Science.gov

Sample records for subcooled hydrothermal boiling

  1. (Investigation of subcooled hydrothermal boiling in ground water flow channels as a source of harmonic tremors)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    As a first step toward assessing the ability of hydrothermal boiling to explain geothermal ground noise and volcanic tremor observations, we are investigating the acoustic power spectrum of boiling (the source'' spectrum in the above model). We simulate boiling in the lab by injecting high pressure steam from a boiler into a pressure vessel filled with water. The water pressure fluctuations that result from the repeated formation and collapse of steam bubbles at the steam inlet vents are recorded by a hydrophone whose output is digitized at 2 {times} 10{sup 4} samples/second by a computer. The range of pressure and temperature conditions attainable within the pressure vessel is limited to <3.5 bars, <139{degree}C, due to the finite strength of observation windows affixed to the pressure vessel. Therefore, dimensional analysis will be used to correlate the experimental results with the pertinent experimental variables. Besides the overall shape of the boiling power spectrum, we are investigating the absolute spectral levels in frequency bands typical of geothermal ground noise and volcanic tremor (0.5 Hz-10 Hz), and the ratio of acoustic power liberated to total available power. The values of these parameters are critical to hydrothermal boiling's ability to generate ground motion amplitudes in accordance with observation. If it can be shown that the range of observed ground noise/tremor amplitudes can be accounted for by hydrothermal boiling at reasonable heat transfer rates, this knowledge would be invaluable to designers of seismic monitoring experiments who are interested in geothermal resource exploration/evaluation and volcanic eruption prediction.

  2. Subcooled flow boiling of fluorocarbons

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Richard Walter

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted of heat transfer and hydrodynamic behavior for subcooled flow boiling of Freon-113, one of a group of fluorocarbons suitable for use in cooling of high-power-density electronic components. Problems ...

  3. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe vapor effusion in an upstream wetting front lifts the vapor-liquid interface off the surface, triggering CHF. Since the model is entirely based on physical observations, it has the potential to accurately predict CHF for other fluids and flow geometries which are beyond the conditions for which it was validated.

  4. Unsteady heat transfer during subcooled film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Zabirov, A. R.; Lexin, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cooling of high-temperature bodies in subcooled liquid is of importance for quenching technologies and also for understanding the processes initiating vapor explosion. An analysis of the available experimental information shows that the mechanisms governing heat transfer in these processes are interpreted ambiguously; a more clear-cut definition of the Leidenfrost temperature notion is required. The results of experimental observations (Hewitt, Kenning, and previous investigations performed by the authors of this article) allow us to draw a conclusion that there exists a special mode of intense heat transfer during film boil- ing of highly subcooled liquid. For revealing regularities and mechanisms governing intense transfer of energy in this process, specialists of Moscow Power Engineering Institute's (MPEI) Department of Engineering Thermal Physics conduct systematic works aimed at investigating the cooling of high-temperature balls made of different metals in water with a temperature ranging from 20 to 100°C. It has been determined that the field of temperatures that takes place in balls with a diameter of more than 30 mm in intense cooling modes loses its spherical symmetry. An approximate procedure for solving the inverse thermal conductivity problem for calculating the heat flux density on the ball surface is developed. During film boiling, in which the ball surface temperature is well above the critical level for water, and in which liquid cannot come in direct contact with the wall, the calculated heat fluxes reach 3-7 MW/m2.

  5. Pool boiling studies on nanotextured surfaces under highly subcooled conditions 

    E-print Network

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2009-05-15

    Subcooled pool boiling on nanotextured surfaces is explored in this study. The experiments are performed in an enclosed viewing chamber. Two silicon wafers are coated with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT), 9 microns (Type-A) and 25 microns (Type...

  6. Model of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Fiori, Mario P.

    1968-01-01

    The physical phenomenon occurring before and at the critical heat flux (CHF) for subcooled flow boiling has been investigated. The first phase of this study established the basic nature of the flow structure at CHF. A ...

  7. Improvements in Predicting Void Fraction in Subcooled Boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Kwi Seok; Lee, Yong Bum; No, Hee Cheon

    2005-06-15

    A simple two-phase thermal-hydraulic tool with the drift-flux model has been used to develop a subcooled boiling model. The tool is composed of four governing equations: mixture mass, vapor mass, mixture momentum, and mixture enthalpy. Using the developed tool, various subcooled boiling models were investigated through the published experimental data. In the process of evaluation, two models were developed associated with the subcooled boiling. First, the Saha and Zuber correlation predicting the point of the net vapor generation was modified to consider the thermal and dynamic effects at the high-velocity region. Second, the pumping factor model was developed using the pi-theorem based on parameters related to the bubble generation mechanism, and it produced an additional parameter: the boiling number. The proposed models and several other models were evaluated against a series of subcooled flow boiling experiments at the pressure range of 1 to 146.8 bars. From the root-mean-square analysis for the predicted void fraction in the subcooled boiling region, the results of the proposed model presented the best predictions for the whole-pressure ranges. Also, the implementation of the developed models into RELAP5/MOD3.3 brought about improved results compared to those of the default model of the code.

  8. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  9. Pool boiling heat transfer on small heaters: effect of gravity and subcooling

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jungho

    . An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environ- ments is of importance to space Abstract Measurements of space and time resolved subcooled pool boiling of FC-72 in low, earth, and high to increase in size with bulk fluid temperature. Boiling curves at various subcoolings and gravity levels

  10. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the operating conditions of the AP1000 pressurized water reactor. The effects of both axial and lateral nonuniform power distributions inside reactor fuel elements are accounted for. Boiling flows are simulated for three different computational domains of increasing complexity: a quarter-subchannel bordering a single fuel pin, two subchannels surround by an array of 2 by 3 fuel pins, and in four subchannels surrounded by an array of 3 by 3 fuel pins. The predicted behavior is consistent with expectations. In the 3 by 3 array, the two-phase coolant is predicted to flow from the hot channels to the cold channels, enhancing heat exchange between subchannels. This, in turn, demonstrates that the new model is capable of capturing the turbulence- and buoyancy-induced coolant mixing across the neighboring channels.

  11. Microscale heat transfer measurements during pool boiling of FC-72: effect of subcooling

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jungho

    Microscale heat transfer measurements during pool boiling of FC-72: effect of subcooling Fatih in revised form 6 February 2004 Available online 19 March 2004 Abstract Heat transfer under nucleating subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily

  12. Experimental data on the mechanism of subcooled water boiling: high-speed video shooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Khodakov, K. A.; Shekhter, Yu. L.

    2014-06-01

    The article provides statistical data on the characteristics of subcooled liquid boiling and behavior of vapor and air bubbles resulted from high-speed shooting. The authors have described a number of new phenomena going along with water boiling.

  13. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  14. Assessment of RETRAN-3D Boiling Models Against Experimental Subcooled Boiling Tube Data

    SciTech Connect

    Macian, Rafael; Coddington, Paul; Stangroom, Paul

    2003-04-15

    Subcooled and saturated nucleate boiling are important physical processes in boiling water reactors (BWRs) under operating and transient conditions and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) under transient conditions. Good predictions of such processes by system codes such as RETRAN-3D are, therefore, important from a safety and operational point of view.For this reason, and continuing the validation efforts carried out in the STARS Project at Paul Scherrer Institute, data from experiments in a uniformly heated tube carried out by Bartolomey et al. have been used to assess the subcooled and saturated nucleate boiling models in RETRAN-3D. These experiments were performed at high ({approx}15-MPa) and medium ({approx}7-, 4-, and 3-MPa) pressures. The heat flux (2210 to 420 kW/m{sup 2}) and mass flux (2123 to 405 kg/s m{sup 2}) were selected to cover a range of values spanning operating and transient situations in both BWRs and PWRs.This paper reports on the results obtained with both the four- and five-equation RETRAN-3D flow models. The results show that both models used in RETRAN-3D provide good estimates of subcooled and saturated nucleate boiling in heated tubes. The four-equation model, which makes use of the Electric Power Research Institute void fraction profile fitting model for the reactivity feedback only, shows the best performance for high mass fluxes, whereas the five-equation model, which directly computes the vaporization rate, performs better at low mass fluxes and relatively high heat fluxes.In addition to the results from RETRAN-3D, results obtained with the system code RELAP-5 are included in the plots and used to support the conclusions and to perform a comparative analysis of the methods used by the codes.

  15. Experimental Study on the Subcooled Boiling Flow via Optical Measurement Techniques 

    E-print Network

    Yoo, Jun Soo

    2015-04-16

    A series of experimental work to investigate the subcooled boiling flow in a vertical square upward flow channel is described. As experimental methods, high-speed photography and infrared (IR) thermometry were employed ...

  16. Simulation of subcooled boiling at low pressure conditions with RELAP5-3D computer program 

    E-print Network

    Reza, S.M. Mohsin

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of subcooled boiling was carried out using RELAP5 thermal hydraulic computer programs. Both one-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses were carried out with one-dimensional RELAP5/MOD3.2 and three-dimensional ...

  17. Effect of subcooling on film boiling from a downward-facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling from inclined and downward-facing flat and curved surfaces is of interest to the passive cooling of the pressure vessel lower head of a Light Water Reactor following a core meltdown accident. The effect of water subcooling on film boiling from a downward-facing curved surface was investigated experimentally. The local and surface average Nusselt numbers were correlated for both saturation and subcooling (5, 10, and 14 K) conditions. Video images of boiling surface and analysis of data demonstrated that surface rewetting in saturation boiling was hydrodynamic in nature, but thermally driven in subcooled boiling. Results confirmed that lower minimum film boiling heat flux values were associated with longer rewetting times and vice versa. Surface rewetting occurred when vapor film reached a critical thickness, {delta}{sub c}, first at the lowermost position, {theta} = 0{degree}, then sequentially at higher inclinations. For saturation boiling, {delta}{sub c} {approximately} 85 {micro}m and 180 {micro}m at {theta} = 0{degree} and 8.26{degree}, respectively. For subcooled boiling, however, {delta}{sub c} varied for {approximately}50 to 175 {micro}m, depending on the values of local inclination and water subcooling.

  18. Variation of Subcooled Film Boiling State in He II with the Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, M.; Murakami, M.; Yamamoto, I.; Kimura, N.

    2004-06-23

    The characteristic feature of subcooled film boiling in He II was experimentally studied. The visual observation and the transient pressure and temperature measurements were performed to investigate the variation of the subcooled film boiling state with the pressure. In the highly subcooled state, the boiling state was relatively stable and little dynamic behavior of the vapor layer was observed. The pressure and temperature oscillations were hardly detected. As the pressure is reduced and consequently the degree of subcooling decreases, the thickness of vapor layer becomes thick and the dynamic behavior gradually becomes violent. The pressure and temperature oscillations appear with a very high frequency around several kHz. As the pressure further decreases to near the lambda pressure, the boiling state changes to much more violent boiling state with a frequency of several hundred Hz. A vapor bubble repeats formation and crush periodically, which apparently resembles noisy film boiling in saturated He II. The boundary between the stable and the unstable boilings seems to be in the pressure higher than the lambda pressure.

  19. Heat transfer to mixtures of acetone, isopropanol and water under subcooled flow boiling conditions. 1: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, U.; Hartmuth, B.; Muller-Steinhagen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients for ternary mixtures of acetone, isopropanol and water were measured over a wide range of process parameters such as heat flux, subcooling, flow velocity and concentration. The measurements cover the regimes of convective heat transfer, transition region and fully developed subcooled boiling. The effect of process parameters on the heat transfer coefficients in various regimes is discussed.

  20. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The physical phenomenon of forced convective boiling is probably one of the most interesting and complex transport phenomena. It has been under study for more than two centuries. Simply stated, forced convective subcooled boiling involves a locally boiling fluid: (1) whose mean temperature is below its saturation temperature, and (2) that flows over a surface exposed uniformly or non-uniformly to a high heat flux (HHF). The objective of this work is to assess and/or improve the present ability to predict local axial heat transfer distributions in the subcooled flow boiling regime for the case of uniformly heated coolant channels. This requires an accurate and complete representation of the boiling curve up to the CHF. The present. results will be useful for both heat transfer research and industrial design applications. Future refinements may result in the application of the results to non-uniformly heated channels or other geometries, and other fluids. Several existing heat transfer models for uniformly heated channels were examined for: (1) accurate representation of the boiling curve, and (2) characterizing the local heat transfer coefficient under high heat flux (HHF) conditions. Comparisons with HHF data showed that major correlation modifications were needed in the subcooled partial nucleate boiling (SPNB) region. Since the slope of boiling curve in this region is important to assure continuity of the HHF trends into the fully developed boiling region and up to the critical heat flux, accurate characterization in the SPNB region is essential. Approximations for the asymptotic limits for the SPNB region have been obtained and have been used to develop an improved composite correlation. The developed correlation has been compared with 363 water data points. For the local heat transfer coefficient and wall temperature, the over-all percent standard deviations with respect to the data were 19% and 3%, respectively, for the high velocity water data.

  1. Static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source reactor was completed in parallel rectangular channels configuration with light water flowing vertically upward at very high velocities. True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide. Out of the three correlations compared, the Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the Stanton (St) and Nusselt (Nu) numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime.

  2. Visualization of Sub-Cooled Flow Film Boiling in Horizontal Channel on Flat Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Wu; Peipei Chen; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2006-07-01

    The observation of sub-cooled flow film boiling was performed on a single-side-heated flat heat exchanger by using refrigerant R134a as the testing fluid. A stable vapor film was observed with the co-existence of sub-cooled bulk liquid. Vapor bubbles might release from the film, with the number and frequency changing under different conditions. The purpose of this paper is to describe these observations, and to provide a quantitative analysis of the phenomena. Results are compared with Berenson's model on horizontal heating surface, with discussion and suggestion made. (authors)

  3. Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

  4. Bubble behaviors under subcooled flow boiling instability in narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Gao, Puzhen; Xu, Chao

    2013-07-01

    Bubble behavior under instable flow at atmospheric pressure were investigated in this paper. The visualization experiments were carried out on a vertical, narrow rectangular test section, with one side heating surface and upward flow. The section of the channel is 40×2mm. Mass flow ranged from 80 to 200kg/h, heat fluxes from 24 to 500kW/m2 and the subcooling from 5 to 35K. High-speed photography at rate of 5000 frames/s captured bubble behaviors. Bulk liquid velocities were found to fluctuat under instable flow, and backflow was observed. The bubbles were generated periodically. A few bubbles with smaller diameter and no sliding generated when the flow reversed. Many bubbles with larger diameter and long distance of sliding were generated as the flow velocity increased.

  5. Analysis and Measurement of Bubble Dynamics and Associated Flow Field in Subcooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay G. Jones

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, subooled nucleate boiling (SNB) has attrcted expanding research interest owing to the emergence of axial offset anomaly (AOA) or crud-induced power shigt (CIPS) in many operating US PWRs, which is an unexpected deviation in the core axial power distribution from the predicted power curves. Research indicates that the formation of the crud, which directly leads to AOA phenomena, results from the presence of the subcooled nucleate boiling, and is especially realted to bubble motion occurring in the core region.

  6. A study of the effects of heater size, subcooling, and gravity level on pool boiling heat transfer

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jungho

    ; Microheater; Subcooling; Heater size 1. Introduction Future space technologies are anticipated to dissipate understanding of the boiling mechanisms in a host of operational environments is paramount to designing robust ¼ ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi r gðql À qvÞ r ð1Þ Such work has laid the foundation for the classical boiling curve and its

  7. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  8. The effect of flowrate of subcooling water on boiling from downward-facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yefanov, A.D.; Kalyakin, S.G.; Grachev, N.S.; Grabezhnaya, V.A.

    1997-12-01

    Experimental results are presented on boiling from downward-facing curved surface. The investigations were carried out at a facility equipped with reactor pressure vessel simulator having the elliptic bottom of 400 mm inside diameter. The molten core (corium) was simulated by lead-bismuth alloy. The cooling of the simulator was produced by forced circulation of water along the annular gap of 16 mm between the pressure vessel and the shell. The results show that maximum heat fluxes for subcooled boiling slowly depend upon the position along the curved wall, and the transition from film boiling to the nucleate one take the origin at the lowermost position ({var_phi} = 0) spreading upon the surface. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Influence of Test Tube Material on Subcooled Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Short Vertical Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koichi Hata; Masahiro Shiotsu; Nobuaki Noda

    2006-07-01

    The steady state subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF) for the flow velocities (u = 4.0 to 13.3 m/s), the inlet subcooling ({delta}T{sub sub,in} = 48.6 to 154.7 K), the inlet pressure (P{sub in} = 735.2 to 969.0 kPa) and the increasing heat input (Q{sub 0} exp(t/t), t = 10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured with the experimental water loop. The 304 Stainless Steel (SUS304) test tubes of inner diameters (d = 6 mm), heated lengths (L = 66 mm) and L/d = 11 with the inner surface of rough finished (Surface roughness, R{sub a} = 3.18 {mu}m), the Cupro Nickel (Cu-Ni 30%) test tubes of d = 6 mm, L = 60 mm and L/d = 10 with R{sub a} = 0.18 {mu}m and the Platinum (Pt) test tubes of d = 3 and 6 mm, L = 66.5 and 69.6 mm, and L/d 22.2 and 11.6 respectively with R{sub a} = 0.45 {mu}m are used in this work. The CHF data for the SUS304, Cu-Ni 30% and Pt test tubes were compared with SUS304 ones for the wide ranges of d and L/d previously obtained and the values calculated by the authors' published steady state CHF correlations against outlet and inlet subcooling. The influence of the test tube material on CHF is investigated into details and the dominant mechanism of subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux is discussed. (authors)

  10. Critical heat flux during subcooled flow boiling in narrow rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, R.; Ramanujapu, N.K.; Dhir, V.K.

    1996-12-31

    The heat generating capacity of energy equipment and electronic devices has increased tremendously with the progress of technology. Subcooled flow boiling, because of its extremely high heat transfer ability, has thus acquired great importance as a cooling technique. For instance, in nuclear fusion reactors some components such as diverters and beam dumps of neutron beam injectors are exposed directly to the plasma or high energy beam. The critical heat flux during subcooled flow boiling in narrow one-side heated rectangular channels was investigated experimentally using fluorinert liquid PF-5060 as a coolant. Three channel widths were examined, that is 1.3mm, 2.0mm, and 3.0mm. The heating surface was 10mm wide and 200mm long and only vertical upflow was experimented. Experiments were conducted at nearly atmospheric pressure under the following conditions: subcooled coolant mass velocity 2,000--5,000 kg/m{sup 2}s; inlet temperature 24--47 C; exit pressure 1.0--1.4 bar; equilibrium quality at channel exit {minus}0.58 to {minus}0.28. Critical heat flux under the above experimental conditions was found to increase with increase in mass velocity, with decrease in the channel width, and with increase in the inlet subcooling. Visual observations showed that bubbles were small and had diameter less than 100{micro}m. A comparison of the data with correlations reported in the literature showed that the correlations generally tended to overpredict the data. The correlations also do not show a proper trend with respect to the effect of channel width on critical heat flux. A new correlation based on dimensional analysis has been proposed. The correlation proposed can predict experimental data within 20% uncertainty.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Subcooled Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water-Cooled W/Cu Divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Le; Chang, Haiping; Zhang, Jingyang; Xu, Tiejun

    2015-04-01

    In order to realize safe and stable operation of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor under high heating condition, the exact knowledge of its subcooled boiling heat transfer characteristics under different design parameters is crucial. In this paper, subcooled boiling heat transfer in a water-cooled W/Cu divertor was numerically investigated based on computational fluid dynamic (CFD). The boiling heat transfer was simulated based on the Euler homogeneous phase model, and local differences of liquid physical properties were considered under one-sided high heating conditions. The calculated wall temperature was in good agreement with experimental results, with the maximum error of 5% only. On this basis, the void fraction distribution, flow field and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) distribution were obtained. The effects of heat flux, inlet velocity and inlet temperature on temperature distribution and pressure drop of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor were also investigated. These results provide a valuable reference for the thermal-hydraulic design of a water-cooled W/Cu divertor. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2010GB104005), Funding of Jiangsu Innovation Program for Graduate Education (CXLX12_0170), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  12. A critical review of predictive models for the onset of significant void in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Dorra, H.; Lee, S.C.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1993-06-01

    This predictive models for the onset of significant void (OSV) in forced-convection subcooled boiling are reviewed and compared with extensive data. Three analytical models and seven empirical correlations are considered in this review. These models and correlations are put onto a common basis and are compared, again on a common basis, with a variety of data. The evaluation of their range of validity and applicability under various operating conditions are discussed. The results show that the correlations of Saha-Zuber seems to be the best model to predict OSV in vertical subcooled boiling flow.

  13. Physical modeling and numerical simulation of subcooled boiling in one- and three-dimensional representation of bundle geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Lyczkowski, R.; Ahuja, S.

    1995-07-01

    Numerical simulation of subcooled boiling in one-dimensional geometry with the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) may yield difficulties related to the very low sonic velocity associated with the HEM. These difficulties do not arise with subcritical flow. Possible solutions of the problem include introducing a relaxation of the vapor production rate. Three-dimensional simulations of subcooled boiling in bundle geometry typical of fast reactors can be performed by using two systems of conservation equations, one for the HEM and the other for a Separated Phases Model (SPM), with a smooth transition between the two models.

  14. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  15. A combined photographic/thermographic study of highly subcooled flow boiling in a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Arif Bilal

    Minichannels (those with channel spacing near 1 mm) offer an attractive scale range for technological applications of two-phase cooling. They are small enough to create large heat fluxes, but large enough to remove significant quantities of heat, and they do not present the same degree of fouling and maintenance issues anticipated for applications of true micro-scale channels. This study applies liquid crystal thermography in concert with high-speed video imaging of a two-phase flow field to study highly subcooled bubbly flow within a millimeter-scale channel. The experiments were conducted with a high-aspect-ratio (12x23 mm) rectangular, horizontal channel with one wide wall forming a uniform-heat-generation boundary and the other designed for optical access to the flow field. By using a thermochromic liquid crystal coating on the uniform-heat-generation boundary, wall temperature variations were obtained and the heat transfer characteristics were investigated. The experiments were focused on high inlet subcooling, typically 15--50 °C. The test surface temperature increases downstream until boiling initiates when a group of nucleation sites activate at a "boiling front." It is commonly thought that cooling of the surface downstream of the front would be dominated by active nucleation sites. However, few active sites were observed downstream of those near the current position of the boiling front. This observation provides strong evidence that it is the action of bubbles sliding in the confined channel that causes the enhancement of heat transfer, not the extensive nucleation of bubbles. A quenching/diffusion analytical model was developed to describe the heat process associated with sliding bubbles. The model is based on a transient conduction hypothesis. It is able to capture the elevated heat transfer rates measured in the channel without the need to consider nucleate boiling from the surface or microlayer evaporation from the sliding bubbles. Bubble speed and size enter the model through a Fourier number associated with the bubble passage frequency. The insight gathered from this experimental investigation provides the basis for a better understanding of the physics of subcooled bubbly flow in minichannels, and this understanding should lead to new models of this regime.

  16. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate the post-DNB heater temperature up to the point of heater melting. Validation of the proposed model was performed using detailed measured wall boiling parameters near CHF, thereby bypassing most needed constitutive relations. It was found that under limiting nucleation conditions; a peak wall temperature at the time of bubble departure can be reached at CHF preventing wall cooling by quenching. The simulations show that the resulting dry patch can survive the surrounding quenching event, preventing further nucleation and leading to a fast heater temperature increase. For more practical applications, the model was applied at known CHF conditions in simple geometry coupled with one-dimensional and three-dimensional (CFD) codes. It was found that, in the case where CHF occurs under bubbly flow conditions, the local wall superheat underneath nucleating bubbles is predicted to reach the Leidenfrost temperature. However, a better knowledge of statistical variations in wall boiling parameters would be necessary to correctly capture the CHF trends with mass flux (or Weber number). In addition, consideration of relevant parameter influences on the Leidenfrost temperature and consideration of interfacial microphysics at the wall would allow improved simulation of the wall rewetting prevention and subsequent dry patch spreading.

  17. Numerical simulation of subcooled boiling water at low pressure incorporating homogeneous MUSIG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E. F.; Li, Y. Z.; Cheng, X. H.; Wang, Lei

    2010-03-01

    Applying a three-dimensional two-fluid model coupled with homogeneous MUSIG approach, numerical simulations of subcooled water at low pressure were performed on the computational fluid dynamics code CFX-10 with user defined FORTRAN program. A modified bubble departure diameter correlation based on the Unal semi-mechanism model was developed. The water boiling flow experiments at low pressure in vertical concentric annulus from reference were used to validate the models. Good quantitative agreement with the experimental data is obtained, including the local distribution of bubble diameter, void fraction, axial liquid and vapor velocity. The results indicate that local bubble diameter first increases and then decreases due to the effect of bubble breakup and coalescence, and has the maximum bubble diameter along the radial direction. Moreover, the peak void fraction phenomenon in the vicinity of the heated wall is predicted at low pressure, which is developed due to the surface tension between vapor bubbles and heated wall.

  18. Prediction of the onset of significant void in transient subcooled flow boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1993-06-01

    A new model to predict the onset of significant void (OSV) in transient subcooled flow boiling has been developed. The model is based upon the influence on vapor bubble departure of the single-phase temperature profile. The steady-state result of the present model was compared to the experimental data of Whittle and Forgan and Dougherty, et al., showing an excellent agreement. The model was then employed in a transient analysis of OSV for vertical downwards turbulent flow to predict whether OSV takes place. The condition for OSV to occur in transient flow situations was also predicted by this model. Two modes for pressure gradient change inside the channel are considered in the present study: step change and ramp change. The calculations were made for various combinations of the flow operating condition and the mode of pressure drop change.

  19. Enhancement of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling of water by use of a volatile additive

    SciTech Connect

    Pabisz, R.A. Jr.; Bergles, A.E.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation considers the effect of a 1-pentanol additive in water on the critical heat flux (CHF) and pressure drop in forced subcooled boiling. A small quantity of 1-pentanol was added to distilled water with the objective of getting an approximate 2% by weight mixture, which had been found to give superior performance in previous studies of pool and flow boiling. Experiments were performed using stainless steel tubes with internal diameters of 4.4 and 6.1 mm. Tests were conducted with mass fluxes of 4,400 kg/m{sup 2}s, exit pressures of 9 bar, length-to-diameter ratios of 25, and exit subcoolings from 65 to 90 C. Test sections were heated directly by DC power, and critical heat flux data were inferred from test-section burnout. The alcohol concentration was periodically checked by draining off a sample and performing a Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scan on the mixture. At high subcoolings, the mixture exhibited an increase in the critical heat flux over that of pure water. However at low subcoolings there is a decrease in the critical heat flux. The increases in critical heat flux noted with the 1-pentanol mixture in this experiment were not as large as would be expected from saturated pool boiling results published by Van Stralen (1959). Pressure drop data for both the mixture and the pure water also were recorded. The 1-pentanol mixture, in general, exhibited larger pressure drops for the same conditions. Subcooled flow boiling has a wide array of commercial cooling applications, including blades in gas turbines, high power laser optics, plasma-facing components in fusion reactors, supercomputers, etc.

  20. Complete Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Flow Boiling in the Presence of Thermal and Chemical Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Dhir

    2003-04-28

    At present, guidelines for fuel cycle designs to prevent axial offset anomalies (AOA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores are based on empirical data from several operating reactors. Although the guidelines provide an ad-hoc solution to the problem, a unified approach based on simultaneous modeling of thermal-hydraulics, chemical, and nuclear interactions with vapor generation at the fuel cladding surface does not exist. As a result, the fuel designs are overly constrained with a resulting economic penalty. The objective of present project is to develop a numerical simulation model supported by laboratory experiments that can be used for fuel cycle design with respect to thermal duty of the fuel to avoid economic penalty, as well as, AOA. At first, two-dimensional numerical simulation of the growth and departure of a bubble in pool boiling with chemical interaction is considered. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration. The Level Set method is used to capture the evolving liquid-vapor interface. A dilute aqueous boron solution is considered in the simulation. From numerical simulations, the dynamic change in concentration distribution of boron during the bubble growth shows that the precipitation of boron can occur near the advancing and receding liquid-vapor interface when the ambient boron concentration level is 3,000 ppm by weight. Secondly, a complete three-dimensional numerical simulation of inception, growth and departure of a single bubble subjected to forced flow parallel to the heater surface was developed. Experiments on a flat plate heater with water and with boron dissolved in the water were carried out. The heater was made out of well-polished silicon wafer. Numbers of nucleation sites and their locations were well controlled. Bubble dynamics in great details on an isolated nucleation site were obtained while varying the wall superheat, liquid subcooling and flow velocity parametrically. Concentration variation of boron near the liquid-vapor interface was detected successfully with a newly developed miniature concentration sensor. The measured concentration variations at different radial locations from the center of cavity have the same trend as given by the numerical simulations. The deposition of boron was found near the nucleation site on the heater surface, which validates the numerical simulation. Subcooled flow boiling experiments at three pressures were performed on a nine-rod bundle with water and with boron dissolved in the water. The test runs were conducted with a wide range of mass fluxes (186 to 2800 kg/m2s) and heat fluxes (1.0 to 30.0 W/ cm2). Not only the variables required to develop mechanistic models for subcooled flow boiling were measured, but also the crud formation during boiling and its effect on the heat transfer process were investigated. (B204)

  1. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  2. Experimental study of flow instability and CHF in a natural circulation system with subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.C.; Shi, D.Q.; Lu, Z.Q.; Zheng, R.C.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Experimental study has been performed to investigate flow instability and critical heat flux (CHF) in a natural circulation system with subcooled boiling. In the experiments three kinds of heated sections were used. Freon-12 was used as the working medium. The experiments show which one of the two phenomena, flow instability and CHF condition, may first occur in the system depends on not only the heat input power to the heated section and the parameters of the working medium, but also the construction of the heated section. The occurrence of the flow instability mainly depends on the total heat input power to the heated section and the CHF condition is mainly caused by the local heat flux of the heated section. In the experiments two kinds of flow instability, flow instability with high frequency and flow instability with low frequency, were found. But they all belong to density wave instability. The influence of the parameters of the working medium on the onset of the flow instability and CHF condition in the system were investigated. The stability boundaries were determined through the experiments. By means of dimensional analysis of integral equations, a common correlation describing the threshold condition of onset of the flow instability was obtained.

