the inflamed brain region was validated. In addition, lentiviral vector DHIV-101 was used to introduce green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into monocytes, and the exogenous GFP gene was detected in the brain at 48 hours following IV infusion of the transduced monocytes. All together, our study has set up the optimized conditions for the more-in-depth tests and development of monocyte-mediated delivery, and our data supported the notion to use monocytes as a non-invasive cell-based delivery system for the brain. PMID:27115998

  1. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-01-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3α) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3α expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3α, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3α-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa. PMID:16792690

  2. [Effect of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 potassium ion channels on the proliferation and migration of monocytes/macrophages].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang-Xia; Wang, Xian-Pei; Gao, Chuan-Yu; Ju, Chen-Hui; Zhu, Li-Jie; DU, Yi-Mei

    2015-10-25

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of blockade of Ca(2+) activated channel KCa3.1 and voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 of the monocytes/macrophages on inflammatory monocyte chemotaxis. Chemotaxis assay was used to test the inflammatory Ly-6C(hi) monocyte chemotaxis caused by the monocytes/macrophages. The proliferation of monocytes/macrophages was detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK8). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to detect the C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7) in cultured media. The results showed that the recruitment of Ly-6C(hi) monocyte induced by monocytes/macrophages was suppressed by the potent Kv1.3 blocker Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin (ShK) or the specific KCa3.1 inhibitor TRAM-34. Meanwhile, the proliferation of monocytes/macrophages was significantly inhibited by ShK. The response of Ly-6C(hi) monocyte pretreated with ShK or TRAM-34 to CCL2 was declined. These results suggest that KCa3.1 and Kv1.3 may play an important role in monocytes/macrophages' proliferation and migration. PMID:26490068

  3. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  4. Irradiation Enhances the Ability of Monocytes as Nanoparticle Carrier for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Yu, Ching-Fang; Yen, Chia-Yi; Woo, Christopher William; Lo, Shao-Hua; Huang, Yu-Kuan; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-homing ability of monocytes renders them a potential cellular delivery system for alternative cancer therapies, although their migratory ability can be impaired following reagent uptake. Approaches that enhance monocyte tumor homing and promote their migration will improve the clinical value of these cells as cellular carriers. Previous studies have shown that irradiation (IR) can promote macrophage aggregation in hypoxic regions. To investigate whether IR enhances the infiltration of bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs) into tumors, the infiltration of BMDMs from GFP-transgenic mice in a murine prostate adenocarcinoma TRAMP-C1 model was examined by fluorescence microscopy. IR did not increase the number of BMDMs that infiltrated initially, but did increase monocyte retention within IR-treated tumors for up to 2 weeks. We also showed that BMDMs can take up various imaging and therapeutic agents, although the mobility of BMDMs decreased with increasing load. When BMDMs were differentiated in IR-treated tumor-conditioned medium (IR-CM) in vitro, the nanoparticle load-mediated inhibition of migration was attenuated. These IR-CM-differentiated BMDMs delivered polymer vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin to radiation therapy (RT)-induced hypoxic tumor regions, and enhanced the efficacy of RT. The prolonged retention of monocytes within irradiated tumor tissues and the ability of IR-CM to enhance the migratory ability of cargo-laden BMDMs suggest that monocytes pre-conditioned by IR-CM can potentially act as cellular carriers for targeted therapy following conventional RT. PMID:26418962

  5. Lessons learned and concepts formed from study of the pathogenesis of the two negative-strand viruses lymphocytic choriomeningitis and influenza

