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Sample records for suas intensidades gama

  1. The GAMA Panchromatic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2013-07-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA) has now been operating for almost 5 years gathering spectroscopic redshifts for five regions of sky spanning 300 sq degrees in total to a depth of r < 19.8 mag. The survey has amassed over 225,000 redshifts making it the third largest redshift campaign after the SDSS and BOSS surveys. The survey has two novel features that set it apart: (1) complete and uniform sampling to a fixed flux limit (r < 19.8 mag) regardless of galaxy clustering due to multiple-visits to each sky region, enabling the construction of high-fidelity catalogues of groups and pairs, (2) co-ordination with diverse imaging campaigns which together sample an extremely broad range along the electro-magnetic spectrum from the UV (GALEX) through optical (VST KIDs), near-IR (VISTA VIKING), mid-IR (WISE), far-IR (Herschel-Atlas), 1m (GMRT), and eventually 20cm continuum and rest-frame 21cm line measurements (ASKAP DINGO). Apart from the ASKAP campaign all multi-wavelength programmes are either complete or in the final stages of observations and the UV-far-IR data are expected to be fully merged by the end of 2013. This article provides a brief flavour of the coming panchromatic database which will eventually include measurements or upper-limits across 27 wavebands for 380,000 galaxies. GAMA DR2 is scheduled for the end of January 2013.

  2. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.; GAMA Team; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bridges, T.; Cameron, E.; Conselice, C.; Couch, W. J.; Croom, S.; Cross, N. J. G.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Edmondson, E.; Ellis, S. C.; Frenk, C. S.; Graham, A. W.; Jones, H.; Hill, D.; Hopkins, A.; van Kampen, E.; Kuijken, K.; Lahav, O.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Nichol, B.; Norberg, P.; Oliver, S.; Parkinson, H.; Peacock, J. A.; Phillipps, S.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Proctor, R.; Sharp, R.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Sutherland, W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Warren, S.

    2009-03-01

    The GAMA survey aims to deliver 250,000 optical spectra (3-7 Å resolution) over 250 sq. degrees to spectroscopic limits of rAB < 19.8 and KAB < 17.0 mag. Complementary imaging will be provided by GALEX, VST, UKIRT, VISTA, HERSCHEL and ASKAP to comparable flux levels leading to a definitive multi-wavelength galaxy database. The data will be used to study all aspects of cosmic structures on 1kpc to 1Mpc scales spanning all environments and out to a redshift limit of z ≈ 0.4. Key science drivers include the measurement of: the halo mass function via group velocity dispersions; the stellar, HI, and baryonic mass functions; galaxy component mass-size relations; the recent merger and star-formation rates by mass, types and environment. Detailed modeling of the spectra, broad SEDs, and spatial distributions should provide individual star formation histories, ages, bulge-disc decompositions and stellar bulge, stellar disc, dust disc, neutral HI gas and total dynamical masses for a significant subset of the sample (~ 100k) spanning both the giant and dwarf galaxy populations. The survey commenced March 2008 with 50k spectra obtained in 21 clear nights using the Anglo Australian Observatory's new multi-fibre-fed bench-mounted dual-beam spectroscopic system (AAΩ).

  3. Botswana: Ntwetwe and Sua Pans

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    ... of red band imagery in which the 45-degree aft camera data are displayed in blue, 45-degree forward as green, and vertical as red. ... coat the surface and turn it bright ("sua" means salt). The mining town of Sowa is located where the Sua Spit (a finger of grassland ...

  4. GAMA: Stellar Mass Assembly in Galaxy Bulges and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Driver, Simon P.; Lange, Rebecca; Robotham, Aaron; Kelvin, Lee; GAMA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has to date obtained spectra, redshifts, and 21-band multi-facility photometry for over 200,000 galaxies in five survey regions that total nearly 300 square degrees on sky. We consider here a low-redshift (z<0.06), volume-limited subsample of ~8,000 GAMA galaxies that have been morphologically classified by the survey team. In order to quantify the separate bulge and disk properties of these galaxies, we apply a large-scale automated procedure for fitting images with 2D, multi-component structure models, including evaluation of fit convergence using a grid of input parameter values for each galaxy. From this analysis, we calculate the total bulge and disk contributions to the local galaxy stellar mass budget and derive mass-size relations for both pure spheroid/disk systems and the separate bulge/disk components of multi-component galaxies. We further examine the fraction of total stellar mass assembled in spheroid and disk structures as a function of galaxy environment, where environment is quantified on multiple scales from membership in large-scale filaments to groups/clusters and down to local pairings. We then discuss the effect of environmental conditions on the mechanisms of stellar mass assembly, including the implied balance between merger accumulation and in situ mass growth in different environment regimes.

  5. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): survey diagnostics and core data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, S. P.; Hill, D. T.; Kelvin, L. S.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Loveday, J.; Peacock, J. A.; Andrae, E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cameron, E.; Ching, J. H. Y.; Colless, M.; Conselice, C. J.; Croom, S. M.; Cross, N. J. G.; de Propris, R.; Dye, S.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Ellis, S.; Graham, Alister W.; Grootes, M. W.; Gunawardhana, M.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Maraston, C.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H. R.; Phillipps, S.; Pimbblet, K.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Roseboom, I. G.; Sadler, E. M.; Sansom, A. E.; Sharp, R. G.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wijesinghe, D.; Dunne, L.; Frenk, C. S.; Jarvis, M. J.; Madore, B. F.; Meyer, M. J.; Seibert, M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Sutherland, W. J.; Warren, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has been operating since 2008 February on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope using the AAOmega fibre-fed spectrograph facility to acquire spectra with a resolution of R≈ 1300 for 120 862 Sloan Digital Sky Survey selected galaxies. The target catalogue constitutes three contiguous equatorial regions centred at 9h (G09), 12h (G12) and 14.5h (G15) each of 12 × 4 deg2 to limiting fluxes of rpet < 19.4, rpet < 19.8 and rpet < 19.4 mag, respectively (and additional limits at other wavelengths). Spectra and reliable redshifts have been acquired for over 98 per cent of the galaxies within these limits. Here we present the survey footprint, progression, data reduction, redshifting, re-redshifting, an assessment of data quality after 3 yr, additional image analysis products (including ugrizYJHK photometry, Sérsic profiles and photometric redshifts), observing mask and construction of our core survey catalogue (GamaCore). From this we create three science-ready catalogues: GamaCoreDR1 for public release, which includes data acquired during year 1 of operations within specified magnitude limits (2008 February to April); GamaCoreMainSurvey containing all data above our survey limits for use by the GAMA Team and collaborators; and GamaCoreAtlasSV containing year 1, 2 and 3 data matched to Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration data. These catalogues along with the associated spectra, stamps and profiles can be accessed via the GAMA website:

  6. A Toxoplasma gondii Ortholog of Plasmodium GAMA Contributes to Parasite Attachment and Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Vern B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and its Plasmodium kin share a well-conserved invasion process, including sequential secretion of adhesive molecules for host cell attachment and invasion. However, only a few orthologs have been shown to be important for efficient invasion by both genera. Bioinformatic screening to uncover potential new players in invasion identified a previously unrecognized T. gondii ortholog of Plasmodium glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (TgGAMA). We show that TgGAMA localizes to the micronemes and is processed into several proteolytic products within the parasite prior to secretion onto the parasite surface during invasion. TgGAMA from parasite lysate bound to several different host cell types in vitro, suggesting a role in parasite attachment. Consistent with this function, tetracycline-regulatable TgGAMA and TgGAMA knockout strains showed significant reductions in host cell invasion at the attachment step, with no defects in any of the other stages of the parasite lytic cycle. Together, the results of this work reveal a new conserved component of the adhesive repertoire of apicomplexan parasites. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is a successful human pathogen in the same phylum as malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites. Invasion of a host cell is an essential process that begins with secretion of adhesive proteins onto the parasite surface for attachment and subsequent penetration of the host cell. Conserved invasion proteins likely play roles that were maintained through the divergence of these parasites. Here, we identify a new conserved invasion protein called glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (GAMA). Tachyzoites lacking TgGAMA were partially impaired in parasite attachment and invasion of host cells, yielding the first genetic evidence of a specific role in parasite entry into host cells. These findings widen our appreciation of the repertoire of conserved proteins that apicomplexan parasites employ for

  7. California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project--shallow aquifer assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    The California State Water Resources Control Board’s (SWRCB) GAMA Program is a comprehensive assessment of statewide groundwater quality in California. From 2004 to 2012, the GAMA Program’s Priority Basin Project focused on assessing groundwater resources used for public drinking-water supplies. More than 2,000 public-supply wells were sampled by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for this effort. Starting in 2012, the GAMA Priority Basin Project began an assessment of water resources in shallow aquifers in California. These shallow aquifers provide water for domestic and small community-supply wells, which are often drilled to shallower depths in the groundwater system than public-supply wells. Shallow aquifers are of interest because shallow groundwater may respond more quickly and be more susceptible to contamination from human activities at the land surface, than the deeper aquifers. The SWRCB’s GAMA Program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 (Water Code sections 10780-10782.3): a public mandate to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supplies, and to increase the availability of information about groundwater quality to the public. The U.S. Geological Survey is the technical lead of the Priority Basin Project. Stewardship of California’s groundwater resources is a responsibility shared between well owners, communities, and the State. Participants and collaborators in the GAMA Program include Regional Water Quality Control Boards, Department of Water Resources, Department of Public Health, local and regional groundwater management entities, county and local water agencies, community groups, and private citizens. Well-owner participation in the GAMA Program is entirely voluntary.

  8. Galaxy and mass assembly (GAMA): Mid-infrared properties and empirical relations from WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Cluver, M. E.; Jarrett, T. H.; Hopkins, A. M.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Bauer, A. E.; Lara-López, M. A.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Taylor, E. N.; Alpaslan, M.; Baldry, I.; Brown, M. J. I.; Peacock, J. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Colless, M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Leschinski, K.; and others

    2014-02-20

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of >110, 000 galaxies over 120 deg{sup 2} to z ≅ 0.5. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-WISE catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterizing and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4 μm and 4.6 μm WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Hα-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12 μm and 22 μm luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to z < 0.5. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12 μm star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at z ∼ 0.5. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticated friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100 h {sup –1} kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.

  9. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates for galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey with -23 < Mr < -17 (ΩM = 0.27, ΩΛ = 0.73, H0 = 100 km s-1 Mpc-1) at 0.01 < z < 0.22 (look-back time of <2 Gyr). The merger fraction is approximately 1.5 per cent Gyr-1 at all luminosities (assuming 50 per cent of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is ≈3.5 × 10-4 Mpc-3 Gyr-1. We examine how the merger rate varies by luminosity and morphology. Dry mergers (between red/spheroidal galaxies) are found to be uncommon and to decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue/discy galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < Mr < -20), the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology, out to z ˜ 0.2. The makeup of the merging population does not appear to change over this redshift range. Galaxy growth by major mergers appears comparatively unimportant and dry mergers are unlikely to be significant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity (BPT class, Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich) of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated objects in the same volume. Galaxies in close pairs tend to be both redder and slightly more spheroid dominated than the comparison sample. We suggest that this may be due to `harassment' in multiple previous passes prior to the current close interaction. Galaxy pairs do not appear to prefer significantly denser environments. There is no evidence of an enhancement in the AGN fraction in pairs, compared to other galaxies in the same volume.

  10. Observações das explosões cósmicas de raios gama GRB021004 e GRB021211 com o satélite HETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, J.; Ricker, G.; Hurley, K.; Lamb, D.; Grew, G.; et al.

    2003-08-01

    O High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE) é o primeiro satélite inteiramente dedicado ao estudo das explosões cósmicas de raios gama (ECRGs). Lançado em 9 de outubro de 2000, o HETE possui instrumentação capaz de observar as ECRGs desde o UV até raios gama e localizá-las com precisão de ~ 1-10 minutos de arco. As localizações das ECRGs detectadas são disseminadas rapidamente (em alguns segundos) pela Internet através de uma rede de estações de recepção ao longo do equador. A participação brasileira nesse projeto se dá através da montagem e operação de uma estação de recepção em Natal, RN, e da participação na equipe científica da missão. Neste trabalho são apresentados resultados da observação pelo HETE de duas ECRGs: GRB 021004 e GRB 021211. A GRB021004 foi detectada em raios gama pelo HETE em 4 de outubro de 2002 e localizada em raios-X em apenas 48 s, quando a emissão de raios gama ainda estava se processando. A explosão, relativamente brilhante e longa, durou aproximadamente 100 s. Um transiente óptico de magnitude 15 foi detectado no local da explosão nove minutos após o evento, e observações realizadas após 7 horas determinaram um desvio para o vermelho de absorção de 1,6. O GRB021004 foi o burst mais bem observado até o momento e suas observações em vários comprimentos de onda têm sido fundamentais para o aprimoramento dos modelos de ECRGs. O GRB21211, um burst brilhante e rico em raios-X, foi detectado em 11 de dezembro de 2002 e localizado em raios-X em 22 s após o início do evento. A duração do burst foi de 2,3 s em altas energias (85 a 400 keV) e de 8,5 s em baixas energias (2 a 10 keV). Caso essa explosão não tivesse sido rapidamente localizada pelo HETE, ela teria sido classificada como "opticamente escura", já que o transiente óptico decaiu rapidamente de R < 14 a R»19 dentro dos primeiros 20 minutos e já estava mais fraco do que R»23 depois de 24 horas da ocorrência do burst. Ser

  11. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  12. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): detection of low-surface-brightness galaxies from SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard P.; Baldry, I. K.; Kelvin, L. S.; James, P. A.; Driver, S. P.; Prescott, M.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Moffett, A. J.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the GAMA equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS PHOTO, combining gri images weighted to maximise the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their g - i and J - K colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The photometry is carried out using an AUTO aperture for each detection giving surface brightnesses of μr ≳ 25 mag arcsec-2 and magnitudes of r > 19.8 mag. None of these galaxies are bright enough to be within the GAMA main survey limit but could be part of future deeper surveys to measure the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.

  13. Galex-Gama Near-Ir Observations of ~100K Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffs, Richard

    We propose a MIS survey (59 pointings) with GALEX of the 108 square degrees covered by the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA). GAMA is a multiwavelength (ugrizYJHK FIR/submm) imaging, spectroscopic (370-880nm and 21cm HI) survey of the nearby galaxy population (125k galaxies out to z~0.25), covering 144 sq. deg. of the equatorial sky using the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) Dedicated observations of the fields are underway or guaranteed with AAT (66 nights), UKIRT (30 nights), VST (60 nights) VISTA (45 nights) Herschel (200 hours) and the Australian Square Kiliometre Array Pathfinder ASKAP (equivalent one year observing time). Redshifts have already been obtained for 50,271 galaxies in the initial observing campaign during March 2008, The spectroscopic depth of GAMA is well matched to the imaging depth of GALEX in MIS mode for normal spiral galaxies, providing an optimum basis for the study of a deep volume-limited sample of the local population of spiral and dwarf galaxies in the UV to test the CDM paradigm. In particular, the very high redshift density (12 x that of the SDSS) is ideal to probe structure traced by UV-emitting galaxies on the sub Mpc scales on which on which dark matter halos virialize and merge, and baryons decouple, collapse and eventually start forming into the stars detectable in UV light by GALEX in, and around the periphery of, the complex visible structures that are galaxies. In particular, we will be in a position to compare and contrast the UV LF of field galaxies with the LF of galaxies in clusters and groups as a function of the depth of the gravitational potential in the parent dark matter halos, as probed by the dispersion of galaxian velocities in the groups and clusters. This will constrain the efficiency of conversion of baryons into stars as a function of halo mass.

  14. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-11-01

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Accurate Panchromatic Photometry from Optical Priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) blended spectra catalogue: strong galaxy-galaxy lens and occulting galaxy pair candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Baldry, I. K.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Conselice, C.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M. J.; Moffett, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high-resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its AUTOZ automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km s-1, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter `Ef' classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g. strong gravitational lens surveys.

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): curation and reanalysis of 16.6k redshifts in the G10/COSMOS region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Baldry, I. K.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Meyer, M.; Popping, A.; Wilkins, S. M.; Wright, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the construction of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) 10h region (G10) using publicly available data in the Cosmic Evolution Survey region (COSMOS) in order to extend the GAMA survey to z ˜ 1 in a single deg2 field. In order to obtain the maximum number of high precision spectroscopic redshifts we re-reduce all archival zCOSMOS-bright data and use the GAMA automatic cross-correlation redshift fitting code AUTOZ. We use all available redshift information (AUTOZ, zCOSMOS-bright 10k, PRIMUS, VVDS, SDSS and photometric redshifts) to calculate robust best-fitting redshifts for all galaxies and visually inspect all 1D and 2D spectra to obtain 16 583 robust redshifts in the full COSMOS region. We then define the G10 region to be the central ˜1 deg2 of COSMOS, which has relatively high spectroscopic completeness, and encompasses the CHILES VLA region. We define a combined r < 23.0 mag and i < 22.0 mag G10 sample (selected to have the highest bijective overlap) with which to perform future analysis, containing 9861 sources with reliable high-precision VLT-VIMOS spectra. All tables, spectra and imaging are available at http://ict.icrar.org/cutout/G10.

  18. Groundwater Quality Data in the Mojave Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,500 square-mile Mojave (MOJO) study unit was investigated from February to April 2008, as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). MOJO was the 23rd of 37 study units to be sampled as part of the GAMA Priority Basin Project. The MOJO study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated ground water used for public water supplies within MOJO, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 59 wells in San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties. Fifty-two of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seven were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds], constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, dissolved organic carbon [DOC], major and minor ions, silica, total dissolved solids [TDS], and trace elements), and radioactive constituents (gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, radium isotopes, and radon-222). Naturally occurring isotopes (stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, and activities of tritium and carbon-14), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Panchromatic Data Release (far-UV-far-IR) and the low-z energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.; Wright, Angus H.; Andrews, Stephen K.; Davies, Luke J.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Lange, Rebecca; Moffett, Amanda J.; Mannering, Elizabeth; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Vinsen, Kevin; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrae, Ellen; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bauer, Amanda E.; Bamford, Steven P.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bourne, Nathan; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Croom, Scott; Colless, Matthew; Conselice, Christopher J.; da Cunha, Elisabete; De Propris, Roberto; Drinkwater, Michael; Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Steve; Edge, Alastair; Frenk, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Grootes, Meiert; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Ibar, Edo; van Kampen, Eelco; Kelvin, Lee S.; Jarrett, Tom; Jones, D. Heath; Lara-Lopez, Maritza A.; Liske, Jochen; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R.; Loveday, Jon; Maddox, Steve J.; Madore, Barry; Mahajan, Smriti; Meyer, Martin; Norberg, Peder; Penny, Samantha J.; Phillipps, Steven; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard J.; Peacock, John A.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Prescott, Matthew; Rowlands, Kate; Sansom, Anne E.; Seibert, Mark; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Sutherland, Will J.; Taylor, Edward N.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Vazquez-Mata, J. Antonio; Wang, Lingyu; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Williams, Richard

    2016-02-01

    We present the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR) constituting over 230 deg2 of imaging with photometry in 21 bands extending from the far-UV to the far-IR. These data complement our spectroscopic campaign of over 300k galaxies, and are compiled from observations with a variety of facilities including: GALaxy Evolution eXplorer, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Visible and Infrared Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and Herschel, with the GAMA regions currently being surveyed by VLT Survey Telescope (VST) and scheduled for observations by Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). These data are processed to a common astrometric solution, from which photometry is derived for ˜221 373 galaxies with r < 19.8 mag. Online tools are provided to access and download data cutouts, or the full mosaics of the GAMA regions in each band. We focus, in particular, on the reduction and analysis of the VISTA VIsta Kilo-degree INfrared Galaxy data, and compare to earlier data sets (i.e. 2MASS and UKIDSS) before combining the data and examining its integrity. Having derived the 21-band photometric catalogue, we proceed to fit the data using the energy balance code MAGPHYS. These measurements are then used to obtain the first fully empirical measurement of the 0.1-500 μm energy output of the Universe. Exploring the cosmic spectral energy distribution across three time-intervals (0.3-1.1, 1.1-1.8, and 1.8-2.4 Gyr), we find that the Universe is currently generating (1.5 ± 0.3) × 1035 h70 W Mpc-3, down from (2.5 ± 0.2) × 1035 h70 W Mpc-3 2.3 Gyr ago. More importantly, we identify significant and smooth evolution in the integrated photon escape fraction at all wavelengths, with the UV escape fraction increasing from 27(18) per cent at z = 0.18 in NUV(FUV) to 34(23) per cent at z = 0.06. The GAMA PDR can be found at: http://gama-psi.icrar.org/.

  20. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E.; Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B.; Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P.; Liske, J.; Seibert, M.; Graham, Alister W.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  1. California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Groundwater in the Livermore Valley Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H; Eaton, G F; Ekwurzel, B E; Esser, B K; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; McNab, W; Moody-Bartel, C; Moore, K; Moran, J E

    2005-11-18

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources Source attribution and nitrate fate and transport are therefore the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the City of Livermore, where high nitrate levels affect both public supply and private domestic wells. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, {delta}{sup 15}N values greater than 10{per_thousand} indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations above the MCL of 45 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1}. In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos induces flux of the contaminant to the regional aquifer. The low {delta}{sup 15}N value (3.1{per_thousand}) in this location implicates synthetic

  2. H-ATLAS/GAMA: quantifying the morphological evolution of the galaxy population using cosmic calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, Stephen; Fullard, Andrew; Allen, Matthew; Smith, M. W. L.; Baldry, Ivan; Bourne, Nathan; Clark, C. J. R.; Driver, Simon; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Graham, Alister W.; Ibar, Edo; Hopkins, Andrew; Ivison, Rob; Kelvin, Lee S.; Maddox, Steve; Maraston, Claudia; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Smith, Dan; Taylor, Edward N.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Werf, Paul van der; Baes, Maarten; Brough, Sarah; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Gomez, Haley; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steven; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Using results from the Herschel Astrophysical Terrahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) project, we show that, for galaxy masses above ≃ 108 M⊙, 51 per cent of the stellar mass-density in the local Universe is in early-type galaxies (ETGs; Sérsic n > 2.5) while 89 per cent of the rate of production of stellar mass-density is occurring in late-type galaxies (LTGs; Sérsic n < 2.5). From this zero-redshift benchmark, we have used a calorimetric technique to quantify the importance of the morphological transformation of galaxies over the history of the Universe. The extragalactic background radiation contains all the energy generated by nuclear fusion in stars since the big bang. By resolving this background radiation into individual galaxies using the deepest far-infrared survey with the Herschel Space Observatory and a deep near-infrared/optical survey with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and using measurements of the Sérsic index of these galaxies derived from the HST images, we estimate that ≃83 per cent of the stellar mass-density formed over the history of the Universe occurred in LTGs. The difference between this value and the fraction of the stellar mass-density that is in LTGs today implies there must have been a major transformation of LTGs into ETGs after the formation of most of the stars.

  3. Actinomadura gamaensis sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from soil in Gama, Chad.

    PubMed

    Abagana, Adam Yacoub; Sun, Pengyu; Liu, Chongxi; Cao, Tingting; Zheng, Weiwei; Zhao, Shanshan; Xiang, Wensheng; Wang, Xiangjing

    2016-06-01

    A novel single spore-producing actinomycete, designated strain NEAU-Gz5(T), was isolated from a soil sample from Gama, Chad. A polyphasic taxonomic study was carried out to establish the status of this strain. The diamino acid present in the cell wall is meso-diaminopimelic acid. Glucose, mannose and madurose occur in whole cell hydrolysates. The polar lipids were found to consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and an unidentified glycolipid. The predominant menaquinones were identified as MK-9(H8) and MK-9(H6). The predominant cellular fatty acids were found to be C16:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and C18:0 10-methyl. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain NEAU-Gz5(T) belongs to the genus Actinomadura and is closely related to Actinomadura oligospora JCM 10648(T) (ATCC 43269(T); 98.3 % similarity). However, the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness and some different phenotypic characteristics allowed the strain to be distinguished from its close relatives. Therefore, it is concluded that strain NEAU-Gz5(T) represents a novel species of the genus of Actinomadura, for which the name Actinomadura gamaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-Gz5(T) (= CGMCC 4.7301(T) = DSM 100815(T)). PMID:27010208

  4. Status of groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel study unit, 2005--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Michael; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile San Fernando--San Gabriel (FG) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study area is in Los Angeles County and includes Tertiary-Quaternary sedimentary basins situated within the Transverse Ranges of southern California. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA FG study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) throughout California. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 35 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the FG study unit. The quality of groundwater in primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the FG study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.

  5. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): deconstructing bimodality - I. Red ones and blue ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward N.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J. I.; Colless, Matthew; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Gunawardhana, Madusha; Kelvin, Lee S.; Liske, Jochen; Conselice, Christopher J.; Croom, Scott; Foster, Caroline; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lara-Lopez, Maritza; Loveday, Jon

    2015-01-01

    We measure the mass functions for generically red and blue galaxies, using a z < 0.12 sample of log M* > 8.7 field galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Our motivation is that, as we show, the dominant uncertainty in existing measurements stems from how `red' and `blue' galaxies have been selected/defined. Accordingly, we model our data as two naturally overlapping populations, each with their own mass function and colour-mass relation, which enables us characterize the two populations without having to specify a priori which galaxies are `red' and `blue'. Our results then provide the means to derive objective operational definitions for the terms `red' and `blue', which are based on the phenomenology of the colour-mass diagrams. Informed by this descriptive modelling, we show that (1) after accounting for dust, the stellar colours of `blue' galaxies do not depend strongly on mass; (2) the tight, flat `dead sequence' does not extend much below log M* ˜ 10.5; instead, (3) the stellar colours of `red' galaxies vary rather strongly with mass, such that lower mass `red' galaxies have bluer stellar populations; (4) below log M* ˜ 9.3, the `red' population dissolves into obscurity, and it becomes problematic to talk about two distinct populations; as a consequence, (5) it is hard to meaningfully constrain the shape, including the existence of an upturn, of the `red' galaxy mass function below log M* ˜ 9.3. Points 1-4 provide meaningful targets for models of galaxy formation and evolution to aim for.

  6. 3DGIS-Based Multi-Agent Geosimulation and Visualization of Building Evacuation Using GAMA Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macatulad, E. G.; Blanco, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Recent GIS applications have already extended analyses from the traditional 2-2.5D environment (x,y,attributes) to 3D space (x,y,z,attributes). Coupled with agent-based modeling (ABM), available 3DGIS data can be used to develop simulation models for improved analysis of spatial data and spatial processes. One such application is on building evacuation for which ABM is integrated with 3D indoor spatial data to model human behavior during evacuation events and simulate evacuation scenarios visualized in 3D. The research presented in this paper develops a multi-agent geosimulation model for building evacuation, integrating 3DGIS dataset of the case study building as input in ABM using the GAMA simulation platform. This model is intended to complement and improve traditional approaches in building evacuation planning and management such as earthquake and fire drills. The initial model developed includes PEOPLE agents to model the building occupants, and FLOORS, ROOMS, INDOOR_PATHS and EXIT_POINTS agents, which are modeled from the 3DGIS layers. The INDOOR_PATHS and EXIT_POINTS agents influence the movement of PEOPLE agents. Test simulations were performed involving PEOPLE agents placed in rooms of the building based on potential number of occupants computed based from the floor area of each room. The PEOPLE agents are programmed to find the shortest path along the INDOOR_PATHS towards the EXIT_POINTS instance designated for each room of the building. The simulation computes for the total time it takes for all PEOPLE agents to exit the building.

  7. Status of groundwater quality in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin, 2006-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldrath, Dara; Fram, Miranda S.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 860-square-mile (2,227-square-kilometer) Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit (CLAB) was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study area is located in southern California in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA CLAB study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2006 by the USGS from 69 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the CLAB study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the CLAB study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal and (or) California regulatory or non-regulatory benchmarks for drinking-water quality. A relative

  8. Cooperative Autonomous Observation of Volcanic Environments with sUAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravela, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Cooperative Autonomous Observing System Project (CAOS) at the MIT Earth Signals and Systems Group has developed methodology and systems for dynamically mapping coherent fluids such as plumes using small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS). In the CAOS approach, two classes of sUAS, one remote the other in-situ, implement a dynamic data-driven mapping system by closing the loop between Modeling, Estimation, Sampling, Planning and Control (MESPAC). The continually gathered measurements are assimilated to produce maps/analyses which also guide the sUAS network to adaptively resample the environment. Rather than scan the volume in fixed Eulerian or Lagrangian flight plans, the adaptive nature of the sampling process enables objectives for efficiency and resilience to be incorporated. Modeling includes realtime prediction using two types of reduced models, one based on nowcasting remote observations of plume tracer using scale-cascaded alignment, and another based on dynamically-deformable EOF/POD developed for coherent structures. Ensemble-based Information-theoretic machine learning approaches are used for the highly non-linear/non-Gaussian state/parameter estimation, and for planning. Control of the sUAS is based on model reference control coupled with hierarchical PID. MESPAC is implemented in part on a SkyCandy platform, and implements an airborne mesh that provides instantaneous situational awareness and redundant communication to an operating fleet. SkyCandy is deployed on Itzamna Aero's I9X/W UAS with low-cost sensors, and is currently being used to study the Popocatepetl volcano. Results suggest that operational communities can deploy low-cost sUAS to systematically monitor whilst optimizing for efficiency/maximizing resilience. The CAOS methodology is applicable to many other environments where coherent structures are present in the background. More information can be found at caos.mit.edu.

  9. 75 FR 78336 - Review of the Designation of Gama'a al-Islamiyya, (IG and Other Aliases); as a Foreign Terrorist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Review of the Designation of Gama'a al-Islamiyya, (IG and Other Aliases); as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant to Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as Amended Based upon a review...

  10. In Aspergillus nidulans the Suppressors suaA and suaC Code for Release Factors eRF1 and eRF3 and suaD Codes for a Glutamine tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Mellado, Laura; Espeso, Eduardo A.; Sealy-Lewis, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, after extensive mutagenesis, a collection of mutants was obtained and four suppressor loci were identified genetically that could suppress mutations in putative chain termination mutations in different genes. Suppressor mutations in suaB and suaD have a similar restricted spectrum of suppression and suaB111 was previously shown to be an alteration in the anticodon of a gln tRNA. We have shown that like suaB, a suaD suppressor has a mutation in the anticodon of another gln tRNA allowing suppression of UAG mutations. Mutations in suaA and suaC had a broad spectrum of suppression. Four suaA mutations result in alterations in the coding region of the eukaryotic release factor, eRF1, and another suaA mutation has a mutation in the upstream region of eRF1 that prevents splicing of the first intron within the 5′UTR. Epitope tagging of eRF1 in this mutant results in 20% of the level of eRF1 compared to the wild-type. Two mutations in suaC result in alterations in the eukaryotic release factor, eRF3. This is the first description in Aspergillus nidulans of an alteration in eRF3 leading to suppression of chain termination mutations. PMID:24727290

  11. California GAMA program: ground-water quality data in the San Diego drainages hydrogeologic province, California, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burton, Carmen A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of concerns over ground-water quality, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. A primary objective of the program is to provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where public supply wells are an important source of drinking water. The San Diego GAMA study unit was the first region of the state where an assessment of ground-water quality was implemented under the GAMA program. The San Diego GAMA study unit covers the entire San Diego Drainages hydrogeologic province, and is broken down into four distinct hydrogeologic study areas: the Temecula Valley study area, the Warner Valley study area, the Alluvial Basins study area, and the Hard Rock study area. A total of 58 ground-water samples were collected from public supply wells in the San Diego GAMA study unit: 19 wells were sampled in the Temecula Valley study area, 9 in the Warner Valley study area, 17 in the Alluvial Basins study area, and 13 in the Hard Rock study area. Over 350 chemical and microbial constituents and water-quality indicators were analyzed for in this study. However, only select wells were measured for all constituents and water-quality indicators. Results of analyses were calculated as detection frequencies by constituent classification and by individual constituents for the entire San Diego GAMA study unit and for the individual study areas. Additionally, concentrations of constituents that are routinely monitored were compared to maximum contaminant levels (MCL) and secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL). Concentrations of constituents classified as 'unregulated chemicals for which monitoring is required' (UCMR) were compared to the 'detection level for the purposes of reporting' (DLR). Eighteen of the 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline oxygenates

  12. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  13. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the bright void galaxy population in the optical and mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, S. J.; Brown, M. J. I.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Cluver, M. E.; Croton, D. J.; Owers, M. S.; Lange, R.; Alpaslan, M.; Baldry, I.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Driver, S. P.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Jones, D. Heath; Kelvin, L. S.; Lara-López, M. A.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Rodrigues, M.

    2015-11-01

    We examine the properties of galaxies in the Galaxies and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey located in voids with radii >10 h-1 Mpc. Utilizing the GAMA equatorial survey, 592 void galaxies are identified out to z ≈ 0.1 brighter than Mr = -18.4, our magnitude completeness limit. Using the WHα versus [N II]/Hα (WHAN) line strength diagnostic diagram, we classify their spectra as star forming, AGN, or dominated by old stellar populations. For objects more massive than 5 × 109 M⊙, we identify a sample of 26 void galaxies with old stellar populations classed as passive and retired galaxies in the WHAN diagnostic diagram, else they lack any emission lines in their spectra. When matched to Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR photometry, these passive and retired galaxies exhibit a range of mid-IR colour, with a number of void galaxies exhibiting [4.6] - [12] colours inconsistent with completely quenched stellar populations, with a similar spread in colour seen for a randomly drawn non-void comparison sample. We hypothesize that a number of these galaxies host obscured star formation, else they are star forming outside of their central regions targeted for single-fibre spectroscopy. When matched to a randomly drawn sample of non-void galaxies, the void and non-void galaxies exhibit similar properties in terms of optical and mid-IR colour, morphology, and star formation activity, suggesting comparable mass assembly and quenching histories. A trend in mid-IR [4.6] - [12] colour is seen, such that both void and non-void galaxies with quenched/passive colours <1.5 typically have masses higher than 1010 M⊙, where internally driven processes play an increasingly important role in galaxy evolution.

  15. Status and Understanding of Groundwater Quality in the Central-Eastside San Joaquin Basin, 2006: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Justin T. Kulongoski, Justin T.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,695-square-mile Central Eastside San Joaquin Basin (Central Eastside) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Central Eastside study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. During March through June 2006, samples were collected from 78 wells in Stanislaus and Merced Counties, 58 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 20 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along groundwater-flow paths (understanding wells). Water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database also were used for the assessment. An assessment of the current status of the groundwater quality included collecting samples from wells for analysis of anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The assessment of status is intended to characterize the quality of untreated-groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The primary aquifer system (hereinafter, primary aquifer) is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Central Eastside study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or

  16. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  17. Groundwater-Quality Data in the South Coast Range-Coastal Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Burton, Carmen A.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 766-square-mile South Coast Range-Coastal (SCRC) study unit was investigated from May to December 2008, as part of the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project was developed in response to legislative mandates (Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act 1999-00 Fiscal Year; and, the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 [Sections 10780-10782.3 of the California Water Code, Assembly Bill 599]) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater in California, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The SCRC study unit was the 25th study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA Priority Basins Project. The SCRC study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality in the primary aquifer systems and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) were defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the SCRC study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from the quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the SCRC study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 70 wells in two study areas (Basins and Uplands) in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties. Fifty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 15 wells were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). In addition to

  18. Groundwater-Quality Data in the South Coast Interior Basins Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Ray, Mary C.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 653-square-mile South Coast Interior Basins (SCI) study unit was investigated from August to December 2008, as part of the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project was developed in response to Legislative mandates (Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act 1999-00 Fiscal Year; and, the Groundwater-Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 [Sections 10780-10782.3 of the California Water Code, Assembly Bill 599]) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater used as public supply for municipalities in California, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). SCI was the 27th study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA Priority Basins Project. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater used for public water supplies within SCI, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 54 wells within the three study areas [Livermore, Gilroy, and Cuyama] of SCI in Alameda, Santa Clara, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Kern Counties. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 19 were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates, polar pesticides and metabolites, and pharmaceutical compounds], constituents of special interest [perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)], naturally occurring inorganic constituents [trace elements, nutrients, major and minor ions, silica, total dissolved solids (TDS), and alkalinity

  19. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long

  20. sUAS and their application in observing geomorphological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallik, Jozef; Bolešová, Lenka

    2016-07-01

    Methodologies and procedures in processing gained data vary based on possibilities and needs of scientific projects. This paper should help to get a general overview in the choice of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS - commonly known as drones) for scientific purposes, namely remote sensing of geomorphologic processes such as soil degradation in high mountainous areas that are hard to access and have unfavourable weather conditions. All high mountain areas in European countries are legislatively protected, and so various permissions and observation of strict procedures are needed in order to not have a negative influence on the environment. Nowadays, several types of UAS exist that could effectively help us in such protection, as well as in full-fledged utilization when answering scientific questions about the alpine lake genesis. We demonstrate it here with selected examples of our photo documentation.

  1. Groundwater-quality data in the Klamath Mountains study unit, 2010: results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 8,806-square-mile Klamath Mountains (KLAM) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from October to December 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The KLAM study unit was the thirty-third study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Klamath Mountains study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined by the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the KLAM study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the KLAM study unit, groundwater samples were collected from sites in Del Norte, Siskiyou, Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, and Shasta Counties, California. Of the 39 sites sampled, 38 were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the primary aquifer system in the study unit (grid sites), and the remaining site was non-randomized (understanding site). The groundwater samples were analyzed for basic field parameters, organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs] and pesticides and pesticide degradates), inorganic constituents (trace elements, nutrients, major and minor ions, total dissolved solids [TDS]), radon-222, gross alpha and gross beta

  2. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behaviour of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as {N}, likewise for effective radius we use {R}. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of {N}. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of {R} (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  3. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Understanding the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure with bulge-disc decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Bamford, Steven P.; Häußler, Boris; Baldry, Ivan; Bremer, Malcolm; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Driver, Simon; Duncan, Kenneth; Graham, Alister W.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Phillipps, Steven; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-05-01

    With a large sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical-near-IR imaging from the GAMA survey we use bulge-disc decompositions to understand the wavelength-dependent behavior of single-Sérsic structural measurements. We denote the variation in single-Sérsic index with wavelength as N, likewise for effective radius we use R. We find that most galaxies with a substantial disc, even those with no discernable bulge, display a high value of N. The increase in Sérsic index to longer wavelengths is therefore intrinsic to discs, apparently resulting from radial variations in stellar population and/or dust reddening. Similarly, low values of R (< 1) are found to be ubiquitous, implying an element of universality in galaxy colour gradients. We also study how bulge and disc colour distributions vary with galaxy type. We find that, rather than all bulges being red and all discs being blue in absolute terms, both components become redder for galaxies with redder total colours. We even observe that bulges in bluer galaxies are typically bluer than discs in red galaxies, and that bulges and discs are closer in colour for fainter galaxies. Trends in total colour are therefore not solely due to the colour or flux dominance of the bulge or disc.

  4. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Improved emission lines measurements in four representative samples at 0.07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Foster, C.; Taylor, E. N.; Wright, A. H.; Hopkins, A. M.; Baldry, I.; Brough, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cluver, M. E.; Lara-López, M. A.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Pimbblet, K. A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new catalog of emission lines based on the GAMA II data for galaxies between 0.07 GAMA II survey and spanning four redshift windows. The four samples are representative of intermediate-mass galaxies down to log M∗> 9.4 at z ~ 0.1 and log M∗> 10.6 at z ~ 0.30. We have developed a dedicated code called MARVIN that automates the main steps of the data analysis, but imposes visual individual quality control of each measurement. We use this catalog to investigate how the sample selection influences the shape of the stellar mass - metallicity relation. We find that commonly used selection criteria on line detections and by AGN rejection could affect the shape and dispersion of the high-mass end of the M - Z relation. For log M∗> 10.6, common selection criteria reject about 65% of the emission-line galaxies. We also find that the relation does not evolve significantly from z = 0.07 to z = 0.34 in the range of stellar mass for which the samples are representative (log M∗> 10.6). For lower stellar masses (log M∗< 10.2) we are able to show that the observed 0.15 dex metallicity decrease in the same redshift range is a consequence of a color bias arising from selecting targets in the r-band. We highlight that this color selection bias affects all samples selected in r-band (e.g., GAMA and SDSS), even those drawn from volume-limited samples. Previously reported evolution of the M - Z relation at various redshifts may need to be revised to evaluate the effect of this selection bias.

  5. Groundwater-quality data in seven GAMA study units: results from initial sampling, 2004-2005, and resampling, 2007-2008, of wells: California GAMA Program Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth; Fram, Miranda S.

    2014-01-01

    The Priority Basin Project (PBP) of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The GAMA-PBP began sampling, primarily public supply wells in May 2004. By the end of February 2006, seven (of what would eventually be 35) study units had been sampled over a wide area of the State. Selected wells in these first seven study units were resampled for water quality from August 2007 to November 2008 as part of an assessment of temporal trends in water quality by the GAMA-PBP. The initial sampling was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within the seven study units. In the 7 study units, 462 wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Wells selected this way are referred to as grid wells or status wells. Approximately 3 years after the initial sampling, 55 of these previously sampled status wells (approximately 10 percent in each study unit) were randomly selected for resampling. The seven resampled study units, the total number of status wells sampled for each study unit, and the number of these wells resampled for trends are as follows, in chronological order of sampling: San Diego Drainages (53 status wells, 7 trend wells), North San Francisco Bay (84, 10), Northern San Joaquin Basin (51, 5), Southern Sacramento Valley (67, 7), San Fernando–San Gabriel (35, 6), Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins (91, 11), and Southeast San Joaquin Valley (83, 9). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N

  6. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, 2007-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Montrella, Joseph; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit contains eight groundwater basins located in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties and is within the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2007 by the USGS from 42 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined as that part of the aquifer system corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Santa Clara River Valley study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in shallow or deep water-bearing zones; for example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. Eleven additional wells were sampled by the USGS to improve understanding of factors affecting water quality.The status assessment of the quality of the groundwater used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the Santa Clara River Valley study unit

  7. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Central Sierra Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrari, Matthew J.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 950 square kilometer (370 square mile) Central Sierra study unit (CENSIE) was investigated in May 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw ground water used for drinking-water supplies within CENSIE, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of ground-water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from thirty wells in Madera County. Twenty-seven of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and three were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). Ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (N-nitrosodimethylamine, perchlorate, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane), naturally occurring inorganic constituents [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements], radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon], and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. In total, over 250 constituents and water-quality indicators were investigated. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-sixth of the wells, and

  8. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coastal Los Angeles Basin Study Unit, 2006: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 860 square-mile Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit (CLAB) was investigated from June to November of 2006 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Coastal Los Angeles Basin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within CLAB, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 69 wells in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Fifty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (?grid wells?). Fourteen additional wells were selected to evaluate changes in ground-water chemistry or to gain a greater understanding of the ground-water quality within a specific portion of the Coastal Los Angeles Basin study unit ('understanding wells'). Ground-water samples were analyzed for: a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gasoline oxygenates and their degradates, pesticides, polar pesticides, and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicators]; constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)]; inorganic constituents that can occur naturally [nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements]; radioactive constituents [gross-alpha and gross-beta radiation, radium isotopes, and radon-222]; and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes [stable isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen, and activities of tritium and carbon-14

  9. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Coachella Valley Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldrath, Dara A.; Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 820 square-mile Coachella Valley Study Unit (COA) was investigated during February and March 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground water used for public-water supplies within the Coachella Valley, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of ground-water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 35 wells in Riverside County. Nineteen of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Sixteen additional wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along selected ground-water flow paths, examine land use effects on ground-water quality, and to collect water-quality data in areas where little exists. These wells were referred to as 'understanding wells'. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (uranium, tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and boron), and dissolved noble gases (the last in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled

  10. Groundwater-Quality Data in the Colorado River Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldrath, Dara A.; Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 188-square-mile Colorado River Study unit (COLOR) was investigated October through December 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the technical project lead. The Colorado River study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within COLOR, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 28 wells in three study areas in San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial Counties. Twenty wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the Study unit; these wells are termed 'grid wells'. Eight additional wells were selected to evaluate specific water-quality issues in the study area; these wells are termed `understanding wells.' The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichlorpropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), and radioactive constituents. Concentrations of naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled groundwater. In total, approximately 220 constituents and water-quality indicators were investigated. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and matrix spikes) were collected at

  11. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southeast San Joaquin Valley, 2005-2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,800 square-mile Southeast San Joaquin Valley study unit (SESJ) was investigated from October 2005 through February 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The SESJ study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SESJ, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Fresno, Tulare, and Kings Counties, 83 of which were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 16 of which were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths or across alluvial fans (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately 10 percent of the wells, and the results

  12. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Kern County Subbasin Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Pimentel, Isabel; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,000 square-mile Kern County Subbasin study unit (KERN) was investigated from January to March, 2006, as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Kern County Subbasin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw (untreated) ground-water quality within KERN, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 50 wells within the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County. Forty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide a statistical representation of the ground-water resources within the study unit. Three additional wells were sampled to aid in the evaluation of changes in water chemistry along regional ground-water flow paths. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and laboratory matrix spikes) were collected and analyzed at approximately 10 percent of

  13. Groundwater-quality data for the Sierra Nevada study unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Munday, Cathy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 25,500-square-mile Sierra Nevada study unit was investigated in June through October 2008, as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Sierra Nevada study was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in the study unit, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for public and community drinking-water supplies. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. In the Sierra Nevada study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 84 wells (and springs) in Lassen, Plumas, Butte, Sierra, Yuba, Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Alpine, Calaveras, Tuolumne, Madera, Mariposa, Fresno, Inyo, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The wells were selected on two overlapping networks by using a spatially-distributed, randomized, grid-based approach. The primary grid-well network consisted of 30 wells, one well per grid cell in the study unit, and was designed to provide statistical representation of groundwater quality throughout the entire study unit. The lithologic grid-well network is a secondary grid that consisted of the wells in the primary grid-well network plus 53 additional wells and was designed to provide statistical representation of groundwater quality in each of the four major lithologic units in the Sierra

  14. Groundwater-Quality Data in the Madera-Chowchilla Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 860-square-mile Madera-Chowchilla study unit (MADCHOW) was investigated in April and May 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within MADCHOW, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 35 wells in Madera, Merced, and Fresno Counties. Thirty of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and five more were selected to provide additional sampling density to aid in understanding processes affecting groundwater quality (flow-path wells). Detection summaries in the text and tables are given for grid wells only, to avoid over-representation of the water quality in areas adjacent to flow-path wells. Groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], low-level 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane [DBCP] and 1,2-dibromoethane [EDB], pesticides and pesticide degradates, polar pesticides and metabolites, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], perchlorate, and low-level 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), and radioactive constituents (uranium isotopes, and gross alpha and gross beta particle activities). Naturally occurring isotopes and geochemical tracers (stable isotopes of hydrogen

  15. Groundwater-Quality Data in the Antelope Valley Study Unit, 2008: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Stephen J.; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,600 square-mile Antelope Valley study unit (ANT) was investigated from January to April 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within ANT, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 57 wells in Kern, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties. Fifty-six of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized, grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and one additional well was selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding well). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline additives and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, fumigants, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), and radioactive constituents (gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, radium isotopes, and radon-222). Naturally occurring isotopes (strontium, tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled groundwater. In total, 239 constituents and water-quality indicators (field parameters) were investigated. Quality

  16. Unlocking the potential of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, C.; Riddell, K.; Barchyn, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS, < 25 kg) are emerging as a viable alternative to conventional remote sensing platforms for Earth observation (EO). sUAS technology affords greater control, lower cost, and flexibility for scientists, and provides new opportunities to match the scale of sUAS data to the scale of the geophysical phenomenon under investigation. Although a mechanism is in place to make sUAS available to researchers and other non-military users through the US Federal Aviation Administration's Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (FAAMRA), there are many regulatory hurdles before they are fully accepted and integrated into the National Airspace System. In this talk we will provide a brief overview of the regulatory landscape for sUAS, both in the USA and in Canada, where sUAS regulations are more flexible. We critically outline potential advantages and disadvantages of sUAS for EO applications under current and potential regulations. We find advantages: relatively low cost, potentially high temporal resolution, rapidly improving technology, and operational flexibility. We also find disadvantages: limited temporal and spatial extent, limited accuracy assessment and methodological development, and an immature regulatory landscape. From a case study we show an example of the accuracy of a photogrammetrically-derived digital terrain map (DTM) from sUAS imagery. We also compare the sUAS DTM to a LiDAR DTM. Our results suggest that sUAS-acquired imagery may provide a low-cost, rapid, and flexible alternative to airborne LiDAR. Overall, we are encouraged about the potential of sUAS for geophysical measurements; however, understanding and compliance with regulations is paramount to ensure that research is conducted legally and responsibly. Because UAS are new outside of military operations, we hope researchers will proceed carefully to ensure this great scientific opportunity remains a long term tool.

  17. Groundwater-quality data in the Western San Joaquin Valley study unit, 2010 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Landon, Matthew K.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 2,170-square-mile Western San Joaquin Valley (WSJV) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from March to July 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program's Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The WSJV study unit was the twenty-ninth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Western San Joaquin Valley study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as parts of aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the WSJV study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the WSJV study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 58 wells in 2 study areas (Delta-Mendota subbasin and Westside subbasin) in Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Kings Counties. Thirty-nine of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and 19 wells were selected to aid in the understanding of aquifer-system flow and related groundwater-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], low-level fumigants, and pesticides and pesticide degradates

  18. California GAMA Special Study. Development of a Capability for the Analysis of Krypton-85 in Groundwater Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ate; Bibby, Richard K.; Moran, Jean E.; Singleton, Michael J.; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-06-01

    A capability for the analysis of krypton-85 (85Kr) in groundwater samples was developed at LLNL. Samples are collected by extracting gas from 2000-4000 L of groundwater at the well, yielding approximately 0.2 cm3 STP krypton. Sample collection takes 1 to 4 hours. Krypton is purified in the laboratory using a combination of molecular sieve and activated charcoal traps, and transferred to a liquid scintillation vial. The 85Kr activity is measured by liquid scintillation on a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter from PerkinElmer. The detection limit for a typical 0.2 cm3Kr sample size is 11% of the present day activity in air, corresponding to the decay corrected activity in air in 1987. The typical measurement uncertainty is below 10% for recently recharged samples. Six groundwater samples were collected, purified and counted. 85Kr was not detected in any of the samples counted at LLNL. 85Kr was detected by the low level counting laboratory of Bern University in all samples between 1.5 and 6.6 decays per minute per cm3 krypton, corresponding to decay corrected activities in air between 1971 and 1985. The new capability is an excellent complement to tritium-helium, expanding the existing suite of age dating tools available to the GAMA program (35S, 3H/3He, 14C and radiogenic helium). 85Kr can replace 3H/3He in settings where 3H/3He ages are impossible to determine (for example where terrigenic helium overwhelms tritiogenic helium) and provides additional insight into travel time distributions in complex mixed groundwater systems.

  19. Groundwater-quality data in the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit, 2010-Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 39,000-square-kilometer Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau (CAMP) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from July through October 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CAMP study unit is the thirty-second study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA PBP. The GAMA CAMP study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the open or screened intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the CAMP study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from the quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the CAMP study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 90 wells and springs in 6 study areas (Sacramento Valley Eastside, Honey Lake Valley, Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau Low Use Basins, Shasta Valley and Mount Shasta Volcanic Area, Quaternary Volcanic Areas, and Tertiary Volcanic Areas) in Butte, Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Tehama Counties. Wells and springs were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Groundwater samples were analyzed for field water-quality indicators, organic constituents, perchlorate, inorganic constituents

  20. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the South Coast Interior groundwater basins, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 653-square-mile (1,691-square-kilometer) South Coast Interior Basins (SCI) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The South Coast Interior Basins study unit contains eight priority groundwater basins grouped into three study areas, Livermore, Gilroy, and Cuyama, in the Southern Coast Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA South Coast Interior Basins study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated (raw) groundwater quality within the primary aquifer system, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality between basins. The assessment was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 50 wells in 2008 and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the SCI study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as trace elements and minor ions. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system of the SCI study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration

  1. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George Luther, V; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Klamath Mountains (KLAM) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in Del Norte, Humboldt, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a spatially unbiased, statistically robust assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality data and explanatory factors for groundwater samples collected in 2010 by the USGS from 39 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) water-quality database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH water-quality database for the KLAM study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study included two types of assessments: (1) a status assessment, which characterized the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds, pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements, and (2) an understanding assessment, which evaluated the natural and human factors potentially affecting the groundwater quality. The assessments were intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the KLAM study unit, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations

  2. Status of groundwater quality in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed, November 2006--March 2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile (2,590-square-kilometer) Upper Santa Ana Watershed (USAW) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southern California in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA USAW study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in the study unit. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) are defined as the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the USAW study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from 90 wells during November 2006 through March 2007, and water-quality data from the CDPH database. The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed based on data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifers of the USAW study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal or California regulatory or

  3. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins, 2005-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000 square mile (2,590 km2) Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins (MS) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in central California in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Luis Obispo Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA MS study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers). The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 97 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the MS study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the MS study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal and (or) California regulatory or

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Sua-type cytoplasmic male sterility of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxia; Yang, Aiguo; Lv, Jing; Gong, Daping; Sun, Yuhe

    2016-07-01

    To uncover the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-associated mitochondrial genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of Sua-CMS mitochondrial genome. The Sua-CMS mtDNA sequence is 522,731 bp in length and contains 34 protein-coding genes, 25 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The nucleotide sequence data of 34 protein-coding genes of 14 mitochondrial genomes were used for constructing the phylogenetic tree. The results showed that Nicotiana tabacum Sua-CMS exhibits most close relationship with other solanaceae species. PMID:27158790

  5. Status of groundwater quality in the California Desert Region, 2006-2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in six areas in the California Desert Region (Owens, Antelope, Mojave, Coachella, Colorado River, and Indian Wells) was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The six Desert studies were designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in parts of the Desert and the Basin and Range hydrogeologic provinces, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing groundwater quality to other areas in California and across the Nation. Samples were collected by the USGS from September 2006 through April 2008 from 253 wells in Imperial, Inyo, Kern, Los Angeles, Mono, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties. Two-hundred wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide a spatially unbiased representation of the study areas (grid wells), and fifty-three wells were sampled to provide additional insight into groundwater conditions (additional wells). The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed based on data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and inorganic constituents such as major ions and trace elements. Water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database also were incorporated in the assessment. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources within the primary aquifer systems of the Desert Region, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) in the six Desert areas are defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation intervals of

  6. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Madera, Chowchilla Study Unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 860-square-mile Madera and Chowchilla Subbasins (Madera-Chowchilla study unit) of the San Joaquin Valley Basin was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in California's Central Valley region in parts of Madera, Merced, and Fresno Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in California. The primary aquifer system within each study unit is defined by the depth of the perforated or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifer system; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Madera-Chowchilla study unit were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 35 wells during April-May 2008 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of natural factors and human activities affecting groundwater quality. The primary aquifer system is represented by the grid wells, of which 90 percent (%) had depths that ranged from about 200 to 800 feet (ft) below land surface and had depths to the top of perforations that ranged from about 140 to 400 ft below land surface. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for

  7. The stellar-to-halo mass relation of GAMA galaxies from 100 deg2 of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uitert, Edo; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, M. J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kuijken, Konrad; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Peacock, John; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, A. S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; Taylor, Edward N.; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2016-07-01

    We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7 < log 10(M*/h- 2 M⊙) < 11.7 and z < 0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ˜100 deg2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M* > 5 × 1010 h- 2 M⊙, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as {˜ }M_h^{0.25}. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8 × 1011 h-1 M⊙ with a value of M_h/M_{*}=56_{-10}^{+16} [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.

  8. The stellar-to-halo mass relation of GAMA galaxies from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uitert, Edo; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, M. J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kuijken, Konrad; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Peacock, John; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, A. S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2016-04-01

    We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7 < log10(M★/h-2M⊙) < 11.7 and z < 0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ˜100 deg2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M★ > 5 × 1010h-2M⊙, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as ˜ {}M_h^{0.25}. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8 × 1011h-1M⊙ with a value of M_h/M_*=56_{-10}^{+16} [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.

  9. Overland Flow Analysis Using Time Series of Suas-Derived Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeziorska, J.; Mitasova, H.; Petrasova, A.; Petras, V.; Divakaran, D.; Zajkowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of the innovative techniques for generating high temporal and spatial resolution terrain models from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) imagery, it has become possible to precisely map overland flow patterns. Furthermore, the process has become more affordable and efficient through the coupling of small UAS (sUAS) that are easily deployed with Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms that can efficiently derive 3D data from RGB imagery captured with consumer grade cameras. We propose applying the robust overland flow algorithm based on the path sampling technique for mapping flow paths in the arable land on a small test site in Raleigh, North Carolina. By comparing a time series of five flights in 2015 with the results of a simulation based on the most recent lidar derived DEM (2013), we show that the sUAS based data is suitable for overland flow predictions and has several advantages over the lidar data. The sUAS based data captures preferential flow along tillage and more accurately represents gullies. Furthermore the simulated water flow patterns over the sUAS based terrain models are consistent throughout the year. When terrain models are reconstructed only from sUAS captured RGB imagery, however, water flow modeling is only appropriate in areas with sparse or no vegetation cover.

  10. Updated study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element data collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project, October 2009-March 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater samples have been collected in California as part of statewide investigations of groundwater quality conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP is being conducted in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Quality-control samples (source-solution blanks, equipment blanks, and field blanks) were collected in order to ensure the quality of the groundwater sample results. Olsen and others (2010) previously determined study reporting levels (SRLs) for trace-element results based primarily on field blanks collected in California from May 2004 through January 2008. SRLs are raised reporting levels used to reduce the likelihood of reporting false detections attributable to contamination bias. The purpose of this report is to identify any changes in the frequency and concentrations of detections in field blanks since the last evaluation and update the SRLs for more recent data accordingly. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), strontium (Sr), thallium (Tl), tungsten (W), uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Data from 179 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from March 2006 through March 2013 by the GAMA-PBP indicated that for trace elements that had a change in detection frequency and concentration since the previous review, the shift occurred near October 2009, in conjunction with a change in the capsule filters used by the study. Results for 89 field blanks and equipment blanks collected from October 2009 through March 2013 were

  11. Status of groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units, 2005-08: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study units are located in California's Central Valley and include parts of Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Placer, Sacramento, Shasta, Solano, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The three study units were designated to provide spatially-unbiased assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in three parts of the Central Valley hydrogeologic province, as well as to provide a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality regionally and statewide. Samples were collected in 2005 (Southern Sacramento Valley), 2006 (Middle Sacramento Valley), and 2007-08 (Northern Sacramento Valley). The GAMA studies in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley were designed to provide statistically robust assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer systems that are used for drinking-water supply. The assessments are based on water-quality data collected by the USGS from 235 wells in the three study units in 2005-08, and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, referred to as primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the CDPH database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic

  12. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, 2007—California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 620-square-mile (1,600-square-kilometer) San Francisco Bay study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in the Southern Coast Ranges of California, in San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Francisco Bay study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater within the primary aquifer system, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout the State. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 79 wells in 2007 and is supplemented with water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system is defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the San Francisco Bay study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifer system; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Water- quality data from the CDPH database also were incorporated for this assessment. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifer system of the San Francisco Bay study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the South Coast Range-Coastal study unit, 2008: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the South Coast Range–Coastal (SCRC) study unit was investigated from May through November 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in the Southern Coast Range hydrologic province and includes parts of Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer system. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the SCRC study unit. The assessments for the SCRC study unit were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2008 by the USGS from 55 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and water-quality data from the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. Water-quality and ancillary data were collected from an additional 15 wells for the understanding assessment. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. The first component of this study, the status assessment of groundwater quality, used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents such as major ions and trace elements. Although the status assessment applies to untreated

  14. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the two southern San Joaquin Valley study units, 2005-2006 - California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley was investigated from October 2005 through March 2006 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. There are two study units located in the southern San Joaquin Valley: the Southeast San Joaquin Valley (SESJ) study unit and the Kern County Subbasin (KERN) study unit. The GAMA Priority Basin Project in the SESJ and KERN study units was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifers. The status assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 and 2006 by the USGS from 130 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Data was collected from an additional 19 wells for the understanding assessment. The aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) were defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the CDPH database for the SESJ and KERN study units. The status assessment of groundwater quality used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources within the primary aquifers in the SESJ and KERN study units, not the quality of drinking water delivered to consumers. Although the status assessment applies to untreated groundwater, Federal and California regulatory and non-regulatory water-quality benchmarks that apply to drinking water are used

  15. Groundwater-quality data in the Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study unit, 2010: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 112-square-mile Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas (BEAR) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from April to August 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The BEAR study unit was the thirty-first study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as the zones corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the BEAR study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallow or deep water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the BEAR study unit, groundwater samples were collected from two study areas (Bear Valley and Selected Hard Rock Areas) in San Bernardino County. Of the 38 sampling sites, 27 were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the primary aquifer system in the study unit (grid sites), and the remaining 11 sites were selected to aid in the understanding of the potential groundwater-quality issues associated with septic tank use and with ski areas in the study unit (understanding sites). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The connection between metals, specific SFR and H I gas in galaxies: the Z-SSFR relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-López, M. A.; Hopkins, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We study the interplay between gas phase metallicity (Z), specific star formation rate (SSFR) and neutral hydrogen gas (HI) for galaxies of different stellar masses. Our study uses spectroscopic data from Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, as well as HI detection from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) and Galex Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS) public catalogues. We present a model based on the Z-SSFR relation that shows that at a given stellar mass, depending on the amount of gas, galaxies will follow opposite behaviours. Low-mass galaxies with a large amount of gas will show high SSFR and low metallicities, while low-mass galaxies with small amounts of gas will show lower SSFR and high metallicities. In contrast, massive galaxies with a large amount of gas will show moderate SSFR and high metallicities, while massive galaxies with small amounts of gas will show low SSFR and low metallicities. Using ALFALFA and GASS counterparts, we find that the amount of gas is related to those drastic differences in Z and SSFR for galaxies of a similar stellar mass. The results of this study were publish recently in a ``letter to the editor" (Lara-Lopez, M. A. et al. 2013, MNRAS, 433, L35).