  3. Modeling and Thermal Performance Evaluation of Porous Curd Layers in Sub-Cooled Boiling Region of PWRs and Effects of Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling on Anomalous Porous Crud Deposition on Fuel Pin Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay Jones

    2005-06-27

    A significant number of current PWRs around the world are experiencing anomalous crud deposition in the sub-cooled region of the core, resulting in an axial power shift or Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA), a condition that continues to elude prediction of occurrence and thermal/neutronic performance. This creates an operational difficulty of not being able to accurately determine power safety margin. In some cases this condition has required power ''down rating'' by as much as thirty percent and the concomitant considerable loss of revenue for the utility. This study examines two aspects of the issue: thermal performance of crud layer and effect of sub-cooled nucleate boiling on the solute concentration and its influence on initiation of crud deposition/formation on fuel pin surface.

  4. Numerical investigation of water-based nanofluid subcooled flow boiling by three-phase Euler-Euler, Euler-Lagrange approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, Ziba; Shams, Mehrzad

    2015-09-01

    A numerical scheme for simulating the subcooled flow boiling of water and water-based nanofluids was developed. At first, subcooled flow boiling of water was simulated by the Eulerian multiphase scheme. Then the simulation results were compared with previous experimental data and a good agreement was observed. In the next step, subcooled flow boiling of water-based nanofluid was modeled. In the previous studies in this field, the nanofluid assumed as a homogeneous liquid and the two-phase scheme was used to simulate its boiling. In the present study, a new scheme was used to model the nanofluid boiling. In this scheme, to model the nanofluid flow boiling, three phases, water, vapor and nanoparticles were considered. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used for modeling water-vapor interphase and Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme was selected to observe water-nanoparticle interphase behavior. The results from the nanofluid boiling modeling were validated with an experimental investigation. The results of the present work and experimental data were consistent. The addition of 0.0935 % volume fraction of nanoparticles in pure liquid boiling flow increases the vapor volume fraction at the outlet almost by 40.7 %. The results show the three-phase model is a good approach to simulate the nanofluid boiling flow.

  5. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

  6. Immersion cooling of an array of heated elements by convective boiling of a subcooled binary liquid mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgillis, W.R.; Carey, V.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Boiling data and the critical heat flux conditions are reported for both channel flow and jet impingement flow using varying concentrations of R-11 in R-113. An array of ten flush-mounted heated elements on one wall of a vertical passage were cooled by subcooled boiling. Data indicate that for this binary system the addition of R-11 to R-113 does not produce a significant change in critical heat flux. For channel flow boiling, the data indicate that addition of a small amount of a less volatile component slightly increases the critical heat flux, whereas addition of a small amount of more volatile component decreases it. The critical heat flux data were also found to agree well with critical heat flux correlations for pure fluids if the mole-weighted mean properties of the mixture were used to compute the critical heat flux from the pure fluid correlation. The significance of the findings of this study with regard to the use of binary mixtures of dielectric fluids for immersion cooling of electronic components is also discussed in this paper. 9 refs.

  7. Subcooled freon-11 flow boiling in top-heated finned coolant channels with and without a twisted tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alvin; Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in top-heated finned horizontal tubes to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels. The objectives are to examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for circular coolant channels with spiral finned walls and/or spiral fins with a twisted tape, and improve the data reduction technique of a previous investigator. The working fluid is freon-11 with an inlet temperature of 22.2 C (approximately 21 C subcooling). The coolant channel's exit pressure and mass velocity are 0.19 M Pa (absolute) and 0.21 Mg/sq. ms, respectively. Two tube configurations were examined; i.e., tubes had either 6.52 (small pitch) or 4.0 (large pitch) fins/cm of the circumferential length (26 and 16 fins, respectively). The large pitch fins were also examined with a twisted tape insert. The inside nominal diameter of the copper channels at the root of the fins was 1.0 cm. The results show that by adding enhancement devices, boiling occurs almost simultaneously at all axial locations. The case of spiral fins with large pitch resulted in larger mean (circumferentially averaged) heat transfer coefficients, h sub m, at all axial locations. Finally, when twisted tape is added to the tube with large-pitched fins, the power required for the onset of boiling is reduced at all axial and circumferential locations.

  8. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  9. A study of system-induced instabilities in forced-convection flows with subcooled boiling

    E-print Network

    Maulbetsch, John S.

    1965-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental program was carried out to investigate the problem of hydrodynamic stability of forcedconvection flows with boiling. The study was restricted to the flow of water in small channels ...

  10. Experimental study of static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental data for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor are very limited. A series of FE tests with light water flowing vertically upward was completed covering a local exit heat flux range of 0.7--18 MW/m{sup 2}, exit velocity range of 2.8--28.4 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.117--1.7 MPa, and inlet temperature range of 40-- 50{degrees}C. Most of the tests were performed in a ``stiff`` (constant flow) system where the instability threshold was detected through the minimum of the pressure-drop curve. A few tests were also conducted using as ``soft`` (constant pressure drop) a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomenon (actual secondary burnout). True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted using a stiff system. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide, most of which were obtained at velocities below 10 m/s. The Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data out of the three correlations compared. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the St and Nu numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime. Comparison of Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) data, as well as extensive data from other investigators, led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void, applied to FE prediction. The mean and standard deviation of the THTL data were 0.95 and 15%, respectively, when comparing the THTL data with the original Saha and Zuber correlation, and 0.93 and 10% when comparing them with the modification. Comparison with the worldwide database showed a mean and standard deviation of 1.37 and 53%, respectively, for the original Saha and Zuber correlation and 1.0 and 27% for the modification.

  11. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  12. Highly subcooled pool boiling heat transfer at various gravity levels Jungho Kim a,*, John F. Benton b

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jungho

    from 1.8g to 10À6 g. The fluid was FC-72 at 1 atm and subcooled by nominally 36 °C for all cases the surface in low-g, occasionally causing nucleation to occur. This primary bubble was surrounded by smaller low heat transfer, consistent with dryout on the heater surfaces. Strong Marangoni convection around

  13. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Jun; Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (?Hi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  14. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water-based nanofluids at low pressure

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    A nanofluid is a colloidal suspension of nano-scale particles in water, or other base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve the critical heat flux (CHF) by as much as 200%. In this ...

  15. Non-linear dynamical analyses of transient surface temperature fluctuations during subcooled pool boiling on a horizontal disk

    E-print Network

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    excellent high frequency response [16] due to its low thermal inertia. Theycan be fabricated is obtained at each steady state condition to generate the boiling curve. The fraction of false, the minimal thermal inertia and small feature size leads to a reduced distortion of the temperature

  16. A New Facility for Measurements of Three-Dimensional, Local Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Flux and Related Critical Heat Flux for PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D. Sr.; Cofie, Penrose; Li Qingyuan; Ekhlassi, Ali A

    2002-01-15

    In the development of plasma-facing components for fusion reactors and high-heat-flux heat sinks (or components) for electronic applications, the components are usually subjected to a peripherally nonuniform heat flux. Even if the applied heat flux is uniform in the axial direction (which is unlikely), both intuition and recent investigations have clearly shown that both the local heat flux and the eventual critical heat flux (CHF) in this three-dimensional (3-D) case will differ significantly from similar quantities found in the voluminous body of data for uniformly heated flow channels. Although this latter case has been used in the past as an estimate for the former case, more study has become necessary to examine the 3-D temperature and heat flux distributions and related CHF. Work thus far has shown that the nonuniform peripheral heat flux condition enhances CHF in some cases.To avoid the excess costs associated with using electron or ion beams to produce the nonuniform heat flux, a new facility was developed that will allow 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements and two-dimensional, local subcooled flow boiling heat flux and related CHF measurements.The configurations under study for this work consist of (a) a nonuniformly heated cylinder-like test section with a circular coolant channel bored through the center and (b) a monoblock that is a square cross-section parallelepiped with a circular drilled flow channel along the channel centerline. The theoretical or ideal cylinder-like test section would be a circular cylinder with half (-90 to 90 deg) of its outside boundary subjected to a uniform heat flux and the remaining half insulated. For the monoblock, a uniform heat flux is applied to one of the outside surfaces, and the remaining surfaces are insulated. The outside diameter of the cylinder-like test section is 30.0 mm, and its length is 200.0 mm. The monoblock square is 30.0 mm long. The inside diameter of the flow channel for both types of test sections is 10.0 mm. Water is the coolant. The inlet water temperature can be set at any level in the range from 26.0 to 130.0 deg. C, and the exit pressure can be set at any level in the range from 0.4 to 4.0 MPa. Thermocouples were placed at 48 locations inside the solid cylinder-like or monoblock test section to obtain 3-D wall temperature variations and related local heat flux. Finally, the mass velocity can be set at any level in the range from 0.4 to 10.0 Mg/m{sup 2}.s for the 10.0-mm-diam channel.

  17. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  18. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. This design precludes nucleate boiling in the flow channels as they are too small to handle vapor flow. Consequently, it was necessary to determine boiling incipience under the operating conditions of the magnet system. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of plus or minus 15 percent

  19. Subcooling for Long Duration In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Johnson, Wesley; Kashani, Ali; Jurns, John; Kutter, Bernard; Kirk, Daniel; Shull, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as hydrogen and oxygen are crucial for exploration of the solar system because of their superior specific impulse capability. Future missions may require vehicles to remain in space for months, necessitating long-term storage of these cryogens. A Thermodynamic Cryogen Subcooler (TCS) can ease the challenge of cryogenic fluid storage by removing energy from the cryogenic propellant through isobaric subcooling of the cryogen below its normal boiling point prior to launch. The isobaric subcooling of the cryogenic propellant will be performed by using a cold pressurant to maintain the tank pressure while the cryogen's temperature is simultaneously reduced using the TCS. The TCS hardware will be integrated into the launch infrastructure and there will be no significant addition to the launched dry mass. Heat leaks into all cryogenic propellant tanks, despite the use of the best insulation systems. However, the large heat capacity available in the subcooled cryogenic propellants allows the energy that leaks into the tank to be absorbed until the cryogen reaches its operational thermodynamic condition. During this period of heating of the subcooled cryogen there will be minimal loss of the propellant due to venting for pressure control. This simple technique can extend the operational life of a spacecraft or an orbital cryogenic depot for months with minimal mass penalty. In fact isobaric subcooling can more than double the in-space hold time of liquid hydrogen compared to normal boiling point hydrogen. A TCS for cryogenic propellants would thus provide an enhanced level of mission flexibility. Advances in the important components of the TCS will be discussed in this paper.

  20. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater 

    E-print Network

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  1. High flux film and transition boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting, the transition region is good, and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  2. Experimental Study of Heat Transfer Induced by a Single Vapor Bubble Growth: Influence of Liquid Subcooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Magali; Reynard, Christelle; Santini, Robert; Tadrist, Lounès

    2004-02-01

    Heat exchanges during boiling are of high interest for cooling systems. The objective of this work is to investigate heat transfer around a single vapor bubble, the influence of the liquid subcooling and of the heat flux applied on the nucleation surface. Experiments on subcooled pool boiling at atmospheric pressure for a single vapor bubble were conducted and the obtained results are presented. The bubble was created on a downward facing heating element. Generation of the single bubble was achieved on an artificial cavity; the indentation was made on a fluxmeter (Captec Entreprise®). FC-72 was used as the test liquid, and its subcooling was maintained to 8 and 14K. Two heating powers were applied on the nucleation surface, and maintained constant during each experiment. Evolutions of bubble size and shape, as a function of wall superheat and liquid subcooling, were followed and studied using a 25 fps video camera. The effect of heating power and subcooling on growth periods were found to be significant. Total heat fluxes during bubble growth were measured using the fluxmeter, for different levels of subcooling and heating powers. Image and data processing has enabled us to show up influence of bubble growth on heat transfer and to determine nucleation periodicity. These preliminary results are discussed.

  3. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Polyaromatic Heterocycles and Related Compounds

    E-print Network

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures The vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of the liqiud phase from T ) 298.15 K to T ) 500 K of a series in the literature was measured on a hydrated form. Vapor pressures and normal boiling temperatures for the liquid

  4. Development of a general purpose subgrid wall boiling model from improved physical understanding for use in computational fluid dynamics

    E-print Network

    Gilman, Lindsey Anne

    2014-01-01

    Advanced modeling capabilities were developed for application to subcooled flow boiling through this work. The target was to introduce, and demonstrate, all necessary mechanisms required to accurately predict the temperature ...

  5. High flux film and transition boiling. Final report, April 1988--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting, the transition region is good, and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  6. Boiling jet impingement cooling of simulated microelectronic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergles, E.; Ma, C.-F.

    Jet impingement cooling is a possible means of accommodating the high heat fluxes which result from testing miroelectronic chips at power levels well above those expected during normal operation. An apparatus is described for study of the heat transfer characteristics of chip-size electrically heated test sections with normally impinging circular submerged mets of saturated or subcooled R-113. Data were obtained for several jet velocities, with the jet directed at two positions on the heated surface. Free convection boiling data were taken for reference. The boiling curve hysteresis with jet boiling is less than with free convection. The fully developed saturated jet boiling data merge into an asymptote that coincides closely with the extrapolation of the pool boiling curve. The burnout heat flux is proportional to the cube root of jet velocity. Heat fluxes up to a million W/sq m were recorded.

  7. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY Yeon SukChoi \\ Steven W. Van to measure the natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen between two vertical plates has been performed power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath

  8. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  9. To boil or not to boil -- A study of bubble embryo dormancy limits

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Dominguez, I.R.; McDonald, T.W.

    1997-12-31

    In the literature, particularly for refrigerants, experimental studies on the superheat required to initiate nucleate boiling tend to be widely scattered, not only among investigators but even for repeated tests by the same investigator. This study provides an explanation of why this occurs and how to avoid such scatter in future tests. With few exceptions, only re-entrant surface cavities are capable of containing dormant vapor bubble embryos. These dormant embryos are essential to initiate nucleate boiling from a cavity. The temperature (wall superheat) range over which an embryo is stable depends upon the cavity shape, neck size, and the fluid surface tension and thermal properties. Above the upper wall-superheat limit, nucleate boiling occurs. Below the lower limit, the embryo will quench (vanish) and cannot be reactivated by increasing the wall superheat. This study makes the following points, for a given cavity shape, fluid, and pressure (1) The larger the cavity neck radius, the smaller the wall-superheat range over which an embryo can exist. (2) Upon cooling any surface, the boiling cavity with the smallest neck radius will be the first to stop boiling but will require the greatest reduction in wall superheat to quench its embryo. (3) Each site that retains a (dormant) vapor embryo will resume boiling at the same wall-superheat at which it ceased boiling. (4) Small cavities can have a shape such that their vapor embryos will always exist, regardless of the wall temperature. Boiling can always be reinitiated from them. (5) Any wall subject to boiling has a memory. The greater the past wall-subcooling, the greater will be the wall-superheat required to initiate boiling. (6) The wall memory can be erased with sufficient wall-superheat and the presence of vapor.

  10. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  11. An experimental research on microbubble emission boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiguo; Zhu, Guangyu; Sun, Licheng; Cao, Xiaxin

    2013-07-01

    In the near future, heat transfer technology with higher performance surely has more application in the field of thermal engineering, such as electrical chip cooling, power regulating system, etc. Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is getting more attentions by many researchers due to its extremely high heat dissipation capacity and potential application in the areas mentioned above. Despite that much work has been done to MEB, heat transfer characteristics and occurrence condition as well as formation mechanism involved MEB are not illustrated clearly by far. An experimental setup is built up to study MEB visually. The heating element is a cone copper block with its upper part of a 10mm diameter cylinder which is insulated from the water by a ceramic thimble. The different liquid subcooling is obtained by a water cooler combined with an electric heater. A high-speed video camera (Photron: Fastcam SA5) is employed for recording the scenario of MEB. Our experimental results are very similar to that from other researchers, and the maximum heat flux is about 9 MW/m2 at 60K subcooling. The presence of noncondensable gas in the vapor film and the liquid subcooling has obviously impact on MEB. Moreover, numerical simulation results show that marangoni convection is perhaps one of the reasons inducing the occurrence of MEB.

  12. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-print Network

    and the NATIONAL PARK SERVICE--OUR VOLCANIC PUBLIC LANDS H The remarkable hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park include roaring fumaroles (steam and volcanic-gas vents), thumping mudpots, boiling pools­17 at Lassen Peak. Hydrothermal Features The areas of hydrothermal activity in Las- sen Volcanic National Park

  13. Multi-mode methanol flow boiling under atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.W.; Liao, Y.C.; Lee, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    This is a continuation work of Lin and Lee (1996 National Heat Transfer Conference, Houston) while reporting the experimental results of multi-mode methanol flow boiling under atmospheric and subatmospheric pressures. An axial (discrete) heat flux distribution with neutral stability at which nucleate and film boiling can coexist steadily is identified under various system pressures and crossflow rates. Below this heat flux distribution, nucleate boiling mode is more stable. Above this distribution, film boiling becomes the more stable mode. An equal-area criterion based on the difference between bottom heat flux and surface boiling heat flux, and the wall superheat temperature relationship is employed for interpreting the experimental data. Effects of system pressure, mass flowrate, liquid subcooling and bottom heat flux on the relative stability of nucleate and film boiling modes are discussed.

  14. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat, III; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent and dramatic events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments from source craters that range from a few meters up to more than 2 km in diameter; associated breccia can be emplaced as much as 3 to 4 km from the largest craters. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam- and liquid-saturated fluids with temperatures at or near the boiling curve underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in confi ning pressure causes fluids to fl ash to steam, resulting in signifi cant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, hydrothermal explosions are a potentially signifi cant hazard for visitors and facilities and can damage or even destroy thermal features. The breccia deposits and associated craters formed from hydrothermal explosions are mapped as mostly Holocene (the Mary Bay deposit is older) units throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and are spatially related to within the 0.64-Ma Yellowstone caldera and along the active Norris-Mammoth tectonic corridor. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 m in diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters have been identifi ed; the scale of the individual associated events dwarfs similar features in geothermal areas elsewhere in the world. Large hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka averaging ??1 every 700 yr; similar events are likely in the future. Our studies of large hydrothermal explosion events indicate: (1) none are directly associated with eruptive volcanic or shallow intrusive events; (2) several historical explosions have been triggered by seismic events; (3) lithic clasts and comingled matrix material that form hydrothermal explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating that explosions occur in areas subjected to intense hydrothermal processes; (4) many lithic clasts contained in explosion breccia deposits preserve evidence of repeated fracturing and vein-fi lling; and (5) areal dimensions of many large hydrothermal explosion craters in Yellowstone are similar to those of its active geyser basins and thermal areas. For Yellowstone, our knowledge of hydrothermal craters and ejecta is generally limited to after the Yellowstone Plateau emerged from beneath a late Pleistocene icecap that was roughly a kilometer thick. Large hydrothermal explosions may have occurred earlier as indicated by multiple episodes of cementation and brecciation commonly observed in hydrothermal ejecta clasts. Critical components for large, explosive hydrothermal systems include a watersaturated system at or near boiling temperatures and an interconnected system of well-developed joints and fractures along which hydrothermal fluids flow. Active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera, active faulting and moderate local seismicity, high heat flow, rapid changes in climate, and regional stresses are factors that have strong infl uences on the type of hydrothermal system developed. Ascending hydrothermal fluids flow along fractures that have developed in response to active caldera deformation and along edges of low-permeability rhyolitic lava flows. Alteration of the area affected, self-sealing leading to development of a caprock for the hydrothermal system, and dissolution of silica-rich rocks are additional factors that may constrain the distribution and development of hydrothermal fields. A partial lowpermeability layer that acts as a cap to the hydrothermal system may produce some over-pressurization, thought to be small in most systems. Any abrupt drop in pressure initiates steam fl ashing and is rapidly transmitted through interconnected fractures that result in a series of multiple large-scale explosions contributing to the excavation of a larger explosion crater. Similarities between the size and dimensions of large hydrothermal explosion craters and thermal fields in Yellowstone may indicate that catastrophic events which result in l

  15. Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Earth and Low Gravity: Boundary Condition and Heater Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2004-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. Recently, time and space resolved heat transfer data were obtained in both earth and low gravity environments using an array of microheaters varying in size between 100 microns to 700 microns. These heaters were operated in both constant temperature as well as constant heat flux mode. Heat transfer under nucleating bubbles in earth gravity were directly measured using a microheater array with 100 m resolution operated in constant temperature mode with low and high subcooled bulk liquid along with images from below and from the side. The individual bubble departure diameter and energy transfer were larger with low subcooling but the departure frequency increased at high subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily due to energy transfer from the superheated liquid layer relatively little was due to wall heat transfer during the bubble growth process. Oscillating bubbles and sliding bubbles were also observed in highly subcooled boiling. Transient conduction and/or microconvection was the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the above cases. A transient conduction model was developed and compared with the experimental data with good agreement. Data was also obtained with the heater array operated in a constant heat flux mode and measuring the temperature distribution across the array during boiling. The instantaneous heat transfer into the substrate was numerically determined and subtracted from the supplied heat to obtain the wall to liquid heat flux.

  16. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  17. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  18. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced gravity can be investigated.

  19. Two-phase structure above hot surfaces in jet impingement boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanic, L.; Auracher, H.; Ziegler, F.

    2009-05-01

    Jet impingement boiling is very efficient in cooling of hot surfaces as a part of the impinging liquid evaporates. Several studies have been carried out to measure and correlate the heat transfer to impinging jets as a function of global parameters such as jet subcooling, jet velocity, nozzle size and distance to the surface, etc. If physically based mechanistic models are to be developed, studies on the fundamentals of two-phase dynamics near the hot surface are required. In the present study the vapor-liquid structures underneath a subcooled (20 K) planar (1 mm × 9 mm) water jet, impinging the heated plate vertically with a velocity of 0.4 m/s, were analyzed by means of a miniaturized optical probe. It has a tip diameter of app. 1.5 ?m and is moved toward the plate by a micrometer device. The temperature controlled experimental technique enabled steady-state experiments in all boiling regimes. The optical probe data provides information about the void fraction, the contact frequencies and the distribution of the vapor and liquid contact times as a function of the distance to the surface. The measured contact frequencies range from 40 Hz at the onset of nucleate boiling to nearly 20,000 Hz at the end of the transition boiling regime. Due to condensation in the subcooled jet vapor disappears at a distance to the surface of app. 1.2 mm in nucleate boiling. This vapor layer becomes smaller with increasing wall superheat. In film boiling a vapor film thickness of 8 ± 2 ?m was found.

  20. The Effect of vapor subcooling on film condensation of metals

    E-print Network

    Fedorovich, Eugene D.

    1968-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the interfacial "vapor-condensate" temperature distribution, which includes the effect of subcooling (supersaturation) in the vapor. Experimental data from previous investigators for ...

  1. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Smith, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    The use of flow boiling for thermal energy transport is intended to provide an alternative for accommodating higher heat fluxes in commercial space systems. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls, spiral fins, or both spiral fins and a twisted tape; (2) examine the effects of channel diameter and subcooling; and (3) develop an improved reduction analysis and/or suggest possible heat transfer correlation of the present data. Freon-11 is the working fluid. Two-dimensional (circumferential and axial) wall temperature distributions were measured for coolant channels with the above noted internal geometries. The flow regimes which are being studied are: (1) single phase; (2) subcooled flow boiling; and (3) stratified flow boiling. The inside diameter of all test sections is near 1.0 cm. Cicumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients at several axial locations were obtained for selected coolant channels for a mass velocity of 210 kg/sq m s, an exit pressure of 0.19 MPa (absolute), and an inlet subcooling of 20.8 C. Overall (averaged over the entire channel) heat transfer coefficients were compared for the above channel geometries. This comparison showed that the channel with large pitch spiral fins had higher heat transfer coefficients at all power levels.

  2. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    For the past decade, efforts have been growing in the development of high heat flux (HHF) components for many applications, including fusion and fission reactor components, advanced electronic components, synchrotrons and optical components, and other advanced HHF engineering applications. From a thermal prospective, work in the fusion reactor development arena has been underway in a number of areas including: (1) Plasma thermal, and electro-magnetics, and particle transport, (2) Fusion material, rheology, development, and expansion and selection; (3) High heat flux removal; and (4) Energy production and efficiency.

  3. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The Thermal Science Research Center (TSRC) at Prairie View A&M University is involved in an international fusion reactor technology development program aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. This report highlights: (1) Recent accomplishments and pinpoints thermal hydraulic problem areas of immediate concern to the development of plasma-facing components, and (2) Next generation thermal hydraulic problems which must be addressed to insure safety and reliability in component operation. More specifically, the near-term thermal hydraulic problem entails: (1) generating an appropriate data base to insure the development of single-side heat flux correlations, and (2) evaluating previously developed single-side/uniform heated transformations and correlations to determine which can be used to relate the vast two-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux (CHF) technical literature for uniformly heated flow channels to single-side heated channels.

  4. Stability of forced-convection subcooled boiling in steady-state and transient annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, V.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1993-06-01

    A semi-analytical model developed by Lee and Bankoff for OFI in round tubes is extended to annular or parallel-plate flows with unequal heat fluxes, and shown to compare well with data by Dougherty, et al. and by Whittle and Forgan. The model is a better fit in the high Peclet number range than the Saha-Zuber model, and is simple to use.

  5. Experimental Two-Phase Flow Characterization of Subcooled Boiling in a Rectangular Channel 

    E-print Network

    Estrada Perez, Carlos E.

    2010-01-16

    channel with one heated wall. Measurements were performed at liquid Reynolds numbers of 3309, 9929 and 16549 over a wall heat flux range of 0.0 to 64.0 kW=m2. From the PTV measurements, liquid two dimensional turbulence statistics are available, such as...

  6. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomena.

  7. A study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of activities conducted over the period 1/2/85-12/31/90, in which the study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity was initiated. The study seeks to improve the understanding of the basic processes that constitute forced convection boiling by removing the buoyancy effects which may mask other phenomena. Specific objectives may also be expressed in terms of the following questions: (1) what effects, if any, will the removal of body forces to the lowest possible levels have on the forced convection boiling heat transfer processes in well-defined and meaningful circumstances? (this includes those effects and processes associated with the nucleation or onset of boiling during the transient increase in heater surface temperature, as well as the heat transfer and vapor bubble behaviors with established or steady-state conditions); and (2) if such effects are present, what are the boundaries of the relevant parameters such as heat flux, heater surface superheat, fluid velocity, bulk subcooling, and geometric/orientation relationships within which such effects will be produced?

  8. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  9. New methods of subcooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weremczuk, Jerzy; Jachowicz, Ryszard

    2001-08-01

    Two new methods of sub-cooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers are presented in this paper. The first one- impedance method use a new semiconductor mirror in which the dew point detector, the thermometer and the heaters were integrated all together. The second one an optical method based on a multi-section optical detector is discussed in the report. Experimental results of both methods are shown. New types of dew pont hydrometers of ability to recognized sub-cooled water were proposed.

  10. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  11. Model for boiling and dryout in particle beds. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    Over the last ten years experiments and modeling of dryout in particle beds have produced over fifty papers. Considering only volume-heated beds, over 250 dryout measurements have been made, and are listed in this work. In addition, fifteen models to predict dryout have been produced and are discussed. A model is developed in this report for one-dimensional boiling and dryout in a porous medium. It is based on conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. The initial coupled differential equations are reduced to a single first-order differential equation with an algebraic equation for the upper boundary condition. The model includes the effects of both laminar and turbulent flow, two-phase friction, and capillary force. The boundary condition at the bed bottom includes the possibility of inflowing liquid and either an adiabatic or a bottom-cooled support structure. The top of the bed may be either channeled or subcooled. In the first case the channel length and the saturation at the base of the channels are predicted. In the latter case, a criterion for penetration of the subcooled zone by channels is obtained.

