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Sample records for sub-micron agglomerate-free alumina

  1. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  2. Gelcasting of sub-micron alumina, sialon, and silicon nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Strehlow, R.A.; Walls, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Gelcasting is a near-net-shape forming technique that is applicable to various types of powders. It is accomplished by casting a concentrated suspension of a commercial ceramic powder in a solution of a polymerizable monomer and then polymerizing. A filled gel is formed, which is dried and processed further. Alumina, sialon, and silicon nitride parts of various geometries have been made and are described. Emphasis is placed on the unit-operations of the process. Because a requirement of the process is a castable suspension of more than 50 vol % solids loading, good dispersion is crucial. Drying, another key process, has been studied extensively. Shrinkage from the cast size occurs during drying and further shrinkage occurs during sintering. Data on the relationship of physical properties of products to some of the more significant processing variables is discussed. Emphasis is also placed on the machinability of the dried gelled body. Because the body at this stage is quite durable, green part machining is feasible. The monomer used in the process is acrylamide, which undergoes a vinyl polymerization. Environmental, safety and hygiene issues are summarized. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Sub-micron filter

    DOEpatents

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  4. Sub-micron particle sampler apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  5. Method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.; McMillan, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar.RTM. and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis.

  6. Sub-micron particle sampler apparatus and method for sampling sub-micron particles

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.; McMillan, W.G.

    1984-04-12

    Apparatus and method steps for collecting sub-micron sized particles include a collection chamber and cryogenic cooling. The cooling is accomplished by coil tubing carrying nitrogen in liquid form, with the liquid nitrogen changing to the gas phase before exiting from the collection chamber in the tubing. Standard filters are used to filter out particles of diameter greater than or equal to 0.3 microns; however, the present invention is used to trap particles of less than 0.3 micron in diameter. A blower draws air to said collection chamber through a filter which filters particles with diameters greater than or equal to 0.3 micron. The air is then cryogenically cooled so that moisture and sub-micron sized particles in the air condense into ice on the coil. The coil is then heated so that the ice melts, and the liquid is then drawn off and passed through a Buchner funnel where the liquid is passed through a Nuclepore membrane. A vacuum draws the liquid through the Nuclepore membrane, with the Nuclepore membrane trapping sub-micron sized particles therein. The Nuclepore membrane is then covered on its top and bottom surfaces with sheets of Mylar and the assembly is then crushed into a pellet. This effectively traps the sub-micron sized particles for later analysis. 6 figures.

  7. Sub-micron structuring of silicon using femtosecond laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Serra, R.; Oliveira, J. C.; Polushkin, N. I.; Conde, O.

    2013-12-01

    We report the fabrication of planar sub-micron gratings in silicon with a period of 720 nm using a modified Michelson interferometer and femtosecond laser radiation. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of laser ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are bordered by parallel ridges which protrude above the unmodified material. In the regions where ridges are formed, the laser radiation intensity is not sufficient to cause ablation. Nevertheless, melting and a significant temperature increase are expected, and ridges may be formed due to expansion of silicon during resolidification or silicon oxidation. These conclusions are consistent with the evolution of the stripes morphology as a function of the distance from the center of the grating. Sub-micron gratings were created in silicon using femtosecond laser radiation. A modified Michelson interferometer was used. The gratings consist of alternated stripes of ablated and unmodified material. Ablated stripes are surrounded by ridges which protrude above unmodified surface.

  8. Sub-micron texturing of silicon wafer with fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, Hamid; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Hong Yu; Li, Zhongli

    2011-03-01

    Laser texturing is extensively investigated for modifying surface properties. A continuous wave (CW) fiber laser (λ= 1090nm) was used to pattern a silicon wafer surface in ambient and O2 atmosphere respectively. The O2 gas stream was delivered through a coaxial nozzle to the laser spot. Characterization of the patterned features was carried out by surface profiling, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS or EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Formation of laser-induced silicon oxide sub-micron bumps was observed, which were analyzed and shown to cause changes in surface wetability and reflectivity.

  9. Discovering sub-micron ice particles across Dione' surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Schenk, Pual; Tosi, Federico; Clark, Roger; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Combe, Jean-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Water ice is the most abundant component of Saturn’s mid-sized moons. However, these moons show an albedo asymmetry - their leading sides are bright while their trailing side exhibits dark terrains. Such differences arise from two surface alteration processes: (i) the bombardment of charged particles from the interplanetary medium and driven by Saturn’s magnetosphere on the trailing side, and (ii) the impact of E-ring water ice particles on the satellites’ leading side. As a result, the trailing hemisphere appears to be darker than the leading side. This effect is particularly evident on Dione's surface. A consequence of these surface alteration processes is the formation or the implantation of sub-micron sized ice particles.The presence of such particles influences and modifies the surfaces' spectrum because of Rayleigh scattering by the particles. In the near infrared range of the spectrum, the main sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators are: (i) asymmetry and (ii) long ward minimum shift of the absorption band at 2.02 μm (iii) a decrease in the ratio between the band depths at 1.50 and 2.02 μm (iv) a decrease in the height of the spectral peak at 2.6 μm (v) the suppression of the Fresnel reflection peak at 3.1 μm and (vi) the decrease of the reflection peak at 5 μm relative to those at 3.6 μm.We present results from our ongoing work mapping the variation of sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators across Dione' surface using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). To characterize the global variations of spectral indicators across Dione' surface, we divided it into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.We will investigate if there exist a correspondence with water ice abundance variations by producing water ice' absorption band depths at 1.25, 1.52 and 2.02 μm, and with surface morphology by comparing the results with ISS color maps in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared

  10. Development of sub-micron patterned carbon electrodes for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Dontha, N; Nowall, W B; Kuhr, W G

    1999-02-01

    Sub-micron sized domains of a carbon surface are derivatized with antibodies using biotin/avidin technology. These sites are spatially-segregated from, and directly adjacent to, electron transfer sites on the same electrode surface. The distance between these electron transfer sites and enzyme-loaded domains are kept to a minimum (e.g. less than a micron) to maintain the high sensitivity required for the measurement of enzyme-linked cofactors in an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). This is accomplished through the use of photolithographic attachment of photobiotin using an interference pattern from a UV laser generated at the electrode surface. This allows the construction of microscopic arrays of active ELISA sites on a carbon substrate while leaving other sites underivatized to facilitate electron transfer reactions of redox mediators; thus maximizing sensitivity and detection of the enzyme mediator. The carbon electrode surface is characterized with respect to its chemical structure and electron transfer properties following each step of the antibody immobilization process. The characterization of specific modifications of micron regions of the carbon surface requires analytical methodology that has both high spatial resolution and sensitivity. We have used fluorescence microscopy with a cooled CCD imaging system to visualize the spatial distribution of enzyme immobilization sites (indicated by fluorescence from Texas-Red labeled antibody) across the carbon surface. The viability of the enzyme attached to the surface in this manner was demonstrated by imaging the distribution of an insoluble, fluorescent product. PMID:10698570

  11. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  12. Sub-micron retarding field energy analyzer for plasma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew

    1997-10-01

    A retarding field energy analyzer with sub-micron apertures for measurement of ion energy distributions in processing plasmas has been built. The analyzer was fabricated using standard Si integrated circuit materials and processing techniques and consists of a shielding grid, an electron repeller grid, and a collector plate, all made of 400 nm thick polycrystalline silicon thin films. The grids are supported and insulated from each other by 1 μm and 2 μm of SiO_2. The apertures in the grids are nominally 0.8 μm in diameter and are self-aligned, thereby minimizing field leakage and optimizing energy resolution. Ion trajectory modeling using SIMION predicts analyzer dispersion to be less than 0.1 eV for 20 eV incident ions. The analyzer can be operated on the wafer on which it was fabricated or can be separated into 1.6 x 1.2 cm^2 die for use as a discrete probe. The basic functionality of the analyzer has been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas and measurements show energy spreads of 3-5 eV which are consistent with the expected presheath voltage drops and agree well with measurements made with differentially pumped, macroscopic ion energy analyzers. Changes in mean ion energy as a function of power and pressure agree with the expected scaling trends. Efforts to passivate the Si surfaces with Ni to allow for operation of the analyzer in reactive gas plasmas are also reported.

  13. Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories induced by total dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qi-Wen; Yu, Xue-Feng; Cui, Jiang-Wei; Guo, Qi; Ren, Di-Yuan; Cong, Zhong-Chao; Zhou, Hang

    2014-10-01

    Pattern imprinting in deep sub-micron static random access memories (SRAMs) during total dose irradiation is investigated in detail. As the dose accumulates, the data pattern of memory cells loading during irradiation is gradually imprinted on their background data pattern. We build a relationship between the memory cell's static noise margin (SNM) and the background data, and study the influence of irradiation on the probability density function of ΔSNM, which is the difference between two data sides' SNMs, to discuss the reason for pattern imprinting. Finally, we demonstrate that, for micron and deep sub-micron devices, the mechanism of pattern imprinting is the bias-dependent threshold shift of the transistor, but for a deep sub-micron device the shift results from charge trapping in the shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide rather than from the gate oxide of the micron-device.

  14. Geometric effects on the mechanical strengths of strong nanocrystalline rhodium sub-micron structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Ting Y.; Jahed, Zeinab; Evans, R. D.; Burek, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    Sub-micron scale nanocrystalline rhodium pillars were fabricated by electron beam lithography and electroplating techniques. The fabricated specimens included solid core pillars and columnar structure with more complex cross-sectional geometries, including x-shaped and annulus shaped. Among these specimens, two groups of sub-micron scale annulus structures with sidewall thicknesses of 250 and 205 nm were fabricated. All of the structures have outer diameters of ~1 μm and consist of average grain size smaller than 22 nm. Uniaxial compression results reveal these rhodium pillars are very strong with true flow stresses exceeding 5 GPa and are not sensitive to the sample cross-sectional geometries.

  15. Extinction spectra of quasi-spherical silver sub-micron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malynych, S.; Chumanov, G.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the experimental data on the extinction spectra of aqueous suspensions of silver sub-micron particles as well as those for planar arrays of particles. The spectra of noninteracting silver particles, i.e. colloidal suspension consist of two characteristic bands: dipole at 545 nm and quadrupole at 430 nm components of the surface plasmon resonance. Presence of some fraction of silver whiskers in colloids causes broadening and tailing of the dipole component. Coating of Ag particles with Si mantle shifts plasmon resonances to the longer wavelengths. The extinction spectrum of planar array of Ag sub-micron particles self-assembled on a glass substrate drastically differs from that for colloidal suspension. The effect may arise from coherent coupling of surface plasmons associated with the particles.

  16. Hydrogels containing metallic glass sub-micron wires for regulating skeletal muscle cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Banan Sadeghian, Ramin; Yaginuma, Shin; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Nashimoto, Yuji; Liang, Xiaobin; Bae, Hojae; Nakajima, Ken; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Koji S; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels with tunable electrical and mechanical properties have a wide range of biological applications in tissue engineering, biosensing, and biorobotics. In this work, palladium-based metallic glass sub-micron wires (PdMGSMWs) were employed to enhance the conductivity and mechanical strength of gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) gels. The values of electrical resistivity and stiffness of hybrid GelMA-PdMGSMW hydrogels were varied by the concentration of the sub-micron wires in the gels. Compared with pristine GelMA gels, hybrid GelMA-PdMGSMW gels were more efficient in regulating adhesion and spreading of C2C12 myoblasts. Formation, contractility, and metabolic activity of C2C12 myotubes in GelMA hydrogels also increased upon inclusion of the PdMGSMWs and applying electrical stimulation. The latter phenomenon is likely because of the electrical conductivity of hybrid GelMA gels. PMID:26343776

  17. Preparation of sub-micron nitrocellulose particles for improved combustion behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-03-15

    A novel method to prepare sub-micron nitrocellulose particles with spherical shape is demonstrated. The morphology of the nitrocellulose can be controlled by the solvent and the growth temperature. Using dimethylformamide (DMF) at a growth temperature is 5°C, reproducibly yielded spherical nitrocellulose particles. The final diameter of the prepared nitrocellulose particles can be further tuned by concentration. The smallest particles in this study were found to have diameters of 500nm at a concentration of 5-10mg/ml with 2 micron spheres formed at 30mg/ml. Furthermore, the thermal properties and the burn rates of the prepared materials are studied by differential scanning calorimetry and digital high-speed photography, respectively. In comparison to the bulk nitrocellulose material, the sub-micron nitrocellulose particles have lower decomposition activation energy, a 350% increase in burn rate, and a more complete combustion. PMID:24509093

  18. Generating Sub-Micron Features On Rough Surfaces Using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    Near-field intensity enhancement enables laser modification of materials with feature sizes below the classical diffraction limit. However, the need to maintain close distances between the objective element and the substrate typically limit demonstrations of this technology to flat surfaces, even though there are many cases where the ability to produce sub-micron features on rough or structured surfaces are needed. Here, we show the use of a new technique, optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN), for the production of nanoscale features on rippled substrates. The ability to position a microbead near-field objective close to the surface without the need for active feedback and control allows one to continuously move the bead across a rough surface without sticking. Sub-micron patterning of polyimide is demonstrated on surfaces with 1.1 μm steps showing good uniformity. Finally, the enabling technology allows for straightforward parallelization where multiple patterns can be created simultaneously over surface.

  19. Characteristics of scandate-impregnated cathodes with sub-micron scandia-doped matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haiqing; Gu, Xin; Pan, Kexin; Wang, Yiman; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Jinshu; Zhou, Meiling; Li, Ji

    2005-09-01

    We describe in this paper scandate-impregnated cathodes with sub-micron scandia-doped tungsten matrices having an improved uniformity of the Sc distribution. The scandia-doped tungsten powders were made by both liquid-solid doping and liquid-liquid doping methods on the basis of previous research. By improving pressing, sintering and impregnating procedures, we have obtained scandate-impregnated cathodes with a good uniformity of the Sc 2O 3- distribution. The porosity of the sub-micron structure matrix and content of impregnants inside the matrix are similar to those of conventionally impregnated cathodes. Space charge limited current densities of more than 30 A/cm 2 at 850 °C b have been obtained in a reproducible way. The current density continuously increases during the first 2000 h life test at 950 °C b with a dc load of 2 A/cm 2 and are stable for at least 3000 h.

  20. The fabrication of sub-micron size cesium iodide x-ray scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Chien Wan; Chen, Po Chun; Huang, Ker Jer; Chen, Chien Chon

    2015-05-01

    The cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator can converts incident X-ray into visible light with very high conversion efficiency of optical photons. The incident energy, response time, film thickness, sample size, and spatial resolution require in engineering and medical applications are difference. A smooth and flat surface and single crystal structure of CsI enhance the X-ray to visible light conversion. However, the regular CsI is soft and extremely hygroscopic; it is very difficult to polish to obtain a smooth and optical flat plane. In order to obtain a good quality of CsI scintillator for X-ray application we used an ordering channel as template and formed sub-micron CsI wire in the template. The fabrication process including: (1) Ordering structure of nano or sub-micron channels were made by an anodization method; (2) fill CsI scintillated film on the channel by CsI solution, (3) fill CsI melt into the channel formation single crystal of sub-micron crystalline scintillator after solidification. The non-vacuum processes of anodization and solidication methods were used for the sub-micron CsI scintillator column formation that is cost down the scintillator fabrication. In addition, through the fabrication method, the ordering structure scintillator of scintillator can be made by anodic treatment and die casting technology with low cost and rapid production; moreover, the film oxidized metal tubes of the tubular template can be further manufactured to nano tubes by adjusting electrolyte composition, electrolysis voltage, and processing time of anodic treatment, and the aperture size, the thickness and the vessel density of the nano tube can be controlled and ranged from 10 nm to 500 nm, 0.1 μm to 1000 μm, and hundred million to thousand billion tube/cm2, respectively.

  1. Oxidation of synthesized sub-micron pyrite (FeS2) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartman, Amy; Luther, George W.

    2014-11-01

    Synthesized sub-micron pyrite was oxidized in 0.2 μm-filtered Sargasso seawater in order to investigate the rate of oxidation and reaction end-products. Over the initial phase of the reaction, the sub-micron pyrite behaved as a soluble entity as the initial rate of oxidation was determined to be first order with respect to both pyrite and oxygen concentration, where the rate is described as -dFeS2/dt = k[FeS2][O2] and k, the rate constant, is 7.60 × 10-5 + 6.29 × 10-5 μM-1 day-1 at 25 °C. Oxidation proceeds inward from an initial surface oxidation of the pyrite and the formation of an amorphous mixed valence Fe(II)/(III) oxide surrounding the remaining pyrite core. The oxidation rates obtained through this study are up to two orders of magnitude slower than reported in previous pyrite oxidation studies using ground rather than synthesized pyrite at similar pH values. These results may be applied anywhere seawater and sub-micron pyrite are found, including hydrothermal vents, salt marshes and marine sediments.

  2. Ordered YBCO sub-micron array structures induced by pulsed femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, C W; Lee, C C; Li, C H; Shih, H C; Chen, Y-J; Hsieh, C C; Su, C H; Tzeng, W Y; Wu, K H; Juang, J Y; Uen, T M; Chen, S P; Lin, J-Y; Kobayashi, T

    2008-12-01

    We report on the formation of organized sub-micron YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) dots induced by irradiating femtosecond laser pulses on YBCO films prepared by pulse laser deposition with fluence in the range of 0.21 approximately 0.53 J/cm(2). The morphology of the YBCO film surface depends strongly on the laser fluences irradiated. At lower laser fluence (approximately 0.21 J/cm(2)) the morphology was pattern of periodic ripples with sub-micrometer spacing. Slightly increasing the laser fluence to 0.26 J/cm(2) changes the pattern into organized sub-micron dots with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 800 nm and height of 150 nm. Further increase of the laser fluence to over 0.32 J/cm(2), however, appeared to result in massive melting and led to irregular morphology. The mechanism and the implications of the current findings will be discussed. Arrays of YBCO sub-micron dots with T(c) = 89.7 K were obtained. PMID:19065200

  3. Optimization of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulation within poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) sub-micron particles.

    PubMed

    Okassa, Lazare Ngaboni; Marchais, Hervé; Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Hervé, Katel; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-08-01

    This work describes a method for preparation of sub-micron poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles loaded with magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles to be used as magnetically-controlled drug delivery systems. The methodology of simple emulsion/evaporation technique has been optimized to provide greater iron oxide loading rates. The surface of iron oxide nanoparticles was coated with oleic acid (OA) for better compatibility with organic phase containing the polymer. To increase their loading into polymeric sub-micron particles, we added dried iron oxide nanoparticles in variable ferrite/polymer ratio of 1:1; 1:1.5 and 1:2 w/w. Composition and surface properties of obtained composite sub-micron particles have been studied in comparison with those of ferrite-free PLGA sub-micron particles. Presence of magnetite/maghemite was qualitatively confirmed by characteristic bands in the FT-IR spectra of composite sub-micron particles. Quantification of the incorporated iron was achieved by AAS. The highest incorporation rates of ferrite (up to 13.5% w/w) were observed with initial ferrite/polymer ratio of 1:1 w/w. TEM images indicate that the composite sub-micron particles are nearly spherical. According to laser granulometry data, average hydrodynamic diameter of the composite sub-micron particles is close to 280nm, independently of ferrite presence. Electrophoretic properties (zeta potential) were very similar for both composite and ferrite-free PLGA sub-micron particles, thus indicating that the polymeric coating should mask the surface of ferrite nanoparticles buried inside. Finally, composite sub-micron particles exhibit superparamagnetic property. PMID:17289360

  4. Generation of sub-micron particles and secondary pollutants from building materials by ozone reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Taisuke; Tanabe, Shin-ichi

    This study reports results from two different experiments examining reactions between ozone and common building materials that can lead to the formation of secondary products and particulate-phase materials. Monitored species include sub-micron particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In the first set of experiments, various building materials were placed in a 20 L stainless-steel chamber and exposed to ozone. The materials included expanded polystyrene, a natural rubber adhesive, cedar board, Japanese Cyprus board and silver fir board, as well as d-limonene, which is a known constituent of certain woods and cleaning products. The combination of ozone and either d-limonene, cedar board or cypress board produced sub-micron particles, with most of the increase occurring in the size range of 0.01- 0.5μm diameter. This was not observed for the other materials. In the case of cedar board, the consequence of ozone exposure over an extended time interval was monitored. As the exposure time elapsed, the concentration of sub-micron particles moderately decreased. In the second set of experiments, unwaxed or waxed plastic tiles were placed in the 20 L chamber and exposed to ozone. Sub-micron particles and organic compounds were measured during the course of the experiments. In the case of the waxed tile, the number of 0.01- 1.0μm size particles grew about 50×108particlesm-3; particle growth was significantly less for the un-waxed tile. For both the waxed and un-waxed tiles, the emission rates of heptane, nonane, nonanal, and decanal increased after ozone was added to the supply air. (However, it is not clear if some or all of this production was due to ozone reacting with the sorbent used for sampling or with compounds captured by the sorbent.) This study provides further evidence that ozone-initiated reactions with building materials can be a significant source of both sub-micron particles and secondary organic compounds in indoor environments.