  17. The sua8 suppressors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode replacements of conserved residues within the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and affect transcription start site selection similarly to sua7 (TFIIB) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Berroteran, R W; Ware, D E; Hampsey, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sua8 gene were found to be suppressors of an aberrant ATG translation initiation codon in the leader region of the cyc1 gene. Analysis of cyc1 transcripts from sua8 mutants revealed that suppression is a consequence of diminished transcription initiation at the normal start sites in favor of initiation at downstream sites, including a site between the aberrant and normal ATG start codons. This effect is not cyc1 gene specific since initiation at other genes, including ADH1, CYC7, and HIS4, was similarly affected, although initiation at HIS3 and SPT15 was unaffected. The SUA8 gene was cloned and partially sequenced, revealing identity to RPB1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The sua8 suppressors are the result of single amino acid replacements of highly conserved residues. Three replacements were found either within or immediately preceding homology block D, and a fourth was found adjacent to homology block H, indicating that these regions play a role in defining start sites in vivo. Nearly identical effects on start site selection were observed for sua7 suppressors, which encode altered forms of TFIIB. Synthetic lethality was associated with double sua7 sua8 suppressor mutations, and recessive sua7 mutants failed to fully complement recessive sua8 mutants in heterozygous diploids (nonallelic noncomplementation). These data indicate that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB are important determinants of transcription start site selection in S. cerevisiae and suggest that this function might be conferred by interaction between these two proteins. Images PMID:8264591

  18. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units, 2006-2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The three study units are located in the Sierra Nevada region of California in parts of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Madera, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems used for drinking water. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) for each study unit are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 132 wells in the three study units during 2006 and 2007 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): mass-size relations of z < 0.1 galaxies subdivided by Sérsic index, colour and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Rebecca; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Graham, Alister W.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bamford, Steven; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Haeussler, Boris; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norberg, Peder; Phillipps, Steven; Taylor, Edward N.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Wilkins, Stephen M.

    2015-03-01

    We use data from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.1 (8399 galaxies in g to Ks bands) to derive the stellar mass-half-light radius relations for various divisions of `early'- and `late'-type samples. We find that the choice of division between early and late (i.e. colour, shape, morphology) is not particularly critical; however, the adopted mass limits and sample selections (i.e. the careful rejection of outliers and use of robust fitting methods) are important. In particular, we note that for samples extending to low stellar mass limits (<10^{10} M_{⊙}) the Sérsic index bimodality, evident for high-mass systems, becomes less distinct and no-longer acts as a reliable separator of early- and late-type systems. The final set of stellar mass-half-light radius relations are reported for a variety of galaxy population subsets in 10 bands (ugrizZY JHKs) and are intended to provide a comprehensive low-z benchmark for the many ongoing high-z studies. Exploring the variation of the stellar mass-half-light radius relations with wavelength, we confirm earlier findings that galaxies appear more compact at longer wavelengths albeit at a smaller level than previously noted: at 10^{10} M_{⊙}} both spiral systems and ellipticals show a decrease in size of 13 per cent from g to Ks (which is near linear in log wavelength). Finally, we note that the sizes used in this work are derived from 2D Sérsic light profile fitting (using GALFIT3), i.e. elliptical semimajor half-light radii, improving on earlier low-z benchmarks based on circular apertures.

  20. sUAS for Rapid Pre-Storm Coastal Characterization and Vulnerability Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, K. L.; Slocum, R. K.; Spore, N.

    2015-12-01

    Open coast beaches and surf-zones are dynamic three-dimensional environments that can evolve rapidly on the time-scale of hours in response to changing environmental conditions. Up-to-date knowledge about the pre-storm morphology of the coast can be instrumental in making accurate predictions about coastal change and damage during large storms like Hurricanes and Nor'Easters. For example, alongshore variations in the shape of ephemeral sandbars along the coastline can focus wave energy, subjecting different stretches of coastline to significantly higher waves. Variations in beach slope and width can also alter wave runup, causing higher wave-induced water levels which can cause overwash or inlet breaching. Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) offer a new capability to rapidly and inexpensively map vulnerable coastlines in advance of approaching storms. Here we present results from a prototype system that maps coastal topography and surf-zone morphology utilizing a multi-camera sensor. Structure-from-motion algorithms are used to generate topography and also constrain the trajectory of the sUAS. These data, in combination with mount boresight information, are used to rectify images from ocean-facing cameras. Images from all cameras are merged to generate a wide field of view allowing up to 5 minutes of continuous imagery time-series to be collected as the sUAS transits the coastline. Water imagery is then analyzed using wave-kinematics algorithms to provide information on surf-zone bathymetry. To assess this methodology, the absolute and relative accuracy of topographic data are evaluated in relation to simultaneously collected terrestrial lidar data. Ortho-rectification of water imagery is investigated using visible fixed targets installed in the surf-zone, and through comparison to stationary tower-based imagery. Future work will focus on evaluating how topographic and bathymetric data from this sUAS approach can be used to update forcing parameters in both

  1. Validation of Spaceborne Radar Surface Water Mapping with Optical sUAS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Chee-Ming, J.; Murnaghan, K.; Sherman, D.; Poncos, V.; Brisco, B.; Armenakis, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has over 40 years of experience with airborne and spaceborne sensors and is now starting to use small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) to validate products from large coverage area sensors and create new methodologies for very high resolution products. Wetlands have several functions including water storage and retention which can reduce flooding and provide continuous flow for hydroelectric generation and irrigation for agriculture. Synthetic Aperture Radar is well suited as a tool for monitoring surface water by supplying acquisitions irrespective of cloud cover or time of day. Wetlands can be subdivided into three classes: open water, flooded vegetation and upland which can vary seasonally with time and water level changes. RADARSAT-2 data from the Wide-Ultra Fine, Spotlight and Fine Quad-Pol modes has been used to map the open water in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, Alberta using intensity thresholding. We also use spotlight modes for higher resolution and the fully polarimetric mode (FQ) for polarimetric decomposition. Validation of these products will be done using a low altitude flying sUAS to generate optical georeferenced images. This project provides methodologies which could be used for flood mapping as well as ecological monitoring.

  2. An Energy-Aware Trajectory Optimization Layer for sUAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, William A.

    The focus of this work is the implementation of an energy-aware trajectory optimization algorithm that enables small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) to operate in unknown, dynamic severe weather environments. The software is designed as a component of an Energy-Aware Dynamic Data Driven Application System (EA-DDDAS) for sUAS. This work addresses the challenges of integrating and executing an online trajectory optimization algorithm during mission operations in the field. Using simplified aircraft kinematics, the energy-aware algorithm enables extraction of kinetic energy from measured winds to optimize thrust use and endurance during flight. The optimization layer, based upon a nonlinear program formulation, extracts energy by exploiting strong wind velocity gradients in the wind field, a process known as dynamic soaring. The trajectory optimization layer extends the energy-aware path planner developed by Wenceslao Shaw-Cortez te{Shaw-cortez2013} to include additional mission configurations, simulations with a 6-DOF model, and validation of the system with flight testing in June 2015 in Lubbock, Texas. The trajectory optimization layer interfaces with several components within the EA-DDDAS to provide an sUAS with optimal flight trajectories in real-time during severe weather. As a result, execution timing, data transfer, and scalability are considered in the design of the software. Severe weather also poses a measure of unpredictability to the system with respect to communication between systems and available data resources during mission operations. A heuristic mission tree with different cost functions and constraints is implemented to provide a level of adaptability to the optimization layer. Simulations and flight experiments are performed to assess the efficacy of the trajectory optimization layer. The results are used to assess the feasibility of flying dynamic soaring trajectories with existing controllers as well as to verify the interconnections between

  3. Ground-Water Quality Data in the San Fernando-San Gabriel Study Unit, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Michael; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460 square mile San Fernando-San Gabriel study unit (SFSG) was investigated between May and July 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The San Fernando-San Gabriel study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SFSG, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 52 wells in Los Angeles County. Thirty-five of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and seventeen wells were selected to aid in the evaluation of specific water-quality issues or changes in water chemistry along a historic ground-water flow path (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides and pesticide degradates], constituents of special interest [perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), and 1,4-dioxane], naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, samples for matrix spikes) were collected at approximately one-fifth (11 of 52) of the wells, and the results for these

  4. 78 FR 17450 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing notice of issuance of a license renewal for Materials License No. SUA- 1341 to Uranium One USA, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Project in Johnson and Campbell Counties,...

  5. GAMA/H-ATLAS: A meta-analysis of SFR indicators - comprehensive measures of the SFR-M relation and Cosmic Star Formation History at z < 0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Grootes, M. W.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Hopkins, A.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bremer, M. N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Croom, S.; da Cunha, E.; Dunne, L.; Lara-López, M. A.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Owers, M.; Phillipps, S.; Sansom, A. E.; Taylor, E. N.; Michalowski, M. J.; Ibar, E.; Smith, M.; Bourne, N.

    2016-06-01

    We present a meta-analysis of star-formation rate (SFR) indicators in the GAMA survey, producing 12 different SFR metrics and determining the SFR-M★ relation for each. We compare and contrast published methods to extract the SFR from each indicator, using a well-defined local sample of morphologically-selected spiral galaxies, which excludes sources which potentially have large recent changes to their SFR. The different methods are found to yield SFR-M★ relations with inconsistent slopes and normalisations, suggesting differences between calibration methods. The recovered SFR-M★ relations also have a large range in scatter which, as SFRs of the targets may be considered constant over the different timescales, suggests differences in the accuracy by which methods correct for attenuation in individual targets. We then recalibrate all SFR indicators to provide new, robust and consistent luminosity-to-SFR calibrations, finding that the most consistent slopes and normalisations of the SFR-M★ relations are obtained when recalibrated using the radiation transfer method of Popescu et al. These new calibrations can be used to directly compare SFRs across different observations, epochs and galaxy populations. We then apply our calibrations to the GAMA II equatorial dataset and explore the evolution of star-formation in the local Universe. We determine the evolution of the normalisation to the SFR-M★ relation from 0 < z < 0.35 - finding consistent trends with previous estimates at 0.3 < z < 1.2. We then provide the definitive z < 0.35 Cosmic Star Formation History, SFR-M★ relation and its evolution over the last 3 billion years.

  6. GAMA/H-ATLAS: a meta-analysis of SFR indicators - comprehensive measures of the SFR-M* relation and cosmic star formation history at z < 0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, L. J. M.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Grootes, M. W.; Popescu, C. C.; Tuffs, R. J.; Hopkins, A.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bremer, M. N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Croom, S.; da Cunha, E.; Dunne, L.; Lara-López, M. A.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Owers, M.; Phillipps, S.; Sansom, A. E.; Taylor, E. N.; Michalowski, M. J.; Ibar, E.; Smith, M.; Bourne, N.

    2016-09-01

    We present a meta-analysis of star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, producing 12 different SFR metrics and determining the SFR-M* relation for each. We compare and contrast published methods to extract the SFR from each indicator, using a well-defined local sample of morphologically selected spiral galaxies, which excludes sources which potentially have large recent changes to their SFR. The different methods are found to yield SFR-M* relations with inconsistent slopes and normalizations, suggesting differences between calibration methods. The recovered SFR-M* relations also have a large range in scatter which, as SFRs of the targets may be considered constant over the different time-scales, suggests differences in the accuracy by which methods correct for attenuation in individual targets. We then recalibrate all SFR indicators to provide new, robust and consistent luminosity-to-SFR calibrations, finding that the most consistent slopes and normalizations of the SFR-M* relations are obtained when recalibrated using the radiation transfer method of Popescu et al. These new calibrations can be used to directly compare SFRs across different observations, epochs and galaxy populations. We then apply our calibrations to the GAMA II equatorial data set and explore the evolution of star formation in the local Universe. We determine the evolution of the normalization to the SFR-M* relation from 0 < z < 0.35 - finding consistent trends with previous estimates at 0.3 < z < 1.2. We then provide the definitive z < 0.35 cosmic star formation history, SFR-M* relation and its evolution over the last 3 billion years.

  7. Genotyping and study of the pauA and sua genes of Streptococcus uberis isolates from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Perrig, Melina S; Ambroggio, María B; Buzzola, Fernanda R; Marcipar, Iván S; Calvinho, Luis F; Veaute, Carolina M; Barbagelata, María Sol

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the clonal relationship among 137 Streptococcus uberis isolates from bovine milk with subclinical or clinical mastitis in Argentina and to assess the prevalence and conservation of pauA and sua genes. This information is critical for the rational design of a vaccine for the prevention of bovine mastitis caused by S. uberis. The isolates were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The 137 isolates exhibited 61 different PFGE types and 25 distinct RAPD profiles. Simpson's diversity index was calculated both for PFGE (0.983) and for RAPD (0.941), showing a high discriminatory power in both techniques. The analysis of the relationship between pairs of isolates showed 92.6% concordance between both techniques indicating that any given pair of isolates distinguished by one method tended to be distinguished by the other. The prevalence of the sua and pauA genes was 97.8% (134/137) and 94.9% (130/137), respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the sua and pauA genes from 20 S. uberis selected isolates, based on their PFGE and RAPD types and geographical origin, showed an identity between 95% and 100% with respect to all reference sequences registered in GenBank. These results demonstrate that, in spite of S. uberis clonal diversity, the sua and pauA genes are prevalent and highly conserved, showing their importance to be included in future vaccine studies to prevent S. uberis bovine mastitis. PMID:26507633

  8. Assembly of iron-sulfur clusters. Identification of an iscSUA-hscBA-fdx gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Cash, V L; Flint, D H; Dean, D R

    1998-05-22

    An enzyme having the same L-cysteine desulfurization activity previously described for the NifS protein was purified from a strain of Azotobacter vinelandii deleted for the nifS gene. This protein was designated IscS to indicate its proposed role in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Like NifS, IscS is a pyridoxal-phosphate containing homodimer. Information gained from microsequencing of oligopeptides obtained by tryptic digestion of purified IscS was used to design a strategy for isolation and DNA sequence analysis of a 7,886-base pair A. vinelandii genomic segment that includes the iscS gene. The iscS gene is contained within a gene cluster that includes homologs to nifU and another gene contained within the major nif cluster of A. vinelandii previously designated orf6. These genes have been designated iscU and iscA, respectively. Information available from complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli and Hemophilus influenzae reveals that they also encode iscSUA gene clusters. A wide conservation of iscSUA genes in nature and evidence that NifU and NifS participate in the mobilization of iron and sulfur for nitrogenase-specific iron-sulfur cluster formation suggest that the products of the iscSUA genes could play a general role in the formation or repair of iron-sulfur clusters. The proposal that IscS is involved in mobilization of sulfur for iron-sulfur cluster formation in A. vinelandii is supported by the presence of a cysE-like homolog in another gene cluster located immediately upstream from the one containing the iscSUA genes. O-Acetylserine synthase is the product of the cysE gene, and it catalyzes the rate-limiting step in cysteine biosynthesis. A similar cysE-like gene is also located within the nif gene cluster of A. vinelandii. The likely role of such cysE-like gene products is to increase the cysteine pool needed for iron-sulfur cluster formation. Another feature of the iscSUA gene cluster region from A. vinelandii is that E. coli genes previously

  9. Scheduling whole-air samples above the Trade Wind Inversion from SUAS using real-time sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, J. E.; Greatwood, C.; Thomas, R.; Richardson, T.; Brownlow, R.; Lowry, D.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Small Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) are increasingly being used in science applications for a range of applications. Here we explore their use to schedule the sampling of air masses up to 2.5km above ground using computer controlled bespoked Octocopter platforms. Whole-air sampling is targeted above, within and below the Trade Wind Inversion (TWI). On-board sensors profiled the TWI characteristics in real time on ascent and, hence, guided the altitudes at which samples were taken on descent. The science driver for this research is investigation of the Southern Methane Anomaly and, more broadly, the hemispheric-scale transport of long-lived atmospheric tracers in the remote troposphere. Here we focus on the practical application of SUAS for this purpose. Highlighting the need for mission planning, computer control, onboard sensors and logistics in deploying such technologies for out of line-of-sight applications. We show how such a platform can be deployed successfully, resulting in some 60 sampling flights within a 10 day period. Challenges remain regarding the deployment of such platforms routinely and cost-effectively, particularly regarding training and support. We present some initial results from the methane sampling and its implication for exploring and understanding the Southern Methane Anomaly.

  10. Aplicación de la metodología Molecular de Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico (MQDO) al cálculo de intensidades vibrónicas y vidas medias de niveles vibracionales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Velasco Sanz, Ana

    Desde que se formuló, en 1996, la metodología Molecular de Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico (MQDO) [1], se han obtenido datos de calidad relativos a intensidades de bandas electrónicas que implican estados Rydberg para una gran variedad de sistemas moleculares [2]. Animados por los buenos resultados obtenidos, recientemente hemos abordado el estudio de transiciones vibrónicas, es decir aquellas que ocurren entre estados vibracionales que pertenecen a distintos estados Rydberg electrónicos. Como prototipo adecuado para nuestros propósitos hemos elegido la molécula de NO, importante en la química de la atmósfera, y para la cual existen en la bibliografía datos experimentales de calidad suficiente para contrastar la validez de nuestros resultados. En concreto, hemos calculado las fuerzas de oscilador y coeficientes de Einstein para transiciones electrónicas y vibrónicas de las principales bandas del NO, al igual que vidas medias radiativas de niveles vibracionales de dicha molécula. Las propiedades estudiadas son esenciales para la comprensión de los aspectos teóricos de los procesos físicos básicos relativos a la dispersión electrónica en moléculas heteronucleares con capas abiertas. Además, valores fiables de probabilidades de transición moleculares tienen importantes aplicaciones en Astrofísica, en la modelización de procesos fotodinámicos moleculares, etc., al igual que para evaluar más profundamente la validez de nuestra metodología teórica.

  11. Groundwater-quality data in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, 2008-2010--Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Wright, Michael T.; Beuttel, Brandon S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 12,103-square-mile Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts (CLUB) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from December 2008 to March 2010, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program's Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CLUB study unit was the twenty-eighth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA CLUB study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer systems, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) are defined as parts of aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the CLUB study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from the quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the CLUB study unit, groundwater samples were collected from 52 wells in 3 study areas (Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts) in San Bernardino, Riverside, Kern, San Diego, and Imperial Counties. Forty-nine of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and three wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile

  12. Status of groundwater quality in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, 2008-2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Hancock, Tracy Connell; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 963-square-mile Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southern California in San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 52 wells (49 grid wells and 3 understanding wells) and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database. The primary aquifer system was defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. This study assesses the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts study unit, not the

  13. Evaluation of the Raven sUAS to detect and monitor greater sage-grouse leks within the Middle Park population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Leanne; Holmquist-Johnson, Christopher L.; Cowardin, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    The Raven sUAS is a hand-launched reconnaissance and data-gathering tool developed for the U.S. Department of Defense by AeroVironment, Inc. Originally designed to provide aerial observation, day or night, at line-of-site ranges up to 6.2 miles (10 kilometers), the Raven sUAS has a wingspan of 4.5 feet (1.38 meters) and weighs 4.2 pounds (1.9 kilograms). A 60-minute lithium-ion rechargeable battery powers the system which also transmits live video (color or infrared imagery), compass headings, and location information to a ground control station. The Raven sUAS is typically operated by a three-person flight crew consisting of a pilot, mission operator, and a trained observer.

  14. Design, testing and demonstration of a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) and payload for measuring wind speed and particulate matter in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Kevin Donald Alexander

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the layer of air directly influenced by the Earth's surface and is the layer of the atmosphere most important to humans as this is the air we live in. Methods for measuring the properties of the ABL include three general approaches: satellite based, ground based and airborne. A major research challenge is that many contemporary methods provide a restricted spatial resolution or coverage of variations of ABL properties such as how wind speed varies across a landscape with complex topography. To enhance our capacity to measure the properties of the ABL, this thesis presents a new technique that involves a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) equipped with a customized payload for measuring wind speed and particulate matter. The research presented herein outlines two key phases in establishing the proof of concept of the payload and its integration on the sUAS: (1) design and testing and (2) field demonstration. The first project focuses on measuring wind speed, which has been measured with fixed wing sUASs in previous research. but not with a helicopter sUAS. The second project focuses on the measurement of particulate matter, which is a major air pollutant typically measured with ground-based sensors. Results from both proof of concept projects suggest that ABL research could benefit from the proposed techniques. .

  15. Hyperspatial Thermal Imaging of Surface Hydrothermal Features at Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska using a small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwimmer, C. E.; Wilson, R.; Upton, C.; Prakash, A.; Holdmann, G.; Walker, G.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal remote sensing provides a valuable tool for mapping and monitoring surface hydrothermal features associated with geothermal activity. The increasing availability of low-cost, small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) with integrated thermal imaging sensors offers a means to undertake very high spatial resolution (hyperspatial), quantitative thermal remote sensing of surface geothermal features in support of exploration and long-term monitoring efforts. Results from the deployment of a quadcopter sUAS equipped with a thermal camera over Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska for detailed mapping and heat flux estimation for hot springs, seeps, and thermal pools are presented. Hyperspatial thermal infrared imagery (4 cm pixels) was acquired over Pilgrim Hot Springs in July 2013 using a FLIR TAU 640 camera operating from an Aeryon Scout sUAS flying at an altitude of 40m. The registered and mosaicked thermal imagery is calibrated to surface temperature values using in-situ measurements of uniform blackbody tarps and the temperatures of geothermal and other surface pools acquired with a series of water temperature loggers. Interpretation of the pre-processed thermal imagery enables the delineation of hot springs, the extents of thermal pools, and the flow and mixing of individual geothermal outflow plumes with an unprecedented level of detail. Using the surface temperatures of thermal waters derived from the FLIR data and measured in-situ meteorological parameters the hot spring heat flux and outflow rate is calculated using a heat budget model for a subset of the thermal drainage. The heat flux/outflow rate estimates derived from the FLIR data are compared against in-situ measurements of the hot spring outflow rate recorded at the time of the thermal survey.

  16. Evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) blank data and application of study reporting levels to groundwater data collected for the California GAMA Priority Basin Project, May 2004 through September 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed in quality-control samples collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. From May 2004 through September 2010, a total of 2,026 groundwater samples, 211 field blanks, and 109 source-solution blanks were collected and analyzed for concentrations of 85 VOCs. Results from analyses of these field and source-solution blanks and of 2,411 laboratory instrument blanks during the same time period were used to assess the quality of data for the 2,026 groundwater samples. Eighteen VOCs were detected in field blanks or source-solution blanks: acetone, benzene, bromodichloromethane, 2-butanone, carbon disulfide, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, styrene, tetrahydrofuran, toluene, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m- and p-xylenes, and o-xylene. The objective of the evaluation of the VOC-blank data was to determine if study reporting levels (SRLs) were needed for any of the VOCs detected in blanks to ensure the quality of the data from groundwater samples. An SRL is equivalent to a raised reporting level that is used in place of the reporting level used by the analyzing laboratory [long‑term method detection level (LT-MDL) or laboratory reporting level (LRL)] to reduce the probability of reporting false-positive detections. Evaluation of VOC-blank data was done in three stages: (1) identification of a set of representative quality‑control field blanks (QCFBs) to be used for calculation of SRLs and identification of VOCs amenable to the SRL approach, (2) evaluation of potential sources of contamination to blanks and groundwater samples by VOCs detected in field blanks, and (3) selection of appropriate SRLs from among four potential SRLs for VOCs detected in field blanks and application of those SRLs to the groundwater data. An important conclusion from this study is that to ensure the

  17. Sua Pan Surface Bidirectional Reflectance: An Experiment to Validate the Surface Products of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) During SAFARI 2000.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, W. A.; Pilorz, S. H.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Bruegge, C.; Diner, D. J.; Conel, J. E.; Martonchik, J. V.; Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. K.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2004-05-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative dry season campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive measurements in this campaign provided the opportunity to validate the surface products of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform. MISR validation team participated with a suite of ground-based instruments, including the PARABOLA and sun radiometers, to measure the surface bidirectional reflectance and atmospheric aerosol. A participating airborne sensor was the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) flown onboard the convair-580 research aircraft. The CAR observations provide measurements of the surface bidirectional reflectance (BRF). This paper presents a validation study of MISR surface products by comparing MISR retrieval of the surface BRF, at Sua Pan, Botswana, with those evaluated on the ground and from the air, using the PARABOLA and CAR observations, respectively.

  18. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy radial alignments in GAMA groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael D.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kelvin, Lee; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Norberg, Peder; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon; Hopkins, Andrew; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Robotham, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    We constrain the distributions of projected radial alignment angles of satellite galaxy shapes within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey group catalogue. We identify the galaxy groups using spectroscopic redshifts and measure galaxy projected ellipticities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. With a sample of 3850 groups with 13 655 satellite galaxies with high quality shape measurements, we find a less than 2σ signal of radial alignments in the mean projected ellipticity components and the projected position angle when using galaxy shape estimates optimized for weak lensing measurements. Our radial alignment measurement increases to greater than 3σ significance relative to the expectation for no alignments if we use 2D Sérsic model fits to define galaxy orientations. Our weak measurement of radial alignments is in conflict with predictions from dark-matter N-body simulations, which we interpret as evidence for large misalignments of baryons and dark matter in group and cluster satellites. Within our uncertainties, that are dominated by our small sample size, we find only weak and marginally significant trends of the radial alignment angle distributions on projected distance from the group centre, host halo mass, and redshift that could be consistent with a tidal torquing mechanism for radial alignments. Using our lensing optimized shape estimators, we estimate that intrinsic alignments of galaxy group members may contribute a systematic error to the mean differential projected surface mass density of groups inferred from weak lensing observations by -1 ± 20 per cent at scales around 300 h-1 kpc from the group centre assuming a photometric redshift rms error of 10 per cent, and given our group sample with median redshift of 0.17 and median virial masses ˜1013 h-1 M⊙.

  19. Provenance analysis and thermo-dynamic studies of multi-type Holocene duricrusts (1700 BC) in the Sua Salt Pan, NE Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.; Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.; Techmer, A.

    2014-08-01

    Multi-type duricrusts, composed of silcretes, calcretes, halcretes and sulcretes developed during the Holocene at the northern rim of the Sua Salt Pan, NE Botswana. They were investigated for their light (quartz/chalcedony, feldspar, analcime, clinoptilolite, calcite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite-smectite mixed-layers, halite) and heavy minerals (baryte, clinozoisite-epidote s.s.s., amphibole, corundum, tourmaline, ilmenite, rutile, sphene, kyanite, andalusite, staurolite, garnet, zircon, apatite, monazite, cassiterite, garnet, biotite) using petrographic microscopy, X-ray fluorescence and diffraction analyses, radio-carbon dating, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an EDX-system, cation exchange capacity and infrared spectroscopy. Detrital minerals predominantly derived from the erosion of rocks belonging to the Archaean Basement Complex, the Stormberg Volcanites and the Kalahari sediments. Of particular interest to exploration geologists, geikielite-enriched ilmenite fragments are a hint to kimberlitic pipes. Biodetritus was derived from invertebrates and from vertebrates (fish bones?). A man-made impact on the heavy mineral suite has to be invoked from small fragments of cassiterite fragments that derived from processing of sulfidic and pegmatitic Sn-bearing ore. In the salt-pan-derived duricrusts mainly the aeolian and to a lesser degree fluvial inputs were responsible for the concentration of clasts in these multi-type duricrusts. Moreover, their variegated mineralogy enables us to constrain the physical-chemical regime, prevalently as to the pH and the chemical composition of the major constituents. All duricrusts developed in a self-sufficient chemically closed system where quartz and feldspar provided the elements Si, Na, K, Ca, and Ba to produce the encrustations. The spatial and temporal trend in the Sua Salt Pan rim encrustations may be described as follows: (1) sulcrete-silcretes, (2) silcretes with kaolinite-group minerals towards more recent

  20. GAMA-LLNL Alpine Basin Special Study: Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Visser, A; Esser, B K; Moran, J E

    2011-12-12

    For this task LLNL will examine the vulnerability of drinking water supplies in foothills and higher elevation areas to climate change impacts on recharge. Recharge locations and vulnerability will be determined through examination of groundwater ages and noble gas recharge temperatures in high elevation basins. LLNL will determine whether short residence times are common in one or more subalpine basin. LLNL will measure groundwater ages, recharge temperatures, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, major anions and carbon isotope compositions on up to 60 samples from monitoring wells and production wells in these basins. In addition, a small number of carbon isotope analyses will be performed on surface water samples. The deliverable for this task will be a technical report that provides the measured data and an interpretation of the data from one or more subalpine basins. Data interpretation will: (1) Consider climate change impacts to recharge and its impact on water quality; (2) Determine primary recharge locations and their vulnerability to climate change; and (3) Delineate the most vulnerable areas and describe the likely impacts to recharge.

  1. 10 CFR 2.1027 - Sua sponte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... high-level radioactive waste repository at a geologic repository operations area under parts 60 or 63 of this chapter, or an application for a license to receive and possess high-level radioactive waste... Issuance of Licenses for the Receipt of High-Level Radioactive Waste at a Geologic Repository § 2.1027...

  2. 10 CFR 2.1027 - Sua sponte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... high-level radioactive waste repository at a geologic repository operations area under parts 60 or 63 of this chapter, or an application for a license to receive and possess high-level radioactive waste... Issuance of Licenses for the Receipt of High-Level Radioactive Waste at a Geologic Repository § 2.1027...

  3. 10 CFR 2.1027 - Sua sponte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-level radioactive waste at a geologic repository operations area under parts 60 or 63 of this chapter... Applicable to Proceedings for the Issuance of Licenses for the Receipt of High-Level Radioactive Waste at a... construction authorization for a high-level radioactive waste repository at a geologic repository...

  4. Rotação do jato em DG tau próximo à região de sua formação: análise comparativa das velocidades radiais simuladas e observadas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; de Gouveia dal Pino, E. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os modelos magneto-centrífugos utilizados para explicar a formação dos jatos Herbig-Haro assumem a presença de um disco de acresção em rotação kepleriana na base de lançamento do jato. Neste cenário, o jato transmite a informação da rotação do disco para regiões distantes da fonte central, além da superfície de Alfvén, na região de colimação inicial do jato. Recentemente, Bacciotti et al. (2002, ApJ, 537, L49) obtiveram pela primeira vez uma evidência observacional de rotação em um jato HH, o jato em DG Tau, em regiões próximas da fonte central, compatível (qualitativa e quantitativamente) com o esperado a partir dos modelos magneto-centrífugos para a produção e colimação inicial de jatos HH. No presente trabalho, apresentamos mapas de velocidade radial, obtidos através de simulações numéricas tri-dimensionais SPH, para um jato com características semelhantes ao jato em DG Tau, objetivando uma comparação com os mapas de velocidade radiais obtidos por Bacciotti et al.. Nossos resultados, embora preliminares, indicam que a inclusão de efeitos como a precessão, evidenciada em DG Tau (Dougados et al. 2000, A&A, 357, L61) devem ser levadas em consideração na análise da presença de rotação não só em DG Tau mas em qualquer sistema, com o uso das velocidades radias observadas. A ausência de um grau elevado de simetria axial (quebrada, por exemplo, pela precessão do eixo do jato; ou pela presença de uma superfície interna de trabalho, ou seja, um bow shock interno), implica também em uma maior complexidade nos mapas, com conseqüências relevantes para suas interpretações.

  5. EuroFIR guidelines for assessment of methods of analysis: GAMA.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Isabel; Saraiva, Marina; Rego, Andreia; Ollilainen, Velimatti

    2016-02-15

    Analytical methodology is a key factor in food composition databases and specific criteria, at the component level, is needed for comparison of analytical data from different sources. The aim of this work is to describe how EuroFIR guidelines for assessment of methods of analysis are created and made available to users. Comprehensive information for macronutrients, vitamins, minerals and trace elements addressing all aspects of analytical procedures was obtained from international standards, and scientific literature. Documentation was compiled in a confluence wiki format provided for each component: background information, description of reference methods of analysis and critical steps, available reference materials, proficiency testing schemes, other analytical methods and relevant references. The information for each nutrient was collated, edited and presented with hypertext links to additional pages where more detailed information can be accessed using full text searches. The wiki format is a useful tool for preparing information and disseminating to users. PMID:26433291

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the stellar mass budget by galaxy type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Ingarfield, Stephen A.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lange, Rebecca; Meštrić, Uroš; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Kennedy, Rebecca; Norberg, Peder; Taylor, Edward N.

    2016-04-01

    We report an expanded sample of visual morphological classifications from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey phase two, which now includes 7556 objects (previously 3727 in phase one). We define a local (z < 0.06) sample and classify galaxies into E, S0-Sa, SB0-SBa, Sab-Scd, SBab-SBcd, Sd-Irr, and `little blue spheroid' types. Using these updated classifications, we derive stellar mass function fits to individual galaxy populations divided both by morphological class and more general spheroid- or disc-dominated categories with a lower mass limit of log(M*/M⊙) = 8 (one dex below earlier morphological mass function determinations). We find that all individual morphological classes and the combined spheroid-/bulge-dominated classes are well described by single Schechter stellar mass function forms. We find that the total stellar mass densities for individual galaxy populations and for the entire galaxy population are bounded within our stellar mass limits and derive an estimated total stellar mass density of ρ* = 2.5 × 108 M⊙ Mpc-3 h0.7, which corresponds to an approximately 4 per cent fraction of baryons found in stars. The mass contributions to this total stellar mass density by galaxies that are dominated by spheroidal components (E and S0-Sa classes) and by disc components (Sab-Scd and Sd-Irr classes) are approximately 70 and 30 per cent, respectively.

  7. Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: dusty early-type galaxies and passive spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.; Bourne, N.; Gomez, H. L.; Kaviraj, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Brough, S.; Charlot, S.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Eales, S. A.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Sansom, A. E.; Sharp, R.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.; Baes, M.; Cava, A.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S. M.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Madore, B.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Rigby, E. E.; Robotham, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Seibert, M.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the dust properties and star formation histories of local submillimetre-selected galaxies, classified by optical morphology. Most of the galaxies are late types and very few are early types. The early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are detected contain as much dust as typical spirals, and form a unique sample that has been blindly selected at submillimetre wavelengths. Additionally, we investigate the properties of the most passive, dusty spirals. We morphologically classify 1087 galaxies detected in the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) Science Demonstration Phase data. Comparing to a control sample of optically selected galaxies, we find 5.5 per cent of luminous ETGs are detected in H-ATLAS. The H-ATLAS ETGs contain a significant mass of cold dust: the mean dust mass is 5.5 × 107 M⊙, with individual galaxies ranging from 9 × 105 to 4 × 108 M⊙. This is comparable to that of spiral galaxies in our sample, and is an order of magnitude more dust than that found for the control early-types, which have a median dust mass inferred from stacking of (0.8-4.0) × 106 M⊙ for a cold dust temperature of 25-15 K. The early-types detected in H-ATLAS tend to have bluer NUV - r colours, higher specific star formation rates and younger stellar populations than early-types which are optically selected, and may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. We also find that H-ATLAS and control early-types inhabit similar low-density environments. We investigate whether the observed dust in H-ATLAS early-types is from evolved stars, or has been acquired from external sources through interactions and mergers. We conclude that the dust in H-ATLAS and control ETGs cannot be solely from stellar sources, and a large contribution from dust formed in the interstellar medium or external sources is required. Alternatively, dust destruction may not be as efficient as predicted. We also explore the properties of the most passive spiral galaxies in our sample with specific star formation rate (SSFR) < 10-11 yr-1. We find these passive spirals have lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios, higher stellar masses and older stellar population ages than normal spirals. The passive spirals inhabit low-density environments similar to those of the normal spiral galaxies in our sample. This shows that the processes which turn spirals passive do not occur solely in the intermediate-density environments of group and cluster outskirts.

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): stellar mass growth of spiral galaxies in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Grootes, Meiert; Marcum, Pamela M.; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Driver, Simon P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Lara-López, Maritza A.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Taylor, Edward N.; Owers, Matt; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2016-04-01

    We look for correlated changes in stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived SFRs of 1799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterize the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the cylindrical centre of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. In addition, these peripheral spiral galaxies have higher SFRs at a given mass. Complementing our sample of filament spiral galaxies with spiral galaxies in tendrils and voids, we find that the average SFR of these objects in different large-scale environments are similar to each other with the primary discriminant in SFR being stellar mass, in line with previous works. However, the distributions of SFRs are found to vary with large-scale environment. Our results thus suggest a model in which in addition to stellar mass as the primary discriminant, the large-scale environment is imprinted in the SFR as a second-order effect. Furthermore, our detailed results for filament galaxies suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids on to filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. Overall, we find our results to be in line with theoretical expectations of the thermodynamic properties of the intergalactic medium in different large-scale environments.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the life and times of L★ galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, A. S. G.; Liske, J.; Driver, S. P.; Sansom, A. E.; Baldry, I. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Colless, M.; Christodoulou, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Grootes, M. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Norberg, P.; Loveday, J.; Phillipps, S.; Sharp, R.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we investigate in detail the effects the local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6150 galaxies are visually classified to determine the emission features, morphological type and presence of a disc. This large sample allows for the significant characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo; the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1; otherwise, we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and while the star-forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky Way halo mass groups. Low-mass haloes, and in particular Local Group mass haloes, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, while pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.

  10. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the unimodal nature of the dwarf galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Smriti; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, S.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Hopkins, A. M.; Baldry, I.; Phillipps, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Loveday, J.; Penny, Samantha J.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we aim to (i) test the number of statistically distinct classes required to classify the local galaxy population and (ii) identify the differences in the physical and star formation properties of visually distinct galaxies. To accomplish this, we analyse the structural parameters - effective radius (Reff), effective surface brightness within Reff (<μ>e), central surface brightness (μ0) and Sérsic index (n) - obtained by fitting the light profile of 432 galaxies (0.002 < z ≤ 0.02; Viking Z band), and their spectral energy distribution using multiband photometry in 18 broad-bands to obtain the stellar mass (M*), the star formation rate (SFR), the specific SFR (sSFR) and the dust mass (Mdust), respectively. We show that visually distinct, star-forming dwarf galaxies (irregulars, blue spheroids and low-surface-brightness galaxies) form a unimodal population in a parameter space mapped by <μ>e, μ0, n, Reff, SFR, sSFR, M*, Mdust and (g - i). The SFR and sSFR distribution of passively evolving (dwarf) ellipticals on the other hand, statistically distinguish them from other galaxies with similar luminosity, while the giant galaxies clearly segregate into star-forming spirals and passive lenticulars. We therefore suggest that the morphology classification scheme(s) used in literature for dwarf galaxies only reflect the observational differences based on luminosity and surface brightness among the apparent distinct classes, rather than any physical differences between them.

  11. H-ATLAS/GAMA: the nature and characteristics of optically red galaxies detected at submillimetre wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariush, A.; Dib, S.; Hony, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Zhukovska, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Andrae, E.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bourne, N.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Cluver, M.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Hopwood, R.; Kaviraj, S.; Kelvin, L.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pearson, C.; Popescu, C.; Robotham, A.; Rowlands, K.; Seibert, M.; Shabani, F.; Smith, M. W. L.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R.; Valiante, E.; Virdee, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We combine Herschel/SPIRE submillimetre (submm) observations with existing multiwavelength data to investigate the characteristics of low-redshift, optically red galaxies detected in submm bands. We select a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.2, having >5σ detections in the SPIRE 250 μm submm waveband. Sources are then divided into two sub-samples of red and blue galaxies, based on their UV-optical colours. Galaxies in the red sample account for ≈4.2 per cent of the total number of sources with stellar masses M* ≳ 1010 M⊙. Following visual classification of the red galaxies, we find that ≳30 per cent of them are early-type galaxies and ≳40 per cent are spirals. The colour of the red-spiral galaxies could be the result of their highly inclined orientation and/or a strong contribution of the old stellar population. It is found that irrespective of their morphological types, red and blue sources occupy environments with more or less similar densities (i.e. the Σ5 parameter). From the analysis of the spectral energy distributions of galaxies in our samples based on MAGPHYS, we find that galaxies in the red sample (of any morphological type) have dust masses similar to those in the blue sample (i.e. normal spiral/star-forming systems). However, in comparison to the red-spirals and in particular blue systems, red-ellipticals have lower mean dust-to-stellar mass ratios. Besides galaxies in the red-elliptical sample have much lower mean star formation/specific star formation rates in contrast to their counterparts in the blue sample. Our results support a scenario where dust in early-type systems is likely to be of an external origin.

  12. SU-A-210-03: Panel Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the career options for medical physicists in the NRC, how the NRC interacts with clinical medical physicists, and a physicist’s experience as a regulator. Learning Objectives: Explore non-clinical career pathways for medical physics students and trainees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Overview of NRC medical applications and medical use regulations. Understand the skills needed for physicists as regulators. Abogunde is funded to attend the meeting by her employer, the NRC.

  13. SU-A-210-04: Panel Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, J.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the career options for medical physicists in the NRC, how the NRC interacts with clinical medical physicists, and a physicist’s experience as a regulator. Learning Objectives: Explore non-clinical career pathways for medical physics students and trainees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Overview of NRC medical applications and medical use regulations. Understand the skills needed for physicists as regulators. Abogunde is funded to attend the meeting by her employer, the NRC.

  14. Groundwater quality data in 15 GAMA study units: results from the 2006–10 Initial sampling and the 2009–13 resampling of wells, California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Most constituents that were detected in groundwater samples from the trend wells were found at concentrations less than drinking-water benchmarks. Two volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene—were detected in samples from one or more wells at concentrations greater than their health-based benchmarks, and three VOCs—chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene—were detected in at least 10 percent of the trend-well samples from the initial sampling period and the later trend sampling period. No pesticides were detected at concentrations near or greater than their health-based benchmarks. Three pesticide constituents—atrazine, deethylatrazine, and simazine—were detected in more than 10 percent of the trend-well samples in both sampling periods. Perchlorate, a constituent of special interest, was detected at a concentration greater than its health-based benchmark in samples from one trend well in the initial sampling and trend sampling periods, and in an additional trend well sample only in the trend sampling period. Most detections of nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements in samples from trend wells were less than health-based benchmarks in both sampling periods. Exceptions included nitrate, fluoride, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, strontium, and uranium; these were all detected at concentrations greater than their health-based benchmarks in at least one well sample in both sampling periods. Lead and vanadium were detected above their health-based benchmarks in one sample each collected in the initial sampling period only. The isotopic ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in water and the activities of tritium and carbon-14 generally changed little between sampling periods.

  15. The masses of satellites in GAMA galaxy groups from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifón, Cristóbal; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Kuijken, Konrad; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2015-12-01

    We use the first 100 deg2 of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey to determine the average galaxy halo mass of ˜10 000 spectroscopically confirmed satellite galaxies in massive (M > 1013 h-1 M⊙) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses log ≈ 11.7-12.2 consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, log ˜ 10.5, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of / ≈ 0.04 h-1. The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass Msub ˜ 0.015Mhost independent of host halo mass, in broad agreement with the expectations of structure formation in a Λ cold dark matter universe.

  16. Dark matter halo properties of GAMA galaxy groups from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, M.; Cacciato, M.; Brouwer, M.; Kuijken, K.; Hoekstra, H.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; van Uitert, E.; Alpaslan, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Choi, A.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Driver, S. P.; Erben, T.; Grado, A.; Graham, Alister W.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hopkins, A. M.; Irisarri, N.; Joachimi, B.; Loveday, J.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; Schneider, P.; Sifón, C.; Verdoes Kleijn, G.

    2015-10-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey is an optical wide-field survey designed to map the matter distribution in the Universe using weak gravitational lensing. In this paper, we use these data to measure the density profiles and masses of a sample of ˜1400 spectroscopically identified galaxy groups and clusters from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We detect a highly significant signal (signal-to-noise-ratio ˜120), allowing us to study the properties of dark matter haloes over one and a half order of magnitude in mass, from M ˜ 1013-1014.5 h-1 M⊙. We interpret the results for various subsamples of groups using a halo model framework which accounts for the mis-centring of the brightest cluster galaxy (used as the tracer of the group centre) with respect to the centre of the group's dark matter halo. We find that the density profiles of the haloes are well described by an NFW profile with concentrations that agree with predictions from numerical simulations. In addition, we constrain scaling relations between the mass and a number of observable group properties. We find that the mass scales with the total r-band luminosity as a power law with slope 1.16 ± 0.13 (1σ) and with the group velocity dispersion as a power law with slope 1.89 ± 0.27 (1σ). Finally, we demonstrate the potential of weak lensing studies of groups to discriminate between models of baryonic feedback at group scales by comparing our results with the predictions from the Cosmo-OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project, ruling out models without AGN feedback.

  17. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic constituents (one or more) with health-based benchmarks were detected at high relative-concentrations in 10.3 percent and at moderate relative-concentrations in 13.8 percent of the primary aquifer system. The high aquifer-scale proportion of ino

  18. Groundwater-quality data in the northern Coast Ranges study unit, 2009: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Dawson, Barbara J.; Shelton, Jennifer L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This study did not attempt to evaluate the quality of water delivered to consumers; after withdrawal from the ground, untreated groundwater typically is treated, disinfected, and (or) blended with other waters to maintain water quality. Regulatory benchmarks apply to water that is served to the consumer, not to untreated groundwater. However, to provide some context for the results, concentrations of constituents measured in the untreated groundwa

  19. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  20. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  1. SU-A-210-02: Medical Physics Opportunities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect

    Abogunde, M.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the career options for medical physicists in the NRC, how the NRC interacts with clinical medical physicists, and a physicist’s experience as a regulator. Learning Objectives: Explore non-clinical career pathways for medical physics students and trainees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Overview of NRC medical applications and medical use regulations. Understand the skills needed for physicists as regulators. Abogunde is funded to attend the meeting by her employer, the NRC.

  2. SU-A-210-01: Why Should We Learn Radiation Oncology Billing?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the career options for medical physicists in the NRC, how the NRC interacts with clinical medical physicists, and a physicist’s experience as a regulator. Learning Objectives: Explore non-clinical career pathways for medical physics students and trainees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Overview of NRC medical applications and medical use regulations. Understand the skills needed for physicists as regulators. Abogunde is funded to attend the meeting by her employer, the NRC.

  3. A new cryptic species of Diatraea (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Crambinae) feeding on eastern gama grass and a novel host association with a braconid (Hymenoptera) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Diatraea currently consists of seven species in the United States, including Diatraea crambidoides (Grote), an economic pest of corn. Larvae of D. crambidoides are also reported to feed on sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.), sugar cane (Sacc...

  4. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit, 2010: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The status assessment showed that inorganic constituents were present at high and moderate RCs in greater proportions of the Cascade Range and Modoc Plateau study unit than were organic constituents. One or more inorganic constituents with health-based benchmarks were present at high RCs in 9.4 percent, and at moderate RCs in 14.7 percent of the primary aquifer system. Arsenic was present at high RCs in approximately 3 percent of the primary aquifer system; boron, molybdenum, uranium, and vanadium each were present at high RCs in approximately 2 percent of the primary aquifer system. One

  5. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Cruz, San Gabriel, and Peninsular Ranges Hard Rock Aquifers study unit, 2011-2012: results from the California GAMA program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Results for constituents with nonregulatory benchmarks set for aesthetic concerns showed that iron concentrations greater than the CDPH secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL-CA) of 300 μg/L were detected in samples from 19 grid wells. Manganese concentrations greater than the SMCL-CA of 50 μg/L were detected in 27 grid wells. Chloride was detected at a concentration greater than the SMCL-CA upper benchmark of 500 mg/L in one grid well. TDS concentrations in three grid wells were greater than the SMCL-CA upper benchmark of 1,000 mg/L.

  6. A multiwavelength exploration of the [C II]/IR ratio in H-ATLAS/GAMA galaxies out to z = 0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, E.; Lara-López, M. A.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Hopwood, R.; Bauer, A.; Ivison, R. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Dannerbauer, H.; van der Werf, P.; Riechers, D.; Bourne, N.; Baes, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Dunne, L.; Verma, A.; Brough, S.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Maddox, S.; Smith, M.; Steele, O.; Thomas, D.; Valiante, E.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the behaviour of [C II] λ157.74 μm forbidden fine-structure line observed in a sample of 28 galaxies selected from ˜ 50 deg2 of the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey survey. The sample is restricted to galaxies with flux densities higher than S160 μm > 150 mJy and optical spectra from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey at 0.02 < z < 0.2. Far-IR spectra centred on this redshifted line were taken with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. The galaxies span 10 < log(LIR/L⊙) < 12 (where LIR ≡ LIR[8-1000 μm]) and 7.32.5 × 10-3 with respect to those showing lower ratios. In particular, those with high ratios tend to have: (1) LIR <1011 L⊙; (2) cold dust temperatures, Td < 30 K; (3) disc-like morphologies in r-band images; (4) a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colour 0.5 ≲ S12 μm/S22 μm ≲ 1.0; (5) low surface brightness ΣIR ≈ 108-9 L⊙ kpc-2, (6) and specific star formation rates of sSFR ≈0.05-3 Gyr-1. We suggest that the strength of the far-UV radiation fields () is main parameter responsible for controlling the [C II]/IR ratio. It is possible that relatively high creates a positively charged dust grain distribution, impeding an efficient photoelectric extraction of electrons from these grains to then collisionally excite carbon atoms. Within the brighter IR population, 11 < log(L IR/L⊙) < 12, the low [C II]/IR ratio is unlikely to be modified by [C II] self-absorption or controlled by the presence of a moderately luminous AGN (identified via the BPT diagram).

  7. Production of arachidonic acid and dihomo-gama-linolenic acid from glycerol by oil-producing filamentous fungi, Mortierella in ARS Culture Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve Mortirella strains: M. alpina NRRL 6302, M. claussenii NRRL 2760, M. elongata NRRL 5246, M. epigama NRRL 5512, M. humilis NRRL 6369, M. hygrophila NRRL 2591, M. minutissima NRRL 6462, M. multidivaricata NRRL 6456, M. nantahalensis NRRL 5216, M. parvispora NRRL 2941, M. sepedonioides NRRL 6425...

  8. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

  9. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the connection between metals, specific SFR and H I gas in galaxies: the Z-SSFR relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-López, M. A.; Hopkins, A. M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Brough, S.; Colless, M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Driver, S.; Foster, C.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sharp, R. G.; Steele, O.; Taylor, E. N.

    2013-06-01

    We study the interplay between gas phase metallicity (Z), specific star formation rate (SSFR) and neutral hydrogen gas (H I) for galaxies of different stellar masses. Our study uses spectroscopic data from Galaxy and Mass Assembly and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) star-forming galaxies, as well as H I detection from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) and Galex Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS) public catalogues. We present a model based on the Z-SSFR relation that shows that at a given stellar mass, depending on the amount of gas, galaxies will follow opposite behaviours. Low-mass galaxies with a large amount of gas will show high SSFR and low metallicities, while low-mass galaxies with small amounts of gas will show lower SSFR and high metallicities. In contrast, massive galaxies with a large amount of gas will show moderate SSFR and high metallicities, while massive galaxies with small amounts of gas will show low SSFR and low metallicities. Using ALFALFA and GASS counterparts, we find that the amount of gas is related to those drastic differences in Z and SSFR for galaxies of a similar stellar mass.

  10. 77 FR 71454 - Crow Butte Resources, Inc. License SUA-1534, License Amendment To Construct and Operate Marsland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR... filing requirements of the NRC's E-Filing Rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007) apply to appeals of NRC... unlisted software, and the NRC Meta System Help Desk will not be able to offer assistance in using...

  11. 77 FR 24993 - License Amendment Request To Amend Source Materials License SUA-1310 and Proceed With Termination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... Corporation, Bear Creek Uranium Mill, Converse County, WY AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... ] Creek Uranium Alternate Concentration Proposal is available electronically under ADAMS Accession...

  12. 78 FR 12365 - License Amendment Request for United Nuclear Corporation, Church Rock Mill-License No. SUA-1475

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...) [ADAMS Accession No. ML12150A146]. On October 12, 2012, UNC submitted a three-dimensional groundwater... appropriate notices will be provided. ] Requests for hearing, petitions for leave to intervene, and motions... leave to intervene, any motion or other document filed in the proceeding prior to the submission of...

  13. 75 FR 62153 - Notice of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuance of Materials License SUA-1596 for Uranium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... processing, alternative site location, alternate lixiviants and alternate wastewater treatment methods. The... request for a materials license was previously noticed in the Federal Register on January 25, 2008 (73...

  14. 76 FR 45300 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License SUA-1597 and Record of Decision for Uranerz Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ..., alternative site location, alternate lixiviants, and alternate wastewater treatment methods. The factors... report) (ML080080600), the Commission's Safety Evaluation Report (SER) published in July 2011..., Supplement 2) published in January 2011 (ML103440120). The record of decision also includes the...

  15. A correlação índice espectral vs. luminosidade em QSOs e suas implicações

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, A.

    2003-08-01

    Estudos de variabilidade de núcleos ativos já demonstraram ser comum o fato de seu contínuo óptico/UV tornar-se mais "duro" à medida que a luminosidade aumenta. Essa tendência ocorre tanto de forma individual quanto global, e pode ter implicações importantes (1) para estudos fotométricos de variabilidade conduzidos numa banda fixa no referencial do observador, comparando objetos a diferentes redshifts, e (2) no cálculo da correção K, com consequente impacto na determinação de massas de buracos negros e bojos de galáxias hospedeiras (através da relação de Magorrian). Confirmo aqui as correlações positivas entre o índice espectral e a luminosidade óptica, utilizando dados espectroscópicos de 11 QSOs monitorados no Brasil e no Chile, durante ~2 anos. O estudo é complementado com parâmetros extraídos de espectros e de dados fotométricos públicos de quasares. Destaco ainda as diferenças observadas em tais correlações para objetos do tipo radio-loud e radio-quiet. Este projeto é financiado pelo I. Milênio/CNPq.

  16. 76 FR 53500 - Notice of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuance of Materials License SUA-1598 and Record of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... request for a materials license was previously noticed in the Federal Register on July 10, 2008 (73 FR... in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . These documents for the Lost Creek... documentation and license, are available electronically in the NRC Library at...

  17. Geochemical conditions and the occurrence of selected trace elements in groundwater basins used for public drinking-water supply, Desert and Basin and Range hydrogeologic provinces, 2006-11: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of strontium, which exists primarily in a cationic form (Sr2+), were not significantly correlated with either groundwater age or pH. Strontium concentrations showed a strong positive correlation with total dissolved solids (TDS). Dissolved constituents, such as Sr, that interact with mineral surfaces through outer-sphere complexation become increasingly soluble with increasing TDS concentrations of groundwater. Boron concentrations also showed a significant positive correlation with TDS, indicating the B may interact to a large degree with mineral surfaces through outer-sphere complexation.

  18. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at present, no others are planned.

  19. GAMA/WiggleZ: the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies and their redshift evolution to z = 0.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Michael B.; Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Couch, Warrick J.; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Prescott, M.; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David

    2016-07-01

    We present radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The radio AGN are separated into low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z < 0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as {˜ } (1+z)^{0.06^{+0.17}_{-0.18}} assuming pure density evolution or {˜ } (1+z)^{0.46^{+0.22}_{-0.24}} assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by {˜ } (1+z)^{2.93^{+0.46}_{-0.47}} assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed, the best-fitting HERG evolution is parametrized by {˜ } (1+z)^{7.41^{+0.79}_{-1.33}}. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (≳1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.

  20. Nacao e Cidadania: A Constituicao de 1824 e Suas Implicacoes Politicas (Nation and Citizenship: The Constitution of 1824 and Its Political Implications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Cecilia Helena Lorenzini de Salles

    1998-01-01

    Brings a different reading of 1824's Brazilian Imperial Political Constitution. Discusses some historical and political circumstances of the document's construction. Investigates practices, conceptions, and supports that could have clarified some principles stressed by the document, especially those related to citizenship matters. (PA)

  1. Os Portugueses No Sudoeste Da Nova Inglaterra E A Sua Literatura Infantil (The Portuguese in Southeast New England and Their Children's Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinkscales, Rosalie Duggan

    The four sections of this paper deal with Portuguese immigrants in southeast New England and with Portuguese-language children's literature. The first section contains a description of Portuguese immigration to the United States from 1511 to the present and notes changes in immigration laws. The second section presents descriptions of the…

  2. SU-A-210-00: AAPM Medical Physics Student Meeting: Medical Billing and Regulations: Everything You Always Wanted To Know, But Were Too Afraid To Ask

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the career options for medical physicists in the NRC, how the NRC interacts with clinical medical physicists, and a physicist’s experience as a regulator. Learning Objectives: Explore non-clinical career pathways for medical physics students and trainees at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Overview of NRC medical applications and medical use regulations. Understand the skills needed for physicists as regulators. Abogunde is funded to attend the meeting by her employer, the NRC.

  3. Sua Pan surface bidirectional reflectance: a validation experiment of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) during SAFARI 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Helmlinger, Mark C.; Diner, David J.; Conel, James E.; Martonchik, John V.; Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dray deason campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive ground-based and airborne measurements in this campaign provided a unique opportunity to validate space sensors, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform.