  12. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment,' flown on the Space Transportation System, STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kW/sq m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10-min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kW/sq m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  13. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment', flown on the Space Transportation System STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kw/so m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10 min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kw/so m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  14. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  15. Sand boils without earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Clark, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentary deformation caused by liquefaction has become a popular means for inferring prehistoric strong earthquakes. This report describes a new mechanism for generating such features in the absence of earthquakes. Sand boils and a 180-m-long sand dike formed in Fremont Valley, California, when sediment-laden surface runoff was intercepted along the upslope part of a 500-m-long preexisting ground crack, flowed subhorizonally in the crack, and then flowed upward in the downslope part of the crack where it discharged as sand boils on the land surface. If the sand boils and their feeder dike were stratigraphically preserved, they could be misinterpreted as evidence for earthquake-induced liquefaction. -Authors

  16. Hydrothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; von Damm, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    What is Hydrothermal Circulation?Hydrothermal circulation occurs when seawater percolates downward through fractured ocean crust along the volcanic mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. The seawater is first heated and then undergoes chemical modification through reaction with the host rock as it continues downward, reaching maximum temperatures that can exceed 400 °C. At these temperatures the fluids become extremely buoyant and rise rapidly back to the seafloor where they are expelled into the overlying water column. Seafloor hydrothermal circulation plays a significant role in the cycling of energy and mass between the solid earth and the oceans; the first identification of submarine hydrothermal venting and their accompanying chemosynthetically based communities in the late 1970s remains one of the most exciting discoveries in modern science. The existence of some form of hydrothermal circulation had been predicted almost as soon as the significance of ridges themselves was first recognized, with the emergence of plate tectonic theory. Magma wells up from the Earth's interior along "spreading centers" or "MORs" to produce fresh ocean crust at a rate of ˜20 km3 yr-1, forming new seafloor at a rate of ˜3.3 km2 yr-1 (Parsons, 1981; White et al., 1992). The young oceanic lithosphere formed in this way cools as it moves away from the ridge crest. Although much of this cooling occurs by upward conduction of heat through the lithosphere, early heat-flow studies quickly established that a significant proportion of the total heat flux must also occur via some additional convective process (Figure 1), i.e., through circulation of cold seawater within the upper ocean crust (Anderson and Silbeck, 1981). (2K)Figure 1. Oceanic heat flow versus age of ocean crust. Data from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans, averaged over 2 Ma intervals (circles) depart from the theoretical cooling curve (solid line) indicating convective cooling of young ocean crust by circulating seawater (after C. A. Stein and S. Stein, 1994). The first geochemical evidence for the existence of hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor came in the mid-1960s when investigations in the Red Sea revealed deep basins filled with hot, salty water (40-60 °C) and underlain by thick layers of metal-rich sediment (Degens and Ross, 1969). Because the Red Sea represents a young, rifting, ocean basin it was speculated that the phenomena observed there might also prevail along other young MOR spreading centers. An analysis of core-top sediments from throughout the world's oceans ( Figure 2) revealed that such metalliferous sediments did, indeed, appear to be concentrated along the newly recognized global ridge crest (Boström et al., 1969). Another early indication of hydrothermal activity came from the detection of plumes of excess 3He in the Pacific Ocean Basin (Clarke et al., 1969) - notably the >2,000 km wide section in the South Pacific ( Lupton and Craig, 1981) - because 3He present in the deep ocean could only be sourced through some form of active degassing of the Earth's interior, at the seafloor. (62K)Figure 2. Global map of the (Al+Fe+Mn):Al ratio for surficial marine sediments. Highest ratios mimic the trend of the global MOR axis (after Boström et al., 1969). One area where early heat-flow studies suggested hydrothermal activity was likely to occur was along the Galapagos Spreading Center in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean (Anderson and Hobart, 1976). In 1977, scientists diving at this location found hydrothermal fluids discharging chemically altered seawater from young volcanic seafloor at elevated temperatures up to 17 °C ( Edmond et al., 1979). Two years later, the first high-temperature (380±30 °C) vent fluids were found at 21° N on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) (Spiess et al., 1980) - with fluid compositions remarkably close to those predicted from the lower-temperature Galapagos findings ( Edmond et al., 1979). Since that time, hydrothermal activity has been found at more than 40 locations throughout the Pacific, North Atlanti

  17. Return to nucleate boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a collection of TMIN (temperature of return to nucleate boiling) correlations, evaluates them under several conditions, and compares them with a wide range of data. Purpose is to obtain the best one for use in a water reactor safety computer simulator known as TRAC-B. Return to nucleate boiling can occur in a reactor accident at either high or low pressure and flow rates. Most of the correlations yield unrealistic results under some conditions. A new correlation is proposed which overcomes many of the deficiencies.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  19. The effect of surface motion on forced convection film boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbrunnen, D.A.; Viskanta, R.; Incropera, F.P. )

    1989-08-01

    The growth in demand for high-quality metallic alloys has placed greater emphasis on the predictability of cooling methods used in manufacturing processes. Several methods involve forced convection film boiling, which can occur on metallic strips or plates cooled by water jet impingement or on strips inside cooling jackets of continuous annealing processes. Since surface temperatures are typically well above the boiling point of water, a substantial portion of the surface area can involve film boiling. The strip or plate speed often exceeds the water velocities and strongly influences boundary layer development in the vapor and liquid. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the effect of plate motion on heat transfer in the film boiling regime. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy have been solved by the integral method for film boiling in forced convection boundary layer flow on a flat isothermal plate in motion parallel to the flow direction. Unlike previous studies, which have shown that heat transfer is chiefly governed by the plate and subcooled liquid temperatures, heat transfer is shown to also depend on the plate velocity. For large velocities, the importance of radiation heat transfer across the vapor layer is reduced. However, when the velocities of the plate and liquid are oppositely directed and of nearly equal magnitude, radiation across the vapor layer can become significant, even at low plate temperatures.

  20. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  1. Performance of extended surface from a cryocooler for subcooling liquid nitrogen by natural convection

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    convection Yeon Suk Choi a,b , Ho-Myung Chang a,*, Steven W. Van Sciver b a Department of Mechanical May 2005; accepted 25 May 2005 Abstract Natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen under that subcooled liquid may generate cellular flow by natural convection. The temperature distributions

  2. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cryogenic system with neon turbo-refrigerator for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hirokawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Hayashi, H.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a prototype sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The system consists of a neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator with a LN sub-cooler and LN circulation pump unit. The neon refrigerator has more than 2 kW cooling power at 65 K. The LN sub-cooler is a plate-fin type heat exchanger and is installed in a refrigerator cold box. In order to carry out the system performance tests, a dummy cryostat having an electric heater was set instead of a HTS power equipment. Sub-cooled LN is delivered into the sub-cooler by the LN circulation pump and cooled within it. After the sub-cooler, sub-cooled LN goes out from the cold box to the dummy cryostat, and comes back to the pump unit. The system can control an outlet sub-cooled LN temperature by adjusting refrigerator cooling power. The refrigerator cooling power is automatically controlled by the turbo-compressor rotational speed. In the performance tests, we increased an electric heater power from 200 W to 1300 W abruptly. We confirmed the temperature fluctuation was about ±1 K. We show the cryogenic system details and performance test results in this paper.

  3. Critical discharge of initially subcooled water through slits. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, C N; Schrock, V E

    1983-09-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation into the critical flow of initially subcooled water through rectangular slits. The study of such flows is relevant to the prediction of leak flow rates from cracks in piping, or pressure vessels, which contain sufficient enthalpy that vaporization will occur if they are allowed to expand to the ambient pressure. Two new analytical models, which allow for the generation of a metastable liquid phase, are developed. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of both these new models and with a Fanno Homogeneous Equilibrium Model.

  4. Design inputs document: Boiling behavior during flow instability

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The coolant flow in a nuclear reactor core under normal operating conditions is kept as a subcooled liquid. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout the multiple flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. If the coolant flow is reduced, the flow through individual channels will also decrease. A decrease in coolant flow will result in higher coolant temperatures if the heat flux is not reduced. When flow is significantly decreased, localized boiling may occur. This localized boiling can restrict coolant flow and the ability to transfer heat out of the reactor system. The maximum operating power for the reactor may be limited by how the coolant system reacts to a flow instability. One of the methods to assure safe operation during a reducing flow instability, is to operate at a power level below that necessary to initiate a flow excursion. Several correlations have been used to predict the conditions which precede a flow excursion. These correlations rely on the steady state behavior of the coolant and are based on steady state testing. This task will evaluate if there are any deviations between the actual transient flow excursion behavior and the flow excursion behavior based on steady state correlations (ONB, OSV, and CHF). Correlations will be developed which will allow a comparison between the time to excursive behavior predicted using steady state techniques and the actual time to excursive behavior.

  5. Design inputs document: Boiling behavior during flow instability

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The coolant flow in a nuclear reactor core under normal operating conditions is kept as a subcooled liquid. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout the multiple flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. If the coolant flow is reduced, the flow through individual channels will also decrease. A decrease in coolant flow will result in higher coolant temperatures if the heat flux is not reduced. When flow is significantly decreased, localized boiling may occur. This localized boiling can restrict coolant flow and the ability to transfer heat out of the reactor system. The maximum operating power for the reactor may be limited by how the coolant system reacts to a flow instability. One of the methods to assure safe operation during a reducing flow instability, is to operate at a power level below that necessary to initiate a flow excursion. Several correlations have been used to predict the conditions which precede a flow excursion. These correlations rely on the steady state behavior of the coolant and are based on steady state testing. This task will evaluate if there are any deviations between the actual transient flow excursion behavior and the flow excursion behavior based on steady state correlations (ONB, OSV, and CHF). Correlations will be developed which will allow a comparison between the time to excursive behavior predicted using steady state techniques and the actual time to excursive behavior.

  6. Subcooled choked flow through steam generator tube cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Brian J.

    The work presented here describes an experimental investigation into the choked flow of initially subcooled water through simulated steam generator tube cracks at pressures up to 6.9 MPa. The study of such flow is relevant to the prediction of leak flow rates from a nuclear reactor primary side to secondary side through cracks in steam generator tubes. An experimental approach to measuring such flow is de- scribed. Experimental results from data found in literature as well as the data collected in this work are compared with predictions from presented models as well as predictions from the thermal-hydraulic system code RELAP5. It is found that the homogeneous equilibrium model underpredicts choked flow rates of subcooled water through slits and artificial steam generator tube cracks. Additional modeling of thermal non-equilibrium improves the predictibility of choking mass flux for homogeneous models, however they fail to account for the characteristics of the two-phase pressure drop. An integral modeling approach is enhanced using a correlation developed from the data herein. Also, an assessment of the thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5 is performed and it’s applicability to predict choking flow rates through steam generator tube cracks is addressed. This assessment determined that the Henry & Fauske model, as coded in RELAP5, is best suited for modeling choked flow through steam generator tube cracks. Finally, an approach to applying choked flow data that is not at the same thermo-dynamic conditions as a prototype is developed.

  7. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  8. A study of electrowetting-assisted boiling

    E-print Network

    Bralower, Harrison L. (Harrison Louis)

    2011-01-01

    The classical theory of boiling heat transfer based on bubble dynamics is explained and includes a full derivation of the Rohsenow boiling correlation. An alternative, more accurate correlation for determining boiling heat ...

  9. Boiling liquid cauldron status report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1980-12-28

    The progress made over the past year in assessing the feasibility of the high-temperature, boiling cauldron blanket concept for the tanden mirror reactor is reviewed. The status of the proposed experiments and recently revised estimates of the vapor void fraction in the boiling pool are discussed.

  10. Liquid Acquisition Device Testing with Sub-Cooled Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; McQuillen, John B.

    2008-01-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth s gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMD) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. Previous experimental test programs conducted at NASA have collected LAD data for a number of cryogenic fluids, including: liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid hydrogen (LH2), and liquid methane (LCH4). The present work reports on additional testing with sub-cooled LOX as part of NASA s continuing cryogenic LAD development program. Test results extend the range of LOX fluid conditions examined, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  11. Heat exchanger for subcooling liquid nitrogen with a regenerative cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Ryu, Seung Hoon

    2011-03-01

    A heat exchanger for continuously subcooling liquid nitrogen in contact with a regenerative cryocooler is analytically investigated as a next step of our recent experimental works. Since the coldhead of regenerative cryocooler has a limited surface area, a cylindrical copper cup is attached as extended surface, and a tube for liquid flow is spirally wound and brazed on the exterior surface of cylinder. Different sizes of heat exchangers are fabricated and tested with a single-stage GM cooler to cool liquid nitrogen from 78 K to 66 K. Analytical model is developed for the heat exchanger effectiveness and thermal resistance, and the results are compared with the experimental data. It is concluded that there exists an optimum for the height and diameter of cylindrical heat exchanger to maximize the cooling rate with a given unit of cryocooler.

  12. Boil-off experiments with the EIR-NEPTUN Facility: Analysis and code assessment overview report

    SciTech Connect

    Aksan, S.N.; Stierli, F.; Analytis, G.T.

    1992-03-01

    The NEPTUN data discussed in this report are from core uncovery (boil-off) experiments designed to investigate the mixture level decrease and the heat up of the fuel rod simulators above the mixture level for conditions simulating core boil-off for a nuclear reactor under small break loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The first series of experiments performed in the NEPTUN test facility consisted of ten boil-off (uncovery) and one adiabatic heat-up tests. In these tests three parameters were varied: rod power, system pressure and initial coolant subcooling. The NEPTUN experiments showed that the external surface thermocouples do not cause a significant cooling influence in the rods to which they are attached under boil-off conditions. The reflooding tests performed later on indicated that the external surface thermocouples have some effect during reflooding for NEPTUN electrically heated rod bundle. Peak cladding temperatures are reduced by about 30--40C and quench times occur 20--70 seconds earlier than rods with embedded thermocouples. Additionally, the external surface-thermocouples give readings up to 20 K lower than those obtained with internal surface thermocouples (in the absence of external thermocouples) in the peak cladding temperature zone. Some of the boil-off data obtained from the NEPTUN test facility are used for the assessment of the thermal-hydraulic transient computer codes. These calculations were performed extensively using the frozen version of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 (version 22). A limited number of assessment calculations were done with RELAP5/MOD2 (version 36.02). In this report the main results and conclusions of these calculations are presented with the identification of problem areas in relation to models relevant to boil-off phenomena. On the basis of further analysis and calculations done, changing some of the models such as the bubbly/slug flow interfacial friction correlation which eliminate some of the problems are recommended.

  13. Design and test of a compact optics system for the pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Laubenthal, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The experiment described seeks to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. The vehicle for accomplishing this is an investigation, including tests to be conducted in microgravity and coupled with appropriate analyses, of the heat transfer and vapor bubble dynamics associated with nucleation, bubble growth/collapse and subsequent motion, considering the interrelations between buoyancy, momentum and surface tension which will govern the motion of the vapor and surrounding liquid, as a function of the heating rate at the heat transfer surface and the temperature level and distribution in the bulk liquid. The experiment is designed to be contained within the confines of a Get-Away-Special Canister (GAS Can) installed in the bay of the space shuttle. When the shuttle reaches orbit, the experiment will be turned on and testing will proceed automatically. In the proposed Pool Boiling Experiment a pool of liquid, initially at a precisely defined pressure and temperature, will be subjected to a step imposed heat flux from a semitransparent thin-film heater forming part of one wall of the container such that boiling is initiated and maintained for a defined period of time at a constant pressure level. Transient measurements of the heater surface and fluid temperatures near the surface will be made, noting especially the conditions at the onset of boiling, along with motion photography of the boiling process in two simultaneous views, from beneath the heating surface and from the side. The conduct of the experiment and the data acquisition will be completely automated and self-contained. For the initial flight, a total of nine tests are proposed, with three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. The design process used in the development and check-out of the compact photographic/optics system for the Pool Boiling Experiment is documented.

  14. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  15. Using noble gases measured in spring discharge to trace hydrothermal processes in the Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, W.P.; Susong, D.D.; Solomon, D.K.; Heasler, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations in springs are used to investigate boiling of hydrothermal water and mixing of hydrothermal and shallow cool water in the Norris Geyser Basin area. Noble gas concentrations in water are modeled for single stage and continuous steam removal. Limitations on boiling using noble gas concentrations are then used to estimate the isotopic effect of boiling on hydrothermal water, allowing the isotopic composition of the parent hydrothermal water to be determined from that measured in spring. In neutral chloride springs of the Norris Geyser Basin, steam loss since the last addition of noble gas charged water is less than 30% of the total hydrothermal discharge, which results in an isotopic shift due to boiling of ?? 2.5% ??D. Noble gas concentrations in water rapidly and predictably change in dual phase systems, making them invaluable tracers of gas-liquid interaction in hydrothermal systems. By combining traditional tracers of hydrothermal flow such as deuterium with dissolved noble gas measurements, more complex hydrothermal processes can be interpreted. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Super eruption environments make for "super" hydrothermal explosions: Extreme hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. P.; Pierce, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments over areas that range from a few meters in diameter up to several kilometers in diameter. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam-saturated fluids underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in pressure causes the fluids to flash to steam resulting in significant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 meters in diameter) hydrothermal explosions have been identified, and the scale of the individual events dwarfs similar features in other hydrothermal and geothermal areas of the world. Large explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka at an interval of ~1 per every 700 yrs and similar events are likely to occur in the future. Our studies of hydrothermal explosive events indicate: 1) none are associated with magmatic or volcanic events; 2) several have been triggered by seismic events coupled with other processes; 3) lithic clasts and matrix from explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating long-term, extensive hydrothermal mineralization in areas that were incorporated into the explosion deposit; 4) many lithic clasts in explosion breccia deposits contain evidence of repeated fracturing and cementation; and 4) dimensions of many documented large hydrothermal explosion craters in Yellowstone are similar to the dimensions of currently active geyser basins or thermal areas in Yellowstone. The vast majority of active thermal areas in Yellowstone are characterized by 1) high-temperature hot-water systems in areas of high heat-flow, 2) extensive systems of hot springs, fumaroles, geysers, sinter terraces, mud pots, and, in places, small hydrothermal explosion craters, 3) widespread alteration of host rocks, 4) large areal dimensions (>several 100 m) and 5) intermittent but long-lived activity (40,000 to 300,000 years). Critical requirements for large hydrothermal explosions are an interconnected system of well-developed joints and fractures along which hydrothermal fluids flow and a water-saturated system close to or at boiling temperatures. Important factors are the active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera, active faults and moderate seismicity, high heat flow, climate changes, and regional stresses. Ascending fluids flow along fractures that develop in response to active deformation of the Yellowstone caldera and along edges of impermeable rhyolitic lava flows. Alteration, self sealing, and dissolution further constrain the distribution and development of hydrothermal fields. A partial impermeable cap can contribute to the final over-pressurization. An abrupt drop in pressure initiates steam-flashing and is instantly transmitted through interconnected fractures, resulting in a series of multiple large-scale explosions and excavation of an explosion crater. Strong similarities between large hydrothermal explosion craters and thermal fields in Yellowstone may indicate that catastrophic failures leading to large hydrothermal explosions represent a unique phase in the life cycle of a geyser basin.

  17. Subcooled-Water Nonstickiness of Condensate Microdrop Self-Propelling Nanosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Luo, Yuting; Zhu, Jie; Li, Hong; Gao, Xuefeng

    2015-12-01

    We report perfect humidity-tolerant subcooled-water nonstickiness on condensate microdrop self-propelling (CMDSP) surfaces. As exemplified by a CMDSP nanoneedle surface, we find that impinged subcooled drops can instantly rebound and simultaneously take away surface condensate. Remarkably, continuously poured subcooled water can also shed off on the nanosample surface. In sharp contrast, they instantly freeze on the contrast flat hydrophobic surface. Such a superior performance may be ascribed to nanostructure-induced extremely low solid-liquid interface adhesion and prevention of phase transition from the liquid subcooled water to the solid ice. These findings help in the development of low-adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces suitable for a cold and humid environment. PMID:26584134

  18. An experimental investigation of critical heat flux in subcooled internal flow 

    E-print Network

    Shatto, Donald Patrick

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the critical heat flux for subcooled refrigerant-11 and refrigerant-113 flowing upward in a vertical cylindrical tube. Critical heat flux (CHF) values are ...

  19. Subcooling Effects for Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube 

    E-print Network

    Cullum, Wes

    2012-10-19

    A counter current annular flow experiment was performed to determine flooding conditions for varying degrees of subcooling using steam and water. The findings can be used in reactor safety codes to provide an improved model of flooding during...

  20. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  1. Multi-Scale Experiments in Turbulent Subcooled Boiling Flow Through a Square Channel with a Single Heated Wall 

    E-print Network

    Estrada Perez, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-12-12

    of 186.8 µm/pixel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 7.4 Front view shadowgraphy experimental image from camera 3 at a resolution of 32.8 µm/pixel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 7.5 Side view shadowgraphy experimental... image from camera 1 at a reso- lution of 17.5 µm/pixel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 7.6 Side view shadowgraphy experimental image from camera 1 at a reso- lution of 4.8 µm/pixel...

  2. Scaling laws and design aspects of a natural-circulation-cooled simulated boiling water reactor fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, R. Van De; Hagen, T.H.J.J. Van Der . Interfaculty Reactor Inst.); Mudde, R.F. . Kramers Lab. voor Fysische Technologie)

    1994-02-01

    In order to study the thermohydraulic behavior of a natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly, such as void drift, flow pattern distribution, and stability, a scaled loop geometry is designed. For modeling the steam/water flow in a BWR fuel assembly, scaling criteria are derived using the one-dimensional drift-flux model. Thermal equilibrium and subcooled boiling conditions are treated separately, resulting in one overall set of criteria. Scaling on all flow regimes that can be present in a normal fuel assembly leads to fixing both the assembly mass flux and the geometric dimensions. When Freon-12 is used as a modeling fluid, model assembly dimensions must be 0.46 of the prototype. Total power consumption must be reduced by a factor 50. To sustain cooling by natural circulation, a modeled chimney and downcomer are included.

  3. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2015-06-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  4. High flux film and transition boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report is a bench-scale experiment on transition boiling. The author gives a detailed description on experimental apparatus and conditions. The visual observed boiling phenomena; nucleate boiling and film boiling, and the effect of heat transfer are also elucidated. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Hydrothermal processes at Mount Rainier, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Field studies and thermal-infrared mapping at Mount Rainier indicate areas of active hydrothermal alteration where excess surface heat flux is about 9 megawatts. Three representative settings include: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82/sup 0/C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit; (2) A small area (less than 500 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60/sup 0/C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver, and other probably similar areas at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls; (3) Sulfate and carbon dioxide enriched thermal springs at 9-24/sup 0/C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers where maximum spring temperatures are 19-25/sup 0/C, respectively, and where extensive travertine deposits have developed. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration products indicate that a narrow, central hydrothermal system exists within Mount Rainier forming steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 kilometers of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is limited in that only sparse, neutral sulfate-enriched thermal water issues from the lower flank of the cone. Simulations of geochemical mass transfer suggest that the thermal springs may be derived from an acid sulfate-chloride parent fluid which has been neutralized by reaction with andesite and highly diluted with shallow ground water.

  6. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Ways in which heat is useful in organic synthesis experiments are described, and experiments on the hydrothermal destruction and synthesis of organic compounds are discussed. It is pointed out that, if heat can overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of metastable states from reduced or oxidized starting materials, abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is a distinct possibility. However, carefully controlled experiments which replicate the descriptive variables of natural hydrothermal systems have not yet been conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis of hydrothermal organic systems.

  7. The Influence of the Heating Condition on the Void Fraction in a Boiling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umekawa, H.; Nakamura, S.; Fujiyoshi, S.; Ami, T.; Ozawa, M.; Saito, Y.; Ito, D.

    The void fraction profile in a boiling channel is essential in analyzing convective flow boiling, where several investigations have been conducted. But due to the difficulty in the treatment of the non-thermodynamic equilibrium phenomena under subcooled conditions, the issues in comprehensive void fraction profile has not been solved, yet. To improve the understanding of these phenomena, detailed measurement results are required. In this investigation, by using five kinds of test sections, i.e. I.D.=3 mm L=400 mm, I.D.=5 mm L=200, 400, 1000 mm, and I.D.=10 mm L=400 mm, the void fraction was measured quantitatively over the whole length. For the measurements, thermal neutron radiography at the B-4 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor was used. This facility is designed for the visualization of forced convective flow boiling in vertical tubes. To introduce the performance of this facility, this paper presents the measurement results of void fraction and the estimation results briefly.

  8. Forced Convection Boiling and Critical Heat Flux of Ethanol in Electrically Heated Tube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Linne, Diane L.; Rousar, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Electrically heated tube tests were conducted to characterize the critical heat flux (transition from nucleate to film boiling) of subcritical ethanol flowing at conditions relevant to the design of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chamber. The coolant was SDA-3C alcohol (95% ethyl alcohol, 5% isopropyl alcohol by weight), and tests were conducted over the following ranges of conditions: pressure from 144 to 703 psia, flow velocities from 9.7 to 77 ft/s, coolant subcooling from 33 to 362 F, and critical heat fluxes up to 8.7 BTU/in(exp 2)/sec. For the data taken near 200 psia, critical heat flux was correlated as a function of the product of velocity and fluid subcooling to within +/- 20%. For data taken at higher pressures, an additional pressure term is needed to correlate the critical heat flux. It was also shown that at the higher test pressures and/or flow rates, exceeding the critical heat flux did not result in wall burnout. This result may significantly increase the engine heat flux design envelope for higher pressure conditions.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulations of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2003-11-01

    For flow problem of practical interest it is frequently necessary to account for phase change between liquid and vapor. Boiling, in particular, is one of the most efficient ways of removing heat from a solid surface. It is therefore commonly used in energy generation and refrigeration. The large volume change and the high temperatures involved can make the consequences of design or operational errors catastrophic and accurate predictions are highly desirable. For numerical simulations of boiling it is necessary to solve the energy equation, in addition to conservation equations for mass and momentum, and to account for the release/absorption of latent heat at the phase boundary. We describe a numerical method for direct numerical simulations of boiling and show results from simulations of explosive boiling of a vapor bubble in an initially superheated liquids. As the vapor bubble grows, its surface becomes unstable, developing wrinkles that increase the surface area significantly. The increased surface area does, however, have relatively little impact on the growth rate for the parameters examined due to a relatively thick thermal boundary layer. We have also examined film boiling and find relatively good agreement with experimental correlations. Research supported by NASA.

  10. Characteristics of Transient Boiling Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Monde, Masanori; Mitsutake, Y.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, one dimensional inverse heat conduction solution is used for a measurement of pool boiling curve. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure for copper, brass, carbon steel and gold. Boiling curves, including unsteady transition boiling region, are found can be traced fairly well from a simple experiment system by solving inverse heat conduction solution. Boiling curves for steady heating and transient heating, for heating process and cooling process are compared. Surface behavior around CHF point, transition boiling and film-boiling regions are observed by using a high-speed camera. The results show the practicability of the inverse heat conduction solution in tracing boiling curve and thereby supply us a new way in boiling heat transfer research. (authors)

  11. Transition from Pool to Flow Boiling: The Effect of Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.

    2004-01-01

    Applications of boiling heat transfer in space can be found in the areas of thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life support fluids, and for cooling of electronic packages for power systems associated with various instrumentation and control systems. Recent interest in exploration of Mars and other planets, and the concepts of in-situ resource utiliLation on Mars highlights the need to understand the effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at gravity levels varying from 1>= g/g(sub e) >=10(exp -6). The objective of the proposed work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under low and micro-gravity conditions when the velocity of the imposed flow is small. For pool boiling, the effect of reduced gravity is to stretch both the length scale as well as the time scale for the boiling process. At high flow velocities, the inertia of the liquid determines the time and the length scales and as such the gravitational acceleration plays little role. However, at low velocities and at low gravity levels both liquid inertia and buoyancy are of equal importance. At present, we have little understanding of the interacting roles of gravity and liquid inertia on the nucleate boiling process. Little data that has been reported in the literature does not have much practical value in that it can not serve as a basis for design of heat exchange components to be used in space. Both experimental and complete numerical simulations of the low velocity, low-gravity nucleate boiling process were carried out. A building block type of approach was used in that first the growth and detachment process of a single bubble and flow and heat transfer associated with the sliding motion of the bubble over the heater surface after detachment was studied. Liquid subcooling and flow velocity were varied parametrically. The experiments were conducted at 1 g(sub e), while varying the orientation of surface with respect to the gravity vector. In the laboratory experiments, holographic interferometry was used to obtain data on velocity and temperature fields associated with a bubble prior to, and after detachment and during sliding motion. A test rig for conducting experiments in the KC-135 was developed, but experiments could not be conducted due to the unavailability of the aircraft prior to completion of the project. Numerical simulations modeling the micro and macro regions of the bubble were carried out in three dimensions. The results of the experiments were used to validate analytical/numerical models.