  5. Development of Sub-micron Broadband Lens-Coupled LEKIDs for Sub-mm Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Prieto, P.; Bueno, J.; Doyle, S.; Barry, P.; Bideaud, A.; Llombart, N.; Granados, D.; Costa-Kramer, J. L.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a fabrication method for sub-micron lens-coupled lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) for broadband sub-millimeter (sub-mm) and THz radiation detection. The LEKIDs are fabricated from very thin (12 nm) and narrow (200 nm) aluminum lines to match the impedance of the LEKID to the substrate impedance. The fabrication process is based on a combination of maskless laserwriter lithography and electron beam lithography, providing low (few microns) and high resolution (down to 200 nm) over large areas in a single process. Preliminary optical characterization shows that the fabricated LEKIDs are sensitive to 1.5 THz radiation.

  6. Suppression of transient enhanced diffusion in sub-micron patterned silicon template by dislocation loops formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Kuan-Kan; Woon, Wei Yen; Chang, Ruey-Dar

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the evolution of two dimensional transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of phosphorus in sub-micron scale patterned silicon template. Samples doped with low dose phosphorus with and without high dose silicon self-implantation, were annealed for various durations. Dopant diffusion is probed with plane-view scanning capacitance microscopy. The measurement revealed two phases of TED. Significant suppression in the second phase TED is observed for samples with high dose self-implantation. Transmission electron microscopy suggests the suppressed TED is related to the evolution of end of range defect formed around ion implantation sidewalls.

  7. Kinetics of Sub-Micron Grain Size Refinement in 9310 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozmel, Thomas; Chen, Edward Y.; Chen, Charlie C.; Tin, Sammy

    2014-05-01

    Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel manufacturing processes capable of producing microstructures dominated by sub-micron grains. For structural applications, grain refinement has been shown to enhance mechanical properties such as strength, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness. Through control of the thermo-mechanical processing parameters, dynamic recrystallization mechanisms were used to produce microstructures consisting of sub-micron grains in 9310 steel. Starting with initial bainitic grain sizes of 40 to 50 μm, various levels of grain refinement were observed following hot deformation of 9310 steel samples at temperatures and strain rates ranging from 755 K to 922 K (482 °C and 649 °C) and 1 to 0.001/s, respectively. The resulting deformation microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques to quantify the extent of carbide coarsening and grain refinement occurring during deformation. Microstructural models based on the Zener-Holloman parameter were developed and modified to include the effect of the ferrite/carbide interactions within the system. These models were shown to effectively correlate microstructural attributes to the thermal mechanical processing parameters.

  8. Non-diffracting beam synthesis used for optical trapping and delivery of sub-micron objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čižmár, Tomáš; Kollárov, Věra; Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Bouchal, Zdeněk; Garcés-Chávez, Veneranda; Dholakia, Kishan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of interference between non-diffracting Bessel beams (BB) to generate a system of optical traps. They offer sub-micron particle confinement, delivery and organization over a distance of hundreds of μm. We analyze system of two identical counter-propagating BBs and the case of two co-propagating BBs with different propagation constants separately. In both of these cases, the interference results in periodic on-axis intensity oscillations involving particle confinement. Altering the phase of one of the interfering beams, the whole structure of optical traps can be shifted axially. Implementing this conveyor belt enables the particle delivery over the whole distance where the optical traps are strong enough for particle confinement. Experimentally we succeeded with generation of both of these systems. In case of two counter-propagating BBs we observed a strong sub-micron particle confinement, while in case of co-propagating BBs the confinement was observed only with help of fluid flow against the radiation pressure of both beams.

  9. High Density Arrays of Sub-Micron Spherical Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Johnson, Timothy W.; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes found in nature are heterogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins. Model systems, such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are often employed to simplify experimental systems while mimicking the properties of natural lipid bilayers. Here we demonstrate a new method to form SLB arrays by first forming spherical supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs) on sub-micron-diameter SiO2 beads. The SSLBs are then arrayed into microwells using a simple physical assembly method that requires no chemical modification of the substrate, nor modification of the lipid membrane with recognition moieties. The resulting arrays have sub-micron SSLBs with 3 μm periodicity where > 75 % of the microwells are occupied by an individual SSLB. Because the arrays have high density, fluorescence from > 1000 discrete SSLBs can be acquired with a single image capture. We show that 2-component random arrays can be formed and we also use the arrays to determine the equilibrium dissociation constant for cholera toxin binding to ganglioside GM1. SSLB arrays are robust and are stable for at least one week in buffer. PMID:22967217

  10. Characterization of the mean force on sub-micron particles in a standing wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani Jajarmi, Ramin; Robert, Etienne; KTH Mechanics Team

    2014-11-01

    The concentration of submicron particles suspended in air by means of a standing wave field is investigated experimentally. The focus in on molecular effects for very small particles and the quantification of the acoustophoretic force as particle size enters the sub-micron range. The experiment consists of a rectangular cross-section channel, with variable height, through which air seeded with TiO2 and salt particles is circulated. An electrostatic transducer generates a standing wave with frequencies in the 40--100 KHz range and the particle concentration is measured qualitatively using laser light scattering. Quantitative measurements of the particle number density and size distribution is obtained by isokinetic sampling downstream of the transducer. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) is used for the characterization of the aerosol as a function of position in the standing wave. The results gathered include the effects of acoustic (frequency, amplitude) and flow (bulk velocity, turbulence intensity) parameters on the separation efficiency. This allows for the estimation of the acoustic force acting on sub-micron particles and comparison with existing theoretical models that do not take into account molecular effects.

  11. Hybridization between nanocavities for a polarimetric color sorter at the sub-micron scale.

    PubMed

    Segal, Elad; Weissman, Adam; Gachet, David; Salomon, Adi

    2016-08-18

    Metallic hole arrays have been recently used for color generation and filtering due to their reliability and color tunability. However, color generation is still limited to several microns. Understanding the interaction between the individual elements of the whole nanostructure may push the resolution to the sub-micron level. Herein, we study the hybridization between silver nanocavities in order to obtain active color generation at the micron scale. To do so, we use five identical triangular cavities which are separated by hundreds of nanometers from each other. By tuning either the distance between the cavities or the optical polarization state of the incoming field, the transmitted light through the cavities is actively enhanced at specific frequencies. Consequently, a rainbow of colors is observed from a sub-micron scale unit. The reason for this is that the metallic surface plays a vital role in the hybridization between the cavities and contributes to higher frequency modes. Cathodoluminescence measurements have confirmed this assumption and have revealed that these five triangular cavities act as a unified entity surrounded by the propagated surface plasmons. In such plasmonic structures, multi-color tuning can be accomplished and may open the possibility to improve color generation and high-quality pixel fabrication. PMID:27500634

  12. Infrared Response of Sub-Micron-Scale Structures of Polyoxymethylene: Surface Polaritons in Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Naoto; Okawara, Makoto; Kijima, Yuta

    2016-08-01

    An investigation of the infrared (IR) spectra of polyoxymethylene (POM) mold plates was undertaken to determine the sub-micron-scale morphology and molecular orientation. The nest-structured cells concerned with the orientation were observed from scanning electron microscope (SEM) measurements with the aid of Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of the anomalous IR reflectance peak of the C-O stretching A2 mode depends on the widths of the POM layers in the SEM image along the orientation direction. The results suggest that the spectral features originate from the Berreman effect of the bulk polaritons and the radiative surface polaritons. Moreover, the IR spectra of certain treated samples suggest that enhancement of the electromagnetic fields from the gap modes and transition dipole-dipole coupling influence the spectral shapes. PMID:27469531

  13. An all-optical modulation method in sub-micron scale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longzhi; Pei, Chongyang; Shen, Ao; Zhao, Changyun; Li, Yan; Li, Xia; Yu, Hui; Li, Yubo; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    We report a theoretical study showing that by utilizing the illumination of an external laser, the Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPP) signals on the graphene sheet can be modulated in the sub-micron scale. The SPP wave can propagate along the graphene in the middle infrared range when the graphene is properly doped. Graphene's carrier density can be modified by a visible laser when the graphene sheet is exfoliated on the hydrophilic SiO2/Si substrate, which yields an all-optical way to control the graphene's doping level. Consequently, the external laser beam can control the propagation of the graphene SPP between the ON and OFF status. This all-optical modulation effect is still obvious when the spot size of the external laser is reduced to 400 nm while the modulation depth is as high as 114.7 dB/μm. PMID:25777581

  14. Progress towards sub-micron hard x-ray imaging using elliptically bent mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.; Chang, C.H.; Frank, K.

    1997-07-01

    Of the many methods used to focus x-rays, the use of mirrors with an elliptical curvature shows the most promise of providing a sub-micron white light focus. Our group has been developing the techniques of controlled bending of mirror substrates in order to produce the desired elliptical shape. We have been successful in producing surfaces with the required microradian slope error tolerances. Details of the bending techniques used, results from laboratory slope error measurements using a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) and data from the measurement of focus shape using knife edge and imaging methods using x-rays in the 5-12 KeV energy range are presented. The development of a white light focusing opens many possibilities in diffraction and spectroscopic studies.

  15. Realization of sub-micron radius of curvature measurement in vertical interferometer workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Erlong; Wang, Rudong; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Shijun

    2014-09-01

    Radius of curvature (ROC) is one of the key parameters for optical elements and it is especially important for high quality optical system, in which the computer-aided integration is wildly used. ROC is one of the main input parameters and its measurement accuracy is a premise for high quality integration. In this paper, sub-micron ROC measurements are realized in a vertical interference workstation based on Fizeau interferometer. The error sources and uncertainty of the system are analyzed. Experiment results based on samples with difference ROC are presented and in accordance with the analysis. At last, a ROC comparing tests between the system and a three-coordinates measuring machine (CMM) are performed on a SiC ball to certify the workstation's measurement uncertainty.

  16. An all-optical modulation method in sub-micron scale

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Longzhi; Pei, Chongyang; Shen, Ao; Zhao, Changyun; Li, Yan; Li, Xia; Yu, Hui; Li, Yubo; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    We report a theoretical study showing that by utilizing the illumination of an external laser, the Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPP) signals on the graphene sheet can be modulated in the sub-micron scale. The SPP wave can propagate along the graphene in the middle infrared range when the graphene is properly doped. Graphene's carrier density can be modified by a visible laser when the graphene sheet is exfoliated on the hydrophilic SiO2/Si substrate, which yields an all-optical way to control the graphene's doping level. Consequently, the external laser beam can control the propagation of the graphene SPP between the ON and OFF status. This all-optical modulation effect is still obvious when the spot size of the external laser is reduced to 400 nm while the modulation depth is as high as 114.7 dB/μm. PMID:25777581

  17. Sintering analysis of sub-micron-sized nickel powders: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation verified by FIB-SEM reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Shotaro; Ohi, Akihiro; Shikazono, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Since sintering of sub-micron-sized particles is a critical phenomenon affecting the electrochemical performance and reliability of solid oxide fuel cell systems, a better understanding of this microstructure-related process is of great importance. In this study, we show that kinetic Potts Monte Carlo modeling is capable of quantitatively predicting the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure evolution over an entire stage of nickel sintering at the sub-micron scale. This is achieved through direct comparison of simulation results and 3D microstructural analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. We show that grain boundary diffusion is the dominant mechanism on densification, while surface diffusion has an impact on the coarsening during sub-micron scale sintering, only acting as one of the multiple mechanisms of sintering.

  18. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  19. Spectral bluing on 101955 Bennu and implications for dynamics of sub micron regolith grains on asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adrian J.

    2015-11-01

    C and B class asteroids (including 101955 Bennu, the destination of the OSIRIS REx mission) display spectral bluing in the visible (Lantz et al. 2013). This spectral bluing effect has been found to be temporally variable on Bennu (Binzel et al. 2015). Binzel et al. suggested this is due to a fining of the ~45 micron grain size fraction, which causes spectral reddening. This finer grain size of the ~45 micron fraction may be associated with regolith migration during formation of Bennu's equatorial ridge.In Brown (2014) the effect of grain size and optical index on the albedo of small conservative and absorbing particles as a function of wavelength was examined. The conditions necessary for maximization of spectral bluing effects in real-world situations were identified.The spectral bluing to be discussed in this presentation was present in the Lantz et al. spectra, but not the Binzel et al. spectra, suggesting that in addition to finer grain ~45 micron material, a decrease in the sub micron grain sized fraction has taken place as Bennu's sub-Earth latitude changed between these observations. Observations of this effect may provide the strongest test yet for cohesive regolith models (e.g. Rositis et al. 2014).In this presentation, I will discuss: 1.) the evidence for spectral bluing on 101955 Bennu (in particular) and other bodies in our solar system and 2.) the implications of how the OVIRS instrument on OSIRIS-REx may be used to determine the spatial variability of this spectral feature on Bennu and 3.) the potential for OVIRS to augment our understanding of the dynamics of sub micron material on asteroids.Refs:Binzel, R. P. et al. "Spectral slope variations for OSIRIS-REx target Asteroid (101955) Bennu: Possible evidence for a fine-grained regolith equatorial ridge" Icarus 256 (2015), 22-29Brown, Adrian J. “Spectral Bluing Induced by Small Particles under the Mie and Rayleigh Regimes.” Icarus 239 (2014): 85-95.Lantz, C., et al. “Evidence for the Effects of

  20. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-09-01

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  1. Large area sub-micron chemical imaging of magnesium in sea urchin teeth.

    PubMed

    Masic, Admir; Weaver, James C

    2015-03-01

    The heterogeneous and site-specific incorporation of inorganic ions can profoundly influence the local mechanical properties of damage tolerant biological composites. Using the sea urchin tooth as a research model, we describe a multi-technique approach to spatially map the distribution of magnesium in this complex multiphase system. Through the combined use of 16-bit backscattered scanning electron microscopy, multi-channel energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental mapping, and diffraction-limited confocal Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate a new set of high throughput, multi-spectral, high resolution methods for the large scale characterization of mineralized biological materials. In addition, instrument hardware and data collection protocols can be modified such that several of these measurements can be performed on irregularly shaped samples with complex surface geometries and without the need for extensive sample preparation. Using these approaches, in conjunction with whole animal micro-computed tomography studies, we have been able to spatially resolve micron and sub-micron structural features across macroscopic length scales on entire urchin tooth cross-sections and correlate these complex morphological features with local variability in elemental composition. PMID:25557499

  2. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Jaung, Jae Yun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics. PMID:26411932

  3. Preparation of sub-micron skeletal monoliths with high capacity for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunhe; Qi, Li; Yang, Gengliang; Wang, Fuyi

    2010-03-01

    A novel kind of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)-based monolithic column was developed for LC by directing supramolecular self-assembly of high internal phase emulsion. Mercury intrusion porosimetry characterization and scanning electron microscope pictures showed that these monoliths presented micrometer-sized throughpores, unique sub-micron skeletons and relatively large specific surface area. Additionally, porosity of monoliths could be adjusted while skeletons remained in the size range of 100.0-1000.0 nm. The new monoliths demonstrated not only better column efficiency, but also larger binding capacity. Dynamic binding capacity for protein (BSA) was evaluated to be 42.5 mg/mL, above two times higher than that of the general monoliths (19.1 mg/mL) and higher than that of commercial "Convective Interaction Media" monolithic columns (30.0 mg/mL). Moreover, their chromatographic behaviors were also evaluated in detail by chemical stability and swelling characterization of the monolithic column. Separation of proteins mixture (cytochrome c, myoglobin, ribonuclease A, lysozyme and BSA) on the monolith was achieved within 4 min at velocity of 1440.0 cm/h. Those unique properties made the novel monolithic column a promising alternative to commercially available monolithic supports in LC applications. PMID:20063358

  4. Measuring Sub-micron Size Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Zermeno, P; Hwang, H; Young, T M

    2009-07-28

    Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to size fractionate particulate matter (PM) into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since MOUDI have low flow rates, it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate ({approx}25 mg Al) presents several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for {sup 14}C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils.

  5. Laser smoothing of sub-micron grooves in hydroxyl-rich fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, N; Matthews, M J; Fair, J E; Britten, J A; Nguyen, H T; Cooke, D; Elhadj, S; Yang, S T

    2009-10-30

    Nano- to micrometer-sized surface defects on UV-grade fused silica surfaces are known to be effectively smoothed through the use of high-temperature localized CO{sub 2} laser heating, thereby enhancing optical properties. However, the details of the mass transport and the effect of hydroxyl content on the laser smoothing of defective silica at submicron length scales is still not completely understood. In this study, we examine the morphological evolution of sub-micron, dry-etched periodic surface structures on type II and type III SiO{sub 2} substrates under 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser irradiation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In-situ thermal imaging was used to map the transient temperature field across the heated region, allowing assessment of the T-dependent mass transport mechanisms under different laser-heating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics simulations correlated well with experimental results, and showed that for large effective capillary numbers (N{sub c} > 2), surface diffusion is negligible and smoothing is dictated by capillary action, despite the relatively small spatial scales studied here. Extracted viscosity values over 1700-2000K were higher than the predicted bulk values, but were consistent with the surface depletion of OH groups, which was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy.

  6. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics. PMID:26411932

  7. Scalable sub-micron patterning of organic materials toward high density soft electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung -Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong -Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun -Hi; Noh, Yong -Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong -Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. As a result, the successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  8. Scalable sub-micron patterning of organic materials toward high density soft electronics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung -Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong -Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; et al

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. Inmore » this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. As a result, the successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.« less

  9. Generation of a quasi-monoergetic proton beam from laser-irradiated sub-micron droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Popov, K. I.; Ramunno, L.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2012-07-15

    Proton bursts with a narrow spectrum at an energy of (2.8 {+-} 0.3 MeV) are accelerated from sub-micron water spray droplets irradiated by high-intensity ({approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), high-contrast ({approx}10{sup 10}), ultra-short (40 fs) laser pulses. The acceleration is preferentially in the laser propagation direction. The explosion dynamics is governed by a residual ps-scale laser pulse pedestal which 'mildly' preheats the droplet and changes its density profile before the arrival of the high intensity laser pulse peak. As a result, the energetic electrons extracted from the modified target by the high-intensity part of the laser pulse establish an anisotropic electrostatic field which results in anisotropic Coulomb explosion and proton acceleration predominantly in the forward direction. Hydrodynamic simulations of the target pre-expansion and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the measured energy and anisotropy of the proton emission have confirmed the proposed acceleration scenario.

  10. Detection, imaging, and kinetics of sub-micron organelles of chondrocytes by multiple beam interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Medina, Honorio; Barboza, J. M.; Colantuoni, Gladys; Quintero, Maritza

    2004-07-01

    Chondrocytes, obtained from testosterone treated human articular cartilage, were examined by a recently developed Multiple Beam Interference Microscopy (MBIM) attached to a confocal set up, Video-enhanced differential interference microphotography and also by cinematography. In the MBIM, the intensity of the transmitted pattern is given by the Airy function which increases the contrast dramatically as the coefficient of the reflectance of the parallel plates increases. Moreover, in this configuration, the beam passes several times through a specific organelle and increases its optical path difference both because of the increase in the trajectory and refractive index (high density) of the organelle. The improved contrast enhances the resolving power of the system and makes visible several structural details of sub micron dimensions like nucleolus, retraction fibers, podia, etc. which are not possible to reveal with such a clarity by conventional techniques such as bright field, phase contrast or DIC. This technique permits to detect the oscillatory and rotational motions of unstained cilia for the first time. The frequency of oscillations was found to be 0.8 Hz.