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have unique lifestyles. To describe the pathogenesis and significance of viral infection in terms of host responses, resultant injury, and therapy, we focused on two RNA viruses: lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCMV) and influenza (Flu). Many of the currently established concepts and consequences about viruses and immunologic tolerance, virus-induced immunosuppression, virus-induced autoimmunity, immune complex disease, and virus–lymphocyte and virus–dendritic cell interactions evolved through studies of LCMV in its natural murine host. Similarly, the mechanisms, aftermath, and treatment of persistent RNA viruses emerged, in large part, from research on LCMV. Analysis of acute influenza virus infections uncovered the prominent direct role that cytokine storm plays in the pathogenesis, morbidity, and mortality from this disease. Cytokine storm of influenza virus infection is initiated via a pulmonary endothelial cell amplification loop involving IFN-producing cells and virus-infected pulmonary epithelial cells. Importantly, the cytokine storm is chemically treatable with specific agonist therapy directed to the sphingosphine 1 phosphate receptor 1, which is located on pulmonary endothelial cells, pointing to the endothelial cells as the gatekeepers of this hyperaggressive host immune response. PMID:23341590

  6. Influence of a Diester Glucocorticoid Spray on the Cortisol Level and the CCR4+ CD4+ Lymphocytes in Dogs with Atopic Dermatitis: Open Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Masato; Ishimaru, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of 0.00584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray (HCA; Cortavance Virbac SA, Carros, France) on blood serum cortisol levels and peripheral blood CCR4+ CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels in dogs with atopic dermatitis. Patients were randomly divided into group I (N = 8) and group II (N = 8). The dogs in group I were sprayed with HCA on the affected skin once a day for three weeks. The dogs in group II were treated once a day for 3 days followed by no treatment for 4 days for a total of three weeks. For the dogs in group I and group II the CADESI-03 scores before and after use of HCA showed significant reduction (P < 0.01). The postcortisol level after the use of HCA in group I showed 36.0% decrease and showed significant suppression (P < 0.01). By comparison, the use of HCA on group II did not show decrease in postcortisol levels. There was a tendency of suppression for hypothalamus—pituitary gland—adrenal gland system, but it was not serious influence. In addition, there was no influence on peripheral blood CCR4+ CD4+ lymphocytes percentage in dogs in group I after treatment with HCA. PMID:26464935

  7. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  8. Evaluation of geriatric assessment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Results of the CLL9 trial of the German CLL study group.

    PubMed

    Goede, Valentin; Bahlo, Jasmin; Chataline, Viktoria; Eichhorst, Barbara; Dürig, Jan; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Kolb, Gerald; Honecker, Friedemann; Wedding, Ulrich; Hallek, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Multidimensional geriatric assessment (GA) has been demonstrated to predict outcomes in older patients with cancer. This study evaluated GA in a cohort of older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Seventy-five of 97 subjects with CLL who were enrolled in a clinical trial of the German CLL Study Group underwent GA prior to the start of study treatment (low-dose chemotherapy with fludarabine). GA included cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS), timed-up-and-go (TUG) test, dementia detection (DEMTECT) test and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) index. There was little correlation between CIRS, TUG, DEMTECT or IADL results and treatment toxicity, feasibility or efficacy in this study. CIRS and IADL had no statistically significant impact on overall prognosis. However, under-performance in TUG or DEMTECT test was strongly associated with poor survival. The latter findings provide a rationale to further investigate geriatric assessment in CLL and in the context with other CLL treatments. PMID:26377031

  9. The Kinetics of Circulating Monocyte Subsets and Monocyte-Platelet Aggregates in the Acute Phase of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Associations with 2-Year Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xin-Lin; Ji, Wen-Jie; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Ren, Dong; Ma, Yong-Qiang; Zeng, Shan; Xu, Zhong-Wei; Li, Hong-Xia; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Yu-Ming; Benefield, Brandon C; Zawada, Adam M; Thorp, Edward B; Lee, Daniel C; Heine, Gunnar H