  12. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  13. Variability in the microbial communities and hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the newly discovered Mariner hydrothermal field, southern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Lupton, John; Suzuki, Ryohei; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Gamo, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-06-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field on the Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau Basin was explored and characterized with geochemical and microbiological analyses. The hydrothermal fluid discharging from the most vigorous vent (Snow Chimney, maximum discharge temperature 365°C) was boiling at the seafloor at a depth of 1908 m, and two distinct end-member hydrothermal fluids were identified. The fluid chemistry of the typical Cl-enriched and Cl-depleted hydrothermal fluids was analyzed, as was the mineralogy of the host chimney structures. The variability in the fluid chemistry was potentially controlled by the subseafloor phase-separation (vapor loss process) and the microbial community activities. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were investigated using culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities on the chimney surfaces differed among three chimneys. Cultivation analysis demonstrated significant variation in the culturability of various microbial components among the chimneys, particularly of thermophilic H2-oxidizing (and S-oxidizing) chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella. The physical and chemical environments of chimney surface habitats are still unresolved and do not directly extrapolate the environments of possible subseafloor habitats. However, the variability in microbial community found in the chimneys also provides an insight into the different biogeochemical interactions potentially affected by the phase separation of the hydrothermal fluids in the subseafloor hydrothermal habitats. In addition, comparison with other deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed that the Mariner field microbial communities have unusual characteristics.

  14. Cryogenic cooling system of HTS transformers by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    Cryogenic cooling system of HTS transformers by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen Ho-793, South Korea Abstract Heat transfer analysis on a newly proposed cryogenic cooling system is performed, and over-load operation. One of the key techniques to realize these advantages in practice is the cryogenic

  15. Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-print Network

    Chickos, James S.

    Hypothetical Thermodynamic Properties. Subcooled Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures and liquid vapor pressures from T ) 298.15 K to T ) 510 K of a series of polyaromatic hydrocarbons have been of a thermochemical cycle, and agreement is within the combined experimental uncertainties. Vapor pressures

  16. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Jacqmin, David

    1999-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work is limited to very simple models. In this project, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. The proposed work is based on previously funded NASA work that allowed us to develop a two-dimensional numerical method for boiling flows and to demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate film boiling. While numerical simulations of multi-fluid flows have been advanced in a major way during the last five years, or so, similar capability for flows with phase change are still in their infancy. Although the feasibility of the proposed approach has been demonstrated, it has yet to be extended and applied to fully three-dimensional simulations. Here, a fully three-dimensional, parallel, grid adaptive code will be developed. The numerical method will be used to study nucleate boiling in microgravity, with particular emphasis on two aspects of the problem: 1) Examination of the growth of bubbles at a wall nucleation site and the instabilities of rapidly growing bubbles. Particular emphasis will be put on accurately capturing the thin wall layer left behind as a bubble expands along a wall, on computing instabilities on bubble surfaces as bubbles grow, and on quantifying the effects of both these phenomena on heat transfer; and 2) Examination of the effect of shear flow on bubble growth and heat transfer.

  17. The hydrothermal system of the Calabozos caldera, central Chilean Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grunder, A.L.; Thompson, J.M.; Hildreth, W.

    1987-01-01

    Active thermal springs associated with the late Pleistocene Calabozos caldera complex occur in two groups: the Colorado group which issues along structures related to caldera collapse and resurgence, and the Puesto Calabozos group, a nearby cluster that is chemically distinct and probably unrelated to the Colorado springs. Most of the Colorado group can be related to a hypothetical parent water containing ???400 ppm Cl at ???250??C by dilution with ???50% of cold meteoric water. The thermal springs in the most deeply eroded part of the caldera were derived from the same parent water by boiling. The hydrothermal system has probably been active for at least as long as 300,000 years, based on geologic evidence and calculations of paleo-heat flow. There is no evidence for economic mineralization at shallow depth. The Calabozos hydrothermal system would be an attractive geothermal prospect were its location not so remote. ?? 1987.

  18. COMBUSTION OF HYDROTHERMALLY TREATED COALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of: (1) the relationship of the combustion characteristics of hydrothermally treated (HTT) coals to environmental emissions, boiler design, and interchangeability of solid fuels produced by the Hydrothermal Coal Process (HCP) with raw coa...

  19. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies. PMID:26117498

  20. The boiling suppression of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayoshi, S.; Kokuyama, W.; Fukuyama, H.

    2009-05-01

    When He gas is injected from room temperature into boiling liquid N, boiling is suppressed, leaving liquid surface flat like a mirror. Although the qualitative explanation for this phenomenon is known [Minkoff GJ, Scherber FI, Stober AK. Suppression of bubbling in boiling refrigerants. Nature 1957;180(4599):1413-4], it has not been studied quantitatively and comprehensively yet. In this report, we made careful simultaneous measurements of temperature and weight variation of the liquid. The results clearly indicate that the boiling suppression is caused by cooling of the liquid with "internal evaporation" of N into the He bubbles.

  1. Hydrothermal Reactivity of Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Gould, I.

    2013-12-01

    The reactivity of aqueous amines depends on temperature, pH, and redox state [1], all of which are highly variable in hydrothermal systems. Temperature and pH affect the ratio of protonated to unprotonated amines (R-NH2 + H+ = R-NH3+), which act as nucleophiles and electrophiles, respectively. We hypothesize that this dual nature can explain the pH dependence of reaction rates, and predict that rates will approach a maximum at pH = pKa where the ratio of protonated and unprotonated amines approaches one and the two compounds are poised to react with one another. Higher temperatures in hydrothermal systems allow for more rapid reaction rates, readily reversible reactions, and unique carbon-nitrogen chemistry in which water acts as a reagent in addition to being the solvent. In this study, aqueous benzylamine was used as a model compound to explore the reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and equilibria of amines under hydrothermal conditions. Experiments were carried out in anoxic silica glass tubes at 250°C (Psat) using phosphate-buffered solutions to observe changes in reaction rates and product distributions as a function of pH. The rate of decomposition of benzylamine was much faster at pH 4 than at pH 9, consistent with the prediction that benzylamine acts as both nucleophile and an electrophile, and our estimate that the pKa of benzylamine is ~5 at 250°C and Psat. Accordingly, dibenzylamine is the primary product of the reaction of two benzylamine molecules, and this reaction is readily reversible under hydrothermal conditions. Extremely acidic or basic pH can be used to suppress dibenzylamine production, which also suppresses the formation of all other major products, including toluene, benzyl alcohol, dibenzylimine, and tribenzylamine. This suggests that dibenzylamine is the lone primary product that then itself reacts as a precursor to produce the above compounds. Analog experiments performed with ring-substituted benzylamine derivatives and chiral methylbenzylamine suggest an SN2 mechanism for the formation of dibenzylamine. These results show the interdependence of pH and speciation with amine reaction rates. We predict the distribution of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary amines in hydrothermal solutions can be used to solve for the pH of subsurface reaction zones in hydrothermal systems. [1] McCollom, T.M. (2013) The influence of minerals on decomposition of the n-alkyl-?-amino acid norvaline under hydrothermal conditions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 104, 330-357.

  2. Maximum two-phase flow rates of subcooled nitrogen through a sharp-edged orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented of an experiment in which subcooled liquid nitrogen was discharged through a sharp-edged orifice at flow rates near the maximum. The data covered a range of inlet stagnation pressures from slightly above saturation to twice the thermodynamic critical pressure. The data were taken along five separate inlet stagnation isotherms ranging from 0.75 to 1.035 times the thermodynamic critical temperature. The results indicate that subcooled liquids do not choke or approach maximum flow in an asymptotic manner even though the back pressure is well below saturation; and orifice flow coefficients are not constant as is frequently assumed. A metastable jet appears to exist which breaks down if the difference between back pressure and saturation pressure is large enough.

  3. Boils

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News 4/3/2014 The Burning Truth 12/19/2013 Osteopathic Training Statement 7/2/2013 The Truth About Tanning 4/24/2013 Sun Safety IQ Online Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  4. An experimental investigation of liquid methane convection and boiling in rocket engine cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Abraham Gerardo

    In the past decades, interest in developing hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engines for deep spaceflight missions has continued to grow. In particular, liquid methane (LCH4) has been of interest due to the weight efficiency, storage, and handling advantages it offers over several currently used propellants. Deep space exploration requires reusable, long life rocket engines. Due to the high temperatures reached during combustion, the life of an engine is significantly impacted by the cooling system's efficiency. Regenerative (regen) cooling is presented as a viable alternative to common cooling methods such as film and dump cooling since it provides improved engine efficiency. Due to limited availability of experimental sub-critical liquid methane cooling data for regen engine design, there has been an interest in studying the heat transfer characteristics of the propellant. For this reason, recent experimental studies at the Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (cSETR) at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) have focused on investigating the heat transfer characteristics of sub-critical CH4 flowing through sub-scale cooling channels. To conduct the experiments, the csETR developed a High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) where all the channels are heated using a conduction-based thermal concentrator. In this study, two smooth channels with cross sectional geometries of 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm and 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm were tested. In addition, three roughened channels all with a 3.2 mm x 3.2 mm square cross section were also tested. For the rectangular smooth channel, Reynolds numbers ranged between 68,000 and 131,000, while the Nusselt numbers were between 40 and 325. For the rough channels, Reynolds numbers ranged from 82,000 to 131,000, and Nusselt numbers were between 65 and 810. Sub-cooled film-boiling phenomena were confirmed for all the channels presented in this work. Film-boiling onset at Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was correlated to a Boiling Number (Bo) of approximately 0.1 for all channels. Convective Nusselt number follows predicted trends for Reynolds number with a wall temperature correction for both the boiling and non-boiling regimes.

  5. An experimental study of subcooled choked flow through steam generator tube cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Ram Anand

    The Work conducted in this Research involved the simulation of Pressurized Water Reactor Conditions of Steam Generators to study the complex phenomenon of Subcooled Choked Flow or two-phase critical flow that occurs when water leaks from the primary side of a steam generator into the secondary side, thus making it highly relevant to Reactor Safety and Probabilistic Risk assessment methods. Slits of small L/D ratio were manufactured and tested on the Facility for Leak Rate Testing at pressures (6.89 MPa) and high temperatures (280°C) relevant to Pressurized Water Reactors over a range of subcooling. Small flow channel length was used (1.3mm) equivalent to steam generator tube thickness with the study of a variety of geometries with differences in surface roughness. Unique to literature, the samples had very small L/Ds and the study was a controlled parametric study of choked flow. The effect of L/D was examined, compared to recent studies conducted at Purdue University by Wolf and Revankar while contrasting with others in literature. Analytical models were applied highlighting the importance of non-equilibrium effects and contrasted with other studies of different L/Ds. RELAP5, a well developed code widely utilized in industry was studied to analyze its predictive capabilities and conditions for best estimate. L/D effects on mass fluxes were studied and it was observed that mass fluxes were affected to a very small degree by subcooling.

  6. Spray Cooling Modeling: Droplet Sub-Cooling Effect on Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Joseph E.; Selvam, R. P.; Silk, Eric A.

    2008-01-21

    Spray cooling has become increasingly popular as a thermal management solution for high-heat flux (>100 W/cm{sup 2}) applications such as laser diodes and radars. Research has shown that using sub-cooled liquid can increase the heat flux from the hot surface. The objective of this study was to use a multi-phase numerical model to simulate the effect of a sub-cooled droplet impacting a growing vapor bubble in a thin (<100 {mu}m) liquid film. The two-phase model captured the liquid-vapor interface using the level set method. The effects of surface tension, viscosity, gravity and phase change were accounted for by using a modification to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, which were solved using the finite difference method. The computed liquid-vapor interface and temperature distributions were visualized for better understanding of the heat removal process. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms of sub-cooled droplet impact on a growing vapor bubble, various initial droplet temperatures were modeled (from 20 deg. C below saturation temperature to saturation temperature). This may provide insights into how to improve the heat transfer in future spray cooling systems.

  7. Performance of Heat Exchanger for Subcooling Liquid Nitrogen with a GM Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. M.; Ryu, S. H.; Kim, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    A heat exchanger to continuously supply subcooled liquid nitrogen at 65˜70 K in thermal contact with a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler is experimentally investigated. This study is motivated by HTS power applications, where liquid nitrogen is circulated in subcooled state by forced convection and a regenerative cryocooler is used for continuous refrigeration. Since the coldhead of the cooler has a very limited surface area, a cylindrical "cup" made of copper is attached to the coldhead to serve as extended surface. A copper tube for liquid nitrogen flow is spirally wound and silver-brazed on the exterior surface of cylinder. In order to examine the effect of physical dimensions on the cooling performance, different sizes of heat exchangers are fabricated and tested with a commercial GM cooler to subcool liquid nitrogen from 78 K to 65˜70 K. It is clearly shown that there exists an optimal size of heat exchanger cylinder to achieve a maximum cooling of liquid nitrogen. The reason for poor performance with a smaller size is that the cooling surface is not enough, and the reason for poor performance with a larger size is that the effectiveness of extended surface is lower and the heat leak from surroundings is greater.

  8. Analysis and measurement of thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuse, Mitsuho; Fuchino, Shuichiro

    2014-09-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) impregnated with subcooled liquid nitrogen. PPLP is widely used for the electrical insulation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) power transmission cables. Although the thermal conductivity of PPLP is an important factor in the design of HTS cables, there has been very limited work on its measurement in subcooled liquid nitrogen. We prepared PPLP samples and symmetrically stacked them on both sides of a heater. The stacked samples were immersed in liquid nitrogen in an open cryostat. A cryocooler mounted on the cryostat was used to maintain the subcooled temperature of the liquid nitrogen. The thermal conductivity of the stacked PPLPs was measured by the steady state method at a bath temperature of 65-75 K and was found to be 0.23-0.26 W/m K, which is about five times that measured in a vacuum as presented in available literature. We also discuss possible mechanisms for boosting the thermal conductivity of PPLP by liquid nitrogen impregnation.

  9. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space - Duration: 19 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  10. Significant role of climatic trends on hydrothermal activity Coso Hot Springs, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lofgren, B.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The hydrothermal features of Coso Hot Springs have attracted visitors for 130 yr and scientific investigators for two decades. In 1978, anticipating effects of major geothermal developments nearby, the Naval Weapons Center (NWC) initiated a comprehensive monitoring program at a dozen hydrothermal sites in the Coso Hot Springs area. Nine years of monitoring preceded power production in the nearby Coso geothermal field in July 1987. During this period, steam was rising from numerous vents and gently boiling mud pots. Local rainfall caused increased boiling activity in several mud pots, with some overflowing during wet periods. Then in August 1988, a year after geothermal power production began major changes in hot spring activity commenced. Small mud pots and steamers started to grow and coalesce. In March 1989, mud-pot activity became more violent. Many buried wells failed causing surface activity in other areas to diminish. During ensuing months, large mud cones developed and much of the steam and boiling water occurred in a few major pots. Because the abrupt changes in hydrothermal activity followed so closely after nearby geothermal production began, the obvious cause has been attributed to geothermal developments. Studies of NWC baseline monitoring data indicate, however, that no effects of geothermal developments have been felt in the hot springs area. Rainfall and barometric effects account for most of the fluctuations in records of the past decade. Early accounts and field evidence suggest similar changes have occurred in the past.

  11. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  12. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems. PMID:25403831

  13. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  14. Dryout and Rewetting in the Pool Boiling Experiment Flown on STS-72 (PBE-2 B) and STS-77 (PBE-2 A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.; Lee, Ho Sung; Keller, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the microgravity of space in which a pool of liquid (R-113), initially at a precisely defined pressure and temperature, is subjected to a step imposed heat flux from a semi-transparent thin-film heater forming part of one wall of the container such that boiling is initiated and maintained for a defined period of time at a constant pressure level. A total of nine tests were conducted at three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling in each of the two space experiments in a GAS canister on the STS-77, -72, respectively. Three (3) modes of propagation of boiling across the heater surface and subsequent vapor bubble growths were observed, in addition to the two (2) modes observed in the previous microgravity pool boiling space flights on STS-47, -57, and -60. Of particular interest were the extremely dynamic or "explosive" growths, which were determined to be the consequence of the large increase in the liquid-vapor interface area associated with the appearance of a corrugated or rough interface. Predictions of circumstances for its onset have been carried out. Assumptions were necessary regarding the character of disturbances necessary for the instabilities to grow. Also, a new vapor bubble phenomena was observed in which small vapor bubbles migrated toward a larger bubble, eventually coalescing with this larger bubble. The heat transfer was enhanced approximately 30% as a result of these migrating bubbles, which is believed to be a vapor bubble manifestation of Marangoni convection and/or molecular momentum effects, sometimes referred to as vapor recoil. The circumstances of heat flux and liquid subcooling necessary to produce heater surface dryout for an initially stagnant liquid subjected to an imposed heat flux have been more closely identified.

  15. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-print Network

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  16. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  17. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  18. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  1. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  2. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  3. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Quartz Nanocrystals

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    Hydrothermal Synthesis of Quartz Nanocrystals Jane F. Bertone, Joel Cizeron, Rajeev K. Wahi, Joan K describes for the first time a chemical method for the preparation for nanocrystalline quartz. Submicron quartz powders are initially produced in hydrothermal reactions where soluble silica precursors

  4. SiC-dopped MCM-41 materials with enhanced thermal and hydrothermal stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingyong; Jin, Guoqiang; Tong, Xili; Guo, Xiangyun

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Novel SiC-dopped MCM-41 materials were synthesized by adding silicon carbide suspension in the molecular sieve precursor solvent followed by in situ hydrothermal synthesis. The dopped materials have a wormhole-like mesoporous structure and exhibit enhanced thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Highlights: {yields} SiC-dopped MCM-41 was synthesized by in situ hydrothermal synthesis of molecular sieve precursor combined with SiC. {yields} The dopped MCM-41 materials show a wormhole-like mesoporous structure. {yields} The thermal stability of the dopped materials have an increment of almost 100 {sup o}C compared with the pure MCM-41. {yields} The hydrothermal stability of the dopped materials is also better than that of the pure MCM-41. -- Abstract: SiC-dopped MCM-41 mesoporous materials were synthesized by the in situ hydrothermal synthesis, in which a small amount of SiC was added in the precursor solvent of molecular sieve before the hydrothermal treatment. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N{sub 2} physical adsorption and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that the thermal and hydrothermal stabilities of MCM-41 materials can be improved obviously by incorporating a small amount of SiC. The structure collapse temperature of SiC-dopped MCM-41 materials is 100 {sup o}C higher than that of pure MCM-41 according to the differential scanning calorimetry analysis. Hydrothermal treatment experiments also show that the pure MCM-41 will losses it's ordered mesoporous structure in boiling water for 24 h while the SiC-dopped MCM-41 materials still keep partial porous structure.

  5. Hydrothermal alteration and evolution of the Ohakuri hydrothermal system, Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberger, R. C.; Browne, P. R. L.

    1988-05-01

    Erosion and excavations at Ohakuri in the Taupo Volcanic zone have exposed the upper portion (100-150 m) of a hydrothermal system that was active sometime between 700,000 and 160,000 years ago. Extensive hydrothermal alteration occurred within a host sequence of young, relatively undeformed, chemically and lithologically similar unwelded rhyolitic ignimbrite and air-fall tuffs. Mapping and petrologic work have identified six distinct alteration types. An early event formed a concentrically zoned suite of alteration through the pervasive movement of alkaline chloride type water. In the innermost zone, primary rock components were almost entirely converted to quartz + adularia ± illite ± hematite ± leucoxene. Mineralized veins and breccias of quartz ± pyrite ± adularia ± chlorite formed here in response to episodic hydraulic fracturing. This zone grades outward and upward into a zone of less intense, lower rank alteration with a mordenite + clinoptilolite + smectite + opal ± hematite assemblage, then a zone of weak clay alteration and into fresh rock. Calcite is conspicuously absent from the entire suite. Acid-sulphate type water, formed from steam-condensate, dominated the shallow activity in a second stage of alteration that followed local erosion. Widespread but discontinuous alteration converted the ignimbrite to kaolinite + opal ± hematite, with alunite occurring in the more intense zones. This alteration locally overprints the early alkali-chloride produced suite, but the focus of the second-stage activity was north of the focus of the older event. Scattered opaline sinters and silicified surficial deposits are products of either still later activity or the waning part of the second stage. Chemical analysis shows that the various alteration types have characteristic patterns of major element addition and removal; these reflect the key hydrothermal mineral reactions that formed the new assemblages. Quartz-adularia alteration involved mainly silicification, dehydration and cation exchange (K + for Na 2+, H +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+), whereas alteration in the mordenite zone was mostly a moderate hydration process. Kaolinite alteration involved strong hydration, hydrolysis and redistribution of silica. Trace elements show varying degrees of mobility and correlation with major elements. Alteration features identify the important upflow zones, zones of mixing between hydrothermal and shallow groundwater, and changes in alkali chloride water level. They also reflect a transition from diffuse to channel flow as sealing eliminated original rock porosity, and led to hydraulic fracturing which maintained fracture permeability in the system. Mineralogy and fluid inclusion studies indicate that the primary fluid at now-exposed levels was a high-pH (7-8), low-CO 2 and low-H 2S water cooler than 200°C, probably modified by boiling at depth.

  6. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  7. Pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in water, and exhibit a very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) at modest nanoparticle concentrations (50.1% by ...

  8. Description of boiling project burnout detector

    E-print Network

    Raymond, M. W.

    1957-01-01

    Introduction: In order to effectively utilize the high heat flux available through the mechanism of nucleate boiling in forced convection heat transfer, it is of primary importance that the maximum flux or "burnout" ...

  9. Geology and hydrothermal resources in the northern Lake Abaya area (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernet, Tadiwos

    2011-09-01

    The northern Lake Abaya area located in the southern part of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) evidently contains an advective hydrothermal system. Regional extensional tectonics and subsidence that began in Late Miocene was followed by rift margin rhyolitic volcanism which produced extensive ignimbrite succession and rift shoulder trachytic volcanism in Pliocene. The extensional axis of the MER became the locus of volcanic activity in the Quaternary with bimodal basalt - rhyolitic volcanic products in the rift floor. Shallow crustal magma chambers feeding the axial volcanic complexes provide heat for the hydrothermal system which reside in Tertiary volcanic succession and is capped by lacustrine and volcanoclastic graben infill sediments. Duguna Fango rhyolitic volcanic complex which has extruded as much volume of volcanic products as all the other felsic centers put together is the most important heat source for the hydrothermal system and related manifestations. The closed drainage basin centered at Lake Abaya with adjacent plateau receiving over 1500 mm annual precipitation maintains a stable recharge for the prevailing hydrothermal system. Regional ground water flow direction is to the southwest following Bilate River which is the major river draining into the lake flowing parallel to the major NNE-SSW structural pattern of MER. Analyses of remote sensing data provided some insight into how the structural fabric had a control on the distribution of the groups of hydrothermal manifestations identified as hydrothermal fields. Thermal infrared image showed distinct thermal signature over the rift floor where hydrothermal fields are situated as compared to the plateau and areas covered by the cap-rock. A hydrothermal field around Duguna Fango volcanic complex has volcanological favorable setting despite lower inferred reservoir equilibrium geothermometer temperatures on the thermal springs. About 30 km to the south two other hydrothermal fields are located at a latitudinal distance of less than 15 km between each other. The near boiling point spring #6 of Northwest Abaya discharge mature water with highest geothermal fluid - host rock equilibrium geothermometer temperatures which together with a nearby fumarolic activity may be explained as an outflow. Across Chewkare graben the Bolcho and northeast Abaya hydrothermal fields located between Bilate and Gidabo rivers geochemically appear to be from a different high-enthalpy geothermal reservoir probably related to the cluster of felsic volcanic centers such as Chericho, Kilisa, Donga and Werencha. The high temperature springs indicate the existence of at least two geochemically distinct hydrothermal reservoirs in the study area. It remains to be proven weather an up-flow of an advective hydrothermal system centered to the north around Duguna Fango have long distance concealed out flows to the south on the northern shores of Lake Abaya which is the hydrologic depocenter.

  10. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Hasan, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies of growth and detachment processes of a single bubble and multiple bubbles formed on a heated surface have been conducted in the parabola flights of KC-135 aircraft. Distilled water and PF5060 were used as the test liquids. A micro-fabricated test surface was designed and built. Artificial cavities of diameters 10 microns, 7 microns and 4 microns were made on a thin polished Silicon wafer that was electrically heated by a number of small heating elements on the back side in order to control the surface superheat. Bubble growth period, bubble size and shape from nucleation to departure were measured under subcooled and saturation conditions. Significantly larger bubble departure diameters and bubble growth periods than those at earth normal gravity were observed. Bubble departure diameters as large as 20 mm for water and 6 mm for PF5060 were observed as opposed to about 3 mm for water and less than 1 mm for PF5060 at earth normal gravity respectively. It is found that the bubble departure diameter can be approximately related to the gravity level through the relation D(sub d) proportional 1/g(exp 1/2). For water,the effect of wall superheat and liquid subcooling on bubble departure diameter is found to be small.The growth periods are found to be very sensitive to liquid subcooling at a given wall superheat. However,the preliminary results of single bubble dynamics using PF5060 showed that the departure diameter increases when wall superheat is elevated at the same gravity and subcooling. Growth period of single bubbles in water has been found to vary as t(sub g) proportional g(exp -.93). For water, when the magnitude of horizontal gravitational components was comparable to that of gravity normal to the surface, single bubbles slid along the heater surface and departed with smaller diameter at the same gravity level in the direction normal to the surface. For PF5060, even a very small horizontal gravitational component caused the sliding of bubble along the surface. The numerical simulation has been carried out by solving under the condition of axisymmetry, the mass, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor and the liquid phases. In the model the contribution of micro-layer has been included and instantaneous shape of the evolving vapor-liquid interface is determined from the analysis. Consistent with the experimental results, it is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter It is found that effect of reduced gravity is to stretch the growth period and bubble diameter at departure. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental data for both the departure diameters and the growth periods. In the study on dynamics of multiple bubbles, horizontal merger of 2,3 4,and 5 bubbles was observed. It is found that after merger of 2 and 3 bubbles the equivalent diameter of the detached bubble is smaller than that of a single bubble departing at the same gravity level. During and after bubble merger, liquid still fills the space between the vapor stems so as to form mushroom type bubbles. The experimental and numerical studies conducted so far have brought us a step closer to prediction of nucleate boiling heat fluxes under low gravity conditions. Preparations for a space flight are continuing.