  11. An automated injection system for sub-micron sized channels used in shear-driven-chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Malsche, Wim; Clicq, David; Eghbali, Hamed; Fekete, Veronika; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a method to automatically and reproducibly inject sharply delimited sample plugs in the shallow (i.e., sub-micron) channels typically used in shear driven chromatography. The formation of asymmetric plugs, which typically occurs during loading of the sample in wide channels, is circumvented by etching a slit in the middle of the channel that is connected to a micro-well and a vacuum system with syringes for the supply of both the analyte and the mobile phase. The design of the injection slit was supported by a series of CFD simulations to optimize its shape and that of the corresponding injection well. The system was intensively tested experimentally and showed good reproducibility, both for the width and the area of the injected peaks (relative standard deviations are max. 4 and 6%, respectively). The concentration of the injected plug was found to be approximately 80% of the original sample concentration. It was also observed that with the current setup the lower limit of the peak width was about 120 microm. This is a consequence of the fact that the peak width originating from the convection filling step becomes negligible to the contribution of diffusion during the filling and flushing time. Being fully automated and perfectly closed, the presently proposed injection system also paves the way to integrate other functionalities in shear driven chromatography, i.e. gradient elution and parallelization. PMID:17102846

  12. Chemical Mapping of Proterozoic Organic Matter at Sub-Micron Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Robert, Francois; Mostefaoui, Smail; Meibom, Anders; Selo, Madeleine; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    We have used a NanoSIMS ion microprobe to map sub-micron-scale distributions of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and oxygen in organic microfossils and laminae from the approximately 0.85 Ga Bitter Springs Formation of Australia. The data provide clues about the original chemistry of the microfossils, the silicification process, and biosignatures of specific microorganisms and microbial communities. Chemical maps of fossil unicells and filaments reveal distinct wall-and sheath-like structures enriched in C, N and S, consistent with their accepted biological origin. Surprisingly, organic laminae, previously considered to be amorphous, also exhibit filamentous and apparently compressed spheroidal structures defined by strong enrichments in C, N and S. By analogy to data from the well-preserved microfossils, these structures are interpreted as being of biological origin, most likely representing densely packed remnants of microbial mats. Because the preponderance of organic matter in Precambrian sediments is similarly "amorphous," our findings open a large body of generally neglected material to in situ structural, chemical, and isotopic study. Our results also offer new criteria for assessing biogenicity of problematic kerogenous materials and thus can be applied to assessments of poorly preserved or fragmentary organic residues in early Archean sediments and any that might occur in meteorites or other extraterrestrial samples.

  13. Local structure of human hair spatially resolved by sub-micron X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Vesna; Bettini, Jefferson; Montoro, Fabiano Emmanuel; Stein, Aaron; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    Human hair has three main regions, the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle. An existing model for the cortex suggests that the α-keratin- based intermediate filaments (IFs) align with the hair’s axis, but are orientationally disordered in-plane. We found that there is a new region in the cortex near the cuticle’s boundary in which the IFs are aligned with the hair’s axis, but additionally, they are orientationally ordered in-plane due to the presence of the cuticle/hair boundary. Further into the cortex, the IF arrangement becomes disordered, eventually losing all in-plane orientation. We also find that in the cuticle, a key diffraction feature is absent, indicating the presence of the β-keratin rather than that of the α-keratin phase. This is direct structural evidence that the cuticle contains β-keratin sheets. This work highlights the importance of using a sub-micron x-ray beam to unravel the structures of poorly ordered, multi-phase systems.

  14. Microstructural and Geometrical Effects on the Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron Scale Nanocrystalline Copper Pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badami, Devavrat V.; Jahed, Zeinab; Seo, Brandon B.; Burek, Michael J.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of microstructure, sample dimensions, and cross-sectional geometry on the deformation characteristics of electroplated nanocrystalline copper sub-micron pillars are investigated. Nanocrystalline copper pillars were produced with four types of geometry—solid core, hollow, c-shaped, and x-shaped—with outer diameters of ~1000 or 220 nm and three different average grain sizes (between 5.1 and 49.3 nm). Flow stress results from uniaxial compression tests of 1000- and 220-nm-outer-diameter pillars, with average grain sizes in the range between ~32 and 50 nm, revealed there are no observable strength dependences with the pillar cross-sectional geometries. This suggests that they behave with bulk-like character: mechanical properties independent of size and sample geometry. All of the pillar specimens examined exhibit an increase in mechanical strength with reduction of grain sizes, but soften as the crystalline dimensions are smaller than 10 to 20 nm threshold limits. Interestingly, pillars with outer diameters of 220 nm are distinctively softer than the 1000-nm-diameter samples when their grain size is at and below this threshold limit. These results indicate a strength specimen size effect exists for such fine grain copper pillars.

  15. Sub-micron Hard X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Synthetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurement such as μ-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used SXFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L3 or L2 edge as well as lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope 242Pu. Elemental maps reveal that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions for an average 202 μm2 cell is 1.4 fg Pu/cell or 2.9 × 10−20 moles Pu/μm2, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge SXFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its Lα X-ray emission. PMID:22444530

  16. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  17. Characterization of phosphorus in organisms at sub-micron resolution using X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.; Ingall, E; Vogt, S; Paterson, D; DeJonge, M; Rao, C; Brandes, J

    2009-01-01

    X-ray spectromicroscopy (combined X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy) is uniquely capable of determining sub-micron scale elemental content and chemical speciation in minimally-prepared particulate samples. The high spatial resolutions achievable with this technique have enabled the close examination of important microscale processes relevant to the cycling of biogeochemically important elements. Here, we demonstrate the value of X-ray microscopy to environmental and biological research by examining the phosphorus and metal chemistry of complete individual cells from the algal genera Chlamydomonas sp. and Chlorella sp. X-ray analysis revealed that both genera store substantial intracellular phosphorus as distinct, heterogeneously distributed granules whose X-ray fluorescence spectra are consistent with that of polyphosphate. Polyphosphate inclusions ranged in size from 0.3-1.4 {micro}m in diameter and exhibited a nonspecies-specific average phosphorus concentration of 6.87 {+-} 1.86 {micro}g cm{sup -2}, which was significantly higher than the average concentration of phosphorus measured in the total cell, at 3.14 {+-} 0.98 {micro}g cm{sup -2} (95% confidence). Polyphosphate was consistently associated with calcium and iron, exhibiting average P:cation molar ratios of 8.31 {+-} 2.00 and 108 {+-} 34, respectively (95% confidence). In some cells, polyphosphate was also associated with potassium, zinc, manganese, and titanium. Based on our results, X-ray spectromicroscopy can provide high-resolution elemental data on minimally prepared, unsectioned cells that are unattainable through alternative microscopic methods and conventional bulk chemical techniques currently available in many fields of marine chemistry.

  18. Grain orientation and strain measurements in sub-micron wide passivated individual aluminum test structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; Valek, B.C.; Spolenak, R.; MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.; Brown, W.L.; Marieb, T.; Bravman, J.C.; Batterman, B.W.; Patel, J.R.

    2001-03-01

    An X-ray microdiffraction dedicated beamline, combining white and monochromatic beam capabilities, has been built at the Advanced Light Source. The purpose of this beamline is to address the myriad of problems in Materials Science and Physics that require submicron x-ray beams for structural characterization. Many such problems are found in the general area of thin films and nano-materials. For instance, the ability to characterize the orientation and strain state in individual grains of thin films allows us to measure structural changes at a very local level. These microstructural changes are influenced heavily by such parameters as deposition conditions and subsequent treatment. The accurate measurement of strain gradients at the micron and sub-micron level finds many applications ranging from the strain state under nano-indenters to gradients at crack tips. Undoubtedly many other applications will unfold in the future as we gain experience with the capabilities and limitations of this instrument. We have applied this technique to measure grain orientation and residual stress in single grains of pure Al interconnect lines and preliminary results on post-electromigration test experiments are presented. It is shown that measurements with this instrument can be used to resolve the complete stress tensor (6 components) in a submicron volume inside a single grain of Al under a passivation layer with an overall precision of about 20 MPa. The microstructure of passivated lines appears to be complex, with grains divided into identifiable subgrains and noticeable local variations of both tensile/compressive and shear stresses within single grains.

  19. Sub-micron silica diaphragm-based fiber-tip Fabry-Perot interferometer for pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Liao, Changrui; Liu, Shen; Xu, Lei; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiping; Li, Zhengyong; Wang, Qiao; Wang, D N

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate a sub-micron silica diaphragm-based fiber-tip Fabry-Perot interferometer for pressure sensing applications. The thinnest silica diaphragm, with a thickness of ∼320  nm, has been achieved by use of an improved electrical arc discharge technique. Such a sub-micron silica diaphragm breaks the sensitivity limitation imposed by traditional all-silica Fabry-Perot interferometric pressure sensors and, as a result, a high pressure sensitivity of ∼1036  pm/MPa at 1550 nm and a low temperature cross-sensitivity of ∼960  Pa/°C are achieved when a silica diaphragm of ∼500  nm in thickness is used. Moreover, the all-silica spherical structure enhanced the mechanical strength of the micro-cavity sensor, making it suitable for high sensitivity pressure sensing in harsh environments. PMID:24978213

  20. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  1. A simple and wide-range refractive index measuring approach by using a sub-micron grating

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Chun-Che; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-04-13

    This paper presents the design and simulation results of a high-precision low-cost refractometer that demonstrates the main advantage of a wide measurement range (1 ≤ n ≤ 2). The proposed design is based on the diffractive properties of sub-micron gratings and Snell's Law. The precision and uncertainty factors of the proposed system were tested and analyzed, revealing that the proposed refractometer demonstrates a wide measurement range with sensitivity of 10{sup −4}.

  2. Prescribed 3-D Direct Writing of Suspended Micron/Sub-micron Scale Fiber Structures via a Robotic Dispensing System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hanwen; Cambron, Scott D.; Keynton, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    A 3-axis dispensing system is utilized to control the initiating and terminating fiber positions and trajectory via the dispensing software. The polymer fiber length and orientation is defined by the spatial positioning of the dispensing system 3-axis stages. The fiber diameter is defined by the prescribed dispense time of the dispensing system valve, the feed rate (the speed at which the stage traverses from an initiating to a terminating position), the gauge diameter of the dispensing tip, the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution, and the programmed drawing length. The stage feed rate affects the polymer solution’s evaporation rate and capillary breakup of the filaments. The dispensing system consists of a pneumatic valve controller, a droplet-dispensing valve and a dispensing tip. Characterization of the direct write process to determine the optimum combination of factors leads to repeatedly acquiring the desired range of fiber diameters. The advantage of this robotic dispensing system is the ease of obtaining a precise range of micron/sub-micron fibers onto a desired, programmed location via automated process control. Here, the discussed self-assembled micron/sub-micron scale 3D structures have been employed to fabricate suspended structures to create micron/sub-micron fluidic devices and bioengineered scaffolds. PMID:26132732

  3. Electron-beam patterned sub-micron magnetic elements and switching mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mun Hyoun

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the magnetization configuration and switching behavior of sub-micron patterned elements for magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications. The investigated shapes include rings and "Pac-man" (PM) shaped elements. The PM element is a newly designed shape proposed in this dissertation. In Chapter 1, currently emerging non-volatile memories are reviewed, which include flash memory, ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), ovonic unified memory (OUM), and MRAM. In particular, MRAM memory is emphasized, and the goals of this dissertation related with MRAM are introduced. In order to fabricate patterned magnetic elements, DC and RF sputtering deposition, electron-beam lithography with lift-off or ion milling processes were used. Magnetization configuration and switching behavior of patterned magnetic elements were characterized by a magnetic force microscope, vibration sample magnetometer, BH loop tracer, and magneto-optic Kerr effect system. Micromagnetic simulation was also performed to study the switching mechanism and energy contribution on their reversal process. Detailed fabrication steps and measurement tools are presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, magnetization modes are classified and reviewed depending on element shape applied to MRAM. In this chapter, current challenges of linear and circular magnetic elements are discussed. In Chapter 4, the geometry dependence of magnetization configuration, switching field distribution, selectivity, and magnetic switching behavior of PM elements are reported. The geometry includes the slot angle, thickness, elements size, shape anisotropy, and slot line. Finally, the most appropriate element showing a well-defined single domain at remanent state, for a low switching field distribution, for high selectivity, and for coherent magnetic switching are explored for its MRAM application. In Chapter 5, the magnetic properties and head-to-head (HTH) domain wall of patterned

  4. Area- and energy-efficient CORDIC accelerators in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, U.; Noll, T. G.

    2012-09-01

    The COordinate Rotate DIgital Computer (CORDIC) algorithm is a well known versatile approach and is widely applied in today's SoCs for especially but not restricted to digital communications. Dedicated CORDIC blocks can be implemented in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies at very low area and energy costs and are attractive to be used as hardware accelerators for Application Specific Instruction Processors (ASIPs). Thereby, overcoming the well known energy vs. flexibility conflict. Optimizing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers to reduce the hardware complexity is an important research topic at present. In such receivers CORDIC accelerators can be used for digital baseband processing (fixed-point) and in Position-Velocity-Time estimation (floating-point). A micro architecture well suited to such applications is presented. This architecture is parameterized according to the wordlengths as well as the number of iterations and can be easily extended for floating point data format. Moreover, area can be traded for throughput by partially or even fully unrolling the iterations, whereby the degree of pipelining is organized with one CORDIC iteration per cycle. From the architectural description, the macro layout can be generated fully automatically using an in-house datapath generator tool. Since the adders and shifters play an important role in optimizing the CORDIC block, they must be carefully optimized for high area and energy efficiency in the underlying technology. So, for this purpose carry-select adders and logarithmic shifters have been chosen. Device dimensioning was automatically optimized with respect to dynamic and static power, area and performance using the in-house tool. The fully sequential CORDIC block for fixed-point digital baseband processing features a wordlength of 16 bits, requires 5232 transistors, which is implemented in a 40-nm CMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 1560 μm2 only. Maximum clock frequency from circuit

  5. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed.Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron

  6. 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface: a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yue; Wang, Shiqiang; Yin, Xianpeng; Liang, Yun; Dong, Hao; Gao, Ning; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2016-07-21

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that the combination of periodic dielectric structures with metallic structures provides an efficient means to yield a synergetic optical response or functionality in the resultant hybrid plasmonic-photonic systems. In this work, a new hybrid plasmonic-photonic structure of 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a flat gold surface was proposed, prepared, and theoretically and experimentally characterized. This hybrid structure supports two types of modes: surface plasmon polaritons bound at the metallic surface and waveguided mode of light confined in the cavity of bowls. Optical responses of this hybrid structure as well as the spatial electric field distribution of each mode are found to be strongly dependent on the structural parameters of this system, and thus could be widely modified on demand. Importantly, compared to the widely studied hybrid systems, namely the flat metallic surface coated with a monolayer array of latex spheres, the waveguided mode with strong field enhancement appearing in the cavities of bowls is more facilely accessible and thus suitable for practical use. For demonstration, a 2D-ordered silica sub-micron bowl array deposited on a flat gold surface was fabricated and used as a regenerable platform for fluorescence enhancement by simply accommodating emitters in bowls. All the simulation and experiment results indicate that the 2D-ordered dielectric sub-micron bowls on a metal surface should be a useful hybrid plasmonic-photonic system with great potential for applications such as sensors or tunable emitting devices if appropriate periods and materials are employed. PMID:27349558

  7. Thermal conductivities of sub-micron Bi2Te3 films sputtered on anisotropic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Shiping; Pei, Yili; Yang, Fan; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 450 nm thick Bi2Te3 films were deposited on flat Al2O3 substrate and nanochannel alumina (NCA) templates with different pore diameters through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The structure and morphology of Bi2Te3 films were investigated by x-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the thermal conductivities of the films deposited on anisotropic substrates were evaluated by micro-Raman method combined with numerical simulation and optimization conducted by COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates with discontinuous Φ20 and Φ100 nm pores and flat Al2O3 substrate were 0.80, 0.99 and 1.54 Wm‑1 K‑1, respectively. The lower thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates are attributed to much smaller grain size, bottom porous layers, and rougher surfaces through analysis.

  8. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  9. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  10. Biased reptation model with electroosmosis for DNA electrophoresis in microchannels with a sub-micron pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Chuen Chan, Yick; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2011-08-01

    A novel biased reptation model with electroosmosis (BRE) is proposed for a long-chain DNA electrophoresis separation mechanism in microchannels with a sub-micron pillar array. The BRE model incorporates effective electroosmosis into the classical biased reptation model (BRM). Initial investigation of the BRM with additional electroosmosis flow was conducted. In order to validate the proposed BRE model, the apparent electrophoretic mobilities of different sizes of long-chain DNA, T4 DNA and lambda DNA at different electric fields were measured in a microfabricated electrophoresis chip with an embedded sub-micron pillar array. The current-monitoring method was used to measure the electroosmotic mobility in the microfabricated electrophoresis chip. The proposed BRE model shows much better agreement with the experimental results compared to the classical BRM and the semi-empirical results based on the biased reptation with fluctuation (BRF). The average standard error between our proposed BRE model and experimental data is 8.13% without any fitting parameters, while the errors are 343.01% for the BRM and 17.54% for the BRF with one fitting parameter, respectively.

  11. Sub-micron fracture mechanism in silica-based glass activated by permanent densification from high-strain loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Waters, Shirley B.; Parten, Randy J.; Pye, L. David

    2016-04-26

    Several silica-based glasses were fractured at high strain energy via drop-weight testing on small specimens. A cylindrical specimen geometry was chosen to promote initially simple, axisymmetric, and uniform compressive loading. The imposed uniaxial compressive strain at impact was sufficiently high to qualitatively cause permanent densification. Produced fragments were collected for postmortem and a fraction of them, for all the silica-based glasses, consistently had distinct sub-micron-sized fractures (~ 300–1000 nm), designated here as “microkernels”, on their surfaces. They would most often appear as a sub-micron pore on the fragment - apparently if the microkernel had popped out as a consequence ofmore » the local crack plane running through it, tensile-strain release, and the associated formation of the fragment it was on. No fractographic evidence was found to show the microkernels were associated with local failure initiation. However, their positioning and habit sometimes suggested they were associated with localized crack branching and that they could have influenced secondary fracturing that occurred during overall crushing and comminution and associated fragment size and shape creation. Furthermore, the size range of these microkernels is much too small to affect structural flexure strength of these glasses for most applications but are of a size and concentration that may affect their ballistic, shock, crush, and comminution responses when permanent densification is concomitantly occurring.« less

  12. Impact of Device Scaling on Deep Sub-micron Transistor Reliability: A Study of Reliability Trends using SRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; Huang, Bing; Qin, Jin; Gur, Zvi; Talmor, Michael; Chen, Yuan; Heidecker, Jason; Nguyen, Duc; Bernstein, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    As microelectronics are scaled in to the deep sub-micron regime, users of advanced technology CMOS, particularly in high-reliability applications, should reassess how scaling effects impact long-term reliability. An experimental based reliability study of industrial grade SRAMs, consisting of three different technology nodes, is proposed to substantiate current acceleration models for temperature and voltage life-stress relationships. This reliability study utilizes step-stress techniques to evaluate memory technologies (0.25mum, 0.15mum, and 0.13mum) embedded in many of today's high-reliability space/aerospace applications. Two acceleration modeling approaches are presented to relate experimental FIT calculations to Mfr's qualification data.

  13. Micro and sub-micron surface structuring of AZ31 by laser re-melting and dimpling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlan, Valentina; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the use of ns-pulsed fibre laser for surface structuring of AZ31 Mg alloy is investigated. Surface re-melting was employed to change surface morphology, especially in terms of surface roughness. Dimpling by percussion microdrilling was investigated to control the hole geometry.. With surface remelting mono-directional and homogeneous surfaces were obtained with Fl<500 J/cm2. Above 500 J/cm2 particle generation was observed, which induced sub-micron structure growth with nano-fibrous features. Moreover, surface roughness could be controlled below the initial value and much higher. With dimpling, transformation from gentle to strong ablation was observed at F0=10.3 J/cm2. XRD analysis was employed to link oxide growth to the surface morphology. Tensile tests were carried out to assess the damage on the mechanical properties after surface structuring.