  4. Groundwater quality in the San Fernando--San Gabriel groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Fernando and San Gabriel groundwater basins constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  5. Groundwater quality in the San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Selected groundwater basins of the San Francisco Bay area constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  6. Groundwater quality in the South Coast Interior Basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The South Coast Interior Basins constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  7. Groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The basins north of San Francisco constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  8. The Science Teachers and Their way of Thinking about Astronomy. (Spanish Title: Los Profesores de Ciencias y Sus Formas de Pensar la Astronomía.) Os Professores de Ciências e Suas Formas de Pensar a Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Cristina; Hosoume, Yassuko

    2007-12-01

    The research presented in this article is about the way science teachers from Elementary School think about astronomical elements. Its methodology is based on semi-structured interviews, which were video recorded. The research is centered in a three-dimensional perspective of astronomical Earth, the Sun, the Moon, the planets and the stars, and also the conceptions about sky and Universe. The esults indicate a Universe that contains: Sun, stars, planets and Moon; where the Solar System is a little part of the whole. Sometimes they think that the Solar System is the Universe. The objects are in the sky or in the Universe, which, for many of them, is only the space above the Earth. The flat shape of astronomical objects and the spatial structure of the Universe are striking features. Many of them think that Sun and stars are different: the Sun is a hot object and the stars are cold ones. These results worry us and they certainly indicate how urgent it is to plan Professional Development in Astronomy for teachers, after all the PCN's emphasize that this subject is important to be taught. El objeto de investigación de este artículo es la manera de pensar sobre los elementos de la Astronomía de los profesores de Ciencias en la enseñanza fundamental. La metodología consiste en entrevistas semi-estructuradas, filmadas en video y centradas en la tridimensionalidad de los elementos astronómicos, para posibilitar un mapeamiento de las concepciones sobre las formas y dimensiones de la Tierra, del Sol, de la Luna, de los planetas y de las estrellas, como también de la concepción de cielo y de Universo en su totalidad. Los resultados indican un Universo conteniendo: Sol, estrellas, planetas y Luna, donde el Sistema Solar se ubica como parte. Algunas veces, el Universo es concebido como el propio Sistema Solar. Los objetos están en el cielo o en el Universo, que, para muchos, se restringe al espacio que está arriba de la Tierra. La forma plana de los objetos astronómicos y la estructura espacial del montaje del Universo son características fundamentales. Muchos indican Sol y estrellas como cosas distintas: el Sol es un objeto caliente y las estrellas son frías. Esos resultados nos preocupan y ciertamente señalan una urgencia de programas de formación continuada para profesores en el contenido de astronomía, pues los PCN's (Parámetros Curriculares Nacionales) recomiendan con énfasis la enseñanza de este contenido. O modo de pensar dos professores de Ciências do ensino fundamental sobre os elementos da Astronomia é o objeto de pesquisa presente neste artigo, cuja metodologia consiste em entrevistas semiestruturadas, filmadas em vídeo e centradas numa perspectiva tridimensional dos elementos astronômicos, possibilitando um mapeamento das concepções das formas e das dimensões da Terra, do Sol, da Lua, dos planetas e das estrelas, bem como da concepção de céu e de Universo como um todo. Os resultados indicam um Universo contendo: Sol, estrelas, planetas e Lua, onde o Sistema Solar é parte do todo. Algumas vezes o Universo é concebido como o próprio Sistema Solar. Os objetos estão no céu ou no Universo o qual, para muitos, se restringe ao espaço que está acima da Terra. A forma plana dos objetos astronômicos e a estrutura espacial da montagem do Universo são características marcantes. Muitos indicam Sol e estrelas como coisas diferentes: Sol é um objeto quente e as estrelas são frias. Esses resultados nos preocupam e certamente sinalizam uma urgência de programas de formação continuada para professores no conteúdo de astronomia, uma vez que os PCN's indicam fortemente o ensino desse conteúdo.

  9. A Concepção de Universo entre Alunos do Ensino Médio de São Paulo e suas Fontes de Aquisição

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, M. A. A.; Elias, D. C. N.; Amaral, L. H.; Araújo, M. S. T.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2006-08-01

    Nesse trabalho procurou-se identificar por meio de um questionário as concepções de Universo, de espaço e tempo que sustentam a visão de mundo de um grupo de 270 estudantes de Ensino Médio, pertencentes a três escolas de São Paulo. As questões relacionadas aos conhecimentos prévios dos estudantes permitiram constatar que há pouco conhecimento acerca dos temas investigados, destacando-se que apenas 20% dos alunos foram capazes de relacionar as semanas com as fases da lua, enquanto 28% associaram as estações do ano à inclinação do eixo de rotação da Terra e 23% tinham noções das distâncias entre objetos celestes próximos da Terra. Enquanto 56% conseguiram relacionar o Big Bang com a origem do Universo, verificou-se que 37% reconheciam ano-luz como unidade de distância e 60% concebiam o Sol como uma estrela. No que se refere às fontes de aquisição que proporcionaram esses conhecimentos, apesar de 60% dos alunos indicarem a escola como principal fonte dos conhecimentos de Ast! ronomia, verificou-se claramente que para a maioria dos alunos seus conceitos ainda são inadequados, havendo necessidade de aprimoramento da abordagem desses conteúdos, pois apesar de popular, a Astronomia ainda é veiculada de maneira pouco esclarecedora e com imprecisões. Nesse contexto, são discutidas algumas possíveis contribuições que podem ser dadas para o ensino de Astronomia pelo uso das ferramentas computacionais nas escolas.

  10. Groundwater quality in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Selected groundwater basins in the Borrego Valley, Central Desert, and Low-Use Basins of the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  11. 10 CFR 431.85 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (GAMA) merged in 2008 with the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute to become the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Hydronics Institute BTS-2000 Testing Standard... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the...

  12. 10 CFR 431.85 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard...-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Hydronics Institute BTS-2000 Testing Standard...://www.ahrinet.org/Content/OrderaStandard_573.aspx. (1) The Hydronics Institute Division of GAMA...

  13. 10 CFR 431.85 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard...-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Hydronics Institute BTS-2000 Testing Standard...://www.ahrinet.org/Content/OrderaStandard_573.aspx. (1) The Hydronics Institute Division of GAMA...

  14. 10 CFR 431.85 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard...-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Hydronics Institute BTS-2000 Testing Standard...://www.ahrinet.org/Content/OrderaStandard_573.aspx. (1) The Hydronics Institute Division of GAMA...

  15. 10 CFR 431.85 - Materials incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Any subsequent amendment to a standard by the standard...-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Hydronics Institute BTS-2000 Testing Standard...://www.ahrinet.org/Content/OrderaStandard_573.aspx. (1) The Hydronics Institute Division of GAMA...

  16. 77 FR 41284 - Azoxystrobin; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... . II. Summary of Petitioned-For Tolerances In the Federal Register of July 20, 2011 (76 FR 43231) (FRL... FR 69690) (FRL- 9325-1), EPA issued a notice pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21 U.S.C. 346a(d)(3... characterized by increased liver weights, increases in alkaline phosphatase and gama...

  17. The Nature of the Refutation Text Effect: An Investigation of Attention Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, Suzanne H.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Reynolds, Ralph E.

    2010-01-01

    Students often hold misconceptions that conflict with scientific explanations. Research has shown that refutation texts are effective for facilitating conceptual change in these cases (Guzzetti, Snyder, Glass, & Gamas, 1993). The process through which refutation texts have their effect is not clear. The authors replicated and extended previous…

  18. Grain sorghum proteomics: An integrated approach towards characterization of seed storage proteins in kafirin allelic variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed protein composition determines quality traits, such as value for food, feedstock and biomaterials uses. Sorghum seed proteins are predominantly prolamins known as kafirins. Located primarily on the periphery of storage protein bodies, cysteine-rich ß- and gama-kafirins are thought to prevent en...

  19. Three Afro-Brazilian Writers: A Supplemental Guide for Black and Latin American Studies Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, James H.

    This biographical/bibliographic guide provides profiles of three Afro-Brazilian writers: Jorge de Lima (1893-1953); Luiz Gonzaga Pinto da Gama (1830-1882); and Abdias do Nascimento (1914- ). The life of each author is briefly described and sources of English language translations together with critical studies of their works are listed. Four…

  20. History of Science and Science Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  1. Hacer frente - Los sentimientos y el cáncer

    Cancer.gov

    El cáncer puede causar una amplia gama de sentimientos, ya sea que usted, un amigo o familiar esté en tratamiento ahora o que ya lo haya completado. Sugerencias para superar las muchas emociones causadas por el cáncer.

  2. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Adaptive Success of Nurses Caring for People with Mental Retardation and Severe Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerits, Linda; Derksen, Jan J. L.; Verbruggen, Antoine B.

    2004-01-01

    The emotional intelligence profiles, gender differences, and adaptive success of 380 Dutch nurses caring for people with mental retardation and accompanying severe behavior problems are reported. Data were collected with the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, Utrecht-Coping List, Utrecht-Burnout Scale, MMPI-2, and GAMA. Absence due to illness…

  4. The family experience of care in chronic situation.

    PubMed

    Bellato, Roseney; Araújo, Laura Filomena Santos de; Dolina, Janderléia Valéria; Musquim, Cleciene Dos Anjos; Corrêa, Geovana Hagata de Lima Souza Thaines

    2016-06-01

    An essay that aims to reflect on the family experience of care in chronic situation, increasing the understanding of the family as the primary caregiver. It is based on comprehensive approach in studies conducted in three matrix searches from family care experiences. We have taken three axes to organize our reflections: a) conformation of family care in chronic situation, highlighting the multiple costs incurred to the family, which can exhaust the potential of care and establish or increase its vulnerability if it is not backed by networks support and sustenance; b) family rearrangements for the care, giving visibility to care cores in which many loved family members share the care, dynamic, plural and changeable way; c) self care modeling family care, pointing to the range of possibilities of the person taking care of diseased conditions supported by people close to them. We learn that the family takes care of itself in everyday life and in the illness experience, creating networks that can provide you support and sustenance. Thus, professionals in health practices should shape up in a longitudinal and very personal way, by reference to the family care, supporting him in what is his own. Ensaio que tem por objetivo refletir sobre a experiência familiar de cuidado na situação crônica, ampliando a compreensão da família como cuidadora primária. Embasa-se em estudos de abordagem compreensiva realizados em três pesquisas matriciais que abordaram experiências familiares de cuidado. Tomamos três eixos para organizar nossas reflexões: a) conformação do cuidado familiar na situação crônica, destacando os múltiplos custos gerados à família, que podem exaurir seus potenciais de cuidado, instaurando ou ampliando sua vulnerabilidade se não for amparada por redes de apoio e sustentação; b) rearranjos familiares para o cuidado, dando visibilidade aos núcleos de cuidado compartilhados pelos diversos entes familiares, de modo dinâmico, plural e mut

  5. 76 FR 52022 - Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for License Amendment No. 64 for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Umetco Minerals Corporation Gas Hill Reclamation Project, License No. SUA-648 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... SUA-648 issued to Umetco Minerals Corporation (Umetco or the licensee) to authorize repairs to...

  6. Understanding the size growth of massive galaxies through stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    The growth of massive galaxies remains an open problem. The observational evidence seems to converge on a two-stage scenario, where a compact massive core is formed during an early, intense burst, followed by a more extended process of mass and size growth at intermediate redshift (z<2). This talk focuses on the latter, exploring the growth of massive galaxies through a detailed analysis of the stellar populations in close pairs, to study their formation history. Two surveys are explored (SHARDS and GAMA), probing the stellar populations of pre-merging systems out to z~1.3, and down to a mass ratio ~1:100. We will compare the results between medium band spectral fitting (SHARDS) and those from a more targeted analysis of line strengths in the GAMA data. The combination of the two datasets provide a unique insight of the growth channel of massive galaxies via mergers.

  7. Predicting FCI gain with a nonverbal intelligence test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semak, M. R.; Dietz, R. D.; Pearson, R. H.; Willis, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    We have administered both a commercial, nonverbal intelligence test (the GAMA) and Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning to students in two introductory physics classes to determine if either test can successfully predict normalized gains on the Force Concept Inventory. Since gain on the FCI is known to be related to gender, we adopted a linear model with gain on the FCI as the dependent variable and gender and a test score as the independent variables. We found that the GAMA score did not predict a significant amount of variation beyond gender. Lawson's test, however, did predict a small but significant variation beyond gender. When simple linear regressions were run separately for males and females with the Lawson score as a predictor, we found that the Lawson score did not significantly predict gains for females but was a marginally significant predictor for males.

  8. Estimation of exposure to dietary acrylamide based on mercapturic acids level in urine of Polish women post partum and an assessment of health risk.

    PubMed

    Mojska, Hanna; Gielecińska, Iwona; Zielińska, Aleksandra; Winiarek, Joanna; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2016-05-01

    We determined metabolites of acrylamide and glycidamide concentrations (AAMA and GAMA, respectively) in urine of 93 women within the first days after delivery, using LC-MS/MS. The median AAMA and GAMA levels in urine were 20.9 μg/l (2.3÷399.0 μg/l) and 8.6 μg/l (1.3÷85.0 μg/l), respectively. In smokers we found significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of metabolites in comparison with the non-smoking women. As demonstrated by the 24-h dietary recall, acrylamide intake was low (median: 7.04 μg/day). Estimated exposure to acrylamide based on AAMA and GAMA levels in the whole group of women was 0.16 μg/kg b.w./day (1.15 μg/kg b.w./day, P95). We found significantly (P<0.05) higher exposure in women who consumed higher amount of acrylamide in the diet (≥10 μg/day vs <10 μg/day). A weak but significant positive correlation between acrylamide intake calculated on the basis of urinary levels of AAMA and GAMA and estimated on the basis of 24-h dietary recall (r=0.26, P<0.05) was found. The estimated margin of exposure values were below 10 000 and ranged from 156 for 95th percentile to 1938 for median acrylamide intake. Our results have shown that even a low dietary acrylamide intake may be associated with health risk. PMID:25827310

  9. Reconstruction of images from Gabor zone plate gamma-ray holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Clare E.; Rew, G. A. A.; Perks, J. R.; Beynon, T. D.; Scott, Malcolm C.

    1999-09-01

    Zone plate holography is a way of obtaining 3D images from a single exposure. Unlike conventional holography, coherent radiation sources are not required. Gama ray zone plate holography can be used to image gamma rays emitted by radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine. This work concerns the computer based reconstruction of gamma ray holograms. Reconstruction algorithms including correlation and Wiener filtering are described. The images obtained using the different methods are compared.

  10. Making the Case for New Research to Support the Integration of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdaragh, Raymon M.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the current state of sUAS regulation, their technical capabilities and the latest technologies that will allow for sUAS NAS integration. The research that is needed to demonstrate sUAS NAS integration capability is identified, and recommendations for conducting this necessary research are suggested.

  11. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. J.; Owers, M. S.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Cortese, L.; Scott, N.; Colless, M.; Schaefer, A.; Taylor, E. N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Allen, J. T.; Baldry, I.; Barnes, L.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brooks, A. M.; Brough, S.; Cecil, G.; Couch, W.; Croton, D.; Davies, R.; Ellis, S.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A.; Gunawardhana, M. L.; Hampton, E.; Ho, I.-T.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kewley, L.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Leslie, S.; McElroy, R.; Lewis, G.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mahajan, S.; Medling, A. M.; Metcalfe, N.; Meyer, M.; Mould, J.; Obreschkow, D.; O'Toole, S.; Pracy, M.; Richards, S. N.; Shanks, T.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.; Walcher, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope in a 3-yr survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume-limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar-mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12 and 14.5 h, and cover a total of 144 deg2 (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and photometry in regions covered by the SDSS and/or VLT Survey Telescope/ATLAS. The aim is to cover a broad range in stellar mass and environment, and therefore the primary survey targets cover redshifts 0.004 < z < 0.095, magnitudes rpet < 19.4, stellar masses 107-1012 M⊙, and environments from isolated field galaxies through groups to clusters of ˜1015 M⊙.

  12. Toxicokinetics of acrylamide in rats and humans following single oral administration of low doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Eva Katharina; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The rodent carcinogen acrylamide (AA) is formed during preparation of starch-containing foods. AA is partly metabolized to the genotoxic epoxide glycidamide (GA). After metabolic processing, the mercapturic acids N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), rac-N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) and rac-N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-moyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) are excreted with urine. In humans, AAMA can be sulfoxidized to AAMA-sulfoxide. The aim of this study was to assess potential species-differences in AA-toxicokinetics in rats and humans after single oral administration of doses similar to the daily human dietary exposure. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 5/dose group) were administered 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA in deionized water via oral gavage. Human subjects (n = 3/gender) were orally administered 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA with drinking water. Urine samples were collected in intervals for 96 and 94 h, respectively. Urinary concentrations of {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recovered urinary metabolites accounted for 66.3% and 70.5% of the 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in rats and for 71.3% and 70.0% of the 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in humans. In rats, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA accounted for 33.6% and 38.8% of dose and 32.7% and 31.7% of dose was recovered as {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA; {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide was not detected in rat urine. In humans, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide accounted for 51.7% and 49.2%, 6.3% and 6.4% and 13.2% and 14.5% of the applied dose, respectively. The obtained results suggest that the extent of AA bioactivation to GA in humans is lower than in rodents.

  13. Serum uric acid is associated with cardiac diastolic dysfunction among women with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Shinpei; Fujita, Shu-Ichi; Okamoto, Yusuke; Kizawa, Shun; Morita, Hideaki; Ito, Takahide; Sakane, Kazushi; Sohmiya, Koichi; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2015-09-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is associated with the severity and prognosis of systolic heart failure. We investigated the potential association between SUA and cardiac diastolic dysfunction among total of 744 cardiac patients (202 women and 542 men) who had preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Presence of diastolic dysfunction was assessed by echocardiographic data, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide concentration, and left ventricular hypertrophy. Univariate analysis showed that the prevalence of diastolic dysfunction increased with increasing SUA value in women, but not in men. When sex-nonspecific SUA quartiles were used, multivariate logistic regression analysis, among female patients who were not taking uric acid lowering medication, showed that the third (SUA, 5.7-6.4 mg) and the fourth (SUA, ≥6.5 mg/dl) SUA quartiles were associated with diastolic dysfunction with an odds ratio of 3.25 (P < 0.05) and 8.06 (P < 0.001), respectively, when compared with the first SUA quartile (≤4.7 mg/dl). When sex-specific SUA quartiles were used among these population, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the fourth SUA quartile (≥5.7 mg/dl) was associated with diastolic dysfunction with an odds ratio of 5.34 (P < 0.05) when compared with the first SUA quartile (≤4.1 mg/dl). By contrast, the relationship between SUA and diastolic dysfunction was not significant in men, irrespective of which of the sex-nonspecific or sex-specific SUA quartiles were used. These data indicated that among cardiac patients with preserved ejection fraction, SUA was significantly associated with diastolic dysfunction in women but not in men. PMID:26209055

  14. Alterações Induzidas Pelo Exercício no Número, Função e Morfologia de Monócitos de Ratos

    PubMed Central

    GUERESCHI, MARCIA G.; PRESTES, JONATO; DONATTO, FELIPE F.; DIAS, RODRIGO; FROLLINI, ANELENA B.; FERREIRA, CLÍLTON KO.; CAVAGLIERI, CLAUDIA R.; PALANCH, ADRIANNE C.

    2008-01-01

    O propósito desse estudo foi verificar as alterações histofisiológicas em monócitos e macrófagos induzidas por curtos períodos de exercícios. Ratos Wistar (idade = 2 meses, peso corporal = 200g) foram divididos em sete grupos (n=6 cada): controle sedentário (C), grupos exercitados (natação) na intensidade leve por 5 (5L), 10 (10L) e 15 minutos (15L), e grupos exercitados em intensidade moderada por 5 (5M), 10 (10M) e 15 minutes (15M). Na intensidade moderada os animais carregaram uma carga de 5% do peso corporal dos mesmos em seus respectivos dorsos. Os monócitos sangüíneos foram avaliados quanto à quantidade e morfologia e os macrófagos peritoneais foram analisados quanto à quantidade e atividade fagocitária. Os dados foram analisados usando ANOVA e Tukey’s post hoc test (p ≤ 0,05). Os grupos de intensidade leve e 5M apresentaram aumento nos níveis dos monócitos quando comparados com o controle. Foi observado aumento na área celular dos monócitos para os grupos 5L, 10L, 5M e 10M; a área nuclear aumentou para os grupos 10L, 5M e 10M em comparação com o controle. Houve aumento nos macrófagos peritoneais para os grupos 15L, 10M, 15M e diminuição no grupo 5M. A capacidade fagocitária dos macrófagos aumentou nos grupos de intensidade leve e para o grupo 10M. O exercício realizado por curtos períodos modulou o número e função dos macrófagos, assim como o número e morfologia dos monócitos, sendo tais alterações dependentes da intensidade. A soma das respostas agudas observadas nesse estudo pode exercer um efeito protetor contra doenças, podendo ser utilizada para a melhora da saúde e qualidade de vida.

  15. Urinary mercapturic acids and a hemoglobin adduct for the dosimetry of acrylamide exposure in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Kavvadias, Dominique; Riedel, Kirsten; Scherer, Gerhard; Tricker, Anthony R

    2006-09-01

    Acrylamide, used in the manufacture of polyacrylamide and grouting agents, is also present in the diet and tobacco smoke. It is a neurotoxin and a probable human carcinogen. Analytical methods were established to determine the mercapturic acids of acrylamide (N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine, AAMA) and its metabolite glycidamide (N-(R/S)-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine, GAMA) by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), as well as the N-terminal valine adduct of acrylamide (N-2-carbamoylethylvaline, AAVal) released by N-alkyl Edman degradation of hemoglobin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty-four-hour urine samples from 60 smokers and 60 nonsmokers were analyzed for AAMA and GAMA, and blood samples were analyzed for AAVal. Smokers excreted 2.5-fold higher amounts of AAMA and 1.7-fold higher amounts of GAMA in their urine and had 3-fold higher levels of AAVal in their blood. All three biomarkers of acrylamide exposure were strongly correlated with the smoking dose as determined by the daily cigarette consumption, nicotine equivalents (the molar sum of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and their respective glucuronides) in urine, salivary cotinine, and carbon monoxide in expired breath. In nonsmokers, a weak but significant correlation between AAMA and the estimated dietary intake of acrylamide was found. It is concluded that all three biomarkers of acrylamide are suitable for the determination of exposure in both smokers and nonsmokers. PMID:16774873

  16. Hyperimmune globulins and same-day thrombotic adverse events as recorded in a large healthcare database during 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Menis, Mikhail; Sridhar, Gayathri; Selvam, Nandini; Ovanesov, Mikhail V; Divan, Hozefa A; Liang, Yideng; Scott, Dorothy; Golding, Basil; Forshee, Richard; Ball, Robert; Anderson, Steven A; Izurieta, Hector S

    2013-12-01

    Thrombotic events (TEs) are rare serious complications following administration of hyperimmune globulin (HIG) products. Our retrospective claims-based study assessed occurrence of same-day TEs following administration of HIGs during 2008-2011 and examined potential risk factors using HealthCore's Integrated Research Database (HIRD(SM) ) and laboratory testing of products' procoagulant Factor XIa activity by U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Multivariable regression was used to estimate same-day TE risk for different products. Of 101,956 individuals exposed to 23 different HIG product groups, 86 (0.84 per 1,000 persons) had a TE diagnosis code (DC) recorded on the same day as HIG administration. Unadjusted same-day TE DC rates (per 1,000 persons) ranged from 0.4 to 148.9 for different products. GamaSTAN S/D IG >10 cc had statistically significantly higher same-day TE DC risk compared to Tetanus IG (OR = 57.57; 95% CI = 19.72-168.10). Increased TE risk was also observed with older age (≥45 years), prior thrombotic events, and hypercoagulable state(s). Laboratory investigation identified elevated Factor XIa activity for GamaSTAN S/D, HepaGam B, HyperHep B S/D, WinRho SDF, HyperRHO S/D full dose, and HyperTET S/D. Our study, for the first time, identified increase in the same-day TE DC risk with GamaSTAN S/D IG >10 cc and suggests potentially elevated TE risk with other HIGs. PMID:23907744

  17. Effects of Special Use Airspace on Economic Benefits of Direct Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik; Barrington, Craig; Foster, John D. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of Special Use Airspace (SUA) on direct route flights is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on evaluating operating costs of aircraft and analyzing the different ground-track distances traveled by flights under different air traffic scenarios. Using this methodology the following objectives are evaluated: optimistic bias of studies that assume accessible SUAs the maximum economic benefit of dynamic use of SUAs and the marginal economic benefit of the dynamic use of individual SUAs.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (Moffett+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, A. J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Berlind, A. A.; Eckert, K. D.; Stark, D. V.; Hendel, D.; Norris, M. A.; Grogin, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ECO catalog represents a cross match between sources with measured redshifts found in the UZC (Updated Zwicky Catalog, Falco et al. 1999, J/PASP/111/438), SDSS (including data releases 6, 7, and 8; see II/294 and V/139), HyperLEDA (VII/237), RESOLVE (S. J. Kannappan et al. 2015, in preparation), GAMA (Driver et al. 2011, J/MNRAS/413/971), 2dF (Colless et al. 2001, VII/250), and 6dF (Jones et al. 2009, VII/259) catalogs with a 15" matching radius on sky. See section 2.1. (1 data file).

  19. Preparation and properties of silane-endcapped polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Silane-endcapped polyimide high temperature adhesive formulations were prepared by reacting anhydride-terminated poly(amic acid), obtained from benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (3,3'-, 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 3,3', 3,4'- or 4,4'-diaminobenzophenone) with varying amounts of gama-aminopropyltriethoxysilane in dimethylacetamide. Resin properties were evaluated by torsional braid analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Lap shear strengths of some of the adhesive bonds were determined at room temperature and at 177 C before and after ageing at 200 C for 2500 h and after boiling in water for 72 h.

  20. The study of gamma-ray bursts on Prognoz spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estulin, I. V.

    A joint French-Soviet experiment to identify the sources of gamma-ray bursts in space is described. The main instrument used in the experiment was a SNEG-2MP gamma-ray detector array consisting of two scintillation proportional counters and a collimator with an aperture angle of 18 degrees. The position of the SNEG-2MP array on the Prognoz-6 spacecraft is illustrated. A total of 15 gama-ray bursts was observed in the energy range 30-50 keV. The positions of the burst sources were localized on a standard star map, and the results are presented in photographic form.

  1. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Asner, David M.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Day, Anthony R.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Jordan, David V.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Morris, Scott J.; Mullen, O Dennis; Myers, Allan W.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Runkle, Robert C.; Seifert, Allen; Shergur, Jason M.; Stave, Sean C.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Thompson, Robert C.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; Willett, Jesse A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  2. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in the 2005 Toyota Camry Electronic Throttle Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed; Holzmann, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Part of the US DOT investigation of Toyota SUA involved analysis of the throttle control software. JPL LaRS applied several techniques, including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software. A handful of logic models were built. Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found. The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  3. The impact of serum uric acid on the natural history of glomerular filtration rate: a retrospective study in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) level has been proposed to have important connections with chronic kidney disease (CKD), while the impact of SUA level on the natural history of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline remains unknown. The present study aims to study the association of the SUA level with the GFR decline in a general population. Two thousand, seven hundred and eighty-nine subjects who visited the Health Checkup Clinic both at 2008 and 2013 were identified. A significant inverse correlation was observed between change in SUA from 2008–2013 (ΔSUA) and change in eGFR (ΔeGFR) during the same period. Multivariate regression analysis of ΔeGFR indicated that the increase in SUA over time were a negative predictor of the change in eGFR. Our result indicates that the decline of eGFR over years is larger in subjects with an increased SUA level, which helps to underline the importance of SUA level management in the context of kidney function preservation. PMID:27069799

  4. Alcohol and Cigarette Free: Examining Social Influences on Substance Use Abstinence among Black Non-Latina and Latina Urban Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Caryn R. R.; Nichols, Tracy R.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in substance use prevalence among girls, as well as a lack of research conducted with urban girls of color, highlight the importance of understanding both predictors and outcomes of substance use abstinence (SUA) within this population. This study addresses gaps in SUA research through a longitudinal investigation conducted with urban…

  5. Detection of nitrogen deficiency in potatoes using small unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. However, research is required to determine which sensors and data processing methods are required to use sUAS in an efficient and cost-effective manner. We set up a ni...

  6. UAS remote sensing for precision agriculture: An independent assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. However, research is required to determine which sensors and data processing methods are required to use sUAS in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Oregon State U...

  7. Prenatal Detection of Cardiac Anomalies in Fetuses with Single Umbilical Artery: Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Maternal-Fetal-Medicine and Pediatric Cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Tasha, Ilir; Brook, Rachel; Frasure, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine agreement of cardiac anomalies between maternal fetal medicine (MFM) physicians and pediatric cardiologists (PC) in fetuses with single umbilical artery (SUA). Methods. A retrospective review of all fetuses with SUA between 1999 and 2008. Subjects were studied by MFM and PC, delivered at our institution, and had confirmation of SUA and cardiac anomaly by antenatal and neonatal PC follow-up. Subjects were divided into four groups: isolated SUA, SUA and isolated cardiac anomaly, SUA and multiple anomalies without heart anomalies, and SUA and multiple malformations including cardiac anomaly. Results. 39,942 cases were studied between 1999 and 2008. In 376 of 39,942 cases (0.94%), SUA was diagnosed. Only 182 (48.4%) met inclusion criteria. Cardiac anomalies were found in 21% (38/182). Agreement between MFM physicians and PC in all groups combined was 94% (171/182) (95% CI [89.2, 96.8]). MFM physicians overdiagnosed cardiac anomalies in 4.4% (8/182). MFM physicians and PC failed to antenatally diagnose cardiac anomaly in the same two cases. Conclusions. Good agreement was noted between MFM physicians and PC in our institution. Studies performed antenatally by MFM physicians and PC are less likely to uncover the entire spectrum of cardiac abnormalities and thus neonatal follow-up is suggested. PMID:24719766

  8. Galaxy and Mass Assembly: the evolution of bias in the radio source population to z˜1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, S. N.; Jarvis, M. J.; Santos, M. G.; Brown, M. J. I.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2014-05-01

    We present a large-scale clustering analysis of radio galaxies in the Very Large Array Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey over the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey area, limited to S1.4 GHz > 1 mJy with spectroscopic and photometric redshift limits up to r < 19.8 and <22 mag, respectively. For the GAMA spectroscopic matches, we present the redshift space and projected correlation functions, the latter of which yielding a correlation length r0 ˜ 8.2 h-1 Mpc and linear bias of ˜1.9 at z ˜ 0.34. Furthermore, we use the angular two-point correlation function w(θ) to determine spatial clustering properties at higher redshifts. We find r0 to increase from ˜6 to ˜14 h-1 Mpc between z = 0.3 and 1.55, with the corresponding bias increasing from ˜2 to ˜10 over the same range. Our results are consistent with the bias prescription implemented in the SKA Design Study simulations at low redshift, but exceed these predictions at z > 1. This is indicative of an increasing (rather than fixed) halo mass and/or active galactic nuclei fraction at higher redshifts or a larger typical halo mass for the more abundant Fanaroff and Riley Class I sources.

  9. Primate diversity, habitat preferences, and population density estimates in Noel Kempff Mercado National Park, Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R B; Painter, R L; Taber, A B

    1998-01-01

    This report documents primate communities at two sites within Noel Kempff Mercado National Park in northeastern Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia. Diurnal line transects and incidental observations were employed to survey two field sites, Lago Caiman and Las Gamas, providing information on primate diversity, habitat preferences, relative abundance, and population density. Primate diversity at both sites was not particularly high, with six observed species: Callithrix argentata melanura, Aotus azarae, Cebus apella, Alouatta caraya, A. seniculus, and Ateles paniscus chamek. Cebus showed no significant habitat preferences at Lago Caiman and was also more generalist in use of forest strata, whereas Ateles clearly preferred the upper levels of structurally tall forest. Callithrix argentata melanura was rarely encountered during surveys at Lago Caiman, where it preferred low vine forest. Both species of Alouatta showed restricted habitat use and were sympatric in Igapo forest in the Lago Caiman area. The most abundant primate at both field sites was Ateles, with density estimates reaching 32.1 individuals/km2 in the lowland forest at Lago Caiman, compared to 14.1 individuals/km2 for Cebus. Both Ateles and Cebus were absent from smaller patches of gallery forest at Las Gamas. These densities are compared with estimates from other Neotropical sites. The diversity of habitats and their different floristic composition may account for the numerical dominance of Ateles within the primate communities at both sites. PMID:9802511

  10. The Local Universe of Disk Galaxies: Energy, Mass, and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2015-08-01

    This talk will explore three themes: (1) Our understanding of the space density of disk systems in the nearby (z<0.1) Universe, their global properties including their panchromatic (FUV-far-IR) information (energy outputs), their dust properties (masses and temperatures), their (specific) star-formation rates, and ultimately the amount of stellar mass locked up in disc components. (2) The completeness of our local surveys, with a particular focus on the severe impact of low surface brightness selection bias, and how these can be overcome using the upcoming deep imaging studies. (3) The complexity of automated structural decomposition and experiences and results from profiling 8000 galaxies at z<0.06 allowing us to derive key relations such as the mass-size relation of disc systems. The data shown is drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. The GAMA survey builds upon the SDSS legacy by extending 2mags deeper spectroscopically (r<19.8mag) and also including panchromatic data from GALEX, VST, VISTA, WISE and Herschel-Atlas and shortly ASKAP for 300,000 galaxies over 250sq deg of sky. This talk will be aligned with the GAMA Panchromatic Data Release where all imaging data products will be publicly released.

  11. Prednisone lowers serum uric acid levels in patients with decompensated heart failure by increasing renal uric acid clearance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhen, Yuzhi; Zhao, Qingzhen; Zhai, Jian-Long; Liu, Kunshen; Zhang, Jian-Xin

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies have shown that large doses of prednisone could lower serum uric acid (SUA) in patients with decompensated heart failure (HF); however, the optimal dose of prednisone and underlying mechanisms are unknown. Thirty-eight patients with decompensated HF were randomized to receive standard HF care alone (n = 10) or with low-dose (15 mg/day, n = 8), medium-dose (30 mg/day, n = 10), or high-dose prednisone (60 mg/day, n = 10), for 10 days. At the end of the study, only high-dose prednisone significantly reduced SUA, whereas low- and medium-dose prednisone and standard HF care had no effect on SUA. The reduction in SUA in high-dose prednisone groups was associated with a significant increase in renal uric acid clearance. In conclusion, prednisone can reduce SUA levels by increasing renal uric acid clearance in patients with decompensated HF. PMID:27144905

  12. A Pharmacist-Staffed, Virtual Gout Management Clinic for Achieving Target Serum Uric Acid Levels: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldfien, Robert; Pressman, Alice; Jacobson, Alice; Ng, Michele; Avins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Context: Relatively few patients with gout receive appropriate treatment. Objective: To determine whether a pharmacist-staffed gout management program is more effective than usual care in achieving target serum uric acid (sUA) levels in gout patients. Design: A parallel-group, randomized controlled trial of a pharmacist-staffed, telephone-based program for managing hyperuricemia vs usual care. Trial duration was 26 weeks. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome measure was achieving sUA levels at or below 6 mg/dL at the 26-week visit. Secondary outcome was mean change in sUA levels in the control and intervention groups. Participants were adults with recurrent gout and sUA levels above 6.0 mg/dL. Participants were randomly assigned to management by a clinical pharmacist following protocol or to monitoring of sUA levels but management of their gout by their usual treating physician. Results: Of 102 patients who met eligibility criteria, 77 subjects obtained a baseline sUA measurement and were entered into the trial. Among 37 participants in the intervention group, 13 (35%) had sUA levels at or below 6.0 mg/dL at 26 weeks, compared with 5 (13%) of 40 participants in the control group (risk ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1 to 7.1, p = 0.03). The mean change in sUA levels among controls was +0.1 mg/dL compared with −1.5 mg/dL in the intervention group (sUA difference = −1.6, 95% CI = −0.9 to −2.4, p < 0.001). Conclusions: A structured pharmacist-staffed program was more effective than usual care for achieving target sUA levels. These results suggest a structured program could greatly improve gout management. PMID:27352414

  13. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. Material/Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. Results The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  14. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. RESULTS The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus. PMID:27130891

  15. Hemispheric sunspot unit area: comparison with hemispheric sunspot number and sunspot area

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    The monthly mean northern and southern hemispheric sunspot numbers (SNs) and sunspot areas (SAs) in the time interval of 1945 January to 2012 December are utilized to construct the monthly northern and southern hemispheric sunspot unit areas (SUAs), which are defined as the ratio of hemispheric SA to SN. Hemispheric SUAs are usually found to rise at the beginning and to fall at the ending time of a solar cycle more rapidly, forming a more irregular cycle profile than hemispheric SNs and SAs, although it also presents Schwabe-cycle-like hemispheric SNs and SAs. Sunspot activity (SN, SA, and SUA) is found asynchronously and is asymmetrically distributed in the northern and southern hemispheres, and hemispheric SNs, SAs, and SUAs are not in phase in the two hemispheres. The similarity of hemispheric SNs and SAs is found to be much more obvious than that of hemispheric SUAs and SNs (or SAs), and also for their north-south asymmetry. A notable feature is found for the behavior of the SUA around the minimum time of cycle 24: the SUA rapidly decreases from the cycle maximum value to the cycle minimum value of sunspot cycles 19-24 within just 22 months.

  16. Sex-Specific Association between Serum Uric Acid and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nengguang; Zhang, Lijuan; Xia, Zhenhua; Peng, Liang; Wang, Yufan; Peng, Yongde

    2016-01-01

    Across-sectional study was performed in 541 type 2 diabetic patients to determine the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and NAFLD in type 2 diabetic patients. Clinical parameters including SUA were determined and NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography. SUA was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic subjects with NAFLD than in those without NAFLD in men, but not in women. Furthermore, the prevalence rate of NAFLD increased progressively across the sex-specific SUA tertiles only in men (37.9%, 58.6%, and 72.6%, resp., P for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, the odd ratios (95% CI) for NAFLD were 1 (reference), 2.93 (95%CI 1.25–6.88), and 3.93 (95% CI 1.55–9.98), respectively, across the tertiles of SUA in men. Contrastingly, SUA levels in women were not independently associated with the risk of NAFLD. Our data suggests that SUA is specifically associated with NAFLD in male type 2 diabetic subjects, independent of insulin resistance and other metabolic factors. PMID:27382573

  17. Supporting Remote Sensing Research with Small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Shanks, P. C.; Kritis, L. A.; Trani, M. G.

    2014-11-01

    We describe several remote sensing research projects supported with small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) operated by the NGA Basic and Applied Research Office. These sUAS collections provide data supporting Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR), NGA University Research Initiative (NURI), and Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADA) efforts in addition to inhouse research. Some preliminary results related to 3D electro-optical point clouds are presented, and some research goals discussed. Additional details related to the autonomous operational mode of both our multi-rotor and fixed wing small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) platforms are presented.

  18. A Framework for Safe Integration of Small UAS Into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.; Bland, Geoffrey; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine classes of platforms and operations. Finally, a framework is proposed for both airworthiness and operations that attempts to balance safety with utility for these important systems.

  19. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  20. Pristine aquatic systems in a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site of the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Bárbara Medeiros; de Mendonça-Galvão, Luciana

    2014-12-01

    The maintenance of limnological monitoring programs in the Cerrado Domain is crucial as a provision of useful information about temporal variations in land use and their respective water quality responses, considering its importance as water source for different Brazilian hydrographic basins. The purpose of this research was to describe limnological variables of low-order lotic systems located in the Cerrado Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site (Environmental Protection Area (APA) Gama and Cabeça de Veado, Federal District of Brazil). Altogether, nine different streams were considered in this study. Samplings were conducted between 2010 and 2012, concentrated in the dry and rainy seasons. The sampling sites were generally characterized by low nutrient concentrations (e.g., medians, TP = 14.8 μg L(-1), TN = 20.0 μg L(-1), NO3 = 13.8 μg L(-1)) and slightly acidic waters (median, pH = 5.3), with quite low electrical conductivity values (median = 6.4 μS cm(-1)). However, water quality degradation as a response to diffuse pollution was reported in some sampling points (e.g., Onça and Gama streams), expressed by relatively higher N and P concentrations, which were probably highlighted by the good water quality of the data set as whole. Although there was a trend to higher values of nitrogen forms during the dry season, significant statistical differences between the seasonal periods were reported only for the variables temperature and dissolved silica, which were higher in the dry and rainy season, respectively. The streams located in the preserved areas inside the ecological stations of APA Gama and Cabeça de Veado can still be considered good examples of reference lotic systems in the Cerrado Domain; notwithstanding, this study reported incipient signs of water quality degradation which cannot be overlooked in future limnological monitoring. PMID:25200993

  1. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Santa Clara and San Mateo County Groundwater Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-01-06

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basins of Santa Clara County and San Mateo County, located to the south of the city of San Francisco. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  2. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Sacramento Area Groundwater Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-03-10

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement the groundwater assessment program in cooperation with local water purveyors. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin of Sacramento suburban area, located to the north of the American River and to the east of the Sacramento River. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3

  3. Hyperuricemia and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Verardi, Federico Maria; Pareo, Ilenia; Bentivenga, Crescenzio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2014-10-01

    Uric acid (UA) is the final end product of purine catabolism and is formed from xanthines and hypoxanthines. Hyperuricemia can be secondary to either an exaggerated production of UA that follows high cellular turnover conditions or, most frequently, to a low renal excretion in patients with impaired renal function. Recent data suggest that serum UA (SUA) at high-normal level is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular disease, often being a predictor of incident events. Preliminary data suggest that the reduction of SUA level in subjects with normal-high SUA could prevent at least a part of target-organ damage related to high SUA, especially when xanthine oxidase is selectively inhibited. PMID:25192804

  4. 78 FR 20146 - Lost Creek ISR, LLC, Lost Creek Uranium In-Situ Recovery Project, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering an amendment to Source Materials License SUA-1598 for continued uranium production operations and in-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium at the Lost Creek Project in Sweetwater County,...

  5. 77 FR 55195 - Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Naval Weapons Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Federal Register on October 5, 2010 (75 FR 61452). A separate and additional scoping effort was conducted... SUA activities for Department of Defense (DoD) contractors for unmanned aerial system testing...

  6. STS-48 MS Gemar, reviewing checklist on OV-103's middeck, is captured by ESC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-48 Mission Specialist (MS) Charles D. Gemar, on the middeck, consults the Payload Operations Checklist for procedures regarding the Shuttle Activation Monitor (SAM) experiment. SAM is designed to measure gama ray data within the orbiter as a function of time and location. Gemar's experiment activities aboard the earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, were captured using the Electronic Still Camera (ESC). Crewmembers were testing the ESC as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography. The digital image was stored on a removable hard disk or small optical disk, and could be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission. The ESC is making its initial appearance on this Space Shuttle mission.

  7. Assessment of research needs for gas-fired vent-free hearth products. Topical report, February-May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerth, D.W.; Roncace, E.A.

    1996-03-01

    The vent-free area is the fastest growing market within the hearth products segment of the gas industry. According to combined statistics of the GAMA and the HPA, almost 4,000,000 unvented gas heaters have been sold in the U.S. since 1980. In 1994 about 270,000 of the 1.2 million hearth products sold were vent-free. Gas-fired hearth product sales have been growing at an annual rate of about 30 percent. This translates into 1995 sales of vent-free hearth products of about 350,000 units. The purpose of the report is to present an integrated plan of research to support the vent-free hearth products and help overcome the potential short term and long term questions.

  8. Water Quality of "Tritium-Dead" Drinking Water Wells in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Moran, J. E.; Singleton, M. J.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B. K.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding ambient levels of regulated constituents with predominantly natural sources, such as arsenic and uranium, or with both natural and anthropogenic sources, such as nitrate, salinity and perchlorate, is important for attributing source, assessing susceptibility, and for groundwater basin management. For California, the large database of tritium-helium, noble gas and stable isotope measurements acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the State of California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program provides a unique opportunity to assess pre-development groundwater quality. GAMA is administered by the State Water Resources Control Board with USGS and LLNL as technical leads. These data were acquired for the GAMA California Aquifer Susceptibility and Priority Basin projects (http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/gama/; Belitz, 2003, USGS WRIR 03-4166). Groundwater pumped from long-screened wells will have a mixed distribution of travel times since recharge. Model calculations of mixing between tritium-dead recharge water and younger recharge water assuming simple binary, exponential or dispersive age distributions show that, given the historical levels of tritium in precipitation in the pacific coastal region, a threshold of less than 1 pCi/L of tritium is required to ensure that less than 25% of the pumped groundwater recharged after 1950. The low detection limit is necessary because water recharged between 1980 and 1995 contains only 3-4 pCi/L of tritium at present. The use of groundwater for irrigation in agricultural areas can result in recent recharge of tritium-dead water and complicates the identification of pre-development groundwater. Additional parameters including radiogenic helium, stable isotopes, and recharge temperature were studied to confirm the absence of a modern component. Initial results show that pre-development groundwater reflects the various hydrogeochemical settings found in California

  9. Nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Smith, J. B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The relation between the degree of nonpotentiality of photospheric magnetic fields and the occurrence of gama-ray flares is examined to determine whether there are special signatures of the stressed fields for this type of flare. Observations of the flares in the active region of April 1984 (AR 4474) are analyzed, showing that the big flare initiated at the location on the magnetic neutral line where the field deviated the most from a potential field. The nonpotential signatures of AR 4474 are compared with those of four other regions. The results suggest that gamma-ray flares are associated with strongly nonpotential fields that extend over relatively larger lengths of the magnetic neutral line that the fields associated with flares that do not produce gamma-ray events.

  10. Investigations of solar activity and the Prognoz space system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeev, R. Z.

    Data obtained by the Prognoz series of automatic magnetospheric explorer spacecraft are reviewed. Consideration is given to the effect of the solar wind on the magnetosphere; plasma diffusion in the outer magnetosphere; and the ion composition of magnetospheric plasma. Among other topics discussed are the physical characteristics of interplanetary shock waves; heavy ion streams in the solar wind and their uses in plasma diagnostic studies of the solar corona; particle acceleration in solar flares; and the study of isotopic and charged particle composition on board the Prognoz-5 and Prognoz-6 spacecraft. Consideration is also given to: the onboard orbital correction system of the 'Prognoz' spacecraft; 'Prognoz' instrument pointing systems; and a study of gama-bursts in the magnetosphere using instruments on board Prognoz-7 spacecraft.

  11. Vehicle and cargo inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbinski, Victor V.; Orphan, Victor J.

    1997-02-01

    Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System (VACIS) is comprised of a 1 Curie 137Cs gamma-ray source in a shield and collimator which produces a fan-shaped beam designed to intercept a vertical array of gama-ray detectors contained in a tower structure. The source and detector modules straddle the vehicle or container being inspected and are mounted on self-propelled trolleys which travel in synchronization along two parallel tracks covering the length of the scanned object. The signals from the gamma-ray detector array are processed and displayed so as to produce a 2D gamma-radiographic image of the object. Testing of the system on a variety of empty and lightly-loaded vehicles and containers has demonstrated the effectiveness of VACIS in detecting hidden contraband. For example, a small sample of cocaine only 1.5 inches thick was readily detected in a container.

  12. Modeling Oxygen yields to study the impact of inflows and outflows in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Lopez, Maritza Arlene

    2015-08-01

    We estimate oxygen yields based on the HI and metallicity measurements for a sample of 4000 galaxies using the SDSS, GAMA, ALFALFA and GASS surveys. Additionally, we include in our sample data form the VIRGO cluster from Hughes et al. 2013. By modeling oxygen yields as a close and open box model, and comparing models with observations, we quantify the impact of inflows and outflows in our sample of galaxies. We analyze different scaling relationships using the gas metallicity, gas fraction, stellar mass, and SFE in 2 and 3 dimensions. Through our models we are able to reproduce most of those scaling relationships, as well as quantify which percentage of the observed dispersion is due to inflows and outflows in galaxies.

  13. HI Gas in Large-Scale Filaments as Measured by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Skye; Phi, An; Shah, Ebrahim; Livecchi, Jack; Yu, Yang; Gengras, Graeme; Wolfe, Pierre-Francois; Crone-Odekon, Mary; Hyman, Mario; ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    We assess the relationship between galaxy environment and HI content as measured by ALFALFA. In particular, we consider membership in large-scale filaments in order to provide clues to how star formation in galaxies is quenched in different environments. We use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to define galaxy environments in terms of clusters, filaments, and voids for a sample of galaxies with z < 0.05, using both a friends-of-friends algorithm and a more refined approach similar to that used for the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, where a minimal spanning tree is constructed from group centers, and galaxies near branches are associated with filaments. We compare the HI content in these environments using statistics that include both HI detections and the upper limits on detections from ALFALFA. This work is supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  14. NAECA impact on gas-fired space heating equipment. Phase report September 1991-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, W.H.; Dewerth, D.W.; Jakob, F.E.; Crisafulli, J.J.

    1992-09-30

    The report describes a program aimed at preparing the gas industry to provide input to the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act rulemaking process for furnaces, including mobile home furnaces, and boilers. The Phase I work described herein is aimed at organizing the gas industry by establishing a Technical Advisory Group, visiting manufacturers to determine their needs, establishing liaison with DOE, LBL, GAMA, A.G.A., etc., and setting up provisions to experimentally evaluate design options identified by DOE as means to increase the minimum efficiency levels now in effect by NAECA. Also, a means is in place to transfer the technology to DOE and LBL to influence the Advance Notice Prior to Rulemaking (ANPRM) for furnaces and boilers, and the Notice Prior to Rulemaking (NPRM) for DHE, etc.

  15. Reduced administration of rasburicase for tumor lysis syndrome: A single-institution experience

    PubMed Central

    TAKAI, MIHOKO; YAMAUCHI, TAKAHIRO; MATSUDA, YASUFUMI; TAI, KATSUNORI; IKEGAYA, SATOSHI; KISHI, SHINJI; URASAKI, YOSHIMASA; YOSHIDA, AKIRA; IWASAKI, HIROMICHI; UEDA, TAKANORI

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the dosage and duration of rasburicase administration were retrospectively evaluated for the ability to control the serum uric acid (S-UA) level in 13 patients diagnosed with hematological malignancies and tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), or those at risk of developing TLS, at the University of Fukui Hospital. At the time of diagnosis, seven patients already exhibited laboratory TLS, and three demonstrated clinical TLS. All patients received rasburicase in addition to chemotherapy agents. The median dose was 0.19 mg/kg (range, 0.13–0.25 mg/kg), and the median duration was four days (range, 1–7 days). Six patients sequentially received a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, allopurinol or febuxostat. The primary estimate was the normalization of the S-UA level at the end of rasburicase treatment and on treatment day seven. The average S-UA level prior to treatment was 10.4±4.5 mg/dl (mean ±standard deviation), and 11 out of 13 patients demonstrated a S-UA level >7 mg/dl. The S-UA level at the end of rasburicase administration was 0.5±1.5 mg/dl and the S-UA level at day seven was 1.4±1.5 mg/dl. All the patients achieved normalization of the S-UA level. On day seven subsequent to the initiation of treatment, the patients receiving rasburicase for a maximum of three days exhibited an S-UA level of 1.9±1.8 mg/dl, while the patients receiving rasburicase for longer than three days demonstrated an S-UA level of 1.0±1.3 mg/dl (P=0.20; Mann-Whitney test). The administration of 0.13 mg/kg and 0.22 mg/kg resulted in comparable UA level reductions. The administration of allopurinol or febuxostat following rasburicase administration suppressed the re-increase in S-UA level. Therefore, it was concluded that reduced administration of rasburicase successfully controlled the S-UA level in TLS. PMID:26137024

  16. Uric acid blood levels and relationship with the components of metabolic syndrome in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, M V; Karamanou, A G; Kalogeropoulos, P; Moustakas, G; Patsianis, S; Pittaras, A

    2016-07-01

    Associations between high serum uric acid (SUA) levels and high blood pressure (BP), as well as between SUA levels and metabolic syndrome (MetS) have already been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the components of MetS with the SUA levels as also between SUA and apolipoproteins A1 and B (apoA1 and apoB) ratio in hypertensive patients. A total of 2577 consecutive hypertensive patients (1193 male and 1384 female) aged 57.5±13.3 years, were enrolled in our research. Samples were taken to measure SUA, glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL-C), components of the MetS and apoA1 and apoB. The study population was divided into two groups: group A: SUA levels above normal range (men ⩾7 mg dl(-1), women ⩾6 mg dl(-1)) and group B: SUA levels within normal range. In the overall study population, SUA levels showed a statistically significant correlation with waist circumference (WC; r=0.293, P<0.000), triglycerides (r=0.197, P<0.000), glucose (r=0.085, P<0.000), apoB/apoA1 (r=0.136, P<0.000) and HDL-C (r=-0.235, P<0,001). In newly diagnosed untreated hypertensive patients there was also a statistically significant correlation of SUA levels with WC (r=0.331, P<0.001), triglycerides (r=0.228, P<0.001) apoB/apoA1 ratio (r=0.202, P<0.001) and HDL-C (r=-0.278, P<0.001). In hyperurecemic hypertensives there was a statistically significant correlation between SUA levels with WC (r=0.168, P=0.007), apoB/apoA1 ratio (r=0.256, P=0.003) and HDL-C (r=-0.202, P<0.001). SUA levels correlate significantly with all the components of MetS, as well as with the risk factor apoB/apoA1 ratio, in hypertensive patients. PMID:26134624

  17. Logic Model Checking of Unintended Acceleration Claims in Toyota Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Part of the US Department of Transportation investigation of Toyota sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) involved analysis of the throttle control software, JPL Laboratory for Reliable Software applied several techniques including static analysis and logic model checking, to the software; A handful of logic models were build, Some weaknesses were identified; however, no cause for SUA was found; The full NASA report includes numerous other analyses

  18. Higher serum uric acid level increases risk of prehypertension in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, but not pre-diabetes and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I-H; Wu, J-S; Sun, Z-J; Lu, F-H; Chang, C-S; Chang, C-J; Yang, Y-C

    2016-08-01

    Although the association between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and prehypertension has been reported in previous studies, it is unknown whether their relationship is similar in subjects with diabetes, pre-diabetes and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). This study thus aimed to investigate the relationship between SUA and prehypertension in subjects with different glycemic status, including NGT, pre-diabetes and diabetes. A total of 12 010 participants were included after excluding subjects with blood pressure ⩾140/90 mm Hg, history of hypertension, leukaemia, lymphoma, hypothyroidism, medication for hypertension and hyperuricemia and missing data. Subjects were divided into four groups based on SUA quartiles (male Q1: ⩽345.0, Q2: 345.0-392.6, Q3: 392.6-440.2, Q4: ⩾440.2 μmol l(-1) and female Q1: ⩽249.8, Q2: 249.8-285.5, Q3: 285.5-333.1, Q4: ⩾333.1 μmol l(-1)). Diabetes, pre-diabetes and NGT were assessed according to the 2010 American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Normotension and prehypertension were defined according to the JNC-7 (The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure) criteria. The SUA was significantly higher in prehypertensive subjects as compared with normotensive subjects. SUA, as a continuous variable, was positively associated with prehypertension in subjects with NGT but not pre-diabetes and diabetes. Besides, NGT subjects with the highest quartile of SUA exhibited a higher risk of prehypertension after adjustment for other confounding factors. In pre-diabetes and diabetes groups, none of SUA quartiles was significantly related to prehypertension. SUA was significantly associated with an increased risk of prehypertension in subjects with NGT but insignificantly in subjects with pre-diabetes and diabetes. PMID:26911534

  19. Developing Collective Training for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Employment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durlach, Paula J.; Priest, Heather; Martin, Glenn A.; Saffold, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The projected use of small unmanned aerial systems (SUAS) in military operations will produce training requirements which go beyond current capabilities. The paper describes the development of prototype training procedures and accompanying research simulations to address this need. We initially constructed a testbed to develop simulation-based training for an SUAS operator equipped with a simulated vertical-lift and land SUAS. However, the required training will go beyond merely training an operator how to pilot an SUAS. In addition to tactics, techniques, and procedures for employment of SUASs, collective training methods must be trained. Moreover, the leader of a unit equipped with SUAS will need to learn how to plan missions which incorporate the SUAS, and take into account air space and frequency management considerations. The demands of the task require the leader to allocate personnel to the SUAS mission, communicate and coordinate with those personnel during the mission, and make use of the information provided. To help address these training issues, we expanded our research testbed to include a command and control node (C2 node), to enable communications between a leader and the SUAS operator. In addition, we added a virtual environment in which dismounted infantry missions can be conducted. This virtual environment provides the opportunity for interactions among human-controlled avatars and non-player characters (NPCs), plus authoring tools to construct scenarios. Using these NPCs, a collective exercise involving friendly, enemy, and civilian personnel can be conducted without the need for a human role-player for every entity. We will describe the results of our first experiment, which examined the ability of players to negotiate use of the C2 node and the virtual environment at the same time, in order to see if this is a feasible combination of tools for training development.

  20. Lower Serum Levels of Uric Acid in Uterine Fibroids and Fibrocystic Breast Disease Patients in Dongying City, China

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Qicai; XIAO, Juan; ZHANG, Pengpeng; CHEN, Lili; CHEN, Xiaoxiao; WANG, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing serum levels of uric acid (SUA) after menopause in women brought up a hypothesis that estrogenic effect may protectively regulate SUA. Estrogenic effect is a major etiology of uterine fibroids and fibrocystic breast disease. The study aimed to explore SUA among patients suffering from these diseases to enhance the hypothesis. Methods: Overall, 1349 female participants were selected into three cases: Case I having uterine fibroids (n=568), Case II having fibrocycstic breast disease (n=608) and Case III having uterine fibroids combining with fibrocycstic breast disease (n=173); 4206 participants without these diseases were selected as controls. Based on health check-up data from 2011 to 2012, in Dongying Shengli Oilfield Central Hospital, a cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the difference in SUA between the case and control. We adjusted covariates by generalized linear regression mode. Results: From 19 to 44 yr, SUA of Case I to Case III were lower than controls by 8.46 umol/L (P=0.011), 5.88umol/L (P=0.014) and 9.39 umol/L (P=0.059), respectively. From 45–54 yr, no significant differences were between three cases and controls. In Case I and its control: from 54–59 yr, differences were not significant; from 60 to 72 yr, SUA in Case I was lower than the control by 32.02umol/L (P=0.003). Conclusion: Participants of uterine fibroids and fibrocystic breast disease had a lower SUA except the stage of menopause, which indirectly supported that estrogenic effect, may protectively decrease SUA. PMID:27398332

  1. Genetic analysis of leaf rust resistance genes and associated markers in the durable resistant wheat cultivar Sinvalocho MA.

    PubMed

    Ingala, L; López, M; Darino, M; Pergolesi, M F; Diéguez, M J; Sacco, F

    2012-05-01

    In the cross of the durable leaf rust resistant wheat Sinvalocho MA and the susceptible line Gama6, four specific genes were identified: the seedling resistance gene Lr3, the adult plant resistance (APR) genes LrSV1 and LrSV2 coming from Sinvalocho MA, and the seedling resistance gene LrG6 coming from Gama6. Lr3 was previously mapped on 6BL in the same cross. LrSV1 was mapped on chromosome 2DS where resistance genes Lr22a and Lr22b have been reported. Results from rust reaction have shown that LrSV1 from Sinvalocho is not the same allele as Lr22b and an allelism test with Lr22a showed that they could be alleles or closely linked genes. LrSV1 was mapped in an 8.5-cM interval delimited by markers gwm296 distal and gwm261 proximal. Adult gene LrSV2 was mapped on chromosome 3BS, cosegregating with gwm533 in a 7.2-cM interval encompassed by markers gwm389 and gwm493, where other disease resistance genes are located, such as seedling gene Lr27 for leaf rust, Sr2 for stem rust, QTL Qfhs.ndsu-3BS for resistance to Fusarium gramineum and wheat powdery mildew resistance. The gene LrG6 was mapped on chromosome 2BL, with the closest marker gwm382 at 0.6 cM. Lines carrying LrSV1, LrSV2 and LrG6 tested under field natural infection conditions, showed low disease infection type and severity, suggesting that this kind of resistance can be explained by additive effects of APR and seedling resistance genes. The identification of new sources of resistance from South American land races and old varieties, supported by modern DNA technology, contributes to sustainability of agriculture through plant breeding. PMID:22278178

  2. ENSO Related Variations in the Flux and Labile Composition of Settling Particles in the Western Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, L. P.; Kawahata, H.; Kawahata, H.