  11. Experimental and analytical study of stability characteristics of natural circulation boiling water reactors during startup transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Kyoungsuk

    Two-phase natural circulation loops are unstable at low pressure operating conditions. New reactor design relying on natural circulation for both normal and abnormal core cooling is susceptible to different types of flow instabilities. In contrast to forced circulation boiling water reactor (BWR), natural circulation BWR is started up without recirculation pumps. The tall chimney placed on the top of the core makes the system susceptible to flashing during low pressure start-up. In addition, the considerable saturation temperature variation may induce complicated dynamic behavior driven by thermal non-equilibrium between the liquid and steam. The thermal-hydraulic problems in two-phase natural circulation systems at low pressure and low power conditions are investigated through experimental methods. Fuel heat conduction, neutron kinetics, flow kinematics, energetics and dynamics that govern the flow behavior at low pressure, are formulated. A dimensionless analysis is introduced to obtain governing dimensionless groups which are groundwork of the system scaling. Based on the robust scaling method and start-up procedures of a typical natural circulation BWR, the simulation strategies for the transient with and without void reactivity feedback is developed. Three different heat-up rates are applied to the transient simulations to study characteristics of the stability during the start-up. Reducing heat-up rate leads to increase in the period of flashing-induced density wave oscillation and decrease in the system pressurization rate. However, reducing the heat-up rate is unable to completely prevent flashing-induced oscillations. Five characteristic regions of stability are discovered at low pressure conditions. They are stable single-phase, flashing near the separator, intermittent oscillation, sinusoidal oscillation and low subcooling stable regions. Stability maps were acquired for system pressures ranging 100 kPa to 400 kPa. According to experimental investigation, the flow becomes stable below a certain heat flux regardless of the inlet subcooling at the core and system pressure. At higher heat flux, unstable phenomena were indentified within a certain range of inlet subcooling. The unstable region diminishes as the system pressure increases. In natural circulation BWRs, the significant gravitational pressure drop over the tall chimney section induces a Type-I instability. The Type-I instability becomes especially important during low power and pressure conditions during reactor start-up. Under these circumstances the effect of pressure variations on the saturation enthalpy becomes significant. An experimental study shows that the flashing phenomenon in the adiabatic chimney section is dominant during the start-up of a natural circulation BWR. Since flashing occurs outside the core, nuclear feedback effects on the stability are small. Furthermore, the thermal-hydraulic oscillation period is much longer than power fluctuation period caused by void reactivity feedback. In the natural circulation system increasing the inlet restriction reduces the natural circulation flow rate, shifting the unstable region to higher inlet subcooling.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a test cell was developed. All four vertical walls of the test cell are transparent, and they allow transillumination with laser light for visualization experiments by HI. The bottom electrode is a copper cylinder, which is electrically grounded. The copper block is heated with a resistive heater and it is equipped with 6 thermocouples that provide reference temperatures for the measurements with HI. The top electrode is a mesh electrode. Bubbles are injected with a syringe into the test cell through the bottom electrode. The working fluids presently used in the interferometric visualization experiments, water and PF 5052, satisfy requirements regarding thermophysical, optical and electrical properties. A 30kV power supply equipped with a voltmeter allows to apply the electric field to the electrodes during the experiments. The magnitude of the applied voltage can be adjusted either manually or through the LabVIEW data acquisition and control system connected to a PC. Temperatures of the heated block are recorded using type-T thermocouples, whose output is read by a data acquisition system. Images of the bubbles are recorded with 35mm photographic and 16mm high-speed cameras, scanned and analyzed using various software packages. Visualized temperature fields HI allows the visualization of temperature fields in the vicinity of bubbles during boiling in the form of fringes. Typical visualized temperature distributions around the air bubbles injected into the thermal boundary layer in PF5052 are shown. The temperature of the heated surface is 35 C. The temperature difference for a pair of fringes is approximately 0.05 C. The heat flux applied to the bottom surface is moderate, and the fringe patterns are regular. In the image a bubble penetrating the thermal boundary layer is visible. Because of the axial symmetry of the problem, simplified reconstruction techniques can be applied to recover the temperature field. The thermal plume developing above the heated surface for more intensive heating is shown. The temperature distribution in the liquid is clearly 3D, and

  13. Origin of tonalites from the Boil Mountain ophiolitic complex, west-central Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    The Boil Mountain ophiolitic complex, west-central Maine, marks the suture between the Boundary Mountain and Gander terranes that became amalgamated in the late Cambrian during a pre-Taconic collisional event known as the Penobscottian orogeny. This even formed a composite terrane that is believed to have collided with the proto-North American margin during the Ordovician Taconic orogeny. The ophiolite is unusual in that there is no associated tectonized ultramafic section; there is a lack of a sheeted dike sequence; and an intrusive tonalite layer comprises a significant volume of the complex. Preliminary major and trace element geochemical analysis of the tonalites indicates that this unit is derived by partial melting of the associated mafic volcanics. This melting may have been induced by stopping water-rich hydrothermally altered basalts into subcrustal magma chambers. The association of arc-like volcanics and plutonics of the Boil Mountain ophiolite with the adjacent Hurricane melange suggests that the Boil Mountain may be a fragment of a forearc supra-subduction zone complex. Similar interpretations have been made recently for the Late Proterozoic Bou Azzer ophiolite in Morocco and the Coast Range ophiolite.

  14. Experimental studies of adiabatic flow boiling in fractal-like branching microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Brian J.; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.

    2011-01-15

    Experimental results of adiabatic boiling of water flowing through a fractal-like branching microchannel network are presented and compared to numerical model simulations. The goal is to assess the ability of current pressure loss models applied to a bifurcating flow geometry. The fractal-like branching channel network is based on channel length and width ratios between adjacent branching levels of 2{sup -1/2}. There are four branching sections for a total flow length of 18 mm, a channel height of 150 {mu}m and a terminal channel width of 100 {mu}m. The channels were Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) into a silicon disk. A Pyrex disk was anodically bonded to the silicon to form the channel top to allow visualization of the flow within the channels. The flow rates ranged from 100 to 225 g/min and the inlet subcooling levels varied from 0.5 to 6 C. Pressure drop along the flow network and time averaged void fraction in each branching level were measured for each of the test conditions. The measured pressure drop ranged from 20 to 90 kPa, and the measured void fraction ranged from 0.3 to 0.9. The measured pressure drop results agree well with separated flow model predictions accounting for the varying flow geometry. The measured void fraction results followed the same trends as the model; however, the scatter in the experimental results is rather large. (author)

  15. Experimental study of an upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouidri, A.; Madani, B.; Roubi, B.; Hamadouche, A.

    2015-08-01

    The upward sub-cooled forced convection in a rectangular channel is investigated experimentally. The aim of the present work is the studying of the local heat transfer phenomena. Concerning the experimentation: the n-pentane is used as a working fluid, the independent variables are: the velocity in the range from 0.04 to 0.086 m/s and heat flux density with values between 1.8 and 7.36 W/cm2. The results show that the local Nusselt number distribution is not uniform along the channel; however, uniformity is observed in the mean Nusselt number for Reynolds under 1600. On the other hand, a new correlation to predict the local fluid temperature is established as a function of local wall temperature. The wall's heat is dissipated under the common effect of the sub-cooled regime; therefore, the local heat transfer coefficient is increased. The study of the thermal equilibrium showed that for Reynolds less than 1500; almost all of the heat flux generated by the heater cartridges is absorbed by the fluid.

  16. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  17. Liquid crystal thermography in boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.F.; Mei, R.; Chen, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    The utilization of liquid crystal thermography to study heterogeneous boiling phenomena has gained popularity in recent years. In order not to disturb the nucleation process, which occurs in the microstructure of the heating surface, the crystals are applied to the backside of a thin heater. This work critically examines the ability of liquid crystal thermography to quantitatively capture the thermal field on the boiling surface. The thermal field identified experimentally through liquid crystal thermography is compared against that computed in the vicinity of a growing vapor bubble using a simulation which considers the simultaneous heat transfer between three phases: the solid heater, the liquid microlayer, and the growing vapor bubble. The temperature history beneath a growing vapor bubble elucidates the high frequency response required to capture the transient thermal fields commonly encountered in boiling experiments. Examination of the governing equations and numerical results reveal that due to the heater thermal inertia, the temperature variation on the bottom of the heater is significantly different than that on the boiling surface. In addition, the crystals themselves have a finite spatial resolution and frequency response which filter out much of the microscale phenomenon associated with boiling heat transfer. Analysis of existing pool and flow boiling liquid crystal thermographs indicate that the typical spacial resolution is on the order of 0.25 mm and the response time is on the order of 5 ms which are insufficient to resolve the fine spacial and temporal details of the heating surface thermal field. Thus the data obtained from liquid crystal thermography applied to boiling heat transfer must be cautiously interpreted.

  18. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  19. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  20. Flow boiling inside enhanced heat transfer tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, G.M.; Hu, H.Y.; Peng, X.F.; Wang, B.X.

    1996-12-31

    A tube with longitudinal microchannels on the inside wall was developed to enhance flow boiling heat transfer. The experimental investigation was conducted to identify the flow boiling heat transfer performance of liquid through the enhanced tubes. The flow boiling heat transfer in the enhanced tubes is greatly intensified, especially for the fully-developed nucleate boiling regime. The heat transfer coefficient in microchanneled tubes with smaller diameter is increased with a magnitude of 170% compared with the identical smooth tubes. The geometric configuration of microchannels and tubes would have significant effect of the flow boiling inside microchanneled tubes. The heat transfer performance of the microchanneled tubes is as good as or even better than that of other existing enhanced tubes. Liquid-vapor phase change heat and mass transport phenomenon is frequently encountered in many practical applications, such as in chemical and petrochemical industry, power generation, air conditioning and refrigeration. Phase change heat exchangers and equipment, including evaporators, condenser and reboilers, are widely used in these cases.

  1. The plumbing of Old Faithful Geyser revealed by hydrothermal tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Roux, P.; Cros, E.

    2013-05-01

    Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park (USA) has attracted numerous scientific investigations for over two centuries to better understand its geological structure, the physics of its eruptions, and the controls of its intermittency. Using data acquired with a seismic array in 1992, we track the sources of hydrothermal tremor produced by boiling and cavitation inside the geyser. The location of seismic sources identifies a previously unknown lateral cavity at 15 m below the surface, on the SW side of the vent, and connected to the conduit. This reservoir is activated at the beginning of each geyser eruption cycle and plays a major role in the oscillatory behavior of the water level in the conduit before each eruption.

  2. Evaluating the Consequences of Edifice Instability-Related Processes in Hydrothermal Ore Genesis at Composite Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakacs, A.

    2009-05-01

    Composite volcanoes intrinsically evolve toward instability, which is resolved through sudden (e.g. flank/edifice failure) or gradual (e.g. volcano-basement interaction) processes. They commonly host hydrothermal systems and related ore deposits within their edifices and shallow basement. The nature and extent of the influence instability-related processes exert on these hydrothermal systems and ore genesis are as yet poorly understood. Short-term effects are basically related to sudden depressurization of the system. The key factors determining the response of the hydrothermal system are its depth and maturity, and amount of depressurization. Deep excavation will lead to evisceration of the edifice-hosted hydrothermal system, dispersion of its volatiles in the atmosphere and incorporation of solid-phase components in the resulting debris avalanche deposit (DAD). When mature, such a system may provide DAD-hosted ore deposits. The fate of the deeper, basement-hosted hydrothermal system depends on its maturity. The evolution of an immature system will be aborted as a consequence of premature depressurization-driven boiling, and no ore-grade mineralization forms. Mature systems, however, will benefit from pressure drop and induced boiling by massive deposition of pressure-sensitive ore minerals and formation of high-grade ore. Long-range effects of edifice-failure are related to increase of the meteoric input into the hydrothermal system due to the formation of a large depression and reorganization of the surface hydrologic regime. Shift from high-T vapor-dominated regime to low-T dilute hydrothermal regime is its expected outcome. The influence of gradual release of edifice instability by volcano spreading and related phenomena on the hydrothermal system has not been studied so far. Deformation induced in both edifice and basement would result in change of fluid pathways according to the shift of local stress regimes between compressional and tensional, in turn depending on a number of factors (e.g. the presence, depth and thickness of a plastically deformable layer in the basement). That would determine the actual location of ore mineral deposition. Thorough understanding of instability-related processes greatly helps in mineral exploration activities at extinct and old composite volcanoes.

  3. Sulfur speciation in natural hydrothermal waters, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Hanna; Stefánsson, Andri

    2011-05-01

    The speciation of aqueous dissolved sulfur was determined in hydrothermal waters in Iceland. The waters sampled included hot springs, acid-sulfate pools and mud pots, sub-boiling well discharges and two-phase wells. The water temperatures ranged from 4 to 210 °C, the pH T was between 2.20 and 9.30 at the discharge temperature and the SO 4 and Cl concentrations were 0.020-52.7 and <0.01-10.0 mmol kg -1, respectively. The analyses were carried out on-site within ˜10 min of sampling using ion chromatography (IC) for sulfate (SO 42-), thiosulfate (S 2O 32-) and polythionates (S xO 62-) and titration and/or colorimetry for total dissolved sulfide (S 2-). Sulfite (SO 32-) could also be determined in a few cases using IC. Alternatively, for few samples in remote locations the sulfur oxyanions were stabilized on a resin on site following elution and analysis by IC in the laboratory. Dissolved sulfate and with few exceptions also S 2- were detected in all samples with concentrations of 0.02-52.7 mmol kg -1 and <1-4100 ?mol kg -1, respectively. Thiosulfate was detected in 49 samples of the 73 analyzed with concentrations in the range of <1-394 ?mol kg -1 (S-equivalents). Sulfite was detected in few samples with concentrations in the range of <1-3 ?mol kg -1. Thiosulfate and SO 32- were not detected in <100 °C well waters and S 2O 32- was observed only at low concentrations (<1-8 ?mol kg -1) in ˜200 °C well waters. In alkaline and neutral pH hot springs, S 2O 32- was present in significant concentrations sometimes corresponding to up to 23% of total dissolved sulfur (S TOT). In steam-heated acid-sulfate waters, S 2O 32- was not a significant sulfur species. The results demonstrate that S 2O 32- and SO 32- do not occur in the deeper parts of <150 °C hydrothermal systems and only in trace concentrations in ˜200-300 °C systems. Upon ascent to the surface and mixing with oxygenated ground and surface waters and/or dissolution of atmospheric O 2, S 2- is degassed and oxidized to SO 32- and S 2O 32- and eventually to SO 42- at pH >8. In near-neutral hydrothermal waters the oxidation of S 2- and the interaction of S 2- and S 0 resulting in the formation of S x2- are considered important. At lower pH values the reactions seemed to proceed relatively rapidly to SO 42- and the sulfur chemistry of acid-sulfate pools was dominated by SO 42-, which corresponded to >99% of S TOT. The results suggest that the aqueous speciation of sulfur in natural hydrothermal waters is dynamic and both kinetically and source-controlled and cannot be estimated from thermodynamic speciation calculations.

  4. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in ?-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods. PMID:26381020

  5. How does surface wettability influence nucleate boiling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Caney, Nadia; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    Although the boiling process has been a major subject of research for several decades, its physics still remain unclear and require further investigation. This study aims at highlighting the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nanocoating techniques were used to vary the water contact angle from 20° to 110° by modifying nanoscale surface topography and chemistry. The experimental results obtained disagree with the predictions of the classical models. A new approach of nucleation mechanism is established to clarify the nexus between the surface wettability and the nucleate boiling heat transfer. In this approach, we introduce the concept of macro- and micro-contact angles to explain the observed phenomenon. To cite this article: H.T. Phan et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  6. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  7. Boiling as Household Water Treatment in Cambodia: A Longitudinal Study of Boiling Practice and Microbiological Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the consistency of use and microbiological effectiveness of boiling as it is practiced in one study site in peri-urban Cambodia. We followed 60 randomly selected households in Kandal Province over 6 months to collect longitudinal data on water boiling practices and effectiveness in reducing Escherichia coli in household drinking water. Despite > 90% of households reporting that they used boiling as a means of drinking water treatment, an average of only 31% of households had boiled water on hand at follow-up visits, suggesting that actual use may be lower than self-reported use. We collected 369 matched untreated and boiled water samples. Mean reduction of E. coli was 98.5%; 162 samples (44%) of boiled samples were free of E. coli (< 1 colony-forming unit [cfu]/100 mL), and 270 samples (73%) had < 10 cfu/100 mL. Storing boiled water in a covered container was associated with safer product water than storage in an uncovered container. PMID:22826487

  8. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces 

    E-print Network

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15

    never-ending love, patience, support and motivation. viii NOMENCLATURE ACu - Top circular area of copper block (cm2) Ab - Total bare surface area on the test surface (cm2) Aw - Test surface area exposed to boiling (cm2...) An - Total area of nano-patterned squares on the test surface (cm2) Anc - Total nano-finned area exposed to boiling (cm2) h - Height of nano-fin (cylindrical or frustum of cone) (nm) kCu - Thermal conductivity of copper (W/mK) l - Slant height of nano...

  9. The boiling point of stratospheric aerosols.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A photoelectric particle counter was used for the measurement of aerosol boiling points. The operational principle involves raising the temperature of the aerosol by vigorously heating a portion of the intake tube. At or above the boiling point, the particles disintegrate rather quickly, and a noticeable effect on the size distribution and concentration is observed. Stratospheric aerosols appear to have the same volatility as a solution of 75% sulfuric acid. Chemical analysis of the aerosols indicates that there are other substances present, but that the sulfate radical is apparently the major constituent.

  10. Performance Assessment of 239 Series Sub-cooling Heat Exchangers for the Large Hadron Collider

    E-print Network

    Riddone, G; Roussel, P; Moracchioli, R; Tavian, L

    2006-01-01

    Helium sub-cooling heat exchangers of the counter-flow type are used to minimize the vapor fraction produced in the final expansion of the 1.9 K distributed cooling loops used for cooling the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These components are of compact design, featuring low-pressure drop and handling very low pressure vapor at low temperature. Following a qualification phase of prototypes, a contract has been placed in European industry for the supply of 239 heat exchanger units. Different levels of extracted heat load require three different variants of heat exchangers. This paper will describe the manufacturing phase with emphasis on the main difficulties encountered to keep the production quality after a brief recall of the prototype phase. Finally, the acceptance tests performed at room temperature and at the nominal cryogenic condition at the factory and at CEA-Grenoble will be presented.

  11. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    E-print Network

    Mizerak, Jordan P.

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase ...

  12. Boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure

    E-print Network

    Bar-Cohen Avram

    1971-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure, with water and Freon- 113 as the working fluids, is described. The operating characteristics of a boiling system, ...

  13. Transition boiling heat transfer from a horizontal surface

    E-print Network

    Berenson Paul Jerome

    1960-01-01

    An experiment, utilising a condensing fluid as the heat source, was performed to determine the heat flux vs. temperature difference curve for transition pool boiling from a horisontal surface. The boiling cure was determined ...

  14. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  15. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: II. Some general geologic applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Hunt, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental metal solubilities for rock-buffered hydrothermal systems provide important insights into the acquisition, transport, and deposition of metals in real hydrothermal systems that produced base metal ore deposits. Water-rock reactions that determine pH, together with total chloride and changes in temperature and fluid pressure, play significant roles in controlling the solubility of metals and determining where metals are fixed to form ore deposits. Deposition of metals in hydrothermal systems occurs where changes such as cooling, pH increase due to rock alteration, boiling, or fluid mixing cause the aqueous metal concentration to exceed saturation. Metal zoning results from deposition occurring at successive saturation surfaces. Zoning is not a reflection simply of relative solubility but of the manner of intersection of transport concentration paths with those surfaces. Saturation surfaces will tend to migrate outward and inward in prograde and retrograde time, respectively, controlled by either temperature or chemical variables. -from Authors

  16. Thermodynamic Vent System Performance Testing with Subcooled Liquid Methane and Gaseous Helium Pressurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high specific impulse and favorable thermal properties for storage, liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered as a candidate propellant for exploration architectures. In order to gain an -understanding of any unique considerations involving micro-gravity pressure control with LCH4, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the performance of a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with subcooled LCH4 and gaseous helium (GHe) pressurant. Thirteen days of testing were performed in November 2006, with total tank heat leak conditions of about 715 W and 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. The TVS system was used to subcool the LCH4 to a liquid saturation pressure of approximately 55.2 kPa before the tank was pressurized with GHe to a total pressure of 165.5 kPa. A total of 23 TVS cycles were completed. The TVS successfully controlled the ullage pressure within a prescribed control band but did not maintain a stable liquid saturation pressure. This was likely. due to a TVS design not optimized for this particular propellant and test conditions, and possibly due to a large artificially induced heat input directly into the liquid. The capability to reduce liquid saturation pressure as well as maintain it within a prescribed control band, demonstrated that the TVS could be used to seek and maintain a desired liquid inlet temperature for an engine (at a cost of propellant lost through the TVS vent). One special test was conducted at the conclusion of the planned test activities. Reduction of the tank ullage pressure by opening the Joule-Thomson valve (JT) without operating the pump was attempted. The JT remained open for over 9300 seconds, resulting in an ullage pressure reduction of 30 kPa. The special test demonstrated the feasibility of using the JT valve for limited ullage pressure reduction in the event of a pump failure.

  17. Anomaly Geochemical Fields in Siberian Hydrothermal Gold Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroshilov, V.; Savinova, O.; Ananev, Yu; Abramova, R.

    2014-08-01

    The composition and internal structure of geochemical fields associated to hydrothermal gold deposits within the Siberian territory were investigated. The concentric zonal structure of ore-forming geochemical fields embracing accumulations of Au, Ag, Bi, Pb, Zn, Cu, Te, As in ore bodies and their adjacent locations, and Ni, Co, V, Cr, Mn, Ba, Ti - within the external margin of gold ore formations were determined. The thermometric properties of gas-fluid inclusions in minerals of hydrothermal gold deposits were described. The results specified not only high-mineralized but also weakly-salted fluids are involved in the formation of the deposit. The latter is subjected to both retrogressive boiling and the mechanisms of direct and reverse osmosis. In this case, ascending and descending fluids produce eddy fluxes during Earth rotation, where minerals of different composition are formed in this flow path. Produced spiral mineral-geochemical fields can be observed on satellite images as hierarchy circular pattern system. Both the analysis of anomalous geochemical field structure and satellite images make it possible to predict the ore bodies of different grades in complicated landscape geological conditions.

  18. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  19. Boiling Water CanningProject Manual

    E-print Network

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    to preserving, 2011 or most current edition canning Fruits, pnW 199 http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications /pnw county HealthyLifestyles HomeFood PreservationSeries #12;4-H Home Food Preservation Series the home food preservation series contains four manuals: Freezing for ages 8­18 Drying for ages 8­18 Boiling water canning

  20. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  1. Big Bubbles in Boiling Liquids: Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costu, Bayram

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elicit students' conceptions about big bubbles in boiling liquids (water, ethanol and aqueous CuSO[subscript 4] solution). The study is based on twenty-four students at different ages and grades. The clinical interviews technique was conducted to solicit students' conceptions and the interviews were analyzed to…

  2. The Plausibility of Boiling Geysers on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested and modeled whereby there may be boiling geysers on Triton. The geysers would be of nitrogen considering that Voyager detected cryovolcanic activity, that solid nitrogen conducts heat much less than water ice, and that there is internal heat on Triton.

  3. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling water. The device is intended to sterilize dental and surgical instruments by submersion in the boiling water in the container. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). [55 FR 48439,...

  4. Mechanism of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to sodium and the criterion for stable boiling

    E-print Network

    Shai, Isaac

    1967-01-01

    A comparison between liquid metals and other common fluids, like water, is made as regards to the various stages of nucleate pool boiling. It is suggested that for liquid metals the stage of building the thermal layer plays ...

  5. Mo isotope fractionation during hydrothermal evolution of porphyry Cu systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiei, Behnam; Shamanian, GholamHossein; Mathur, Ryan; Mirnejad, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    We present Mo isotope compositions of molybdenite types from three successive stages of ore deposition in several porphyry copper deposits of the Kerman region, Iran. The data provide new insights into controlling processes on Mo isotope fractionation during the hydrothermal evolution of porphyry systems. The Mo isotope compositions of 27 molybdenite samples show wide variations in ?97Mo ranging from -0.37 to +0.92 ‰. The data reveal that molybdenites in the early and transitional stages of mineralization (preferentially 2H polytypes; ?97Mo mean = 0.35 ‰) have higher ?97Mo values than late stage (mainly 3R polytypes; ?97Mo mean = 0.02 ‰) molybdenites. This trend suggests that fractionation of Mo isotopes occurred in high-temperature stages of mineralization and that hydrothermal systems generally evolve towards precipitation of molybdenite with lower ?97Mo values. Taking into account the genetic models proposed for porphyry Cu deposits along with the temperature-dependent fractionation of Mo isotope ratios, it is proposed that large variations of Mo isotopes in the early and the transitional stages of ore deposition could be controlled by the separation of the immiscible ore-forming fluid phases with different density, pH, and ƒO2 properties (i.e., brine and vapor). The fractionation of Mo isotopes during fluid boiling and Rayleigh distillation processes likely dominates the Mo isotope budget of the remaining ore-forming fluids for the late stage of mineralization. The lower ?97Mo values in the late stage of mineralization can be explained by depletion of the late ore-forming hydrothermal solutions in 97Mo, as these fluids have moved to considerable distance from the source. Finally, the relationship observed between MoS2 polytypes (2H and 3R) and their Mo isotopic compositions can be explained by the molecular vibration theory, in which heavier isotopes are preferentially partitioned into denser primary 2H MoS2 crystals.

  6. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  8. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-3, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Keith E.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    1985-01-01

    Y-3, a U.S. Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, reached a depth of 156.7 m. The recovered drill core consists of 42.2 m of surficial (mostly glacial) sediments and two rhyolite flows (Nez Perce Creek flow and an older, unnamed rhyolite flow) of the Central Plateau Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite. Hydrothermal alteration is fairly extensive in most of the drill core. The surficial deposits are largely cemented by silica and zeolite minerals; and the two rhyolite flows are, in part, bleached by thermal water that deposited numerous hydrothermal minerals in cavities and fractures. Hydrothermal minerals containing sodium as a dominant cation (analcime, clinoptilolite, mordenite, Na-smectite, and aegirine) are more abundant than calcium-bearing minerals (calcite, fluorite, Ca-smectite, and pectolite) in the sedimentary section of the drill core. In the volcanic section of drill core Y-3, calcium-rich minerals (dachiardite, laumontite, yugawaralite, calcite, fluorite, Ca-smectite, pectolite, and truscottite) are predominant over sodium-bearing minerals (aegirine, mordenite, and Na-smectite). Hydrothermal minerals that contain significant amounts of potassium (alunite and lepidolite in the sediments and illitesmectite in the rhyolite flows) are found in the two drill-core intervals. Drill core y:.3 also contains hydrothermal silica minerals (opal, [3-cristobalite, chalcedony, and quartz), other clay minerals (allophane, halloysite, kaolinite, and chlorite), gypsum, pyrite, and hematite. The dominance of calcium-bearing hydrothermal minerals in the lower rhyolitic section of the y:.3 drill core appears to be due to loss of calcium, along with potassium, during adiabatic cooling of an ascending boiling water.

  9. Marangoni Effects on Near-Bubble Microscale Transport During Boiling of Binary Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    V. Carey; Sun, C.; Carey, V. P.

    2000-01-01

    In earlier investigations, Marangoni effects were observed to be the dominant mechanism of boiling transport in 2-propanol/water mixtures under reduced gravity conditions. In this investigation we have examined the mechanisms of binary mixture boiling by exploring the transport near a single bubble generated in a binary mixture between a heated surface and cold surface. The temperature field created in the liquid around the bubble produces vaporization over the portion of its interface near the heated surface and condensation over portions of its interface near the cold surface. Experiments were conducted using different mixtures of water and 2-propanol under 1g conditions and under reduced gravity conditions aboard the KC135 aircraft. Since 2-propanol is more volatile than water, there is a lower concentration of 2-propanol near the hot surface and a higher concentration of 2-propanol near the cold plate relative to the bulk quantity. This difference in interface concentration gives rise to strong Marangoni effects that move liquid toward the hot plate in the near bubble region for 2-propanol and water mixtures. In the experiments in this study, the pressure of the test system was maintained at about 5 kPa to achieve the full spectrum of boiling behavior (nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and film boiling) at low temperature and heat flux levels. Heat transfer data and visual documentation of the bubble shape were extracted from the experimental results. In the 1-g experiments at moderate to high heat flux levels, the bubble was observed to grow into a mushroom shape with a larger top portion near the cold plate due to the buoyancy effect. The shape of the bubble was somewhat affected by the cold plate subcooling and the superheat of the heated surface. At low superheat levels for the heated surface, several active nucleation sites were observed, and the vapor stems from them merged to form a larger bubble. The generation rate of vapor is moderate in this regime and the bubble shape is cylindrical in appearance. In some instances, the bubble interface appeared to oscillate. At higher applied heat flux levels, the top of the bubble became larger, apparently to provide more condensing interface area adjacent to the cold plate. Increasing the applied heat flux ultimately led to dry-out of the heated surface, with conditions just prior to dryout corresponding to the maximum heat flux (CHF). A more stable bubble was observed when the system attained the minimum heat flux (for film boiling). In this regime, most of the surface under the bottom of the bubble was dry with nucleate boiling sometimes occuring around the contact perimeter of the bubble at heated surface. Different variations (e.g. gap between two plates, molar concentration of the liquid mixture) of the experiments were examined to determine parametric effects on the boiling process and to determine the best conditions for the KC135 reduced gravity tests. Variation of the gap was found to have a minor impact on the CHF. However, reducing the gap between the hot and cold surface was observed to significantly reduce the minimum heat flux for fixed molar concentration of 2-propanol. In the reduced gravity experiments aboard the KC135 aircraft, the bubble formed in the 6.4 mm gap was generally cylindrical or barrel shaped and it increased its extent laterally as the surface superheat increased. In reduced gravity experiments, dryout of the heated surface under the bubble was observed to occur at a lower superheated temperature than for 1g conditions. Observed features of the boiling process and heat transfer data under reduced gravity will be discussed in detail. The results of the reduced gravity experiments will also be compared to those obtained in comparable 1g experiments. In tandem with the experiments we are also developing a computational model of the transport in the liquid surrounding the bubble during the boiling process. The computational model uses a level set method to model motion of the interface. It will incorporate a macroscale treatment of the tr

  10. Hydrothermal alteration facies within the intrusive-hosted Salave gold prospect, NW Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Salave gold prospect occurs within an Hercynian granodioritic complex intruding Cambro-Ordovician metasediments and a heterogeneous gabbroic body. Mineralization consists mostly of disseminated and veinlet pyrite, arsenopyrite, molybdenite, stibnite, and lesser sphalerite associated with a zoned sequence of hydrothermal alteration. Gold occurs as free particles and/or intergrown with the sulfides. Mathematical appraisal of analytical data suggests that the hydrothermal alteration resulted from largely isochemical redistribution processes imposed on the mineralogy of the host granodiorite by influxes of sporadically boiling fluids rich in CO/sub 2/. Hydrothermal alteration is described in terms of a zonal sequence inward from unaltered host rock through (1) chlorite-sericite alteration-(2) propylitic to advanced propylitic alterations-(3)albitites-(4) an auriferous (greater than or equal to 1g/t Au) sericite-carbonate-albite-(+/-)quartz-sulfide cataclastic facies. The zonation corresponds to increasing carbonatization, sericitization, albitization, desilification, and destruction of the original igneous texture. Aventurine alteration is common and is thought to be the product of late stage hydrothermal oxidizing conditions. Potassic alteration in the form of K-feldspar or biotite was occasionally observed.