  14. Effects of Carbides on the Microstructural Evolution in Sub-micron Grain 9310 Steel During Isothermal Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozmel, Thomas; Tin, Sammy

    2015-07-01

    Recent interest in bulk ultra-fine-grained microstructures has given rise for the necessity to quantify their behavior during heat treatment should any subsequent thermal processing of the material be necessary after forming. The present study showed that the microstructure of 9310 steel forgings containing varying fractions of sub-micron grains retained some degree of stability after 4 hours of heat treatment between the temperatures of 522 K and 866 K (249 °C and 593 °C, respectively). The behavior of the microstructure during heat treatment was largely influenced by both the carbide volume fraction and distribution, which affected the level of Zener Drag present. This in effect controlled the type of growth behavior exhibited by the ferrite grains and the ability to retain the fine-grained structure.

  15. Dust Diffusion and Settling in the Presence of Collisions: Trapping (sub)micron Grains in the Midplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2016-05-01

    In protoplanetary disks, the distribution and abundance of small (sub)micron grains are important for a range of physical and chemical processes. For example, they dominate the optical depth at short wavelengths and their surfaces are the sites of many important chemical reactions, such as the formation of water. Based on their aerodynamical properties (i.e., their strong dynamical coupling with the surrounding gas) it is often assumed that these small grains are well-mixed with the gas. Our goal is to study the vertical (re)distribution of grains taking into account settling, turbulent diffusion, and collisions with other dust grains. Assuming a fragmentation-limited background dust population, we developed a Monte Carlo approach that follows single monomers as they move through a vertical column of gas and become incorporated in different aggregates as they undergo sticking and fragmenting collisions. We find that (sub)micron grains are not necessarily well-mixed vertically, but can become trapped in a thin layer with a scale height that is significantly smaller than that of the gas. This collisional trapping occurs when the timescale for diffusion is comparable to or longer than the collision timescale in the midplane and its effect is strongest when the most massive particles in the size distribution show significant settling. Based on simulations and analytical considerations, we conclude that for typical dust-to-gas ratios and turbulence levels, the collisional trapping of small grains should be a relatively common phenomenon. The absence of trapping could then indicate a low dust-to-gas ratio, possibly because a large portion of the dust mass has been removed through radial drift or is locked up in planetesimals.

  16. Ethanol (C2H5OH) spray of sub-micron droplets for laser driven negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R; Borghesi, M; Abicht, F; Nickles, P V; Stiel, H; Schnürer, M; Ter-Avetisyan, S

    2012-08-01

    Liquid ethanol (C(2)H(5)OH) was used to generate a spray of sub-micron droplets. Sprays with different nozzle geometries have been tested and characterised using Mie scattering to find scaling properties and to generate droplets with different diameters within the spray. Nozzles having throat diameters of 470 μm and 560 μm showed generation of ethanol spray with droplet diameters of (180 ± 10) nm and (140 ± 10) nm, respectively. These investigations were motivated by the observation of copious negative ions from these target systems, e.g., negative oxygen and carbon ions measured from water and ethanol sprays irradiated with ultra-intense (5 × 10(19) W/cm(2)), ultra short (40 fs) laser pulses. It is shown that the droplet diameter and the average atomic density of the spray have a significant effect on the numbers and energies of accelerated ions, both positive and negative. These targets open new possibilities for the creation of efficient and compact sources of different negative ion species. PMID:22938287

  17. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-07-07

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

  18. Prospects for Sub-Micron Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Low-Temperature Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Summary We evaluate the feasibility of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with sub-micron voxel dimensions using a combination of low temperatures and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Experiments are performed on nitroxide-doped glycerol/water at 9.4 T and temperatures below 40 K, using a 30 mW tunable microwave source for DNP. With DNP at 7 K, a 0.5 µl sample yields a 1H NMR signal-to-noise ratio of 770 in two scans with pulsed spin-lock detection and after 80 db signal attenuation. With reasonable extrapolations, we infer that 1H NMR signals from 1 µm3 voxel volumes should be readily detectable, and voxels as small as 0.03 µm3 may eventually be detectable. Through homonuclear decoupling with a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg spin echo technique, we obtain 830 Hz 1H NMR linewidths at low temperatures, implying that pulsed field gradients equal to 0.4 G/d or less would be required during spatial encoding dimensions of an imaging sequence, where d is the resolution in each dimension. PMID:20458431

  19. Exploitation of sub-micron cavitation nuclei to enhance ultrasound-mediated transdermal transport and penetration of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunali; Kwan, James J; Shah, Apurva R; Coussios, Constantin-C; Carlisle, Robert C

    2016-09-28

    Inertial cavitation mediated by ultrasound has been previously shown to enable skin permeabilisation for transdermal drug and vaccine delivery, by sequentially applying the ultrasound then the therapeutic in liquid form on the skin surface. Using a novel hydrogel dosage form, we demonstrate that the use of sub-micron gas-stabilising polymeric nanoparticles (nanocups) to sustain and promote cavitation activity during simultaneous application of both drug and vaccine results in a significant enhancement of both the dose and penetration of a model vaccine, Ovalbumin (OVA), to depths of 500μm into porcine skin. The nanocups themselves exceeded the penetration depth of the vaccine (up to 700μm) due to their small size and capacity to 'self-propel'. In vivo murine studies indicated that nanocup-assisted ultrasound transdermal vaccination achieved significantly (p<0.05) higher delivery doses without visible skin damage compared to the use of a chemical penetration enhancer. Transdermal OVA doses of up to 1μg were achieved in a single 90-second treatment, which was sufficient to trigger an antigen-specific immune response. Furthermore, ultrasound-assisted vaccine delivery in the presence of nanocups demonstrated substantially higher specific anti-OVA IgG antibody levels compared to other transdermal methods. Further optimisation can lead to a viable, safe and non-invasive delivery platform for vaccines with potential use in a primary care setting or personalized self-vaccination at home. PMID:27417040

  20. Multimodal imaging for the detection of sub-micron particles in the gas-exchange region of the mammalian lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberthür, David; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Takenaka, Shinji; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Stampanoni, Marco; Tsuda, Akira; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2009-09-01

    The deposition sites of inhaled aerosols in the gas-exchange region of the lung represent one of the key parameters needed for the understanding of the interaction between these particles and lung tissue. In order to develop a method for three-dimensional imaging of sub-micron particles in lung tissue we applied gold particles (200 and 700 nm) to rat lungs by intratracheal instillation. The samples were scanned at TOMCAT, the beamline for TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs at the Swiss Light Source. The 200 nm particles were slightly below the detection capabilities of TOMCAT. Therefore, their localization was obtained only by electron microscopy. At a voxel size of 350 nm we observed single and clustered gold particles (700 nm) in alveoli, alveolar ducts, and small bronchioli. The locations of the gold particles were verified by transmission electron microscopical serial sections. We observed a very high correlation between these two imaging modalities. We conclude that a combination of x-ray tomographic microscopy and electron microscopy allows the full unrestricted 3D localization of particles smaller than the resolution of x-ray tomographic microscopy. We are planning to use this method for the verification of the simulation of particle deposition in the airway tree.

  1. LiCoO 2 sub-microns particles obtained from micro-precipitation in molten stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, S. M.; Montoro, L. A.; Rosolen, J. M.

    The present work reports a novel emulsion method for preparation of lithium cobalt oxide based on the micro-precipitation of lithium and cobalt salts in molten stearic acid. The precursors consist of micro-aggregated powders of CoOOH and CH 3(CH 2) 16COOLi whose formation depends on the concentration of stearic acid used in the synthesis. The micro-aggregated of CoOOH and CH 3(CH 2) 16COOLi when calcined at 800 °C yielded well-crystalline sub-microns particles of LiCoO 2 ( R-3 m) with a very uniform shape (quasi-hexagonal pellets), a very narrow grain size distribution ( d10=0.31, d50=3.14, d90=6.30 μm) and high specific surface area (7.4 m 2 g -1). The long life reversible specific capacity of the mp-LiCoO 2 composite electrode subsequently made was 110 mAh g -1 for initial deinsertion 165 mAh g -1.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse, mesoporous, and magnetic sub-micron particles doped with a near-infrared fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guével, Xavier; Nooney, Robert; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2011-06-01

    Recently, multifunctional silica nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their potential use in biomedical applications. We have prepared sub-micron monodisperse and stable multifunctional mesoporous silica particles with a high level of magnetization and fluorescence in the near infrared region using an one-pot synthesis technique. Commercial magnetite nanocrystals and a conjugated-NIR-dye were incorporated inside the particles during the silica condensation reaction. The particles were then coated with polyethyleneglycol to stop aggregation. X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption analysis, TEM, fluorescence and absorbance measurements were used to structurally characterize the particles. These mesoporous silica spheres have a large surface area (1978 m 2/g) with 3.40 nm pore diameter and a high fluorescence in the near infrared region at λ=700 nm. To explore the potential of these particles for drug delivery applications, the pore accessibility to hydrophobic drugs was simulated by successfully trapping a hydrophobic ruthenium dye complex inside the particle with an estimated concentration of 3 wt%. Fluorescence imaging confirmed the presence of both NIR dye and the post-grafted ruthenium dye complex inside the particles. These particles moved at approximately 150 μm/s under the influence of a magnetic field, hence demonstrating the multifunctionality and potential for biomedical applications in targeting and imaging.

  3. The sub-micron hole array in sapphire produced by inductively-coupled plasma reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Su-Wei; Lee, Chao-Te; Wu, Tzung-Chen; Hsueh, Wen-Jeng; Ma, Kung-Jeng; Chiang, Donyau

    2012-02-01

    The sub-micron hole array in a sapphire substrate was fabricated by using nanosphere lithography (NSL) combined with inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) technique. Polystyrene nanospheres of about 600 nm diameter were self-assembled on c-plane sapphire substrates by the spin-coating method. The diameter of polystyrene nanosphere was modified by using oxygen plasma in ICP-RIE system. The size of nanosphere modified by oxygen plasma was varied from 550 to 450 nm with different etching times from 15 to 35 s. The chromium thin film of 100 nm thick was then deposited on the shrunk nanospheres on the substrate by electron-beam evaporation system. The honeycomb type chromium mask can be obtained on the sapphire substrate after the polystyrene nanospheres were removed. The substrate was further etched in two sets of chlorine/Argon and boron trichloride/Argon mixture gases at constant pressure of 50 mTorr in ICP-RIE processes. The 400 nm hole array in diameter can be successfully produced under suitable boron trichloride/Argon gas flow ratio. PMID:22630019

  4. Ethanol (C2H5OH) spray of sub-micron droplets for laser driven negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Abicht, F.; Nickles, P. V.; Stiel, H.; Schnürer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2012-08-01

    Liquid ethanol (C2H5OH) was used to generate a spray of sub-micron droplets. Sprays with different nozzle geometries have been tested and characterised using Mie scattering to find scaling properties and to generate droplets with different diameters within the spray. Nozzles having throat diameters of 470 μm and 560 μm showed generation of ethanol spray with droplet diameters of (180 ± 10) nm and (140 ± 10) nm, respectively. These investigations were motivated by the observation of copious negative ions from these target systems, e.g., negative oxygen and carbon ions measured from water and ethanol sprays irradiated with ultra-intense (5 × 1019 W/cm2), ultra short (40 fs) laser pulses. It is shown that the droplet diameter and the average atomic density of the spray have a significant effect on the numbers and energies of accelerated ions, both positive and negative. These targets open new possibilities for the creation of efficient and compact sources of different negative ion species.

  5. Characterisation of sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events in the western Bushveld Igeneous Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; Vakkari, V.; Tiitta, P.; Manninen, H. E.; Gagné, S.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Mirme, A.; Mirme, S.; Mabaso, D.; Beukes, J. P.; Laakso, L.

    2012-01-01

    South Africa holds significant mineral resources, with a substantial fraction of these reserves occurring in a large geological structure termed the Bushveld Igeneous Complex (BIC). The majority of the world's platinum group metals (PGMs) and chromium originate from the BIC. Considering the importance of PGMs in the manufacturing of automotive catalytic converters, as well as the relatively poor current state of air quality and the general lack of atmospheric research in the BIC, atmospheric related research in this geographical area is of local (South African) and of international interest. The western limb of the BIC is the most exploited, with at least eleven pyrometallurgical smelters occurring within a 55 km radius. Due to the lure of employment in the industrialised BIC, the area is populated by informal, semi-formal and formal residential developments. In order to investigate the characteristics and processes affecting sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events, air ion and aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements were conducted for over two years at Marikana in the heart of the western BIC. Our results indicated that high amounts of Aitken and accumulation mode particles originated from domestic burning for heating and cooking in the morning and evening, while during daytime SO2-based nucleation (from industrial emissions) was the most probable source for large number concentrations of nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Nucleation event day frequency was extremely high, i.e. 86% of the analysed days, which to the knowledge of the authors is the highest frequency ever reported. Secondary particle formation was influenced both by local pollution sources and regional ambient conditions. Therefore, our observation of the annual cycle and magnitude of the particle formation and growth rates during nucleation events were similar to the results from a semi-clean savannah site in South Africa.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse, mesoporous, and magnetic sub-micron particles doped with a near-infrared fluorescent dye

    SciTech Connect

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Nooney, Robert; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2011-06-15

    Recently, multifunctional silica nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their potential use in biomedical applications. We have prepared sub-micron monodisperse and stable multifunctional mesoporous silica particles with a high level of magnetization and fluorescence in the near infrared region using an one-pot synthesis technique. Commercial magnetite nanocrystals and a conjugated-NIR-dye were incorporated inside the particles during the silica condensation reaction. The particles were then coated with polyethyleneglycol to stop aggregation. X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption analysis, TEM, fluorescence and absorbance measurements were used to structurally characterize the particles. These mesoporous silica spheres have a large surface area (1978 m{sup 2}/g) with 3.40 nm pore diameter and a high fluorescence in the near infrared region at {lambda}=700 nm. To explore the potential of these particles for drug delivery applications, the pore accessibility to hydrophobic drugs was simulated by successfully trapping a hydrophobic ruthenium dye complex inside the particle with an estimated concentration of 3 wt%. Fluorescence imaging confirmed the presence of both NIR dye and the post-grafted ruthenium dye complex inside the particles. These particles moved at approximately 150 {mu}m/s under the influence of a magnetic field, hence demonstrating the multifunctionality and potential for biomedical applications in targeting and imaging. - Graphical Abstract: Hydrophobic fluorescent Ruthenium complex has been loaded into the mesopores as a surrogate drug to simulate drug delivery and to enhance the multifunctionality of the magnetic NIR emitting particles. Highlights: > Monodisperse magnetic mesoporous silica particles emitting in the near infrared region are obtained in one-pot synthesis. > We prove the capacity of such particles to uptake hydrophobic dye to mimic drug loading. > Loaded fluorescent particles can be moved under a magnetic field in a

  7. Sub-micron particle number size distributions characteristics at an urban location, Kanpur, in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanawade, V. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bhattu, Deepika; Shamjad, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    We present long-term measurements of sub-micron particle number size distributions (PNSDs) conducted at an urban location, Kanpur, in India, from September 2007 to July 2011. The mean Aitken mode (NAIT), accumulation mode (NACCU), the total particle (NTOT), and black carbon (BC) mass concentrations were 12.4 × 103 cm- 3, 18.9 × 103 cm- 3, 31.9 × 103 cm- 3, and 7.96 μg m- 3, respectively, within the observed range at other urban locations worldwide, but much higher than those reported at urban sites in the developed nations. The total particle volume concentration appears to be dominated mainly by the accumulation mode particles, except during the monsoon months, perhaps due to efficient wet deposition of accumulation mode particles by precipitation. At Kanpur, the diurnal variation of particle number concentrations was very distinct, with highest during morning and late evening hours, and lowest during the afternoon hours. This behavior could be attributed to the large primary emissions of aerosol particles and temporal evolution of the planetary boundary layer. A distinct seasonal variation in the total particle number and BC mass concentrations was observed, with the maximum in winter and minimum during the rainy season, however, the Aitken mode particles did not show a clear seasonal fluctuation. The ratio of Aitken to accumulation mode particles, NAIT/NACCU, was varied from 0.1 to 14.2, with maximum during April to September months, probably suggesting the importance of new particle formation processes and subsequent particle growth. This finding suggests that dedicated long-term measurements of PNSDs (from a few nanometer to one micron) are required to systematically characterize new particle formation over the Indian subcontinent that has been largely unstudied so far. Contrarily, the low NAIT/NACCU during post-monsoon and winter indicated the dominance of biomass/biofuel burning aerosol emissions at this site.

  8. Characterisation of sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; Vakkari, V.; Tiitta, P.; Manninen, H. E.; Gagné, S.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Mirme, A.; Mirme, S.; Mabaso, D.; Beukes, J. P.; Laakso, L.

    2012-05-01

    South Africa holds significant mineral resources, with a substantial fraction of these reserves occurring and being processed in a large geological structure termed the Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC). The area is also highly populated by informal, semi-formal and formal residential developments. However, knowledge of air quality and research related to the atmosphere is still very limited in the area. In order to investigate the characteristics and processes affecting sub-micron particle number concentrations and formation events, air ion and aerosol particle size distributions and number concentrations, together with meteorological parameters, trace gases and particulate matter (PM) were measured for over two years at Marikana in the heart of the western BIC. The observations showed that trace gas (i.e. SO2, NOx, CO) and black carbon concentrations were relatively high, but in general within the limits of local air quality standards. The area was characterised by very high condensation sink due to background aerosol particles, PM10 and O3 concentration. The results indicated that high amounts of Aitken and accumulation mode particles originated from domestic burning for heating and cooking in the morning and evening, while during daytime SO2-based nucleation followed by the growth by condensation of vapours from industrial, residential and natural sources was the most probable source for large number concentrations of nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Nucleation event day frequency was extremely high, i.e. 86% of the analysed days, which to the knowledge of the authors is the highest frequency ever reported. The air mass back trajectory and wind direction analyses showed that the secondary particle formation was influenced both by local and regional pollution and vapour sources. Therefore, our observation of the annual cycle and magnitude of the particle formation and growth rates during nucleation events were similar to results previously published for a semi

  9. Fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio sub-micron tool using a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yongbin; Wang, Yufeng; Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method for preparing a high-aspect-ratio sub-micron tool using a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers and a straight reciprocating motion applied at the anode via the liquid membrane electrochemical machining (ECM). Simulation results indicate that the application of a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers is beneficial for the localization of ECM. Moreover, a mathematical model was derived to estimate the final average diameter of the fabricated tools. Experiments were conducted to verify the versatility and feasibility of the proposed method and its mathematical model. It was observed that the calculated and the experimental results are in good agreement with each other. A sub-micron tool with an average diameter 140.8 nm and an aspect ratio up to 50 was fabricated using the proposed method. PMID:24089857

  10. Fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio sub-micron tool using a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yongbin; Wang, Yufeng; Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method for preparing a high-aspect-ratio sub-micron tool using a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers and a straight reciprocating motion applied at the anode via the liquid membrane electrochemical machining (ECM). Simulation results indicate that the application of a cathode coated with stretched-out insulating layers is beneficial for the localization of ECM. Moreover, a mathematical model was derived to estimate the final average diameter of the fabricated tools. Experiments were conducted to verify the versatility and feasibility of the proposed method and its mathematical model. It was observed that the calculated and the experimental results are in good agreement with each other. A sub-micron tool with an average diameter 140.8 nm and an aspect ratio up to 50 was fabricated using the proposed method.

  11. Surface plasmon interference pattern on the surface of a silver-clad planar waveguide as a sub-micron lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, QiuXiang; Hu, CanDong; Wang, WenJie; He, Miao; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, LingZhi; Peng, ZhiXiang; Li, ShuTi; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Yong

    2011-02-01

    A new sub-micron photolithography tool has been realized by utilizing the interference of surface plasmon waves (SPWs) on the near surface of a silver (Ag)-clad ultraviolet (UV) planar waveguide. A laser beam with a wavelength of 325 nm was incident into the waveguide core, and suffered a series of total internal reflections on the interfaces between the waveguide core and the cladding layers. The incident light and the reflected light induced two beams of SPWs traveling in contrary directions, which interfered with each other and formed a standing wave as a sub-micron photolithography tool. A near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) was employed to measure the intensity distribution of the stationary wave field of the near surface of the Ag layer of the waveguide, anastomosed with theoretical values acquired by use of finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. And with this sub-micron photolithography tool a SMG with a period of 79.3 nm, in good agreement with the theoretical value of 80.1 nm, was inscribed on the surface of a self-processing hybrid SiO2/ZrO2 solgel film for the first time.