    2001-12-01

    Sediment trap moorings deployed in three distinct oceanographic zones along the equator in the western Pacific Ocean during 1991-93, 1994-95 and 1999 provided time series data on total mass and amino acid fluxes and composition of settling particulate organic matter (POM). The traps were deployed at shallow (970-1769 m) and deep (2060-4574 m) water depths, where seafloor depth ranged from 3181 to 4888 m, to collect settling particles over an interval of about 12-16 days. An intercomparison of annual averages of various parameters revealed discrete patterns in flux and composition of POM under the El Nino (1991-93, 1994-95) and La Nina (1999) conditions which prevailed over the equatorial Pacific during this experiment. In the hemipelagic zone of the far western equatorial Pacific, average total mass and amino acid fluxes were relatively higher during El Nino than during La Nina. However, in the oligotrophic warm pool and upwelling sites, total mass and amino acid fluxes were higher during La Nina. Influence of ENSO-related changes in the settling particle flux was much clearer in the hemipelagic zone compared to that in the warm pool. Average values of biogeochemical parameters such as mole ratios of Glucosamine/Galactosamine and amino acid/hexosamine, and bulk parameters like amino acid carbon and nitrogen contents relative to organic carbon and total nitrogen (THAA-C% and THAA-N%, respectively), and organic carbon normalized amino acid concentrations indicated that settling POM was more labile during La Nina at all the sites. The mole ratios Aspartic acid/beta-Alanine, Glutamic acid/gama-Aminobutyric acid, and relative mole concentration of non-protein amino acids (beta-Alanine + gama-Aminobutyric acid) suggested that POM degradation was enhanced during La Nina than during El Nino conditions at all sites.

  3. Gravitational lensing analysis of the Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijken, Konrad; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Nakajima, Reiko; Erben, Thomas; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Viola, Massimo; Choi, Ami; Hoekstra, Henk; Miller, Lance; van Uitert, Edo; Amon, Alexandra; Blake, Chris; Brouwer, Margot; Buddendiek, Axel; Conti, Ian Fenech; Eriksen, Martin; Grado, Aniello; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Helmich, Ewout; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Irisarri, Nancy; Kitching, Thomas; Klaes, Dominik; La Barbera, Francesco; Napolitano, Nicola; Radovich, Mario; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Sikkema, Gert; Simon, Patrick; Tudorica, Alexandru; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2015-12-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is a multi-band imaging survey designed for cosmological studies from weak lensing and photometric redshifts. It uses the European Southern Observatory VLT Survey Telescope with its wide-field camera OmegaCAM. KiDS images are taken in four filters similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugri bands. The best seeing time is reserved for deep r-band observations. The median 5σ limiting AB magnitude is 24.9 and the median seeing is below 0.7 arcsec. Initial KiDS observations have concentrated on the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) regions near the celestial equator, where extensive, highly complete redshift catalogues are available. A total of 109 survey tiles, 1 square degree each, form the basis of the first set of lensing analyses of halo properties of GAMA galaxies. Nine galaxies per square arcminute enter the lensing analysis, for an effective inverse shear variance of 69 arcmin-2. Accounting for the shape measurement weight, the median redshift of the sources is 0.53. KiDS data processing follows two parallel tracks, one optimized for weak lensing measurement and one for accurate matched-aperture photometry (for photometric redshifts). This technical paper describes the lensing and photometric redshift measurements (including a detailed description of the Gaussian aperture and photometry pipeline), summarizes the data quality and presents extensive tests for systematic errors that might affect the lensing analyses. We also provide first demonstrations of the suitability of the data for cosmological measurements, and describe our blinding procedure for preventing confirmation bias in the scientific analyses. The KiDS catalogues presented in this paper are released to the community through http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VIKING catalogue data release 1 (Edge+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, A.; Sutherland, W.; VIKING Team

    2014-09-01

    The VIKING survey with VISTA (ESO programme ID 179.A-2004) is a wide area (eventually 1500 sq.degrees), intermediate-depth (5-sigma detection limit J=21 on Vega system) near-infrared imaging survey, in the five broadband filters Z, Y, J, H, Ks. The planned sky coverage is at high galactic latitudes, and includes two main stripes 70x10°2 each: one in the South Galactic cap near Dec~-30°, and one near Dec~0° in the North galactic cap; in addition, there are two smaller outrigger patches called GAMA09 and CFHLS-W1. Science goals include z>6.5 quasars, extreme brown dwarfs, and multiwavelength coverage and identifications for a range of other imaging surveys, notably VST-KIDS and Herschel-ATLAS. This first public data release of data taken between the 12th of November 2009 and the 13th of February 2011 includes 151 tiles with complete coverage in all five VIKING filters (55 in GAMA09/12/14, 91 in SGP and 5 in CFHLS-W1) i.e. 226 square degrees, and includes approximately 14,773,385 total sources (including low-reliability single-band detections) and the imaging and source lists total 314.4GB. The coverage in each of the five sub-areas is not completely contiguous but any inter-tile gaps are relatively small. More details can be found in the accompanying documentation: vikingcatdr1.pdf (3 data files).

  5. The Use of Amino Sugars by Bacillus subtilis: Presence of a Unique Operon for the Catabolism of Glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Gaugué, Isabelle; Oberto, Jacques; Putzer, Harald; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    B. subtilis grows more rapidly using the amino sugar glucosamine as carbon source, than with N-acetylglucosamine. Genes for the transport and metabolism of N-acetylglucosamine (nagP and nagAB) are found in all the sequenced Bacilli (except Anoxybacillus flavithermus). In B. subtilis there is an additional operon (gamAP) encoding second copies of genes for the transport and catabolism of glucosamine. We have developed a method to make multiple deletion mutations in B. subtilis employing an excisable spectinomycin resistance cassette. Using this method we have analysed the contribution of the different genes of the nag and gam operons for their role in utilization of glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. Faster growth on glucosamine is due to the presence of the gamAP operon, which is strongly induced by glucosamine. Although the gamA and nagB genes encode isozymes of GlcN6P deaminase, catabolism of N-acetylglucosamine relies mostly upon the gamA gene product. The genes for use of N-acetylglucosamine, nagAB and nagP, are repressed by YvoA (NagR), a GntR family regulator, whose gene is part of the nagAB yvoA(nagR) operon. The gamAP operon is repressed by YbgA, another GntR family repressor, whose gene is expressed divergently from gamAP. The nagAB yvoA synton is found throughout the Bacilli and most firmicutes. On the other hand the ybgA-gamAP synton, which includes the ybgB gene for a small protein of unknown provenance, is only found in B. subtilis (and a few very close relatives). The origin of ybgBA-gamAP grouping is unknown but synteny analysis suggests lateral transfer from an unidentified donor. The presence of gamAP has enabled B. subtilis to efficiently use glucosamine as carbon source. PMID:23667565

  6. WISE × SuperCOSMOS Photometric Redshift Catalog: 20 Million Galaxies over 3/pi Steradians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Peacock, John A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Maddox, Natasha; Brown, Michael J. I.; Taylor, Edward N.; Hambly, Nigel C.; Solarz, Aleksandra; Holwerda, Benne W.; Baldry, Ivan; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Driver, Simon P.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2016-07-01

    We cross-match the two currently largest all-sky photometric catalogs—mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and SuperCOSMOS scans of UKST/POSS-II photographic plates—to obtain a new galaxy sample that covers 3π steradians. In order to characterize and purify the extragalactic data set, we use external GAMA and Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic information to define quasar and star loci in multicolor space, aiding the removal of contamination from our extended source catalog. After appropriate data cleaning, we obtain a deep wide-angle galaxy sample that is approximately 95% pure and 90% complete at high Galactic latitudes. The catalog contains close to 20 million galaxies over almost 70% of the sky, outside the Zone of Avoidance and other confused regions, with a mean surface density of more than 650 sources per square degree. Using multiwavelength information from two optical and two mid-IR photometric bands, we derive photometric redshifts for all the galaxies in the catalog, using the ANNz framework trained on the final GAMA-II spectroscopic data. Our sample has a median redshift of {z}{med}=0.2, with a broad {dN}/{dz} reaching up to z > 0.4. The photometric redshifts have a mean bias of | δ z| ∼ {10}-3, a normalized scatter of σ z = 0.033, and less than 3% outliers beyond 3σ z . Comparison with external data sets shows no significant variation of photo-z quality with sky position. Together with the overall statistics, we also provide a more detailed analysis of photometric redshift accuracy as a function of magnitudes and colors. The final catalog is appropriate for “all-sky” three-dimensional (3D) cosmology to unprecedented depths, in particular through cross-correlations with other large-area surveys. It should also be useful for source preselection and identification in forthcoming surveys, such as TAIPAN or WALLABY.

  7. Toxicokinetics of acrylamide in primary rat hepatocytes: coupling to glutathione is faster than conversion to glycidamide.

    PubMed

    Watzek, Nico; Scherbl, Denise; Schug, Markus; Hengstler, Jan G; Baum, Matthias; Habermeyer, Michael; Richling, Elke; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    Acrylamide (AA), classified as class 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic to humans) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is formed during heating of food from reducing carbohydrates and asparagine by Maillard reaction chemistry. After dietary uptake, AA is in part metabolically converted into the proximate genotoxic phase I metabolite glycidamide (GA). GA reacts with nucleophilic base positions in DNA, primarily forming N7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)guanine (N7-GA-Gua) adducts. In a competing phase II biotransformation pathway AA, as well as its phase I metabolite GA, is coupled to glutathione (GSH). The GSH coupling products are further biotransformed and excreted via urine as mercapturic acids (MA), N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)cysteine (AAMA), and N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxy-2-carbamoylethyl)cysteine (GAMA). In the present study, hepatic biotransformation pathways and DNA adduct formation were studied in primary rat hepatocytes, incubated with AA (0.2-2,000 μM) for up to 24 h. Contents of AA-GSH, GA, AAMA, and GAMA were measured in the cell culture medium after solid phase extraction (SPE). N7-GA-Gua adducts in DNA of hepatocytes were determined by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS after lysis of the cells and neutral thermal hydrolysis. Formation of AA-GSH was linear with AA concentration and incubation time and became detectable already at 0.2 μM (4 h). In contrast to AA, GA was not detected before 16 h incubation at 10-fold higher AA concentration (2 μM). In summary, the rate of AA-GSH formation was found to be about 1.5-3 times higher than that of GA formation. N7-GA-Gua adducts were found only at the highest AA concentration tested (2,000 μM). PMID:23568512

  8. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  9. A provably-secure ECC-based authentication scheme for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Nam, Junghyun; Kim, Moonseong; Paik, Juryon; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    A smart-card-based user authentication scheme for wireless sensor networks (in short, a SUA-WSN scheme) is designed to restrict access to the sensor data only to users who are in possession of both a smart card and the corresponding password. While a significant number of SUA-WSN schemes have been suggested in recent years, their intended security properties lack formal definitions and proofs in a widely-accepted model. One consequence is that SUA-WSN schemes insecure against various attacks have proliferated. In this paper, we devise a security model for the analysis of SUA-WSN schemes by extending the widely-accepted model of Bellare, Pointcheval and Rogaway (2000). Our model provides formal definitions of authenticated key exchange and user anonymity while capturing side-channel attacks, as well as other common attacks. We also propose a new SUA-WSN scheme based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC), and prove its security properties in our extended model. To the best of our knowledge, our proposed scheme is the first SUA-WSN scheme that provably achieves both authenticated key exchange and user anonymity. Our scheme is also computationally competitive with other ECC-based (non-provably secure) schemes. PMID:25384009

  10. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  11. Comparison of the effect of high fruit and soybean products diet and standard diet interventions on serum uric acid in asymptomatic hyperuricemia adults: an open randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meilin; Gao, Yuxia; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Weiqiao; Zhang, Yuwen; Huang, Guowei

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of high fruit and soybean products diet and standard diet interventions on serum uric acid (SUA) in asymptomatic hyperuricemia adults. A total of 187 Chinese adults (20-59 years old) with asymptomatic hyperuricemia participated in this randomized trial and were assigned to receive the standard diet recommended by guideline (group 1) and high fruit and soybean products diet (group 2) for 3 months. The outcome of SUA was assessed before and at the end of the intervention period. After 3 months, the SUA in group 1 and group 2 was significant reduced, whereas the SUA was not significantly changed in-between groups. These data suggest that over a 3-month period, although the high fruit and soybean products diet and standard diet interventions yield no different effects on SUA, the high fruit and soybean products dietary intervention could be an effective alternative to a standard diet for achieving clinically important reductions in SUA for asymptomatic hyperuricemia patients. PMID:26940151

  12. A Provably-Secure ECC-Based Authentication Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Junghyun; Kim, Moonseong; Paik, Juryon; Lee, Youngsook; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    A smart-card-based user authentication scheme for wireless sensor networks (in short, a SUA-WSN scheme) is designed to restrict access to the sensor data only to users who are in possession of both a smart card and the corresponding password. While a significant number of SUA-WSN schemes have been suggested in recent years, their intended security properties lack formal definitions and proofs in a widely-accepted model. One consequence is that SUA-WSN schemes insecure against various attacks have proliferated. In this paper, we devise a security model for the analysis of SUA-WSN schemes by extending the widely-accepted model of Bellare, Pointcheval and Rogaway (2000). Our model provides formal definitions of authenticated key exchange and user anonymity while capturing side-channel attacks, as well as other common attacks. We also propose a new SUA-WSN scheme based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC), and prove its security properties in our extended model. To the best of our knowledge, our proposed scheme is the first SUA-WSN scheme that provably achieves both authenticated key exchange and user anonymity. Our scheme is also computationally competitive with other ECC-based (non-provably secure) schemes. PMID:25384009

  13. The Association between Serum Uric Acid Levels and the Prevalence of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Kehui; Wang, Anxin; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhu, Yi; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the associations between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and atherosclerotic carotid plaque vulnerability. The aim of this study was to assess the associations of SUA levels with the prevalence of vulnerable atherosclerotic carotid plaque in a community-based cohort. In the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, cross-sectional data from 2860 Chinese residents who underwent SUA measurement and ultrasonographic assessment of carotid plaque were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of SUA levels with presence of vulnerable carotid plaque. After adjustment for potential confounders, SUA levels were significantly associated with the prevalence of vulnerable plaque amongst the middle-aged adults (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.28). Compared to the lowest quartile, quartiles 2, 3 and 4 had a prevalence OR of 1.33 (1.02–1.74), 1.70 (1.27–2.27) and 2.05 (1.53–2.75), respectively, for the presence of vulnerable carotid plaque (p for trend across quartiles < 0.001). In the APAC study, elevated SUA levels were independently associated with the prevalence of vulnerable carotid plaque in middle-aged adults. PMID:25961501

  14. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Loureiro, Nuno; Fernández-Martínez, Antonio; Mota, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos: examinar la asociación del apoyo de los padres y de los amigos con diferentes intensidades de actividad física durante el tiempo libre de adolescentes españoles de ambos sexos.Métodos: un total 352 adolescentes españoles (51.70% chicos; 12-16 años) cumplimentaron el International Physical Activity Questionnarie for Adolescents y un cuestionario validado sobre apoyo social. Se realizaron análisis de regresión linear ajustados por edad.Resultados: el apoyo social de padres y amigos influyó positivamente sobre los niveles de actividad física vigorosa que los adolescentes españoles realizan durante su tiempo libre (β=.226 y β=.285 en chicos y β=.167 y β=.181 en chicas, para el apoyo de padres y amigos respectivamente) y sobre los de intensidad moderada en el caso de las chicas (β=.195 y β=.200, respectivamente).Conclusiones: el apoyo de padres y amigos contribuye a los niveles de actividad física moderada o vigorosa en adolescentes españoles. PMID:27571649

  15. Obtención de perfiles teóricos de elementos metálicos con velocidades macroscópicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, D.; Costa, A.; Rovira, M.

    El propósito de este trabajo es poder establecer -a partir de la modelización de perfiles de distintas especies- patrones de comparación observacional que permitan caracterizar los fenómenos físicos que están presentes en las estructuras que se observan. Para ello se resuelven las ecuaciones de equilibrio de ionización para un determinado átomo y una atmósfera de parámetros determinados. A partir de ello se definen las poblaciones para los distintos grados de ionización. Considerando distintas configuraciones e intensidades de flujos de masa se deducen la función fuente, el espesor óptico y se calculan los perfiles de las distintas líneas. Se obtuvieron perfiles teóricos de líneas del CII, CIV y del OIV para flujos entrante, saliente y pasante. La forma del perfil, las intensidades relativas entre los distintos flujos y el corrimiento Doppler da cuenta de una caracterización teórica a partir de la cual se comparará con observaciones.

  16. A Real-World Study of Switching From Allopurinol to Febuxostat in a Health Plan Database

    PubMed Central

    Altan, Aylin; Shiozawa, Aki; Bancroft, Tim; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the real-world comparative effectiveness of continuing on allopurinol versus switching to febuxostat. Methods In a retrospective claims data study of enrollees in health plans affiliated with Optum, we evaluated patients from February 1, 2009, to May 31, 2012, with a gout diagnosis, a pharmacy claim for allopurinol or febuxostat, and at least 1 serum uric acid (SUA) result available during the follow-up period. Univariate and multivariable-adjusted analyses (controlling for patient demographics and clinical factors) assessed the likelihood of SUA lowering and achievement of target SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL or less than 5.0 mg/dL in allopurinol continuers versus febuxostat switchers. Results The final study population included 748 subjects who switched to febuxostat from allopurinol and 4795 continuing users of allopurinol. The most common doses of allopurinol were 300 mg/d or less in 95% of allopurinol continuers and 93% of febuxostat switchers (prior to switching); the most common dose of febuxostat was 40 mg/d, in 77% of febuxostat switchers (after switching). Compared with allopurinol continuers, febuxostat switchers had greater (1) mean preindex SUA, 8.0 mg/dL versus 6.6 mg/dL (P < 0.001); (2) likelihood of postindex SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL, 62.2% versus 58.7% (P = 0.072); (3) likelihood of postindex SUA of less than 5.0 mg/dL, 38.9% versus 29.6% (P < 0.001); and (4) decrease in SUA, 1.8 (SD, 2.2) mg/dL versus 0.4 (SD, 1.7) mg/dL (P < 0.001). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, compared with allopurinol continuers, febuxostat switchers had significantly higher likelihood of achieving SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL (40% higher) and SUA of less than 5.0 mg/dL (83% higher). Conclusions In this “real-world” setting, many patients with gout not surprisingly were not treated with maximum permitted doses of allopurinol. Patients switched to febuxostat were more likely to achieve target SUA levels than those

  17. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Declining of Circulating Proangiogenic Mononuclear Progenitor Cells in Chronic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Alexander E.; Kremzer, Alexander A.; Samura, Tatyana A.; Berezina, Tatyana A.; Martovitskaya, Yulia V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Serum uric acid (SUA) is considered a marker for natural progression of chronic heart failure (CHF) mediated cardiovascular remodelling. CHF associates with declining of circulating mononuclear progenitor cells (MPCs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the interrelationship between SUA concentrations and proangiogenic MPCs in ischemic CHF patients. Methods: The study population was structured retrospectively after determining the coronary artery disease (CAD) by contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography angiography in 126 subjects with symptomatic ischemic mild-to-severe CHF and 128 CAD subjects without CHF. Baseline biomarkers were measured in all patients. Cox proportional multivariate hazard ratio was calculated for predictors of MPCs declining in both CHF and non-CHF patient population predictors of MPCs declining in CHF subjects were examined in stepwise logistic regression. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices (IDI) and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results: Cox proportional adjusted hazard ratio analyses for CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs by SUA has shown that the higher quartiles (Q3 and Q4) of SUA compared to the lower quartiles (Q1 and Q2) are associated with increased risks of depletion of both CD14+CD309+ and CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. The addition of Q4 SUA to the ABC model improved the relative IDI by 13.8% for depletion of CD14+CD309+ MPCs and by 14.5% for depletion of CD14+CD309+Tie2+ MPCs. Conclusion: Circulating levels of proangiogenic MPCs are declined progressively depending on the levels of SUA in the HF subjects with CHF. We suggest that even mild elevations of SUA might be used to predict of relative depletion of proangiogenic MPCs among chronic HF patients. PMID:25320662

  18. Predictive value of serum uric acid on left atrial spontaneous echo contrast in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hong-Tao; Liu, Fang-Zhou; Xue, Yu-Mei; Zhan, Xian-Zhang; Fang, Xian-Hong; Huang, Jun; Wei, Wei; Rao, Fang; Deng, Hai; Liu, Yang; Lin, Wei-Dong; Wu, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (LA-SEC) in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Methods We retrospectively screened 1,476 consecutive hospitalized patients with AF who underwent transesophageal echocardiography prior to radiofrequency catheter ablation, left atrial appendage closure and electric cardioversion at Guangdong General Hospital. Data on the clinical baseline characteristics of all patients were collected from electronic medical records and analyzed. Results After exclusion of patients with left atrial thrombus, 1,354 patients entered into present study and 57 were LA-SEC. The mean female SUA level (380.88 ± 94.35 µmol/L vs. 323.37 ± 72.19 µmol/L, P < 0.001) and male SUA level (416.97 ± 98.87 µmol/L vs. 367.88 ± 68.50 µmol/L, P = 0.008) were both significantly higher in patients with LA-SEC than in the controls. The mean left atrial dimension (41.32 ± 5.12 mm vs. 36.12 ± 5.66 mm, P < 0.001) was markedly larger in patients with LA-SEC. In multivariate regression analysis, SUA level was an independent risk factor for LA-SEC (OR: 1.008, P < 0.001). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the corresponding area under the curve for SUA predicting LA-SEC in female and male were 0.670 and 0.657, respectively. SUA level is significantly higher in non-valvular AF patients with LA-SEC. Conclusion SUA level is an independent risk factor and has a moderate predictive value for LA-SEC among non-valvular AF patients in Southern China. PMID:26788041

  19. Modifiable Factors Associated with Allopurinol Adherence and Outcomes Among Gout Patients in an Integrated Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Nazia; Coburn, Brian W.; Wu, Yi-Lin; Cheetham, T. Craig; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Saag, Kenneth G; Mikuls, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify modifiable patient and provider factors associated with allopurinol adherence and the achievement of a serum urate (sUA) goal in gout. Methods We identified a retrospective cohort of gout patients, newly initiated on allopurinol. All patient data came from administrative datasets at a large integrated health delivery system. Patients were > 18 years old at time of initial allopurinol dispensing, and had 12 months or more of membership and drug eligibility prior to the index date. Allopurinol adherence was defined as a proportion of days covered ≥ 0.80, evaluated during the first 12 months of observation after the initial dispensing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with allopurinol nonadherence and attaining a sUA concentration < 6.0 mg/dl. Results We identified 13,341 gout patients with incident allopurinol use (mean age 60 years, 78% male). Of these, 9,581 patients (72%) had sUA measured both at baseline and during follow-up. Only 3,078 patients (32%) attained sUA target of < 6.0 mg/dl during follow-up. Potentially modifiable factors associated with treatment adherence and obtaining sUA goal in the multivariable analysis included concomitant diuretic use, prescriber specialty, and allopurinol dosing practices. Adherent patients were 2.5-fold more likely than nonadherent patients to achieve a sUA < 6.0 mg/dl during observation. Conclusion Among gout patients initiating allopurinol in this study, 68% did not reach sUA goal and 57% of patients were nonadherent. Modifiable factors, including allopurinol dose escalation, treatment adherence, rheumatology referral, and concomitant medication use could be important factors to consider in efforts aimed at optimizing gout treatment outcomes. PMID:25512479

  20. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  1. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  2. Improving management of gout in primary care using a customised electronic records template.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith; McNab, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the management of chronic gout in relation to serum uric acid (SUA) monitoring, allopurinol dosing, and lifestyle advice is often sub-optimal in primary care.[1] A quality improvement project in the form of a criterion based audit was carried out in an urban general practice to improve the care of patients being treated for gout. Baseline searching of EMIS confirmed that management of patients with gout who were taking allopurinol was not in line with current guidance. 51(40%) had a SUA checked in the past 12 months, 88(25%) had a SUA below target level, and gout lifestyle advice was not being recorded. An audit was performed to measure and improve the following criteria: Monitoring of SUA levels in the past 12 monthsTitration of urate lowering therapy to bring the SUA below target levelLifestyle advice in the past 12 months An audit standard of 60% achievement at 2 months and 80% achievement at 4 months was set. The intervention consisted of a custom electronic template within EMIS which allowed guidance of gout management to be displayed and for data to be entered. All members of the team including GPs and administrative staff were educated regarding the intervention. This resulted in a sustained improvement over a 6 month period in all 3 components of the audit with 112(84%) having a SUA level checked, 79(51%) having a SUA below target level and 76(57%) receiving lifestyle advice. Although the improvement did not reach the audit standard in 2 of the criteria it would be expected that outcomes would continue given the systems changes which have been made. PMID:26734335

  3. Effects of Treatment of Asymptomatic Hyperuricemia on Graft Survival and Mortality in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Pagonas, Nikolaos; Kor, Samad; Seibert, Felix S; Giese, Arnd; Zidek, Walter; Reinke, Petra; Babel, Nina; Bauer, Frederic; Westoff, Timm H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperuricemia is very common after renal transplantation. It is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and graft loss. To date, however, treatment is only recommended in symptomatic disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS We included 503 adult patients who underwent kidney transplantation at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin in this retrospective study. Patients were followed up for up to 120 months. All-cause mortality, graft survival, changes in level of serum uric acid (SUA), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were analyzed. RESULTS At 12 months post-transplantation, 225 patients had a serum uric acid (SUA) level >7 mg/dl: 52 patients were treated with allopurinol, 37 with benzbromarone, and 136 patients received no medication for hyperuricemia (control). At 12 months, eGFR did not differ between groups (p=0.15) but treated patients had higher SUA levels (p<0.001) compared to the control group. SUA-lowering treatment was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (p=0.013) and graft loss (p=0.014) compared to controls. At 120 months, patients in the treatment group had lower SUA levels (p=0.001) and higher eGFR (p<0.001) compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia was associated with a substantial benefit in patient and graft survival. PMID:27271872

  4. Association of the serum uric acid level with liver histology in biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qian; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiantu; Liu, Shourong; Ge, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is significantly associated with and independently predicts the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of the present study was to examine the association of serum uric acid (SUA) levels with liver histology in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Data were collected from 158 adults aged >18 years, and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD. The differences in liver histology were assessed between hyperuricemic and normal SUA groups with NAFLD to determine the possible risk factors. The SUA level was closely associated with the degree of steatosis (correlation coefficient 0.177, P=0.027). A higher proportion of patients with hyperuricemia showed increased severity of lobular inflammation (lobular inflammation score ≥2) compared with patients exhibiting normal SUA (75 vs. 52.7%; χ2=8.548, P=0.003). Hyperuricemic groups had higher non-alcoholic steatosis (≥5) compared to the normal SUA groups with NAFLD (48.8 vs. 31.1%; χ2=5.131, P=0.024). Hyperuricemia was independently associated with advanced lobular inflammation (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.250–6.257; P=0.012) using a logistic regression model controlling for ferritin, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. In conclusion, hyperuricemia is associated with histologically severe NAFLD. Hyperuricemia was independently associated with greater odds of advanced lobular inflammation of NAFLD. PMID:27446539

  5. [Induction of heat resistance in wheat coleoptiles by salicylic and succinic acids: connection of the effect with the generation and neutralization of active oxygen forms].

    PubMed

    Kolupaev, Iu E; Iastreb, T O; Shvidenko, N V; Karpets, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    The influence of salicylic (SaA) and succinic (SuA) acids on the generation of active oxygen forms (AOFs) and the heat resistance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) coleoptiles has been studied. The treatment of coleoptiles with 10 microM SaA or SuA results in the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and enhanced formation of a superoxide anion radical. This effect is partially suppressed by both alpha-naphthol (the NADPH oxidase inhibitor) and salicylhydroxamic acid (peroxidase inhibitor). SaA and SuA cause an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and soluble peroxidase, and improve the heat resistance ofcoleoptiles. Antioxidant ionol and compounds, which inhibit the NADPH oxidase and peroxidase, significantly reduce the positive influence of SaA and SuA on the heat resistance of wheat coleoptiles. AOFs are considered to be intermediates for heat resistance induction in coleoptiles, treated with SaA and SuA; enhanced AOF generation can be caused by an increased activity of the NADPH oxidase and peroxidase. PMID:23101394

  6. Concentrations of specific dusts in swineries and the humoral response of swinery workers.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, T; Kalliokoski, P; Vilhunen, P; Taivainen, A; Mäntyjärvi, R

    1990-07-01

    The concentrations of swine epithelial antigen (SEA), swine urinary antigen (SUA) and swine feed antigen (SFA) were measured in swineries. SEA seems to be the most prevalent of the constituents measured. In the serum samples of the subjects studied, specific IgG antibodies against the antigens were frequently encountered. However, a difference was seen in the distribution of anti-SUA-IgG antibodies between swinery workers and a control group of students. The influence of the level of specific dust concentrations on specific antibody titers was studied statistically. Positive correlations were observed between stationary site SUA concentrations and anti-SUA-IgG and anti-SEA-IgG titers, respectively, pointing to an association between exposure and humoral response in swinery work. Consequently, our results suggest that the measurement of antibodies against SUA or its components could offer a basis for the estimation of the level of swinery work-related respiratory exposure and for monitoring the quality of the working environment in swineries. PMID:2378439

  7. Genome wide association study of uric acid in Indian population and interaction of identified variants with Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Anil K; Banerjee, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Shraddha; Kauser, Yasmeen; Undru, Aditya; Roy, Suki; Parekatt, Vaisak; Ghosh, Saurabh; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal level of Serum Uric Acid (SUA) is an important marker and risk factor for complex diseases including Type 2 Diabetes. Since genetic determinant of uric acid in Indians is totally unexplored, we tried to identify common variants associated with SUA in Indians using Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS). Association of five known variants in SLC2A9 and SLC22A11 genes with SUA level in 4,834 normoglycemics (1,109 in discovery and 3,725 in validation phase) was revealed with different effect size in Indians compared to other major ethnic population of the world. Combined analysis of 1,077 T2DM subjects (772 in discovery and 305 in validation phase) and normoglycemics revealed additional GWAS signal in ABCG2 gene. Differences in effect sizes of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 gene variants were observed between normoglycemics and T2DM patients. We identified two novel variants near long non-coding RNA genes AL356739.1 and AC064865.1 with nearly genome wide significance level. Meta-analysis and in silico replication in 11,745 individuals from AUSTWIN consortium improved association for rs12206002 in AL356739.1 gene to sub-genome wide association level. Our results extends association of SLC2A9, SLC22A11 and ABCG2 genes with SUA level in Indians and enrich the assemblages of evidence for SUA level and T2DM interrelationship. PMID:26902266

  8. Association between serum uric acid levels and cardiovascular risk among university workers from the State of Mexico: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that serum uric acid (SUA) can be an inexpensive and easy-to-obtain indicator of cardiovascular risk (CR). This is especially important in developing countries with high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between SUA levels and 10-year global CR among university workers from the State of Mexico, Mexico. Methods A case–control study nested within a cohort was conducted between 2004 and 2006. Anthropometric measures, lifestyle variables, family background and CR factors were assessed. The analysis estimated odds ratios using conditional logistic regression. Results The study included 319 cases with CR and 638 controls. Subjects in the upper tertile of SUA had 48.0% higher odds of having an elevated CR than those in the lower tertile (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04 - 2.10) in the crude analysis, but the association was non-significant when adjusting for other covariates. Among physically inactive individuals, being in the third tertile of SUA doubled the odds of high CR, compared with those who perform physical activity three or more hours per week being in the first tertile of SUA (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.24 - 4.45). Conclusion Serum concentration of uric acid is associated with 10-year global CR among individuals with high levels of physical inactivity. PMID:23631758

  9. School attainment of children who had a single umbilical artery at birth.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Monica

    2010-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first registry study of school achievements among children born with a single umbilical artery (SUA). A total of 1600 infants born with SUA during 1983-86 were studied. We linked the Swedish Medical Birth Registry with the Swedish School Registry, which contains the school grades of all children in Sweden when leaving compulsory school. Risks were estimated as odds ratios (OR) using the Mantel-Haenzel procedure, after adjustment for four potential confounders: year of birth, maternal age, parity and maternal education. There was a 60% excess of children born with SUA who did not complete compulsory school after removal of infants born preterm, small-for-gestational age and low Apgar score (OR = 1.60 [95% confidence interval 1.28, 2.00]). When sports and the three core school subjects (mathematics, English and Swedish) were studied, there was an increased risk for 'not passed' in all subjects except sport and a slight decrease in the probability of achieving 'passed with distinction or excellence'. In the three core subjects there was an association with gender, boys with SUA being more likely to have 'not passed' than girls. In conclusion the children born with SUA are more likely than children born with three vessels to show impaired school achievements. PMID:20415773

  10. Observación espectroscópica de NGC 2442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüero, E.; Bajaja, E.; Paolantonio, S.

    La galaxia NGC 2442 (SAB(s)bc pec) fue observada con el telescopio de 2,15 m y el espectrógrafo REOSC del CASLEO utilizando el detector CCD Tektronix de 1024 × 1024 pixels de 24 μ m (0,26"). Las exposiciones fueron realizadas con la ranura de 3,3'' × 348'', en el plano focal, ubicadas en seis posiciones, cinco a 40o de áng. de pos. y una a 79o. La mayor parte de las exposiciones se efectuó con la red de 1200 líneas mm-1, a un ángulo de 25,53o cubriendo el rango de λλ 6200 a 6900 con dispersión de 32Å mm-1 y resolución de 2,5 Å. Las relaciones entre las intensidades de las líneas de emisión en el núcleo de NGC 2442 indican que es un LINER lo cual es compatible con la sugerencia de Shobrook de que se trataría de una galaxia Seyfert u otro tipo de galaxia activa. La temperatura y densidad electrónicas nucleares son Te ~14.000 K y Ne ~ 530 cm-3, respectivamente. Una región a 87'' al NE en cambio, donde las intensidades son también altas, presenta características espectrales típicas de una Región HII con Te ~6500 K y Ne ~10 cm-3. La correlación de las intensidades con el CO en 115 GHz y con el continuo en 843 MHz y de las velocidades ópticas con las del CO, a lo largo del eje mayor, son muy buenas. La mayor resolución angular de las observaciones, sin embargo, permite apreciar la existencia de dos componentes de velocidad en el núcleo que pueden corresponder a un anillo en rotación o a un fenómeno de expansión.

  11. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Alarcón Hormazábal, Manuel; Delgado Floody, Pedro; Castillo Mariqueo, Lidia; Thuiller Lepelegy, Nicole; Bórquez Becerra, Pablo; Sepúlveda Mancilla, Carlos; Rebolledo Quezada, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: existe una alta prevalencia de sedentarismo, sobrepeso y obesidad en jóvenes universitarios. Objetivo: el propósito del estudio fue determinar los efectos de un programa de entrenamiento intervalado de alta intensidad (HIIT) sobre el perfil antropométrico, glicemia basal y VO 2 máx (consumo máximo de oxígeno) de jóvenes sedentarios con malnutrición por exceso. Material y métodos: 6 mujeres y 2 hombres (2 obesos y 6 con sobrepeso) se sometieron a un programa de entrenamiento de alta intensidad de 8 semanas de duración (3 sesiones/semana). Se evaluó en ayuno y posterior a 72 horas de la última intervención; peso, índice de masa corporal (IMC), contorno de cintura (CC), perímetro de cadera y glicemia de basal. El VO 2 máx fue evaluado en condiciones normales previo a la primera sesión. Resultados: las variables de estudio no presentaron cambios significativos (p > 0,05), pero reportaron disminuciones porcentuales. El peso disminuyó un 0,18%, el IMC un 0,27%, el CC 2,67%, el perímetro de cadera un 1,15%, y el VO 2 máx un 0,48%. La glicemia basal presentó la mayor disminución, pasó de 95,13 ± 23,91 a 89,88 ± 12,45 mg/dl (5,52%), estabilizando y mejorando sus niveles en cada uno de los participantes. Conclusiones: el programa de entrenamiento intervalado de alta intensidad fue factible de realizar sin resultados adversos para la salud de los participantes, la glicemia basal mostró la mayor variación, estabilizando sus valores en los participantes, lo que es un indicador positivo dentro del programa. Es necesario seguir investigando sobre esta metodología HIIT y aumentar los tiempos de estudio para ver los cambios que se pueden producir en distintos parámetros metabólicos, antropométricos y físicos en población con malnutrición por exceso. PMID:27238786

  12. Examination of Frameworks for Safe Integration of Intelligent Small UAS into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper briefly examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine "classes" of platforms and operations. A framework for categorization of the "intelligence" level of the UAS is postulated for purposes of NAS integration. Finally, constraints on the intelligent systems are postulated to ensure their ease of integration into the NAS.

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the North San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Landon, Matthew K.; Farrar, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile (2,590-square-kilometer) North San Francisco Bay study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in northern California in Marin, Napa, and Sonoma Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA North San Francisco Bay study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality in the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 89 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the North San Francisco Bay study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifers of the North San Francisco Bay study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal and (or

  14. Controlling serum uric acid using febuxostat in cancer patients at risk of tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takai, Mihoko; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Fujita, Kei; Lee, Shin; Ookura, Miyuki; Kishi, Shinji; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Yoshida, Akira; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening oncological emergency, in which control of serum uric acid (S-UA) levels is important. S-UA-lowering efficacy of a new xanthine oxidase inhibitor, febuxostat, was retrospectively evaluated in seven patients with hematological malignancies who were at an intermediate risk of developing TLS. A 10-mg dose of febuxostat was initiated and chemotherapy was started within 24 h of administering the first dose of febuxostat. Febuxostat was continued until at least day 7 of chemotherapy treatment. The UA-lowering treatment was considered effective if febuxostat reduced S-UA levels to ≤7.5 mg/dl by day 5. The mean S-UA level at base line was 6.4±2.6 mg/dl and, on day 5, the mean S-UA level was 4.7±1.8 mg/dl. All the patients achieved S-UA levels ≤7.5 mg/dl. Serum creatinine levels decreased from 0.93±0.25 to 0.85±0.25 mg/dl. The estimated glomerular filtration rate values increased from 69.7±24.5 to 76.9±26.2 ml/min. No adverse reactions were noted during the study period and no patients experienced progressive TLS. Successful control of S-UA and improved renal function were obtained in response to febuxostat treatment in cancer patients at a risk of TLS. PMID:25202361

  15. Role of Streptococcus uberis adhesion molecule in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus uberis mastitis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Raúl A; Dego, Oudessa Kerro; Headrick, Susan I; Lewis, Mark J; Oliver, Stephen P

    2015-09-30

    Adherence to and internalization into mammary epithelial cells are central mechanisms in the pathogenesis of S. uberis mastitis. Through these pathogenic strategies, S. uberis reaches an intracellular environment where humoral host defenses and antimicrobials in milk are essentially ineffective, thus allowing persistence of this pathogen in the mammary gland. We reported that S. uberis expresses a surface adhesion molecule (SUAM) that has affinity for lactoferrin (LF) and a central role adherence to and internalization of S. uberis into bovine mammary epithelial cells. To define the role of SUAM in the pathogenesis of S. uberis mastitis, we created a sua gene deletion mutant clone of S. uberis UT888 (Δsua S. uberis UT888) unable to express SUAM. When tested in vitro, Δsua S. uberis UT888 was defective in adherence to and internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells. To prove that the absence of SUAM reduces bacterial attachment, subsequent colonization and infection of bovine mammary glands, the wild type S. uberis UT888 and its isogenic Δsua S. uberis UT888 were infused into mammary quarters of dairy cows. Results showed that fewer mammary glands infused with Δsua S. uberis UT888 become infected than those infused with the isogenic parental strain. Furthermore, mammary glands infused with Δsua S. uberis UT888 had less severe clinical symptoms as compared to those infused with the isogenic parental strain. These results suggest that the SUAM mutant clone was less virulent than the isogenic parental strain which further substantiates the role of SUAM in the pathogenesis of S. uberis mastitis. PMID:26216456

  16. Serum uric acid and insulin sensitivity in adolescents and adults with and without type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Wadwa, R. Paul; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) exists in type 1 diabetes. Serum uric acid (SUA), whose concentration is related to renal clearance, predicts vascular complications in type 1 diabetes. SUA is also inversely associated with IS in non-diabetics, but has not been examined in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized SUA would be associated with reduced IS in adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of SUA with IS was investigated in 254 adolescents with type 1 diabetes and 70 without in the Determinants of Macrovascular Disease in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Study, and in 471 adults with type 1 diabetes and 571 without in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 diabetes (CACTI) study. Results SUA was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes (p<0.0001), but still remained inversely associated with IS after multivariable adjustments- in adolescents (β±SE: −1.99±0.62, p=0.001, R2=2%) and adults (β±SE:−0.91±0.33, p=0.006, R2=6%) with type 1 diabetes, though less strongly than in non-diabetic controls (adolescents: β±SE: −2.70±1.19, p=0.03, R2=15%, adults: β±SE:−5.99±0.75, p<0.0001, R2=39%). Conclusion We demonstrated a significantly weaker relationship between SUA and reduced IS in subjects with type 1 diabetes than non-diabetic controls. PMID:24461546

  17. Indoor/outdoor PM2.5 elemental composition and organic fraction medications, in a Greek hospital.

    PubMed

    Loupa, Glykeria; Zarogianni, Aikaterini-Maria; Karali, Dimitra; Kosmadakis, Ioannis; Rapsomanikis, Spyridon

    2016-04-15

    In the newly constructed General Hospital of Kavala, Greece, air quality was monitored in two indoor locations (the Triage room at the emergency department and the Laboratory of bio-pathology) and also outdoors. Indoor PM2.5 filter samples were collected at both rooms and outdoors, in the yard of the hospital. PM2.5 organic content and elemental composition were determined. Analyses of selected organic compounds in PM2.5 samples, revealed that chemicals from medications were distributed in the air of the hospital. Qualitatively, dehydrocholic acid, hydrocortisone acetate, gama-bufotalin, syrosingopine, dimethyl phthalate and o,p'-DDT were found in the Triage. In the bio-pathology laboratory, triethoxypentylsilane and carbohydrazide were also found. An unexpected air pollutant pathway was the pneumatic system which delivered the blood samples from the emergency department to the bio-pathology laboratory, as the presence of gama-bufotalin and syrosingopine was found in the aerosol samples from both locations. Indoor PM2.5 24-h average mass concentration ranged from 10.16μgm(-3) to 21.87μgm(-3) in the laboratory and between 9.86μgm(-3) to 26.27μgm(-3) in the Triage room, where the limit value set for human health protection, i.e. 25μgm(-3) for 24h, was exceeded once. The I/O 24-h average PM2.5 mass concentration ratio, ranged from 0.74-1.11 in the Triage and from 0.67-1.07 in the Lab, respectively. On the contrary, the I/O elemental concentration ratios were below unity for the whole campaign, indicating an outdoor origin of the monitored elements (Al, Si, Br, P, S, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti and Zn). This finding was also confirmed by high sulfur I/O ratios in both rooms. The diurnal variations of PM2.5, Black Carbon, CO2 concentrations and microclimatic conditions were also monitored. PMID:26849336

  18. Groundwater quality in the Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Barbara J. Milby; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Antelope Valley is one of the study areas being evaluated. The Antelope study area is approximately 1,600 square miles (4,144 square kilometers) and includes the Antelope Valley groundwater basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). Antelope Valley has an arid climate and is part of the Mojave Desert. Average annual rainfall is about 6 inches (15 centimeters). The study area has internal drainage, with runoff from the surrounding mountains draining towards dry lakebeds in the lower parts of the valley. Land use in the study area is approximately 68 percent (%) natural (mostly shrubland and grassland), 24% agricultural, and 8% urban. The primary crops are pasture and hay. The largest urban areas are the cities of Palmdale and Lancaster (2010 populations of 152,000 and 156,000, respectively). Groundwater in this basin is used for public and domestic water supply and for irrigation. The main water-bearing units are gravel, sand, silt, and clay derived from surrounding mountains. The primary aquifers in Antelope Valley are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells in Antelope Valley are completed to depths between 360 and 700 feet (110 to 213 meters), consist of solid casing from the land surface to a depth of 180 to 350 feet (55 to 107 meters), and are screened or perforated below the solid casing. Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily runoff from the surrounding mountains, and by direct infiltration of irrigation and sewer and septic

  19. Propriedades de estruturas temporais rápidas submilimétricas durante uma grande explosão solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, J.-P.; Kaufmann, P.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Pacini, A. A.; Makhmutov, V.; Levato, H.; Rovira, M.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos novas propriedades de variações rápidas da emissão submilimétrica durante uma das maiores explosões solares do ciclo solar 23. Os dados analisados neste estudo foram obtidos com o Telescópio Solar Submilimétrico (SST), que observa o Sol em 212 GHz e 405 GHz, e comparados com emissões em Raios-X duros e Raios-gama (fótons de energia > 10 MeV), que foram obtidas pelo experimento GRS do Yohkoh. Aplicamos diferentes metodologias para detectar e caracterizar, ao longo do evento, os pulsos submilimétricos (duração de 50-300 ms) detectados acima de uma componente mais lenta (alguns minutos). Os resultados mostram que durante a fase impulsiva, num instante próximo ao tempo do máximo do evento, houve um aumento da ocorrência de maiores e de mais rápidas estruturas temporais. Também identificamos uma boa correlação com as emissões em raios-X e raios-gama (até a faixa de energia 10-100 MeV), indicando que os pulsos rápidos submilimétricos refletiram injeções primárias de energia durante o evento.O espectro do fluxo desses pulsos é crescente com a freqüência entre 212 and 405 GHz, na maioria dos casos, ao contrário do observado para a componente gradual. As posições calculadas para as estruturas rápidas são discretas, compactas e localizadas em toda a área da região ativa, o que é previsto nos modelos de explosões solares decorrentes de instabilidades múltiplas em diferentes pequenas regiões. Por outro lado, a posição calculada para a componente lenta é estável durante a fase impulsiva. Assim, a comparação entre as características do espectro de fluxo e da localização da emissão, para os pulsos rápidos e para a componente gradual, sugere que as respectivas emissões são de natureza diferente.

  20. A Study of Recipients of Federal Supplemental Benefits and Special Unemployment Assistance. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Walter; And Others

    This is the final report of a study of approximately 12,000 recipients of Federal Supplemental Benefits (FSB) and Special Unemployment Assistance (SUA) during 1975. (The study, involving interviews with recipients in 15 States and analysis of administrative records from each State's Unemployment Insurance Service, was conducted in response to the…

  1. Bench-to-bedside review: Antidotal treatment of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycaemia with octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Philippe ER; Zahir, Soheil; Penaloza, Andrea; Gris, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    The major potential adverse effect of use of sulfonylurea agents (SUAs) is a hyperinsulinaemic state that causes hypoglycaemia. It may be observed during chronic therapeutic dosing, even with very low doses of a SUA, and especially in older patients. It may also result from accidental or intentional poisoning in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. The traditional approach to SUA-induced hypoglycaemia includes administration of glucose, and glucagon or diazoxide in those who remain hypoglycaemic despite repeated or continuous glucose supplementation. However, these antidotal approaches are associated with several shortcomings, including further exacerbation of insulin release by glucose and glucagon, leading only to a temporary beneficial effect and later relapse into hypoglycaemia, as well as the adverse effects of both glucagon and diazoxide. Octreotide inhibits the secretion of several neuropeptides, including insulin, and has successfully been used to control life-threatening hypoglycaemia caused by insulinoma or persistent hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia of infancy. Therefore, this agent should in theory also be useful to decrease glucose requirements and the number of hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with SUA-induced hypoglycaemia. This has apparently been confirmed by experimental data, one retrospective study based on chart review, and several anecdotal case reports. There is thus a need for further prospective studies, which should be adequately powered, randomized and controlled, to confirm the probable beneficial effect of octreotide in this setting. PMID:16356235

  2. Serum Uric Acid and Prehypertension Among Adults Free of Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: Baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Paulo A; Baena, Cristina P; Santos, Itamar S; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2016-02-01

    The association between serum uric acid (SUA) and prehypertension was evaluated in a racially admixed sample of civil servants aged 35 to 74 years, enrolled (2008-2010) in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Health (ELSA-Brasil). Of the 15 105 patients who enrolled in the study, we analyzed 3412 after excluding those who reported previous cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or hypertension; were heavy drinkers; or had a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2). Among the men, logistic regression, adjusted for age, race, income, birth weight, salt intake, insulin resistance, BMI, and renal function revealed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of prehypertension from the bottom quartile (referent) to the top quartile of SUA levels as follows: 0.84 (95% CI, 0.61-1.38), 0.97 (0.71-1.34) and 1.44 (1.04-2.0; P for trend .01). Analyzing for 1-standard deviation of change in SUA, the ORs were 1.19 (1.06-1.32). This association persisted in the subgroup analysis consisting of patients who were white, overweight, with a high salt intake but with normal renal function, and without metabolic syndrome. No association was found among women. In conclusion, SUA levels were associated with prehypertension among men. PMID:25972396

  3. 40 CFR 78.20 - Appeal of decision of Administrator or proposed decision to the Environmental Appeals Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal of decision of Administrator or proposed decision to the Environmental Appeals Board. 78.20 Section 78.20 Protection of Environment... Presiding Officer, the Environmental Appeals Board may issue sua sponte in its discretion a notice of...

  4. 5 CFR 1201.31 - Representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representatives. 1201.31 Section 1201.31 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES... proceeding sua sponte or on the motion of a party for a stay of the proceeding. (5) The Board,...

  5. Dissociable effects of natural image structure and color on LFP and spiking activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex and extrastriate visual area V4.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Stefanie; Logothetis, Nikos K; Rainer, Gregor

    2011-07-13

    Visual perception is mediated by unique contributions of the numerous brain regions that constitute the visual system. We performed simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) and single unit activity (SUA) in areas V4 and lateral prefrontal cortex to characterize their contribution to visual processing. Here, we trained monkeys to identify natural images at different degradation levels in a visual recognition task. We parametrically varied color and structural information of natural images while the animals were performing the task. We show that the visual-evoked potential (VEP) of the LFP in V4 is highly sensitive to color, whereas the VEP in prefrontal cortex predominantly depends on image structure. When examining the relationship between VEP and SUA, we found that stimulus sensitivity for SUA was well predicted by the VEP in PF cortex but not in V4. Our results first reveal a functional specialization in both areas at the level of the LFP and further suggest that the degree to which mesoscopic signals, such as the VEP, are representative of the underlying SUA neural processing may be brain region specific within the context of visual recognition. PMID:21752998

  6. 10 CFR 820.38 - Consolidation and severance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consolidation and severance. 820.38 Section 820.38 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.38 Consolidation and severance. (a) Consolidation. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, consolidate...

  7. 75 FR 43168 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Service Network which is comprised of State Units on Aging (SUA), Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) and Local... AAA directors and their staff and focus groups with provider organizations was deemed to be the most... range of AAA and service provider network characteristics. A focus group will be conducted with LSPs...

  8. 77 FR 20637 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; OAA Title III-C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... the Aging Network--State Unit on Aging (SUA), Area Agency on Aging (AAA), and Local Service Provider... population served and a survey that covers a variety of topics. The AAA process component includes a short... faxable survey that is comparable to the AAA faxable survey and a web-based survey that covers a range...

  9. 75 FR 63518 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... License Amendment No. 61 for Rio Algom Mining LLC, Ambrosia Lake, NM--SUA-1473 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Mining LLC (Rio Algom, or the Licensee) to authorize an alternate on-site disposal cell location for... System (ADAMS), which provides text and image files of NRC's public ] documents. The ADAMS...

  10. Tophus resolution with pegloticase: a prospective dual-energy CT study

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Elizabeth G; Bayat, Sara; Petsch, Christina; Englbrecht, Matthias; Faustini, Francesca; Kleyer, Arnd; Hueber, Axel J; Cavallaro, Alexander; Lell, Michael; Dalbeth, Nicola; Manger, Bernhard; Schett, Georg; Rech, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of intensive lowering of serum uric acid (SUA) levels by pegloticase on the resolution of tophi in patients with refractory gout. Methods Descriptive study in patients with refractory gout receiving pegloticase treatment. SUA levels were measured before and after each infusion. Dual-energy CT (DECT) scans were taken from all patients before the first infusion and after the last infusion. Computerised tophus volumes were calculated for the baseline and follow-up assessments and compared with each other. Results 10 patients with refractory gout and baseline mean SUA level of 8.1 mg/dL were enrolled. Patients were treated for a mean of 13.3 weeks. Pegloticase effectively reduced tophi in all patients showing a decrease in volume by 71.4%. Responders, showing reduction of SUA level below 6 mg/dL during at least 80% of the treatment time, were virtually cleared from tophi (−94.8%). Dependent on their anatomical localisation, resolution of tophi showed different dynamics, with articular tophi showing fast, and tendon tophi slow, resolution. Conclusions Tophi are highly sensitive to pegloticase treatment, particularly when located at articular sites. Debulking of disease and a tophus-free state can be reached within a few months of pegloticase treatment. DECT allows for comprehensively assessing tophus burden and monitoring treatment responses. PMID:26509070

  11. Uric acid lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Sposato, Barbara; Romeo, Franco

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence would indicate that high serum uric acid (SUA) levels can be a significant and independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In the last few years an independent risk relationship between hyperuricemia, cardiovascular disease and mortality has also been reported. Hyperuricemia has been shown as an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and an independent and conjoint association of either gout and SUA with total and cardiovascular mortality has been reported, with mortality impact in gout patients increasing with rising SUA concentrations, even for SUA levels in the normal to high range. These findings prompted a growing research interest on the possible benefits of uric acid lowering drugs in cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, clinical studies have reported on the beneficial effects of uric acid lowering drugs, in particular of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, in hypertension, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Two main mechanisms have been claimed to explain the dangerous effects of hyperuricemia and, as a consequence, the benefits of uric acid lowering therapy: endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence from human studies on the role of acid uric lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases for practical and clinical purposes. The possible mechanisms underlying the benefits of acid uric lowering therapy are also addressed. PMID:26386814

  12. Insecticide sensitivity of native chloride and sodium channels in a mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Lacey J; Anderson, Troy D; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of cultured Anopheles gambiae Sua1B cells for insecticide screening applications without genetic engineering or other treatments. Sua1B cells were exposed to the known insecticidal compounds lindane and DIDS, which inhibited cell growth at micromolar concentrations. In patch clamp studies, DIDS produced partial inhibition (69%) of chloride current amplitudes, and an IC50 of 5.1μM was determined for Sua1B cells. A sub-set of chloride currents showed no response to DIDS; however, inhibition (64%) of these currents was achieved using a low chloride saline solution, confirming their identity as chloride channels. In contrast, lindane increased chloride current amplitude (EC50=116nM), which was reversed when cells were bathed in calcium-free extracellular solution. Voltage-sensitive chloride channels were also inhibited by the presence of fenvalerate, a type 2 pyrethroid, but not significantly blocked by type 1 allethrin, an effect not previously shown in insects. Although no evidence of fast inward currents typical of sodium channels was observed, studies with fenvalerate in combination with veratridine, a sodium channel activator, revealed complete inhibition of cell growth that was best fit by a two-site binding model. The high potency effect was completely inhibited in the presence of tetrodotoxin, a specific sodium channel blocker, suggesting the presence of some type of sodium channel. Thus, Sua1B cells express native insect ion channels with potential utility for insecticide screening. PMID:27155485

  13. Detection of nitrogen deficiency in potatoes using unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are recognized as potentially important remote-sensing platforms for precision agriculture. We set up a nitrogen rate experiment in 2013 with ‘Ranger Russet’ potatoes by applying four rates of nitrogen fertilizer (112, 224, 337, and 449 kg N/ha) in a randomized...

  14. 45 CFR 672.6 - Appearances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING... section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. Agreements, arrangements...) Severance. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, for good cause shown order any...

  15. 45 CFR 672.6 - Appearances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING... section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. Agreements, arrangements...) Severance. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, for good cause shown order any...

  16. 45 CFR 672.6 - Appearances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING... section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. Agreements, arrangements...) Severance. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, for good cause shown order any...

  17. 45 CFR 672.6 - Appearances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING... section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. Agreements, arrangements...) Severance. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, for good cause shown order any...

  18. 45 CFR 672.6 - Appearances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING... section, a statement of good cause for the failure to file in a timely manner. Agreements, arrangements...) Severance. The Presiding Officer may, by motion or sua sponte, for good cause shown order any...

  19. 24 CFR 26.39 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 26.39... § 26.39 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party or sua sponte, the ALJ may schedule a prehearing conference at...

  20. Determinants of Aspirin Metabolism in Healthy Men and Women: Effects of Dietary Inducers of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Saracino, Misty R.; Makar, Karen W.; Thomas, Sushma S.; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Levy, Lisa; Schwarz, Yvonne; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Interindividual variation in aspirin (ASA) metabolism is attributed to concomitant use of drugs or alcohol, urine pH, ethnicity, sex, and genetic variants in UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). Little is known about the effects of diet. Methods We evaluated cross-sectionally whether urinary excretion of ASA and its metabolites [salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA) phenolic glucuronide (SUAPG), salicylic acid acyl glucuronide (SAAG) and salicylic acid phenolic glucuronide (SAPG)] differed by UGT1A6 genotype and dietary factors shown to induce UGT. Following oral treatment with 650 mg ASA, urine was collected over 8 h in 264 men and 264 women (21–45 years old). Results There were statistically significant differences in metabolites excreted between sexes and ethnicities. Men excreted more SUA; women more ASA (p = 0.03), SA, SAAG and SAPG (p ≤ 0.001 for all). Compared to Caucasians, Asians excreted more ASA, SA and SAAG, and less SUA and SUAPG (p ≤ 0.03 for all); African-Americans excreted more SAAG and SAPG and less SUA (p ≤ 0.04). There was no effect of UGT1A6 genotypes. Increased ASA and decreased SUAPG excretion was observed with increased servings of vegetables (p = 0.008), specifically crucifers (p = 0.05). Conclusion Diet may influence the pharmacokinetics of ASA, but effects may be through modulation of glycine conjugation rather than glucuronidation. PMID:21625173

  1. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss... Prehearing Procedures § 305.27 Accelerated order, order to dismiss. (a) General. The Presiding Officer, upon motion of any party or sua sponte, may at any time render an accelerated order in favor of the...

  2. 10 CFR 820.33 - Default order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Default order. 820.33 Section 820.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.33 Default order. (a... Default Order sua sponte, may find a party to be in default if the party fails to comply with...

  3. 10 CFR 820.33 - Default order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Default order. 820.33 Section 820.33 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.33 Default order. (a... Default Order sua sponte, may find a party to be in default if the party fails to comply with...