  11. [Keeping quality of hard boiled eggs].

    PubMed

    Partmann, W; Wedler, A

    1979-09-01

    Only a few and contradictory results are available on the storage stability of hard boiled eggs which are of considerable importance for institutional feeding. Therefore four storage experiments on about 500 hard boiled eggs each were carried out and chemical and sensorial changes occurring during storage investigated. The one-day-old eggs of the same origin were boiled for 17 minutes under standard conditions and subsequently stored in air at a relative humidity between 73 and 85% at 4 degrees C (experiment No. 1), at 20 degrees C (experiments No. 2 and 3) and in pure carbon dioxide at 20 degrees C (experiment No. 4). Immediately after boiling, the eggs used for experiments No. 3 were dipped into coloured resin for egg shells (natural Manila-Kopa; dissolved in ethanol and stained with "Acillantechtgrün). Losses in weight during storages were distincly lower in the lacquered eggs than in the non-lacquered samples otherwise treated in the same manner. The weight decrease caused by the loss of water was extraordinarily high in pure CO2 and is due mainly the the decrease of the pH in the egg whites caused by the uptake of CO2. A few days after boiling the concentration of the free amino acids reached approximately the same level in albumen and yolk and remained practically constant over the following 3 weeks. For the breakdown of lecithine in yolk determined according to Grossfeld and Peter, a "deterioration quotient" of 6, like in unboiled eggs, was fixed as the limit value for unspoiled condition. Accordingly a possible storage time of 3 to 4 weeks resulted for the eggs stored at 4 degrees C and for the eggs treated with stained resin. The non-lacquered eggs stored in air or in CO2 at 20 degrees C reached the critical value in about 10 days. From the vitamins A, B1 and B2 only vitamin A showed considerable losses during storage. On the basis of the microbiological (3) and chemical findings and of the sensorial evaluation of colour, consistency, odour and taste of egg whites and yolks, the following storage times were determined for eggs in the quality class "saleable" requiring an overall rating not lower than 6 (satisfactory): 14 to 16 days, for non-lacquered eggs stored at 4 degrees C and for lacquered eggs at 20 degrees C whereas 5 days were found to be the maximum storage time for untreated eggs stored at 20 degrees C. If boiled eggs are stored in pure carbon dioxide at 20 degrees C, a distinct quality loss is observed already after a few days. PMID:575006

  12. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-01-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer. PMID:23056912

  13. Heat transfer in nucleate boiling of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunder, E.U.

    1983-10-01

    An equation for predicting heat transfer coefficients for nucleate boiling of mixtures is derived. This expression contains only one adjustable parameter and the liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient. If the adjustable parameter is put equal to unity, comparison with the most recent data for the SF/sub 6/-CF/sub 2/-Cl/sub 2/ system gives a mass transfer coefficient of 2 X 10/sup -4/ m/s, which is of the same order of magnitude as the value obtained in physical and chemical absorption and in fallingfilm vaporization. The new equation corresponds particularly well with the experimental observation that the heat transfer coefficient is less dependent on the heat flux density and the pressure for nucleate boiling of mixtures than in the case of the pure components.

  14. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  15. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  16. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  17. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  18. Stability monitoring for boiling water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecenas-Falcon, Miguel

    1999-11-01

    A methodology is presented to evaluate the stability properties of Boiling Water Reactors based on a reduced order model, power measurements, and a non-linear estimation technique. For a Boiling Water Reactor, the feedback reactivity imposed by the thermal-hydraulics has an important effect in the system stability, where the dominant contribution to this feedback reactivity is provided by the void reactivity. The feedback reactivity is a function of the operating conditions of the system, and cannot be directly measured. However, power measurements are relatively easy to obtain from the nuclear instrumentation and process computer, and are used in conjunction with a reduced order model to estimate the gain of the thermal-hydraulics feedback using an Extended Kalman Filter. The reduced order model is obtained by estimating the thermal-hydraulic transfer function from the frequency-domain BWR code LAPUR, and the stability properties are evaluated based on the pair of complex conjugate eigenvalues. Because of the recursive nature of the Kalman Filter, an estimate of the decay ratio is generated every sampling time, allowing continuous estimation of the stability parameters. A test platform based on a nuclear-coupled boiling channel is developed to validate the capability of the BWR stability monitoring methodology. The thermal-hydraulics for the boiling channel is modeled and coupled with neutron kinetics to analyze the non-linear dynamics of the closed-loop system. The model uses point kinetics to study core-wide oscillations, and normalized modal kinetics are introduced to study out-of-phase oscillations. The coolant flow dynamics is dominant in the power fluctuations observed by in-core nuclear instrumentation, and additive white noise is added to the solution for the channel flow in the thermal-hydraulic model to generate noisy power time series. The operating conditions of the channel can be modified to accommodate a wide range of stability conditions. Autoregressive analysis performed with the computer-generated series agrees with the stability properties of the boiling channel and with the results of the reduced order model method. Finally, a method to separate the fundamental and first harmonic modes form LPRM readings is presented and tested with computer simulations and plant data.

  19. A two-phase model for subcooled and superheated liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, R.; Jersey, G.R.; Krambeck, F.J.; Sundaresan, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a two-phase jet model for predicting the liquid rainout (capture) and composition of subcooled and superheated HF/additive pressurized liquid releases. The parent droplets of the release mixture constitute the fist phase. The second phase can in general be a vapor-liquid fog. The drops are not in equilibrium with the fog phase with which they exchange mass and energy. The fog at any location is assumed to be in local equilibrium. Correlations are developed for predicting the initial drop size for hydrodynamic breakup of jets. Applications are discussed in this paper for HF/additive mixtures. The fog phase calculations account for HF oligomerization and HF-water complex formation in the vapor phase and equilibrium between the liquid and vapor in the fog. The model incorporates jet trajectory calculations and hence can predict the amount of liquid rained out (liquid capture) and the capture distance. The HF captures predicted by the model for various release conditions are in agreement with small and large scale release experiments.

  20. Effect of Residual Noncondensables on Pressurization and Pressure Control of a Zero-Boil-Off Tank in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Hylton, Sonya; Kartizova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment is a small-scale experiment that uses a transparent ventless Dewar and a transparent simulant phase-change fluid to study sealed tank pressurization and pressure control with applications to on-surface and in-orbit storage of propellant cryogens. The experiment will be carried out under microgravity conditions aboard the International Space Station in the 2014 timeframe. This paper presents preliminary results from ZBOT's ground-based research that focuses on the effects of residual noncondensable gases in the ullage on both pressurization and pressure reduction trends in the sealed Dewar. Tank pressurization is accomplished through heating of the test cell wall in the wetted and un-wetted regions simultaneously or separately. Pressure control is established through mixing and destratification of the bulk liquid using a temperature controlled forced jet flow with different degrees of liquid jet subcooling. A Two-Dimensional axisymmetric two-phase CFD model for tank pressurization and pressure control is also presented. Numerical prediction of the model are compared to experimental 1g results to both validate the model and also indicate the effect of the noncondensable gas on evolution of pressure and temperature distributions in the ullage during pressurization and pressure control. Microgravity simulations case studies are also performed using the validated model to underscore and delineate the profound effect of the noncondensables on condensation rates and interfacial temperature distributions with serious implications for tank pressure control in reduced gravity.

  1. Hydrothermal Monitoring in a Quiescent Volcanic Arc: Cascade Range, Northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelwick, K.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Crankshaw, I. M.; McCulloch, C. L.; Lundstrom, E. A.; Murveit, A. M.; Bergfeld, D.; Spicer, K.; Tucker, D.; Schmidt, M. E.; Mariner, R. H.; Evans, W.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing (1996-present) volcanic unrest near South Sister, Oregon, is accompanied by a striking set of hydrothermal anomalies, including elevated temperatures, elevated major-ion concentrations, and 3He/4He ratios as large as 8.6 RA in slightly thermal springs. These observations prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to begin a systematic hydrothermal-monitoring effort encompassing 25 sites and 10 of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascade Range volcanic arc, from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Mount Lassen in northern California. A concerted effort was made to develop hourly records of temperature and (or) hydrothermal solute flux spanning multiple years, suitable for comparison with other continuous geophysical monitoring data. Monitored sites included summit-fumarole groups and springs/streams that show clear evidence of magmatic influence in the form of high 3He/4He ratios and (or) large fluxes of magmatic CO2 or heat. As of 2009-2012 measured summit-fumarole temperatures in the Cascade Range were generally near or below the local pure-water boiling point; the maximum observed superheat was <+2.5°C at Mount Baker. Temporal variability in ground-temperature records from the summit-fumarole sites is temperature-dependent, with the hottest sites tending to show less variability. Seasonal variability in the flux of hydrothermally sourced major anions from the springs varied from essentially undetectable to a factor of 5-10. This range of observed behavior owes mainly to the local climate regime, with strongly snowmelt-influenced springs and streams exhibiting more variability. As of the end of the 2012 field season, there had been 87 occurrences of local seismic energy densities ~>0.001 J/m3 during periods of hourly record. Hydrothermal responses to these small seismic stimuli were generally undetectable or ambiguous. Evaluation of multiyear to multi-decadal trends indicates that whereas the hydrothermal system at Mount St. Helens is still fast-evolving in response to the 1980-present eruptive cycle, there is no clear evidence of ongoing long-term trends in hydrothermal activity at other Cascade Range volcanoes that have been active or restless during the past century (Baker, South Sister, and Lassen). Experience gained during the Cascade Range hydrothermal-monitoring experiment informs ongoing efforts to capture entire unrest cycles at more active but generally less accessible volcanoes such as those in the Aleutian arc.

  2. Natural saltwater upconing by boils: field measurements and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Louw, Perry; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Werner, Adrian; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2013-04-01

    In this study, natural saltwater upconing by boils was investigated using field measurements and numerical simulations. As one-quarter of The Netherlands lies below mean sea level, the upward flow of saline groundwater leads to the salinization of surface waters for large areas, impacting on agriculture and aquatic ecosystems. The largest seepage fluxes are found in deep polders with surface water levels maintained as low as 6 to 8 m below sea level. Recent studies showed that preferential groundwater discharge through boils is the dominant salinization source in these deep polders. Boils occur as conduits in the upper aquitard that connect the underlying aquifer to the surface through which groundwater discharges at high velocities. Groundwater preferentially discharging through boils contains up to hundred times more salt than diffuse forms of groundwater discharge. The upconing of deep saline groundwater induced by the localized, high-velocity flow through boils is the mechanism that leads to the high boil water salinities. The local boil system and associated natural salt water upconing were explored in the field in three different hydrogeological settings. Measurements of the aquifer salinity distribution, temperature, boil discharge, boil salinity and aquifer heads showed that the preferential flow through boils creates localized and narrow saltwater upconing spikes. The possibility to seal the boil at its source vent as a measure to abate surface water salinization was explored in the field. Numerical modeling with the code SEAWAT was applied to investigate the upconing processes in more detail. The field measurements were largely reproduced by the numerical model. 56 different cases, which differ in aquifer properties, salinity distribution, boil discharge and lateral regional flow,were defined to determine the most important boil salinity controlling factors. For each upconing case the sources of boil water, i.e. the contribution to boil discharge from different aquifer depths, were derived from the model results. The contributing depth distributions showed a form opposite to the aquifer salinity distribution, with higher contributions from shallower and less saline groundwater. This illustrates the importance of the density distribution in the aquifer on the saltwater upconing mechanism. The numerical results showed that the most important factors controlling the contributing depths and boil salinity are boil discharge, the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, the depth of the interface and the salinity (and therefore density) contrast within the aquifer. Within a small area of clustered boils, boil salinity varies between individual boils and is determined by the combination of its discharge and its position within the boil area, whereas the total discharge of boil clusters is the principal factor that controls natural saltwater upconing and total salt loads. Regional lateral flow had a large impact on the upconing mechanism in terms of flow patterns but had a minor effect on both the contribution of saline and fresh groundwater to boil discharge and boil salinity. Both measurements and model results will be presented at the EGU.

  3. High-temperature synthesis of highly hydrothermal stable mesoporous silica and Fe-SiO{sub 2} using ionic liquid as a template

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Mengyang; Hu, Hongjiu; Liang, Yuguang; Wang, Yong; Cao, Weiran; Wang, Xiaohong

    2011-03-15

    Mesoporous silicas and Fe-SiO{sub 2} with worm-like structures have been synthesized using a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-hexadecane-3-methylimidazolium bromide, as a template at a high aging temperature (150-190 {sup o}C) with the assistance of NaF. The hydrothermal stability of mesoporous silica was effectively improved by increasing the aging temperature and adding NaF to the synthesis gel. High hydrothermally stable mesoporous silica was obtained after being aged at 190 {sup o}C in the presence of NaF, which endured the hydrothermal treatment in boiling water at least for 10 d or steam treatment at 600 {sup o}C for 6 h. The ultra hydrothermal stability could be attributed to its high degree of polymerization of silicate. Furthermore, highly hydrothermal stable mesoporous Fe-SiO{sub 2} has been synthesized, which still remained its mesostructure after being hydrothermally treated at 100 {sup o}C for 12 d or steam-treated at 600 {sup o}C for 6 h. -- Graphical abstract: Worm-like mesoporous silica and Fe-SiO{sub 2} with high hydrothermal stability have been synthesized using ionic liquid 1-hexadecane-3-methylimidazolium bromide as a template under the assistance of NaF at high temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Increasing aging temperature improved the hydrothermal stability of materials. {yields}Addition of NaF enhanced the polymerization degree of silicates. {yields} Mesoporous SiO{sub 2} and Fe-SiO{sub 2} obtained have remarkable hydrothermal stability.

  4. Phreatic and Hydrothermal Explosions: A Laboratory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatic eruptions are amongst the most common eruption types on earth. They might be precursory to another type of volcanic eruption but often they stand on their one. Despite being the most common eruption type, they also are one of the most diverse eruptions, in appearance as well as on eruption mechanism. Yet steam is the common fuel behind all phreatic eruptions. The steam-driven explosions occur when water beneath the ground or on the surface is heated by magma, lava, hot rocks, or fresh volcanic deposits (such as ignimbrites, tephra and pyroclastic-flow deposits) and result in crater, tuff rings and debris avalanches. The intense heat of such material may cause water to boil and flash to steam, thereby generating an explosion of steam, water, ash, blocks, and bombs. Another wide and important field affected by phreatic explosions are hydrothermal areas; here phreatic explosions occur every few months creating explosion craters and resemble a significant hazard to hydrothermal power plants. Despite of their hazard potential, phreatic explosions have so far been overlooked by the field of experimental volcanology. A part of their hazard potential in owned by the fact that phreatic explosions are hardly predictable in occurrence time and size as they have manifold triggers (variances in groundwater and heat systems, earthquakes, material fatigue, water level, etc..) A new set of experiments has been designed to focus on this phreatic type of steam explosion, whereas classical phreatomagmatic experiments use molten fuel-coolant interaction (e.g., Zimanowski, et al., 1991). The violent transition of the superheated water to vapour adds another degree of explosivity to the dry magmatic fragmentation, driven mostly by vesicle bursting due to internal gas overpressure. At low water fractions the fragmentation is strongly enforced by the mixture of these two effects and a large fraction of fine pyroclasts are produced, whereas at high water fraction in the sample the fragmentation is less violent as its dry counterpart. The experimental conditions used it this study (varying degree of water saturation, moderate overpressure, 200- 300°C) applies e.g. to volcanic rocks as well as country rocks at depth of about 100-800 m in a conduit or dome bearing a fraction of ground water and being heated from magma rising beneath (150-400°C). The diversity of phreatic eruptions at a volcanic system (vent) arises from the variety of host rocks, ways to seal the conduit, and to alter this material depending on the composition of volcanic gases. Here, we assess the influence of rapid decompression of the supercritical water phase in the pore space of samples, on the fragmentation behaviour. This will enable us to elucidate the characteristics of the different “fuels” for explosive fragmentation (gas overpressure, steam flashing), as well as their interplay.

  5. Magmatic contributions to hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Hedenquist, Jeffrey W.; Kesler, Stephen E.; Izawa, Eiji

    Although there is agreement that many hydrothermal systems in the upper crust derive their thermal energy from magmas, debate continues over the extent to which magmas contribute water, metals, and sulfur to hydrothermal systems. A multidisciplinary seminar was held November 10-16, 1991, in Ebino and Kagoshima, Japan, to establish current understanding about this topic and to explore the major unanswered questions and the most promising research directions. The thirty-eight participants were from Japan (eighteen), the U.S. (thirteen), Canada and New Zealand (two each), and England, the Philippines, and Russia (one each). Disciplines represented were volcanology, geochemistry (volcanic-gas, water, isotopes, experimental, and modeling), igneous petrology, geothermal geology, economic geology, fluid-inclusion study, geophysics, and physical modeling.

  6. Optimizing the Combination of Smoking and Boiling on Quality of Korean Traditional Boiled Loin (M. longissimus dorsi)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of smoking and boiling on the proximate composition, technological quality traits, shear force, and sensory characteristics of the Korean traditional boiled loin were studied. Cooking loss, processing loss, and shear force were lower in the smoked/boiled samples than those in the control (without smoking treatment) (p<0.05). The results showed that the boiled loin samples between the control and treatment did not differ significantly in protein, fat, or ash contents, or pH values (p>0.05). The treated samples had higher score for overall acceptability than the control (p<0.05). Thus, these results show that the Korean traditional boiled loin treated with smoking for 60 min before boiling had improved physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics.

  7. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryocooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  8. Implementation of Sub-Cooling of Cryogenic Propellants by Injection of Non-condensing Gas to the Generalized Fluid Systems Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, Daniel J.; Majumdar, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants are readily heated when used. This poses a problem for rocket engine efficiency and effective boot-strapping of the engine, as seen in the "hot" LOX (Liquid Oxygen) problem on the S-1 stage of the Saturn vehicle. In order to remedy this issue, cryogenic fluids were found to be sub-cooled by injection of a warm non-condensing gas. Experimental results show that the mechanism behind the sub-cooling is evaporative cooling. It has been shown that a sub-cooled temperature difference of approximately 13 deg F below saturation temperature [1]. The phenomenon of sub-cooling of cryogenic propellants by a non-condensing gas is not readily available with the General Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) [2]. GFSSP is a thermal-fluid program used to analyze a wide variety of systems that are directly impacted by thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. In order to model this phenomenon, additional capabilities had to be added to GFSSP in the form of a FORTRAN coded sub-routine to calculate the temperature of the sub-cooled fluid. Once this was accomplished, the sub-routine was implemented to a GFSSP model that was created to replicate an experiment that was conducted to validate the GFSSP results.

  9. Triops (Entomostraca) eggs killed only by boiling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D B

    1968-07-19

    Temporary rainpools near Khartoum, Sudan, are inhabited by the notostracan crustacean Triops which completes its life cycle within 4 weeks. The annual rains fall in late summer, and throughout the winter and early summer the eggs of Triops remain in the dried mud or dust where they may be exposed to temperatures up to 80 degrees C. Laboratory experiments show that they can withstand temperatures up to within 1 degrees C of boiling, but are killed in partial vacuum by 70 degrees C, at atmospheric pressure by 100 degrees C, or under pressure by 105 degrees C. Exposure to high temperature seems to be necessary to break the egg diapause. PMID:5690518

  10. Vapliq hydrothermal systems, and the vertical permeability of Los Azufres, Mexico, geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Arellano, Victor M.

    1988-01-01

    We identify a new category of natural hydrothermal systems intermediate between liquid- and vapor-dominated. This category is characterized by a “vapliq” vertical pressure profile, which is nearly vaporstatic in the shallower portion of the system, and nearly boiling-point-for-depth at depth. The prototype of these systems is the geothermal field of Los Azufres, Mexico. To explore the thermohydrological conditions conducent to this type of system, we propose a 1-D vertical scenario based on generally accepted conceptual models of liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. We use the corresponding mass and thermal energy transport equations to establish that a necessary condition for the existence of 2-phase hydrothermal systems is that the absolute value of the vertical thermal flux must exceed Q{sub min}, a parameter that depends only on the values of the pressure and of the thermal conductivity at the boiling point of the system. The values of Q{sub min} are typically 1-4 times the average terrestrial flux. We also find that geothermal systems in which convective heat transport is accomplished by the well-known heat-pipe mechanism can exist only if the corresponding heat flux exceeds Q{sub min} and the permeability at the boiling point of the system is smaller than k{sub Bmax}, a parameter that depends only on the values of the pressure and of the thermal conductivity at the boiling point. Typical values of k{sub Bmax} are 1-3 {times} 10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, suggesting a reason for the fact that all vapor-dominated systems are associated with very-low matrix permeability formations. Applying these insights, and the mass and heat transport equations to Los Azufres, we conclude that a contrast of 1-3 orders of magnitude exists between the vertical permeability at the boiling point and that corresponding to the vapor-dominated portion of the system. We propose that similar permeability contrasts may be responsible for the characteristic composite pressure observed in other vapliq systems.

  11. Hydrothermal vent complexes associated with sill intrusionsin sedimentarybasins

    E-print Network

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    Hydrothermal vent complexes associated with sill intrusionsin sedimentarybasins BJIbRNJAMTVEIT1 sedimentarybasinscause strongthermal perturbations and frequentlycause extensivehydrothermalactivity.Hydrothermal vent strata surrounding a central vent complex. comprisingmultiplesandstone dykes, pipes, and hydrothermal

  12. SWR 1000: The Innovative Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brettschuh, Werner; Hudson, Greg

    2004-07-01

    Framatome ANP has developed the boiling water reactor SWR 1000 in close cooperation with German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners. This advanced reactor design marks a new era in the successful tradition of boiling water reactor technology and, with a gross electric output of between 1290 and 1330 MW, is aimed at assuring competitive power generating costs compared to gas- and coal-fired stations. At the same time, the SWR 1000 meets the highest safety standards, including control of a core melt accident these objectives are met by supplementing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. The plant is also protected against airplane crash loads. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths of between 12 and 24 months and a high fuel discharge burn-up all contribute towards meeting economic goals. The SWR 1000 fulfills international nuclear regulatory requirements and has been offered to TVO for the fifth nuclear unit in Finland. (authors)

  13. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  14. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in binary compressible fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiewei; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We numerically study the thermohydrodynamics of boiling for a CO_{2} + ethanol mixture on lyophilic and lyophobic surfaces in both closed and open systems, based on a diffuse interface model for a two-component system. The corresponding wetting boundary conditions for an isothermal system are proposed and verified in this paper. New phenomena due to the addition of another component, mainly the preferential evaporation of the more volatile component, are observed. In the open system and the closed system, the physical process shows very different characteristics. In the open system, except for the movement of the contact line, the qualitative features are rather similar for lyophobic and lyophilic surfaces. In the closed system, the vortices that are observed on a lyophobic surface are not seen on a lyophilic surface. More sophisticated wetting boundary conditions for nonisothermal, two-component systems might need to be further developed, taking into account the variations of density, temperature, and surface tension near the wall, while numerical results show that the boundary conditions proposed here also work well even in boiling, where the temperature is nonuniform. PMID:26565342

  15. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in binary compressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiewei; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We numerically study the thermohydrodynamics of boiling for a CO2 + ethanol mixture on lyophilic and lyophobic surfaces in both closed and open systems, based on a diffuse interface model for a two-component system. The corresponding wetting boundary conditions for an isothermal system are proposed and verified in this paper. New phenomena due to the addition of another component, mainly the preferential evaporation of the more volatile component, are observed. In the open system and the closed system, the physical process shows very different characteristics. In the open system, except for the movement of the contact line, the qualitative features are rather similar for lyophobic and lyophilic surfaces. In the closed system, the vortices that are observed on a lyophobic surface are not seen on a lyophilic surface. More sophisticated wetting boundary conditions for nonisothermal, two-component systems might need to be further developed, taking into account the variations of density, temperature, and surface tension near the wall, while numerical results show that the boundary conditions proposed here also work well even in boiling, where the temperature is nonuniform.

  16. Electrohydrodynamically enhanced heat transfer in pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Geppert, C.A.; Geppert, L.M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1995-12-31

    The electrohydrodynamically enhanced heat transfer in pool boiling in the nucleate regime was studied using R-123 as the working fluid. An experimental apparatus was designed and built which allowed accurate measurements. The evaporator consisted of an electrically heated single horizontal smooth tube. Several different electrode designs were investigated. This study included higher heat fluxes than most of those previously reported in the literature. A summary of the previous work is provided. The results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient at a heat flux of 1.6 kW/m{sup 2} and a voltage of 10 kV was 4.6 times higher than the heat transfer coefficient without the electric field presence. However, the heat transfer coefficient at 52 kW/m{sup 2} and 10 kV was improved only by 38%. These enhancements are significant even at large heat flux levels. The power consumption for establishing the electric fields was on the order of 0.1% of the heat transfer power in the evaporator. When R-123 fluid was contaminated with a few percent ethanol, the boiling heat transfer at 3.3 kW/m{sup 2} was increased by a factor of 12.6 at 15 kV compared to zero kV. Finally, the presence of the electric fields nearly eliminated the hysteresis effect.

  17. A method of correlating heat transfer data for surface boiling of liquids

    E-print Network

    Rohsenow, Warren M.

    1951-01-01

    A method based an a logical uxplanation of the meani of beat transfer associated with the boiling process is presented for correlating heat transfer data for nucleate boiling of liquids for the case of pool boiling. Tbe ...

  18. 77 FR 38338 - Dairyland Power Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...Background The La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor (LACBWR) is owned and...forced-circulation, direct-cycle boiling water reactor as its heat source....

  19. 77 FR 38339 - Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...Cooperative, La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...Background The La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor (LACBWR) is owned and...forced-circulation, direct-cycle boiling water reactor as its heat source....

  20. Densities of liquids and vapors in boiling NaCl-H2O solutions: a PVTx summary from 300° to 500°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data for densities of liquids and vapors on the two-phase surface of the system NaCl-H2O were compiled and evaluated to provide a complete summary between 300° and 500°C. The results are added to a previously published PTx summary compiled in the same manner to provide a PVTx summary of the present state of knowledge. Results are in table form of use to the understanding of two-phase behaviour in boiling hydrothermal systems and to theoretical modeling of this important system. 

  1. Conditions leading to a recent small hydrothermal explosion at Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M.; Cunningham, C.G.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Porkchop Geyser, in Yellowstone National Park, was the site of a small hydrothermal explosion on September 5, 1989. The geyser column suddenly rose to a height of 20-30 m, followed immediately by the explosive ejection of sinter blocks up to 1.88 m in maximum dimension and formation of an irregular crater 13.9 m long and 11.7 m wide. The ejected blocks show a variety of siliceous deposits indicative of changing environments of deposition with time, and possibly of prior hydrothermal explosive activity at this site. Water samples from Porkchop were collected and analyzed once in the 1920s, again in 1951, ten times between 1960 and mid-1989, and once in January 1990 after the explosion. It is hypothesized that a sudden breaking loose of the constriction at the exit of the geyser tube, likely triggered by a seasonal increase in subsurface boiling throughout Norris Basin, allowed water and steam to be discharged from Porkchop much more rapidly than previously. This resulted in a drop in pressure within the geyser tube, causing water in adjacent connected chambers to become superheated. An ensuing rapid flashing of superheated water to steam within relatively confined spaces resulted in the hydrothermal explosion. -after Authors

  2. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (Runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported.

  3. 18. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Detail of floor with molasses pits below floor level. The remaining floor boards indicate the structure of the floor covering the entire inside of the boiling house. In the left background the base of the centrifugals are in view. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  4. 17. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House, 1878. View: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House, 1878. View: Southwest corner of boiling house. The amimal-powered cane mill is located in the undergrowth in the right foreground, - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  5. Explosive Boiling at Very Low Heat Fluxes: A Microgravity Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents experimental observations of explosive boiling from a large (relative to bubble sizes) flat heating surface at very low heat fluxes in microgravity. The explosive boiling is characterized as either a rapid growth of vapor mass over the entire heating surface due to the flashing of superheated liquid or a violent boiling spread following the appearance of single bubbles on the heating surface. Pool boiling data with saturated Freon 113 was obtained in the microgravity environment of the space shuttle. The unique features of the experimental results are the sustainability of high liquid superheat for long periods and the occurrence of explosive boiling at low heat fluxes (0.2 to 1.2 kW/sq m). For a heat flux of 1.0 kW/sq m a wall superheat of 17.9 degrees C was attained in ten minutes of heating. This was followed by an explosive boiling accompanied with a pressure spike and a violent bulk liquid motion. However, at this heat flux the vapor blanketing the heating surface could not be sustained. Stable nucleate boiling continued following the explosive boiling.