  12. On the sub-micron aerosol size distribution in a coastal-rural site at El Arenosillo Station (SW - Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribas, M.; de La Morena, B. A.; Wehner, B.; López, J. F.; Prats, N.; Mogo, S.; Wiedensohler, A.; Cachorro, V. E.

    2011-11-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the sub-micron aerosol characteristics at El Arenosillo Station, a rural and coastal environment in South-western Spain between 1 August 2004 and 31 July 2006 (594 days). The mean total concentration (NT) was 8660 cm-3 and the mean concentrations in the nucleation (NNUC), Aitken (NAIT) and accumulation (NACC) particle size ranges were 2830 cm-3, 4110 cm-3 and 1720 cm-3, respectively. Median size distribution was characterised by a single-modal fit, with a geometric diameter, median number concentration and geometric standard deviation of 60 nm, 5390 cm-3 and 2.31, respectively. Characterisation of primary emissions, secondary particle formation, changes to meteorology and long-term transport has been necessary to understand the seasonal and annual variability of the total and modal particle concentration. Number concentrations exhibited a diurnal pattern with maximum concentrations around noon. This was governed by the concentrations of the nucleation and Aitken modes during the warm seasons and only by the nucleation mode during the cold seasons. Similar monthly mean total concentrations were observed throughout the year due to a clear inverse variation between the monthly mean NNUC and NACC. It was related to the impact of desert dust and continental air masses on the monthly mean particle levels. These air masses were associated with high values of NACC which suppressed the new particle formation (decreasing NNUC). Each day was classified according to a land breeze flow or a synoptic pattern influence. The median size distribution for desert dust and continental aerosol was dominated by the Aitken and accumulation modes, and marine air masses were dominated by the nucleation and Aitken modes. Particles moved offshore due to the land breeze and had an impact on the particle burden at noon, especially when the wind was blowing from the NW sector in the morning during summer time. This increased NNUC and NAIT by factors of 3

  13. NBS K409: A potential reference material for sub-micron X-ray resolution by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H. E.; Gopon, P.; Fournelle, J.

    2013-12-01

    With advances in electron beam instrumentation, there has been a trend toward higher resolution electron gun sources for electron microprobes. JEOL has been marketing field-emission gun (FEG) microprobes since 2003 (JXA 8500F), and CAMECA introduced their SX5FE microprobe in 2011. However, there remain questions about the full utilization of such tight beams as those afforded by the FEG applied to common rock-forming minerals (e.g. silicates, oxides, carbonates, phosphates, glasses), because the desired improvement in X-ray spatial resolution for quantitative determination of the compositions of sub-micron size objects necessitates operation at lower accelerating voltages and use of low-energy X-ray lines. The physics of electron scatter and ionization energies under such conditions is of primary concern regarding the spatial resolution of field-emission EPMA. In the 1970s, the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (now National Institute of Standards and Technology) developed a series of glass reference materials for microanalysis. The two glasses K411 and K412 were certified in 1982 (Marinenko, 1982) and contain SiO2, MgO, CaO and FeO/Fe2O3, with K412 additionally containing Al2O3. Both glasses were independently characterized and each found to be homogeneous. The composition of K411 is equivalent to stoichiometric pyroxene (augite). Decades later, with interest in microanalysis of particles, microspheres (2-40 um) of K411 composition were developed (Marinenko et al., 2000). Recently, a vial of NBS glass "K409" was unearthed at the University of Wisconsin; it was apparently a "failed experiment" for a sodium-rich microanalysis standard (D. Newbury, pers. comm.) with a nominal composition of SiO2 (55 wt%), Al2O3 (15 wt%), FeO (20 wt%) and Na2O (10 wt%). Close inspection of this sample by SEM reveals a plenitude of equant euhedral iron oxide microlites ≤ 1000 nm in diameter. This "failed experiment" fortuitously created a potential standard for higher resolution X

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis Au-Bi2Te3 Nanocomposite Thermoelectric Film with a Hierarchical Sub-Micron Antireflection Quasi-Periodic Structure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Yuan; Xue, Ruiyang; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Au-Bi(2)Te(3) nanocomposite thermoelectric film with a hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure was synthesized via a low-temperature chemical route using Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) as the biomimetic template. This method combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques, without the requirement of expensive equipment and energy intensive processes. The microstructure and the morphology of the Au-Bi(2)Te(3) nanocomposite thermoelectric film was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning-electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coupled the plasmon resonances of the Au nanoparticles with the hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure, the Au-Bi(2)Te(3) nanocomposite thermoelectric film possesses an effective infrared absorption and infrared photothermal conversion performance. Based on the finite difference time domain method and the Joule effect, the heat generation and the heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi(2)Te(3) nanocomposite thermoelectric film were studied. The heterogeneity of heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi(2)Te(3) nanocomposite thermoelectric film opens up a novel promising technique for generating thermoelectric power under illumination. PMID:26047340

  15. Effect of epicuticular wax crystals on the localization of artificially deposited sub-micron carbon-based aerosols on needles of Cryptomeria japonica.

    PubMed

    Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukahori, Mie; Nugroho, Widyanto Dwi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Wuled Lenggoro, I; Izuta, Takeshi; Funada, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of adsorption of particles suspended in the gas-phase (aerosol) to the outer surfaces of leaves provides useful information for understanding the mechanisms of the effect of aerosol particles on the growth and physiological functions of trees. In the present study, we examined the localization of artificially deposited sub-micron-sized carbon-based particles on the surfaces of needles of Cryptomeria japonica, a typical Japanese coniferous tree species, by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The clusters (aggregates) of carbon-based particles were deposited on the needle surface regions where epicuticular wax crystals were sparsely distributed. By contrast, no clusters of the particles were found on the needle surface regions with dense distribution of epicuticular wax crystals. Number of clusters of carbon-based particles per unit area showed statistically significant differences between regions with sparse epicuticular wax crystals and those with dense epicuticular wax crystals. These results suggest that epicuticular wax crystals affect distribution of carbon-based particles on needles. Therefore, densely distributed epicuticular wax crystals might prevent the deposition of sub-micron-sized carbon-based particles on the surfaces of needles of Cryptomeria japonica to retain the function of stomata. PMID:27294967

  16. Hydrothermal Synthesis Au-Bi2Te3 Nanocomposite Thermoelectric Film with a Hierarchical Sub-Micron Antireflection Quasi-Periodic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Yuan; Xue, Ruiyang; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film with a hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure was synthesized via a low-temperature chemical route using Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) as the biomimetic template. This method combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques, without the requirement of expensive equipment and energy intensive processes. The microstructure and the morphology of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning-electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coupled the plasmon resonances of the Au nanoparticles with the hierarchical sub-micron antireflection quasi-periodic structure, the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film possesses an effective infrared absorption and infrared photothermal conversion performance. Based on the finite difference time domain method and the Joule effect, the heat generation and the heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film were studied. The heterogeneity of heat source density distribution of the Au-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite thermoelectric film opens up a novel promising technique for generating thermoelectric power under illumination. PMID:26047340

  17. Both improvements of the light extraction efficiency and scattered angle of GaN-LED using sub-micron Fresnel lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinyu; Chen, Linsen; Shen, Su; Wan, Wenqiang

    2015-11-01

    With the demanding requirements for light source, light emitting diodes (LED) attracts more and more attention because of its inherent advantages such as low power consumption, high reliability and longevity. However, there are two disadvantages for LED, one is the low light extraction efficiency resulting from the total internal reflection, and the other is the relative large scattered angle. In order to improve the light extraction efficiency and collimate the out-coupling light, a sub-micron Fresnel lens array is introduced and investigated in this paper. The focal length of the proposed Fresnel lens is 3μm and the minimum width of the outmost ring is about 150nm. To calculate and analyze the light extraction efficiency and the scattered angle of LED with such Fresnel lens array structure, we optimize the parameters of the Fresnel lens, such as the depth of the Fresnel lens array structure and the thickness of the p-type gallium nitride layer by using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). By comparing the discussed patterned GaN-based LED with that traditional flat LEDs, it can be found that significant enhancement factor of the light extraction efficiency, which is improved by 3.5 times, can be obtained and the scattered angle at half maximum can be decreased 50° from 60° with this novel Fresnel lens structure. It will be expected that the proposed sub-micron structure can find wide applications in LEDs industry.

  18. An optoelectronic device in bulk LiF with sub-micron periodic gratings fabricated by interference of 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurobori, T.; Obayashi, Y.; Kurashima, M.; Hirose, Y.; Sakai, T.; Aoshima, S.; Kojima, T.; Okuda, S.

    2008-06-01

    Sub-micron periodic gratings of transparent materials are holographically fabricated by interference with the second harmonic (400 nm) of a mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator-amplifier laser. As one optoelectronic application, a pulsed, room temperature laser action in bulk lithium fluoride is demonstrated, for the first time, in the green spectral region based on the laser-active F3+colour centres utilizing a distributed feedback structure encoded by interference of 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses. A lasing output with a linewidth of 1 nm is obtained at approximately 539 nm, which value reflects the selective laser resonator. Realization of green and red distributed feedback colour centre laser action based on the F3+and F2 centres in LiF excited by a single wavelength can be expected.

  19. Out-of-plane actuation with a sub-micron initial gap for reconfigurable terahertz micro-electro-mechanical systems metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Akihiro; Kan, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2015-10-01

    We propose a reconfigurable terahertz (THz) metamaterial that can control the transmittance by out-of-plane actuation with changing the sub-micron gap distance between electrically coupled metamaterial elements. By using the out-of-plane actuation, it was possible to avoid contact between the coupled metamaterial elements across the small initial gap during the adjustment of the gap size. THz spectroscopy was performed during actuation, and the transmission dip frequency was confirmed to be tunable from 0.82 to 0.92 THz for one linear polarization state and from 0.80 to 0.91 THz for the other linear polarization; the two polarizations were orthogonal. The proposed approach will contribute to the development of tunable metamaterials based on structural deformations. PMID:26480137

  20. Co-existence of a few and sub micron inhomogeneities in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Yoshiya; Oto, Takao; Banal, Ryan G.; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi; Gachet, David

    2015-03-21

    Inhomogeneity in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells is directly observed using our custom-built confocal microscopy photoluminescence (μ-PL) apparatus with a reflective system. The μ-PL system can reach the AlN bandgap in the deep ultra-violet spectral range with a spatial resolution of 1.8 μm. In addition, cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements with a higher spatial resolution of about 100 nm are performed. A comparison of the μ-PL and CL measurements reveals that inhomogeneities, which have different spatial distributions of a few- and sub-micron scales that are superimposed, play key roles in determining the optical properties.

  1. Magnetic and Mössbauer characterization of the magnetic properties of single-crystalline sub-micron sized Bi₂Fe₄O₉ cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Viescas, Arthur J.; Le Breton, Jean-Marie; Chiron, Hubert; Juraszek, Jean; Park, Tae-Jin

    2014-11-25

    Magnetic and Mössbauer characterization of single crystalline, sub-micron sized Bi₂Fe₄O₉ cubes has been performed using SQUID magnetometry and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range of 4.2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K. A broad magnetic phase transition from the paramagnetic to the anti-ferromagnetic state is observed below 250 K, with the Mössbauer spectra exhibiting a superposition of magnetic, collapsed and quadrupolar spectra in the transition region of 200 K < T < 245 K. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra obtained in transmission geometry are identical to those recorded in back-scattering geometry via conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, indicating the absence of strain at the surface. A small hysteresis loop is observed in SQUID measurements at 5 K, attributable to the presence of weak-ferromagnetism arising from the canting of Fe³⁺ ion sublattices in the antiferromagnetic matrix.

  2. Observation of current polarity effect in stressing as-formed sub-micron Al-Si-Cu/TiW/TiSi 2 contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Zen; Hsu, Klaus Y.-J.

    1999-06-01

    Formation of good silicide contacts becomes more important but difficult as the contact size continues shrinking toward the deep sub-micron regime. At the same time, higher current density, which may easily appear in small regions, could pose strong impact to the long-term reliability of sub-micron contacts. In this work, high current density stress experiments were conducted on the Al-Si-Cu/TiW/TiSi 2 contacts with the size ranging from 0.5×0.5 μm 2 down to 0.25×0.25 μm 2. The self-aligned silicide contacts were formed by using collimated sputtering, E-beam lithography, RTA, and RIE techniques. The silicide contacts were sintered at 400°C for 30 min. Cross-bridge Kelvin resistor structures were formed for electrical stressing and contact resistance measurement. One-way and two-way stressings were performed at high current density (˜10 7 A/cm 2) and the contact resistance was measured periodically at low current density during the stressing to monitor the evolution. It was found that the initial resistance of as-formed contacts was higher than expected. This is probably due to the difficulty of forming good interfaces in the small contact region by sputtering and that the sintering temperature may not be high enough to smear out the imperfection. The stressing was found to anneal the contacts. With electrons flowing from metal layer into the contact window, the contact resistance was reduced more efficiently than with reverse current of the same density. Stressed first by reverse current then by normal current, the resistance showed a two-step reduction with a significant transition at the switch of current polarity. For prolonged stressing, the contacts were gradually degraded and the reverse current induced more severe damage. These observations indicate strong electromigration effect at the small contacts.

  3. Rheological and filtration behavior of aqueous alumina casting slips dispersed with polyacrylate and polymethacrylate deflocculants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemo, David M.

    Dynamic stress-controlled rheometry methods and filtration analysis were used to characterize aluminum oxide suspensions relative to several process variables. These included dispersant molecular weight, dispersant concentration, solids concentration, alumina PSD, and aging time. It is believed that through rheological analysis, a better understanding of a slip's structure and dewatering behavior can be achieved. Based upon time- and stress-sweep data, structural models were developed for the build-up (gelation) and break-down (yielding) processes in alumina suspensions. Aqueous alumina suspensions dispersed with acrylate-based polyelectrolytes of average molecular weights of 2400, 3500, and 15000 were evaluated over an aging period of up to ten days. The aging-induced variations in their rheological, filtration, and electrochemical characteristics were quantified. These effects were related to changes in the structures of the suspensions over time. It was found that the aging effect was most pronounced for slips dispersed with higher molecular weight polyacrylate or polymethacrylate deflocculants. A mechanism was proposed to account for the aging behavior and the effect of dispersant molecular weight. Alumina slips were prepared with bimodal particle size compositions by combining two sub-micron alumina powders. Variation in rheological behavior with the composition was evaluated for slips at moderate and high solids concentration, and at fully dispersed and under dispersed states. The corresponding changes in the filtration behavior and cast density were measured. A structural model was constructed for the observed variations with alumina composition.

  4. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, Juergen

    2014-02-06

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  5. Image-Guided Ultrasound Characterization of Volatile Sub-Micron Phase-Shift Droplets in the 20-40 MHz Frequency Range.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paul S; Daghighi, Yasaman; Yoo, Kimoon; Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F Stuart; Burns, Peter N

    2016-03-01

    Phase-shift perfluorocarbon droplets are designed to convert from the liquid to the gas state by the external application of acoustic or optical energy. Although droplet vaporization has been investigated extensively at ultrasonic frequencies between 1 and 10 MHz, few studies have characterized performance at the higher frequencies commonly used in small animal imaging. In this study, we use standard B-mode imaging sequences on a pre-clinical ultrasound platform to both image and activate sub-micron decafluorobutane droplet populations in vitro and in vivo at center frequencies in the range of 20-40 MHz. Results show that droplets remain stable against vaporization at low imaging pressures but are vaporized at peak negative pressures near 3.5 MPa at the three frequencies tested. This study also found that a small number of size outliers present in the distribution can greatly influence droplet performance. Removal of these outliers results in a more accurate assessment of the vaporization threshold and produces free-flowing microbubbles upon vaporization in the mouse kidney. PMID:26725168

  6. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888-2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  7. Free-standing millimetre-long Bi2Te3 sub-micron belts catalyzed by TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schönherr, Piet; Zhang, Fengyu; Kojda, Danny; Mitdank, Rüdiger; Albrecht, Martin; Fischer, Saskia F; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2016-12-01

    Physical vapour deposition (PVD) is used to grow millimetre-long Bi2Te3 sub-micron belts catalysed by TiO2 nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of TiO2 nanoparticles for the nanostructure growth is compared with the catalyst-free growth employing scanning electron microscopy. The catalyst-coated and catalyst-free substrates are arranged side-by-side, and overgrown at the same time, to assure identical growth conditions in the PVD furnace. It is found that the catalyst enhances the yield of the belts. Very long belts were achieved with a growth rate of 28 nm/min. A ∼1-mm-long belt with a rectangular cross section was obtained after 8 h of growth. The thickness and width were determined by atomic force microscopy, and their ratio is ∼1:10. The chemical composition was determined to be stoichiometric Bi2Te3 using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements show a characteristic increase of the conductivity at low temperatures. The room temperature conductivity of 0.20 × 10(5) S m (-1) indicates an excellent sample quality. PMID:27342602

  8. Free-standing millimetre-long Bi2Te3 sub-micron belts catalyzed by TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönherr, Piet; Zhang, Fengyu; Kojda, Danny; Mitdank, Rüdiger; Albrecht, Martin; Fischer, Saskia F.; Hesjedal, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    Physical vapour deposition (PVD) is used to grow millimetre-long Bi2Te3 sub-micron belts catalysed by TiO2 nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of TiO2 nanoparticles for the nanostructure growth is compared with the catalyst-free growth employing scanning electron microscopy. The catalyst-coated and catalyst-free substrates are arranged side-by-side, and overgrown at the same time, to assure identical growth conditions in the PVD furnace. It is found that the catalyst enhances the yield of the belts. Very long belts were achieved with a growth rate of 28 nm/min. A ˜1-mm-long belt with a rectangular cross section was obtained after 8 h of growth. The thickness and width were determined by atomic force microscopy, and their ratio is ˜1:10. The chemical composition was determined to be stoichiometric Bi2Te3 using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements show a characteristic increase of the conductivity at low temperatures. The room temperature conductivity of 0.20 × 105 S m -1 indicates an excellent sample quality.

  9. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888-2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:25620787

  10. Magnetic and Mössbauer characterization of the magnetic properties of single-crystalline sub-micron sized Bi₂Fe₄O₉ cubes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Viescas, Arthur J.; Le Breton, Jean-Marie; Chiron, Hubert; Juraszek, Jean; Park, Tae-Jin

    2014-11-25

    Magnetic and Mössbauer characterization of single crystalline, sub-micron sized Bi₂Fe₄O₉ cubes has been performed using SQUID magnetometry and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range of 4.2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K. A broad magnetic phase transition from the paramagnetic to the anti-ferromagnetic state is observed below 250 K, with the Mössbauer spectra exhibiting a superposition of magnetic, collapsed and quadrupolar spectra in the transition region of 200 K < T < 245 K. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra obtained in transmission geometry are identical to those recorded in back-scattering geometry via conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, indicating the absence ofmore » strain at the surface. A small hysteresis loop is observed in SQUID measurements at 5 K, attributable to the presence of weak-ferromagnetism arising from the canting of Fe³⁺ ion sublattices in the antiferromagnetic matrix.« less

  11. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888–2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:25620787

  12. Ultrasonic energy input influence οn the production of sub-micron o/w emulsions containing whey protein and common stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Kaltsa, O; Michon, C; Yanniotis, S; Mandala, I

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasonication may be a cost-effective emulsion formation technique, but its impact on emulsion final structure and droplet size needs to be further investigated. Olive oil emulsions (20wt%) were formulated (pH∼7) using whey protein (3wt%), three kinds of hydrocolloids (0.1-0.5wt%) and two different emulsification energy inputs (single- and two-stage, methods A and B, respectively). Formula and energy input effects on emulsion performance are discussed. Emulsions stability was evaluated over a 10-day storage period at 5°C recording the turbidity profiles of the emulsions. Optical micrographs, droplet size and viscosity values were also obtained. A differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) multiple cool-heat cyclic method (40 to -40°C) was performed to examine stability via crystallization phenomena of the dispersed phase. Ultrasonication energy input duplication from 11kJ to 25kJ (method B) resulted in stable emulsions production (reduction of back scattering values, dBS∼1% after 10days of storage) at 0.5wt% concentration of any of the stabilizers used. At lower gum amount samples became unstable due to depletion flocculation phenomena, regardless of emulsification energy input used. High energy input during ultrasonic emulsification also resulted in sub-micron oil-droplets emulsions (D(50)=0.615μm compared to D(50)=1.3μm using method A) with narrower particle size distribution and in viscosity reduction. DSC experiments revealed no presence of bulk oil formation, suggesting stability for XG 0.5wt% emulsions prepared by both methods. Reduced enthalpy values found when method B was applied suggesting structural modifications produced by extensive ultrasonication. Change of ultrasonication conditions results in significant changes of oil droplet size and stability of the produced emulsions. PMID:23266492

  13. A novel synthesis and characterization of ordered meso/macroporous alumina with hierarchical and adjustable pore size.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiuhong; Duan, Linhai; Qin, Huibo; Xie, Xiaohua; Umar, Ahmad; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    The sub-micron polystyrene (PS) microspheres with adjustable size were firstly synthesized using emulsion polymerization method by adding only a small amount of emulsifier. Then, three dimensionally ordered macroporous alumina with mesoporous walls and adjustable macropore size was facilely prepared by the colloidal template method. The alumina and PS spheres were characterized by nanoparticle size analyzer, SEM, XRD and N2 adsorption. The results show that the polystyrene microsphere has adjustable single-sized pore with diameter in the range of 100-350 nm and the yield is higher than that prepared by soap free emulsion polymerization. The alumina materials as prepared using the PS colloidal crystals as the template, had ordered meso-macroporous structures and adjustable apertures. The mesopores (about 3.6 nm) in γ-alumina were formed by controlling the heat treatment of alumina precursor. BET surface area and pore volume of the hierarchical alumina as obtained can reach to 241.3 m2/g and 0.33 cm3/g, respectively. PMID:25924412

  14. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on bauxite and alumina mining. U.S. states like Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia produced small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical uses. Total metallurgical-grade bauxite imports in 2008 is cited. The leading suppliers of bauxite to the U.S. are Jamaica, Guinea and Brazil. The estimated domestic production of alumina in 2008 is mentioned. It also discusses consumption and prices of both bauxite and alumina.