  4. Watch and wait approach to rectal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Marcos E; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-11-27

    In 2014, there were an estimated 136800 new cases of colorectal cancer, making it the most common gastrointestinal malignancy. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and over one-third of newly diagnosed patients have stage III (node-positive) disease. For stage II and III colorectal cancer patients, the mainstay of curative therapy is neoadjuvant therapy, followed by radical surgical resection of the rectum. However, the consequences of a proctectomy, either by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection, can lead to very extensive comorbidities, such as the need for a permanent colostomy, fecal incontinence, sexual and urinary dysfunction, and even mortality. Recently, trends of complete regression of the rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy have been confirmed by clinical and radiographic evaluation-this is known as complete clinical response (cCR). The "watch and wait" approach was first proposed by Dr. Angelita Habr-Gama in Brazil in 2009. Those patients with cCR are followed with close surveillance physical examinations, endoscopy, and imaging. Here, we review management of rectal cancer, the development of the "watch and wait" approach and its outcomes. PMID:26649153

  5. Sediment and process water characterization in support of 300 Area North Process Pond physical soil washing test

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1994-02-18

    The sediments in the 300 Area North Process Pond are being considered for clean-up using soil washing processes. Prior to site clean-up several preliminary pilot-scale physical washing campaigns were performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) staff in the summer of 1993. WHC used equipment that was obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Specific details are found in the 300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan. Physical soil washing includes separation and proper containment of the contaminant-rich fines and residual liquid effluent and release of the coarse ``clean`` fraction, should it meet minimum performance levels for residual contaminant concentration to the site being cleaned. A goal of the demonstration is to concentrate the contaminants into {le}10% of the soil volume excavated and, therefore, to release {ge}90% of the soil back to the site as clean soil. To support interpretation of the WHC soil washing treatability study, PNL performed some sediment and process water characterization on samples taken during three major and one small campaign. This report documents particle-size distributions in various field washed piles, and chemical and gama emitting radionuclide contents as a function of particle-size distribution for the field washed sediments and contents in the spent process water. All of the particle fractions were separated by wet sieving, but two field samples were also subjected to dry sieving and attrition scrubbing followed by wet sieving.

  6. Phylogenetic relationship of phosphate solubilizing bacteria according to 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can convert insoluble form of phosphorous to an available form. Applications of PSB as inoculants increase the phosphorus uptake by plant in the field. In this study, isolation and precise identification of PSB were carried out in Malaysian (Serdang) oil palm field (University Putra Malaysia). Identification and phylogenetic analysis of 8 better isolates were carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in which as a result five isolates belong to the Beta subdivision of Proteobacteria, one isolate was related to the Gama subdivision of Proteobacteria, and two isolates were related to the Firmicutes. Bacterial isolates of 6upmr, 2upmr, 19upmnr, 10upmr, and 24upmr were identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. Also, bacterial isolates of 20upmnr and 17upmnr were identified as Bacillus cereus and Vagococcus carniphilus, respectively, and bacterial isolates of 31upmr were identified as Serratia plymuthica. Molecular identification and characterization of oil palm strains as the specific phosphate solubilizer can reduce the time and cost of producing effective inoculate (biofertilizer) in an oil palm field. PMID:25632387

  7. Effect of Withinia Somnifera and Shilajit on Alcohol Addiction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Priya; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alcohol addiction is a social problem leading to both loss of health and economic prosperity among addicted individuals. Common properties of anti-addictive compounds include anti-anxiety, anticonvulsants, anti-depressant, and nootropic actions primarily through modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonergic systems. Objective: Here, we screen ashwagandha and shilajit known ethnopharmacologically as nervine tonic and adaptogenic herbs for possible anti-addictive potential. Materials and Methods: Effect of ashwagandha churna and shilajit was measured on ethanol withdrawal anxiety using elevated plus maze. Role of ashwagandha and shilajit on chronic ethanol consumption (21 days) was measured using two bottle choice protocol of voluntary drinking. We also measured the effect of the above herbs on corticohippocampal GABA, dopamine, and serotonin levels. Results: Both ashwagandha and shilajit were found to reduce alcohol withdrawal anxiety in a dose-dependent manner. These herbs alone or in combination also decreased ethanol intake and increased water intake significantly after 21 days of chronic administration. Chronic administration of ashwagandha was found to significantly increase GABA and serotonin levels whereas shilajit altered cortico-hippocampal dopamine in mice. Conclusion: These central nervous system active herbs alone or in combination reduced both alcohol dependence and withdrawal thus showing promising anti-addictive potential. SUMMARY Withinia Somnifera alone and in combination with Shilajeet prevented ethanol withdrawal and alcohol addiction Abbreviations used: GABA: Gama aminobutyric acid, CNS: Central Nervous System, CPP:Condition place preference, DA: Dopamine, 5-HT: 5-hydroxytryptamine, NMDA:N-methyl-D-aspartate PMID:27279696

  8. Astronomical surveys and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum, from γ -rays to radio waves, are reviewed, including such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ -ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and POSS II-based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in the optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio range, and many others, as well as the most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS), and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era, with Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics playing an important role in using and analyzing big data for new discoveries.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rat by activating Nrf2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shirong; Wang, Dexuan; Qiu, Xiaoxiao; Pang, Lingxia; Song, Zhangjuan; Guo, Kunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal disorder. Although the precise mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are not fully understood, oxidant/antioxidant may play an important role in many of the processes of inflammation and fibrosis. Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway represents one of the most important cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are in clinical trials for widespread indications including musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiac and haematological disorders. One emerging concept is that MSCs may have paracrine, rather than a functional, roles in lung injury repair and regeneration. In the present study, we investigated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for the treatment of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Our results showed that BMSCs administration significantly ameliorated the bleomycin mediated histological alterations and blocked collagen deposition with parallel reduction in the hydroxyproline level. The gene expression levels of NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), gama-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), attenuated by bleomycin, were increased up to basal levels after BMSCs transplantation. BMSCs significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and inhibited malondialdehyde (MDA) production in the injured lung. The present study provides evidence that BMSCs may be a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of lung fibrosis. PMID:26339340

  10. Evaluation of risk markers fluctuation during an initial therapy with rosiglitazon in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macić-Dzanković, Amra; Dzanković, Fuad; Pojskić, Belma; Velija-Asimi, Zelija

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hypoglycaemic drug-agonists of PPAR-gama receptors-rosiglitazone (Avandia,4 mg - Glaxo Smith Kline) on values of wide-spread risk - markers-fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and uric acid and glicolysated haemoglobin HbA1C as parameter of metabolic control .We included fourty patients with criteria for metabolic syndrome and evaluated results into groups of diabetic and prediabetic patients according to criteria of IDF (International Diabetic Federation)These risk markers and glicolysated haemoglobin HbA1C were observed at the start of therapy, then after four, eight and twelve weeks and results were compared and statistically calculated. Three months initial therapy with rosiglitazone significantly reduced values of HbA1C, fibrinogen and CRP but not uric acid in prediabetic patients.Rosiglitazone initial three months therapy significantly reduced HbA1C, fibrinogen and uric acid, but not CRP in diabetic patients. PMID:20001999

  11. Geophysical logging studies in the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Wells 44, 45, and 46

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R.H.; Paillet, F.L.; Taylor, T.A.; Barrash, W.

    1993-05-01

    A geophysical logging program was undertaken to vertically profile changes in the hydrology and hydrochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer underlies the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Field investigations were concentrated within an area west of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in three wells that penetrated the upper 190 feet of the aquifer. The logs obtained in these wells consisted of temperature, caliper, nuclear (neutron porosity and gamma-gama density), natural gamma, borehole televiewer, gamma spectral, and thermal flowmeter (with and without pumping). The nuclear, caliper, and televiewer logs are used to delineate individual basalt flows or flow units and to recognize breaks between flows or flow units at interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds. The temperature logs and flowmeter measurements obtained under ambient hydraulic head conditions identified upward fluid-circulation patterns in the three wells. Gamma-spectral analyses performed at several depths in each well showed that the predominant source of gamma radiation in the formation at this site originates mainly from potassium ({sup 40}K). However, {sup 137}Cesium was detected at 32 feet below land surface in well 45. An empirical investigation of the effect of source-receiver spacing on the response of the neutron-porosity logging tool was attempted in an effort to understand the conditions under which this tool might be applied to large-diameter boreholes in-unsaturated formations.

  12. The filtration activity of a serpulid polychaete population ( Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel) and its effects on water quality in a coastal marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B. R.; Stuart, V.; de Villiers, M.

    1989-12-01

    An estimate of the total standing stock of Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel) in the Marina da Gama, Zandvlei, near Cape Town was made, and some aspects of the animals' filter-feeding behaviour investigated. Working on values of 5·23 g dry mass of worm (excluding tube) m -2 on the submerged aquatic plant Potamogeton pectinatus L., plus 84·9 g m -2 on the canal walls, the total standing stock of the serpulid was estimated at 2·88±2·24 t (1·4 t on Potamogeton; 1·48 t on canal walls). At the average particle concentrations of Marina water of 5·27 mg l -1, the clearnace rate of F. enigmaticus was 8·59 ml mg -1 worm h -1, resulting in an ingestion rate of 45·27 mg mg -1 worm h -1 of particles in the size range 2-16 μm. Clearance and ingestion rates both increased in direct proportion to food concentration. Using estimates of total standing stocks within the Marina, the F. enigmaticus population clears 2·47 × 10 7 l of water h -1 and consumes 1·3 × 10 8 mg of particles h -1 in the 2-16 μm size range. Thus, the entire volume of the Marina will be filtered in 26·1 h through the activities of this animal alone, illustrating its importance for the maintenance of water quality within this moderately polluted system.

  13. A generalized gamma mixture model for ultrasonic tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Aja-Fernandez, Santiago; Palencia, Cesar; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Several statistical models have been proposed in the literature to describe the behavior of speckles. Among them, the Nakagami distribution has proven to very accurately characterize the speckle behavior in tissues. However, it fails when describing the heavier tails caused by the impulsive response of a speckle. The Generalized Gamma (GG) distribution (which also generalizes the Nakagami distribution) was proposed to overcome these limitations. Despite the advantages of the distribution in terms of goodness of fitting, its main drawback is the lack of a closed-form maximum likelihood (ML) estimates. Thus, the calculation of its parameters becomes difficult and not attractive. In this work, we propose (1) a simple but robust methodology to estimate the ML parameters of GG distributions and (2) a Generalized Gama Mixture Model (GGMM). These mixture models are of great value in ultrasound imaging when the received signal is characterized by a different nature of tissues. We show that a better speckle characterization is achieved when using GG and GGMM rather than other state-of-the-art distributions and mixture models. Results showed the better performance of the GG distribution in characterizing the speckle of blood and myocardial tissue in ultrasonic images. PMID:23424602

  14. Effects of germination and high hydrostatic pressure processing on mineral elements, amino acids and antioxidants in vitro bioaccessibility, as well as starch digestibility in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Xu, Congcong; Mei, Jun; Li, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    The effects of germination and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing on the in vitro bioaccessibility of mineral elements, amino acids (AAs), antioxidants and starch in brown rice (BR) were investigated. Germinated BR (GBR) was obtained by incubating at 37°C for 36h and then subjected to HHP treatments at 0.1, 100, 300 and 500MPa for 10min. The in vitro bioaccessibility of calcium and copper was increased by 12.59-52.17% and 2.87-23.06% after HHP, respectively, but bioaccessible iron was decreased. In addition, HHP significantly improved individual AAs, particularly indispensable AAs and gama-aminobutyric acid, as well as bioaccessible total antioxidant activities and starch resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis. However, germination greatly increased starch digestibility. Atomic force microscopy characterization suggested an obvious structural change in bran fraction at pressures above 300MPa. These results can help to understand the effects of germination and HHP technologies on nutrients bioaccessibility and develop appropriate processing conditions. PMID:27507507

  15. SecureCPS: Defending a nanosatellite cyber-physical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lance; Vu, Huy; Udrea, Bogdan; Hagar, Hamilton; Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.; Yampolskiy, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Recent inexpensive nanosatellite designs employ maneuvering thrusters, much as large satellites have done for decades. However, because a maneuvering nanosatellite can threaten HVAs on-­orbit, it must provide a level of security typically reserved for HVAs. Securing nanosatellites with maneuvering capability is challenging due to extreme cost, size, and power constraints. While still in the design process, our low-­cost SecureCPS architecture promises to dramatically improve security, to include preempting unknown binaries and detecting abnormal behavior. SecureCPS also applies to a broad class of cyber-­physical systems (CPS), such as aircraft, cars, and trains. This paper focuses on Embry-­Riddle's ARAPAIMA nanosatellite architecture, where we assume any off-­the-­shelf component could be compromised by a supply chain attack.1 Based on these assumptions, we have used Vanderbilt's Cyber Physical -­ Attack Description Language (CP-­ADL) to represent realistic attacks, analyze how these attacks propagate in the ARAPAIMA architecture, and how to defeat them using the combination of a low-­cost Root of Trust (RoT) Module, Global InfoTek's Advanced Malware Analysis System (GAMAS), and Anomaly Detection by Machine Learning (ADML).2 Our most recent efforts focus on refining and validating the design of SecureCPS.

  16. A magnetic nanoparticles relaxation sensor for protein-protein interaction detection at ultra-low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Peixiang; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Zhang, Yi; Willbold, Dieter; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-15

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can serve as magnetic relaxation sensors (MRSs) to detect different biological targets, because the clustering of magnetic particle may cause the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) decrease of the surrounding water protons. However, the application of MNPs in clinical NMR systems faces the challenge of poor stability at magnetic field strengths in the order of tesla. The recently developed ultra-low field (ULF) NMR technique working at microtesla (μT) range then becomes a candidate. Herein, we incorporated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the detector in the ultra-low field system to enhance the sensitivity. We functionalized the Fe3O4 nanoparticles with the gama-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated proteins (GABARAP), which specifically interact with calreticulin (CRT). As a result of the interaction between GABARAP and CRT, the clustering of the functionalized MNPs generates local magnetic fields, which accelerate the dephasing of the water protons in the vicinity. We analyzed the relation between T2 values and the CRT concentrations at 211μT and the low detection limit for CRT is 10 pg/ml, which is superior to the immunoblot system. The high sensitivity of the ULF NMR system for protein-protein interaction detection demonstrates the potential to use this inexpensive, portable system for quick biochemical and clinical assays. PMID:26914374

  17. Herschel-ATLAS: Dust Temperature and Redshift Distribution of SPIRE and PACS Detected Sources Using Submillimetre Colours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amblard, A.; Cooray, Asantha; Serra, P.; Temi, P.; Barton, E.; Negrello, M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Bonfield, D.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; deZotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present colour-colour diagrams of detected sources in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Field from 100 to 500/microns using both PACS and SPIRE. We fit isothermal modified-blackbody spectral energy distribution (SED) models in order to extract the dust temperature of sources with counterparts in GAMA or SDSS with either a spectroscopic or a photometric redshift. For a subsample of 331 sources detected in at least three FIR bands with significance greater than 30 sigma, we find an average dust temperature of (28 plus or minus 8)K. For sources with no known redshifts, we populate the colour-colour diagram with a large number of SEDs generated with a broad range of dust temperatures and emissivity parameters and compare to colours of observed sources to establish the redshift distribution of those samples. For another subsample of 1686 sources with fluxes above 35 mJy at 350 microns and detected at 250 and 500 microns with a significance greater than 3sigma, we find an average redshift of 2.2 plus or minus 0.6.

  18. Determination of multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    2003-08-01

    Multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan, in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Five samples (ca. 510-1000 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (TRIGA Mark-II, 100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional gama-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The concentrations of 38 elements were determined by these methods. PMID:12945682

  19. In vivo HMRS and lipidomic profiling reveals comprehensive changes of hippocampal metabolism during aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lejun; Cao, Bofeng; Xu, Zhiying; Sui, Yanbin; Chen, Jiao; Luan, Qiang; Yang, Ruifang; Li, Shanchun; Li, Ke Feng

    2016-01-29

    Aging is characterized by various cellular changes in the brain. Hippocampus is important for systemic aging and lifespan control. There is still a lack of comprehensive overview of metabolic changes in hippocampus during aging. In this study, we first created an accelerated brain aging mice model through the chronic administration of d-galactose. We then performed a multiplatform metabolomic profiling of mice hippocampus using the combination of in vivo 9.4 T HMRS and in vitro LC-MS/MS based lipidomics. We found N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA), gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate/glutamine, taurine, choline, sphingolipids (SMs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), phosphatidylinositols (PIs), phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) and phosphatidylserines (PSs), all of them decreasing with the aging process in mice hippocampus. The changes of sphingolipids and phospholipids were not limited to one single class or molecular species. In contrast, we found the significant accumulation of lactate, myoinositol and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) along with aging in hippocampus. SM (d18:1/20:2), PE (36:2), PG (34:1), PI (36:4), PS (18:0/20:4) and PC (36:0) have the most significant changes along with aging. Network analysis revealed the striking loss of biochemical connectivity and interactions between hippocampal metabolites with aging. The correlation pattern between metabolites in hippocampus could function as biomarkers for aging or diagnosis of aging-related diseases. PMID:26707637

  20. Influence of age, body temperature, GABAA receptor inhibition and caffeine on the Hering-Breuer inflation reflex in unanesthetized rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Ashley V.; Gore, Julie L.; Rudkin, Alison; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the duration of apnea induced by sustained end-inspiratory lung inflation (the Hering Breuer Reflex; HBR) in unanesthetized infant rat pups aged 4 days (P4) to P20 at body temperatures of 32°C and 36°C. The expiratory prolongation elicited by the HBR lasted longer in the younger pups and lasted longer at the higher body temperature. Blockade of adenosine receptors by caffeine following injection into the cisterna magna (ICM) significantly blunted the thermal prolongation of the HBR. Blockade of gama-amino-butyric acid A (GABAA) receptors by pre-treatment with ICM bicuculline had no effect on the HBR duration at either body temperature. To test the hypothesis that developmental maturation of GABAergic inhibition of breathing was modifying the response to bicuculline, we pretreated rat pups with systemically administered bumetanide to lower the intracellular chloride concentration, and repeated the bicuculline studies. Bicuculline still did not alter the HBR at either temperature after bumetanide treatment. We administered PSB-36, a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and this drug treatment did not modify the HBR. We conclude that caffeine blunts the thermal prolongation of the HBR, probably by blocking adenosine A2a receptors. The thermally-sensitive adenosinergic prolongation of the HBR in these intact animals does not seem to depend on GABAA receptors PMID:23318703

  1. History of Science and Science Museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish adaptations to deep sea, through the exploration of a fictional story, based on historical data and based on the work of the King that served as a guiding script for all the subsequent tasks. In both museums, students had access to: historical collections of organisms, oceanographic biological sampling instruments, fish gears and ships. They could also observe the characteristics and adaptations of diverse fish species characteristic of deep sea. The present study aimed to analyse the impact of these activities on students' scientific knowledge, on their understanding of the nature of science and on the development of transversal skills. All students considered the project very popular. The results obtained suggest that the activity promoted not only the understanding of scientific concepts, but also stimulated the development of knowledge about science itself and the construction of scientific knowledge, stressing the relevance of creating activities informed by the history of science. As a final remark we suggest that the partnership between elementary schools and museums should be seen as an educational project, in which the teacher has to assume a key mediating role between the school and the museums.

  2. Application of the fractal method to determine the membership function parameter for geoelectrical data (case study: Hamyj copper deposit, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi Ferdows, Mohammad; Ramazi, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    The selection of a suitable membership function and its parameters plays a critical role in the integration of layer information by the fuzzy method. In this paper, parameters of membership function for induced polarization (IP) and resistivity (RS) data (in the Hamyj copper deposit) have been determined by the threshold parameter of IP and resistivity data, already determined by expert opinion or drilling data. The Hamyj deposit is located about 80 km west of Birjand city, South Khorasan province, Iran. In this area, resistivity and induced polarization data have been surveyed by dipole-dipole array. In this paper, outlier-induced polarization data have been corrected by the Doerffel method and then IP and resistivity data have been inversed by the Newton and Gauss-Newton methods. The threshold of the IP data is recognized by statistical (gap statistic) and fractal (concentration-area) methods. The determined threshold by the fractal method is higher than the gap statistic. These two thresholds have been used to determine the S-shape function for the IP data. The thresholds of the RS data are recognized by the fractal method. These two thresholds have been used to determine the Z-shape function for the RS data. The integration of geoelectrical layer information has been carried out by the Gama method. Finally, the best drilling points were proposed based on fuzzy modelling for the area. The results show that the optimum exploration borehole is located at a depth of 25 m.

  3. How does the far-IR properties of star-forming galaxies depend on environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, most observational studies estimate SFRs using rest-frame UV luminosities or emission lines, which are subject to uncertain corrections for dust extinction. In star-forming regions, UV photons heat the dust, and their energy is re-emitted in the mid- and far-IR range. About half of the starlight is absorbed and re-emitted over the history of the Universe. Observations at IR wavelengths are thus an essential complement to UV and optical tracers of star formation. We use far-IR selected galaxies from the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey and optically selected galaxies from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey to study the environmental effects on far-IR properties. It includes the following aspects. What is the typical halo mass of the low-redshift H-ATLAS sources? How does far-IR luminosity depend on host halo mass? How do the far-IR conditional luminosity functions depend on group masses and redshifts? How is the total far-IR light-to-mass ratio in groups of different masses at different redshifts? How much of the far-IR luminosity is contributed by galaxies in groups? Are there any environmental effects on the far-IR-to-optical colour? How does the far-IR properties depend on large-scale environments? Can we pose constrains on current galaxy formation models?

  4. Simulation of 0.3 MWt AFBC test rig burning Turkish lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, N.; Degirmenci, E.; Oymak, O.

    1997-12-31

    A system model coupling bed and freeboard models for continuous combustion of lignite particles of wide size distribution burning in their own ash in a fluidized bed combustor was modified to incorporate: (1) a procedure for faster computation of particle size distributions (PSDs) without any sacrifice in accuracy; (2) energy balance on char particles for the determination of variation of temperature with particle size, (3) plug flow assumption for the interstitial gas. An efficient and accurate computer code developed for the solution of the conservation equations for energy and chemical species was applied to the prediction of the behavior of a 0.3 MWt AFBC test rig burning low quality Turkish lignites. The construction and operation of the test rig was carried out within the scope of a cooperation agreement between Middle East Technical University (METU) and Babcock and Wilcox GAMA (BWG) under the auspices of Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). Predicted concentration and temperature profiles and particle size distributions of solid streams were compared with measured data and found to be in reasonable agreement. The computer code replaces the conventional numerical integration of the analytical solution of population balance with direct integration in ODE form by using a powerful integrator LSODE (Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations) resulting in two orders of magnitude decrease in CPU (Central Processing Unit) time.

  5. Identification of Volatile Flavor Components by Headspace Analysis: A Quick and Easy Experiment for Introducing GC/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjonaas, Richard; Soller, Jean L.; McCoy, Leslee A.

    1997-09-01

    By placing a piece of chewing gum (Wrigley's) or a crushed piece of hard candy (LifeSavers or Runts) into a vial, followed by GC/MS analysis of a five microliter sample of the headspace, students are able to identify several of the volatile flavoring components which are present. The experiment has been used successfully with sophomore organic chemistry students, and with visiting groups of talented high school students over a three year period. Identification is simplified by handing out a list of the structural formulas of some likely candidates. Some of the components that these students easily identity include ethyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, limonene, and cinnamaldehyde. Some of the more difficult to identify components include menthol, menthone, carvone, cineole, myrcene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, para-cymene, and gama-terpinene. Most of the major headspace components give signals whose size is comparable to that of the carbon dioxide which is present in each injection. Even with split injection, the background noise is trivial compared to the signals from the major components. The experiments were carried out with a commercially available tabletop GC/MS (Varian 3400 with Saturn MS).

  6. SYNMAG PHOTOMETRY: A FAST TOOL FOR CATALOG-LEVEL MATCHED COLORS OF EXTENDED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Yasuda, Naoki; Hogg, David W.; Higgs, Tim D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Masters, Karen L.; Lang, Dustin; Wake, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining reliable, matched photometry for galaxies imaged by different observatories represents a key challenge in the era of wide-field surveys spanning more than several hundred square degrees. Methods such as flux fitting, profile fitting, and PSF homogenization followed by matched-aperture photometry are all computationally expensive. We present an alternative solution called 'synthetic aperture photometry' that exploits galaxy profile fits in one band to efficiently model the observed, point-spread-function-convolved light profile in other bands and predict the flux in arbitrarily sized apertures. Because aperture magnitudes are the most widely tabulated flux measurements in survey catalogs, producing synthetic aperture magnitudes (SYNMAGs) enables very fast matched photometry at the catalog level, without reprocessing imaging data. We make our code public and apply it to obtain matched photometry between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz and UKIDSS YJHK imaging, recovering red-sequence colors and photometric redshifts with a scatter and accuracy as good as if not better than FWHM-homogenized photometry from the GAMA Survey. Finally, we list some specific measurements that upcoming surveys could make available to facilitate and ease the use of SYNMAGs.

  7. The faint end of the 250 μm luminosity function at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Bethermin, M.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Cowley, W.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Viero, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the 250 μm luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods: We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 μm LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 μm luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results: We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (~ 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution L*250(z)∝(1+z)4.89±1.07 and moderate negative density evolution Φ*250(z)∝(1+z)-1.02±0.54 over the redshift range 0.02

  8. Phylogenetic Relationship of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria according to 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can convert insoluble form of phosphorous to an available form. Applications of PSB as inoculants increase the phosphorus uptake by plant in the field. In this study, isolation and precise identification of PSB were carried out in Malaysian (Serdang) oil palm field (University Putra Malaysia). Identification and phylogenetic analysis of 8 better isolates were carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in which as a result five isolates belong to the Beta subdivision of Proteobacteria, one isolate was related to the Gama subdivision of Proteobacteria, and two isolates were related to the Firmicutes. Bacterial isolates of 6upmr, 2upmr, 19upmnr, 10upmr, and 24upmr were identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. Also, bacterial isolates of 20upmnr and 17upmnr were identified as Bacillus cereus and Vagococcus carniphilus, respectively, and bacterial isolates of 31upmr were identified as Serratia plymuthica. Molecular identification and characterization of oil palm strains as the specific phosphate solubilizer can reduce the time and cost of producing effective inoculate (biofertilizer) in an oil palm field. PMID:25632387

  9. Protective effect of carnosine after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion possibly through suppressing astrocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Jihui; Bo, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) induced by chronic hypoperfusion is a common cause of vascular dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of carnosine on white matter lesion after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through suppressing astrocyte activation. Methods: Adult male mice (C57BL/6 strain) were subjected to permanent occlusion of the right unilateral common carotid arteries (rUCCAO) and treated with carnosine or histidine. Open field test, freezing test, Klüver-Barrera staining, immunohistochemical analyses and western blot were performed after rUCCAO. Results: We found that carnosine ameliorated white matter lesion and cognitive impairment after rUCCAO. Carnosine suppressed the activation of astrocyte in both wide type mice and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice. However, administration of histidine did not show the same effect. We found that there were no differences between rUCCAO group and sham group for the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Furthermore, carnosine significantly attenuated the increase of inflammatory cytokine interferon gama. Conclusion: These data suggest carnosine induced neuroprotection during SIVD in mice is not dependent on the histaminergic pathway or the regulation of the expression of GLT-1 and GLAST, but may be due to a suppression of astrocyte activation and inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:26885268

  10. A Generalized Gamma Mixture Model for Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Cesar; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Several statistical models have been proposed in the literature to describe the behavior of speckles. Among them, the Nakagami distribution has proven to very accurately characterize the speckle behavior in tissues. However, it fails when describing the heavier tails caused by the impulsive response of a speckle. The Generalized Gamma (GG) distribution (which also generalizes the Nakagami distribution) was proposed to overcome these limitations. Despite the advantages of the distribution in terms of goodness of fitting, its main drawback is the lack of a closed-form maximum likelihood (ML) estimates. Thus, the calculation of its parameters becomes difficult and not attractive. In this work, we propose (1) a simple but robust methodology to estimate the ML parameters of GG distributions and (2) a Generalized Gama Mixture Model (GGMM). These mixture models are of great value in ultrasound imaging when the received signal is characterized by a different nature of tissues. We show that a better speckle characterization is achieved when using GG and GGMM rather than other state-of-the-art distributions and mixture models. Results showed the better performance of the GG distribution in characterizing the speckle of blood and myocardial tissue in ultrasonic images. PMID:23424602

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection induces elevation of CXCL10 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Li; Zou, Ziying; Zhu, Bing; Hu, Zonghai; Zeng, Ping; Wu, Lijuan; Xiong, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) primarily infects liver tissues, while pathogenesis of extrahepatic tissues has been reported. About 50% of patients with HCV infection suffer from neurological disease. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the induction of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by HCV infection. CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 were constitutively expressed in HBMECs. HCV infection induced CXCL10 elevation in HBMECs. The elevation of CXCL10 in HBMECs was eliminated when HCV infection was blocked by neutralizing antibodies. NF-κB is a positive regulator for CXCL10 transcription. HCV infection led to an increased phosphorylation of NF-κB (ser536) in HBMECs, and CXCL10 induced by HCV was slightly decreased when an inhibitor of NF-κB was added. IL1 beta and IFN gama were also upregulated in HCV infected HBMECs, and could be depressed by inhibitor of NF-κB. Thus, HCV infection leads to upregulated expression of CXCL10 in HBMECs, which is probably via the phosphorylation of NF-κB. The findings of this study provide potential mechanisms and novel targets for HCV induced neuroinflammation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1596-1603, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895737

  12. Astronomical Surveys, Catalogs, Databases, and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    All-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their cataloged data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from γ-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in γ-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). Most important astronomical databases and archives are reviewed as well, including Wide-Field Plate DataBase (WFPDB), ESO, HEASARC, IRSA and MAST archives, CDS SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin, NED and HyperLEDA extragalactic databases, ADS and astro-ph services. They are powerful sources for many-sided efficient research using Virtual Observatory tools. Using and analysis of Big Data accumulated in astronomy lead to many new discoveries.

  13. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABA/sub A/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, D.B.; Cole, R.J.; Valdes, J.J.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1987-11-09

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA/sub A/) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on (/sup 3/H)muscimol or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding to the GAMA/sup A/ receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)TBPS) binding in rate brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of (/sup 35/S)TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABA/sub A/ receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl/sup -/ channel. On the voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABA/sub A/ receptor function. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Selection of plants for optimization of vegetative filter strips treating runoff from turfgrass.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katy E; Putnam, Raymond A; Phaneuf, Clifford; Lanza, Guy R; Dhankher, Om P; Clark, John M

    2008-01-01

    Runoff from turf environments, such as golf courses, is of increasing concern due to the associated chemical contamination of lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and ground water. Pesticide runoff due to fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides used to maintain golf courses in acceptable playing condition is a particular concern. One possible approach to mitigate such contamination is through the implementation of effective vegetative filter strips (VFS) on golf courses and other recreational turf environments. The objective of the current study was to screen ten aesthetically acceptable plant species for their ability to remove four commonly-used and degradable pesticides: chlorpyrifos (CP), chlorothalonil (CT), pendimethalin (PE), and propiconazole (PR) from soil in a greenhouse setting, thus providing invaluable information as to the species composition that would be most efficacious for use in VFS surrounding turf environments. Our results revealed that blue flag iris (Iris versicolor) (76% CP, 94% CT, 48% PE, and 33% PR were lost from soil after 3 mo of plant growth), eastern gama grass (Tripsacum dactyloides) (47% CP, 95% CT, 17% PE, and 22% PR were lost from soil after 3 mo of plant growth), and big blue stem (Andropogon gerardii) (52% CP, 91% CT, 19% PE, and 30% PR were lost from soil after 3 mo of plant growth) were excellent candidates for the optimization of VFS as buffer zones abutting turf environments. Blue flag iris was most effective at removing selected pesticides from soil and had the highest aesthetic value of the plants tested. PMID:18689747

  15. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Barbera, F. La; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    2015-09-01

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the OmegaCAM camera, which aims to tackle open questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution, such as the origin of dark energy and the channel of galaxy mass growth. We present a catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained using the Multi-Layer Perceptron with Quasi-Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE). These photometric redshifts are based on a spectroscopic knowledge base that was obtained by merging spectroscopic data sets from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) data release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) data release 9. The overall 1σ uncertainty on Δz = (zspec - zphot)/(1 + zspec) is ˜0.03, with a very small average bias of ˜0.001, a normalized median absolute deviation of ˜0.02 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 0.15) of ˜0.4 per cent.

  16. Simulaciones hidrodinámicas de flujos complejos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Ibáñez Cabanell, José

    Son muchos los escenarios astrofísicos en que los procesos hidrodinámicos juegan un papel clave. En la complejidad que encierra la descripción de dichos procesos destaca el de la correcta simulación de flujos complejos donde la presencia de ondas de choque fuertes que, eventualmente, interaccionan entre ellas o también la presencia de inestabilidades (Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.) suponen un verdadero desafío numérico. Los códigos hidrodinámicos basados en la solución de un problema de valores iniciales discontinuo (problema de Riemann) son, en la actualidad, los más robustos en el campo de la dinámica de fluidos computacional. En esta charla se dará un resumen de los fundamentos de dichas técnicas numéricas (esquemas de alta resolución de captura de choques) y se ilustrará su potencialidad mostrando una amplia gama de resultados en diferentes aplicaciones astrofísicas.

  17. Flux measurements using the BATSE spectroscopic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Among the Compton Gama-Ray Observatory instruments, the BATSE Spectroscopic Detectors (SD) have the distinction of being able to detect photons of energies less than about 20 keV. This is an interesting energy range for the examination of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB's). In fact, Sco X-1, the prototype LMXB, is easily seen even in the raw BATSE spectroscopic data. The all-sky coverage afforded by these detectors offers a unique opportunity to monitor this source over time periods never before possible. The aim of this investigation was to test a number of ways in which both continous and discrete flux measurements can be obtained using the BATSE spectroscopic datasets. A instrumental description of a SD can be found in the Compton Workshop of Apr. 1989, this report will deal only with methods which can be used to analyze its datasets. Many of the items discussed below, particularly in regard to the earth occultation technique, have been developed, refined, and applied by the BATSE team to the reduction of BATSE LAD data. Code written as part of this project utilizes portions of that work. The following discussions will first address issues related to the reduction of SD datasets using the earth occultation technique. It will then discuss methods for the recovery of the flux history of strong sources while they are above the earth's limb. The report will conclude with recommended reduction procedures.

  18. Liquid-vapor interfaces of patchy colloids.

    PubMed

    Oleksy, A; Teixeira, P I C

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the liquid-vapor interface of a model of patchy colloids. This model consists of hard spheres decorated with short-ranged attractive sites ("patches") of different types on their surfaces. We focus on a one-component fluid with two patches of type A and nine patches of type B (2A9B colloids), which has been found to exhibit reentrant liquid-vapor coexistence curves and very low-density liquid phases. We have used the density-functional theory form of Wertheim's first-order perturbation theory of association, as implemented by Yu and Wu [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7094 (2002)], to calculate the surface tension, and the density and degree of association profiles, at the liquid-vapor interface of our model. In reentrant systems, where AB bonds dominate, an unusual thickening of the interface is observed at low temperatures. Furthermore, the surface tension versus temperature curve reaches a maximum, in agreement with Bernardino and Telo da Gama's mesoscopic Landau-Safran theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 116103 (2012)]. If BB attractions are also present, competition between AB and BB bonds gradually restores the monotonic temperature dependence of the surface tension. Lastly, the interface is "hairy," i.e., it contains a region where the average chain length is close to that in the bulk liquid, but where the density is that of the vapor. Sufficiently strong BB attractions remove these features, and the system reverts to the behavior seen in atomic fluids. PMID:25679617

  19. Star formation rates of spiral galaxies in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Marcum, Pamela M.; Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA)

    2016-01-01

    We look for shifts in stellar mass and star formation rate along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived star formation rates of 1,799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterise the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the orthogonal core of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. We also find that these peripheral galaxies have higher specific star formations at a given mass. Our results suggest a model in which gas accretion from voids onto filaments is primarily in an orthogonal direction. While the star formation rates of spiral galaxies in filaments are susceptible to their locations, we find that the global star formation rates of galaxies in different large scale environments are similar to each other. The primary discriminant in star formation rates is therefore the stellar mass of each spiral galaxy, as opposed to its large scale environment.

  20. Galaxy and mass assembly: Redshift space distortions from the clipped galaxy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, F.; Blake, C.; Peacock, J. A.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Heavens, A. F.; Heymans, C.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first cosmological measurement derived from a galaxy density field subject to a "clipping" transformation. By enforcing an upper bound on the galaxy number density field in the galaxy and mass assembly survey (GAMA), contributions from the nonlinear processes of virialization and galaxy bias are greatly reduced. This leads to a galaxy power spectrum which is easier to model, without calibration from numerical simulations. We develop a theoretical model for the power spectrum of a clipped field in redshift space, which is exact for the case of anisotropic Gaussian fields. Clipping is found to extend the applicability of the conventional Kaiser prescription by more than a factor of 3 in wave numbers, or a factor of 30 in terms of the number of Fourier modes. By modeling the galaxy power spectrum on scales k <0.3 h Mpc-1 and density fluctuations δg<4 we measure the normalized growth rate f σ8(z =0.18 )=0.29 ±0.10 .

  1. The Herschel-ATLAS survey: main results and data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, Elisabetta

    2015-08-01

    I describe the first major data release of the largest single key-project carried out in opentime with the Herschel Space Observatory. The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey(H-ATLAS) was a survey of 550 deg^2 in five photometric bands: 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron.In this talk I will show some of the results of the survey: 1) the development of a technique to select lensed objects with 100% efficiency, 2) how to select up to 1000 lensed sources, 3) the development of a technique to select very high redshift galaxies, 4) the discover of a high-redshift proto-cluster, 5) the definition of the local far-ir luminosity function, 6) dust properties of nearby galaxies.Moreover, I will describe images and catalogues of the three fields on the celestial equator previouslyobserved in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey, which cover a total area of 161.6 deg^2. These data will be released and made available to the public during 2015.Our catalogues include ~3x10^5 sources detected at 5 sigma at 250, 350 and 500 micron, respectively. I will describe a detailed analysis of the effects of instrumental noise and source confusion on the images and the catalogues, as well as other simulations which will aid the interpretation of the H-ATLAS data by the astronomical community.

  2. The Herschel-ATLAS survey: main results and data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, Elisabetta

    2015-08-01

    I describe the first major data release of the largest single key-project carried out in opentime with the Herschel Space Observatory. The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey(H-ATLAS) was a survey of 550 deg^2 in five photometric bands: 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron.In this talk I will show some of the results of the survey: 1) the development of a technique to select lensed objects with 100% efficiency, 2) how to select up to 1000 lensed sources, 3) the development of a technique to select very high redshift galaxies, 4) the discover of a high-redshift proto-cluster, 5) the definition of the local far-ir luminosity function, 6) dust properties of nearby galaxies.Moreover, I will describe images and catalogues of the three fields on the celestial equator previously observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey, which cover a total area of 161.6 deg^2. These data will be released and made available to the public during 2015.Our catalogues include ~3x10^5 sources detected at 5 sigma at 250, 350 and 500 micron, respectively. I will describe a detailed analysis of the effects of instrumental noise and source confusion on the images and the catalogues, as well as other simulations which will aid the interpretation of the H-ATLAS data by the astronomical community.

  3. An OEF/OIF study of close combat missions using small unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, Gabriel; Tierney, Richard J.; Vitali, Juan A.

    2007-04-01

    The Small Unmanned Aircraft System (SUAS) is a rucksack portable aerial observation vehicle designed to supplement reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition tasks of an infantry company. The Raven is an earlier version of the SUAS. Raven is an Urgent Material Release (UMR) acquisition and has been used for the past two years by selected Army units in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF). Army Test and Evaluation Command-led surveys were used to assess the capabilities and limitations of the Raven in OEF/OIF. Results and analyses of the surveys indicate that Raven enhances situational awareness of a small unit in urban areas and in selected close combat missions. Users of the Raven state it is easy to use, although there are major issues with frequency de-confliction, airspace management, short endurance, and sensor performance. The SUAS is a program of record and completed developmental and operational testing in preparation for full rate production. This paper addresses the SUAS effectiveness, suitability, and survivability evaluation strategy based on actual testing of the system. During the Initial Operational Test (IOT), the SUAS was found to be effective with limitations in a set of 21 closed combat missions and two call for fire tests for which it was tested. Low Mean Time Between Operational Mean Failure (MTBOMF) and human factors issues make the system suitable with limitations. Acoustic (audible to the human ear) and electronic vulnerabilities make the system non-survivable in most combat scenarios. The SUAS was found to be useful as an extra asset usable in certain infantry company close combat missions where terrain and visual line of sight give the system an advantage over traditional reconnaissance patrols. Army aviation and infantry units uncover new ways every day to use this portable "eye in the sky", especially when unmanned aerial reconnaissance assets are in premium demand. A discussion on changes in doctrine with the

  4. Serum Uric Acid and Its Association with Longitudinal Cognitive Change Among Urban Adults.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, May A; Canas, Jose-Atilio; Dore, Gregory A; Beydoun, Hind A; Rostant, Ola S; Fanelli-Kuczmarski, Marie T; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2016-04-21

    Uric acid, a waste metabolite among humans, was linked to various cognitive outcomes. We describe sex and age-group specific associations of baseline serum uric acid (SUAbase) and significant change in SUASUA: 1 versus 0 = decrease versus no change; 2 versus 0 = increase versus no change) with longitudinal annual rate of cognitive change among a large sample of urban adults. Data from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study, 2004-2009 (visit 1) and 2009-2013 (visit 2) were used. Of 3,720 adults selected at baseline (age range: 30-64 y), complete data were available for N = 1,487-1,602 with a mean repeat of 1.5-1.7 visits/participant. Cognitive test domains spanned attention, processing speed, learning/memory, executive function, visuo-spatial/visuo-construction ability, language/verbal, and global cognitive function. SUA was measured at both visits. Multiple mixed-effects regression analyses were conducted. In the total population, a higher SUAbase was associated with a faster annual rate of decline on a measure of visual memory/visuo-construction ability (the Benton Visual Retention Test) by γ= 0.07 with a standard error of 0.02, p < 0.001. Among older men, a significant increase in SUA was associated with slower decline on a test of attention/processing speed, namely Trailmaking test, Part A, measured in seconds to completion (γ= -6.91 ± 1.73, p < 0.001). In sum, a higher SUAbase was associated with faster cognitive decline over-time in a visual memory/visuo-construction ability test. ΔSUA had particular beneficial effects of an increasing ΔSUA on the domain of attention/processing speed among older men. More longitudinal studies are needed to examine cognitive domain-specific effects of over-time change in SUA within sex and age groups. PMID:27104899

  5. Relationships among low-frequency local field potentials, spiking activity, and three-dimensional reach and grasp kinematics in primary motor and ventral premotor cortices

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Truccolo, Wilson; Donoghue, John P.

    2011-01-01

    A prominent feature of motor cortex field potentials during movement is a distinctive low-frequency local field potential (lf-LFP) (<4 Hz), referred to as the movement event-related potential (mEP). The lf-LFP appears to be a global signal related to regional synaptic input, but its relationship to nearby output signaled by single unit spiking activity (SUA) or to movement remains to be established. Previous studies comparing information in primary motor cortex (MI) lf-LFPs and SUA in the context of planar reaching tasks concluded that lf-LFPs have more information than spikes about movement. However, the relative performance of these signals was based on a small number of simultaneously recorded channels and units, or for data averaged across sessions, which could miss information of larger-scale spiking populations. Here, we simultaneously recorded LFPs and SUA from two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted in two major motor cortical areas, MI and ventral premotor (PMv), while monkeys freely reached for and grasped objects swinging in front of them. We compared arm end point and grip aperture kinematics′ decoding accuracy for lf-LFP and SUA ensembles. The results show that lf-LFPs provide enough information to reconstruct kinematics in both areas with little difference in decoding performance between MI and PMv. Individual lf-LFP channels often provided more accurate decoding of single kinematic variables than any one single unit. However, the decoding performance of the best single unit among the large population usually exceeded that of the best single lf-LFP channel. Furthermore, ensembles of SUA outperformed the pool of lf-LFP channels, in disagreement with the previously reported superiority of lf-LFP decoding. Decoding results suggest that information in lf-LFPs recorded from intracortical arrays may allow the reconstruction of reach and grasp for real-time neuroprosthetic applications, thus potentially supplementing the ability to decode these same

  6. As compared to allopurinol, urate-lowering therapy with febuxostat has superior effects on oxidative stress and pulse wave velocity in patients with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Tausche, A-K; Christoph, M; Forkmann, M; Richter, U; Kopprasch, S; Bielitz, C; Aringer, M; Wunderlich, C

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated whether an effective 12-month uric acid-lowering therapy (ULT) with the available xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors allopurinol and febuxostat in patients with chronic tophaceous gout has an impact on oxidative stress and/or vascular function. Patients with chronic tophaceous gout who did not receive active ULT were included. After clinical evaluation, serum uric acid levels (SUA) and markers of oxidative stress were measured, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was assessed. Patients were then treated with allopurinol (n = 9) or with febuxostat (n = 8) to target a SUA level ≤ 360 μmol/L. After 1 year treatment, the SUA levels, markers of oxidative stress and the cfPWV were measured again. Baseline characteristics of both groups showed no significant differences except a higher prevalence of moderate impairment of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min) in the febuxostat group. Uric acid lowering with either inhibitors of XO resulted in almost equally effective reduction in SUA levels. The both treatment groups did not differ in their baseline cfPWV (allopurinol group: 14.1 ± 3.4 m/s, febuxostat group: 13.7 ± 2.7 m/s, p = 0.80). However, after 1 year of therapy, we observed a significant cfPWV increase in the allopurinol group (16.8 ± 4.3 m/s, p = 0.001 as compared to baseline), but not in the febuxostat patients (13.3 ± 2.3 m/s, p = 0.55). Both febuxostat and allopurinol effectively lower SUA levels in patients with severe gout. However, we observed that febuxostat also appeared to be beneficial in preventing further arterial stiffening. Since cardiovascular events are an important issue in treating patients with gout, this unexpected finding may have important implications and should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:24026528

  7. Safety, efficacy and renal effect of febuxostat in patients with moderate-to-severe kidney dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Yugo; Ohno, Iwao; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-10-01

    Hyperuricemia (HU) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and accumulating evidence suggests it has a pathogenic role in the progression of the disease. However, a major challenge in treating patients with HU is the adverse effects caused by urate-lowering drugs used to treat CKD. Because of these untoward effects, doses need to be reduced, which leads to suboptimal efficacy. Febuxostat has been shown to be highly efficacious in reducing serum uric acid (sUA) and is well tolerated in patients with mild kidney dysfunction. However, its safety and efficacy have not been well studied in more advanced cases of CKD. We studied the safety and efficacy of escalating doses of febuxostat over a 24-week period in 70 patients with CKD stages 3b, 4 and 5, and we also observed the changes in blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria following the reduction of sUA. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in only 5 out of 70 patients. All but one of the events were mild, and all five patients fully recovered. By 24 weeks, the reduction of sUA levels was >40% in CKD stage 3b and >50% in CKD stages 4 and 5. More than 70% of patients achieved target sUA levels of 6 mg dl(-1) or less. Multivariate analysis showed that a greater reduction in sUA with febuxostat was associated with an increase in eGFR and a tendency toward decreased proteinuria. Febuxostat was safe and efficacious in the treatment of CKD stages 3b-5. PMID:24942770

  8. Maternal serum uric acid concentration is associated with the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Zheng, D-Y; Yang, J-M; Wang, M; Zhang, X-T; Sun, L; Yun, X-G

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to investigate whether there is a correlation between elevated serum uric acid (SUA) concentration and endothelial inflammatory response in women with preeclampsia (PE). On the basis of clinical and laboratory findings, patients were assigned to three groups: normal blood pressure (Control (Con)), gestational hypertension (GH) and PE (n=50 in each group). SUA concentration was measured by spectrophotometry, and serum tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were also used to detect the changes in TNF-α and ICAM-1 expression in subcutaneous fat tissue. PE patients showed significantly higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures compared with Con and GH pregnant women (P=0.02 and P=0.02, respectively). The changes of body mass index (ΔBMI) before and after pregnancy and 24-h urine protein were significantly different among the three groups (P<0.001). Maternal SUA, TNF-α and soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) levels were significantly increased in the patients with PE (P<0.05) compared with the other two groups. Scatterplot analysis revealed that elevated SUA concentration positively correlated with TNF-α and sICAM-1 in pregnant women. Moreover, vessels in subcutaneous fat tissues of preeclamptic patients showed intense TNF-α and ICAM-1 staining compared with Con and GH patients. The results support that, to a certain extent, elevated SUA concentration is significantly associated with inflammation of maternal systemic vasculature as indicated by increased TNF-α and ICAM-1 expression in women with PE. PMID:26511169

  9. Abundant local interactions in the 4p16.1 region suggest functional mechanisms underlying SLC2A9 associations with human serum uric acid.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Guo, Yunfei; Kindt, Alida S D; Merriman, Tony R; Semple, Colin A; Wang, Kai; Haley, Chris S

    2014-10-01

    Human serum uric acid concentration (SUA) is a complex trait. A recent meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified 28 loci associated with SUA jointly explaining only 7.7% of the SUA variance, with 3.4% explained by two major loci (SLC2A9 and ABCG2). Here we examined whether gene-gene interactions had any roles in regulating SUA using two large GWAS cohorts included in the meta-analysis [the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study cohort (ARIC) and the Framingham Heart Study cohort (FHS)]. We found abundant genome-wide significant local interactions in ARIC in the 4p16.1 region located mostly in an intergenic area near SLC2A9 that were not driven by linkage disequilibrium and were replicated in FHS. Taking the forward selection approach, we constructed a model of five SNPs with marginal effects and three epistatic SNP pairs in ARIC-three marginal SNPs were located within SLC2A9 and the remaining SNPs were all located in the nearby intergenic area. The full model explained 1.5% more SUA variance than that explained by the lead SNP alone, but only 0.3% was contributed by the marginal and epistatic effects of the SNPs in the intergenic area. Functional analysis revealed strong evidence that the epistatically interacting SNPs in the intergenic area were unusually enriched at enhancers active in ENCODE hepatic (HepG2, P = 4.7E-05) and precursor red blood (K562, P = 5.0E-06) cells, putatively regulating transcription of WDR1 and SLC2A9. These results suggest that exploring epistatic interactions is valuable in uncovering the complex functional mechanisms underlying the 4p16.1 region. PMID:24821702

  10. Serum uric acid is associated with increased risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in high HDL-C population: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    YU, MIAO; LING, KEN; TENG, YUNFEI; LI, QIN; MEI, FEI; LI, YIQING; OUYANG, CHENXI

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that metabolic disorders are positively correlated with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE), whereas the risk factor serum uric acid (SUA) for idiopathic VTE has yet to be investigated. In this retrospective case-control study, 276 idiopathic VTE patients and 536 gender- and age-matched control subjects were included. The subjects in the case and control groups exhibiting common known VTE risk factors and the patients with a first VTE onset in one month were excluded. For the control group, primary and secondary VTE patients were excluded. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and current smoking were significantly associated with idiopathic VTE in the univariate analysis. Hyperuricemia was detected in 56/276 (20.29%) idiopathic patients compared with 71/536 (13.25%) in the control group. HDL-C was considered the most prominent interactive factor for SUA in idiopathic VTE by the interaction analysis. After testing for the interaction terms, SUA was closely associated with idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population (P=0.0026 for interaction), while there was no such correlation in the low HDL-C group. The results indicated no obvious correlation between triglyceride and hypertension to idiopathic VTE. In conclusion, SUA is closely associated with an increased risk of idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population. The abnormality of SUA may act as an important linkage between atherosclerosis and idiopathic VTE through HDL-C. PMID:27284315

  11. Cross-Organization Service Use Management for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witmer, J.; Gerschefske, K.

    2012-09-01

    With the Joint Space Operations Center Mission Systems (JMS) focus to deploy a service-oriented architecture (SOA) environment, the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) community is moving rapidly toward a platform environment. Organizations will no longer rely entirely on systems within their boundaries. Instead, services and data are shared across organizational boundaries between diverse organizations. For SSA to succeed, JMS and similar efforts must employ and share resources across organizational boundaries (from AFSPC, to other US partners, to non-US partners and even universities). However, sharing services across organizational boundaries presents visibility and dependency issues. What information does an organization need to rely on these external services for mission critical needs? This paper presents an approach to dynamic service use agreement (SUA) negotiation that provides service platforms (and SOAs) the ability to dynamically negotiate the use of services across organizational boundaries. Using a small set of common service level agreement metadata (SLA metadata) parameters, service use can automatically be negotiated between SOAs. The Managing Aggregated Services (MASS) toolkit is designed to enable automated SUA across organizational boundaries by standardizing the service use parameters (the SLA metadata) as the foundation for SUA. The MASS toolkit demonstrates that this SUA can be done between systems as the SLA metadata provides the necessary visibility for the consuming organization into the provider organization services. The MASS toolkit also answers the question "who is using my service?" Service access can be limited to only SOAs which have negotiated an SUA, providing information security for service providers. In the highly dynamic SSA environment, where services will be provided by a variety of organizations, previous work has shown that SOA can shorten service integration from months to weeks. MASS demonstrates the potential to move this

  12. Overview of Serum Uric Acid Treatment Targets in Gout: Why Less Than 6 mg/dL?

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Gary; Edwards, N Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    Gout is a progressive, painful, debilitating form of inflammatory arthritis. It is caused by factors that elevate the concentration of serum uric acid (sUA), leading to hyperuricemia (sUA >6.8 mg/dL). Continued elevated sUA can result in monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition in joints and soft tissues, and can cause acute and chronic inflammation. The prevalence of hyperuricemia and gout has increased over the last few decades, likely due to an aging population, changes in lifestyles and diet, and an increase in gout-associated comorbidities. Untreated or improperly treated gout can lead to chronic manifestation of the disease, including persistent inflammation, increased number of flares, development of tophi, and structural joint damage. Data show that even when patients are asymptomatic, ongoing inflammation and subsequent damage occurs locally at the joint and systemically. The aim of long-term treatment of gout is to reduce sUA levels to <6 mg/dL, which is below the saturation point of MSU (6.8 mg/dL), to inhibit formation of new crystals and to promote dissolution of existing crystals. Gout treatment should improve disease outcomes by eliminating gout flares, inducing long-term resolution of tophi, and more effectively managing comorbidities, many of which are associated with hyperuricemia. A number of studies have demonstrated that treating to the target of <6 mg/dL, by using effective therapies to lower sUA, results in reduction in the incidence of gout flares as well as shrinkage and eventual disappearance of tophi. Gout is often poorly managed due to a number of factors including lack of physician and patient adherence to treatment guidelines. Patients need to be educated about their diagnosis and management of the disease, such as the influence of diet and the importance of compliance with long-term treatment. With treatment, regular sUA monitoring, and patient adherence, gout is a curable disease. PMID:27558643

  13. Real-Time Assessment of the 16 September 2015 Chile Tsunami and Implications for Near-Field Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liujuan; Titov, Vasily V.; Moore, Christopher; Wei, Yong

    2016-02-01

    The magnitude 8.3 earthquake in central Chile on 16 September 2015 and the resulting tsunami severely affected the region, with 15 deaths ( Onemi in Monitoreo por sismo de mayor intensidad. (In Spanish) [Available at: http://www.onemi.cl/alerta/se-declara-alerta-roja-por-sismo-de-mayor-intensidad-y-alarma-de-tsunami/], 2015), over one million evacuated, and flooding in nearby coastal cities. We present our real-time assessment of the 2015 Chile tsunami using the Short-term Inundation Forecasting for Tsunamis system, and post-event analyses with local community models in Chile. We evaluate three real-time tsunami sources, which were inverted at the time that the first quarter-, half-, and full-wave passed the first tsunameter (DART 32402, located approximately 580 km north-northwest of the epicenter), respectively. Measurement comparisons from 26 deep-ocean tsunameters and 38 coastal tide stations show that good model accuracies are achieved for all three sources, particularly for the local sites that recorded the most destructive waves. The study highlights the forecast speed, time and accuracy dependence, and their implications for the local forecast capability. Our analyses suggest that the tsunami's main origination area is about 100-200 km long and 100 km wide, to the north of the earthquake epicenter along the trench and the total estimated tsunami wave energy is 7.9 × 1013 J (with 13 % uncertainty). The study provides important guidelines for the earliest reliable estimate of tsunami energy and local forecasts. They can be obtained with the first quarter-wave of tsunameter recording. These results are also confirmed by a forecast analysis of the 2011 Japan tsunami. Furthermore, we find that the first half-wave tsunameter data are sufficient to accurately forecast the 2015 Chile tsunami, due to the specific orientation between the nearest tsunameter and the source. The study also suggests expanding the operational use of the local community models in real

  14. Espectroscopia infravermelha de núcleos ativos de galáxias: resultados adicionais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ardila, A.; Viegas, S.; Pastoria, M. G.

    2003-08-01

    Apresentamos resultados parciais de um levantamento espectroscópico na região do infravermelho próximo (NIR) realizado em 30 núcleos ativos de galáxias (AGN), incluindo vários objetos selecionados do catálogo PG com z de até 0.55. O objetivo é estudar a natureza do contínuo observado e as condições físicas do gas emissor. Todas as fontes de tipo 1 apresentam uma mudança na inclinação do contínuo na região de 1.2mm, associada ao término da contribuição do contínuo emitido pelo AGN e ao início da contribuição do contínuo emitido pela poeira quente atribuída ao tórus que rodeia a fonte central. O índice espectral associado à segunda contribuição varia apreciavelmente de objeto para objeto. Este resultado é comparado com distribuições espectrais de energia preditas por modelos de toroides para testar a validez do modelo unificado. A partir das linhas de FeII observado nos espectros deriva-se, pela primeira vez nessa região espectral, um template empírico de FeII para estudar a intensidade e a origem dessa emissão. A intensidade do FeII é estudada em conjunto com aquela da região visível e comparada às predições de modelos teóricos que incluem fluorescência de Lya, excitação colisional e auto-fluorescência como mecanismos dominantes de exitação. Encontra-se que os dois primeiros processos dominam na formação do espectro de FeII observado. Indicadores de avermelhamento, entre eles Brg/Pab, Pab/Pag, Pab/Pad e [FeII] 1.257/1.644 mm são utilizados para mapear a distribuição de poeira nas regiões emissoras de linhas. Encontra-se valores de extinção Av~3 associados ao último indicador e valores significativamente menores (Av~1.5) para os restantes, o que sugere que o [FeII] se forma em uma região separada da maior parte do gás emissor de linhas estreitas.

  15. Correlação de longo alcance em sistemas binários de raios-x usando remoção de flutuações

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. G.; Moret, M. A.; Zebende, G. F.; Nogueira, E., Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho é proposta uma metodologia de analise de series temporais de fontes astrofísicas, baseada no método proposto por Peng et al. (1994) e Liu et al. (1999), o qual consiste na idéia de que uma série temporal correlacionada pode ser mapeada por um processo de busca de auto-similaridades em diversas escalas de tempo n. Removendo as eventuais tendências e integrando o sinal observado, é obtida uma medida do desvio médio quadrático das flutuações do sinal integrado F(n)~na, onde a representa o fator de escala associado com a auto-similaridade da correlação de longo alcance do sinal. Baseado nos valores obtidos de a, é possível distinguir entre os casos de sinais não-correlacionados, tipo ruído branco (a = 0,5), sinal anti-persistentes (a < 0,5) e sinal persistente (a > 0,5). Usando esta metodologia, foram analisadas 129 curvas de luz de sistemas binários de raios-X, provenientes do banco de dados públicos de observações feitas pelo instrumento All Sky Monitor, a bordo do satélite Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (ASM-RXTE). Foram identificadas a presença de a'0,5 em mais de 90% dos sistemas estudados, implicando em dizer que as flutuações de intensidade observadas apresentam correlação de auto-similaridade, sem entretanto, indícios de apresentarem uma escala de tempo característica das flutuações de intensidade. Sistemas onde são observadas erupções (flares), apresentam sistematicamente a > 0,5, característica esta, possivelmente associada com persistência das flutuações de densidade de disco ou taxa de acréscimo de massa. Os sistemas com curvas de luz onde nao são observadas as erupções apresentam uma distribuição normal centrada em a~0,62+/-0,10. Referências ¾ Peng, C.-K., Buldyrev, S.V., Havlin, S., Simons, M., Stanley, H.E., e Goldberg, A.L., Phys. Rev. E, (49), 1685 (1994). ¾ Liu, Y., Gopikrishnan, P., Cizeau, P., Meyer, M., Peng,C.-K., e Stanley, H.E., Phys. Rev. E, (60), 1390 (1999).