    2016-05-01

    In experimental myocardial infarction (MI), a rise in cell counts of circulating monocyte subsets contributes to impaired myocardial healing and to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization. In humans, the prognostic role of monocyte subsets in patients suffering ST-elevation MI (STEMI) is still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to determine the kinetics of the 3 monocyte subsets (classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes), as well as the subset-specific monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPA), in acute STEMI followed by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and their relationships with cardiovascular outcomes during a 2-year follow-up.Monocyte subsets and MPA were measured in 100 STEMI patients receiving primary PCI on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 of symptom onset, which were compared with 60 stable coronary heart disease patients and 35 healthy volunteers. From day 1 to day 7, significant increases in the counts of CD14++CD16+ monocytes and CD14++CD16+ MPA were observed, with peak levels on day 2. During a median follow-up of 2.0 years, 28 first cardiovascular events (defined as cardiovascular death, nonfatal ischemic stroke, recurrent MI, need for emergency or repeat revascularization, and rehospitalization for heart failure) were recorded. After adjustment for confounders, CD14++CD16+ monocytosis (day 1 [HR: 3.428; 95% CI: 1.597-7.358; P = 0.002], day 2 [HR: 4.835; 95% CI: 1.106-21.13; P = 0.04], day 3 [HR: 2.734; 95% CI: 1.138-6.564; P = 0.02], and day 7 [HR: 2.647; 95% CI: 1.196-5.861; P = 0.02]), as well as increased levels of CD14++CD16+ MPA measured on all time points (days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7), had predictive values for adverse cardiovascular events.In conclusion, our data show the expansion of the CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset during acute phase of STEMI has predictive values for 2-year adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with primary PCI. Future studies will be warranted to elucidate whether CD14++CD16+ monocytes may become a target cell population for new therapeutic strategies after STEMI. PMID:27149446

  10. Influences of weight loss on monocytes and T-cell subpopulations in male judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Katsuji; Suzuki, Natsumi; Masuchi, Katsuyuki; Okada, Hirotaka; Akimoto, Takayuki; Mesaki, Noboru; Kono, Ichiro; Akama, Takao

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine weight loss effects on immune function in judo athletes. Six elite male Japanese judo athletes (20.3 ± 0.4 years) were enrolled in this study. They completed usual weight loss programs during 2 weeks preceding an actual competition. Subjects noted the appearance of upper-respiratory tract infection (URTI) symptoms during the study period. Blood samples were obtained at 40 (baseline period: BL) and 3 (weight loss period: WL) days before and 1 day after the competition (AC). The CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56CD3, CD28CD4, CD28CD8, and Toll-like-receptor-4 (TLR-4) CD14 cells were counted by using flow cytometer analysis. The 6 subjects reported 1 headache, 3 runny nose conditions, and 1 coughing instance during the WL. The CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD28CD4 cell counts were significantly lower at WL than at BL (p ≤ 0.05); they reverted to the baseline value at AC. The TLR-4CD14 cells were significantly fewer at WL (p ≤ 0.05); they remained fewer than they had been at BL, even at AC. These results suggest that 2 weeks of weight loss before a competition can impair cell-mediated immune function and induce high susceptibility to URTI in judo athletes. Coaches, support staff, and athletes should monitor athletes' weight loss, hydration status, appearance of URTI symptoms, and immunocompetence such as lymphocytes and monocytes to prevent the physical condition from becoming worse. PMID:21499138

  11. γδ T Lymphocytes Coordinate Eosinophil Influx during Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Henriques, Maria Das Graças Muller; Penido, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Tissue eosinophil infiltration, which is a hallmark of allergic and helminthic diseases, is mainly coordinated by T lymphocytes, via the production of eosinophilotactic chemokines. Among T lymphocyte subsets, lymphocytes expressing γδ T cell receptor have been determined as a key factor for eosinophil accumulation via direct and indirect mechanisms. This knowledge is strongly supported by the fact that, in different experimental models of eosinophilic airway inflammation and helminth-induced Th2 lung inflammation, an evident tissue accumulation of γδ T lymphocytes is observed. In addition, the depletion of γδ T lymphocytes is correlated with the impairment of eosinophil accumulation in inflamed tissue. γδ T lymphocytes are non-conventional T lymphocytes, which comprise a minor T lymphocyte subset, mainly distributed in the tissue, and present crucial roles in innate and acquired immune responses. γδ T lymphocytes recognize several danger- and pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and stress antigens in a MHC-independent fashion and can provide rapid tissue-specific responses, via the production of a wide range of chemical mediators capable to modulate other cell populations. These mediators include chemoattractant cytokines and chemokines that attract eosinophils into the tissue by either direct recognition (such as IL-5, CCL11/eotaxin), or indirect mechanisms via the modulation of αβ T lymphocytes and macrophages (through the production of interferon-γ, IL-4, and CCL2/Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1, for example). The present review presents an overview of how γδ T lymphocytes coordinate eosinophil accumulation in allergy, by focusing on their role in airway inflammation and by discussing the involvement of cytokines and chemokines in this phenomenon. PMID:23316161