  15. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface. PMID:21170406

  16. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Huang, Shi-Ming; Pu, Lin; Shi, Yi; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Ji, Li; Kang, Jun-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface. PMID:21170406

  17. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Huang, Shi-Ming; Pu, Lin; Shi, Yi; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Ji, Li; Kang, Jun-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface.

  18. Room Temperature Deformation Mechanisms of Alumina Particles Observed from In Situ Micro-compression and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. The identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  19. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  20. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  1. Agglomeration-Free Distributor for Fluidized Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, F.; Sinica, A.; Levenspiel, O.

    1986-01-01

    New gas distributor for fluidized beds prevents hot particles from reacting on it and forming hard crust. In reduction of iron ore in fluidized bed, ore particles do not sinter on distributor and perhaps clog it or otherwise interfere with gas flow. Distributor also relatively cool. In fluidized-bed production of silicon, inflowing silane does not decompose until within bed of hot silicon particles and deposits on them. Plates of spiral distributor arranged to direct incoming gas into spiral flow. Turbulence in flow reduces frequency of contact between fluidized-bed particles and distributor.

  2. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  3. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  4. Emulsification mechanism and storage instabilities of hydrocarbon-in-water sub-micron emulsions stabilised with Tweens (20 and 80), Brij 96v and sucrose monoesters.

    PubMed

    Henry, John V L; Fryer, Peter J; Frith, William J; Norton, Ian T

    2009-10-01

    -Slesov-Wagner (LSW) theory. This ripening rate is the change in radius that results from movement of the oil through the continuous phase, taking into account the oil solubility in water and the diffusion coefficient of the decane-in-water. The ripening rate for Brij 96v was about three times larger than the calculated rate and there is an indication that the ripening rate increases slightly with increasing surfactant concentration, indicating that some enhancement due to the presence of micelles has occurred. With Tween 80 and 20 the ripening rates were 20 and 40 times, respectively, larger than those calculated using the solubility and diffusion coefficients. The increased rate has been shown to be first order with respect to the surfactant concentration indicating micelle mediated ripening. It is hypothesized that an optimum formulation for the sub-micron emulsion with these types of surfactant, will balance surfactant concentration to minimize droplet size during processing while aiming to minimize or prevent Ostwald ripening. PMID:19589533

  5. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  6. Alumina from oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Dawsonite-bearing oil shale of Colorado's Green River Formation offers a unique and vast (6.5 billion tons of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) resource of easily extractable alumina. The processing methods required by the thermal reactions of dawsonite and its oil-shale carrier also require production of shale oil, soda ash, and nahcolite as marketable coproducts. These production methods are presented. The alumina production process is contrasted with the Bayer process to describe technical advantages of extraction of alumina from oil shale which may offset the problems associated with processing a relatively lean ore. While alumina production from oil shale requires development of new technology, the technical problems appear solvable. Only the political problems arising from the now onerous and completely unnecessary Federal oil-shale withdrawal appear less solvable.

  7. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the bauxite and alumina industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the U.S. mainly relies on imports for its bauxite consumption. Several states, including Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia, however, produce small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical purposes. The major exporters of alumina to the U.S. include Australia, Brazil and Jamaica.

  8. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  9. Large pore alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Ternan, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Earlier the authors reported preparation conditions for an alumina material which contained large diameter macropores (0.1-100 [mu]). The preparation variable that caused the formation of the uncommonly large macropores was the large acid/alumina ratios which were very much greater than the ones used in the preparation of conventional porous aluminas. The alumina material had large BET surface areas (200 m[sup 2]/g) and small mercury porosimetry surface areas (1 m[sup 2]/g). This indicated that micropores (d[sub MIP]<2 nm) were present in the alumina, since they were large enough for nitrogen gas molecules to enter, but too small for mercury to enter. As a result they would be too small for significant diffusion rates of residuum molecules. In earlier work, the calcining temperature was fixed at 500[degrees]C. In the current work, variations in both calcining temperature and calcining time were used in an attempt to convert some of the micropores into mesopores. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of bauxite and alumina in 2009 and presents an outlook for their 2010 performance. There were only several U.S. states that could produce bauxite and bauxitic clays including Georgia, Arkansas, and Alabama. The prices for imported refractory-grade calcined bauxite ranged between 426 U.S. dollars and 554 dollars per ton.

  11. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  12. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  13. Prediction of alumina penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D A

    1993-02-01

    The MESA hydrocode was used to predict two-dimensional tests of L/D 10 and L/D 15 tungsten rods impacting AD 90 alumina with a steel backing. The residual penetration into the steel is the measured quantity in these experiments conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWR). The interface velocity as a function of time between an alumina target and a lithium fluoride window, impacted by an alumina disk at velocities between 544 m/s and 2329 m/s, was also predicted. These one-dimensional flyer plate experiments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories using Coors AD 995 alumina. The material strength and fracture models are important in the prediction of ceramic experiments. The models used in these predictions are discussed. The penetrations in the two-dimensional tests were predicted to 11.4 percent or better. In five of the six experiments, the predicted penetration depth was deeper than the measured value. This trend is expected since the calculation is based on ideal conditions. The results show that good agreement between the 1-D flyer plate data and the MESA predictions exists at the lower impact velocities, but the maximum velocity is overpredicted as the flyer plate velocity increases. At a flyer plate velocity of 2329 m/s the code overpredicted the data by 12.3 percent.

  14. Transglutaminase-induced or citric acid-mediated cross-linking of whey proteins to tune the characteristics of subsequently desolvated sub-micron and nano-scaled particles.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Leila; Yarmand, Mohammadsaeed; Madadlou, Ashkan; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins were inter-connected either by the enzyme transglutaminase or citric acid and then desolvated with ethanol to generate particles. Both samples comprised of sub-micron (>300 nm) and nano-scaled (~100 nm) particles based on the hydrodynamic size measurements. Enzyme-induced cross-linking of proteins yielded more monodisperse particles and decreased the mean size of the major (nano-scaled) fraction of particles. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed a spherical morphology for all samples with mean sizes of <40 nm. Atomic force microscopy indicated a lower height for the particles from enzymatically cross-linked proteins. The mediating role of citric acid in bridging the proteins was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that pre-heating of protein solution before cross-linking and desolvation denatured the proteins entirely. In vitro degradation of whey protein particles in a simulated gastric fluid demonstrated that cross-linking of whey proteins before desolvation stage enhanced significantly the digestion stability of particles. PMID:24766206

  15. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  16. Alumina reduction cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, A.T.; Gunnip, F.L.

    1987-06-16

    An alumina reduction cell is described having a cathode and an anode. The anode is formed of a carbonaceous paste and baked during operation of cell and the anode having rows of anode pins on opposing faces. The pins are positioned by passing the pins through openings in anode channels vertically stacked along the opposing faces of the anode. The lowermost row of anode pins carries current through the anode; the improvement positions the anode pins passing through along a line of constant current distribution in the anode.

  17. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. Conclusions: A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures. PMID:24806720

  18. Tip-like anodic alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. W.; Ding, G. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Zheng, M. J.; Shen, W. Z.

    2007-05-01

    Porous anodic alumina membranes and various nanotips have been demonstrating individually their unique usefulness in current nanotechnology. We present a one-step electrochemical approach to fabricate nanoscale alumina tips (tip-like anodic alumina, TAA) in order to combine the benefits of porous anodic alumina and a nanoscale tip array. The realized TAA has an ordered tip surface with controllable aspect ratio and high sheet density of ~1011 cm-2. The formation of alumina nanotips is due to the heat-driven dissolution of the nanopore surface. We have further shown that the surface nanostructure in TAA leads to the wettability reversal, and preferred nucleation and growth during material deposition. The easy and large-scale fabrication of TAA makes it possible for novel nanodevice applications.

  19. Branchy alumina nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jianping; Pu, Lin; Bao, Ximao; Feng, Duan

    2002-02-01

    Branchy alumina nanotubes (bANTs) have been shown to exist in aluminum oxide. Electron-beam evaporated 400 nm Al film on Si substrate is stepwise anodized in dilute sulfuric acid under the constant dc voltage 40 V at 10.0 °C. This electrochemical-anodizing route resulted in the formation of individual bANTs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the length of the bANTs was around 450 nm, and the inner diameter was around 10-20 nm. We deduced that the bANTs, the completely detached multibranchy cells of anodic porous alumina (APA) film, should be evolved from the stagnant cells of the APA mother film. The bANTs may be used as templates in fabrication of individual branchy nanoscale cables, jacks, and heterojunctions. The proposed formation mechanisms of the bANTs and the stagnant cells should give some insights into the long-standing problem of APA film, i.e., the self-ordering mechanism of the cells arrangement in porous anodization of aluminum.

  20. Gelcasting Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.; Zuk, K.J.; Wei, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    OSRAM SYLVANIA INC. is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux TM line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency ({approximately}97% total transmittance in the visible), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach l2OOC), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, up to 100 initial lumens per watt. (Compare incandescent lamps 10-20 lumens per watt, fluorescent lamps 25-90 lumens per watt.)

  1. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  2. Gelcast zirconia-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Bleier, A.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Young, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Near net-shaped parts of zirconia-alumina composites have been successfully formed by gelcasting, a technique which utilizes in situ polymerization of acrylamide monomers. The high solids loading required for gelcasting ({approximately}50 vol %) was obtained by controlling the pH-dependent stability of the aqueous zirconia-alumina suspensions. A strong correspondence was found among the surface charges on the particles, colloidal stability, and the maximum solids loading. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Gelcasting polycrystalline alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    This work is being done as part of a CRADA with Osram-Sylvania, Inc. (OSI) OSI is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux{reg_sign} line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency (95% total transmittance in the visible region), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach 1400{degrees}C), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, on the order of several hundred lumens / watt. (Compare - incandescent lamps -13 lumens/watt fluorescent lamps -30 lumens/watt.) Osram-Sylvania would like to explore using gelcasting to form PCA tubes for Lumalux{reg_sign} lamps, and eventually for metal halide lamps (known as quartz-halogen lamps). Osram-Sylvania, Inc. currently manufactures PCA tubes by isostatic pressing. This process works well for the shapes that they presently use. However, there are several types of tubes that are either difficult or impossible to make by isostatic pressing. It is the desire to make these new shapes and sizes of tubes that has prompted Osram-Sylvania`s interest in gelcasting. The purpose of the CRADA is to determine the feasibility of making PCA items having sufficient optical quality that they are useful in lighting applications using gelcasting.

  4. Nickel in high-alumina basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.

    1971-01-01

    New analyses of high-alumina basalts reveal an average nickel content higher than previously indicated. Ni in high-alumina basalts correlates with magnesium in the same way as it does in other basalt types. There is therefore no reason, based on Ni contents, to hypothesize a special origin for high-alumina basalts and it is permissible (based on Ni contents) to form andesites by fractional crystallization from high-alumina basalts. ?? 1971.

  5. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  6. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  7. Alumina as a Thermoluminescent Material

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Erdem; Yarar, Yasemin

    2007-04-23

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters are extensively used for quantitative dose measurements in various irradiation fields. They are also important for environmental monitoring after nuclear accident and weapon tests. In this work, the principles of TLD dosimeter and characteristics of several TLD materials are presented. Besides, taken into account the importance as a raw material, the utilization of domestic alumina (Al2O3) in TLDs as a thermoluminescent material is discussed.

  8. Packed Alumina Absorbs Hypergolic Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; Mauro, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Beds of activated alumina effective as filters to remove hypergolic vapors from gas streams. Beds absorb such substances as nitrogen oxides and hydrazines and may also absorb acetylene, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, benzene, butadiene, butene, styrene, toluene, and xoylene. Bed has no moving parts such as pumps, blowers and mixers. Reliable and energy-conservative. Bed readily adapted to any size from small portable units for use where little vapor release is expected to large stationary units for extensive transfer operations.

  9. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  10. Physical chemistry of carbothermic reduction of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Robert A.

    1985-09-01

    Production of aluminium, by means of carbothermic reduction of alumina, is discussed. By employing a solvent metal bath to absorb the alumina metal, carbothermic reduction of alumina was accomplished at temperatures 300/degree/C lower than the temperatures reported in the literature. Reduction occurred without the formation of intermediate compounds and without the high volatilization of aluminum bearing species. Reduction of alumina immersed in a solvent bath appeared to be rate limited by chemical reaction control. The rates seemed to be a function of the activity of aluminum in the solvent metal bath. Reduction of alumina particles, above the surface of the bath, seemed to occur via vapor transport with carbon in the particles or in the crucible walls. Mass transport in the gas phase appeared to be rate limiting. The rates seemed to be a function of the distance separating the alumina and carbon sources. With both submerged alumina and alumina particles, increasing the surface area of the alumina increased the rate of reduction. 58 refs., 65 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Microwave sintering of large alumina bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.

    1993-05-01

    The application of microwaves as an energy source for materials processing of large alumina bodies at elevated temperatures has been limited to date. Most work has concerned itself with small laboratory samples. The nonuniformity of the microwave field within a cavity subjects large alumina bodies to areas of concentrated energy, resulting in uneven heating and subsequent cracking. Smaller bodies are not significantly affected by field nonuniformity due to their smaller mass. This work will demonstrate a method for microwave sintering of large alumina bodies while maintaining their structural integrity. Several alumina configurations were successfully sintered using a method which creates an artificial field or environment within the microwave cavity.

  12. Microwave sintering of large alumina bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The application of microwaves as an energy source for materials processing of large alumina bodies at elevated temperatures has been limited to date. Most work has concerned itself with small laboratory samples. The nonuniformity of the microwave field within a cavity subjects large alumina bodies to areas of concentrated energy, resulting in uneven heating and subsequent cracking. Smaller bodies are not significantly affected by field nonuniformity due to their smaller mass. This work will demonstrate a method for microwave sintering of large alumina bodies while maintaining their structural integrity. Several alumina configurations were successfully sintered using a method which creates an artificial field or environment within the microwave cavity.

  13. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  14. Formation of alumina-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V.I.; Basov, V.G.; Vagin, A.I.; Kalechits, I.V.

    1982-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained in physical and chemical studies of alumina-nickel-molybdenum oxide catalysts as well as binary system and the individual oxides, the conclusions show that the commercial catalyst consists mainly of nickel and aluminium molybdates, aluminium molybdates, molybdenum oxide, and the alumina support. 4 figures.

  15. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  16. Characterization and application of electrospun alumina nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alumina nanofibers were prepared by a technique that combined the sol–gel and electrospinning methods. The solution to be electrospun was prepared by mixing aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) in ethanol, which was then refluxed in the presence of an acid catalyst and polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) in ethanol. The characterization results showed that alumina nanofibers with diameters in the range of 102 to 378 nm were successfully prepared. On the basis of the results of the XRD and FT-IR, the alumina nanofibers calcined at 1,100°C were identified as comprising the α-alumina phase, and a series of phase transitions such as boehmite → γ-alumina → α-alumina were observed from 500°C to 1,200°C. The pore size of the obtained γ-alumina nanofibers is approximately 8 nm, and it means that they are mesoporous materials. The kinetic study demonstrated that MO adsorption on alumina nanofibers can be seen that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. PMID:24467944

  17. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Penumetcha, Sai S.; Kona, Ravikanth; Hardin, Jonathan L.; Molder, Andrew L.; Steinle, Erich D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examine alumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The function of these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing the local environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long (C18) or short and branched (isopropyl) hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantly decreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containing alumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionic surfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to an increased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance the sensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilane attachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy, which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters of these silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electron microscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanes that are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  18. Laser carbonitriding of alumina surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.; Karatas, C.

    2011-03-01

    Laser carbonitriding of alumina surfaces is examined. Temperature and stress fields developed during the laser heating of the substrate surface are predicted using the finite element method in line with the experimental conditions. The formation of Al(C, N) and AlN compounds in the surface region of irradiated workpiece is examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser irradiated region are examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The microhardness of the resulting surface is measured and compared with the base material hardness. It is found that high temperature gradient is developed in the irradiated region, which in turn, results in high residual stress levels in this region. XPS and XRD data reveal the presence of Al (C, N) and AlN compounds in the surface region. The microhardness in the surface region of the laser treated workpiece increases significantly.

  19. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  20. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  1. Fabrication of thin layer beta alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennenhouse, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Beta alumina tubes having walls 700 microns, 300 microns, and 140 microns were processed by extrusion and sintering utilizing Ford proprietary binder and fabrication systems. Tubes prepared by this method have properties similar to tubes prepared by isostatic pressing and sintering, i.e. density greater than 98% of theoretical and a helium leak rate less than 3 x 10 to the -9th power cc/sq cm/sec. Ford ultrasonic bonding techniques were used for bonding beta alumina end caps to open ended beta -alumina tubes prior to sintering. After sintering, the bond was hermetic, and the integrity of the bonded area was comparable to the body of the tube.

  2. Corrosion Behaviour of Sputtered Alumina Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, I. Neelakanta; Dey, Arjun; Sridhara, N.; Anoop, S.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Rani, R. Uma; Anandan, Chinnasamy; Sharma, Anand Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Corrosion studies of sputtered alumina thin films grown on stainless steel (SS) 304 were carried out by linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Noticeable changes were not observed in morphology and surface roughness of films after carrying out the corrosion test. Corrosion current density (icorr) of alumina coated SS decreased up to 10-10 A cm-2 while icorr value in the range of 10-5-10-6 A cm-2 was observed for bare SS. The direct sputtered film showed superior corrosion resistance behaviour than the reactive sputtered film. This might be attributed to the difference in thickness of the films sputtered by direct and reactive methods. The electronic structure of deposited alumina films was studied both before and after corrosion test by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique which also confirmed no structural changes of alumina film after exposing it to corrosive environment.

  3. Processing of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2003-01-01

    Dense and crack-free 10-mol%-yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites, containing 0 to 30 mol% of alumina, have been fabricated by hot pressing. Release of pressure before onset of cooling was crucial in obtaining crack-free material. Hot pressing at 1600 C resulted in the formation of ZrC by reaction of zirconia with grafoil. However, no such reaction was observed at 1500 C. Cubic zirconia and -alumina were the only phases detected from x-ray diffraction indicating no chemical reaction between the composite constituents during hot pressing. Microstructure of the composites was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Density and elastic modulus of the composites followed the rule-of-mixtures. Addition of alumina to 10YSZ resulted in lighter, stronger, and stiffer composites by decreasing density and increasing strength and elastic modulus.