  16. Effect of cotreatment of aspirin metabolites on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2006-01-01

    In our previous reports, aspirin, an antipyretic analgesic, suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of the anti-genotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressing ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA), and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in Drosophila melanogaster using the cotreatment protocol in this report. SUA, GA, GUA, and DHBA reduced the number of the three types of spot induced by MMC without decrease of survival. These aspirin metabolites decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC for total spots in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, each metabolite decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC by approximately 80% at a dose of 40 mg/bottle, respectively. It is suggested that these metabolites are the main substances of anti-genotoxicity in the aspirin metabolic pathway. PMID:16931440

  17. Theta coupling between V4 and prefrontal cortex predicts visual short-term memory performance.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Stefanie; Hoerzer, Gregor M; Logothetis, Nikos K; Rainer, Gregor

    2012-03-01

    Short-term memory requires communication between multiple brain regions that collectively mediate the encoding and maintenance of sensory information. It has been suggested that oscillatory synchronization underlies intercortical communication. Yet, whether and how distant cortical areas cooperate during visual memory remains elusive. We examined neural interactions between visual area V4 and the lateral prefrontal cortex using simultaneous local field potential (LFP) recordings and single-unit activity (SUA) in monkeys performing a visual short-term memory task. During the memory period, we observed enhanced between-area phase synchronization in theta frequencies (3-9 Hz) of LFPs together with elevated phase locking of SUA to theta oscillations across regions. In addition, we found that the strength of intercortical locking was predictive of the animals' behavioral performance. This suggests that theta-band synchronization coordinates action potential communication between V4 and prefrontal cortex that may contribute to the maintenance of visual short-term memories. PMID:22286175

  18. Nitrate Contamination of Deep Aquifers in the Salinas Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Holtz, M.; Roberts, S. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Visser, A.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Salinas Valley, known as 'the salad bowl of the world', has been an agricultural center for more than 100 years. Irrigated row crops such as lettuce and strawberries dominate both land use and water use. Groundwater is the exclusive supply for both irrigation and drinking water. Some irrigation wells and most public water supply wells in the Salinas Valley are constructed to draw water from deep portions of the aquifer system, where contamination by nitrate is less likely than in the shallow portions of the aquifer system. However, a number of wells with top perforations greater than 75 m deep, screened below confining or semi-confining units, have nitrate concentrations greater than the Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) of 45 mg/L as NO3-. This study uses nitrate concentrations from several hundred irrigation, drinking water, and monitoring wells (Monterey County Water Resources Agency, 1997), along with tritium-helium groundwater ages acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the State of California Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program (reported in Kulongoski et al., 2007 and in Moran et al., in press), to identify nitrate 'hot spots' in the deep aquifer and to examine possible modes of nitrate transport to the deep aquifer. In addition, observed apparent groundwater ages are compared with the results of transport simulations that use particle tracking and a stochastic-geostatistical framework to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity to determine the distribution of travel times from the water table to each well (Fogg et al., 1999). The combined evidence from nitrate, tritium, tritiogenic 3He, and radiogenic 4He concentrations, reveals complex recharge and flow to the capture zone of the deep drinking water wells. Widespread groundwater pumping for irrigation accelerates vertical groundwater flow such that high nitrate groundwater reaches some deep drinking water wells. Deeper portions of the wells often draw in water that recharged

  19. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the northern San Joaquin Basin, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,079 square mile Northern San Joaquin Basin (Northern San Joaquin) study unit was investigated from December 2004 through February 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 that was passed by the State of California and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Northern San Joaquin study unit was the third study unit to be designed and sampled as part of the Priority Basin Project. Results of the study provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw (untreated) groundwater, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 61 wells in parts of Alameda, Amador, Calaveras, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus Counties; 51 of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based approach to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 10 of the wells were sampled to increase spatial density and provide additional information for the evaluation of water chemistry in the study unit (understanding/flowpath wells). The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the California Department of Public Health database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource; and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors

  20. Groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    More than 40 percent of California's drinking water is from groundwater. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter referred to as San Diego) is one of the study units being evaluated. The San Diego study unit is approximately 3,900 square miles and consists of the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and 12 other alluvial basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The study unit also consists of all areas outside defined groundwater basins that are within 3 kilometers of a public-supply well. The study unit was separated, based primarily on hydrogeologic settings, into four study areas: Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, Alluvial Basins, and Hard Rock (Wright and others, 2005). The sampling density for the Hard Rock study area, which consists of areas outside of groundwater basins, was much lower than for the other study areas. Consequently, aquifer proportions for the Hard Rock study area are not used to calculate the aquifer proportions shown by the pie charts. An assessment of groundwater quality for the Hard Rock study area can be found in Wright and Belitz, 2011. The temperatures in the coastal part of the study unit are mild with dry summers, moist winters, and an average annual rainfall of about 10 inches. The temperatures in the mountainous eastern part of the study unit are cooler than in the coastal part, with an annual precipitation of about 45 inches that occurs mostly in the winter. The primary aquifers consist of Quaternary-age alluvium and weathered bedrock in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas, whereas in the Hard Rock study area the primary aquifers consist mainly of fractured and

  1. Borehole Geophysics, Hydraulic Characteristics and Chemistry of Groundwater Flow in Fractured Granite With Very Low Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, J.; Rukavickova, L.; Paces, T.

    2005-12-01

    Three test boreholes 10.9 and 10.5 meters apart were drilled in a compact granite at locality Podles' in the Bohemian Massif of central Europe. The depths of the drill boreholes were 349, 300 and 296 m. The location of the boreholes form a triangle. The main goal of this study was to determine the degree to which the very compact granite is fractured and what is the hydraulic conductivity of the fracture system. A combination of neutron log, electrical resistivity logs, gama gama log, fluid-resistivity log, and acoustic log was used to test the function of the fracture system. The hydraulic connection among the boreholes was determined from the fluid-resistivity log using injected salt as a tracer. The pressure communication through fractures among boreholes was investigated by a set of water pressure tests (WPT) in one borehole with simultaneous monitoring of responses in the other two holes equipped by a multipacker system. The connection of selected permeable fracture systems was verified by a combination of hydraulic stress tests in one borehole and simultaneous fluid-resistivity logging in other two boreholes. Indication of salt in water in adjoining boreholes was registered as anomalies on curves of the fluid-resistivity record. Several communications between boreholes were along a horizontal level, however, some connections were through combination of both horizontal and vertical fractures. The hydraulic connection between two of the boreholes was fast and straightforward. The connection with the third borehole was inexpressive. This difference was due to the position of the boreholes with regard to the direction of main fractures and the direction of natural groundwater flow. All fractures were identified using acoustic tele-viewer and inspection of core. The density of the fractures varied with depth. The density was 3 fractures per meter near surface, the density dropped to 0.9 fractures per meter at the depth of 80 m. Between 80 and 300 m, the density

  2. Groundwater quality in the Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jennifer L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s untreated groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley constitute one of the study units being evaluated. The Madera-Chowchilla study unit is about 860 square miles and consists of the Madera and Chowchilla groundwater subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley Basin (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Shelton and others, 2009). The study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 11 to 15 inches, most of which occurs between November and February. The main surface-water features in the study unit are the San Joaquin, Fresno, and Chowchilla Rivers, and the Madera and Chowchilla canals. Land use in the study unit is about 69 percent (%) agricultural, 28% natural (mainly grasslands), and 3% urban. The primary crops are orchards and vineyards. The largest urban area is the city of Madera. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifer corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. In the Madera-Chowchilla study unit, these wells typically are drilled to depths between 200 and 800 feet, consist of a solid casing from land surface to a depth of about 140 to 400 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. The primary aquifer system in the study unit consists of Quaternary-age alluvial-fan and fluvial deposits that were formed by the rivers draining the Sierra Nevada. Sediments consist of gravels, sands

  3. MISR Images Northeastern Botswana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    MISR images of the Ntwetwe and Sua Pans in northeastern Botswana, acquired on August 18, 2000 (Terra orbit 3553). The left image is a color view from the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. On the right is a composite of red band imagery in which the 45-degree aft camera data are displayed in blue, 45-degree forward as green, and vertical as red. This combination causes wet areas to appear blue because of the glint-like reflection from water and damp surfaces. Clouds are visible in the upper left corner and right center of each image. The clouds look peculiar in the multi-angle view because geometric parallax resulting from their elevation above the surface causes a misregistration of the individual images making up the composite. This stereoscopic effect provides a way of distinguishing clouds from bright surfaces.

    The images are approximately 250 kilometers across. Ntwetwe and Sua pans are closed interior basins that catch rainwater and surface runoff during the wet season. Seasonal lakes form that may reach several meters in depth. During the dry season the collected waters rapidly evaporate leaving behind dissolved salts that coat the surface and turn it bright ('sua' means salt). The mining town of Sowa is located where the Sua Spit (a finger of grassland extending into the pan) attaches to the shore. Sowa represents headquarters for a JPL contingent carrying out MISR field experiments using the evaporite surface and the grasslands as targets and for Botswana scientists studying migration of groundwaters beneath the pans and surrounding areas. These efforts support the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000), which is now underway.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

    For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  4. Serum uric acid as a prognostic marker in the setting of advanced vascular disease: a prospective study in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Di Stolfo, Giuseppe; Mastroianno, Sandra; Potenza, Domenico Rosario; De Luca, Giovanni; d'Arienzo, Carmela; Pacilli, Michele Antonio; Fanelli, Mario; Russo, Aldo; Fanelli, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies analyze the relationship between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular outcomes. This observational prospective study investigates the association of serum uric acid (SUA) levels with adverse cardiovascular events and deaths in an elderly population affected by advanced atherosclerosis. Methods Two hundred and seventy six elderly patients affected by advanced atherosclerosis (217 males and 59 females; aged 71.2 ± 7.8 years) were included. All patients were assessed for history of cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity and traditional risk factors. Patients were followed for approximately 31 ± 11 months. Major events were recorded during follow-up, defined as myocardial infarction, cerebral ischemia, myocardial and/or peripheral revascularization and death. Results Mean SUA level was 5.47 ± 1.43 mg/dL; then we further divided the population in two groups, according to the median value (5.36 mg/dL). During a median follow up of 31 months (5 to 49 months), 66 cardiovascular events, 9 fatal cardiovascular events and 14 cancer-related deaths have occurred. The patients with increased SUA level presented a higher significant incidence of total cardiovascular events (HR: 1.867, P = 0.014, 95% CI: 1.134–3.074). The same patients showed a significant increased risk of cancer-related death (HR: 4.335, P = 0.025, 95% CI: 1.204–15.606). Conclusions Increased SUA levels are independently and significantly associated with risk of cardiovascular events and cancer related death in a population of mainly elderly patients affected by peripheral vasculopathy. PMID:26512243

  5. Suppressive effect of post- or pre-treatment of aspirin metabolite on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Shin, Seizai; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-01-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of mitomycin C (MMC) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of bio-antimutagenicity and/or preventive effect of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in D. melanogaster using post- and pre-treatments. As for the post-treatment, SA reduced the numbers of large single and twin spots. GA reduced the small single and large single spots, and GUA reduced the single spots, large single and twin spots. The inhibition of GUA is slightly stronger than that of any other metabolites; the inhibition percentage is 49 at the dose of 5 mg/bottle. On the other hand, as for the pre-treatment, aspirin, SUA, GA and DHBA reduced the numbers of small single spots. SUA, GE and DHBA reduced the number of large single spots. Aspirin and its metabolites did not reduce the number of twin spots. The results of the present study suggest that SA, GA and GUA repair or replicate DNA-damage by MMC and SUA, GA, GUA and DHBA prevent DNA-damage by MMC. It is suggested that secondary cancer is prevented by aspirin post-treatment without losing the medicinal effectiveness (anti-tumor activity). Therefore, we consider there are effective doses and/or administration timing of aspirin and MMC to prevent secondary cancer. PMID:17275250

  6. Cesarean Section - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Your Recovery After Cesarean Birth Sua recuperação após ...

  7. The Association Between Hyperuricemia and Hematological Indicators in a Chinese Adult Population.

    PubMed

    Su, Pu; Hong, Liu; Zhao, Yifan; Sun, Hang; Li, Liang

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between hyperuricemia and hematological indicators. Five hundred twenty-two male and 255 female subjects (18-90 years old) were recruited in the study. The level of serum uric acid (SUA), total white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count was measured, computed, and analyzed. Pearson correlation coefficients, Student t-tests, multivariate linear regression models, and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to analyze the results.For men, WBC count (r = 0.13, P < 0.01), RBC count (r = 0.15, P < 0.001), and hemoglobin (r = 0.11, P < 0.05) were significantly correlated with SUA. For women, WBC count (r = 0.24, P < 0.001), RBC count (r = 0.31, P < 0.001), hemoglobin (r = 0.31, P < 0.001), and hematocrit (r = 0.29, P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with SUA. For men, WBC (P < 0.01) and RBC (P < 0.05) counts were significantly higher in patients with hyperuricemia than in normal subjects. For men, after adjustment for confounding factors, those in the fourth quartiles of WBC counts had 1.66-fold increased odds of hyperuricemia as compared with those in the reference group. For women, after adjustment, those in the second to fourth quartiles of WBC count, RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit had increased the odds of hyperuricemia as compared with those in the reference groups. Our study showed significant relations between the level of SUA and WBC count, RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, which could be important biological markers of hyperuricemia. PMID:26886635

  8. The Association Between Hyperuricemia and Hematological Indicators in a Chinese Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pu; Hong, Liu; Zhao, Yifan; Sun, Hang; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between hyperuricemia and hematological indicators. Five hundred twenty-two male and 255 female subjects (18–90 years old) were recruited in the study. The level of serum uric acid (SUA), total white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count was measured, computed, and analyzed. Pearson correlation coefficients, Student t-tests, multivariate linear regression models, and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to analyze the results. For men, WBC count (r = 0.13, P < 0.01), RBC count (r = 0.15, P < 0.001), and hemoglobin (r = 0.11, P < 0.05) were significantly correlated with SUA. For women, WBC count (r = 0.24, P < 0.001), RBC count (r = 0.31, P < 0.001), hemoglobin (r = 0.31, P < 0.001), and hematocrit (r = 0.29, P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with SUA. For men, WBC (P < 0.01) and RBC (P < 0.05) counts were significantly higher in patients with hyperuricemia than in normal subjects. For men, after adjustment for confounding factors, those in the fourth quartiles of WBC counts had 1.66-fold increased odds of hyperuricemia as compared with those in the reference group. For women, after adjustment, those in the second to fourth quartiles of WBC count, RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit had increased the odds of hyperuricemia as compared with those in the reference groups. Our study showed significant relations between the level of SUA and WBC count, RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, which could be important biological markers of hyperuricemia. PMID:26886635

  9. Occurrence and concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds in deep groundwater used for public drinking-water supply in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds were detected at low concentrations in 2.3% of 1231 samples of groundwater (median depth to top of screened interval in wells = 61 m) used for public drinking-water supply in California. Samples were collected statewide for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. Of 14 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed, 7 were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to method detection limits: acetaminophen (used as an analgesic, detection frequency 0.32%, maximum concentration 1.89 μg/L), caffeine (stimulant, 0.24%, 0.29 μg/L), carbamazepine (mood stabilizer, 1.5%, 0.42 μg/L), codeine (opioid analgesic, 0.16%, 0.214 μg/L), p-xanthine (caffeine metabolite, 0.08%, 0.12 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (antibiotic, 0.41%, 0.17 μg/L), and trimethoprim (antibiotic, 0.08%, 0.018 μg/L). Detection frequencies of pesticides (33%), volatile organic compounds not including trihalomethanes (23%), and trihalomethanes (28%) in the same 1231 samples were significantly higher. Median detected concentration of pharmaceutical compounds was similar to those of volatile organic compounds, and higher than that of pesticides. Pharmaceutical compounds were detected in 3.3% of the 855 samples containing modern groundwater (tritium activity > 0.2 TU). Pharmaceutical detections were significantly positively correlated with detections of urban-use herbicides and insecticides, detections of volatile organic compounds, and percentage of urban land use around wells. Groundwater from the Los Angeles metropolitan area had higher detection frequencies of pharmaceuticals and other anthropogenic compounds than groundwater from other areas of the state with similar proportions of urban land use. The higher detection frequencies may reflect that groundwater flow systems in Los Angeles area basins are dominated by engineered recharge and intensive groundwater pumping.

  10. Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

    2008-05-16

    Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less

  11. Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

    2006-05-12

    Residential two-stage gas furnaces account for almost a quarter of the total number of models listed in the March 2005 GAMA directory of equipment certified for sale in the United States. Two-stage furnaces are expanding their presence in the market mostly because they meet consumer expectations for improved comfort. Currently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure serves as the method for reporting furnace total fuel and electricity consumption under laboratory conditions. In 2006, American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) proposed an update to its test procedure which corrects some of the discrepancies found in the DOE test procedure and provides an improved methodology for calculating the energy consumption of two-stage furnaces. The objectives of this paper are to explore the differences in the methods for calculating two-stage residential gas furnace energy consumption in the DOE test procedure and in the 2006 ASHRAE test procedure and to compare test results to research results from field tests. Overall, the DOE test procedure shows a reduction in the total site energy consumption of about 3 percent for two-stage compared to single-stage furnaces at the same efficiency level. In contrast, the 2006 ASHRAE test procedure shows almost no difference in the total site energy consumption. The 2006 ASHRAE test procedure appears to provide a better methodology for calculating the energy consumption of two-stage furnaces. The results indicate that, although two-stage technology by itself does not save site energy, the combination of two-stage furnaces with BPM motors provides electricity savings, which are confirmed by field studies.

  12. Mode of action of FK-506 on protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Taki, M; Matsuo, S; Yamada, K

    1996-01-01

    FK-506 (Tacrolimus) has been shown to block T cell proliferation in vitro by inhibiting the generation of several lymphokines, especially interleukin (IL)-2, but little direct evidence is available to support the view that the immunosuppressive effects of FK-506 in vivo are mediated by a similar inhibition of lymphokine cascade. To investigate the mechanisms of FK-506-induced immunosuppression, the effects of FK-506 on cell-mediated immunity to Hymenolepis nana were examined in mice. FK-506 administration into BALB/c mice daily at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 5.0 mg/kg) for 5 days caused suppression of protective immunity against H. nana challenge infection. During the infection of mice with H. nana, IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-gama were produced by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells with a time course corresponding to that of MLN T cell proliferation. These responses were completely suppressed by repeated administration of FK-506 for 5 days at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg/day (but not 5.0 mg/kg/day). In contrast to the effects of FK-506 on IL-2 and IFN-gamma productions in MLN, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the intestinal wall, which were enhanced by H. nana infection, were not completely decreased as a result of 10.0 mg/kg FK-506 treatment. The reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed complete inhibition of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression on mesenteric L3T4+ cells that were induced by H. nana infection, when mice were given 10.0 mg/kg/day FK-506 for 5 days. These results strongly suggest that FK-506 affects cell-mediated immunity in vivo with mechanisms similar to those observed in vitro. PMID:8986461

  13. Geostatistical Analysis of Tritium, 3H/3He Age and Noble Gas Derived Parameters in California Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Fram, M. S.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Esser, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge, are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of the data set of tritium, dissolved noble gas and helium isotope analyses collected for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) and California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) programs. Over 4,000 tritium and noble gas analyses are available from wells across California. 25% of the analyzed samples contained less than 1 pCi/L indicating recharge occurred before 1950. The correlation length of tritium concentration is 120 km. Nearly 50% of the wells show a significant component of terrigenic helium. Over 50% of these samples show a terrigenic helium isotope ratio (Rter) that is significantly higher than the radiogenic helium isotope ratio (Rrad = 2×10-8). Rter values of more than three times the atmospheric isotope ratio (Ra = 1.384×10-6) are associated with known faults and volcanic provinces in Northern California. In the Central Valley, Rter varies from radiogenic to 2.25 Ra, complicating 3H/3He dating. The Rter was mapped by kriging, showing a correlation length of less than 50 km. The local predicted Rter was used to separate tritiogenic from atmospheric and terrigenic 3He. Regional groundwater recharge areas, indicated by young groundwater ages, are located in the southern Santa Clara Basin and in the upper LA basin and in the eastern San Joaquin Valley and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water. Recharge in California is dominated by agricultural return flows, river recharge and managed aquifer recharge rather than precipitation excess. Combined application of noble gases and other groundwater tracers reveal the impact of engineered groundwater recharge and prove invaluable for the study of complex groundwater systems. This work was performed under the

  14. Occurrence and concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds in groundwater used for public drinking-water supply in California.

    PubMed

    Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-08-15

    Pharmaceutical compounds were detected at low concentrations in 2.3% of 1231 samples of groundwater (median depth to top of screened interval in wells=61 m) used for public drinking-water supply in California. Samples were collected statewide for the California State Water Resources Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. Of 14 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed, 7 were detected at concentrations greater than or equal to method detection limits: acetaminophen (used as an analgesic, detection frequency 0.32%, maximum concentration 1.89 μg/L), caffeine (stimulant, 0.24%, 0.29 μg/L), carbamazepine (mood stabilizer, 1.5%, 0.42 μg/L), codeine (opioid analgesic, 0.16%, 0.214 μg/L), p-xanthine (caffeine metabolite, 0.08%, 0.12 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (antibiotic, 0.41%, 0.17 μg/L), and trimethoprim (antibiotic, 0.08%, 0.018 μg/L). Detection frequencies of pesticides (33%), volatile organic compounds not including trihalomethanes (23%), and trihalomethanes (28%) in the same 1231 samples were significantly higher. Median detected concentration of pharmaceutical compounds was similar to those of volatile organic compounds, and higher than that of pesticides. Pharmaceutical compounds were detected in 3.3% of the 855 samples containing modern groundwater (tritium activity>0.2 TU). Pharmaceutical detections were significantly positively correlated with detections of urban-use herbicides and insecticides, detections of volatile organic compounds, and percentage of urban land use around wells. Groundwater from the Los Angeles metropolitan area had higher detection frequencies of pharmaceuticals and other anthropogenic compounds than groundwater from other areas of the state with similar proportions of urban land use. The higher detection frequencies may reflect that groundwater flow systems in Los Angeles area basins are dominated by engineered recharge and intensive groundwater pumping. PMID:21684580

  15. Enhanced expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 improves symptoms of rat parkinsonian models.

    PubMed

    Lee, B; Lee, H; Nam, Y R; Oh, J H; Cho, Y H; Chang, J W

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the amelioration of parkinsonian symptoms in rat Parkinson's disease (PD) models, as a result of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 65 with a modified cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The transfer of the gene for gamma-amino butryic acid (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme in gama-amino butrylic acid (GABA) production, has been investigated as a means to increase inhibitory synaptic activity. Electrophysiological evidence suggests that the transfer of the GAD65 gene to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can change the excitatory output of this nucleus to inhibitory output. Our in vitro results also demonstrated higher GAD65 expression in cells transfected with the JDK promoter, as compared to cells transfected with the CMV promoter. Also, a rat PD model in which recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV2)-JDK-GAD65 was delivered into the STN exhibited significant behavioral improvements, as compared to the saline-injected group. Interestingly, we observed that these behavioral improvements were more obvious in rat PD models in which rAAV2-JDK-GAD65 was injected into the STN than in rat PD models in which rAAV2-CMV-GAD65 was injected into the STN. Moreover, according to electrophysiological data, the rAAV2-JDK-GAD65-injected group exhibited more constant improvements in firing rates than did the rAAV2-CMV-GAD65-injected group. These data indicate that the JDK promoter, when coupled with GAD65 expression, is more effective with regard to parkinsonian symptoms than is the CMV promoter. PMID:15829994

  16. Sediment prokaryote communities in different sites of eutrophic Lake Taihu and their interactions with environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Yang, Jin-Shui; Qu, Jiang-Hang; Li, Hai-Feng; Liu, Wei-Jie; Li, Bao-Zhen; Wang, En Tao; Yuan, Hong-Li

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the temporal variation of the sediment prokaryote communities and their relation with the rapid increase of algae population in Taihu, a shallow eutrophic freshwater Lake, water and surface sediments were sampled from seven sites in different stages of algal bloom. The physicochemical characterization revealed positive correlations among the nutrient (N, P) parameters in the water and sediments, as well as TN/TP ratio 30.79 in average in water and 0.13 in sediments, demonstrating that P content was the limit factor for bloom in Taihu and sediment was an important nutrient resource for the water body. T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed a diversity decrease of sediment prokaryotic communities along the bloom. The bacterial communities in sediments were more sensitive and shaped by the temporal changes, while archaea were more sensitive to the trophic level. The pyrosequencing data showed clear spatial and temporal changes in diversity of sediment bacteria. Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant group in all the samples, following by Delta-, Gama- and Alpha-proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, Chloroflexi etc. At the genus level, Thiobacillus and Sulfuricurvum were the most dominant groups in the sediments, and the increase of Thiobacillus abundance in February might be used as bioindicator for the subsequent bloom. In addition, NO3 (-)-N was evidenced to be the main factor to regulate the bacterial community structure in the sediments. These results offered some novel and important data for the evaluation and predict the algal bloom in Taihu and can be reference for other shallow fresh water lakes. PMID:25772498

  17. Phylogenetic Evidence That Two Distinct Trichuris Genotypes Infect both Humans and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ravasi, Damiana F.; O’Riain, Mannus J.; Davids, Faezah; Illing, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon) for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade) and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade), respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa. PMID:22952922

  18. Chang'e 3 and Jade Rabbit's: observations and the landing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinsong

    Chang’E-3 was launched and landed on the near side of the Moon in December 2013. It is realizing the 2nd phase of Chinese lunar scientific exploration projects. Together with the various in-situ optical observations around the landing sites, the mission carried 4 kinds of radio science experiments, cover the various lunar scientific disciplines as well as lunar surface radio astronomy studies. The key payloads onboard the lander and rover include the near ultraviolet telescope, extreme ultraviolet cameras, ground penetrating radar, very low frequency radio spectrum analyzer, which have not been used in earlier lunar landing missions. Optical spectrometer, Alpha Paticle X-ray spectrometer and Gama Ray spectrometer is also used. The mission is using extreme ultraviolet camera to observe the sun activity and geomagnetic disturbances on geo-space plasma layer of extreme ultraviolet radiation, studying space weather in the plasma layer role in the process; the mission also carries the first time lunar base optical astronomical observations. Most importantly, the topography, landforms and geological structure has been explored in detail. Additionally, the very precise Earth-Moon radio phase ranging technique was firstly tested and realized in this mission. It may increase the study of lunar dyanmics together with LLR technique. Similar to Luna-Glob landers, together with the VLBI radio beacons, the radio transponders are also set on the Chang’E-3. Transponder will receive the uplink X band radio wave transmitted from the two newly constructed Chinese deep space stations, where the high quality hydrogen maser atomic clocks have been used as local time and frequency standard. Radio science receivers have been developed by updating the multi-channel open loop Doppler receiver developed for VLBI and Doppler tracking in Yinghuo-1 and Phobos-Glob Martian missions. This experiment will improve the study of lunar dynamics, by means of measuring the lunar physical liberations

  19. Mapping selected trace elements and major ions, 2000-2012, Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins, southwestern Mojave Desert, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Landon, Matthew K.; House, Sally F.; Olsen, Lisa D.

    2015-01-01

    The population of the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins has grown rapidly during the last several decades, increasing from an estimated population of almost 273,000 in 1990 (Mojave Water Agency, 2004) to more than 453,000 in 2010 (Mojave Water Agency, 2014). Groundwater is the primary source of potable water in both basins (Mojave Water Agency, 2014). Previous studies noted elevated concentrations of several trace elements, nitrate, and total dissolved solids in groundwater in portions of the two basins (Christensen and Fields-Garland, 2001; Ball and Izbicki, 2004; Izbicki and others, 2008; Mathany and Belitz, 2009; Wright and Belitz, 2010; Dawson and Belitz, 2012; and Izbicki and others, 2012). Since 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected water-quality data annually from a network of wells and has provided quality-assurance for Mojave Water Agency (MWA) data that are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database. The new data and results from the joint State of California and USGS Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program assessments of regional water quality (these data are also stored in NWIS), in combination with ongoing MWA/USGS groundwater-quality monitoring provide a timely opportunity for mapping of groundwater quality in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins. The purpose of this report is to provide maps and time-series plots of concentrations of selected water-quality constituents (arsenic, boron, chromium-6, total chromium, dissolved oxygen, fluoride, iron, manganese, nitriate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total dissolved solids, uranium, and vanadium) in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins using data collected by the USGS and MWA from 2000 to 2012. These maps and plots can be accessed on this website.

  20. The Infrared Properties of Sources Matched in the WISE All-Sky and Herschel Atlas Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Amblard, Alexandre; Temi, Pasquale; Fleuren, Simone; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Smith, Daniel J.; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Dye, Simon; Baes, Maarten; Bonfield, David; Bourne, Nathan; Bridge,Carrie

    2012-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over approx. 36 deg2 of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5(sigma) point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 microns and 3.4 microns, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of approx. 630 deg-2. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 microns and that at 250 microns, with +/-50% scatter over approx. 1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, approx. 10(exp 9) - 10(exp 10.5) Stellar Luminosity. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r > or approx. 20.5) have 250-350 microns flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z > or approx. 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T < or approx. 20). Their small 3.4-250 microns flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (approx. 30%) in a 12 microns flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.

  1. The Infrared Properties of Sources Matched in the Wise All-Sky and Herschel ATLAS Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Amblard, Alexandre; Fleuren, Simone; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Auld, Robbie; Bales, Maarten; Bonfield, David; Bourne, Nathan; Bridge, Carrie; Buttiglione, Sara; Cava, Antonio; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Dariush, Ali; deZotti, Gianfranco; Driver, Simon; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over approx 36 sq deg of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (HATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5sigma point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 micron and 3.4 micron, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of approx 630 deg(exp -2). Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 micron and that at 250 micron, with +/- 50% scatter over approx 1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, approx 10(exp 9) - 10(exp 10.5) Solar Luminosity By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r approx > 20.5) have 250-350 micron flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z approx > 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T approx < 20). Their small 3.4-250 micron flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (approx 30%) in a 12 micron flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample

  2. Pathway engineering of Bacillus subtilis for microbial production of N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-09-01

    Glucosamine (GlcN) and its acetylated derivative, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), are widely used in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. Currently, GlcN and GlcNAc are mainly produced by hydrolysis from crab and shrimp shells, which can cause severe environmental pollution and carries the potential risk of allergic reactions. In this study, we attempted to achieve microbial production of GlcNAc by pathway engineering of Bacillus subtilis 168. Specifically, glmS (encoding GlcN-6-phosphate synthase) from B. subtilis 168 and GNA1 (encoding GlcNAc-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C were firstly co-overexpressed in B. subtilis; the level of GlcNAc reached 240mg/L in shake flask culture. Next, nagP, encoding the GlcNAc-specific enzyme of phosphotransferase system, was deleted to block the importation of extracellular GlcNAC, thus improving GlcNAc production to 615mg/L in shake flask culture. Then, nagA (encoding GlcNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase), gamA (encoding GlcN-6-phosphate deaminase), and nagB (encoding GlcN-6-phosphate deaminase) were deleted to block the catabolism of intracellular GlcNAc, thereby further increasing the GlcNAc titer to 1.85g/L in shake flask culture. Finally, microbial production of GlcNAc by the engineered B. subtilis 168 was conducted in a 3-L fed-batch bioreactor, and the GlcNAc titer reached 5.19g/L, which was 2.8-fold of that in shake flask culture. This is the first report regarding the pathway engineering of B. subtilis for microbial production of GlcNAc, and provides a good starting point for further metabolic engineering to achieve the industrial production of GlcNAc by a generally regarded as safe strain. PMID:23876412

  3. Extrasynaptic exocytosis and its mechanisms: a source of molecules mediating volume transmission in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Trueta, Citlali; De-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2012-01-01

    We review the evidence of exocytosis from extrasynaptic sites in the soma, dendrites, and axonal varicosities of central and peripheral neurons of vertebrates and invertebrates, with emphasis on somatic exocytosis, and how it contributes to signaling in the nervous system. The finding of secretory vesicles in extrasynaptic sites of neurons, the presence of signaling molecules (namely transmitters or peptides) in the extracellular space outside synaptic clefts, and the mismatch between exocytosis sites and the location of receptors for these molecules in neurons and glial cells, have long suggested that in addition to synaptic communication, transmitters are released, and act extrasynaptically. The catalog of these molecules includes low molecular weight transmitters such as monoamines, acetylcholine, glutamate, gama-aminobutiric acid (GABA), adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP), and a list of peptides including substance P, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and oxytocin. By comparing the mechanisms of extrasynaptic exocytosis of different signaling molecules by various neuron types we show that it is a widespread mechanism for communication in the nervous system that uses certain common mechanisms, which are different from those of synaptic exocytosis but similar to those of exocytosis from excitable endocrine cells. Somatic exocytosis has been measured directly in different neuron types. It starts after high-frequency electrical activity or long experimental depolarizations and may continue for several minutes after the end of stimulation. Activation of L-type calcium channels, calcium release from intracellular stores and vesicle transport towards the plasma membrane couple excitation and exocytosis from small clear or large dense core vesicles in release sites lacking postsynaptic counterparts. The presence of synaptic and extrasynaptic exocytosis endows individual neurons with a wide variety of time- and space-dependent communication possibilities

  4. The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti

    SciTech Connect

    Barbos, D.; Paunoiu, C.; Mladin, M.; Cosma, C.

    2008-08-14

    PGNAA is a very widely applicable technique for determining the presence and amount of many elements simultaneously in samples ranging in size from micrograms to many grams. PGNAA is characterized by its capability for nondestructive multi-elemental analysis and its ability to analyse elements that cannot be determined by INAA. By means of this PGNAA method we are able to increase the performance of INAA method. A facility has been developed at Institute for Nuclear Research-Pitesti so that the unique features of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis can be used to measure trace and major elements in samples. The facility is linked at the radial neutron beam tube at ACPR-TRIGA reactor. During the PGNAA-facility is in use the ACPR reactor will be operated in steady-state mode at 250 KW maximum power. The facility consists of a radial beam-port, external sample position with shielding, and induced prompt gamma-ray counting system.Thermal neutron flux with energy lower than cadmium cut-off at the sample position was measured using thin gold foil is: {phi}{sub scd} = 1.10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}/s with a cadmium ratio of:80.The gamma-ray detection system consist of an HpGe detector of 16% efficiency (detector model GC1518) with 1.85 keV resolution capability. The HpGe is mounted with its axis at 90 deg. with respect to the incident neutron beam at distance about 200mm from the sample position. To establish the performance capabilities of the facility, irradiation of pure element or sample compound standards were performed to identify the gama-ray energies from each element and their count rates.

  5. Anthropometric and Biochemical Characteristics of Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Diagnosed by Non-Invasive Diagnostic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Tatjana; Mekic, Mevludin; Smilic, Ljiljana; Smilic, Tanja; Inić-Kostic, Biljana; Jovicevic, Ljiljana; Mirkovic, Zlatica; Milinic, Srbislava

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Non-alcoholic (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of disease states, from steatosis (fatty liver) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (also called NASH steatosis with inflammatory changes) followed by progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma Excess liver fat is believed to be a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and not surprisingly NASH is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes in humans. Aim of the study: is to establish anthropometric and biochemical specificities in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis diagnosed with non-invasive diagnostic methods Material and methods: Study enrolled 170 participants, 130 with NASH steatosis. The non-alcoholic group (control), consisted of 40 normal weight patients without metabolic syndrome. Alcohol intake was estimated with established protocol. Routine biochemistry analysis were performed by standard laboratory procedures; serum levels of serum levels of fasting cholesterol and triglycerides, fasting glucose and insulin, insulin resistance estimated by HOMA index (Homeostasis model assessment), biochemistry tests and a liver ultrasound examination. Results: In study participants group, patients were more obese comparing with controls p < 0, 01, waist line extent also was of greater statistical significance in the non-alcoholic group fatty liver (p < 0, 01). Comparing biochemical parameter values, significant statistical deference has been noted in glaucosis and insulin levels, total cholesterol and gama-glutamil transferase levels, between groups (p<0, 01). Fasting glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR were significantly greater in study cohort group patients, as was significantly positive correlation between BMI and waist line extent. Conclusion: Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver are excessively obese, have greater waist line extent, consequently insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism, insulin resistance

  6. Monitoring urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of human dietary exposure to acrylamide in combination with acrylamide uptake assessment based on duplicate diets.

    PubMed

    Ruenz, Meike; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Richling, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The present human intervention study investigated the relation between the intake of acrylamide (AA) in diets with minimized, low, and high AA contents and the levels of urinary exposure biomarkers. As biomarkers, the mercapturic acids, N-acetyl-S-(carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) were monitored. The study was performed with 14 healthy male volunteers over a period of 9 days, under controlled conditions excluding any inadvertent AA exposure. Dietary exposure to AA was measured by determining AA contents in duplicates of all meals consumed by the volunteers. The study design included an initial washout period of 3 days on AA-minimized diet, resulting in dietary AA exposure not exceeding 41 ng/kg bw/d. Identical washout periods of 2 days each followed the AA exposure days (day 4, low exposure, and day 7, high exposure). At the respective AA intake days, volunteers ingested 0.6-0.8 (low exposure) or 1.3-1.8 (high exposure) μg AA/kg bw/d with their food. Both low and high AA intakes resulted in an AAMA output within 72 h corresponding to 58 % of the respective AA intake. At the end of the initial 3-day washout period, an AAMA baseline level of 93 ± 31 nmol/d was recorded, suggestive for an assumed net AA baseline exposure level of 0.2-0.3 μg AA/kg bw/d. PMID:25757395

  7. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016. PMID:27347903

  8. Evidence classification of high-throughput protocols and confidence integration in RegulonDB.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Verena; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Huerta, Araceli M; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Salgado, Heladia; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2013-01-01

    RegulonDB provides curated information on the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli and contains both experimental data and computationally predicted objects. To account for the heterogeneity of these data, we introduced in version 6.0, a two-tier rating system for the strength of evidence, classifying evidence as either 'weak' or 'strong' (Gama-Castro,S., Jimenez-Jacinto,V., Peralta-Gil,M. et al. RegulonDB (Version 6.0): gene regulation model of Escherichia Coli K-12 beyond transcription, active (experimental) annotated promoters and textpresso navigation. Nucleic Acids Res., 2008;36:D120-D124.). We now add to our classification scheme the classification of high-throughput evidence, including chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RNA-seq technologies. To integrate these data into RegulonDB, we present two strategies for the evaluation of confidence, statistical validation and independent cross-validation. Statistical validation involves verification of ChIP data for transcription factor-binding sites, using tools for motif discovery and quality assessment of the discovered matrices. Independent cross-validation combines independent evidence with the intention to mutually exclude false positives. Both statistical validation and cross-validation allow to upgrade subsets of data that are supported by weak evidence to a higher confidence level. Likewise, cross-validation of strong confidence data extends our two-tier rating system to a three-tier system by introducing a third confidence score 'confirmed'. Database URL: http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/ PMID:23327937

  9. Liquid-vapor interfaces of patchy colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksy, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the liquid-vapor interface of a model of patchy colloids. This model consists of hard spheres decorated with short-ranged attractive sites ("patches") of different types on their surfaces. We focus on a one-component fluid with two patches of type A and nine patches of type B (2 A 9 B colloids), which has been found to exhibit reentrant liquid-vapor coexistence curves and very low-density liquid phases. We have used the density-functional theory form of Wertheim's first-order perturbation theory of association, as implemented by Yu and Wu [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7094 (2002), 10.1063/1.1463435], to calculate the surface tension, and the density and degree of association profiles, at the liquid-vapor interface of our model. In reentrant systems, where A B bonds dominate, an unusual thickening of the interface is observed at low temperatures. Furthermore, the surface tension versus temperature curve reaches a maximum, in agreement with Bernardino and Telo da Gama's mesoscopic Landau-Safran theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 116103 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.116103]. If B B attractions are also present, competition between A B and B B bonds gradually restores the monotonic temperature dependence of the surface tension. Lastly, the interface is "hairy," i.e., it contains a region where the average chain length is close to that in the bulk liquid, but where the density is that of the vapor. Sufficiently strong B B attractions remove these features, and the system reverts to the behavior seen in atomic fluids.

  10. Acute and chronic tramadol administration impair spatial memory in rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Rabbani, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Bagheri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride, a synthetic opioid, acts via a multiple mechanism of action. Tramadol can potentially change the behavioral phenomena. The present study evaluates the effect of tramadol after single or multiple dose/s on the spatial memory of rat using object recognition task (ORT). Tramadol, 20 mg/kg, was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) as a single dose or once a day for 21 successive days considered as acute or chronic treatment respectively. After treatment, animals underwent two trials in the ORT. In the first trial (T1), animals encountered with two identical objects for exploration in a five-minute period. After 1 h, in the T2 trial, the animals were exposed to a familiar and a nonfamiliar object. The exploration times and frequency of the exploration for any objects were recorded. The results showed that tramadol decreased the exploration times for the nonfamiliar object in the T2 trial when administered either as a single dose (P<0.001) or as the multiple dose (P<0.05) compared to the respective control groups. Both acute and chronic tramadol administration eliminated the different frequency of exploration between the familiar and nonfamiliar objects. Our findings revealed that tramadol impaired memory when administered acutely or chronically. Single dose administration of tramadol showed more destructive effect than multiple doses of tramadol on the memory. The observed data can be explained by the inhibitory effects of tramadol on the wide range of neurotransmitters and receptors including muscarinic, N-methyl D-aspartate, AMPA as well as some second messenger like cAMP and cGMP or its stimulatory effect on the opioid, gama amino butyric acid, dopamine or serotonin in the brain. PMID:27051432

  11. Seasonality of the activity pattern of Callithrix penicillata (Primates, Callitrichidae) in the cerrado (scrub savanna vegetation).

    PubMed

    Vilela, S L; de Faria, D S

    2004-05-01

    Two wild groups of Callithrix penicillata, the Black Pincelled Marmoset, were observed from January to September 1998, in two areas, one an area of dense scrub savanna vegetation (cerrado) and the other, a semidecidual woodland (cerradão), both within the boundaries of the Ecological Reserve of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics), in an environmentally protected area, the APA (Portuguese abbreviation for "environmental protected area") Gama/Cabeça-de-Veado, Brasília, DF. The behavioral data collected during the rainy (January 15 to April 15) and dry season (June 1 to September 15) were compared. Because of the proximity to the Reserve facilities, the group from the dense scrub savanna vegetation (CD) was submitted to antropic impacts different from the group in the semidecidual woodland (CE), which was using as territory an area that had been suffering from man-made fires every two years as part of a long-term experimental project on fire impacts. The behavioral data was quantified by instantaneous cross-section ("scan sampling") every ten minutes with records of locomotion, rest, foraging for insects, use of exudate, and feeding. During the whole year, the greatest percentage of time spent by CE and CD was in foraging for insects, with 44% and 39%, respectively. It was evident when comparing the data for the two seasons that, for both groups, foraging for insects was more intense during the dry season, possibly to complement the shortage of food, and locomotion increased during the rainy season. The greater the availability and distribution of fruit in the areas, the greater the locomotion of the groups to obtain these resources. None of the other behavioral patterns, including the use of exudates, presented significant differences between the two seasons. Both groups foraged more frequently during the dry season and locomoted more during the rainy one. PMID:15462311

  12. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Thermodynamic Advantage of Organic Acids in Facilitating Formation of Bisulfate Ion Clusters: Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Lin, Wei; Deng, Shihu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Weijun; Paesani, Francesco; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-03-07

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. Such findings have stimulated theoretical studies with the aim of understanding interaction of organic acids with common aerosol nucleation precursors like bisulfate (HSO4-). In this Letter, we report a combined negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of molecular clusters formed by HSO4- with succinic acid (SUA, HO2C(CH2)2CO2H), HSO4-(SUA)n (n = 0-2), along with HSO4-(H2O)n and HSO4-(H2SO4)n. It is found that one SUA molecule can stabilize HSO4- by ca. 39 kcal/mol, triple the corresponding value that one water molecule is capable of (ca. 13 kcal/mol). Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations reveal the most plausible structures of these clusters and attribute the stability of these clusters due to formation of strong hydrogen bonds. This work provides direct experimental evidence showing significant thermodynamic advantage by involving organic acid molecules to promote formation and growth in bisulfate clusters and aerosols.

  13. Distribution and infection frequency of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in Maryland populations of the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum) and culture in an Anopheles gambiae mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Ren, Xiaoxia; Norris, Douglas E; Rasgon, Jason L

    2012-02-01

    Amblyomma americanum (the lone star tick) is a broadly distributed tick that transmits multiple pathogens of humans and domestic animals. 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' is a spotted-fever group rickettsial species that is potentially associated with human disease. In 2008 and 2009, we assayed over 500 unfed adult ticks from 19 Maryland populations for the presence of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii'. Infection frequencies ranged from 33% to 100%, with an average infection rate of 60% in 2008 and 69% in 2009. Infection frequencies did not differ statistically between sexes. To develop a system in which to study 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' in the laboratory, we used a cell line developed from Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes (Sua5B) to isolate and culture 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' from field-collected A. americanum ticks from 2 localities in Maryland. After infection, Sua5B cells were infected for more than 40 passages. Infection was confirmed by Rickettsia-specific PCR, gene sequencing, and Rickettsia-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These data show that 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' is widespread in Maryland A. americanum populations and that Sua5B cells are a useful tool for culturing Rickettsia infections from wild ticks. PMID:22309857

  14. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2013. The logical extension of sUAS gas concentration measurement is quantification of flux rate. We will discuss the preliminary strategy for quantitative flux determination, including intrinsic challenges and heritage from airborne science campaigns, associated with this point source flux quantification. This system approach forms the basis for intelligent autonomous quantitative characterization of gas plumes, which holds great value for applications in commercial, regulatory, and safety environments.

  15. Febuxostat (Feburic tablet) in the management of hyperuricemia in a general practice cohort of Japanese patients with a high prevalence of cardiovascular problems.

    PubMed

    Hiramitsu, Shinya; Ishiguro, Yoshiaki; Matsuyama, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kenji; Kato, Kazuo; Noba, Manji; Uemura, Akihisa; Matsubara, Yoshirou; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kani, Atsushi; Tokuda, Mamoru; Kato, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Tatsushi; Matsubara, Shiro; Mori, Kazuma; Kimura, Hisashi; Shino, Kenji; Kato, Yasuchika; Ishii, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is increasing in prevalence and this is paralleled by an increased incidence of acute gout. In addition, there is growing evidence of an association between high serum levels of uric acid (sUA) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this preliminary report, we present 12-16 week results from a multicenter, general practice study in which we evaluated the usefulness of febuxostat in a cohort of untreated patients with hyperuricemia with a high prevalence of CVD. Febuxostat titrated from 10 mg/day up to 40 mg/day resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant reductions in sUA after 12-16 weeks. A "responder" level of 6.0 mg/dL or lower was achieved in 95 of 100 (95%) patients. Significant reductions in sUA were achieved regardless of the presence/absence of coexisting diseases (e.g. CVD, renal insufficiency, diabetes and obesity) or the class of antihypertensive agent being used by the patient. No serious adverse reactions were noted with febuxostat. Although allopurinol has been used generally for hyperuricemia/gout, it is excreted fully via the kidneys, restricting its use in patients with reduced renal function, and its three-times-daily administration leads to poor adherence. Based on the results of this study, febuxostat may provide an easier option than allopurinol for clinicians specializing in CVDs. PMID:24164405

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    PubMed Central

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10−8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10−7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  17. PubMed

    Silva, Cristiane Gonçalves da; Santos, Alessandro Oliveira; Licciardi, Daniele Carli; Paiva, Vera; Parker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Esse artigo descreve como jovens religiosos e autoridades religiosas de sua comunidade compreendem a sexualidade, considerando suas experiências pessoais e como membros de comunidades religiosas. A análise pretende contribuir para que políticas públicas dedicadas à promoção da saúde sexual da juventude considerem a religiosidade, no contexto de um estado laico e da promoção do direito à prevenção. Foram realizadas 26 entrevistas abertas e semidirigidas em diferentes comunidades da região metropolitana da cidade de São Paulo (comunidades católicas, da umbanda, do candomblé e de diferentes denominações evangélicas) sobre iniciação sexual, casamento, gravidez, contracepção e prevenção das DST/Aids, homossexualidade, aborto e direitos humanos. Observou-se como jovens e autoridades religiosas convivem com a tensão entre tradição e modernidade e os distintos discursos sobre a sexualidade. Como sujeitos religiosos (do discurso religioso) e sujeitos sexuais (de discursos sobre sexualidade), devem ser incorporados pelos programas como sujeitos de direito nos termos de sua religiosidade. PMID:21886456

  18. Religiosidade, juventude e sexualidade: entre a autonomia e a rigidez1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cristiane Gonçalves da; Santos, Alessandro Oliveira; Licciardi, Daniele Carli; Paiva, Vera; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Esse artigo descreve como jovens religiosos e autoridades religiosas de sua comunidade compreendem a sexualidade, considerando suas experiências pessoais e como membros de comunidades religiosas. A análise pretende contribuir para que políticas públicas dedicadas à promoção da saúde sexual da juventude considerem a religiosidade, no contexto de um estado laico e da promoção do direito à prevenção. Foram realizadas 26 entrevistas abertas e semidirigidas em diferentes comunidades da região metropolitana da cidade de São Paulo (comunidades católicas, da umbanda, do candomblé e de diferentes denominações evangélicas) sobre iniciação sexual, casamento, gravidez, contracepção e prevenção das DST/Aids, homossexualidade, aborto e direitos humanos. Observou-se como jovens e autoridades religiosas convivem com a tensão entre tradição e modernidade e os distintos discursos sobre a sexualidade. Como sujeitos religiosos (do discurso religioso) e sujeitos sexuais (de discursos sobre sexualidade), devem ser incorporados pelos programas como sujeitos de direito nos termos de sua religiosidade. PMID:21886456

  19. Acute kidney injury observed during phase 1 clinical trials of a novel xanthine oxidase/URAT1 dual inhibitor PF-06743649.

    PubMed

    Dua, Pinky; Gurrell, Rachel; Kirby, Simon; Sudworth, Maria; Loudon, Peter T

    2016-08-01

    The objective of these clinical studies was to assess the safety and urate lowering activity of a novel urate transporter 1 (URAT1)/ xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor PF-06743649 in healthy subjects and gout patients. Escalating doses of PF-06743649 or placebo were given to healthy young subjects, healthy elderly subjects and gout patients. Serum uric acid (sUA) and urinary pharmacodynamic markers were assayed, and safety was assessed by collection of adverse events and assessment of safety labs, ECGs and vital signs. Administration of PF-06743649 led to rapid decrease in sUA in all cohorts; in gout patients, a change from baseline of 69 % was observed for the 40 mg dose. Urinary and serum biomarkers were consistent with inhibition of both URAT1 and XO. Although dosing was otherwise well tolerated, two subjects experienced serious adverse events of acute kidney injury. Both subjects exhibited increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen in the first 3 days post first dose and were hospitalised. One subject exhibited oliguria for the first 24 h. Both subjects made a complete recovery with minimal intervention. PF-06743649 was effective at rapidly lowering sUA, but further development was terminated for an identified renal safety risk. PMID:27094945

  20. Insect detection and nitrogen management for irrigated potatoes using remote sensing from small unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond; Rondon, Silvia I.; Hamm, Philip B.; Turner, Robert W.; Bruce, Alan E.; Brungardt, Josh J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing with small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) has potential applications in agriculture because low flight altitudes allow image acquisition at very high spatial resolution. We set up experiments at the Oregon State University Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center with different platforms and sensors to assess advantages and disadvantages of sUAS for precision farming. In 2013, we conducted an experiment with 4 levels of N fertilizer, and followed the changes in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over time. In late June, there were no differences in chlorophyll content or leaf area index (LAI) among the 3 higher application rates. Consistent with the field data, only plots with the lowest rate of applied N were distinguished by low NDVI. In early August, N deficiency was determined by NDVI, but it was too late to mitigate losses in potato yield and quality. Populations of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) may rapidly increase, devouring the shoots, thus early detection and treatment could prevent yield losses. In 2014, we conducted an experiment with 4 levels of CPB infestation. Over one day, damage from CPB in some plots increased from 0 to 19%. A visual ranking of damage was not correlated with the total number of CPB or treatment. Plot-scale vegetation indices were not correlated with damage, although the damaged area determined by object-based feature extraction was highly correlated. Methods based on object-based image analysis of sUAS data have potential for early detection and reduced cost.

  1. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10(-4)), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10(-3)) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  2. Wavelet-Monte Carlo Hybrid System for HLW Nuclide Migration Modeling and Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nasif, Hesham; Neyama, Atsushi

    2003-02-26

    This paper presents results of an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for performance of the different barriers of high level radioactive waste repositories. SUA is a tool to perform the uncertainty and sensitivity on the output of Wavelet Integrated Repository System model (WIRS), which is developed to solve a system of nonlinear partial differential equations arising from the model formulation of radionuclide transport through repository. SUA performs sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) on a sample output from Monte Carlo simulation. The sample is generated by WIRS and contains the values of the output values of the maximum release rate in the form of time series and values of the input variables for a set of different simulations (runs), which are realized by varying the model input parameters. The Monte Carlo sample is generated with SUA as a pure random sample or using Latin Hypercube sampling technique. Tchebycheff and Kolmogrov confidence bounds are compute d on the maximum release rate for UA and effective non-parametric statistics to rank the influence of the model input parameters SA. Based on the results, we point out parameters that have primary influences on the performance of the engineered barrier system of a repository. The parameters found to be key contributor to the release rate are selenium and Cesium distribution coefficients in both geosphere and major water conducting fault (MWCF), the diffusion depth and water flow rate in the excavation-disturbed zone (EDZ).

  3. Prediction of imagined single-joint movements in a person with high-level tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, A Bolu; Simeral, John D; Donoghue, John P; Hochberg, Leigh R; Kirsch, Robert F

    2012-10-01

    Cortical neuroprostheses for movement restoration require developing models for relating neural activity to desired movement. Previous studies have focused on correlating single-unit activities (SUA) in primary motor cortex to volitional arm movements in able-bodied primates. The extent of the cortical information relevant to arm movements remaining in severely paralyzed individuals is largely unknown. We record intracortical signals using a microelectrode array chronically implanted in the precentral gyrus of a person with tetraplegia, and estimate positions of imagined single-joint arm movements. Using visually guided motor imagery, the participant imagined performing eight distinct single-joint arm movements, while SUA, multispike trains (MSP), multiunit activity, and local field potential time (LFPrms), and frequency signals (LFPstft) were recorded. Using linear system identification, imagined joint trajectories were estimated with 20-60% variance explained, with wrist flexion/extension predicted the best and pronation/supination the poorest. Statistically, decoding of MSP and LFPstft yielded estimates that equaled those of SUA. Including multiple signal types in a decoder increased prediction accuracy in all cases. We conclude that signals recorded from a single restricted region of the precentral gyrus in this person with tetraplegia contained useful information regarding the intended movements of upper extremity joints. PMID:22851229

  4. Association of Serum Uric Acid with Cardiovascular Disease in Taiwanese Patients with Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tsung-Yuan; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Jung-Sheng; Po, Helen L.; Chou, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Yeng; Ueng, Kwo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperuricemia is closely linked to hypertension and may be a marker of susceptibility or an intermediate step in the development of metabolic syndrome. However, recently, there have been conflicting conclusions regarding the independent role of uric acid as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The specific role of serum uric acid (SUA) in relation to CVD remains controversial, and there are limited reports utilizing Asian data available on this issue. Therefore, this study investigated the association between SUA and cardiovascular disease in Taiwanese patients with essential hypertension. Methods There were 3472 participants from 55-80 years of age (1763 males, 1709 females) from 38 sites across Taiwan in this hospital-based cross-sectional study, covering the period November 2005 to December 2006. The CVD included diagnosed angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and stroke. Results Hyperuricemia is positively associated with CVD in both sexes when a unified cut-off SUA level of 7 mg/dl was used. However, the odds ratios (ORs) for all CVD were greater in magnitude in hypertensive women than in men when there was co-morbidity of diabetes. The ORs of all CVD in the diabetes subgroup were statistically significantly (p = 0.01 for women, p = 0.07 for men). By multivariate analysis, hyperuricemia did not confer an increased risk of CVD. Conclusions Hyperuricemia may be associated with increased risk of CVD, but is not an independent risk factor of CVD in essential hypertensive Taiwanese patients. PMID:27122845

  5. Point Cloud Generation from sUAS-Mounted iPhone Imagery: Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladai, A. D.; Miller, J.

    2014-11-01

    The rapidly growing use of sUAS technology and fast sensor developments continuously inspire mapping professionals to experiment with low-cost airborne systems. Smartphones has all the sensors used in modern airborne surveying systems, including GPS, IMU, camera, etc. Of course, the performance level of the sensors differs by orders, yet it is intriguing to assess the potential of using inexpensive sensors installed on sUAS systems for topographic applications. This paper focuses on the quality analysis of point clouds generated based on overlapping images acquired by an iPhone 5s mounted on a sUAS platform. To support the investigation, test data was acquired over an area with complex topography and varying vegetation. In addition, extensive ground control, including GCPs and transects were collected with GSP and traditional geodetic surveying methods. The statistical and visual analysis is based on a comparison of the UAS data and reference dataset. The results with the evaluation provide a realistic measure of data acquisition system performance. The paper also gives a recommendation for data processing workflow to achieve the best quality of the final products: the digital terrain model and orthophoto mosaic. After a successful data collection the main question is always the reliability and the accuracy of the georeferenced data.

  6. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  7. Tracing Large-Scale Structure with Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    In this thesis, I investigate the spatial distribution of radio sources, and quantify their clustering strength over a range of redshifts, up to z _ 2:2, using various forms of the correlation function measured with data from several multi-wavelength surveys. I present the optical spectra of 30 radio AGN (S1:4 > 100 mJy) in the GAMA/H-ATLAS fields, for which emission line redshifts could be deduced, from observations of 79 target sources with the EFOSC2 spectrograph on the NTT. The mean redshift of these sources is z = 1:2; 12 were identified as quasars (40 per cent), and 6 redshifts (out of 24 targets) were found for AGN hosts to multiple radio components. While obtaining spectra for hosts of these multi-component sources is possible, their lower success rate highlights the difficulty in acheiving a redshift-complete radio sample. Taking an existing spectroscopic redshift survey (GAMA) and radio sources from the FIRST survey (S1:4 > 1 mJy), I then present a cross-matched radio sample with 1,635 spectroscopic redshifts with a median value of z = 0:34. The spatial correlation function of this sample is used to find the redshiftspace (s0) and real-space correlation lengths (r0 _ 8:2 h Mpc), and a mass bias of _1.9. Insight into the redshift-dependence of these quantities is gained by using the angular correlation function and Limber inversion to measure the same spatial clustering parameters. Photometric redshifts! from SDSS/UKIDSS are incorporated to produce a larger matched radio sample at z ' 0:48 (and low- and high-redshift subsamples at z ' 0:30 and z ' 0:65), while their redshift distribution is subtracted from that taken from the SKADS radio simulations to estimate the redshift distribution of the remaining unmatched sources (z ' 1:55). The observed bias evolution over this redshift range is compared with model predictions based on the SKADS simulations, with good agreement at low redshift. The bias found at high redshift significantly exceeds these

  8. Digitalización de diapositivas del Sol en H α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missio, H.; Montenegro, C.; Montenegro, R.