  12. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramón; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study is to investigate transcriptional mechanism underlying homocysteine (Hcy)-induced and monocytes (MC)-derived inflammatory response. We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFNγ-induced genes, but not that in TNFα-induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF, which includes heat shock factor, MC enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells and Krueppel-like factor 4, as putative Hcy-responsive TFs. PMID:23276953

  13. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramon; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Here, we studied transcriptional regulation in homocysteine (Hcy)-induced gene expression in monocytes (MC). We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN gamma)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFN gamma -induced genes, but not that in TNF alpha -induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF as putative Hcy-responsive TFs. PMID:23276953

  14. Ber-MAC3: new monoclonal antibody that defines human monocyte/macrophage differentiation antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Backé, E; Schwarting, R; Gerdes, J; Ernst, M; Stein, H

    1991-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody Ber-MAC3 is reported. It recognises a formol sensitive epitope of a not yet clustered monocyte/macrophage specific 140 kilodalton glycoprotein that is expressed on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. In 30 cases of acute and chronic leukaemia, Ber-MAC3 staining was restricted to 15 myeloid leukaemias of M4 and M5 types. The tumour cells of two cases of true histiocytic malignancies were Ber-MAC3 positive, whereas those of all 280 malignancies of lymphocytic origin were negative. The latter included 52 cases of Hodgkin's disease and 41 cases of Ki-1 positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas which had previously been classified as true histiocytic lymphomas. Ber-MAC3 therefore seems to be of considerable value for selective identification of monocytes and macrophages at a certain stage of differentiation and seems to be suitable for diagnosing myelomonocytic or monocytic leukaemia and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin. Images PMID:1721628

  15. Enhanced Monocyte Response and Decreased Central Memory T Cells in Children with Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Monica I.; Banchereau, Romain; Mejias, Asuncion; Di Pucchio, Tiziana; Glaser, Casey; Allantaz, Florence; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a significant pathogen causing severe invasive disease in otherwise healthy people. Despite considerable advances in understanding the epidemiology, resistance mechanisms, and virulence factors produced by the bacteria, there is limited knowledge of the in vivo host immune response to acute, invasive S. aureus infections. Herein, we report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with severe S. aureus infections demonstrate a distinctive and robust gene expression profile which is validated in a distinct group of patients and on a different microarray platform. Application of a systems-wide modular analysis framework reveals significant over-expression of innate immunity genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. Simultaneous flow cytometry analyses demonstrated marked alterations in immune cell numbers, with decreased central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of monocytes. CD14+ monocyte numbers significantly correlated with the gene expression levels of genes related to the innate immune response. These results demonstrate the value of applying a systems biology approach that reveals the significant alterations in the components of circulating blood lymphocytes and monocytes in invasive S. aureus infections. PMID:19424507