  4. Loss tangent measurements on unirradiated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Unirradiated room temperature loss tangent for sapphire and several commercial grades of polycrystalline alumina are complied for frequencies between 10{sup 5} and 4x10{sup 11} Hz. Sapphire exhibits significantly lower values for the loss tangent at frequencies up to 10{sup 11} Hz. The loss tangents of 3 different grades of Wesgo alumina (AL300, AL995, AL998) and 2 different grades of Coors alumina (AD94, AD995) have typical values near {approx}10{sup -4} at a frequency of 10{sup 8} Hz. On the other hand, the loss tangent of Vitox alumina exhibits a large loss peak tan d{approx} 5x10{sup -3} at this frequency.

  5. Studies of Plasma-Sprayed Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilavsky, Jan

    1994-05-01

    Phase transformations and porosity of the plasma sprayed alumina deposits were examined. The dependence of the phase transformations on deposit chemistry was established. Porosity changes during heat treatment were studied and a model for the porosity is proposed. A novel technique in the field of plasma sprayed deposits--small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)--was successfully applied. Deposits were manufactured using the water-stabilized plasma spray system, PAL160, with an input of 160 kW. Phase transformations of the plasma sprayed alumina deposits were studied using XRD and DTA. The deposits were manufactured from 99.9% alumina, alumina-chromia (1.5% Cr_2O_3), gray alumina (3.7% TiO_2) and alumina -titania (17% TiO_2). The addition of chromia increases the temperature of the alpha phase formation by about 40^circ C and the addition of TiO_2 reduces this temperature by about 150^circ C for gray alumina and by about 175^ circC for alumina-titania. The amount of metastable theta phase was found to depend on the chemistry of the feedstock. Porosities of the deposits, made from alumina and gray alumina, were studied using mercury intrusion porosimetry, weighing method (Archimedean porosimetry), image analysis and SANS. Samples were studied in the as -sprayed condition and after heat treatment for 2 hours at 1300^circC and 1500 ^circC. Porosity depends on the deposit chemistry and on the heat treatment and varies from 5% to about 11%. Different porosity measurement techniques yield different results. Surface areas of 1.5 to 7.5 times 10^4 cm^2 /cm^3 (times 10^6 m^{ -1}) were measured using SANS and depend on heat treatment and on the deposit chemistry. The phase transformations can be associated with an increase in pore surface area and decrease in surface area at 1500 ^circC can be associated with sintering. The effective pore radius, R_{ rm eff}, as measured by SANS is a measure of the pore sizes in the 0.08 to 10 μm size range. The R_{rm eff} depends on deposit

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Electrospun Alumina Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Marie J.; Tacastacas, Stephen N.; Stojilovic, Nenad; O'Brien, John P.; Pischera, Anna; Espe, Matthew P.

    2008-10-01

    Alumina nanofibers are promising materials for use in high- temperature applications since they are chemically inert up to very high temperatures. Applications include use as catalyst support in high-temperature chemical reactions, fire protection materials, and as a high-temperature insulator. Electrospinning is a relatively simple and inexpensive method for obtaining nanometer-size fibers and has become a popular technique for producing metal-oxide nanofibers in recent years. The electrospinning mixture for the production of alumina nanofibers typically contains aluminum acetate stabilized with boric acid as the alumina precursor; but the observed presence of boron and sodium on the surface of these nanofibers may affect their use as catalytic supports. We have produced alumina nanofibers from an aluminum reagent devoid of the boric acid stabilizer and calcined the fibers at different temperatures to produce nanofibers with different phases of alumina. Characterization of the fibers by TGA, FE-SEM equipped with the XEDS, powder XRD, DRIFTS, and SSNMR methods to determine the fate of the precursors, fiber morphology and the composition and structure of the calcined alumina nanofibers.

  7. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  8. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hannouche, Didier; Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2011-02-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  9. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  10. Long-term results of alumina-on-alumina hip arthroplasty for osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Nich, Christophe; Sariali, El-Hadi; Sari Ali, El-Hadi; Hannouche, Didier; Nizard, Rémy; Witvoet, Jacques; Sedel, Laurent; Bizot, Pascal

    2003-12-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in THR may, in theory, provide an effective answer to osteolysis in young patients with ON of the femoral head. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report the long-term results of a series of 52 consecutive alumina THAs (41 patients) done for ON. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 41 years (range, 22-79 years). Cemented femoral stems with a 32-mm alumina head were used. Plain alumina cups were used and were either cemented (39 hips) or press-fit (13 hips). No patients were lost to followup. Sixteen hips have been revised. Aseptic loosening of the socket was the main cause of failure. At an average 16-year followup (range, 11-23.65 years), 26 hips were rated excellent and one hip was rated good. No osteolysis was observed and wear was undetectable. If revision for aseptic loosening was the end point, the rate of survival was 88.5% at 10 years for the socket and 100% at 10 years for the stem. With the alumina-on-alumina hip replacement done for ON, absence of osteolysis can be expected for as many as 24 years after the operation. New methods of socket fixation now are being explored. PMID:14646707

  11. Characterization of vitrified ICPP alumina waste calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, H.S.; Brotzman, J.R.; Simpson, G.G.

    1980-08-01

    The properties of one borosilicate and two borophosphate glasses previously developed to vitrify an ICPP alumina nuclear waste calcine are determined. Based on melt viscosity at 1100/sup 0/C and leach rate, the maximum permissible calcine contents in the borophosphate and borosilicate formulations are 26 and 16 mol%, respectively. Glasses containing lesser amounts of calcine do not develop crystalline compounds upon annealing. Based upon the same viscosity and leach rate criteria, 40 wt % CaO or zirconia calcine can be substituted for alumina calcine in the borophosphate glasses. Ten wt % of either additive can be substituted for alumina calcine in the borosilicate glass. Minor modifications of the alkali or cupric oxide content in the borophosphate glasses does not alter glass characteristics.

  12. Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy of pyridine adsorbed on silica-alumina and. gamma. -alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Riseman, S.M.; Massoth, F.E.; Dhar, G.M.; Eyring, E.M.

    1982-05-13

    Relative numbers of Bronsted acid to Lewis acid sites on silica-alumina have been determined photoacoustically by an infrared analysis of chemisorbed pyridine compared to similar adsorption of ..gamma..-alumina that has only Lewis sites. Results are similar to those obtained by earlier IR transmission studies that suggested the use of framework vibrations of silica as an internal reference standard. The 20% coverage of the silica-alumina surface by pyridine adsorbed at Bronsted sites found photoacoustically is in good agreement with a previous value of 17% estimated from transmission spectroscopic data. Reproducibility of the photoacoustic measurements is excellent.

  13. Laser Ablation of Alumina in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Wrobel, J; Kruger, M

    2010-01-01

    Bulk {alpha}-alumina immersed in distilled water was ablated by pulsed UV laser radiation. The resulting colloidal solution contained micron and submicron size particles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of the ablated and original material are similar. Hence, most of the ablated material is {alpha}-alumina. From transmission electron microscope images, most of the submicron and all of the micron-sized particles have sharp edges and do not have spherical shapes, indicating that the dominant ablation mechanism is due to crack propagation. Some spherical particles of diameter less than 100 nm are observed, indicating that they were formed from the liquid state.

  14. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  15. Nanomechanical humidity detection through porous alumina cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Klimenko, Alexey; Lebedev, Vasiliy; Lukashin, Alexey; Eliseev, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present here the behavior of the resonance frequency of porous anodic alumina cantilever arrays during water vapor adsorption and emphasize their possible use in the micromechanical sensing of humidity levels at least in the range of 10–22%. The sensitivity of porous anodic aluminium oxide cantilevers (Δf/Δm) and the humidity sensitivity equal about 56 Hz/pg and about 100 Hz/%, respectively. The approach presented here for the design of anodic alumina cantilever arrays by the combination of anodic oxidation and photolithography enables easy control over porosity, surface area, geometric and mechanical characteristics of the cantilever arrays for micromechanical sensing. PMID:26199836

  16. Structural transformations in reactively sputtered alumina films

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, P. Khanna, A.

    2014-04-24

    Thin films of amorphous alumina of thickness ∼350 nm were prepared on silicon wafer by DC cathode reactive sputtering. The effects of thermal annealing on the structural properties were investigated at annealing temperatures of 600°C, 800°C, 1100°C and 1220°C. X-ray diffraction showed that crystallization starts at 800°C and produces δ and θ alumina phases, the latter phase grows with heat treatment and the film was predominantly δ-phase with small amount of a-phase after annealing at 1220°C. AFM studies found that the surface of thin films smoothened upon crystallization.

  17. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Dragnea, Bogdan (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multi-channel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single microchip sensor is described. A multi-channel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  18. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Dragnea, Bogdan (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multi-channel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single micro-chip sensor is described. A multi-channel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  19. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Wearable or implantable devices combining microfluidic control of sample and reagent flow and micro-cavity surface plasmon resonance sensors functionalized with surface treatments or coatings capable of specifically binding to target analytes, ligands, or molecules in a bodily fluid are provided. The devices can be used to determine the presence and concentration of target analytes in the bodily fluids and thereby help diagnose, monitor or detect changes in disease conditions.

  20. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multi-channel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single micro-chip sensor is described. A multi-channel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  1. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multichannel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single microchip sensor is described. A multichannel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  2. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multi-channel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single microchip sensor is described. A multi-channel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  3. Advanced composite applications for sub-micron biologically derived microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnur, J. M.; Price, R. R.; Schoen, P. E.; Bonanventura, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A major thrust of advanced material development is in the area of self-assembled ultra-fine particulate based composites (micro-composites). The application of biologically derived, self-assembled microstructures to form advanced composite materials is discussed. Hollow 0.5 micron diameter cylindrical shaped microcylinders self-assemble from diacetylenic lipids. These microstructures have a multiplicity of potential applications in the material sciences. Exploratory development is proceeding in application areas such as controlled release for drug delivery, wound repair, and biofouling as well as composites for electronic and magnetic applications, and high power microwave cathodes.

  4. Sub-micron scale conduction processes on clean surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlin, K.

    1995-06-19

    Electrical conductance has been measured in-situ in two dimensions in the Ag/Si(111) system as a function of incident adatom flux rate with a 4-probe method. A conductance study in a 3-D conical structure was also made using field emission. For the 2-D study, the origin of conduction is still unclear, as transport by percolating Ag clusters and conduction through the substrate lvia electrons from the film have both been suggested. Experiments varying the flux rate were conducted to decide between the two. Smoother films are expected at lower growth rates which would result in faster drops in the 4-probe voltage; however the 4-probe voltage vs deposition time for various flux rates collapse into a universal curve which indicates that the morphology is not relevant and supports through the substrate. In the 3-D conductance study, a single, lateral micromachined W protrusion on a silica substrate is examined to identify the factors controlling emission in micromachined structures. The I-V characteristics and emission pattern indicate that miniprotrusions of a few hundred Angstroms, much smaller than the nominal radius of the tip, exist on the tip and are responsible for the emission. Adsorption-desorption events from the background environment are the cause of large fluctuations in the emitting current. Comparison of the emission of a single tip to gated arrays suggest that only a fraction of the tips in the array are emitting.

  5. The Columbia University Sub-micron Charged Particle Beam

    PubMed Central

    Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Marino, Stephen A.; Xu, Yanping; Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Brenner, David J.

    2009-01-01

    A lens system consisting of two electrostatic quadrupole triplets has been designed and constructed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The lens system has been used to focus 6-MeV 4He ions to a beam spot in air with a diameter of 0.8 µm. The quadrupole electrodes can withstand voltages high enough to focus 4He ions up to 10 MeV and protons up to 5 MeV. The quadrupole triplet design is novel in that alignment is made through precise construction and the relative strengths of the quadrupoles are accomplished by the lengths of the elements, so that the magnitudes of the voltages required for focusing are nearly identical. The insulating sections between electrodes have had ion implantation to improve the voltage stability of the lens. The lens design employs Russian symmetry for the quadrupole elements. PMID:20161365

  6. The Columbia University sub-micron charged particle beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Marino, Stephen A.; Xu, Yanping; Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Brenner, David J.

    2009-10-01

    A lens system consisting of two electrostatic quadrupole triplets has been designed and constructed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The lens system has been used to focus 6 MeV 4He ions to a beam spot in air with a diameter of 0.8 μm. The quadrupole electrodes can withstand voltages high enough to focus 4He ions up to 10 MeV and protons up to 5 MeV. The quadrupole triplet design is novel in that alignment is made through precise construction and the relative strengths of the quadrupoles are accomplished by the lengths of the elements, so that the magnitudes of the voltages required for focusing are nearly identical. The insulating sections between electrodes have had ion implantation to improve the voltage stability of the lens. The lens design employs Russian symmetry for the quadrupole elements.

  7. Mechanical characterization of sub-micron polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, B.N.; Oliver, W.C.; Rosenmayer, C.T.

    1998-12-31

    This study reports the results of an investigation of the mechanical properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films on silicon substrates in the 0.5 to 15 {micro}m thickness regime using frequency specific depth-sensing indentation. All measurements were conducted at an excitation frequency of 45 Hz using a constant (1/P dP/dt) load ramp of 0.1 s{sup {minus}1}. The modulus of the PTFE at a depth of 5% of the film thickness was measured to be approximately 1 GPa ({nu} = 0.46) independent of film thickness. These values are somewhat higher than the values obtained from free-standing 15 {micro}m film measurements of 0.4 GPa for the tensile modulus and 0.49 GPa for the storage modulus {at} 1.1 Hz. The film hardness at these depths was observed to range between 30 and 55 MPa with no correlation observed between the hardness and respective film thickness. While reliability modeling for interconnects currently uses interlayer dielectric mechanical properties data determined from free-standing films with thicknesses of several microns, these in-situ results should more closely mimic the constrained deformation that occurs during service and perhaps lead to a better understanding of the electromigration resistance of PTFE.

  8. Physics of sub-micron cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory tests with simulated micrometeoroids to measure the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. Equations for ablation path length for electrically accelerated micrometeoroids entering a gas target are developed which yield guidelines for the laboratory measurement of the heat transfer coefficient. Test results are presented for lanthanum hexaboride (LaB sub 6) microparticles in air, argon, and oxygen targets. The tests indicate the heat transfer coefficient has a value of approximately 0.9 at 30 km/sec, and that it increases to approximately unity at 50 km/sec and above. Test results extend to over 100 km/sec. Results are also given for two types of small particle detectors. A solid state capacitor type detector was tested from 0.61 km/sec to 50 km/sec. An impact ionization type detector was tested from 1.0 to 150 km/sec using LaB sub 6 microparticles.

  9. Sub-Micron Long HTS Ho Electron Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harnack, 0.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The hot-electron bolometer mixer made from a high-T, superconductor (HTS) was introduced recently as an alternative to a Schottky mixer at THz frequencies. The performance of the mixer depends on the total thermal conductance for heat removal from the phonon sub-system due to either length-dependent phonon diffusion or phonon escape to the substrate. We have measured both the length and temperature dependencies of the IF bandwidth of the mixers fabricated from 25-35 mn thick YBCO films on MgO and sapphire substrates. The films were grown by a laser deposition technique and electron-beam lithography was used to define bridge lengths down to 50 nm. Mixer measurements were done using signal frequencies in the range of 1-100 GHz. For 50 nm and 400 nm long devices on MgO, the 3-dB bandwidth was about 100 MHz. At temperatures below 60 K, the hot-electron plateau was clearly seen starting around 2-3 GHz. At temperatures above 70 K, the flux-flow effects begin to dominate and the IF bandwidth increases to 1-8 GHz, while the conversion efficiency drops by several dB. This temperature dependence of the IF bandwidth can account for previously reported unexpectedly high bandwidth of HTS mixers.

  10. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxane modified alumina... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. REMOVING RADIUM FROM WATER BY PLAIN AND TREATED ACTIVATED ALUMINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research determined the feasibility of using BaSO4-impregnated activated alumina and plain activated alumina for radium removal from groundwater by fixed-bed adsorption. The major factors influencing radium adsorption onto the two types of alumina were identified. The radium ...

  19. Method of making nanocrystalline alpha alumina

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Richard W.; Hahn, Horst; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making selected phases of nanocrystalline ceramic materials. Various methods of controlling the production of nanocrystalline alpha alumina and titanium oxygen phases are described. Control of the gas atmosphere and use of particular oxidation treatments give rise to the ability to control the particular phases provided in the aluminum/oxygen and titanium/oxygen system.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2003-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of the composites, determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique, increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from simple rule of mixtures.

  1. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  2. Alumina-on-alumina total hip prostheses in patients 40 years of age or younger.

    PubMed

    Bizot, P; Banallec, L; Sedel, L; Nizard, R

    2000-10-01

    To avoid the consequences of polyethylene wear in a high-risk population, 128 alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties have been done in 104 consecutive patients. The maximum age of patients was 40 years. The main preoperative diagnoses were osteonecrosis and sequellae of congenital hip dislocation (71% of the hips). The same titanium alloy cemented stem was implanted in all of the hips. Four types of alumina acetabular component fixations were used: a cemented plain alumina socket (41 hips), a screw-in ring with an alumina insert (22 hips), a press-fit plain alumina socket (32 hips), and a press-fit titanium metal back with an alumina insert (33 hips). Eight patients (11 hips) died during the followup period. Sixteen revisions have been documented, 12 for acetabular aseptic loosening, three for bipolar loosening (two of which were septic), and one for unexplained pain. Eighty-eight hips in 74 patients have been followed up radiologically for 2 to 22 years. Wear was unmeasurable. Four additional sockets showed definite migration. The respective survival rates after 7 years were 94.1% for the cemented cup, 88.8% for the screw-in ring, 95.1% for cementless press-fit plain alumina socket and 94.3% for the metal-back press-fit component. The 10-year survival rate was 90.4% for the cemented socket and 88.8% for the screw-in ring. The 15-year survival rate was 78.9% for the cemented socket. Grafting was the only prognostic factor, with a survival rate of 62.6% after 10 years for the hips with a bone graft and of 90.1% for hips without a graft. The alumina-on-alumina bearing surfaces seem to be a valuable alternative to the standard metal-on-polyethylene system for young patients. However, an improvement in socket fixation is required to lengthen the life span of the prosthesis to match the life expectancy of this demanding population. PMID:11039794

  3. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chuanping Li

    2004-12-19

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the {sup 17}O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles' surfaces

  4. Cementless bulk alumina socket: preliminary results at 6 years.

    PubMed

    Hamadouche, M; Nizard, R S; Meunier, A; Bizot, P; Sedel, L

    1999-09-01

    To avoid polyethylene wear observed in total hip replacement, an alumina-alumina combination has been used since 1977. The aim of this study is to report the results of a hybrid alumina-alumina total hip arthroplasty with a cementless press-fit bulk alumina socket and a cemented titanium alloy stem in 55 patients (62 hips) operated on between 1982 and 1990. The bearing surfaces were a 32-mm alumina head articulating within the alumina socket. Four failures occurred: 3 aseptic loosenings of the socket and 1 femoral head fracture. Considering aseptic loosening as the endpoint, the survival rate was 93.2% after 6 years. At a mean of 72.1 months' follow-up, 92.4% of the surviving hips were graded as very good or good using the Merle d'Aubigné-Postel hip score. Radiolucent lines were observed on the acetabular side in 68.1 of the hips. The future of this interface, which is probably fibrous, remains questionable. With the exception of 1 femoral head fracture, all revisions were related to failure of the bony fixation of the socket, and no problem was encountered related to the alumina-alumina friction coupling. Alumina sockets with other types of cementless fixation have therefore been designed and are presently under clinical investigation. PMID:10512442

  5. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  6. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  7. Health Risk Assessments for Alumina Refineries

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Methods: Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. Results: The acute hazard index can exceed 1 close to refineries, but it is typically less than 1 at neighboring residential locations. The chronic hazard index is typically substantially less than 1. The incremental carcinogenic risk is typically less than 10−6. Conclusions: The risks of acute health effects are adequately controlled, and the risks of chronic health effects and incremental carcinogenic risks are negligible around referenced alumina refineries. PMID:24806721

  8. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  9. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  10. Fast Glazing of Alumina/Silica Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.; Gzowski, E. R.; Wheeler, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for applying ceramic coating to fibrous silica/alumina insulation tiles prevents cracks and substantially reduces firing time. To reduce thermal stresses in tile being coated, high-temperature, shorttime firing schedule implemented. Such schedule allows coating to mature while substrate remains at relatively low temperature, reducing stress differential between coating and substrate. Technique used to repair tiles with damaged coatings and possibly used in heat-treating objects made of materials having different thermal-expansion coefficients.