    El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido el de obtener imágenes digitalizadas de las diapositivas tomadas del Sol en luz de hidrógeno de la línea correspondiente a Hα, y de esta manera llegar a convertir las mismas a un archivo digital para poder ser tratadas luego por computadora y poder contabilizar con exactitud, mediante un programa adecuado para tal fin, las zonas activas del Sol en la imagen digitalizada. En principio, para llegar a esto se pensó en la utilización de medios accesibles, y como detector se utilizó un fototransistor ubicado dentro de un soporte rectangular sobre dos ejes de desplazamiento X e Y. Se han obtenido con este procedimiento imágenes de buena calidad, construídas a partir de tres datos digitalizados en cada barrido que aportan la posición X e Y y la intensidad del pixel en ese punto indicada en 255 tonos de grises.

  9. Espectroscopia del Cometa Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, O.; Fuenmayor, F.; Ferrin, L.; Bulka, P.; Mendoza, C.

    1987-05-01

    Se reportan observaciones espectroscópicas del cometa Halley. Los espectros fueron tomados usando el espectrógrafo del telescopio reflector de 1 metro del Observatorio Nacional de Venezuela. Se utilizó óptica azul, con una red de difracción de 600 lineas/min, obteniéndose una dispersión de 74.2 A/mm y una resolución de 2.5 A, en el rango espectral de 3500 a 6500 A. Seis placas fueron tomadas con emulsión IIa-O y dos con IIa-D. Los tiempos de exposición fueron entre 10 y 150 minutos. El cometa se encontraba entre 0.70 y 1.04 UA del Sol, y entre 1.28 y 0.73 UA de la Tierra. Las emisiones más prominentes en el espectro, son las del CN, C2, y C3. Otras emisiones detectadas corresponden a CH, NH2 y Na. Los espectros muestran un fuerte continuo, indicando un contenido significativo de polvo. Se detectó mayor intensidad del contínuo, en la dirección anti solar, lo cual es evidencia de la cola de polvo.

  10. Estudio teórico del CO2. Orbitales de valencia y del ``core''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalla Gutiérrez, E.

    Hemos calculado las intensidades de las transiciones E1 a los miembros de las series de Rydberg con origen en los orbitales ``no enlazantes'' del dióxido de carbono, especie de conocida relevancia atmosférica. Se han computado, asimismo, los continuos de fotoionización correspondientes a los distintos canales de ionización, representándolos como densidad espectral de fuerza de oscilador frente a la energía del fotón incidente; mostramos los resultados df/dE para la fotoionización total de esta especie en el intervalo 15-60 eV. Todos los cálculos se han llevado a cabo mediante la formulación Molecular del Método de los Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico, MQDO [1,2]. La calidad de los resultados que presentamos se ha evaluado en base a la comparación con los datos, tanto experimentales como teóricos, disponibles en la bibliografía. El acuerdo encontrado es altamente satisfactorio

  11. Modelo semi-empírico de protuberancia solar a partir del diagnóstico de densidades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirigliano, D.; Vial, J. C.; Rovira, M.

    A partir de la observación del espectro del quintuplete de C III alrededor de 1175 Å, se ha realizado el diagnóstico de la densidad y presión electrónica, basado en el cálculo del cociente de las intensidades observadas. Una vez establecida la densidad electrónica, y con el cálculo de las velocidades Doppler, hemos investigado el flujo de masa en la protuberancia en función de la temperatura. Estableciendo como hipótesis la conservación del número de partículas que ingresan y salen del cuerpo de la protuberancia, se investiga la variación del área de un tubo de flujo semi-empírico en función de la temperatura. A partir de dicho diagnóstico, se examina el comportamiento del radio del tubo magnético en función de la temperatura, los que dan cuenta de la abertura de las líneas de campo magnético que confinan el plasma y de la divergencia del campo magnético en diferentes alturas de la atmósfera solar.

  12. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = -0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = -0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = -0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = -0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. PMID:27328642

  13. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = −0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = −0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. PMID:27328642

  14. Development of Flight-Test Performance Estimation Techniques for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrink, Matthew Henry

    This dissertation provides a flight-testing framework for assessing the performance of fixed-wing, small-scale unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) by leveraging sub-system models of components unique to these vehicles. The development of the sub-system models, and their links to broader impacts on sUAS performance, is the key contribution of this work. The sub-system modeling and analysis focuses on the vehicle's propulsion, navigation and guidance, and airframe components. Quantification of the uncertainty in the vehicle's power available and control states is essential for assessing the validity of both the methods and results obtained from flight-tests. Therefore, detailed propulsion and navigation system analyses are presented to validate the flight testing methodology. Propulsion system analysis required the development of an analytic model of the propeller in order to predict the power available over a range of flight conditions. The model is based on the blade element momentum (BEM) method. Additional corrections are added to the basic model in order to capture the Reynolds-dependent scale effects unique to sUAS. The model was experimentally validated using a ground based testing apparatus. The BEM predictions and experimental analysis allow for a parameterized model relating the electrical power, measurable during flight, to the power available required for vehicle performance analysis. Navigation system details are presented with a specific focus on the sensors used for state estimation, and the resulting uncertainty in vehicle state. Uncertainty quantification is provided by detailed calibration techniques validated using quasi-static and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) ground based testing. The HIL methods introduced use a soft real-time flight simulator to provide inertial quality data for assessing overall system performance. Using this tool, the uncertainty in vehicle state estimation based on a range of sensors, and vehicle operational environments is

  15. Cost-effectiveness of febuxostat in chronic gout.

    PubMed

    Beard, Stephen M; von Scheele, Birgitta G; Nuki, George; Pearson, Isobel V

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate data on the cost-effectiveness of febuxostat compared with standard clinical practice with allopurinol in patients with gout that was presented to the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) in 2010. A Markov health-state model estimated the direct health-related costs and clinical benefits expressed as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Adults with chronic gout and established hyperuricaemia received treatment sequences of daily doses of allopurinol 300 mg alone or allopurinol 300 mg followed by febuxostat 80 mg/120 mg. The proportion of patients achieving the target serum uric acid (sUA) level of less than 6 mg/dl (0.36 mmol/l) was linked to the utility per sUA level to generate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Second-line therapy with febuxostat 80 mg/120 mg versus with allopurinol alone resulted in an ICER of £3,578 per QALY over a 5-year time horizon. Additional univariate analyses showed that ICER values were robust and ranged from £2,550 to £7,165 per QALY when different parameters (e.g., low- and high-dose allopurinol titrations and variations in treatment-induced flare rates) were varied. Febuxostat reduces sUA below the European League Against Rheumatism target of 0.36 mmol/l (6 mg/dl) in significantly more patients with gout than allopurinol in its most frequently prescribed dose of 300 mg per day. The SMC accepted febuxostat as cost-effective as a suitable second-line option for urate-lowering therapy for the treatment of patients with chronic hyperuricaemia in conditions where urate deposition has already occurred (including a history or presence of tophus and/or gouty arthritis) when treatment with allopurinol was inadequate, not tolerated, or contraindicated. PMID:23719971

  16. Febuxostat: a review of its use in the treatment of hyperuricaemia in patients with gout.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2015-03-01

    Febuxostat (Adenuric(®), Uloric(®), Feburic(®)) is an orally-active, potent, non-purine, selective xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In the EU, it is indicated in adults for the treatment of chronic hyperuricaemia in conditions where urate deposition has already occurred. Unlike allopurinol, the prototypical xanthine oxidase inhibitor that is the cornerstone therapy for chronic gout, febuxostat does not require dosage adjustment in patients with mild or moderate renal impairment. In randomized, double-blind studies, 6-12 months' treatment with febuxostat at dosages approved for use in the EU (80 and 120 mg/day) was significantly more effective in lowering serum uric acid (sUA) levels in patients with hyperuricaemia and gout than allopurinol at dosages commonly prescribed in practice (100-300 mg/day); febuxostat demonstrated greater urate-lowering efficacy than allopurinol in patients with renal impairment. In open-label extension studies, 3-5 years' treatment with febuxostat maintained a target sUA level of <6.0 mg/dL in most patients; sustained reduction in sUA level was associated with near elimination of gout flares and improved tophus status. Febuxostat therapy was generally well tolerated during clinical development; frequently reported adverse events included liver function abnormalities, diarrhoea and rash. Cardiovascular (CV) events were the most common serious adverse events; the comparative safety of febuxostat and allopurinol is being examined further in large, ongoing trials in patients with gout who already have, or are at risk of developing, CV disease. In conclusion, febuxostat is a well established antihyperuricaemic agent that provides an effective alternative to allopurinol for the management of chronic gout. PMID:25724536

  17. Coupled Boltzmann computation of mixed axion neutralino dark matter in the SUSY DFSZ axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyu Jung; Baer, Howard; Lessa, Andre; Serce, Hasan

    2014-10-01

    The supersymmetrized DFSZ axion model is highly motivated not only because it offers solutions to both the gauge hierarchy and strong CP problems, but also because it provides a solution to the SUSY μ-problem which naturally allows for a Little Hierarchy. We compute the expected mixed axion-neutralino dark matter abundance for the SUSY DFSZ axion model in two benchmark cases—a natural SUSY model with a standard neutralino underabundance (SUA) and an mSUGRA/CMSSM model with a standard overabundance (SOA). Our computation implements coupled Boltzmann equations which track the radiation density along with neutralino, axion, axion CO (produced via coherent oscillations), saxion, saxion CO, axino and gravitino densities. In the SUSY DFSZ model, axions, axinos and saxions go through the process of freeze-in—in contrast to freeze-out or out-of-equilibrium production as in the SUSY KSVZ model—resulting in thermal yields which are largely independent of the re-heat temperature. We find the SUA case with suppressed saxion-axion couplings (ξ=0) only admits solutions for PQ breaking scale falesssim 6× 1012 GeV where the bulk of parameter space tends to be axion-dominated. For SUA with allowed saxion-axion couplings (ξ =1), then fa values up to ~ 1014 GeV are allowed. For the SOA case, almost all of SUSY DFSZ parameter space is disallowed by a combination of overproduction of dark matter, overproduction of dark radiation or violation of BBN constraints. An exception occurs at very large fa~ 1015-1016 GeV where large entropy dilution from CO-produced saxions leads to allowed models.

  18. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  19. Common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2 have stronger impact on hyperuricemia progression than typical environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Oikawa, Yuji; Takada, Tappei; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shimizu, Seiko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Chiba, Toshinori; Abe, Junko; Wakai, Kenji; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Tamura, Takashi; Shichijo, Yuka; Akashi, Airi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gout/hyperuricemia is a common multifactorial disease having typical environmental risks. Recently, common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2, a urate exporter gene also known as BCRP, are revealed to be a major cause of gout/hyperuricemia. Here, we compared the influence of ABCG2 dysfunction on serum uric acid (SUA) levels with other typical risk factors in a cohort of 5,005 Japanese participants. ABCG2 dysfunction was observed in 53.3% of the population investigated, and its population-attributable risk percent (PAR%) for hyperuricemia was 29.2%, much higher than those of the other typical environmental risks, i.e. overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25.0; PAR% = 18.7%), heavy drinking (>196 g/week (male) or >98 g/week (female) of pure alcohol; PAR% = 15.4%), and aging (≥60 years old; PAR% = 5.74%). SUA significantly increased as the ABCG2 function decreased (P = 5.99 × 10(-19)). A regression analysis revealed that ABCG2 dysfunction had a stronger effect than other factors; a 25% decrease in ABCG2 function was equivalent to "an increase of BMI by 1.97-point" or "552.1 g/week alcohol intake as pure ethanol" in terms of ability to increase SUA. Therefore, ABCG2 dysfunction originating from common genetic variants has a much stronger impact on the progression of hyperuricemia than other familiar risks. Our study provides a better understanding of common genetic factors for common diseases. PMID:24909660

  20. Functional interaction between TFIIB and the Rpb9 (Ssu73) subunit of RNA polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z W; Tessmer, A; Hampsey, M

    1996-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the SSU71, SSU72 and SSU73 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified as either suppressors or enhancers of a TFIIB defect (sua7-1) that confers both a cold-sensitive growth phenotype and a downstream shift in transcription start site selection. The SSU71 (TFG1) gene encodes the largest subunit of TFIIF and SSU72 encodes a novel protein that is essential for cell viability. Here we report that SSU73 is identical to RPB9, the gene encoding the 14.2 kDa subunit of RNA polymerase II. The ssu73-1 suppressor compensates for both the growth defect and the downstream shift in start site selection associated with sua7-1. These effects are similar to those of the ssu71-1 suppressor and distinct from the ssu72-1 enhancer. The ssu73-1 allele was retrieved and sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation at codon 107. Consequently, ssu73-1 encodes a truncated form of Rpb9 lacking the C-terminal 16 amino acids. This Rpb9 derivative retains at least partial function since the ssu73-1 mutant exhibits none of the growth defects associated with rpb9 null mutants. However, in a SUA7+ background, ssu73-1 confers the same upstream shift at ADH1 as an rpb9 null allele. This suggests that the C-terminus of Rpb9 functions in start site selection and demonstrates that the previously observed effects of rpb9 mutations on start site selection are not necessarily due to complete loss of function. These results establish a functional interaction between TFIIB and the Rpb9 subunit of RNA polymerase II and suggest that these two components of the preinitiation complex interact during transcription start site selection. PMID:8692696

  1. Is coffee consumption associated with a lower risk of hyperuricaemia or gout? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Tuo; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Yi-lin; Yang, Ye; Ding, Xiang; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations of coffee consumption with the serum uric acid (SUA) level, hyperuricaemia (HU) and gout. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources and study eligibility criteria A comprehensive literature search up to April 2015, using PubMed and EMBASE databases, was conducted to identify the observational researches that examined the associations of coffee consumption with the SUA level, HU and gout. The standard mean difference (SMD), OR, relative risk (RR) and their corresponding 95% CIs for the highest and the lowest categories of coffee intake were determined. Results A total of 11 observational studies (6 cross-sectional, 3 cohort and 2 case–control studies) were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The combined SMD suggested that there was no significant difference between the highest and the lowest coffee intake categories in terms of the SUA level (SMD=−0.09, 95% CI −0.23 to 0.05; p=0.21). Meanwhile, the overall multivariable adjusted OR for HU showed no significant difference between the highest and the lowest coffee intake categories (OR=0.84, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.09; p=0.20). However, the overall multivariable adjusted RR for gout showed a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and the incidence of gout (RR=0.43, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.59, p<0.001). Conclusions Current evidences are insufficient to validate the association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of HU. Owing to the limited number of studies, the available data show that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of incident gout. Further well-designed prospective researches and randomised controlled trials are therefore needed to elaborate on these issues. PMID:27401353

  2. Stars with Extended Atmospheres. Homage to Cees de Jager.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2003-05-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA: Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the talks presented on 3 May, 2001 as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Kees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  3. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  4. Long-term decoding stability of local field potentials from silicon arrays in primate motor cortex during a 2D center out task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Li, Yue; Wang, Yiwen; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Many serious concerns exist in the long-term stability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) based on spike signals (single unit activity, SUA; multi unit activity, MUA). Some studies showed local field potentials (LFPs) could offer a stable decoding performance. However, the decoding stability of LFPs was examined only when high quality spike signals were recorded. Here we aim to examine the long-term decoding stability of LFPs over a larger time scale when the quality of spike signals was from good to poor or even no spike was recorded. Approach. Neural signals were collected from motor cortex of three monkeys via silicon arrays over 230, 290 and 690 days post-implantation when they performed 2D center out task. To compare long-term stability between LFPs and spike signals, we examined them in neural signals characteristics, directional tuning properties and offline decoding performance, respectively. Main results. We observed slow decreasing trends in the number of LFP channels recorded and mean LFP power in different frequency bands when spike signals quality decayed over time. The number of significantly directional tuning LFP channels decreased more slowly than that of tuning SUA and MUA. The variable preferred directions for the same signal features across sessions indicated non-stationarity of neural activity. We also found that LFPs achieved better decoding performance than SUA and MUA in retrained decoder when the quality of spike signals seriously decayed. Especially, when no spike was recorded in one monkey after 671 days post-implantation, LFPs still provided some kinematic information. In addition, LFPs outperformed MUA in long-term decoding stability in a static decoder. Significance. Our results suggested that LFPs were more durable and could provide better decoding performance when spike signals quality seriously decayed. It might be due to their resistance to recording degradation and their high redundancy among channels.

  5. A Utilização da Astronomia como Tema Interdisciplinar e Aplicações de Objetos de Aprendizagem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. A.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2008-09-01

    Este trabalho visa analisar a possibilidade de relacionar conteúdos aplicados no ensino fundamental e médio de forma interdisciplinar por intermédio da astronomia, com a intervenção de objetos de aprendizagem que possam integrar as disciplinas e a utilização de recursos tecnológicos. Em uma pesquisa prévia com 20 professores de uma escola estadual situada na cidade de Guarulhos foi observado que apenas 25% dos professores utilizam algum recurso tecnológico para o desenvolvimento de conteúdos pertinentes à sua disciplina, tais como sites e softwares educativos, sendo que a maioria absoluta continua ensinando apenas com livros didáticos. A maior parte dos professores apresenta dificuldades em trabalhar sua disciplina de forma interdisciplinar, ou seja, 75% dos professores preferem aplicar os conteúdos seguindo uma hierarquia linear de tópicos, evitando a discussão de temas que de alguma forma estão relacionados. A astronomia pode vir à fascinar o ser humano e despertar sua curiosidade promovendo um maior interesse no aprendizado, podendo favorecer análises interdisciplinares de forma lógica e objetiva, desta forma colocar a astronomia como tema motivador interdisciplinar, pode ser relevante no que se refere ao distanciamento da fragmentação dos conteúdos. No Estado de São Paulo, a implantação da proposta curricular no ensino fundamental e médio mostra claramente a inserção da astronomia na maior parte das séries, principalmente na 6ª série em que todo o bimestre se fala de astronomia.

  6. Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration into the National Airspace System Visual-Line-of-Sight Human-in-the-Loop Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Mcadaragh, Raymon; Burdette, Daniel W.; Comstock, James R.; Hempley, Lucas E.; Fan, Hui

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) project, research on integrating small UAS (sUAS) into the NAS was underway by a human-systems integration (HSI) team at the NASA Langley Research Center. Minimal to no research has been conducted on the safe, effective, and efficient manner in which to integrate these aircraft into the NAS. sUAS are defined as aircraft weighing 55 pounds or less. The objective of this human system integration team was to build a UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) and to develop a research test-bed and database that provides data, proof of concept, and human factors guidelines for GCS operations in the NAS. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of flying sUAS in Class D and Class G airspace utilizing manual control inputs and voice radio communications between the pilot, mission control, and air traffic control. The design of the experiment included three sets of GCS display configurations, in addition to a hand-held control unit. The three different display configurations were VLOS, VLOS + Primary Flight Display (PFD), and VLOS + PFD + Moving Map (Map). Test subject pilots had better situation awareness of their vehicle position, altitude, airspeed, location over the ground, and mission track using the Map display configuration. This configuration allowed the pilots to complete the mission objectives with less workload, at the expense of having better situation awareness of other aircraft. The subjects were better able to see other aircraft when using the VLOS display configuration. However, their mission performance, as well as their ability to aviate and navigate, was reduced compared to runs that included the PFD and Map displays.

  7. Mapeamento do fenômeno de pulsações não-radiais no DHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelkens, A. H.; Janot Pacheco, E.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho de IC, pretende-se estabelecer um mapa das características do fenômeno das pulsações não-radiais (PNR) no diagrama HR (DHR). Trata-se de oscilações que não mantém a homotecia radial. O fenômeno foi inicialmente descoberto no Sol nos anos 60 e hoje é detectado num grande número de objetos. Sua grande importância reside em que as pulsações descrevem a física da cavidade em que se propagam. As PNR são classificadas basicamente por suas frequências, amplitudes e certos números quânticos associados. Com o objetivo de descrever a variação desses parâmetros no DHR, procedeu-se a um extenso levantamento bibliográfico (artigos de revistas e outras fontes) cobrindo o tema. Compôs-se assim uma tabela, que será apresentada nesta comunicação, contendo os parâmetros físicos das estrelas (T, L, logg, M) e suas características de PNR, deduzidas a partir de observações fotométricas e/ou espectroscópicas. No momento, completamos os dados sobre as Anãs Brancas e Beta Cep. Apresentaremos no trabalho diagramas L-T com os últimos resultados obtidos, eventualmente com uma terceira dimensão que descreva características pulsacionais.

  8. Dust emission thresholds from sodic playas with varying geochemistry and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; McKenna Neuman, C.; O'Brien, P.

    2014-12-01

    Sodic playa surfaces can be major sources of dust emission but their erodibility depends on the surface salt crust characteristics. Here we determine dust emission thresholds in a wind tunnel for 22 different crusts with varying concentrations of sodium sulphate and sodium chloride. Crusts mimic those on Sua Pan, in the Makgadikgadi Basin, Botswana, which is one of the biggest dust hot spots in the Southern Hemisphere. Crusts were grown by encouraging capillary processes and subjected to several weeks of diurnal temperature variation to enable the development of hydrated and dehydrated salt crystals, along with low density, 'fluffy' sediment beneath the primary (and in some cases, secondary) crust. Spray on crusts and liquefied crusts were also developed for response comparison. Using laser scanning we tracked surface change and crystal growth, which we link to crust type and evaporation rates. We found that under pre-dawn and early morning Sua Pan conditions, crusts were typically non-emissive, but during mid-day temperature and humidity conditions typical of Sua Pan in August and September (dry and peak dust emission season), several crusts became friable and highly emissive above wind velocities of 7 m/s, which agrees with in-situ field observations. Thenardite capillary crusts were the most emissive, in contrast to supply limited, halite liquefied crusts which were relatively stable. Disturbances, or small crust fractures, common on polygonal surface patterns decreased the dust emission threshold values and enabled emission from more stable crusts. Our study confirms the potential of playa surfaces to emit dust without the presence of saltation, and highlights the sensitivity of emission thresholds to crust geochemistry, evaporation rates and temperature and humidity conditions.

  9. Ensino de astronomia e óptica: é possível fazê-lo de forma contextualizada no nível médio?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrinho, A. A.; Jafelice, L. C.

    2003-08-01

    Discutimos nossa participação em um curso de treinamento para professores de diversas disciplinas do ensino médio. Nossa preocupação básica foi desenvolver instrumentos educacionais adequados para levar à sala de aula, nesse nível de ensino, de forma contextualizada, questionamentos freqüentes dos alunos sobre astronomia e sua relação com tecnologia e sociedade. Encaminhamos questões como: a evolução da astronomia, suas relações com outros ramos do conhecimento humano e conseqüentes aplicações; avanços na tecnologia dos instrumentos ópticos versus a importância da observação do céu a olho nu; a relação entre olho humano, luneta e telescópio; e desenvolvimento da tecnologia espacial e sua influência em nosso cotidiano. Objetivamos com isto fazer um resgate histórico e pedagógico das aplicações e observações do céu no cenário escolar, destacando a relação entre eventos astronômicos, olho humano, instrumentos mediadores e suas contextualizações históricas e sociais. Produtos desta abordagem foram o desenvolvimento e a adaptação de práticas e materiais instrucionais diversos (e.g., "espelhos" de isopor e "raios luminosos" de bolinhas de gude; montagens envolvendo velas, lasers, lentes e espelhos; desmonte e análise de peças de um telescópio; etc.). Além disto, como outro resultado deste trabalho, elaboramos textos sobre história da astronomia e da óptica para atividades em classe. Com estas ações visamos facilitar a concretização de conceitos físicos envolvidos, exemplificar um ensino contextualizado e interdisciplinar motivado por temas astronômicos e favorecer que práticas e discussões feitas com os treinandos possam ser transpostas para a sala de aula. A reação dos professores às práticas propostas foi bastante positiva. Todos esses aspectos são discutidos em detalhe neste trabalho. (PPGECNM/UFRN; PRONEX/FINEP; NUPA/USP; Temáticos/FAPESP)

  10. Modeling Stratigraphic Architecture of Deep-water Deposits Using a Small Unmanned Aircraft: Neogene Thin-bedded Turbidites, East Coast Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminski, N.; Graham, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges of field geology is inaccessibility of exposure. The ability to view and characterize outcrops that are difficult to study from the ground is greatly improved by aerial investigation. Detailed stratigraphic architecture of such exposures is best addressed by using advances and availability of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) that can safely navigate from high-altitude overviews of study areas to within a meter of the exposure of interest. High-resolution photographs acquired at various elevations and azimuths by sUAS are then used to convert field measurements to digital representations in three-dimensions at a fine scale. Photogrammetric software is used to capture complex, detailed topography by creating digital surface models with a range imaging technique that estimates three-dimensional structures from two-dimensional image sequences. The digital surface model is overlain by detailed, high-resolution photography. Pairing sUAS technology with readily available photogrammetry software that requires little processing time and resources offers a revolutionary and cost-effective methodology for geoscientists to investigate and quantify stratigraphic and structural complexity of field studies from the convenience of the office. These methods of imaging and modeling remote outcrops are demonstrated in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand, where wave-cut platform exposures of Miocene deep-water deposits offer a unique opportunity to investigate the flow processes and resulting characteristics of thin-bedded turbidite deposits. Stratigraphic architecture of wavecut platform and vertically-dipping exposures of these thin-bedded turbidites is investigated with sUAS coupled with Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry software. This approach allows the geometric and spatial variation of deep-water architecture to be characterized continuously along 2,000 meters of lateral exposure, as well as to measure and quantify cyclic

  11. Relationship Between Hyperuricemia and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in a Chinese Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pu; Hong, Liu; Zhao, Yifan; Sun, Hang; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between hyperuricemia and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) risk factors in a Chinese population. Material/Methods Data analyzed in this study were from the Chinese Hyperuricemia and Gout Database. Indicators of serum uric acid (SUA) level, height, weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), smoking status, alcohol consumption, blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. T test, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation, multivariate linear regression, and multivariate logistic regression were used. Results Compared with normouricemic men, hyperuricemic men had greater height (P<0.01), weight (P<0.001), body mass index (BMI) (P<0.001), SBP (P<0.01), DBP (P<0.001), cholesterol (P<0.01), and triglyceride (P<0.001). Compared with normouricemic women, hyperuricemic women were older (P<0.01) and had greater weight (P<0.05), BMI (P<0.01), SBP (P<0.01), DBP (P<0.05), glucose (P<0.05), and triglyceride (P<0.001). In men, an increase of 1 mg/dL in SUA was associated with a 0.279 kg/m2 increase in BMI (P<0.001), a 2.438 mg/dL increase in cholesterol (P<0.05), a 10.358 mg/dL increase in triglyceride (P<0.001), and a 3.1 mg/dL decrease in glucose (P<0.01). In women, an increase of 1 mg/dL SUA was associated with a 0.168 kg/m2 increase in BMI (P<0.01) and a 3.708 mg/dL increase in triglyceride (P<0.01). After adjustment, SUA was strongly associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia in both sexes. Conclusions Elevated serum uric acid concentration was strongly associated with obesity and hyperlipidemia in both men and women. These results indicated that, among hyperuricemia patients, we should pay more attention to the possibility of cardiovascular complications. These results might provide a novel target or a possible new treatment for cardiovascular diseases by lowering the level of serum uric acid. PMID:26364955

  12. Estudo exaustivo e sistemático de erros nas provas da olimpíada brasileira de astronomia - resultados preliminares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. S.; Canalle, J. B. G.; Villas da Rocha, J. F.

    2003-08-01

    A Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia (OBA) contou, em sua quinta edição, com a participação de mais de 60 mil alunos dos ensinos fundamental e médio de praticamente todo o território nacional. Uma das formas de controle que a sua coordenação nacional possui sobre a correção, levada a cabo pelos professores que as aplicaram, é a do envio, por parte destes professores, das 10 melhores provas de cada um dos três níveis nos quais a Olimpíada é realizada. Assim, e dado ao caráter discursivo das provas da Olimpíada, a sua coordenação nacional dispõe de um vasto acervo sobre as concepções, certas ou erradas, dos alunos que dela participaram. Este conjunto de dados jamais fora explorado até o presente trabalho que pretende ser, neste sentido, inaugural. Nas provas dos níveis I e II da V OBA, que abrangem todo o conjunto do ensino fundamental, uma das questões versava sobre a noção que os alunos tinham sobre como os habitantes da Terra situam-se sobre sua superfície. Fizemos um estudo sistemático das respostas a esta questão. Primeiramente, todas as modalidades de erros foram levantadas; em seguida, realizamos uma distribuição por idade tanto do índice de acerto como da ocorrência e da distribuição de cada erro. Como resultado, obtivemos que, em ambos os níveis: 1) as concepções errôneas não se apresentam distribuídas aleatoriamente; 2) há uma concentração no tipo de erro apresentado; 3) há uma tendência de progressivo acerto com relação à idade quando os dados são considerados em termos nacionais; 4) esta tendência nacional é fraca ou mesmo não é verificada em alguns dos estados com maior patamar de acerto.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Emerging Applications of Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    In anticipation of transforming the research methods and resource management techniques employed across the Department of the Interior, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office is conducting missions using small UAS- sUAS platforms (<20 lbs.). The USGS is dedicated to expanding the use of sUAS technology in support of scientific, resource and land management missions. UAS technology is currently being used by USGS and our partners to monitor environmental conditions, analyze the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management and law enforcement missions. Our ultimate goal is to support informed decision making by creating the opportunity, via UAS technology, to gain access to an increased level of persistent monitoring of earth surface processes (forest health conditions, wildfires, earthquake zones, invasive species, etc.) in areas that have been logistically difficult, cost prohibitive or technically impossible to obtain consistent, reliable, timely information. USGS is teaming with the Department of the Interior Aviation Management Directorate to ensure the safe and cost effective adoption of UAS technology. While the USGS is concentrating on operating sUAS, the immense value of increased flight time and more robust sensor capabilities available on larger platforms cannot be ignored. We are partnering with several groups including the Department of Homeland Security, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Defense, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for access to data collected from their fleet of high altitude, long endurance (HALE) UAS. The HALE systems include state of the art sensors including Electro-Optical, Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The data being collected by High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) systems is can be routinely

  14. Otimização de procedimento de manobra para indução de reentrada de um satélite retornável

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, W.; Suarez, M.

    2003-08-01

    Veículos espaciais que retornam à Terra passam por regimes de velocidade e condições de vôo distintos. Estas diferenças dificultam sua concepção aerodinâmica e o planejamento de seu retorno. A partir de uma proposta de um veículo orbital retornável (satélite SARA, em desenvolvimento no IAE/CTA) para realização de experimentos científicos e tecnológicos em ambiente de baixa gravidade, surge a necessidade de realizarem-se estudos considerando-se os aspectos relativos à sua aerodinâmica. Após o lançamento, o veículo deve permanecer em órbita pelo tempo necessário para a condução de experimentos, sendo depois direcionado à Terra e recuperado em solo. A concepção aerodinâmica é de importância para o vôo em suas diversas fases e deve considerar aspectos relativos à estabilização Aerodinâmica e ao arrasto atmosférico, sendo este último de importância crucial na análise do aquecimento a ser enfrentado. A manobra de retorno inclui considerações sobre as condições atmosféricas e dinâmica de reentrada, devendo ser calculada de forma mais precisa possível. O trabalho proposto avalia estudos da dinâmica de vôo de um satélite recuperável considerando aspectos relativos à determinação orbital com GPS, técnica utilizada com sucesso na CONAE, e seu comportamento aerodinâmico em vôo balístico de retorno, com ênfase em sua fase de reentrada atmosférica. Busca-se otimizar a manobra de reentrada de tal forma que a utilização do sistema GPS garanta minimizar a área de impacto com o solo.

  15. Raízes pós-mitológicas da Astronomia Clássica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Bartolo, L.; Villas da Rocha, J. F.

    2004-02-01

    Apresentamos como a invenção de um modelo astronômico e cosmológico fundado em causas naturais foi um processo gestado num ambiente cultural específico, o do advento do pensamento pós-mitológico, que tem como sua raiz mais funda a trajetória particular da Grécia Antiga, com ênfase na resolução de uma grave crise social e a evolução do mundo clássico para o contexto espiritual de um império universal.

  16. Bio-inspired sensing and control for disturbance rejection and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremillion, Gregory; Humbert, James S.

    2015-05-01

    The successful operation of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) in dynamic environments demands robust stability in the presence of exogenous disturbances. Flying insects are sensor-rich platforms, with highly redundant arrays of sensors distributed across the insect body that are integrated to extract rich information with diminished noise. This work presents a novel sensing framework in which measurements from an array of accelerometers distributed across a simulated flight vehicle are linearly combined to directly estimate the applied forces and torques with improvements in SNR. In simulation, the estimation performance is quantified as a function of sensor noise level, position estimate error, and sensor quantity.

  17. Hyper-luminous dust-obscured galaxies discovered by the Hyper Suprime-Cam on Subaru and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Yoshiki; Nagao, Tohru; Strauss, Michael A.; Aoki, Kentaro; Goto, Tomotsugu; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Bosch, James; Bundy, Kevin; Doi, Yoshiyuki; Inami, Hanae; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nakata, Fumiaki; Oi, Nagisa; Onoue, Masafusa; Oyabu, Shinki; Price, Paul; Tait, Philip J.; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Turner, Edwin L.; Uchida, Tomohisa; Usuda, Tomonori; Utsumi, Yousuke; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2015-10-01

    We present the photometric properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, we discovered 48 DOGs with i - Ks > 1.2 and i - [22] > 7.0, where i, Ks, and [22] represent AB magnitude in the i-band, Ks-band, and 22 μm, respectively, in the GAMA 14 hr field (˜ 9 deg2). Among these objects, 31 (˜ 65%) show power-law spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the near-IR (NIR) and MIR regime, while the remainder show an NIR bump in their SEDs. Assuming that the redshift distribution for our DOGs sample is Gaussian, with mean and sigma z = 1.99 ± 0.45, we calculated their total IR luminosity using an empirical relation between 22 μm luminosity and total IR luminosity. The average value of the total IR luminosity is (3.5 ± 1.1) × 1013 L⊙, which classifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. We also derived the total IR luminosity function (LF) and IR luminosity density (LD) for a flux-limited subsample of 18 DOGs with 22 μm flux greater than 3.0 mJy and with i-band magnitude brighter than 24 AB magnitude. The derived space density for this subsample is log φ = -6.59 ± 0.11 [Mpc-3]. The IR LF for DOGs including data obtained from the literature is fitted well by a double-power law. The derived lower limit for the IR LD for our sample is ρIR ˜ 3.8 × 107 [L⊙ Mpc-3] and its contributions to the total IR LD, IR LD of all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and that of all DOGs are > 3%, > 9%, and > 15%, respectively.

  18. Geodetic Observations From the Region Surrounding the M 5.2 Mt. Carmel, Illinois Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M.; Galgana, G.; Johnson, K.

    2008-12-01

    We present new results from a GPS geodetic network in the southern Illinois Basin, including a post-seismic survey in the aftermath of the M5.2 Mt. Carmel Illinois earthquake. A 56-station regional network at ~30 km spacing in SW Indiana, S Illinois and W Kentucky is augmented by continuous data from IGS, GAMA, and CORS GPS stations. We also present results from a densified, 35-station GPS network (~10 km spacing) in the Fluorspar district of southernmost Illinois, located near near a complex transitional zone between the Wabash Valley and New Madrid seismic zones. The region is traversed by steep-angled, basement-penetrating faults and characterized by moderate (M ~3 to 5.5) earthquakes. The most recent of these events was the April 18, 2008 M 5.2 event, located close to the New Harmony Fault at ~14 km deep near Mt. Carmel, Illinois. We combine data from the regional network with GPS observations from five stations near the epicenter of the April 2008 earthquake. Predictions based on the depth and mechanism of the earthquake suggest horizontal coseismic motions of < 1mm at most network stations. Observed data suggest small, but marginally significant displacements as compared to block motions in the area. Results from the regional network show highly improved position and velocity estimates of these campaign sites relative to previous campaign measurements, with station velocities suggesting systematic northwestward motion of about 0.5-0.7 mm/yr with respect to the Stable North American Reference Frame. We then investigate strain patterns using models to explain tectonic deformation within the Wabash Valley. We use an elastic block modeling approach, supplemented by continuum-based methods to explain variable strain between GPS stations. Block models which assume boundaries along the Cottonwood Grove-Rough Creek Graben (CGRCG) and the WVFS indicate marginal block velocities with possible strike- slip motion along the WVFS, and E-W motions along the CGRCG. We also

  19. Camões e a cosmogonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os Lusíadas, escrito por Luis de Camões em 1572, é um poema épico renascentista e a visão Cosmogônica do autor é apresentada, principalmente, no último canto do poema, quando Tétis mostra ao Gama a Máquina do Mundo. A Cosmogonia de Camões neste poema reflete uma visão de uma época de transição, que ainda não incorporou os elementos da revolução Copernicana. É uma visão Grego- Ptolomaica e também medieval. O poeta guia-se pela tradução e notas feita por Pedro Nunes, inventor do Nonio, do Tratado da Esfera "De Sphaera" do Astrônomo Inglês John Holywood, mais conhecido pelo nome latinizado de Johannes Sacrobosco. Outra provável fonte de Camões, de acordo com Luciano Antonio Pereira da Silva em Astronomia de os Lusíadas, é o "Theoricae novae Planetarum" (1460) do astrólogo Alemão Jorge Purbáquio (1423 - 1461). A Astronomia de Os Lusíadas representa a ciência do tempo de Camões. Camões nunca emprega a palavra constelação e seu catálogo é bastante completo. A Máquina do Mundo tem a Terra no centro. Em redor, em círculos concêntricos, a lua (Diana), Mercúrio, Vênus, o Sol (Febo), Marte, Júpiter e Saturno. Envolvendo estes astros tem o firmamento seguido pelo "Céu Áqueo" ou cristalino, depois o 1o Móbil, esfera que arrasta todas as outras consigo. Este trabalho, multidisciplinar, serve tanto para ensinar aos alunos da Física como das Ciências Humanas, a concepção de mundo do renascimento de uma forma belamente poética em versos decassílabos Este trabalho também ajuda na apreciação do maior clássico da língua portuguesa e mostra como as Ciências e as artes, em geral, estão correlacionadas e refletem a visão de mundo da época em que foi produzida.

  20. Multifrequency studies of galaxies and groups. I. Environmental effect on galaxy stellar mass and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, A.; Heinämäki, P.; Nurmi, P.; Teerikorpi, P.; Tempel, E.; Lietzen, H.; Einasto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. To understand the role of the environment in galaxy formation, evolution, and present-day properties, it is essential to study the multifrequency behavior of different galaxy populations under various environmental conditions. Aims: We study the stellar mass functions of different galaxy populations in groups as a function of their large-scale environments using multifrequency observations. Methods: We cross-matched the SDSS DR10 group catalog with GAMA Data Release 2 and Wide-field Survey Explorer (WISE) data to construct a catalog of 1651 groups and 11 436 galaxies containing photometric information in 15 different wavebands ranging from ultraviolet (0.152 μm) to mid-infrared (22 μm). We performed the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies using the MAGPHYS code and estimate the rest-frame luminosities and stellar masses. We used the 1 /Vmax method to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and luminosity functions, and the luminosity density field of galaxies to define the large-scale environment of galaxies. Results: The stellar mass functions of both central and satellite galaxies in groups are different in low- and high-density, large-scale environments. Satellite galaxies in high-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope compared to low-density environments, independent of the galaxy morphology. Central galaxies in low-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope, but the difference disappears for fixed galaxy morphology. The characteristic stellar mass of satellite galaxies is higher in high-density environments and the difference exists only for galaxies with elliptical morphologies. Conclusions: Galaxy formation in groups is more efficient in high-density, large-scale environments. Groups in high-density environments have higher abundances of satellite galaxies, irrespective of the satellite galaxy morphology. The elliptical satellite galaxies are generally more massive in high-density environments. The stellar

  1. Use of tritium-helium groundwater age and anthropogenic VOCs to assess deep groundwater susceptibility in California urban and agricultural basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Leif, R. N.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Moran, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    With the discovery of MTBE contamination in public supply wells in the 1990's and the subsequent demonstration that most public supply wells were in close proximity to leaking underground fuel tanks, the State of California recognized the need to rapidly assess the vulnerability of public supply wells throughout the State. The California Aquifer Susceptibility project funded by the State of California GAMA Program used a cost-effective approach to assess ambient groundwater susceptibility at large scales through the use of groundwater age (using the tritium/helium-3 method), the presence of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at ultra-trace levels, and stable isotopes of water. To date, over 2000 wells have been sampled in the major agricultural and urban basins in California. One pattern that has emerged is a significantly greater vulnerability to contamination in the alluvial aquifers of the Central Valley than in either southern or northern Coastal Basins. The project also has allowed investigation of the utility of the tritium/helium-3 method for vulnerability assessment. This method in conjunction with noble gas analysis allows determination of mean apparent groundwater age from 2 to 50 years, and the fraction of water recharged before atmospheric weapons testing in mid-century. Long-screened supply wells can produce waters with old mean apparent ages (indicating that they are not vulnerable) and still contain small fractions of young highly vulnerable water (through improper well construction, short-circuiting, screening across shallow zones, and dispersive transport). The recent introduction and wide dispersion of anthropogenic VOCs into the environment coupled with our ability to detect these compounds at ultra-trace levels (low ppt) allow their use as proxies for small mixing fractions of young contaminated water. The occurrence of anthropogenic VOCs in tritium-dead groundwater is infrequent but not rare, evidence for apparent groundwater age

  2. Comparison of a beach parametric morphodynamic model results with in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Caroline; Silva, Paulo A.; Baptista, Paulo; Abreu, Tiago

    2014-05-01

    unsaturated surf zones, Coastal Engineering, Vol. 34, 173-196. Baptista P, Cunha TR, Matias A, Gama C, Bernardes C, Ferreira O., 2011a. New land-based method for surveying sandy shores and extracting DEMs: the INSHORE system, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 182, 243-257. Baptista PRB, Bernardes C, Cunha TR, 2011b. The validation analysis of the INSHORE system-a precise and efficient coastal survey system, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 179, 589-604. Battjes, JA, Janssen, JPFM, 1978. Energy Loss and Set-up due to Breaking of Random Waves Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Coastal Engineering, ASCE, Hamburg, Vol. 1, 569-587.

  3. Strategies to observe JWST First Light objects at z=10--20 based on recent results from the HUDF XDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Driver, S. P.; Robotham, A.; Alpaslan, M.; Lange, R.; Hopkins, A. M.; Cluver, M.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Barone-Nugent, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    We reflect on the best observing strategies to see an optimum number of First Light objects at 10-20 with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), based on recent results from the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 UltraDeep Field. First, we summarize the best available data to redshifts z<8 on how the Schechter UV Luminosity Function (LF) evolves in its faint-end slope [alpha(z)], its characteristic luminosity [M*(z)] and corresponding space density [phi*(z)], and use hierarchical models to explore how alpha(z) and phi*(z) may evolve for z>8. We use the strongly declining number of z=9-11 candidates in the HUDF-XDF compared to the large number of z=7-8 objects, to constrain the plausible range in evolution of M*(z) for z> 9. While hierarchical models suggest that alpha(z>8) converges to ~-2 and phi*(z>8) to ~< 10^-3/Mpc^3, the one plausible =10-12 candidate seen in the HUDF-XDF suggests that M*(z) may drop to fainter than M=--17.5 mag at z>10 in WMAP9/Planck cosmology. If so, this may have a significant impact on the optimal observing strategies of z>10 objects with JWST. If M*(z) and/or phi*(z) continue to decline significantly for z>9, only deep 200+-hr JWST surveys that reach to AB>31 mag will see a significant number of z>10 objects. Shallow or medium deep JWST surveys that reach to AB<30 mag will not see very many unlensed z>10 objects, since they will generally sample brighter than M* at z>10. Hence, in order to sample the brighter-end of the LF at z>10, and to average over the expected significant cosmic variance at z>10, JWST will either need to observe a larger number (>5) of deep JWST fields, and/or it will need to do a much larger number (>10-20) of medium-deep surveys on gravitational lensing foreground targets. The 6 Hubble Frontier Fields that started in 2013 are excellent lensing targets for JWST. We present a subset of 2400 galaxy groups from the GAMA spectroscopic survey to z=0.4 that have M>10^15 M_o and are sufficiently compact to also be excellent

  4. Two Micron All Sky Survey Photometric Redshift Catalog: A Comprehensive Three-dimensional Census of the Whole Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Peacock, John A.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Key cosmological applications require the three-dimensional (3D) galaxy distribution on the entire celestial sphere. These include measuring the gravitational pull on the Local Group, estimating the large-scale bulk flow, and testing the Copernican principle. However, the largest all-sky redshift surveys—the 2MASS Redshift Survey and IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey—have median redshifts of only z = 0.03 and sample the very local universe. All-sky galaxy catalogs exist that reach much deeper—SuperCOSMOS in the optical, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the near-IR, and WISE in the mid-IR—but these lack complete redshift information. At present, the only rapid way toward larger 3D catalogs covering the whole sky is through photometric redshift techniques. In this paper we present the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) containing one million galaxies, constructed by cross-matching Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog (2MASS XSC), WISE, and SuperCOSMOS all-sky samples and employing the artificial neural network approach (the ANNz algorithm), trained on such redshift surveys as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, 6dFGS, and 2dFGRS. The derived photometric redshifts have errors nearly independent of distance, with an all-sky accuracy of σ z = 0.015 and a very small percentage of outliers. In this way, we obtain redshift estimates with a typical precision of 12% for all the 2MASS XSC galaxies that lack spectroscopy. In addition, we have made an early effort toward probing the entire 3D sky beyond 2MASS, by pairing up WISE with SuperCOSMOS and training the ANNz on GAMA redshift data currently reaching to z med ~ 0.2. This has yielded photo-z accuracies comparable to those in the 2MPZ. These all-sky photo-z catalogs, with a median z ~ 0.1 for the 2MPZ, and significantly deeper for future WISE-based samples, will be the largest and most complete of their kind for the foreseeable future.

  5. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Disk and Bar Kinematics, Mass Decompositions with Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Fogarty, Lisa; SAMI Galaxy Survey Team, GAMA Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    discuss interesting individual systems and statistics of our sample from the first 600 galaxies surveyed. GC was a visiting professor supported by U. of Sydney. The SAMI and GAMA surveys are supported by grants from the Australian Research Council.

  6. Modeling 3H-3He Gas-Liquid Phase Transport for Interpretation of Groundwater Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carle, S. F.; Esser, B.; Moran, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    California’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program has measured many hundreds of tritium (3H) and helium-3 (3He) concentrations in well water samples to derive estimates of groundwater age at production and monitoring wells in California basins. However, a 3H-3He age differs from an ideal groundwater age tracer in several respects: (1) the radioactive decay of 3H results in the accumulation of 3He being first-order with respect to 3H activity (versus a zero-order age-mass accumulation process for an ideal tracer), (2) surface concentrations of 3H as measured in precipitation over the last several decades have not been uniform, and (3) the 3H-3He “clock” begins at the water table and not at the ground surface where 3H source measurements are made. To better understand how these non-idealities affect interpretation of 3H-3He apparent groundwater age, we are modeling coupled gas-liquid phase flow and 3H-3He transport including processes of radiogenic decay, phase equilibrium, and molecular diffusion for water, air, 3H, and 3He components continuously through the vadose zone and saturated zone. Assessment of coupled liquid-gas phase processes enables consideration of 3H-3He residence time and dispersion within the vadose zone, including partitioning of tritiogenic 3He to the gas phase and subsequent diffusion into the atmosphere. The coupled gas-liquid phase modeling framework provides direct means to compare apparent 3H-3He age to ideal mean or advective groundwater ages for the same groundwater flow conditions. Examples are given for common groundwater flow systems involving areal recharge, discharge to streams or long-screened wells, and aquifer system heterogeneity. The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment program is sponsored by the California State Water Resources Control Board and carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

  7. D Model of the Torres Syncline in the PARANÁ-ETENDEKA Province, South Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Waichel, B. L.; Lima, E. F. D.; Rossetti, L. D. M. M.; Bueno, G. V.; Viana, A. R.; Barreto, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paraná-Etendeka Volcanic Province (PEVP) is Early Cretaceous in age and precedes the fragmentation of the south Gondwana. These volcanic rocks cover an area in excess of 1,200,000 km2 and can reach a maximum thickness of 1,700 m. The PEVP is composed mainly of tholeiitic basalts and subordinately by andesites and rhyolites/quartz-latites. Recently new models considering physical characteristics of the lava flow stratigraphy on both sides, Africa and South America, have been built providing a new vision of the volcanic stratigraphy and flow morphologies inside the province. This work presents a 3D model of the volcanic sequence at theTorres Syncline (Brazil). The 3D model was build using the PETREL E&P Software Platform. Geological sections based on field data and Log data from Paraná Basin (Gama-ray and soniclogs) were used to build the model. The Torres Syncline is a tectonic structure located in southern Brazil with the main orientation NW-SE. In Torres Syncline the basal portion is characterized by pahoehoe lava flows in a compound braided architecture, followed by rubbly lavas in a tabular classic architecture, and in the upper portions silicic units interbedded with basaltic lavas. The central portion of the volcanic pile is characterized by thick tabular lavas with rubbly tops (25-50 m thick). These flows have an internal structure divided in four parts: a smooth vesicular base, aphanitic massive cores with irregular joints, upper vesicular portion and a rubbly top. This unit is thicker along of the Torres Syncline and represents the main phase of the volcanism. Silicic units occur in the upper parts of the PEVP stratigraphy and include lava domes interbedded with rubbly flows and thick tabular flows. The Torres Syncline and Huab constituted one Basin features single active structure in the Early Cretaceous and during the main rifting phase. The onset of the volcanism was characterized by low effusion rate eruptions over the paleoerg, forming pahoehoe

  8. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis Developed for Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, Subodh K.; Stefko, George L.; Pai, Shantaram S.

    2003-01-01

    (GAMA), elastic axis (ELAXS), Mach number (MACH), mass ratio (MASSR), and frequency ratio (WHWB). The cascade is considered to be in subsonic flow with Mach 0.7. The results of the probabilistic aeroelastic analysis are the probability density function of predicted aerodynamic damping and frequency for flutter and the response amplitudes for forced response.

  9. SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spectrally Dissecting 3400 Galaxies By the Dozen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Gerald N.; Croom, S.; The SAMI Galaxy Survey Team

    2014-01-01

    More than 440 mapped, less than 3000 to go in the Sydney-AAO Multi-object IFU (SAMI) Galaxy Survey! SAMI uses novel, photonic fused-optical fiber “hexabundles” that were developed successfully at The University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory AAO), with support from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO). The SAMI Galaxy Survey, led by Assoc. Prof. Croom, is backed by an international team. This spectro-bolometric survey mitigates against “aperture effects” that may mislead when stacking single-fiber galaxy spectra. We seek to answer questions such as “what is the physical role of environment in galaxy evolution? How is stellar mass growth and angular momentum development related in galaxies? How does gas get into and out of galaxies, and how do such flows drive star formation?” SAMI maps stellar and gas properties with 13 integral-field units (IFU) plugged onto a dozen galaxies over the 1° field of the AAT prime-focus corrector. 78% of each bundle's area is filled by sixty-one 1.6-arcsec diameter fibers that are packed closely into concentric circles then their etched, thinned cladding is fused without deforming their cores. The fiber hexabundles route to the bench-mounted AAOmega double-beam spectrograph to cover simultaneously 373-570 nm at R=1730 and 620-735 nm at R=4500. Full spatial resolution of the observing site is recovered by dithered exposures totaling 3.5 hours per field. Target stellar masses generally exceed 108 M⊙, and span a range of environments: ˜650 are within clusters of virial mass 1014-15 M⊙ at 0.03 < z < 0.06, the rest are in the z < 0.1 field with extensive frequency data ancillary to the GAMA Survey. We display some key early results of major science themes being addressed by the SAMI survey team, from rotation curve dependence on group halo mass, through galaxy winds and AGN feedback mechanisms, to oxygen abundance gradients, kinematic decomposition

  10. Origin of hepatitis C virus genotype 3 in Africa as estimated through an evolutionary analysis of the full-length genomes of nine subtypes, including the newly sequenced 3d and 3e.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Lu, Ling; Murphy, Donald G; Negro, Francesco; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes of nine hepatitis C virus genotype 3 (HCV-3) isolates: QC7, QC8, QC9, QC10, QC34, QC88, NE145, NE274 and 811. To the best of our knowledge, NE274 and NE145 were the first full-length genomes for confirming the provisionally assigned subtypes 3d and 3e, respectively, whereas 811 represented the first HCV-3 isolate that had its extreme 3' UTR terminus sequenced. Based on these full-length genomes, together with 42 references representing eight assigned subtypes and an unclassified variant of HCV-3, and 10 sequences of six other genotypes, a timescaled phylogenetic tree was reconstructed after an evolutionary analysis using a coalescent Bayesian procedure. The results indicated that subtypes 3a, 3d and 3e formed a subset with a common ancestor dated to ~202.89 [95% highest posterior density (HPD): 160.11, 264.6] years ago. The analysis of all of the HCV-3 sequences as a single lineage resulted in the dating of the divergence time to ~457.81 (95% HPD: 350.62, 587.53) years ago, whereas the common ancestor of all of the seven HCV genotypes dated to ~780.86 (95% HPD: 592.15, 1021.34) years ago. As subtype 3h and the unclassified variant were relatives, and represented the oldest HCV-3 lineages with origins in Africa and the Middle East, these findings may indicate the ancestral origin of HCV-3 in Africa. We speculate that the ancestral HCV-3 strains may have been brought to South Asia from Africa by land and/or across the sea to result in its indigenous circulation in that region. The spread was estimated to have occurred in the era after Vasco da Gama had completed his expeditions by sailing along the eastern coast of Africa to India. However, before this era, Arabians had practised slave trading from Africa to the Middle East and South Asia for centuries, which may have mediated the earliest spread of HCV-3. PMID:24795446

  11. Desenvolvimento das câmeras de raios-X duros do satélite MIRAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, J.; Rothschild, R.; Staubert, R.; Heise, J.; Remillard, R.; D'Amico, F.; Jablonski, F.; Mejía, J.; Carvalho, H.; Heindl, B.; Matteson, J.; Kendziorra, E.; Wilms, J.; in't Zand, J.; Kuulkers, E.

    2003-08-01

    O MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) é um projeto de desenvolvimento de um pequeno satélite astronômico de raios-X (~200 kg, ~240 W). A estratégia básica da missão será observar continuamente (~9 meses por ano) a região central (~1000 graus2) do plano Galáctico e realizar estudos espectroscópicos de banda larga (2-200 keV) e alta sensibilidade de um grande conjunto de fontes através de imagens com resolução de ~6'. Isso proporcionará uma cobertura inédita do "espaço de descobertas" através da detecção, localização, identificação e estudo detalhado de fenômenos imprevisíveis, tais como transientes fracos de raios-X, novas rápidas de raios-X e bursts de raios gama, assim como o estudo de fontes com emissão persistente. Neste trabalho apresentamos o projeto das duas câmeras de raios-X duros (CXDs) do MIRAX, que irão operar na faixa de 10 a 200 keV. Cada CXD consistirá de um plano de detectores CZT (Cd0,9Zn0,1Te) de 0,5 mm de resolução espacial e 370 cm2 de área total, e de uma máscara codificada com elementos quadrados de 1,3 mm de lado e 0,5 cm de espessura. A máscara terá dimensões de 315 cm ´ 275 cm e será montada a 700 cm de distância dos detectores. Com essa configuração as CXDs terão 6' de resolução angular e, quando colocadas a um ângulo de 29° entre si, as duas câmeras propiciam um campo totalmente codificado de 39° ´ 6°12' e um campo total de 76° ´ 44°. Serão apresentadas simulações de observações da região do plano Galáctico com o conjunto formado pelas duas CXDs.

  12. Análise Temporal da Coma de CO+ no Cometa P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidt-Kaler, Th.

    1995-08-01

    Observações fotográficas e fotoelétricas da coma de gás ionizado do cometa P/Halley a nível de CO+ em 4250 angstroms fizeram parte do programa de Monitoramento do Halley desenvolvido pela Universidade de Bochum (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum) na Alemanha, realizado de 17 de fevereiro a 17 de abril de 1986 no European Southern Observatory (ESO) em La Silla (Chile). Nesta faixa espectral é possível observar a contínua formação, bem como o movimento e expansão das estruturas de plasma. Para observar a morfologia destas estruturas foram analisadas 32 placas fotográficas de CO+ (placas de vidro) do cometa P/Halley. Tais placas possuem um campo de visão de 28,6 por 28,6 graus sendo obtidas entre 29 de março e 17 de abril de 1986 com tempos de exposição entre 20 e 120 minutos. Todas as placas foram digitadas com o auxílio de um microdensitômetro PDS 2020 GM (Photometric Data System) do Instituto Astronómico da Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Universitaet em Muenster, Alemanha (um pixel = 25 por 25 micrômetros correspondendo aproximadamente a 46,88 por 46,88 segundos de arco). Após a digitação os dados foram reduzidos à intensidades relativas, sendo que os posssíveis de calibração também foram reduzidos à intensidades absolutas, expressas em termos de densidade colunar utilizando-se dos sistemas de tratamento de imagens MIDAS (Munich Image Data Analysis System; ESO - Image Processing Group, 1988) e IHAP (Image Handling And Processing; Middleburg, 1983). Com o auxílio do método de teta mínimo de Stellingwerf (Stellingwerf, 1978) obteve-se um período de 2,22 +/- 0,09 dias a partir da análise de estruturas na coma de plasma através da subtração de imagens subsequentes. Este método foi comparado com o método de Fourier. Provavelmente exista um segundo ciclo com período aproximado de 3,6 dias. A idéia de subtrair imagens subsequentes é devido ao fato de que os efeitos de rotação são apenas 10% dos fenômenos de distribuição gasosa. Portanto as

  13. Radio-Observaciones del OH EN la Coma del Cometa Halley Desde EL Hemisferio Sur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M.; Bajaja, E.; Morras, R.; Cersosimo, J. C.; Martin, M. C.; Arnal, E. M.; Poppel, W. G. L.; Colomb, F. R.; Mazzaro, J.; Olalde, J. C.; Boriakoff, V.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1987-05-01

    Se utilizó una antena de 30 metros del Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía para observaciones diarias Cf ebrero a abril de 1986) de la transición en 1667 MHz ( λ = 18 cm) del OH en la coma del cometa Halley. De las observaciones realizadas se concluye: 1) El número promedio de moléculas de OH en la coma durante 37 días de observación fue de (8.9±3.5)x1034 moléculas, lo que implica una tasa de producción promedio de OH de 1.8x1029 moléculas seg-1 y consecuentemente una pérdida de masa promedio de 17±6 toneladas seg-1 . Este valor está de acuerdo con las mediciones realizadas por las sondas Vega y Giotto. 2) El monitoreo desde el lAR revela la existencia de variaciones bruscas en los flujos de absorción del OH. Estas variaciones son consistentes con los modelos que representan la producción gaseosa a partir de ejecciones y/o desprendimientos discretos de materia congelada del núcleo. 3) Las variaciones en la densidad de flujo son consistentes con las estimaciones de los tiem- pos de vida medios del H2O y del OH en presencia del campo de radiación solar. 4) Se encuentra una correlación entre la intensidad del flujo absorbido y anisotropías en Ia dinamica de la coma.

  14. Binary and Ternary Heterometallic (La3+, Gd3+, Y3+)-Eu3+ Functionalized SBA-15 Mesoporous Hybrids: Chemically Bonded Assembly and Photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Kong, Li-Li

    2010-07-01

    A novel kind of organic-inorganic monomer SUASi has been achieved by modifying 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SUA) with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS), subsequently binary and ternary Eu3+ mesoporous hybrid materials with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SUA)-functionalized SBA-15 and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) are synthesized by co-condensation of SUASi and TEOS in the presence of Eu3+ complex and Pluronic P123 as a template. Finally, luminescent hybrid mesoporous materials consisting of active rare earth ions (Eu3+)—inert rare earth ions (Y3+, La3+, Gd3+) complex covalently bonded to the mesoporous materials network have been obtained via this sol-gel approach. The physical characterization and photoluminescence of all these resulting materials are studied in detail. Especially the luminescent behavior has been studied with the different ratios of Eu3+-(Y3+, La3+, Gd3+), which suggests that the existence of inert rare earth ions can enhance the luminescence intensity of Eu3+. This may be due to the intramolecular energy transfer between Y3+, La3+, Gd3+, and Eu3+ through the covalently bonded mesoporous framework.