  6. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  7. ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, John E.

    ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING WATER REACTOR AND THE HEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.1 Temperature Wave with Lateral Heat Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.2 One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor - General Description . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1 Modifications

  8. Recent population expansion and connectivity in the hydrothermal shrimp

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Recent population expansion and connectivity in the hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris of the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, which forms high-density local populations on hydrothermal vents along

  9. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles ‘on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  10. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  11. Microbiological Effectiveness of Disinfecting Water by Boiling in Rural Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Miller, Laura; Clasen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Boiling is the most common means of treating water in the home and the benchmark against which alternative point-of-use water treatment options must be compared. In a 5-week study in rural Guatemala among 45 households who claimed they always or almost always boiled their drinking water, boiling was associated with a 86.2% reduction in geometric mean thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) (N = 206, P < 0.0001). Despite consistent levels of fecal contamination in source water, 71.2% of stored water samples from self-reported boilers met the World Health Organization guidelines for safe drinking water (0 TTC/100 mL), and 10.7% fell within the commonly accepted low-risk category of (1–10 TTC/100 mL). As actually practiced in the study community, boiling significantly improved the microbiological quality of drinking water, though boiled and stored drinking water is not always free of fecal contaminations. PMID:20207876

  12. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Cho, H Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles 'on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  13. Reliquefaction of boil-off from liquefied natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P.J.

    1989-07-11

    This patent describes a process for liquifying boil-off gas resulting from the evaporation of liquified natural gas contained in a storage vessel. The boil-off gas is cooled and liquified in a closed-loop refrigeration system and then returned to the storage vessel wherein. The closed-loop refrigeration system comprises the steps: compressing nitrogen as a working fluid in a compressor system to form a compressed working fluid; splitting the compressed working fluid into a first and second stream; isenthalpically expanding the first stream to produce a cooled first stream, then warming against boil-off gas and compressed working fluid; and isentropically expanding the second stream to form a cooled expanded stream which is then warmed against boil-off gas to form at least partially condensed boil-off prior to warming against the working fluid and prior to return to the compressor system.

  14. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-10-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles `on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  15. Hydrothermal Solute Flux from Ebeko Volcanic Center, Paramushir, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kalacheva, E.; Kotenko, T.; Chaplygin, I.

    2014-12-01

    Ebeko volcano on the northern part of Paramushir Island, Northern Kurils, is characterized by frequent phreatic eruptions, a strong low-temperature fumarolic activity at the summit and was the object of comprehensive volcanological and geochemical studies during the last half a century. The volcanic center is composed of several Pleistocene volcanic structures aadjacent to Ebeko and hosts a hydrothermal system with a high outflow rate of hot SO4-Cl acidic water (Upper Yurieva springs) with the current maximum temperature of ~85oC, pH 1.3 and TDS ~ 10 g/L. All discharging thermal waters are drained by the Yurieva River to the Sea of Okhotsk. The hot springs have been changing in time, generally decreasing their activity from near boiling in 1960s, with TDS ~ 20 g/L and the presence of a small steaming field at the upper part of the ~ 700 m long discharging area, to a much lower discharge rate of main vents, lower temperature and the absence of the steaming ground. The spring chemistry did not react to the Ebeko volcanic activity (14 strong phreato-magmatic events during the last 60 years).The total measured outputs of chloride and sulfur from the system last time (2006-2010) were estimated on average as 730 g/s and 980 g/s, respectively, which corresponds to the equivalent fluxes of 64 t/d of HCl and 169 t/d of SO2. These values are higher than the fumarolic volatile output from Ebeko. The estimated discharge rate of hot (85oC) water from the system with ~ 3500 ppm of chloride is about 0.3 m3/s which is much higher than the thermal water discharge from El Chichon or Copahue volcano-hydrothermal systems and among the highest hot water natural outputs ever measured for a volcano-hydrothermal system. We also report the chemical composition (major and ~ 60 trace elements including REE) of water from the main hot spring vents and the Yurieva river mouth.

  16. Size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of the boiling point distribution of high-boiling petroleum fractions.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kami?ski, Marian

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes a new procedure for the determination of boiling point distribution of high-boiling petroleum fractions using size-exclusion chromatography with refractive index detection. Thus far, the determination of boiling range distribution by chromatography has been accomplished using simulated distillation with gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This study revealed that in spite of substantial differences in the separation mechanism and the detection mode, the size-exclusion chromatography technique yields similar results for the determination of boiling point distribution compared with simulated distillation and novel empty column gas chromatography. The developed procedure using size-exclusion chromatography has a substantial applicability, especially for the determination of exact final boiling point values for high-boiling mixtures, for which a standard high-temperature simulated distillation would have to be used. In this case, the precision of final boiling point determination is low due to the high final temperatures of the gas chromatograph oven and an insufficient thermal stability of both the gas chromatography stationary phase and the sample. Additionally, the use of high-performance liquid chromatography detectors more sensitive than refractive index detection allows a lower detection limit for high-molar-mass aromatic compounds, and thus increases the sensitivity of final boiling point determination. PMID:25545251

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chirayil, T.; Zavalij, P.Y.; Whittingham, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The use of mild hydrothermal methods to synthesize vanadium oxides is reviewed, with particular emphasis on those with layer and 3-dimensional structures. A wide range of studies have been performed predominantly in the past decade to grow new materials that might have interesting electrochemical and magnetic properties. Most emphasis has been placed on vanadium oxides that contain organic species or simple cations such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, zinc and copper. The key parameters determining the structures formed are reviewed, including pH and the organic structure-directing ion. Some initial electrochemical studies are described.

  18. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  19. Hydrothermal metamorphism in the Larderello Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Cavarretta, G.; Gianelli, G.; Puxeddu, M.

    1980-01-01

    The various tectonic units underlying the Larderello-Travale geothermal region have undergone hydrothermal metamorphism. The hydrothermal mineral assemblages are generally consistent with the temperatures now measured in the wells, leading to the hypothesis that solid phases deposited from a liquid medium during a hot-water stage that preceded the vapor-dominated one. 61 refs.

  20. Hydrothermal surface alteration in the Copahue Geothermal Field (Argentina)

    SciTech Connect

    Mas, G.R.; Bengochea, L.; Mas, L.C.

    1996-12-31

    In the area of the Copahue Geothermal Field, there are five active geothermal manifestations, which mainly consist of fumaroles, hot springs and mud pots. Four of these manifestations are located in Argentina: Las Maquinas, Tennas de Copahue, Las Maquinitas and El Anfiteatro, and the fifth on the Chilean side: Chancho Co. All of them present a strong acid sulfate country rock alteration, characterized by the assemblage alunite + kaolinite + quartz + cristobalite + pyrite + sulfur + jarosite, as the result of the base leaching by fluids concentrated in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, by atmospheric oxidation at the water table in a steam heated environment of H{sub 2}S released by deeper boiling fluids. Another alteration zone in this area, called COP-2, is a fossil geothermal manifestation which shows characteristics of neutral to alkaline alteration represented mainly by the siliceous sinter superimposed over the acid alteration. The mineralogy and zoning of these alteration zones, and their relation with the hydrothermal solutions and the major structures of the area are analyzed.

  1. Hydrothermal upgrading of algae paste in a continuous flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavish; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    This investigation demonstrates the utility of a novel laboratory scale continuous plug flow reactor for fast Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) of microalgae in a quartz lined chamber. Reactions were carried out between 300 and 380 °C and residence times of 0.5-4 min. Cyclohexane was used as a co-solvent to enhance extraction and prevent char formation. Highest biocrude yield of 38 wt.% was achieved at 380 °C and 30 s as well as Water Soluble Fraction containing up to 60 wt.% matter recovered. Analysis of the biocrude showed that the extent of deoxygenation and denitrogenation after HTL varied and is dependent on the reaction conditions, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis showed that biocrude contains similar functional moieties with only a small difference observed at different reaction conditions. Conversely, the Simulated Distillation and Size Exclusion Chromatography data showed that harsher conditions produced marginally better biocrude with improved boiling point profile and lower molecular weight compounds, respectively which was confirmed using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. PMID:25908412

  2. Hybrid modelling of a sugar boiling process

    E-print Network

    Lauret, Alfred Jean Philippe; Gatina, Jean Claude

    2012-01-01

    The first and maybe the most important step in designing a model-based predictive controller is to develop a model that is as accurate as possible and that is valid under a wide range of operating conditions. The sugar boiling process is a strongly nonlinear and nonstationary process. The main process nonlinearities are represented by the crystal growth rate. This paper addresses the development of the crystal growth rate model according to two approaches. The first approach is classical and consists of determining the parameters of the empirical expressions of the growth rate through the use of a nonlinear programming optimization technique. The second is a novel modeling strategy that combines an artificial neural network (ANN) as an approximator of the growth rate with prior knowledge represented by the mass balance of sucrose crystals. The first results show that the first type of model performs local fitting while the second offers a greater flexibility. The two models were developed with industrial data...

  3. The Physics of Boiling at Burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofanous, T. G.; Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Salmassi, T.; Dinh, A. T.; Gasljevic, K.

    2000-01-01

    The basic elements of a new experimental approach for the investigation of burnout in pool boiling are presented. The approach consists of the combined use of ultrathin (nano-scale) heaters and high speed infrared imaging of the heater temperature pattern as a whole, in conjunction with highly detailed control and characterization of heater morphology at the nano and micron scales. It is shown that the burnout phenomenon can be resolved in both space and time. Ultrathin heaters capable of dissipating power levels, at steady-state, of over 1 MW/square m are demonstrated. A separation of scales is identified and it is used to transfer the focus of attention from the complexity of the two-phase mixing layer in the vicinity of the heater to a micron-scaled microlayer and nucleation and associated film-disruption processes within it.

  4. Boiling Performance of Antifreeze Solutions in a Saturate Pool Boiling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Kunihito; Kaminaga, Fumito

    Nucleate boiling of binary mixtures is of particular importance in a various industries. The purpose of the present study is to provide experimental data and prediction method for nucleate boiling heat transfer of anti-freeze solutions, Propylene-glycol (PG)/water and Ethylene-glycol (EG)/water. The pool nucleate boiling experiments were carried out under a saturated and atmospheric condition. The platinum wire of 0.3 mm diameter was used as the heating surface. The mole fractions of solutions are varied from 0.85 to 1. It was found that the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases with increasing fraction of anti-freeze to water. It was also shown that a small addition of propylene-glycol and ethylene-glycol also decreases the CHF value far below that of pure water. It is concluded that the correlation proposed by Fujita for several binary mixtures can well predict the heat transfer coefficients within almost ±5% accuracy for every concentration of present anti-freeze solutions.

  5. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  6. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-Iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical `footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus.

  7. Reliquefaction of boil-off from liquefied natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Stuber, W.G.; Kovak, K.W.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a process for liquifying boil-off gas resulting from the evaporation of liquified natural gas contained in a storage vessel, the boil-off gas being cooled and liquified in a closed-loop nitrogen refrigeration system and then returned to the storage vessel. The closed loop refrigeration system comprises the following steps: compressing nitrogen as a working fluid in a multi-stage compressor system having an initial and final stage to form a compressed working fluid; splitting the compressed working fluid into a first and second stream; isenthalpically expanding the first stream to produce a cooled first stream, then warming against recycle compressed working fluid and boil-off gas; isentropically expanding the second stream to form a cooled expanded stream which is then warmed against boil-off gas and working fluid prior to return to the compressor system; the improvement for reliquefying a boil-off gas containing from about 0 to 10% nitrogen by volume. It comprises: effecting isenthalpic expansion of the first stream under conditions such that at least a liquid fraction is generated; separating any vapor fraction, if generated, from the liquid fraction; warming the vapor fraction, if generated, against boil-off gas and recycle compressed working fluid; pressurizing the liquid fraction formed by pumping; warming the pressurized liquid fraction first against boil-off gas and then in parallel with the warming of the isentropically expanded second stream.

  8. Characterizing preferential groundwater discharge through boils using temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, A.; de Louw, P. G. B.; Doornenbal, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    In The Netherlands, preferential groundwater discharge trough boils is a key process in the salinization of deep polders. Previous work showed that boils also influence the temperature in the subsurface and of surface water. This paper elaborates on this process combining field observations with numerical modeling. As is the case for salinity, a distinct anomaly in the subsurface and surface water temperature can be attributed to boils. Lines of equal temperature are distorted towards the boil, which can be considered as an upconing of the temperature profile by analogy of the upconing of a fresh-saltwater interface. The zone of this distortion is limited to the immediate vicinity of the boil, being about 5 m in the aquitard which holds the boil's conduit, or maximum a few dozens of meters in the underlying aquifer. In the aquitard, heat transport is conduction dominated whereas this is convection dominated in the aquifer. The temperature anomaly differs from the salinity anomaly by the smaller radius of influence and faster time to reach a new steady-state of the former. Boils discharge water with a temperature equal to the mean groundwater temperature. This influences the yearly and diurnal variation of ditch water temperature in the immediate vicinity of the boil importantly but also the temperature in the downstream direction. Temporary nature of the boil (e.g. stability of the conduit, discharge rate), uncertainty on the 3D construction of the conduit and heterogeneity of the subsoil make it unlikely that temperature measurements can be interpreted further than a qualitative level.

  9. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  10. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  11. New equations predict boiling point from viscosity, gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J.V.

    1996-10-07

    A simple numerical routine computes the normal boiling point of light and heavy petroleum fractions as a function of kinematic viscosities at 100 F abd 219 F and specific gravity at 60 F. The algorithm makes use of a single nonlinear equation with one unknown variable (boiling point), which requires numerical solution. A convenient correlation generates starting values for mean average boiling point (MeABP) that are accurate enough to allow convergence in three or fewer iterations. The paper discusses the need for new equations, the new approach, and the calculations.

  12. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy effects become significant to the boiling process (2) the effect of lower liquid flow velocities on the Critical Heat Flux when buoyancy is removed. Results of initial efforts in these directions are presented, albeit restricted currently to the ever present earth gravity.

  13. Effect of tube inclination on pool boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, M.G.

    2000-02-01

    An experimental parametric study of a tubular heat exchanger has been carried out under pool boiling conditions to determine effects of the tube inclination angle on pool boiling heat transfer. Through the study, it can be concluded that (1) tube inclination gives much change on pool boiling heat transfer and the effect of the inclination angle is more strongly observed in the smooth tube and (2) if a tube is properly inclined, enhanced heat transfer is expected due to the decrease in bubble slug formation on the tube surface and easy liquid access to the surface.

  14. Phase change of a confined subcooled simple liquid in a nanoscale cavity P. A. E. Schoen, D. Poulikakos,* and S. Arcidiacono

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    and the response of the membrane is given by v^ = v^0 1 + Ctr p/p0 1 where v^0 is the bulk specific volume wherePhase change of a confined subcooled simple liquid in a nanoscale cavity P. A. E. Schoen, D December 2004; published 1 April 2005 The phase transition of a simple liquid bounded between two parallel

  15. CASE STUDIES OF FLUID TRANSIENTS IN SUBCOOLED Anton Bergant, Litostroj E.I. d.o.o., Slovenia, anton.bergant@litostroj-ei.si

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Feasibility and design studies of new and ageing piping systems carrying subcooled1 fluid flow should include, slug flow, plug flow and fluid- structure interaction in the system. Fluid transients may severely of the sudden load rejection of a horizontal-shaft Francis turbine in Pluzna hydro power plant, Slovenia

  16. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-01

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges. PMID:14999274

  17. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-09-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  18. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  19. An Analytical Approach for Relating Boiling Points of Monofunctional Organic Compounds to Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2011-01-01

    The boiling point of a monofunctional organic compound is expressed as the sum of two parts: a contribution to the boiling point due to the R group and a contribution due to the functional group. The boiling point in absolute temperature of the corresponding RH hydrocarbon is chosen for the contribution to the boiling point of the R group and is a…

  20. What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

    1995-01-01

    Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

  1. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    PubMed

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes. PMID:17793659

  2. Hydrothermal processing of actinide contaminated organic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, A.; Buelow, S.J.; Le, L.A.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrothermal oxidation is an innovative process for the destruction of organic wastes, that occurs above the critical temperature and pressure of water. The process provides high destruction and removal efficiencies for a wide variety of organic and hazardous substances. For aqueous/organic mixtures, organic materials, and pure organic liquids hydrothermal processing removes most of the organic and nitrate components (>99.999%) and facilitates the collection and separation of the actinides. We have designed, built and tested a hydrothermal processing unit for the removal of the organic and hazardous substances from actinide contaminated liquids and solids. Here we present results for the organic generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility.

  3. Critical boiling phenomena observed in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrabos, Y.; Chabot, C.; Wunenburger, R.; Delville, J.-P.; Beysens, D.

    1999-06-01

    We report experimental observations of the critical boiling when co-existing gas and liquid phases of pure fluid are heated under weigthlessness through the critical point. We find that when the system's temperature T is being increased to the critical temperature Tc so that it's slightly out of equilibrium, the apparent contact angle becomes very large (up to 110 circ). The gas appears to "web" the solid surface. In addition, we detect large temperature gradients between the (hot) gas phase and the (cold) liquid phase in the interferometric cell. These unexpected results are robust: they are observed either under continuous heating (ramping) or stepping by positive temperature quenches, for various morphologies of the gas bubble and in different fluids (SF6 and CO2). The difference in isentropic thermal responses of gas and liquid during heating, due to the adiabatic heating by the "Piston Effect", is responsible for the temperature non-homogeneities. The vapour recoil force due to liquid evaporation, which is involved in the boiling crisis in heat exchangers, is presumably at the origin of the interface deformation. Nous rapportons les observations expérimentales obtenues en chaffant un fluide pur diphasique gaz-liquide en coexistence au cours de la traversée de son point critique en absence de pesanteur. Lorsque la température du système diphasique hors d'équilibre est augmentée vers la température critique, nous observons en transmission un angle de contact apparent de la vapeur très important (atteignant 110 circ), le gaz semblant "mouiller" la surface solide. De plus, d'importants gradients de température entre la phase gaz chaude et la phase liquide froide sont mesurés dans les cellules observées par interférométrie. Ces résultats inattendus sont observés pour un chauffage continu (rampe) et par trempe positive (échelon), pour différents rapports d'aspect du système diphasique, pour des cellules de CO2 et de SF6, démontrant ainsi une grande robustesse. Les réponses isentropiques différentes du gaz et du liquide lors du chauffage par effet piston sont certainement responsables des inhomogénéités de température. La force de recul de la vapeur due à l'évaporation pourrait être la cause dominante de la déformation de l'interface liquide-vapeur à l'approche de la température de transition.

  4. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  5. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  6. Hydrodynamics, heat transfer and flow boiling instabilities in microchannels 

    E-print Network

    Barber, Jacqueline Claire

    2010-01-01

    Boiling in microchannels is a very efficient mode of heat transfer with high heat and mass transfer coefficients achieved. Less pumping power is required for two-phase flows than for single-phase liquid flows to achieve ...

  7. BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR. WAREHOUSE TO LEFT REAR, MASSECUITTE HEATERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR. WAREHOUSE TO LEFT REAR, MASSECUITTE HEATERS ABOVE RIGHT, LOW GRADE CENTRIFUGALS BELOW. CRYSTALLIZER HOT WATER TANK TO REAR. VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  8. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-print Network

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  9. BOILING HOUSE, SECOND FLOOR, FROM TOP OF GARVER CLARIFIER, MUD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, SECOND FLOOR, FROM TOP OF GARVER CLARIFIER, MUD FILTERS AND CAUSTIC SODA TANKS TO THE LEFT. VIEW FROM THE EAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  10. BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN BACKGROUND, THE ELEVATOR AND STAIRS GOING UP. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  11. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, CLARIFIERS, SIEP TO THE LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, CLARIFIERS, SIEP TO THE LEFT, WITH CLARIFIER FLASH TANK ABOVE, SAMPLING STATION TO THE LEFT. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  12. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-print Network

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  13. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment - Duration: 21 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  14. Why Is NASA Boiling Fluids in Space? - Duration: 59 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Convection and buoyancy work differently in space than on Earth. Learn how NASA uses this information and applies it to everyday life. Boiling fluids in space is easier than it is on Earth. Learn m...

  15. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, SYRUP TANKS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, SYRUP TANKS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, HIGH GRADE VACUUM PANS BEYOND THE SYRUP TANKS. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  16. 20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Remains of south wall. The molasses storage pits are below the floor in the foreground. The remaining piece of floor indicates the form of the entire floor. The sorghum pan and boiling range flue slope from left to right (east to west) and permitted batches of cane juice to flow through the boiling pan by gravity. The beams, joists, truss work are built of northwest pine. The sides and floor boards are built of redwood. The boiling range flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. The corrugated roof appears to be a later addition, not contemporary with mill operation. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  17. Effects of surface parameters on boiling heat transfer phenomena

    E-print Network

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluids, engineered colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in fluid, have been shown to enhance pool and flow boiling CHF. The CHF enhancement was due to nanoparticle deposited on the heater surface, which was verified ...

  18. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 ?m hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance. PMID:23506445

  19. Pressure drop with surface boiling in small-diameter tubes

    E-print Network

    Dr?mer, Thomas

    1964-01-01

    Pressure drop for water flowing in small-diameter tubes under isothermal, nonboiling, and surface-boiling conditions was investigated. Experimental results for local pressure gradient and heattransfer coefficients are ...

  20. Burnout in forced convection nucleate boiling of water

    E-print Network

    Reynolds John Mitchell

    1957-01-01

    Data are presented for burnout in forced coivection nucleate boiling of water at pressures above 500 psia. A dimensionless correlation is devised for. the M.I.T. data which is found to be valid for certain recent data ...

  1. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-print Network

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  2. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, GARVER CLARIFIER IN FOREGROUND, TOPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, GARVER CLARIFIER IN FOREGROUND, TOPS OF LONG TUBE EVAPORATORS IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  3. Relationships between lava types, seafloor morphology, and the occurrence of hydrothermal venting in the ASHES vent field of Axial Volcano. [Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, S.R. )

    1990-08-10

    Deep-towed and submersible photographic surveys within the caldera of Axial Volcano have been integrated with high-resolution bathmetry to produce a geological map of the most active vent field in the caldera. Locations for over 2,000 photographs in and near the vent field were determined using a seafloor transponder network. Then each photograph was described utilizing a classification system which provides detailed information concerning lava type, hydrothermal activity, sediment cover, geological structure, and biology. Resulting data were entered into a digital data base, and computer-generated maps were created that portray spatial relationships between selected geological variables. In general, the entire ASHES field is characterized by pervasive low-temperature venting. The most vigorous venting is concentrated in an approximately 80 m {times} 80 m area where there are several high-temperature vents including some which are producing high-temperature vapor-phase fluids derived from a boiling hydrothermal system. Lava types within the ASHES vent field are grouped into three distinct morphologies: (1) smooth (flat-surfaced, ropy, and whorled) sheet flows, (2) lobate flows, and (3) jumbled-sheet flows. The most intense hydrothermal venting is concentrated in the smooth sheet flows and the lobate flows. The location of the ASHES field is mainly attributable to faulting which defines the southwest caldera wall, but the concentration of intense venting appears to be related also to the spatial distribution of lava types in the vent field and their contrasting permeabilities. Other structural trends of faults and fissures within the field also influence the location of individual events.

  4. 16. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Looking from west to east through boiling house. The sorghum pan is on the right. The beams; joists, and trusses are of northwest pine; side boards are of redwood. A foundation line of a loading dock and smokestack are in the foreground. Both end walls have deteriorated completely. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  5. Critical heat flux in a boiling aqueous dispersion of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokin, B. S.; Belenkiy, M. Ya.; Almjashev, V. I.; Khabensky, V. B.; Almjasheva, O. V.; Gusarov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The effect of nanoparticles in an aqueous dispersion (nanofluid) on the critical heat flux (CHF) removed by boiling liquid from a heat-exchange surface has been studied. It is shown that a nanoparticles layer formed on the heated surface in the course of boiling possesses a hierarchical structure. Hydrophilic properties of this layer and its high permeability facilitating the supply of liquid to vapor bubbles lead to an increase in the CHF density.

  6. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-01-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  7. Boiling and condensing pumped loop microgravity experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Standley, V.H.; Fairchild, J.F. )

    1991-01-10

    Aircraft testing of a boiling and condensing (two-phase) pumped loop system was conducted to investigate transient induced by low gravity (Keplerian) maneuvers. The experiment, unchanged, will repeat a selected aircraft test sequence during its flight aboard a suborbital rocket. Such a test of a two-phase system has never been done. A comparison of aircraft and rocket data, particularly equilibrium conditions, may validate aircraft testing of similar systems: Aircraft testing has been completed and preliminary results indicate that local transients induced by Keplerian maneuvers do not generate sizeable or lasting feedback. System feedback, expected to damp exponentially with loop transit time, {theta}{sub loop} (20 s{lt}{theta}{sub loop}{lt}30 s) is negligible compared to local temperature transients having shorter equilibrium times, {theta}{sub local} (5{lt}{theta}{sub local}{lt}10 s). Since {theta}{sub local} is typically 2 to 5 times shorter than the duration of low gravity, {ital t}{sub 0{minus}{ital g}} (20 s{lt}t{sub 0{minus}{ital g}}{lt}25 s), equilibrium conditions are approximated. Transients following a transition from normal to low gravity resulted from destratification of hot and cold fluid, loss of the liquid convection component in laminar flows, and a reduction in condensing heat transfer.

  8. Optimal boiling temperature for ORC installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Jaros?aw; Mikielewicz, Dariusz

    2012-09-01

    In the paper a research on cost-effective optimum design boiling temperature for Organic Rankine Cycle utilizing low-temperature heat sources is presented. The ratio of the heat exchanger area of the boiler to the power output is used as the objective function. Analytical relations for heat transfer area as well power of the cycle are formulated. Evaporation temperature and inlet temperature of the heat source medium as well its mass flow rate are varied in the optimization method. The optimization is carried out for three working fluids, i.e. R 134a, water and ethanol. The objective function (economics profitability, thermodynamic efficiency) leads to different optimal working conditions in terms of evaporating temperature. Maximum power generation in the near-critical conditions of subcritical ORC is the highest. The choice of the working fluid can greatly affect the objective function which is a measure of power plant cost. Ethanol exhibits a minimum objective function but not necessarily the maximum cycle efficiency.

  9. Esterification of fatty acid catalyzed by hydrothermally stable propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Mar, Win Win; Somsook, Ekasith

    2013-01-01

    Propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been synthesized via one-step strategy at 130°C based on the co-condensation of TEOS and MPTMS in the presence of Pluronic 123 polymer and H?O? in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized solid exhibited hydrothermal stability in boiling water without significant change in textural properties. The catalytic performance of the synthesized solid was studied in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The experimental results revealed that the large mesopore structures of SBA-15-PrSO?H solid synthesized at 130°C could favor a facile access of oleic acid to the acid sites, making the comparable activity to that of phenyl ethyl sulfonic acid functionalized silica and higher than that of dry amberlyst-15. PMID:23728335

  10. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  11. Characteristics of Subcooled Liquid Methane During Passage Through a Spray-Bar Joule-Thompson Thermodynamic Vent System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Schnell, A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted liquid methane (LCH4) testing in November 2006 using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) outfitted with a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). The basic objective was to identify any unusual or unique thermodynamic characteristics associated with subcooled LCH4 that should be considered in the design of space-based TVSs. Thirteen days of testing were performed with total tank heat loads ranging from 720 W to 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. During an updated evaluation of the data, it was noted that as the fluid passed through the Joule Thompson expansion, thermodynamic conditions consistent with the pervasive presence of metastability were indicated. This paper describes the observed thermodynamic conditions that correspond with metastability and effects on TVS performance.