  11. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Fernández, A.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks.

  12. Compression Testing of Alumina Fiber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2006-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the response of alumina fiber insulation to compression loading. The alumina fiber insulation is a candidate gasket material for the Space Shuttle Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) Tile Overlay Repair. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 2300 F. The alumina fiber insulation is a fibrous insulation blanket which was supplied to Langley in two forms, a nominal 3 lb/ft3 version and a nominal 9 lb/ft3 version. The 3 lb/ft3 material was tested as sheets 0.15 and 0.25 inches thick and the 9 lb/ft3 material in sheets 1 inch thick. The material showed very non-linear compression behavior with the compressive resistance of the material increasing as the material was compressed. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material required 4.1 psi to reach the nominal installation thickness of 0.045 inches and retain a load of 2.1 lbs during unloading. Testing at 2300 F resulted in a stiffer more board-like material. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material retained 1 psi of compressive resistance after a 10 minute hold at 2300 F and 0.045 inches thickness.

  13. Synthesis and properties of high-purity alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.S.; Weaver, M.L. . Chemical Systems Div.)

    1993-07-01

    High-purity alumina is intended primarily for the high-pressure sodium-vapor lamp envelope market and other specialty alumina applications such as abrasives, catalysts, and structural ceramics. High-purity alumina must calcine to Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] with minimal metal impurities ([>=]99.99% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]). Sulfate and chloride impurities are also undesirable. High-purity alumina should have less than 20ppm alkali and alkaline-earth metals, and less than 10 ppm each in transition-metal impurities. A process for synthesizing alumina by converting pure aluminum metal to aluminum hydroxide and the resultant alumina properties are described.

  14. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hongyu; Ning Guiling Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan

    2009-04-02

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  15. New experience with alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearings for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, James; Capello, William; Manley, Michael; Bierbaum, Benjamin

    2002-06-01

    A major challenge for total hip arthroplasty is to minimize wear and osteolysis in young, active patients. Alumina ceramic bearings have shown superior wear resistance and lubrication and do not carry the risk of ion release. In a prospective randomized study, 514 hips were implanted. All patients (average age, 53 years) received the same press-fit hydroxyapatite coated femoral stem; two thirds (345 hips) received alumina ceramic bearings, and one third (169 hips) received a cobalt-chrome-on-polyethylene bearing. At a mean follow-up of 35.2 months (range, 24-48 months), there was no significant difference in clinical performance between the patient cohorts. No ceramic fracture or alumina ceramic bearing failure occurred. This new experience involves the use of improved ceramic materials and new design considerations that eliminate the risks and complications of past experiences with ceramic implants and provides a safe bearing option for young patients. PMID:12066265

  16. Free-standing alumina nanobottles and nanotubes pre-integrated into nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-08-01

    A novel interfacial structure consisting of long (up to 5 μm), thin (about 300 nm), highly-ordered, free-standing, highly-reproducible aluminum oxide nanobottles and long tubular nanocapsules attached to a rigid, thin (less than 1 μm) nanoporous anodic alumina membrane is fabricated by simple, fast, catalyst-free, environmentally friendly voltage-pulse anodization. A growth mechanism is proposed based on the formation of straight channels in alumina membrane by anodization, followed by neck formation due to a sophisticated voltage control during the process. This process can be used for the fabrication of alumina nanocontainers with highly controllable geometrical size and volume, vitally important for various applications such as material and energy storage, targeted drug and diagnostic agent delivery, controlled drug and active agent release, gene and biomolecule reservoirs, micro-biologically protected platforms, nano-bioreactors, tissue engineering and hydrogen storage.

  17. Alumina Solubility and Diffusion Coefficient of the Dissolved Alumina Species in Low-Temperature Fluoride Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, E. J.; Thonstad, J.

    2010-06-01

    The solubility of alumina was measured by rotating an alumina cylinder (~500 rpm) in a high-purity melt for ~3 to 6 hours, crushing and sampling the frozen melt, and determining the oxygen content in a Leco analyzer. The alumina solubilities determined were as follows: (1) 3.2 ± 0.3 wt pct in NaF-AlF3 eutectic at 1023 K (750 °C); (2) 3.0 ± 0.3 wt pct in NaF-AlF3-CaF2 (5 wt pct) at 1023 K (750 °C); and (3) 5.2 ± 0.5 wt pct in a KF-AlF3 eutectic at 1003 K (730 °C). The alumina solubility in the KF-AlF3 eutectic was 2 wt pct more than in the sodium analogue, offering the possibility of operating a low-temperature aluminum smelting cell without the need for an alumina slurry. The diffusion coefficient of the dissolved alumina species was determined in the NaF-AlF3 eutectic at 1023 K (750 °C) using the rotating disc method and applying the Levich equation. Through a limited range of rotation rates, the system seemed to be mass-transfer controlled, and the diffusion coefficient was estimated to be in the range 1.8 to 2.2 × 10-6 cm2 s-1. This value is about five times lower than the values encountered at traditional aluminum smelting temperatures (~1233 K (960 °C)) and would result in relatively low mass transfer coefficients.

  18. Method for preparing Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, Eric E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic from Na-.beta."-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  19. Sintering of beta-type alumina bodies using alpha-alumina encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    McEntire, Bryan J.; Virkar, Anil V.

    1981-01-01

    A method of sintering a shaped green, beta-type alumina body comprising: (A) inserting said body into an open chamber prepared by exposing the interior surface of a container consisting essentially of at least about 50 weight percent of alpha-alumina and a remainder of other refractory material to a sodium oxide or sodium oxide producing environment; (B) sealing the chamber; and heating the chamber with the shaped body encapsulated therein to a temperature and for a time necessary to sinter said body to the desired density. The encapsulation chamber prepared as described above is also claimed.

  20. Modelling the initial stage of porous alumina growth during anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryslanova, E. M.; Alfimov, A. V.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    Artificially on the surface of aluminum there may be build a thick layer of Al2O3, which has a porous structure. In this paper we present a model of growth of porous alumina in the initial stage of anodizing, identifying dependencies anodizing parameters on the rate of growth of the film and the distance between the pores and as a result of the created model equations were found for changes in the disturbance of alumina for the initial stage of anodizing aluminum oxide porous border aluminum-alumina and alumina-electrolyte, with the influence of surface diffusion of aluminum oxide.

  1. Porous Alumina Prepared from Diethylaluminum Amide, Acetone, and Water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lize; Burnside, Gaylen G.; Kiranga, Beatrice; Shekhawat, Ritu; Mazumder, Malay K.; Hawk, Roger M.; Lindquist, David A.; Burton, Sarah D.)

    2003-01-14

    Mesoporous aluminas are valued catalysts because they exhibit a combination of properties that allow both long life and activity. The surface area, acidity, stability, and pore size of the alumina directly influence lifetime and activity. Increased surface area and acidity, along with decreased pore size, lead to increased activity. However, these same characteristics also decrease lifetime. The properties of alumina are mutually dependent, and can be mutually opposed. Aluminas with better activity and longer life will result from a better understanding of these trends given the preparative method and thermal history.

  2. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  3. Intercalation of water into lithium. beta. -alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N J; Bates, J B; Wang, J C; Brown, G M; Larson, B C; Engstrom, H

    1981-01-01

    Infrared absorption, neutron diffraction and weight loss techniques have been used to investigate the hydration of single crystals of Li ..beta..-alumina. The hydration is a reversible intercalation reaction. Up to approximately two water molecules per formula unit can penetrate the conduction plane. Other protonated species are formed from the dissociation of the molecular water. The rate of hydration is controlled by the diffusion of water in the conduction plane. A likely diffusion mechanism requires dissociation of the water and an interstitialcy motion of the oxygen.

  4. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  5. Crack growth resistance of textured alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Shannon, John L., Jr.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of a textured, extruded alumina body was compared with that of anisotropic, isopressed body of similar grain size, density, and chemistry. R-curve levels reflected the preferred orientation; however, R-curve slopes were the same in all instances, implying a similar crack growth-resistive mechanism. Three orthogonal orientations of crack growth in the two structures exhibited similar forms of K(IR) versus Delta-a curves, for which a schematic diagram for polycrystalline ceramics is proposed.

  6. Improved Synthesis Of Potassium Beta' '-Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Underwood, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Improved formulations of precursor materials synthesize nearly-phase-pure potassium beta' '-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) powder. Materials are microhomogeneous powders (or, alternatively, gels) containing K(+,) Mg(2+), and Al(3+). K-BASE powder produced used in potassium-working-fluid alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (K-AMTEC), in which heat-input and heat-rejection temperatures lower than sodium-working-fluid AMTEC (Na-AMTEC). Additional potential use lies in purification of pottassium by removal of sodium and calcium.

  7. Conduction mechanism of single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The fully guarded three-terminal technique was used to perform conductivity measurements on single-crystal alumina at temperatures of 400-1300 C. The conductivity was also determined as a function of time at various temperatures and applied fields. Further, the fractions of the current carried by Al and O ions (ionic transference numbers) were determined from long-term transference experiments in the temperature range 1100-1300 C. A mathematical model of the conduction mechanism is proposed, and model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  8. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  9. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  10. Depositing Adherent Ag Films On Ti Films On Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses cleaning of ceramic (principally, alumina) substrates in preparation for sputter deposition of titanium intermediate films on substrates followed by sputter deposition of outer silver films. Principal intended application, substrates sliding parts in advanced high-temperature heat engines, and outer silver films serve as solid lubricants: lubricating properties described in "Solid Lubricant for Alumina" (LEW-15495).

  11. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  15. Determination and evaluation of organic balances of alumina refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Solymar, K.; Gimpel-Kazar, M.; Molnar, E.

    1996-10-01

    The adequate measures to control the organic level and especially that of humates and oxalate need the determination and evaluation of the organic balance of the given alumina plant. The organic materials of the different alumina refineries have special compositions, therefore it is very difficult and limited to draw general and common conclusions for all alumina refineries concerning the role and control of organics. The methodology of the determination of the organic balance of an alumina plant will be discussed. The qualitative and quantitative determination of organic materials has been performed by means of gas-chromatography of the esterized organic materials. The organic balances of three different alumina refineries will be compared and evaluated relating to the total organic and oxalate contents.

  16. Morphology and transmittance of porous alumina on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitao, Guo; Zhilin, Xia; Yiyu, Xue; Caihua, Huang; Lixin, Zhao

    2011-02-01

    The porous optical film has higher threshold of laser-induced damage than densified films, for the study of mechanism of laser-induced damage of porous optical film with ordered pore structure. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) film with high transmittance on glass substrate has been prepared. Aluminum film was deposited on glass substrate by means of resistance and electron beam heat (EBH) evaporation. Porous alumina was prepared in oxalic acid solution under different anodizing conditions. At normal incidence, the optical transmittance spectrum over 300-1000 nm spectra region was obtained by spectrophotometer. SEM was introduced to analysis the morphology of the porous alumina film. The pore aperture increased with the increase of anodizing voltage, which resulted in a rapid decrease of the pore concentration and the optical thickness of porous alumina film. Damage morphology of porous alumina film is found to be typically defects initiated, and the defect is the pore presented on the film.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2005-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10SZ) - alumina composites containing 0-30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from the Maxwell-Eucken model where one phase is uniformly dispersed within a second major continuous phase.

  18. The mineralogy of bauxite for producing smelter-grade alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Authier-Martin, M.; Forte, G.; Ostap, S.; See, J.

    2001-12-01

    Aluminum-producing companies rely on low-cost, high-purity, smelter-grade alumina (aluminum oxide), and alumina production utilizes the bulk of bauxites mined world-wide. The mineralogy of the bauxites has a significant impact on the operation of the Bayer process for alumina production. Typically, the Bayer process produces smelter-grade alumina of 99.5% Al2O3, starting from bauxite containing 30% to 60% Al2O3. The main objective of the Bayer process is to extract the maximum amount of aluminum from the bauxite at as high an aluminate concentration in solution as possible, while limiting any troublesome side reactions. Only with a better understanding of the chemistry of the mineral species and a strict control of the operating/processing conditions can the Bayer process produce efficiently, a low cost, high-quality alumina with minimum detrimental environmental impact.

  19. Dispersion Caused by Carbon Dioxide During Secondary Alumina Dissolution: A Lab-Scale Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youjian; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Yu, Jiangyu

    2014-06-01

    Secondary alumina is the byproduct of dry scrubbing in aluminum smelting. Secondary alumina has superior dissolution characteristics to primary alumina. Secondary alumina dissolves in pieces in molten cryolite, which results in larger contact area and better diffusion kinetics. In this work, the dissolution phenomenon of primary alumina, secondary alumina, and primary alumina doped with sodium carbonate or calcium carbonate (mass ratio = 10:1, 20:1) was observed and compared to estimate carbon-induced dispersion in industrial secondary alumina. Temperature fluctuations during sample dissolution were measured to evaluate the benefits of preheating on alumina dissolution. It was found that carbon mixed in secondary alumina significantly influences the dispersion of alumina particles at the moment of feeding, and thermodynamic analysis also shows that the combustion heat from carbon facilitates dispersion.

  20. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  1. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-04-30

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  2. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  3. On the material and the tribology of alumina-alumina couplings for hip joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Walter, A

    1992-09-01

    The yearly sphericity deviation ranged from 0.03 mu to 3.7 mm in 48 retrieved implants with alumina--alumina bearing balls and cups. Excessive amounts of wear are predominantly design dependent or caused by malalignment. But the abrasion phenomena occurring in the cup centers and in the corresponding ball areas are related to unfavorable function zones. The influence of the lubricating gap geometry as studied in laboratory tests shows the form of sphericity deviations to be of decisive importance for wear and friction, if extended over small angles. Then, the contact stresses attributable to the actual effective curvatures of the bearing exceed the resistance to abrasion of the material under boundary lubrication conditions. There are remarkable differences between the early and actual material quality. Based on the state of knowledge of material aspects of wear criteria for the optimization of material and design, promising tolerable wear rates may be achieved. PMID:1516324

  4. Terbium luminescence in alumina xerogel fabricated in porous anodic alumina matrix under various excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponenko, N. V.; Kortov, V. S.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Nikolaenko, I. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Zvonarev, S. V.; Slesarev, A. I.; Prislopski, S. Ya.

    2011-07-15

    Terbium-doped alumina xerogel layers are synthesized by the sol-gel method in pores of a porous anodic alumina film 1 {mu}m thick with a pore diameter of 150-180 nm; the film is grown on a silicon substrate. The fabricated structures exhibit terbium photoluminescence with bands typical of trivalent terbium terms. Terbium X-ray luminescence with the most intense band at 542 nm is observed for the first time for such a structure. Morphological analysis of the structure by scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of xerogel clusters in pore channels, while the main pore volume remains unfilled and pore mouths remain open. The data obtained confirm the promising applications of fabricated structures for developing matrix converters of X-rays and other ionizing radiations into visible light. The possibilities of increasing luminescence intensity in the matrix converter are discussed.

  5. Processing and mechanical characterization of alumina laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, John K.

    2002-08-01

    Single-phase ceramics that combine property gradients or steps in monolithic bodies are sought as alternatives to ceramic composites made of dissimilar materials. This work describes novel processing methods to produce stepped-density (or laminated) alumina single-phase bodies that maintain their mechanical integrity. One arrangement consists of a stiff, dense bulk material with a thin, flaw tolerant, porous exterior layer. Another configuration consists of a lightweight, low-density bulk material with a thin, hard, wear resistant exterior layer. Alumina laminates with strong interfaces have been successfully produced in this work using two different direct-casting processes. Gelcasting is a useful near-net shape processing technique that has been combined with several techniques, such as reaction bonding of aluminum oxide and the use of starch as a fugative filler, to successfully produced stepped-density alumina laminates. The other direct casting process that has been developed in this work is thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG). This is a reversible gelation process that has been used to produce near-net shape dense ceramic bodies. Also, individual layers can be stacked together and heated to produce laminates. Bilayer laminate samples were produced with varied thickness of porous and dense layers. It was shown that due to the difference in modulus and hardness, transverse cracking is found upon Hertzian contact when the dense layer is on the exterior. In the opposite arrangement, compacted damage zones formed in the porous material and no damage occurred in the underlying dense layer. Flaw tolerant behavior of the porous exterior/dense underlayer was examined by measuring biaxial strength as a function of Vickers indentation load. It was found that the thinnest layer of porous material results in the greatest flaw tolerance. Also, higher strength was exhibited at large indentation loads when compared to dense monoliths. The calculated stresses on the surfaces

  6. Fracture of the alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner.

    PubMed

    Taheriazam, Afshin; Mohajer, Mohammad Azizbaig; Aboulghasemian, Mansoour; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-01

    The fracture rate of third-generation ceramic liners is greatly reduced compared with first- and second-generation liners because of improvements in the design and manufacturing process. Fractures of the alumina-bearing couple are rare for the same reason.This article describes a case of a fracture of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner without trauma history that was treated with ceramic-on-polyethylene revision total hip arthroplasty. A 57-year-old man was admitted to the hip ward because of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner fracture. He underwent hip replacement by anterior approach 18 months previously in the same center because of left hip primary osteoarthritis. He received a 54×36-mm modular press-fit cup ceramic alumina-bearing couple delta insert. Probable causes of such fractures are manufacture production failure and edge loading based on cup inclination, but in our patient, inacceptable range of motion, failure of the locking mechanism during implantation insertion, or cracking were possible causes of fracture.Although the fracture rate of third-generation alumina-bearing couples is low, we believe that it may not be possible to eliminate the actual risk of alumina head fracture. Patients should be informed about the potential for this complication before receiving an alumina-bearing couple. PMID:22229622

  7. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.

  8. Essentials of specifications for activated alumina in defluoridation technology.

    PubMed

    Misra, S K

    2006-10-01

    Worldwide, fluoride occurs naturally in some aquifers at concentrations above the WHO guideline values or Bureau of Indian Standards or CPHEEO - MUD - GOI parametric values. Fluoride in excess of the permissible limits in drinking water causes a number of endemic conditions referred to collectively as "fluorosis". Endemic fluorosis remains a challenging national health problem in India and Rajasthan is one of the worst affected states in India though a wide range of chemical and physical defluoridation systems were evolved and tried. Still activated alumina is one of the most widely used and liked defluoridation material currently available. Boom in the advanced and versatile alumina technology has opened new vistas to avail the strong potential of selective alumina adsorbents which are application-specific. Non-regenerable and specialty alumina offer tremendous scope to defluoridate drinking water. Indian industries are manufacturing regenerable activated alumina for defluoridation of drinking water. In order to ensure application of an adsorbent, which caters the desired results with minimum interferences, health risks and long service life span, it is inevitable to draw out dimensions which define precisely the attributes of activated alumina. Specifications for activated alumina intended for defluoridation of drinking water, specific operating and performance requirements, and limitations expressed by critical analysis of cardinal characteristics pave way for adoption of acceptable specifications and code of practice at national level. PMID:18179116

  9. Dermal Toxicity of Flake-Like α-Alumina Pigments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, HyunJeong; Jang, Seongwan; Lee, Sang-Geun; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum is one of the most widely used nonferrous metals and an important industrial material, especially for automotive coatings. However, potential toxicity caused by aluminum in humans limits the used of this metal. α-alumina is the most stable form of aluminum in various phases. Although the results of studies evaluating the dermal toxicity of α-alumina remained unclear, this compound can still be used as a pigment in cosmetics for humans. In the current study, we further evaluated the dermal cytotoxic effects of α-alumina on human skin cells and an in vivo mouse model. We also measured the in vitro penetration profile of flake-like α-alumina in porcine skin and assessed the degree of cellular metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrated that treatment with flake-like α-alumina did not significantly affect cell viability up to 24 h. This compound was found to have a non-penetration profile based on a Franz modified diffusion cell assay. In addition, flake-like α-alumina was not found to induce dermal inflammation as assessed by histology of epidermal architecture, hyperplasia, and the expression of Interleukin-1β and Cyclooxygenase-2. Results of the cellular metabolic disorder assay indicated that flake-like α-alumina does not exert a direct effect on human skin cells. Taken together, our findings provided not only evidence that flake-like α-alumina may serve as a pearlescent pigment in cosmetics but also experimental basis utilizing α-alumina for human application. Our results also obviously provide new insight of the further toxicity study to aluminum based nanoparticles for skin. PMID:26353706

  10. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.