  16. Brugia malayi Microfilariae Induce a Regulatory Monocyte/Macrophage Phenotype That Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Gopinath; Rao, Gopala B.; Lucius, Richard; Srikantam, Aparna; Hartmann, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes and macrophages contribute to the dysfunction of immune responses in human filariasis. During patent infection monocytes encounter microfilariae in the blood, an event that occurs in asymptomatically infected filariasis patients that are immunologically hyporeactive. Aim To determine whether blood microfilariae directly act on blood monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages to induce a regulatory phenotype that interferes with innate and adaptive responses. Methodology and principal findings Monocytes and in vitro generated macrophages from filaria non-endemic normal donors were stimulated in vitro with Brugia malayi microfilarial (Mf) lysate. We could show that monocytes stimulated with Mf lysate develop a defined regulatory phenotype, characterised by expression of the immunoregulatory markers IL-10 and PD-L1. Significantly, this regulatory phenotype was recapitulated in monocytes from Wuchereria bancrofti asymptomatically infected patients but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. Monocytes from non-endemic donors stimulated with Mf lysate directly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10). IFN-γ responses were restored by neutralising IL-10 or PD-1. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with Mf lysate expressed high levels of IL-10 and had suppressed phagocytic abilities. Finally Mf lysate applied during the differentiation of macrophages in vitro interfered with macrophage abilities to respond to subsequent LPS stimulation in a selective manner. Conclusions and significance Conclusively, our study demonstrates that Mf lysate stimulation of monocytes from healthy donors in vitro induces a regulatory phenotype, characterized by expression of PD-L1 and IL-10. This phenotype is directly reflected in monocytes from filarial patients with asymptomatic infection but not patients with pathology or endemic normals. We suggest that suppression of T cell functions typically seen in lymphatic filariasis is caused by microfilaria-modulated monocytes in an IL-10-dependent manner. Together with suppression of macrophage innate responses, this may contribute to the overall down-regulation of immune responses observed in asymptomatically infected patients. PMID:25275395

  17. Proteoglycans in normal and neoplastic monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kolset, S.O.

    1987-02-01

    35S proteoglycans produced by normal and neoplastic (U-937) monocytes after a 20-h pulse with (35S)sulfate in vitro have been isolated and compared. Both cell types produce exclusively chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG), which are released into the medium and are not contained within the cells. The neoplastic cell-derived molecules were much larger in molecular size, due to the substitution of galactosaminoglycan chains, with an approximate Mr of 60,000. The corresponding chains in monocyte CSPG had an Mr of approx. 20,000. The latter chains were also found to be more sulfated than their neoplastic counterparts.

  18. Effects of isolation on various lymphocyte activities

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of Sprague Dawley male rats to isolation, water scheduling, or their combination resulted in an enhanced lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogen. Time course studies of effects of isolation on mitogenic response of splenic and/or blood T and B lymphocytes and splenic NK cell activity demonstrated a suppression with short term exposure followed by an enhancement with prolonged exposure. Use of immunoperoxidase staining techniques to identify splenic T or T helper cells revealed that prolonged exposure to isolation had no significant effect on the proportion of these cell populations in the spleen. Examination of the data by Lineweaver-Burke plot and plot of the data as % maximum response showed that prolonged exposure to isolation did not alter the sensitivity of the lymphocytes to mitogen. Involvement of corticosteroids and opioid peptides in mediation of the effects of exposure to isolation on lymphocyte activity was assessed by measurement of plasma corticosterone by radioimmunoassay and by examination of the ability of the opioid antagonist naltrexone to alter the effects of isolation on lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogen. Attempts were made to mimic the effects of short-term isolation on lymphocyte activity by morphine sulfate administration.

  19. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Whole Blood Activation Results in Enhanced Detection of T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production by Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Crucian, Brian E.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a wholeblood activation culture has been described. We compared whole blood culture to standard PBMC culture and determined the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells and monocytes via flow cytometry. For T cells cytokine assessment following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture; (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. In addition, a four-color cytometric analysis was used to allow accurate phenotyping and quantitation of cytokine producing lymphocyte populations. Using this technique we found IFNgamma production to be significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines in conjunction with CD 14. The cytokine pairs used for analysis were IL-1a/IL-12, and IL-10ITNFa. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFalpha equally well in both culture systems. Monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated following whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes may represent functionally different monocyte subsets with distinct functions. Whole blood culture eliminates the need to purify cell populations prior to culture and may have significant utility for the routine monitoring of the cytokine balances of the peripheral blood T cell and monocyte populations. In addition, there are distinct advantages to performing whole-blood (WB) activ