  15. DEZ ANOS DE EXPERIÊNCIA DO COMITÊ DE ÉTICA EM PESQUISA DA SECRETARIA DE SAÚDE DO DISTRITO FEDERAL, BRASIL

    PubMed Central

    Novaes, Maria Rita C. G.; Guilhem, Dirce; Lolas, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo deste artigo é relatar a experiência do Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Secretaria de Estado de Saúde do Distrito Federal (CEP/SES/DF) Brasil, durante o período de 10 anos a partir de sua fundação. Trata-se de uma avaliação descritiva e documental, na modalidade estudo de caso, utilizando-se a totalidade de projetos protocolados no CEP/SES/DF (N° 052/08) nesse período. As pendências mais freqüentes dos projetos foram: termo de consentimento livre e esclarecido (30%), folha de rosto (25%), metodologia (20%), curriculum vitae (12%), planilha de orçamento (9%), outros (4%). O relato das atividades do CEP/SES/DF no período de 10 anos revelou, através de sua produtividade, a legitimidade do processo de análise ética dos protocolos visando à proteção dos participantes da pesquisa. PMID:19888441

  16. [A model-based meta-analysis to compare urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-Yan; Lu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient using a model-based meta-analysis. The literature search identified 22 clinical trials of gout with a total of 43 unique treatment arms that met our inclusion criteria, and a total of 6 365 gout patients were included in the study. The response rates of allopuriol and febuxostat were characterized by Tmax model and Emax model respectively, and the effect of baseline serum uric acid (sUA) and patient type on the drug effect was tested. The results showed that allopurinol can reach an average maximum response rate of 50.8% while febuxostat can reach a 100% response rate within a very short time, and the ED50 was 34.3 mg. Covariate analysis revealed that baseline sUA has a negative effect on response rate of allopurinol, and a positive effect on the predicted ED50 of febuxostat. For patients who had shown inadequate response to prior allopurinol treatment, the average response rate was about half that of the allopurinol responder patients. PMID:25920196

  17. Lesinurad: First Global Approval.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-03-01

    Lesinurad (ZURAMPIC(®)) is an oral urate-anion exchanger transporter 1 (URAT1) inhibitor developed by Ardea Biosciences (a subsidiary of AstraZeneca) for the treatment of hyperuricaemia associated with gout. It reduces serum uric acid (sUA) levels by inhibiting the function of the transporter proteins (URAT1 and organic anion transporter 4) involved in uric acid reabsorption in the kidney. In December 2015, lesinurad was approved in the USA as combination therapy with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor for the treatment of hyperuricaemia associated with gout in patients who have not achieved sUA target levels with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor alone. Lesinurad has also received a positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use for this indication and is in phase III development as a combination therapy in several other countries. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of lesinurad leading to this first approval for hyperuricaemia associated with gout. PMID:26861027

  18. Association between Hyperuricemia and Metabolic Syndrome: An Epidemiological Study of a Labor Force Population in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Sun, Chia-Cheng; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Sun, Chien-An; Chung, Chian-Fang; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Pi-Li; Yang, Tsan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become an important issue worldwide. Metabolic comorbidities of hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia are shown as important risk factors for incident gout. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hyperuricemia and MetS. This is a cross-sectional study. The effective sample included 21,544 individuals who received worker health examinations at a local teaching hospital in Changhua County from 2008~2012. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to investigate the influences of hyperuricemia on MetS. The results showed that individuals with MetS had significantly higher blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, waist circumference, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than those without MetS (P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed hyperuricemia to be an important factor of MetS. The risk of developing MetS is higher with high levels of serum uric acid (SUA) and the odds ratio (OR) of having MetS is 4.98 times higher for Tertile 3 than for Tertile 1 (95% CI = 4.16–5.97) and 4 times higher for Quartile 4 than for Quartile 1 (95% CI = 3.59–4.46). In conclusion, males are more likely to develop MetS than females, and the risk of having MetS increases with age and SUA concentration. PMID:26273611

  19. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R L C; Mercier, Patrick P; Wang, Joseph

    2015-12-15

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  20. Hyperuricemia in the inhabitants of the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Jamner, A.H.

    1984-06-01

    Annual medical examinations are conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for a population of Marshallese who were accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954, for a comparison population, and for all inhabitants of the atolls of Rongelap and Utirik. Disease surveillance includes analysis of serum samples. Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) levels are common along Pacific populations, and modifying environmental factors have been investigated as a cause for this finding. The authors have studied SUA levels of people living in the Marshall Islands, and have found elevated values similar to those reported for other Micronesian populations. The nearly Gaussian distribution of individual serum uric acid values for men, and for women less than or equal to45 years of age, indicates that the elevation is due to a regularized increase in serum uric acid rather than to a subpopulation that has pathologic hyperuricemia. The higher serum uric acid levels appear, therefore, to be normal for the Marshallese, a conclusion supported by the infrequency of clinical gout in the population tested.

  1. Problem Definition and Solution Concept for En Route Constrained Airspace Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven; Vivona, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA's AATT Program is investigating potential ground-based decision support tool (DST) development for en route controllers and managers. NASA's previous work in en route DST development has focused on Transition airspace, where aircraft are impacted by constraints associated with the transition of aircraft from en route to terminal airspace. This paper investigates the problems associated with aircraft in non-transitional en route airspace, termed Constrained Airspace. A literature search was performed to catalog previously identified constrained airspace problems. The results of this search were investigated with industry representatives to validate these problems were significant in constrained airspace. Three general problem areas were identified. The first problem area involves negative impacts caused by a loss of airspace (e.g., activation of Special Use Airspace (SUA), weather cell formation, and overloaded sectors). The second problem area is the lack of identifying and taking advantage of gained airspace (e.g., SUA deactivation, weather dissipation, and sector loading reductions). The third problem area is unforeseen negative impacts caused by the acceptance of user routing requests (e.g., a route change into an area of congestion that negated the users intended benefit). Based upon the problems identified, an operational concept was developed for a DST to help handle these problems efficiently. The goal is to strategically identify constrained airspace problems and to provide functionality to support ARTCC TMUs in resolving the identified impacts. The capability lends itself well to TMU and Airline Operations Center (AOC) collaboration.

  2. Wearable salivary uric acid mouthguard biosensor with integrated wireless electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Imani, Somayeh; de Araujo, William R.; Warchall, Julian; Valdés-Ramírez, Gabriela; Paixão, Thiago R.L.C.; Mercier, Patrick P.; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates an instrumented mouthguard capable of non-invasively monitoring salivary uric acid (SUA) levels. The enzyme (uricase)-modified screen printed electrode system has been integrated onto a mouthguard platform along with anatomically-miniaturized instrumentation electronics featuring a potentiostat, microcontroller, and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) transceiver. Unlike RFID-based biosensing systems, which require large proximal power sources, the developed platform enables real-time wireless transmission of the sensed information to standard smartphones, laptops, and other consumer electronics for on-demand processing, diagnostics, or storage. The mouthguard biosensor system offers high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability towards uric acid detection in human saliva, covering the concentration ranges for both healthy people and hyperuricemia patients. The new wireless mouthguard biosensor system is able to monitor SUA level in real-time and continuous fashion, and can be readily expanded to an array of sensors for different analytes to enable an attractive wearable monitoring system for diverse health and fitness applications. PMID:26276541

  3. Sobre a atividade pós-periélica do cometa de órbita parabólica Yanaka (1988r)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, A. A.; Sanzovo, G. C.; Boczko, R.

    2003-08-01

    Greenberg, Singh & de Almeida (ApJ, 414: L45-48, 1993) mostraram que a deficiência nas abundâncias observadas de C2 e CN no Cometa Yanaka (1988r) pode ser explicada em termos das propriedades dos seus componentes refratários orgânicos, além do fato que trata-se de um cometa dinamicamente novo, observado através de abertura de fenda pequena projetada muito próximo do núcleo. Neste trabalho, complementamos o estudo sobre a atividade deste cometa de órbita parabólica, através da determinação da lei de potência que exprime sua taxa de produção de H2O (o principal indicador de atividade) na fase pós-periélica, determinamos o raio nuclear efetivo mínimo com sua fração de área ativa e analisamos a emissão de partículas de poeira observadas no contínuo em 625,0 nm.

  4. [Evaluation of the efficiency and quality of hospitals publicly owned with private management and hospitals of the public sector].

    PubMed

    Giraldes, Maria Do Rosário

    2007-01-01

    , and by the Garcia de Orta Hospital, which are the less efficient hospitals. In Group V, with central hospitals and hospitals with functions of central hospital, it is the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, EPE, to present the best situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator, followed by the Santo António Hospital, EPE, the Santa Maria Hospital, EPE, and the HUC, while the hospitals with a worst situation of the Composite Efficiency Indicator are the Hospitals of Faro, Evora and S. José. In Group VI hospitals with a better Composite Efficiency Indicator are the hospitals of Santa Marta, Gama Pinto Institute and Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, while the Estefânia Hospital is the most inefficient. Tondela, Valongo and Peniche Hospitals (Group I), have a good value of the Composite Efficiency and Quality Indicator, while Barcelos, Oliveira de Azeméis and Póvoa de Varzim/Vila do Conde Hospitals (Group II) present also good values of this indicator. The Hospitals of Vila Franca de Xira, Bragança and Setúbal (Group III), the Hospitals of Santarém, Garcia de Orta, and Curry Cabral (Group IV), the Hospital of Vila Real/Régua, the Egas Moniz Hospital and the Santa Maria Hospital (Group V), and the Gama Pinto Institute, the Orthopedic Hospital of Outão, and the Santa Cruz Hospital (Group VI) are the best classified in their groups. EPE Hospitals (Hospitals publicly owned with private management) are the best classified in their groups in what efficiency is concerned, what is a better result tan the one shown in 2003. The lower inequality in relation to management indicators, in all hospital groups, exists in the areas of expenditure with inpatient care by user, what shows the existence of a norm of proceeding, in this traditional hospital area. The higher inequalities are those of day hospital, drugs in day hospital, drugs in outpatient care and rehabilitation by user. In what management indicators are concerned incentives must be created. The most efficient hospitals

  5. Cosmoeducação: uma proposta para o ensino de astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, L. A. L.; Jafelice, L. C.

    2003-08-01

    Entende-se por cosmoeducação o desenvolvimento vivencial da unidade homem-cosmo. Este conceito é norteado pela psicologia transpessoal, que estuda o ser humano em sua totalidade, onde suas relações ecológicas e cósmicas são de grande importância. Constata-se uma necessidade latente no ser humano moderno em resgatar uma relação holística com o Universo. Neste trabalho exploramos meios de cultivar a consciência de que o ser humano constitui parte integrante do cosmo e se relaciona com este com o objetivo de promover em si uma percepção ambiental mais ampla. Nossa hipótese de trabalho inicial foi que o ensino de conteúdos básicos em astronomia realizado através de uma abordagem holística, que incorpore práticas vivenciais correlacionadas àqueles conteúdos, pode despertar no indivíduo sua identidade cósmica. O método que utilizamos é o fenomenológico e o universo desta pesquisa é um grupo de estudantes da disciplina de Astronomia (Curso de Licenciatura em Geografia/UFRN), onde realizamos observação participante, entrevistas, depoimentos e as práticas vivenciais mencionadas. Neste caso estamos desenvolvendo e adaptando exercícios de algumas técnicas terapêuticas de psicologia transpessoal, que um de nós (LALM) tem aplicado no contexto clínico, para trabalhar aspectos cognitivos envolvidos naquele processo de conscientização cósmica. Resultados parciais claramente referendam a hipótese inicial. Um resultado a destacar é fruto de uma dinâmica de representação corporal interiorizada do eclipse lunar, envolvendo um pequeno grupo daqueles estudantes, na qual conteúdos míticos afloraram de maneira espontânea e contundente para todos, sugerindo ressonância, ou pelo menos isomorfismo, entre o macro e o microcosmo. Este e outros resultados são discutidos em detalhe neste trabalho. (PPGECNM/UFRN; PRONEX/FINEP; NUPA/USP; Temáticos/FAPESP).

  6. Large and small UAS for trace gas measurements in climate change studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Moore, F. L.; Hintsa, E. J.; D'Amore, P.; Dutton, G. S.; Nance, J. D.; Hall, B. D.; Gao, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA and CIRES scientists have used Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for the measurement of trace gases involved in climate change since 2005, including both high altitude-long endurance (HALE UAS: NASA Altair & Global Hawk) and 1-m wingspan, small UAS (sUAS: SkyWisp, Aero). These gases include nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), methane (CH4), ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), and water vapor (H2O). In particular, atmospheric N2O is the third strongest greenhouse gas (326 parts-per-billion, ppb) and is the largest increasing stratospheric ozone depleting gas in terms of future emissions (~4 Tg N2O-N yr-1), primarily from fertilizer use. Atmospheric SF6, another potent greenhouse gas, is present globally at 8.2 parts-per-trillion (ppt) and growing at a rate of 0.25 ppt yr-1, and is used primarily in electrical power distribution. It is an excellent indicator of transport timescales (e.g., mean age) in the troposphere and stratosphere, because of its source distribution (~95% emitted in NH), long atmospheric lifetime (~600-3200 yr), and large relative atmospheric growth rate (~3%). We have developed atmospheric instrumentation for HALE platforms using a two-channel gas chromatograph with an ozone photometer and a water vapor tunable diode laser spectrometer. We are currently investigating a sUAS glider (SkyWisp) for balloon-assisted high altitude flights (30 km) and propeller driven sUAS (Aero) as a test bed for a new autopilot (Pixhawk, 3DRobotics). Our motivation for utilizing this autopilot is a low cost, open source autopilot alternative that can be used to return AirCore samples from high altitude balloons for quick laboratory analysis. The goal is a monitoring program to understand transport changes as a result of climate change during different seasons at many locations from a balloon-borne package (Moore et al., BAMS, pp. 147-155, Jan. 2014). The glider version of our open source autopilot system is also being considered for a

  7. Precessão do jato de 3C120: simulações hidrodinâmicas 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, A.; de Gouveia dal Pino, E. M.; Abraham, Z.; Raga, A. C.

    2003-08-01

    Observações com técnicas de interferometria com longa linha de base têm mostrado a existência de um jato relativístico com componentes superluminais na região central de 3C 120. Estas componentes são ejetadas em distintas direções no plano do céu e com diferentes velocidades aparentes. Estas características foram interpretadas em trabalhos anteriores como efeitos da precessão do jato relativístico. Neste trabalho, realizamos simulações tri-dimensionais do jato de 3C 120 utilizando os parâmetros de precessão determinados em trabalhos anteriores e variando as características iniciais do jato e meio ambiente, tais como densidade numérica e temperatura. Todas as simulações foram feitas com o código hidrodinâmico YGUAZÚ-A, assumindo-se um jato adiabático descrito por uma equação de estado relativística. Pelo fato de estarmos utilizando um código hidrodinâmico, nós assumimos que a intensidade do campo magnético e a distribuição de partículas, necessários para se calcular a emissão sincrotron, são proporcionais à pressão hidrodinâmica. Comparação entre dois cenários distintos, nos quais o material do jato é ejetado com velocidade constante (jato contínuo) e com velocidade modulada por um padrão sinusoidal no tempo (jato intermitente), é apresentada e discutida. Para jatos que apresentam fenômenos de precessão e intermitência, com amplitude de variação na velocidade de injeção maior que dez por cento da velocidade média de injeção, a hipótese balística, controlada pela intermitencia, é mais provável. Por outro lado, para jatos com precessão mas sem intermitência (ou com amplitude de variabilidade em velocidade mais baixa que no caso anterior), o efeito da precessão na morfologia do jato não é desprezível. Portanto, de um modo geral, ambos efeitos (precessão e movimentos balísticos) devem estar concorrendo para afetar a morfologia dos jatos superluminais.

  8. Radioastronomía: Una Mirada Más Amplia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Viviana

    2004-12-01

    The existence of the celestial bodies is known due to the light they emit. But light is a small part of a bigger phenomenon known as electromagnetic radiation. The representation of all kinds of electromagnetic radiation as a function of its frequency is called the electromagnetic spectrum. If we only studied the visible part of the spectrum, we would ignore a great deal of information. The celestial bodies emit radiation in all the regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, with very different intensity. To capture these data, astronomers design new types of telescopes that capture radiation at different wavelengths, among them the radiotelescopes that, as the name indicates, detect radio waves. The radiotelescope can be compared to a regular radio set. A radio station sends information by means of radio waves. The radio set captures these waves by means of its antenna, processes it and reproduces the information (music, etc.) in audible form. In the field of radioastronomy, interesting observations can be carried out: radio emission from stars, nebulas, pulsars, distant galaxies and stars, radiogalaxies, the Milky Way, the Sun, Jupiter, etc. La presencia de los cuerpos celestes se conoce gracias a que emiten luz. Pero la luz constituye solo una pequeña parte de un fenómeno mucho mas amplio conocido como radiación electromagnética. La representación de todas las clases de radiación como función de su frecuencia se denomina espectro electromagnético. Si solo estudiáramos la parte visual del espectro ignoraríamos una gran cantidad de información. Los cuerpos celestes emiten radiación en todas las regiones del espectro electromagnético, aunque con muy distinta intensidad. Para captar estos datos, los astrónomos deben diseñar nuevos tipos de telescopios que puedan captar la radiación de distintas longitudes de ondas, entre ellos los radiotelescopios, qué como su nombre lo indica detectan ondas de radio. El radiotelescopio puede compararse a un aparato

  9. Vínculos observacionais para o processo-S em estrelas gigantes de Bário

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanic, R. H. S.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; da Silva, L.

    2003-08-01

    Estrelas de bário são gigantes vermelhas de tipo GK que apresentam excessos atmosféricos dos elementos do processo-s. Tais excessos são esperados em estrelas na fase de pulsos térmicos do AGB (TP-AGB). As estrelas de bário são, no entanto, menos massivas e menos luminosas que as estrelas do AGB, assim, não poderiam ter se auto-enriquecido. Seu enriquecimento teria origem em uma estrela companheira, inicialmente mais massiva, que evolui pelo TP-AGB, se auto-enriquece com os elementos do processo-s e transfere material contaminado para a atmosfera da atual estrela de bário. A companheira evolui então para anã branca deixando de ser observada diretamente. As estrelas de bário são, portanto, úteis como testes observacionais para teorias de nucleossíntese pelo processo-s, convecção e perda de massa. Análises detalhadas de abundância com dados de alta qualidade para estes objetos são ainda escassas na literatura. Neste trabalho construímos modelos de atmosferas e, procedendo a uma análise diferencial, determinamos parâmetros atmosféricos e evolutivos de uma amostra de dez gigantes de bário e quatro normais. Determinamos seus padrões de abundância para Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu e Gd, concluindo que algumas estrelas classificadas na literatura como gigantes de bário são na verdade gigantes normais. Comparamos dois padrões médios de abundância, para estrelas com grandes excessos e estrelas com excessos moderados, com modelos teóricos de enriquecimento pelo processo-s. Os dois grupos de estrelas são ajustados pelos mesmos parâmetros de exposição de nêutrons. Tal resultado sugere que a ocorrência do fenômeno de bário com diferentes intensidades não se deve a diferentes exposições de nêutrons. Discutimos ainda efeitos nucleossintéticos, ligados ao processo-s, sugeridos na literatura para os elementos Cu, Mn, V e Sc.

  10. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Viñuela García, Manuel; Vera Ibáñez, Antonio; Colomer Poveda, David; Márquez Sánchez, Gonzalo; Romero Arenas, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: actualmente los programas de entrenamiento interválicos de alta intensidad parecen ser una forma de optimizar el tiempo, provocando cambios en la composición corporal debido a la activación de diferentes mecanismos hormonales y metabólicos.Objetivo: observar el efecto de cuatro semanas de entrenamiento de esprints repetidos basados en la prueba de Wingate sobre la potencia y la composición corporal en adultos jóvenes.Métodos: los participantes (22,4 ± 1,8 años) fueron asignados aleatoriamente a un grupo experimental o a un grupo control. Antes de comenzar y al acabar el periodo experimental, a los sujetos se les realizó una densitometría de cuerpo completo y una prueba de Wingate. El grupo experimental realizó 12 sesiones de esprints repetidos, realizando de 3 a 6 esprints de 30 segundos con un tiempo de recuperación de 4 minutos. El grupo control continuó con su rutina diaria y no se le aplicó ningún tipo de intervención.Resultados: en el grupo experimental, la potencia media y máxima incrementó un 9,4-16,5% (p < 0,001). Además, disminuyó la masa grasa total un 8,1% (p < 0,028) y la grasa abdominal un 10,0% (p < 0,038). El grupo control no sufrió cambios en ninguna de las variables estudiadas.Conclusiones: cuatro semanas de entrenamiento de esprints repetidos basados en la prueba de Wingate con un volumen específico de ~3 minutos por sesión y una frecuencia de 3 sesiones por semana, muestra mejoras estadísticamente significativas en la potencia máxima y media. Además, provoca cambios en la composición corporal, principalmente en la masa grasa total y de la zona abdominal. PMID:27513499

  11. Comportamiento del Helio en estrellas químicamente peculiares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaroda, S. M.; López García, Z.; Leone, F.; Catalano, F.

    Las estrellas químicamente peculiares (CP) se caracterizan por tener deficiencias y sobreabundancias de algunos elementos químicos de hasta 106 veces la abundancia solar. Además presentan variaciones en las líneas espectrales. Se piensa que ello se debe a que los campos magnéticos presentes en este tipo de estrellas son principalmente dipolares, con un eje de simetría diferente del eje de rotación. La distribución de los elementos sobreabundantes y deficientes no es homogénea sobre la superficie estelar y las variaciones observadas serían una consecuencia directa de la rotación estelar. Entre los elementos con abundancia anómala se encuentra el Helio, cuyas líneas tienen intensidades que no son consistentes con una abundancia normal, que no puede ser determinada del modo usual, o sea, considerando una atmósfera con composición solar. Con el fin de determinar la abundancia de este elemento, se inició un estudio de estrellas anómalas de Helio, Hew y He strong. Además se determinarán las abundancias de otros elementos anómalos como ser el Si, Cr, Mg, Mn y Fe. Las mismas se determinan del modo tradicional, o sea: a) medida de los anchos equivalentes de las líneas de los distintos elementos analizados; b) adopción de la temperatura efectiva, gravedad y abundancia del Helio; c) cálculo del modelo de atmósfera d) comparación con las observaciones y reinicio de un proceso iterativo hasta lograr un acuerdo entre todos los parámetros analizados. Las observaciones se llevaron a cabo en el Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito. Se observaron setenta y ocho estrellas anómalas de Helio. En este momento se está procediendo a calcular las abundancias correspondientes a los distintos elementos químicos. Para ello se hace uso de los modelos de Kurucz, ATLAS9. Los cálculos NLTE de las líneas de Helio se llevan a cabo con el programa MULTI y se compararán con los realizados con el programa WIDTH9 de Kurucz (LTE), con el objeto de resaltar la importancia de

  12. Analisis de Alteraciones EN la Imagen Debidas a Descolimacion de un Telescopio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, F. J.; Galan, M. J.

    1987-05-01

    Podemos considerar, en términos generales, que los espejos de un telescopio tienen una calidad óptica intrínseca, entendiendo por ésta la que se ha obtenido como resultado, fundamentalmente, de la destreza del personal del Taller Optico, que considerará terminadas las superficies ópticas cuando éstas satisfagan los requisitos de diseño y las pruebas de evaluación pertinentes. Debemos esperar que, una vez instalados los espejos en el telescopio, no se altere esta calidad de la óptica por un funcionamiento inadecuado de partes mecánicas del mismo. En los últimos años, en la medida que los problemas de infraestructuratura de nuestros Observatorios se han ido resolviendo, se ha hecho más patente la necesidad de llevar a la instrumentación existente al máximo de su potencial y parte esencial de ésta la conforman los mismos te lescopios. Mejorar la calidad óptica de las imágenes obtenidas con ellos ha hecho que sea prioritario el realizar una investigación más sistemática de sus características. Este trabajo ha tenido como objetivo primordial el usar un programa de diseño óptico, en el caso particular del telescopio UNAM212, con el fin de calcular y obtener gráficamente los diagramas de manchas de imagenes en foco y extrafocales, tanto con la óptica perfectamente alineada como descolimándola (mediante pequenos giros y descentramientos de los espejos). De esta manera, se hizo una evaluación de los efectos que estas alteraciones simuladas producirían en las imágenes focales y extra focales para así poder compararlas con las que realmente se han observado. Asimismo, se ha buscado información bibliográfica, en particular sobre los efectos de giros y descentramientos en las imágenes extrafocales, en lo que se ref iere a la falta de concentricidad de los círculos que forman la "dona" y a la distribución de intensidad luminosa en la misma. De ésta, l futuro un proceso que, haciendo uso de los detectores bidimensionales, nos permita Ilevar a

  13. EL PROTEOMA DEL TEJIDO ADIPOSO SUBCUTÁNEO MUESTRA HETEROGENEIDAD ANATÓMICA

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Moreno, G.A.; Sackmann-Sala, L.; Berryman, D.E.; Blome, D.W.; Argente, J.; Kopchick, y J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introducción El tejido adiposo blanco (TAB) subcutáneo (Sc) humano podría variar dependiendo de su localización anatómica, con diferencias en su perfil proteómico. Pacientes y métodos Se obtuvieron aspirados de TAB-Sc de seis mujeres con IMC >25 kg/m2, sometidas a liposucción. Dicho TAB-Sc se obtuvo de seis localizaciones anatómicas: abdominal superior e inferior, muslo, dorsal, flanco y cadera, analizándose su perfil proteómico mediante electroforesis bidimensional. En muslo y abdomen superior se compararon, además, las muestras obtenidas de las dos capas del TAB-Sc (profunda y superficial). Resultados Se detectaron 21 proteínas que mostraban una intensidad de expresión diferente entre las seis localizaciones anatómicas y 14 entre las capas superficial y profunda de una misma región. Entre las proteínas identificadas se incluyen: vimentina (proteína estructural); proteínas “heat-shock” (HSPs), superóxido-dismutasa, (estrés/chaperoninas); proteína fijadora de ácidos grasos 4 (FABP-4) y alfa-enolasa (metabolismo lipídico y de los hidratos de carbono, respectivamente) y ATP-sintetasa (producción de energía). Entre las regiones estudiadas, el TAB-Sc dorsal mostraba un perfil proteómico particular, con menor expresión de proteínas implicadas en la producción de energía y metabolismo (ATP-sintetasa, alfa-enolasa, HSPs y FABP-4) que el resto de regiones. Conclusiones Los niveles de expresión de diversas proteínas en el TAB-Sc humano no son homogéneos, difiriendo entre localizaciones anatómicas. Esto sugiere la existencia de diferencias funcionales en el TAB-Sc de acuerdo con su localización anatómica, lo que debe considerarse antes de asumir la extrapolación de los datos derivados del TAB-Sc de una determinada localización al de otras partes de la anatomía. PMID:23228439

  14. Extensión del Formalismo de Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, J. M.; Martín, I.; Velasco, A. M.

    El estudio experimental de las interacciones de átomos Rydberg altamente excitados con campos eléctricos ha experimentado un creciente interés durante las dos últimas décadas debido, en gran medida, al desarrollo de nuevas técnicas para crear y estudiar átomos Rydberg en el laboratorio. Acompañando a estas nuevas técnicas experimentales, es necesario el desarrollo de modelos teóricos que nos permitan contrastar sus medidas y conocer mejor los fundamentos de los mismos. Desde el punto de vista teórico el conocimiento del desdoblamiento de los niveles energéticos de un átomo en función de la magnitud del campo eléctrico aplicado (lo que se conoce como mapa Stark) es el mejor punto de partida para la descripción del sistema y un prerrequisito fundamental para el cálculo de distintas propiedades atómicas en presencia del campo eléctrico tales como intensidades de transición, umbrales de ionización de campo eléctrico, tiempos de vida, posición y anchura de cruces evitados, etc. En este trabajo presentamos la adaptación del método de orbitales de defecto cuántico [1,2,3] al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO) [4] y su aplicación al cálculo de los desdoblamientos energéticos y fuerzas de oscilador de estados Rydberg en los átomos de Li, Na y K. El propósito de este estudio es, por un lado, desarrollar métodos fiables para la determinación de propiedades atómicas en presencia de campos eléctricos y, por otro, mostrar la fiabilidad de las funciones de onda QDO en la descripción del efecto Stark en sistemas atómicos.

  15. Detección y estudio mediante Fluorescencia Inducida por Láser de radicales libres formados por Disociación Multifotónica Infrarroja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Torresano, J. A.; Rubio, L.; Samoudi, B.

    Una de las principales aplicaciones actuales de los procesos de disociación multifotónica inducidos por radiación láser infrarroja (DMI) es la producción de radiales libres, con el fin de estudiar sus propiedades cinéticas y espectroscópicas. La disociación de moléculas poliatómicas en el IR con láseres de CO2 tiene lugar desde la superficie de energía molecular mas baja y conduce generalmente a la formación de fragmentos en el estado electrónico fundamental, con diversos grados de excitación vibracional. En el Grupo de Procesos Multifotónicos del Instituto de Estructura de la Materia del C.S.I.C. hemos puesto a punto la técnica de Fluorescencia Inducida por Láser (LIF) para la detección y análisis en tiempo real de los fragmentos producidos en la DMI inducida mediante uno o dos campos láseres de diferentes longitudes de onda. Objetivos de nuestro trabajo han sido el estudio de los canales de disociación mayoritarios y de las especies transitoria producidas, así como de la distribución de energía interna con que éstas son generadas. En particular hemos detectado mediante LIF las especies: C2, CF, CH, SiH2, CF2, CH2, SiHCl, y CF3 a partir de la disociación de, entre otras, las siguientes moléculas: C2H3Br, C3F6, C4H8Si, C2H5ClSi y CH5ClSi. En este trabajo presentamos algunos de los resultados obtenidos mediante el estudio por LIF de estos radicales: estudio temporal de la señal LIF obtenida con determinación de tiempos de vida, espectros de excitación y fluorescencia, temperaturas vibracionales de formación, variación de la intensidad LIF con el tiempo de retraso entre los láseres de disociación y prueba, etc.

  16. Reconexión magnética en una región activa en decaimiento

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Schmieder, B.; Bagalá, L. G.; Rovira, M. G.

    Se han obtenido observaciones desde Tierra (Hα y magnetogramas) coordinadas con el Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT), a bordo del satélite japonés Yohkoh, de una región activa bipolar en decaimiento. Estos datos constituyen la base para el estudio de un punto brillante en rayos X (PBX) y de la actividad relacionada con el mismo en distintas capas de la atmósfera solar. Las observaciones muestran que el PBX está relacionado con la aparición de un bipolo menor (~ 1020 Mx) y que su abrillantamiento continuo, así como sus aumentos de brillo esporádicos (``fulguraciones"), son el resultado de la reconexión entre el pequeño arco emergente (visto en Hα como un sistema de filamentos arqueados, SFA) y arcos mayores asociados al campo facular preexistente. Se ha extrapolado el campo magnético observado en la aproximación libre de fuerzas lineal y se ha seguido su evolución a lo largo de la vida del PBX. Se ha calculado la posición de las cuasiseparatrices (CSs) a partir del campo modelado. Las líneas de campo extrapoladas, cuyas bases fotosféricas se encuentran a ambos lados de las CSs, están de acuerdo con las estructuras cromosféricas y coronales observadas. Se ha calculado el espesor de la CD ubicada a lo largo de la polaridad negativa emergente, encontrándose que su variación está de acuerdo con la evolución de la intensidad del PBX; la CS es muy delgada durante la vida del PBX (~ 100 m), mientras que su espesor aumenta considerablemente (>= 10^4 m) cuando el PBX desaparece de las imágenes del SXT. Estos resultados señalan que el abrillantamiento y las ``fulguraciones" de este PBX se deben al proceso de reconexión en 3D que tiene lugar en las CSs.

  17. Estudio comparativo de las moléculas isovalentes de interés atmosférico CF3Cl y CF3Br y sus correspondientes halógenos aislados Cl y Br.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, E.; Velasco, A. M.; Martín, I.; Lavín, C.

    Los estados Rydberg moleculares han suscitado en los últimos años un creciente interés entre los espectroscopistas experimentales, motivado en parte por el desarrollo de nuevas técnicas espectroscópicas capaces de investigar estos estados altamente excitados electrónicamente. Los procesos de fotoabsorción que implican estados Rydberg en los derivados halogenados del metano son de gran importancia, debido a su abundancia en la atmósfera y a sus implicaciones medioambientales. Por ello, la obtención de datos relativos a sus fuerzas de oscilador es de gran interés. En este trabajo se aborda el estudio de dichas propiedades para las moléculas isovalentes CF3Cl y CF3Br. Ambas moléculas presentan idéntica estructura electrónica para el estado fundamental por lo que se espera que sus espectros Rydberg presenten grandes similitudes, en ausencia de perturbaciones. Por ello y dada la escasez de datos relativos a fuerzas de oscilador, hemos establecido la corrección de nuestros resultados en base a las analogías esperadas en las intensidades espectrales correspondientes a transiciones análogas. Por otro lado, Novak y col. [1] han encontrado experimentalmente un marcado carácter atómico en el espectro correspondiente a estas moléculas, siendo muy similar a los de los átomos de Cl y Br. Por ello en el presente trabajo, además de establecer la comparación entre ambas moléculas hemos buscado las similitudes con sus respectivos halógenos. Los cálculos relativos a las especies moleculares se han realizado utilizando la Metodología Molécular de Orbítales de Defecto Cuántico (MQDO) [2], mientras que para el estudio de los átomos de Cl y Br se empleó la versión relativista del método (RQDO) [3].

  18. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Peñailillo Escarate, Luis; Mackay Phillips, Karen; Serrano Duarte, Natalia; Canales Espinoza, Pablo; Miranda Herrera, Pamela; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el entrenamiento de intervalos de alta intensidad (HIIT) y el consumo de ácidos grasos omega-3 (O3) ha demostrado cada uno por separado aumentar la capacidad aeróbica, metabolismo oxidativo y función cardiovascular.Objetivo: examinar el efecto combinado de HIIT más suplementación de O3 en el rendimiento físico, presión arterial y composición corporal en jóvenes sedentarios.Método: 28 jóvenes sedentarios con sobrepeso (Edad=22 ± 4 años; IMC=25.8 ± 2.4 kg·m-2) fueron distribuidos aleatoriamente en cuatro grupos: grupo O3/HIIT (n=7) realizó un protocolo de HIIT, tres veces por semana durante seis semanas y consumió 2 g·día-1 de O3; grupo HIIT (n=7) realizó solo el HIIT; grupo O3 (n=7) solo consumió O3; y grupo CONTROL (n=7) que no realizó ninguna intervención. Consumo de oxígeno peak (VO2peak), velocidad máxima (Vmax), presión arterial sistólica y diastólica (PAS y PAD), y porcentaje de grasa fueron medidos antes y después de la intervención.Resultados: el consumo de oxígeno peak aumentó más en el grupo O3/HIIT (+10.9%) en comparación con HIIT, O3 y CONTROL. Velocidad máxima aumentó en O3/HIIT (+7.1%) y HIIT (+11.9%). La presión arterial sistólica disminuyó más en O3 (-6.8%) en comparación con O3/HIIT, HIIT y CONTROL. Por último, O3/HIIT (-19.2%), HIIT (-20.2%), y O3 (-15.2%) presentaron mayores disminuciones del porcentaje de masa grasa en relación al CONTROL.Conclusión: nuestros resultados sugieren un efecto potenciador de la capacidad aeróbica máxima producto de la combinación de HIIT y suplementación de O3. Además, se observó una disminución de masa grasa en todos los grupos intervenidos. PMID:27571658

  19. [Some historical considerations on the inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Marson, P; Zanchin, G; Stefanutti, C

    2004-01-01

    In the past 20 years several clinical and experimental observations have led to the hypothesis that an inflammatory response can trigger some key processes during the development of atherosclerosis. Here we briefly review, from the historical viewpoint, the inflammatory theory of atherosclerosis, as proposed by the Berliner pathologist Rudolf Virchow in the XIX century. Contrary to this hypothesis, in the same period the Viennese Karl von Rokitansky recognized blood dyscrasia (particularly fibrin-induced alterations) as the promoting factor in the process of atherogenesis. Moreover, we outline the relationship between atherosclerosis and arthritis, by reporting some passages from two scientific works published in the late XIX century, the former by the Italian Achille De Giovanni ("Sull'arterite. Sue forme cliniche e sua patogenesi", 1882) and the latter by the French Theophile Guyot ("L'arthritis. Maladie Constitutionnelle", 1890). PMID:15470528

  20. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  1. Perspectivas Futuras para o Observatório do Pico dos Dias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Albert

    2004-02-01

    Com o Observatório Gemini plenamente operacional e o telescópio SOAR iniciando suas operações em breve, a astronomia observacional brasileira encontra-se no auge de uma transformação profunda que terá um impacto grave no Observatório do Pico dos Dias - OPD. Refletimos aqui sobre a natureza desse impacto e estratégias para manter a competitividade do OPD. Não queremos apresentar receitas prontas, mas idéias que poderão servir como base de discussão sobre o uso inteligente dos telescópios do OPD como parte do conjunto de instrumentos disponíveis à comunidade astronômica brasileira.

  2. Acardius acephalus fetus--report of distinctive anatomical anomalies with regards to pathophysiology of TRAP sequence.

    PubMed

    Lewitowicz, P; Wincewicz, A; Koziel, D; Matykiewicz, J; Horecka-Lewitowicz, A; Koda, M; Kanczuga-Koda, L; Gluszek, S; Sulkowski, S

    2015-01-01

    Acardiac fetuses are consequences of twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP). Here the authors present a case of 40-year-old gravida IX who gave birth to a healthy, 2,900 g female child by a cesarean section. Additionally amorphic 1,020 g maldeveloped fetus was removed. There was a diamnion monochorionic type of twin placenta with incorrect single umbilical arteries (SUA) both in umbilical cord of healthy fetus and in atrophic second umbilical cord. A malformed fetus developed a rather well formed lower leg with four digital foot and oval shape amorphous body mass with omphalocele and eventration of the intestines. X-ray picture showed well visible metatarsal and femur bone and anatomically undefined bones cluster in the central part. A cavity of fetal body contained intestines--the only one well-formed organ, nests of heterotopic pilosebaceous residues, remnants of adrenal glands, well-formed ganglia, and nests of neural tissue covered by neuroepithelium. PMID:26753494

  3. Caracterização do rotator de instrumentos do telescópio de 1,60m.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F.; Nishida, K.; Faúndez-Abans, M.; Campos, R. P.

    2004-04-01

    Na base do tubo do telescópio de 1,60m do Observatório do Pico dos Dias (OPD) encontra-se o flange de rotação de instrumentos “Rotator”. Neste flange são fixados todos os instrumentos científicos tais como câmeras, espectrógrafos e fotômetros, utilizados nas missões observacionais. Nesta nota técnica são relatados a utilização e o ganho de tempo obtido na operação de posicionamento do rotator, após sua automatização.

  4. CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE – RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, ELSA DÍAZ

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia); também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei. PMID:20689657

  5. Alcohol consumption in arthritic patients: clinical and laboratory studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bradlow, A; Mowat, A G

    1985-01-01

    In popular belief patients with chronic arthritis take alcohol for its analgesic effect. To test this we studied by validated questionnaire the past and present alcohol consumption of 103 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA), 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 90 orthopaedic non-arthritic controls. OA men were most likely and RA men least likely to have been heavy drinkers at any time of their lives. Mean red corpuscular volume (MCV), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), and serum uric acid (SUA) levels did not correlate with reported alcohol consumption. Two of 93 OA femoral heads examined had avascular change; both were from heavy drinkers. The abstemiousness of RA men compared with their OA counterparts was due to a striking increase in joint pain after drinking alcohol (p = 0.004), fear of adverse drug reactions with alcohol, and a widespread belief not expressed by OA men that 'alcohol and arthritis do not mix'. PMID:2858181

  6. Herschel-ATLAS: Dusty early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.

    2015-03-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are thought to be devoid of dust and star-formation, having formed most of their stars at early epochs. We present the detection of the dustiest ETGs in a large-area blind submillimetre survey with Herschel (H-ATLAS, Eales et al. 2010), where the lack of pre-selection in other bands makes it the first unbiased survey for cold dust in ETGs. The parent sample of 1087 H-ATLAS galaxies in this study have a >= 5σ detection at 250μm, a reliable optical counterpart to the submillimetre source (Smith et al. 2011) and a spectroscopic redshift from the GAMA survey (Driver et al. 2011). Additionally, we construct a control sample of 1052 optically selected galaxies undetected at 250μm and matched in stellar mass to the H-ATLAS parent sample to eliminate selection effects. ETGs were selected from both samples via visual classifications using SDSS images. Further details can be found in Rowlands et al. (2012). Physical parameters are derived for each galaxy using the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting code of da Cunha, Charlot and Elbaz (2008), Smith et al. 2012, using an energy balance argument. We investigate the differences between the dusty ETGs and the general ETG population, and find that the H-ATLAS ETGs are more than an order of magnitude dustier than the control ETGs. The mean dust mass of the 42 H-ATLAS ETGs is 5.5 × 107M⊙ (comparable to the dust mass of spirals in our sample), whereas the dust mass of the 233 control ETGs inferred from stacking at optical positions on the 250μm map is (0.8 - 4.0) × 106M⊙ for 25-15 K dust. The average star-formation rate of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.0 dex higher than that of control ETGs, and the mean r-band light-weighted age of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.8 Gyr younger than the control ETGs. The rest-frame NUV - r colours of the H-ATLAS ETGs are 1.0 magnitudes bluer than the control ETGs, and some ETGs may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Some H-ATLAS ETGs

  7. Groundwater Quality in the North San Francisco Bay Groundwater Basins, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater quality in the ~2,600 km2 North San Francisco Bay groundwater basins was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program, a collaboration of the California State Water Resources Control Board, U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Samples from 96 wells and 1 hydrothermal spring were analyzed for water chemistry, isotopic abundances, and dissolved gases. The study, designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality in the primary aquifer systems, was based on water-quality and ancillary data from 84 of the wells sampled and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database. Inorganic constituents with human-health benchmarks were present at high concentrations in 14%, moderate in 35.8%, and low in 50.2% of the primary aquifers. Arsenic, boron, and lead were the trace elements that most frequently occurred at high concentrations. Fluoride is a minor element, and nitrate, a nutrient were present at high concentrations in ~1% of the primary aquifers. In contrast, organic constituents (one or more) with human-health benchmarks were present at high concentrations in 1.4%, moderate in 4.9%, and low in 93.7% (not detected in 64.8%) of the primary aquifers. The high proportion of organic constituents primarily reflected high concentrations of PCE (1.3%), TCE (0.1%), and 1,1-dichloroethene (0.1%). Of the 255 organic constituents analyzed for, 26 constituents were detected. Two organic constituents were frequently detected (detected in 10% or more of samples): the trihalomethane chloroform and the herbicide simazine, but both were detected at low concentrations. In this study, arsenic is the constituent which most frequently exists at high concentrations (about 10%) in the primary aquifers. Natural sources

  8. [Study of post-myocardial infarction ventricular aneurysms with equilibrium radionuclide angiography. Significance of Fourier analysis].

    PubMed

    de Sá, M E; Ferreira, R; Rebelo, J R; Nogueira, A; Baptista, A M; Ribeiro, C

    2001-05-01

    The concept of left ventricular aneurysm has been a subject of controversy and it's not yet completely settled. This has some implications on the patients selection for surgery and explains the various non-invasive methods so far developed for the clinical assessment of patients with ventricular aneurysms. Seventy-one patients with ischemic heart disease, 65 with recent myocardial infarction, were studied by equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) in order to define left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. One hundred ERNA were undertaken, through the usual erytrocites in vivo labelling technic, employing a GE 400 T Gama-Camera GP. Image acquisition was through 400 cardiac cycles, on LAO (30 and 60 degrees) and left lateral. PAGE protocol was employed. Fourier transform was used in the present work to obtain phase and amplitude images, which actually became the main criteria to define aneurysmatic areas. Global ejection fraction, regional wall motion and regional ejection fraction were other parameters investigated. Wall motion abnormalities have been identified in all the 65 patients having suffered a myocardial infarction. Extensive areas of akinesia or localized dyskinesia were present in 40 patients (16.5%), while remainder 25 had just localized hypoakinesia. Phase image enabled the selection of LV areas of contraction delay in 19 of the 40 patients with extensive wall motion abnormalities (Group I). In such Group I we could identify an LV area with contrasting colour, defining the aneurysmatic LV portion. In the order 21 patients with extensive akinesia, no significant changes of colour were present on ventricular phase image (Group II) meaning absence of aneurysm. No phase disturbances were seen in the remainder 25 patients with MI (Group III) and the 6 patients with CAD without MI had normal phase images (Group IV). The percentage of akinetic segments was 39.1 and 35.4 in Group I and II, respectively (p = .53) while it was significantly lower in Group

  9. A quantitative analysis of local anaesthetic alteration of miniature end-plate currents and end-plate current fluctuations.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, R L

    1977-01-01

    -plate channels. 9. QX222 action could be explained by alteration of the ACh receptors such that they sequentially c-hanged from one conductance state to another. A specific case in which QX222 binds to the ACh receptors in its open state creating a partially blocked state, was found to be the most parisimonious. 10. The conductance, gamma, of a single end-plate channel was estimated from e.p.c. fluctuations. In Ringer's solution gama = 24-4 +/- 1-2 (s.d.) pmho. In the presence of 0-1 mm to 0-5 mm QX222 the effective single channel conductance, gamma, varied from 14-2 to 1-39 pmho. 11. gamma decreased with increased local anesthetic concentration, hyperpolarization, or decreased temperature. The variation in gamma is thought to reflect the dependence on the experimental conditions of the relative probability that the ACh receptors is in an open vs a partially blocked state. PMID:190384

  10. Calibração do sistema imageador do telescópio MASCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, J.; D'Amico, F.; Villela, T.; Braga, J.

    2003-08-01

    O MASCO (MÁScara COdificada) é um telescópio imageador de raios-X e gama atualmente configurado para operar na faixa de 50 a 600 keV com uma resolução angular de 14 minutos de arco num campo de visada total circular de 23,5° de diâmetro. O MASCO está totalmente operacional e deverá ser lançado em um balão estratosférico no segundo semestre de 2003 para realizar observações durante ~20 horas a ~40 km de altitude. O telescópio utiliza uma máscara codificada de padrão uniformemente redundante modificado (MURA) de dimensões 19 ´ 19. Esse padrão pertence a uma subclasse de MURAs que apresenta anti-simetria de 90° e conseqüentemente permite a utilização da técnica de subtração de variações sistemáticas de ruído de fundo através de utilização da configuração anti-máscara, obtida com uma simples rotação da máscara. Neste trabalho apresentamos resultados de calibrações em laboratório que tiveram como objetivo testar o sistema imageador. Imagens de fontes radioativas foram obtidas com o telescópio em configuração de vôo, com a máscara girando. Serão discutidos os resultados desses testes e as técnicas desenvolvidas para eliminar ambigüidades de posição de fontes, otimização da relação sinal-ruído e observação de fontes fora do campo totalmente codificado. O sistema de máscara/antimáscara mostrou-se capaz de aumentar a relação sinal-ruído de ~60% para fontes intensas (100 s). Com a máscara girando, a técnica de reconstrução de imagens desenvolvida identificou a posição exata da fonte e não introduziu perda de sensibilidade. Imagens de uma fonte colocada a 8,3° - fora do campo totalmente codificado do telescópio -, mostraram uma diminuição de ~40% na relação sinal/ruído em relação ao centro do campo de visada, o que se deve à codificação incompleta pela máscara e à absorção parcial do fluxo pelos detectores de blindagem.

  11. Compilação de dados atômicos e moleculares do UV ao IV próximo para uso em síntese espectral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, P.; Barbuy, B.; Melendez, J.; Allen, D. M.; Castilho, B.

    2003-08-01

    final, temos uma lista de linhas atômicas com mais de 24.000 linhas e uma lista molecular com as moléculas CN, CH, OH, NH, MgH, C2, TiO Gama, CO, FeH, adequadas ao estudo de estrelas G, K e M e populações estelares velhas.

  12. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Zogg

    2011-03-14

    The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering

  13. Characterizing the Microstructure of Heparin and Heparan Sulfate using N-sulfoglucosamine 1H and 15N NMR Chemical Shift Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beecher, Consuelo N.; Naggi, Annamaria; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are members of a biologically important group of highly anionic linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Because of their structural complexity, the molecular-level characterization of heparin and HS continues to be a challenge. The work presented herein describes an emerging approach for the analysis of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins as well as porcine and human-derived HS. This approach utilizes the untapped potential of 15N NMR to characterize these preparations through detection of the NH resonances of N-sulfo-glucosamine residues. The sulfamate group 1H and 15N chemical shifts of six GAG microenvironments were assigned based on the critical comparison of selectively modified heparin derivatives, NMR measurements for a library of heparin-derived oligosaccharide standards, and an in-depth NMR analysis of the low molecular weight heparin enoxaparin through systematic investigation of the chemical exchange properties of NH resonances and residue-specific assignments using the [1H, 15N] HSQC-TOCSY experiment. The sulfamate microenvironments characterized in this study include GlcNS(6S)-UA(2S), ΔUA(2S)-GlcNS(6S), GlcNS(3S)(6S)-UA(2S), GlcNS-UA, GlcNS(6S)-redα, and 1,6-anhydro GlcNS demonstrate the utility of [1H, 15N] HSQC NMR spectra to provide a spectroscopic fingerprint reflecting the composition of intact GAGs and low molecular weight heparin preparations. PMID:23240897

  14. Curva de rotação óptica de ESO-LV 5100550

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, D. B.; Soares, D. S. L.

    2003-08-01

    ESO-LV 5100550 é o membro mais fraco do par de galáxias austral SBG 357 (Soares et al. 1995). É classificada no catálogo RC3 como uma espiral ordinária de tipo inicial (early-type); porém, uma análise morfológica sugere que ela tenha uma grande barra. O objetivo do estudo é determinar sua cinemática de tal modo que possamos inferir mais a respeito de sua dinâmica, provavelmente perturbada, já que se espera que esteja sob forte influência da companheira ESO-LV 5100560. Apresentarei resultados parciais determinados a partir de espectros obtidos com o instrumento Double Spectrograph montado no telescópio Hale do Monte Palomar, EUA. As observações foram realizadas por D.S.L. Soares, P.M.V. Veiga e T.E. Nordgren, em 1998. Foram tomados espectros de fenda longa posicionada sobre a linha dos nodos do disco e ao longo da suposta barra. Os dados foram reduzidos com uso do pacote IRAF. Obtivemos o perfil de velocidades radiais na linha de visada ao longo das fendas e calculamos o desvio para o vermelho cosmológico do sistema, com base no espectro central. Determinamos as curvas de rotação deprojetadas, com base em cálculos para os valores teóricos esperados das componentes de velocidades puramente circulares em um disco inclinado. A inclinação do disco, dado fundamental nesta deprojeção, foi estimada através da média das elipticidades das isofotas mais externas.

  15. CaseBook challenges: Managing gout, hyperuricemia and comorbidities -- dialogue with the experts.

    PubMed

    Bakris, George L; Doghramji, Paul P; Keenan, Robert T; Silber, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia are on the rise in the United States corresponding with an increase in risk factors for these conditions, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and the use of diuretics. A progressive disorder, untreated gout can be debilitating and result in tophi, chronic arthropathy, and recurrent kidney stones. Although joint aspiration is needed for a definitive diagnosis, the majority of patients are diagnosed presumptively based on medical history and presentation with characteristic signs and symptoms. Patients with gout also often have multiple comorbidities, and there is an increasing body of evidence that shows hyperuricemia is associated with incidence hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and heart failure. Clinical strategies for the management of gout and hyperuricemia must include considerations for these and other common cardiometabolic and renal conditions. In addition to acute flare therapy and prophylaxis, the treatment of gout involves lowering serum uric acid (SUA) levels with the urate-lowering therapies (ULTs) allopurinol or febuxostat. Once begun, treatment with ULT is lifelong. However, inadequate dosing and patient nonadherence or intolerance to therapy often lead to treatment failure. Recent guidelines from the American College of Rheumatology stress tailoring therapy and target SUA level (traditionally <6 mg/dL, but lower levels may be needed for certain patients) based on gout severity and the presence of comorbid conditions. Because painful acute gout flares may result in trips to the emergency department and because the majority of gout cases are managed in primary care, it is important for clinicians practicing in these settings to be able to diagnose and treat this condition and communicate with patients to improve their understanding of the disease process and adherence to treatment. PMID:24268074

  16. OV-Wav: um novo pacote para análise multiescalar em astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D. N. E.; Rabaça, C. R.

    2003-08-01

    Wavelets e outras formas de análise multiescalar têm sido amplamente empregadas em diversas áreas do conhecimento, sendo reconhecidamente superiores a técnicas mais tradicionais, como as análises de Fourier e de Gabor, em certas aplicações. Embora a teoria dos wavelets tenha começado a ser elaborada há quase trinta anos, seu impacto no estudo de imagens astronômicas tem sido pequeno até bem recentemente. Apresentamos um conjunto de programas desenvolvidos ao longo dos últimos três anos no Observatório do Valongo/UFRJ que possibilitam aplicar essa poderosa ferramenta a problemas comuns em astronomia, como a remoção de ruído, a detecção hierárquica de fontes e a modelagem de objetos com perfis de brilho arbitrários em condições não ideais. Este pacote, desenvolvido para execução em plataforma IDL, teve sua primeira versão concluída recentemente e está sendo disponibilizado à comunidade científica de forma aberta. Mostramos também resultados de testes controlados ao quais submetemos os programas, com a sua aplicação a imagens artificiais, com resultados satisfatórios. Algumas aplicações astrofísicas foram estudadas com o uso do pacote, em caráter experimental, incluindo a análise da componente de luz difusa em grupos compactos de galáxias de Hickson e o estudo de subestruturas de nebulosas planetárias no espaço multiescalar.

  17. UAS Developments Supporting Wildfire Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Dahlgren, R. P.; Watts, A.; Reynolds, K. W.; Ball, T.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires are regularly occurring emergency events that threaten life, property, and natural resources in every U.S. State and many countries around the world. Despite projections that $1.8 billion will be spent by U.S. Federal agencies alone on wildfires in 2014, the decades-long trend of increasing fire size, severity, and cost is expected to continue. Furthermore, the enormous potential for UAS (and concomitant sensor systems) to serve as geospatial intelligence tools to improve the safety and effectiveness of fire management, and our ability to forecast fire and smoke movements, remains barely tapped. Although orbital sensor assets are can provide the geospatial extent of wildfires, generally those resources are limited in use due to their spatial and temporal resolution limitations. These two critical elements make orbital assets of limited utility for tactical, real-time wildfire management, or for continuous scientific analysis of the temporal dynamics related to fire energy release rates and plume concentrations that vary significantly thru a fire's progression. Large UAS platforms and sensors can and have been used to monitor wildfire events at improved temporal, spatial and radiometric scales, but more focus is being placed on the use of small UAS (sUAS) and sensors to support wildfire observation strategies. The use of sUAS is therefore more critical for TACTICAL management purposes, rather than strategic observations, where small-scale fire developments are critical to understand. This paper will highlight the historical development and use of UAS for fire observations, as well as the current shift in focus to smaller, more affordable UAS for more rapid integration into operational use on wildfire events to support tactical observation strategies, and support wildfire science measurement inprovements.

  18. Minilaparoscopy-assisted transumbilical laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Geraldo José DE Souza; Leite, Rodrigo Fabiano Guedes; Abras, Gustavo Munayer; Pires, Livio José Suretti; Castro, Eduardo Godoy

    2016-01-01

    The role of laparoscopy in the modern surgery era is well established. With the prospect of being able to improve the already privileged current situation, new alternatives have been proposed, such as natural orifice endoscopic surgery (NOTES), the method for single transumbilical access (LESS - Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery) and minilaparoscopy (MINI). The technique proposed by the authors uses a laparoscope with an operative channel like the flexible endoscope used in NOTES. All operative times are carried out through the umbilical trocar as in LESS, and assisted by a minilaparoscopy grasper. This new technic combines, and results from, the rationalization of technical particularities and synergy of these three approaches, seeking to join their advantages and minimize their disadvantages. RESUMO O papel da videolaparoscopia na era moderna da cirurgia encontra-se bem estabelecido. Com a perspectiva de ser possível melhorar a já privilegiada situação atual, novas alternativas têm sido propostas, como a cirurgia por orifícios naturais (NOTES), o método por acesso único transumbilical (LESS - Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery) e a minilaparoscopia (MINI). A técnica proposta pelos autores utiliza-se de óptica com canal de trabalho como o endoscópio flexível do NOTES, executa-se todos os tempos operatórios pelo trocarte umbilical, como no LESS, e é assistido por pinça de minilaparoscopia. Esta nova técnica combina e resulta da racionalização de particularidades técnicas e do sinergismo destas três abordagens, buscando agregar suas vantagens e minimizar as suas desvantagens. PMID:27556545

  19. Mapping patients’ experiences from initial symptoms to gout diagnosis: a qualitative exploration

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, Jennifer; Roddy, Edward; Mallen, Christian D; Hider, Samantha L; Prinjha, Suman; Ziebland, Sue; Richardson, Jane C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore patients’ experiences from initial symptoms to receiving a diagnosis of gout. Design Data from in-depth semistructured interviews were used to construct themes to describe key features of patients’ experiences of gout diagnosis. Participants and setting A maximum variation sample of 43 UK patients with gout (29 men; 14 women; age range 32–87 years) were recruited from general practices, rheumatology clinics, gout support groups and through online advertising. Results Severe joint pain, combined with no obvious signs of physical trauma or knowledge of injury, caused confusion for patients attempting to interpret their symptoms. Reasons for delayed consultation included self-diagnosis and/or self-medication, reluctance to seek medical attention, and financial/work pressures. Factors potentially contributing to delayed diagnosis after consultation included reported misdiagnosis, attacks in joints other than the first metatarsophalangeal joint, and female gender. The limitations in using serum uric acid (SUA) levels for diagnostic purposes were not always communicated effectively to patients, and led to uncertainty and lack of confidence in the accuracy of the diagnosis. Resistance to the diagnosis occurred in response to patients’ beliefs about the causes of gout and characteristics of the people likely to be affected. Diagnosis prompted actions, such as changes in diet, and evidence was found of self-monitoring of SUA levels. Conclusions This study is the first to report data specifically about patients’ pathways to initial consultation and subsequent experiences of gout diagnosis. A more targeted approach to information provision at diagnosis would improve patients’ experiences. PMID:26369796

  20. Cooperative Autonomous Observation of Coherent Atmospheric Structures using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravela, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the structure of localized atmospheric phenomena, from sea breeze and shallow cumuli to thunderstorms and hurricanes, is of scientific interest. Low-cost small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) open the possibility for autonomous "instruments" to map important small-scale phenomena (kilometers, hours) and serve as a testbed for for much larger scales. Localized phenomena viewed as coherent structures interacting with their large-scale environment are difficult to map. As simple simulations show, naive Eulerian or Lagrangian strategies can fail in mapping localized phenomena. Model-based techniques are needed. Meteorological targeting, where supplementary UAS measurements additionally constrain numerical models is promising, but may require many prim