  12. Hydrothermal disturbances at the Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park (USA) in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.; Smith, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    The Norris Geyser Basin in north-central Yellowstone National Park (YNP) experienced a series of notable changes during 2003, including formation of new hot springs and fumaroles, renewed activity of dormant geysers and elevated ground temperatures. This abstract provides a short synopsis of the new hydrothermal activity. In 2000, Yellowstone's tallest geyser, Steamboat, erupted after a dormant period of nearly 9 years. It erupted twice in 2002 and then again on 26 March and 27 April 2003. Surges in flux of thermal water preceding the eruptions (preplay) were recorded by a couplet of temperature data loggers placed in the outlet stream. The data indicated pulses of water flow with 1 and ~3 day intervals. On 10 July 2003, a new thermal feature was reported just west of Nymph Lake, ~ 3.5 km northwest of the Norris Museum. A linear series of vigorous fumaroles, about 75 m long had formed in a forested area, ~ 200 m up a hill on the lake's west shore. Fine particles of rock and mineral fragments coated nearby vegetation. Fumarole temperatures were around the local boiling temperature of water (92° C). After two months, somewhat reduced steam emission was accompanied by discharge of ~ 3-10 gallons per minute of near-neutral thermal water. Trees within 4 meters of the lineament were dead and were being slowly combusted. Porkchop Geyser in Norris' Back Basin had been dormant since it exploded in 1989, littering the nearby area with boulders up to over 1 m in diameter. Since that time, its water had remained well below the boiling temperature of water. From 1 April through 1 July `03, the temperature of waters in Porkchop's vent increased continuously from 67° to 88° C. Each Summer, Norris' Back Basin experiences an "annual disturbance" where individual hot springs and geysers typically show anomalous boiling, and have measurable increases in turbidity, acidity and SO4/Cl ratios. The disturbance has been linked to depressurization of the hydrothermal system as the hydrostatic pressure of the snowmelt-fed groundwater table wanes each summer. This year, the "Norris disturbance" is estimated to have begun on 11 July 2003,when pronounced changes were noted, including thermal pools that were boiled to dryness (e.g., Pearl Geyser), creating fumaroles. Porkchop Geyser erupted for the first time since 1989 on 16 July. New mud pots formed along the Back Basin Trail and increased ground temperatures were noted over an 500 x 300 m area. Park staff noted temperatures up to 94° C at 1 cm beneath the ground surface in areas that were previously cool. Vegetation in the area immediately died and began to break down due to the high temperatures. Yellowstone National Park closed the Back Basin Trail to all visitor travel on 22 July 2003. During the first week of August 2003, the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory installed a temporary monitoring network in the Norris Geyser Basin. University of Utah staff, with equipment and personnel made available by IRIS, UNAVCO, USGS and YNP, installed seven broadband seismometers and five continuous GPS receivers. In addition, YNP deployed a series of temperature data-loggers to record changes in flow from thermal features within the Norris Back Basin. The network is intended to identify ground motions associated with fluid flow within the geyser basin that may accompany eruptions of geysers, boiling episodes or events precursory to hydrothermal explosions. The monitoring network will remain operational for between four and twelve weeks.

  13. Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

  14. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such determinations rely on studies of pieces of deep oceanic crust uplifted by tectonic forces such as along the Southwest Indian Ridge, or more complete sections of oceanic crust called ophiolite sequences which are presently exposed on continents owing to tectonic emplacement. Much of what is thought to happen in submarine hydrothermal systems is inferred from studies of ophiolite sequences, and especially from the better-exposed ophiolites in Oman, Cyprus and North America. The focus of much that follows is on a few general features: pressure, temperature, oxidation states, fluid composition and mineral alteration, because these features will control whether organic synthesis can occur in hydrothermal systems.

  15. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  16. Rare earth element systematics in hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Michard, A. )

    1989-03-01

    Rare earth element concentrations have been measured in hydrothermal solutions from geothermal fields in Italy, Dominica, Valles Caldera, Salton Sea and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The measured abundances show that hydrothermal activity is not expected to affect the REE balance of either continental or oceanic rocks. The REE enrichment of the solutions increases when the pH decreases. High-temperature solutions (> 230{degree}C) percolating through different rock types may show similar REE patterns.

  17. Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids from the PACMANUS, Northeast Pual and Vienna Woods hydrothermal fields, Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Eoghan P.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Saccocia, Peter; Bach, Wolfgang; Craddock, Paul R.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Sylva, Sean P.; Walsh, Emily; Pichler, Thomas; Rosner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Processes controlling the composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in silicic back-arc or near-arc crustal settings remain poorly constrained despite growing evidence for extensive magmatic-hydrothermal activity in such environments. We conducted a survey of vent fluid compositions from two contrasting sites in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea, to examine the influence of variations in host rock composition and magmatic inputs (both a function of arc proximity) on hydrothermal fluid chemistry. Fluid samples were collected from felsic-hosted hydrothermal vent fields located on Pual Ridge (PACMANUS and Northeast (NE) Pual) near the active New Britain Arc and a basalt-hosted vent field (Vienna Woods) located farther from the arc on the Manus Spreading Center. Vienna Woods fluids were characterized by relatively uniform endmember temperatures (273-285 degrees C) and major element compositions, low dissolved CO2 concentrations (4.4 mmol/kg) and high measured pH (4.2-4.9 at 25 degrees C). Temperatures and compositions were highly variable at PACMANUS/NE Pual and a large, newly discovered vent area (Fenway) was observed to be vigorously venting boiling (358 degrees C) fluid. All PACMANUS fluids are characterized by negative delta DH2O values, in contrast to positive values at Vienna Woods, suggesting substantial magmatic water input to circulating fluids at Pual Ridge. Low measured pH (25 degrees C) values (~2.6-2.7), high endmember CO2 (up to 274 mmol/kg) and negative delta 34SH2S values (down to -2.7 permille) in some vent fluids are also consistent with degassing of acid-volatile species from evolved magma. Dissolved CO2 at PACMANUS is more enriched in 13C (-4.1 permille to -2.3 permille) than Vienna Woods (-5.2 permille to -5.7 permille), suggesting a contribution of slab-derived carbon. The mobile elements (e.g. Li, K, Rb, Cs and B) are also greatly enriched in PACMANUS fluids reflecting increased abundances in the crust there relative to the Manus Spreading Center. Variations in alkali and dissolved gas abundances with Cl at PACMANUS and NE Pual suggest that phase separation has affected fluid chemistry despite the low temperatures of many vents. In further contrast to Vienna Woods, substantial modification of PACMANUS/NE Pual fluids has taken place as a result of seawater ingress into the upflow zone. Consistently high measured Mg concentrations as well as trends of increasingly non-conservative SO4 behavior, decreasing endmember Ca/Cl and Sr/Cl ratios with increased Mg indicate extensive subsurface anhydrite deposition is occurring as a result of subsurface seawater entrainment. Decreased pH and endmember Fe/Mn ratios in higher Mg fluids indicate that the associated mixing/cooling gives rise to sulfide deposition and secondary acidity production. Several low temperature (< or = 80 degrees C) fluids at PACMANUS/NE Pual also show evidence for anhydrite dissolution and water-rock interaction (fixation of B) subsequent to seawater entrainment. Hence, the evolution of fluid compositions at Pual Ridge reflects the cumulative effects of water/rock interaction, admixing and reaction of fluids exsolved from silicic magma, phase separation/segregation and seawater ingress into upflow zones.

  18. Nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability analysis of boiling water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Atul A.

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model we developed from: the space-time modal neutron kinetics equations based on spatial omega-modes, the equations for two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels, the fuel rod heat conduction equations, and a simple model for the recirculation loop. The model is represented as a dynamical system comprised of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and it is studied using stability analysis, modern bifurcation theory, and numerical simulations. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value and then transform the SB to the practical power-flow map. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that points are least stable in the low-flow/high-power region. We also determine the SB when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics and show that the first harmonic mode has no significant effect on the SB. Later we carry out the relevant numerical simulations where we first show that the Hopf bifurcation, that occurs as a parameter is varied across the SB is subcritical, and that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line. Hence, a point on the 100% rod line in the low-flow/high-power region, although stable, may nevertheless be a point at which a BWR should not be operated. Numerical simulations are then done to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is determined that the NRC requirement of DR < 0.75-0.8 is not rigorously satisfied in the low-flow/high-power region and hence these points should be avoided during normal startup and shutdown operations. The frequency of oscillation is shown to decrease as the flow rate is reduced and the frequency of 0.5Hz observed in the low-flow/high-power region is consistent with those observed during actual instability incidents. Additional numerical simulations show that in the low-flow/high-power region, for the same initial conditions, the use of point kinetics leads to damped oscillations, whereas the model that includes the modal kinetics equations results in growing nonlinear oscillations. Thus, we show that side-by-side out-of-phase growing power oscillations result due to the very important first harmonic mode effect and that the use of point kinetics, which fails to predict these growing oscillations, leads to dramatically nonconservative results. Finally, the effect of a simple recirculation loop model that we develop is studied by carrying out additional stability analyses and additional numerical simulations. It is shown that the loop has a stabilizing effect on certain points on the 100% rod line for time delays equal to integer multiples of the natural period of oscillation, whereas it has a destabilizing effect for half-integer multiples. However, for more practical time delays, it is determined that the overall effect generally is destabilizing.

  19. Seismicity and fluid geochemistry at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California: Evidence for two circulation cells in the hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; McLaren, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270 ??C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature fumarolic areas, and has a plume of degassed reservoir liquid that flows southward to emerge at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs. The second cell originates SSE to SE of Lassen Peak and flows southeastward along inferred faults of the Walker Lane belt (WLB) where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (220-240 ??C) that boils beneath Devils Kitchen and Boiling Springs Lake, and has an outflow plume of degassed liquid that boils again beneath Terminal Geyser. Three distinct seismogenic zones (identified as the West, Middle, and East seismic clusters) occur at shallow depths (< 6 km) in Lassen Volcanic National Park, SW to SSE of Lassen Peak and adjacent to areas of high-temperature (??? 161 ??C) fumarolic activity (Sulphur Works, Pilot Pinnacle, Little Hot Springs Valley, and Bumpass Hell) and an area of cold, weak gas emissions (Cold Boiling Lake). The three zones are located within the inferred Rockland caldera in response to interactions between deeply circulating meteoric water and hot brittle rock that overlies residual magma associated with the Lassen Volcanic Center. Earthquake focal mechanisms and stress inversions indicate primarily N-S oriented normal faulting and E-W extension, with some oblique faulting and right lateral shear in the East cluster. The different focal mechanisms as well as spatial and temporal earthquake patterns for the East cluster indicate a greater influence by regional tectonics and inferred faults within the WLB. A fourth, deeper (5-10 km) seismogenic zone (the Devils Kitchen seismic cluster) occurs SE of the East cluster and trends NNW from Sifford Mountain toward the Devils Kitchen thermal area where fumarolic temperatures are ??? 123 ??C. Lassen fumaroles discharge geothermal gases that indicate mixing between a N2-rich, arc-type component and gases derived from air-saturated meteoric recharge water. Most gases have relatively weak isotopic indicators of upper mantle or volcanic components, except for gas from Sulphur Works where ??13C-CO2, ??34S-H2S, and ??15N-N2 values indicate a contribution from the mantle and a subducted sediment source in an arc volcanic setting.

  20. Study of hydrothermal channels based on near-bottom magnetic prospecting: Application to Longqi hydrothermal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Zhaocai, W.; Jinhui, Z.; Qinzhu, C.; Shili, L.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, largely present far from the continental plates, are characterized by complex geological structures and numerous hydrothermal systems with complex controlling factors. Exploring seafloor sulfide resources for industrial and scientific applications is a challenge. With the advent of geophysical surveys for seabed investigation, near-bottom magnetic prospecting, which yields shallow geological structure, is an efficient method for investigating active and inactive hydrothermal fields and for researching the structure of hydrothermal systems (Tivey et al., 1993, 1996?German et al., 2008). We collected near-bottom magnetic data in the Longqi hydrothermal area, located in the southwest Indian ridge (49.6° E; Zhu et al., 2010; Tao et al., 2014), using the autonomous benthic explorer, an autonomous underwater vehicle, during the second leg of the Chinese cruise DY115-19 on board R/V DaYangYiHao. Based on the results of the intensity of the spatial differential vector method (Seaman et al., 1993), we outline the hydrothermal alternation zone. By building models, we subsequently infer a fault along the discovered hydrothermal vents; this fault line may be connected to a detachment fault (Zhao et al., 2013). In addition, we discuss the channels of the hydrothermal circulation system (Figure 1), and presume that heat was conducted to the sea subsurface by the detachment fault; the aqueous fluid that infiltrated the fault is heated and conveyed to the seafloor, promoting the circulation of the hydrothermal system.

  1. Synthesis of hydrothermally stable, hierarchically mesoporous aluminosilicate Al-SBA-1 and their catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Wang, Jin-Gui; Xu, Jian-Xiong; Liu, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2012-03-01

    Hydrothermally stable mesoporous aluminosilicates Al-SBA-1 with hierarchical pore structure have been successfully synthesized under alkaline condition at 120 °C by employing organic mesomorphous complexes of polyelectrolyte (poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)) and cationic surfactant (hexadecyl pyridinium chloride (CPC)) as template. The Si/Al ratio could be as high as 5 and the incorporation of Al into the silica framework did not disturb the well-ordered cubic Pm3&cmb.macr;n mesostructure. Meanwhile, the incorporation of Al could greatly increase the specific surface area and pore volume of the samples. The Al-SBA-1 materials exhibited a high hydrothermal stability and remained stable even after being treated in boiling water for 10 days. The catalytic activity of the Al-SBA-1 materials was investigated by employing the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of toluene with benzyl alcohol as a model reaction and they exhibited excellent catalytic property due to the incorporated acid sites and the hierarchically mesoporous structure.

  2. Hydrothermal flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than 50 deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies show the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity through a typical cross-section of the reservoir of about 6 m/year. The heat in storage in that part of the reservoir hotter than 200/sup 0/C and shallower than 3 km depth is equivalent to that which would be released by the cooling of about 1 or 2 km/sup 3/ of basalt or gabbro magma.

  3. Hydrothermal origin of halogens at Home Plate, Gusev Crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, M.E.; Ruff, S.W.; McCoy, T.J.; Farrand, W.H.; Johnson, J.R.; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, D.W.; Morris, R.V.; Cabrol, N.; Lewis, K.W.; Schroeder, C.

    2008-01-01

    In the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater is Home Plate, an 80 m platform of layered elastic rocks of the Barnhill class with microscopic and macroscopic textures, including a bomb sag, suggestive of a phreatomagmatic origin. We present data acquired by the Spirit Mars Exploration Rover by Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), Mo??ssbauer Spectrometer, Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) for the Barnhill class rocks and nearby vesicular Irvine class basalts. In major element concentrations (e.g., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, and FeO*), the two rock classes are similar, suggesting that they are derived from a similar magmatic source. The Barnhill class, however, has higher abundances of Cl, Br, Zn, and Ge with comparable SO3 to the Irvine basalts. Nanophase ferric oxide (np ox) and volcanic glass were detected in the Barnhill class rocks by Mo??ssbauer and Mini-TES, respectively, and imply greater alteration and cooling rates in the Barnhill than in the Irvine class rocks. The high volatile elements in the Barnhill class agree with volcanic textures that imply interaction with a briny groundwater during eruption and (or) by later alteration. Differences in composition between the Barnhill and Irvine classes allow the fingerprinting of a Na-Mg-Zn-Ge-Cl-Br (??Fe ?? Ca ?? CO2) brine with low S. Nearby sulfate salt soils of fumarolic origin may reflect fractionation of an acidic S-rich vapor during boiling of a hydrothermal brine at depth. Persistent groundwater was likely present during and after the formation of Home Plate. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Permeability Reduction in Passively Degassing Seawater-dominated Volcanic-hydrothermal systems: Processes and Perils on Raoul Island, Kermadecs (NZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, B. W.; Reyes, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2006 eruption from Raoul Island occurred apparently in response to local tectonic swarm activity, but without any precursory indication of volcanic unrest within the hydrothermal system on the island. The eruption released some 200 T of SO2, implicating the involvement of a deep magmatic vapor input into the system during/prior to the event. In the absence of any recognized juvenile material in the eruption products, previous explanations for this eruptive event focused on this vapor being a driving force for the eruption. In 2004, at least 80 T/d of CO2 was escaping from the hydrothermal system, but mainly through areas that did not correspond to the 2006 eruption vents. The lack of a pre-eruptive hydrothermal system response related to the seismic event in 2006 can be explained by the presence of a hydrothermal mineralogic seal in the vent area of the volcano. Evidence for the existence of such a seal was found in eruption deposits in the form of massive fracture fillings of aragonite, calcite and anhydrite. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in these phases range from ca. 140 °C to 220 °C which, for pure water indicate boiling point depths of between 40 and 230 m assuming a cold hydrostatic pressure constraint. Elevated pressures behind this seal are consistent with the occurrence of CO2 clathrates in some inclusion fluids, indicating CO2 concentrations approaching 1 molal in the parent fluids. Reactive transport modeling of magmatic volatile inputs into what is effectively a seawater-dominated hydrothermal system provide valuable insights into seal formation. Carbonate mineral phases ultimately come to saturation along this flow path, but we suggest that focused deposition of the observed massive carbonate seal is facilitated by near-surface boiling of these CO2-enriched altered seawaters, leading to large degrees of supersaturation which are required for the formation of aragonite. As the seal grew and permeability declined, pore pressures increased until a state of critical stress was achieved. The eruption of 2006 was probably triggered by further deep release of magmatic volatiles brought about by intense shaking of the local tectonic swarm event, and the addition of these gases further increased pore pressures, and ultimately led to the failure of the already critically stressed seal.

  5. Hydrothermal convection and mordenite precipitation in the cooling Bishop Tuff, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Breen, S. J.; Hernandez, A.; Self, S.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present field observations of erosional columns in the Bishop Tuff and then use laboratory results and numerical models to argue that these columns are evidence of relict convection in a cooling ignimbrite. Many square kilometers of the Bishop Tuff have evenly-spaced, vertical to semi-vertical erosional columns, a result of hydrothermal alteration. These altered regions are more competent than the surrounding tuff, are 0.1-0.7 m in diameter, are separated by ~ 1 m, and in some cases are more than 8 m in height. JE Bailey (U. of Hawaii, dissertation, 2005) suggested that similar columns in the Bandelier Tuff were formed when slumping allowed water to pool at the surface of the still-cooling ignimbrite. As water percolated downward it boiled generating evenly spaced convection cells similar to heat pipes. We quantify this conceptual model and apply it the Bishop Tuff to understand the physics within ignimbrite-borne hydrothermal systems. We use thin sections to measure changing porosity and use scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses to show that pore spaces in the columns are cemented by the mineral mordenite, a low temperature zeolite that precipitates between 120-200 oC (Bish et al., 1982), also found in the Bandelier Tuff example. We then use scaling to show 1) that water percolating into the cooling Bishop Tuff would convect and 2) that the geometry and spacing of the columns is predicted by the ignimbrite temperature and permeability. We use the computer program HYDROTHERM (Hayba and Ingebritsen, 1994; Kipp et al., 2008) to model 2-phase convection in the Bishop Tuff. By systematically changing permeability, initial temperature, and topography we can identify the pattern of flows that develop when the ignimbrite is cooled by water from above. Hydrothermally altered columns in ignimbrite are the natural product of coupled heat, mass, and chemical transport and have similarities to other geothermal systems, economic ore deposits, and mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. The columns allow direct observation to constrain complex models of multiphase convection, reactive transport, and permeability. Our results also have paleoclimate implications, implying a large and stable source of water in the SE/SSE Long Valley area immediately after the ~760,000 ka caldera-forming eruption.

  6. Scaling of high heat flux flow boiling flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Castrogiovanni, A.; Sforza, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The scaling of high heat flux boiling flow systems is examined using a computational technique newly developed by the present authors. The current work is an extension of previously reported two-dimensional scaling technique to include flow development along the axis of a cooling channel. The new approach involves the solution of the energy equation for a pipe flow subjected to a step change in wall heat flux assuming a fully developed turbulent velocity profile at the point of initial heating. A boiling-induced turbulent eddy diffusivity term is used with an adaptive genetic algorithm closure scheme to predict both the transition to, and development of, the partial nucleate boiling regime based on a postulated minimization of the local wall temperature. Examination of the constitutive equations in non-dimensional form in conjunction with the use of previously established fluid-property scaling tools, leads to the development of a scaling procedure. Reasonable similarity between a high heat flux boiling flow system utilizing water, and a lower heat flux boiling flow system using R-12 is demonstrated. A numerical experiment is carried out to illustrate the scaling technique.

  7. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  8. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic evidences of magmatic inputs in the hydrothermal reservoir feeding the fumarolic discharges of Tacora volcano (northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, B.; Aguilera, F.; Tassi, F.; Darrah, T.; Poreda, R. J.; Vaselli, O.

    2011-12-01

    Tacora volcano is a nearly unknown and understudied 5980 m high volcano located on the northernmost border between Chile and Peru. Tacora is characterized by intense fumarolic activity with extensive, white-colored, hydrothermal areas along the NW and W flanks of the volcanic structure. The chemical and isotopic features of gas emissions indicate that the hydrothermal reservoir is significantly affected by contributions from magmatic degassing, despite relatively low outlet temperatures (82-93 °C). Water and gas isotopic signatures stem from degassing of andesitic magmas produced from the sediment-poor subducting slab. Isotopic data suggests CH 4-CO 2 isotopic equilibration occurs at ~ 400 °C, likely in the deepest portion of the hydrothermal-magmatic fluid reservoir. The H 2-H 2O, CO-CO 2, H 2-Ar, CH 4-CO 2 and C 2-C 3 alkenes/alkanes pairs tend to approach a chemical equilibrium at temperatures between 200 and 320 °C when redox conditions are more oxidizing than those determined by the typical FeO/FeO 1.5 rock buffer system. Boiling occurs at shallow depth at 85 °C within a discontinuous, thin aquifer, enough as thermal buffer but not able to scrub the uprising magmatic-related acidic gases.

  10. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (? 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal zones of active extension) common to all spreading centers, regional tectonic setting determined by stage (early, advanced), and rate (slow, intermediate-to-fast) of opening of an ocean basin about a spreading center, and local tectonic sub-setting that incorporates anomalous structural and thermal conditions conducive to mineral concentration (thermal gradient, permeability, system geometry, leaky versus tight hydrothermal systems). Temporal frames of reference comprise the relation between mineral concentration and timing of regional plutonic, volcanic and tectonic cycles and of episodic local physical and chemical events (transient stress, fluctuating heat transfer, intrusion-extrusion, fracturing, sealing, etc.). Types of hydrothermal deposits are not uniquely associated with specific tectonic settings and subsettings. Similar types of hydrothermal deposits may occur in different tectonic settings as a consequence of convergence of physical and chemical processes of concentration. Local tectonic sub-settings with conditions conducive to hydrothermal mineralization at slow-spreading centers (half rate ? 2cm y -1; length c. 28,000 km), characterized by an estimated average convective heat transfer of 15.1·10 8 cal. cm -2, deep-level ( > 3 km), relative narrow (< 5 km wide at base) magma chambers, and high topographic relief (1-5 km) are: (1) basins along linear sections of the axial zone of volcanic extrusion near transform faults at an early stage of opening, represented by a large stratiform sulfide deposit (estimated 32.5·10 6 metric tons) of the Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea; (2) the wall along linear sections of the rift valley in the marginal zone of active extension at an advanced stage of opening, represented by encrustations and layered deposits of manganese and iron oxides, hydroxides and silicates inferred to be underlain by stockwork sulfides at the TAG Hydrothermal Field at latitude 26°C on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge; (3) transform faults, especially those with large ridge-ridge offset ( > 30 km), at an advanced stage of opening,

  11. Sample Return from Ancient Hydrothermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrothermal spring deposits on Mars would make excellent candidates for sample return. Molecular phylogeny suggests that that life on Earth may have arisen in hydrothermal settings [1-3], and on Mars, such settings not only would have supplied energy-rich waters in which martian life may have evolved [4-7] but also would have provided warm, liquid water to martian life forms as the climate became colder and drier [8]. Since silica, sulfates, and clays associated with hydrothermal settings are known to preserve geochemical and morphological remains of ancient terrestrial life [9-11], such settings on Mars might similarly preserve evidence of martian life. Finally, because formation of hydrothermal springs includes surface and subsurface processes, martian spring deposits would offer the potential to assess astrobiological potential and hydrological history in a variety of settings, including surface mineralized terraces, associated stream deposits, and subsurface environments where organic remains may have been well protected from oxidation. Previous attempts to identify martian spring deposits from orbit have been general or limited by resolution of available data [12-14]. However, new satellite imagery from HiRISE has a resolution of 28 cm/pixel, and based on these new data, we have interpreted several features in Vernal Crater, Arabia Terra as ancient hydrothermal springs [15, 16].

  12. The hydrothermal power of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, C. J.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have estimated the power of ventilated hydrothermal heat transport, and its spatial distribution, using a set of recently developed plate models which highlight the effects of hydrothermal circulation and thermal insulation by oceanic crust. Testing lithospheric cooling models with these two effects, we estimate that global advective heat transport is about 6.6 TW, significantly lower than previous estimates, and that the fraction of that extracted by vigorous circulation on the ridge axes (<1 Ma) is about 50% of the total, significantly higher than previous estimates. This low hydrothermal power estimate originates from the thermally insulating properties of oceanic crust in relation to the mantle. Since the crust is relatively insulating, the effective properties of the lithosphere are "crust dominated" near ridge axes (yielding lower heat flow), and gradually approach mantle values over time. Thus, cooling models with crustal insulation predict low heat flow over young seafloor, implying that the difference of modeled and measured heat flow is due to the heat transport properties of the lithosphere, in addition to ventilated hydrothermal circulation as generally accepted. These estimates may bear on important problems in the physics and chemistry of the Earth because the magnitude of hydrothermal power affects chemical exchanges between the oceans and the lithosphere, thereby affecting both thermal and chemical budgets in the oceanic crust and lithosphere, the subduction factory, and convective mantle.

  13. Ancient Hydrothermal Springs in Arabia Terra, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrothermal springs are important astrobiological sites for several reasons: 1) On Earth, molecular phylogeny suggests that many of the most primitive organisms are hyperthermophiles, implying that life on this planet may have arisen in hydrothermal settings; 2) on Mars, similar settings would have supplied energy- and nutrient-rich waters in which early martian life may have evolved; 3) such regions on Mars would have constituted oases of continued habitability providing warm, liquid water to primitive life forms as the planet became colder and drier; and 4) mineralization associated with hydrothermal settings could have preserved biosignatures from those martian life forms. Accordingly, if life ever developed on Mars, then hydrothermal spring deposits would be excellent localities in which to search for morphological or chemical remnants of that life. Previous attempts to identify martian spring deposits from orbit have been general or limited by resolution of available data. However, new satellite imagery from HiRISE has a resolution of 28 cm/pixel which allows detailed analysis of geologic structure and geomorphology. Based on these new data, we report several features in Vernal Crater, Arabia Terra that we interpret as ancient hydrothermal springs.

  14. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  15. Hydrothermal Venting at Kick'Em Jenny Submarine Volcano (West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Croff Bell, K. L.; Dondin, F. J. Y.; Roman, C.; Smart, C.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Ballard, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Kick'em Jenny is a frequently-erupting, shallow submarine volcano located ~8 km off the northwest coast of Grenada in the West Indies. The last eruption took place in 2001 but did not breach the sea surface. Focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting is taking place mainly within a small (~100 x 100 m) depression within the 300 m diameter crater of the volcano at depths of about 265 meters. Near the center of the depression clear fluids are being discharged from a focused mound-like vent at a maximum temperature of 180o C with the simultaneous discharge of numerous bubble streams. The gas consists of 93-96% CO2 with trace amounts of methane and hydrogen. A sulfur component likely contributes 1-4% of the gas total. Gas flux measurements on individual bubble streams ranged from 10 to 100 kg of CO2 per day. Diffuse venting with temperatures 5 to 35o C above ambient occurs throughout the depression and over large areas of the main crater. These zones are extensively colonized by reddish-yellow bacterial mats with the production of loose Fe-oxyhydroxides largely as a surface coating and in some cases, as fragile spires up to several meters in height. A high-resolution photo mosaic of the crater depression was constructed using the remotely operated vehicle Hercules on cruise NA039 of the E/V Nautilus. The image revealed prominent fluid flow patterns descending the sides of the depression towards the base. We speculate that the negatively buoyant fluid flow may be the result of second boiling of hydrothermal fluids at Kick'em Jenny generating a dense saline component that does not rise despite its elevated temperature. Increased density may also be the result of high dissolved CO2 content of the fluids, although we were not able to measure this directly. The low amount of sulphide mineralization on the crater floor suggests that deposition may be occurring mostly subsurface, in accord with models of second boiling mineralization from other hydrothermal vent systems.

  16. 3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: South side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace (east) end to the smokestack (west) end of the boiling range. The sorghum pan sides are of redwood. The flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  17. Predicting logarithmic values of the subcooled liquid vapor pressure of halogenated persistent organic pollutants with QSPR: How different are chlorinated and brominated congeners?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Haranczyk, Maciej; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2010-04-01

    Logarithmic values of the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (log PL) were estimated for 1436 polychlorinated and polybrominated congeners of benzenes, biphenyls, dibenzo- p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, diphenyl ethers and naphthalenes by employing the Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) approach. The QSPR model developed with GA-PLS technique was characterized by satisfactory goodness-of-fit, robustness and the external predictive performance (R 2Y = 0.970, Q CV2 = 0.970, Q Ext2 = 0.966, RMSE C = 0.21, RMSE CV = 0.22 and RMSE P = 0.22). The externally validated model has been applied to predict subcooled liquid vapor pressure of uninvestigated halogenated persistent organic pollutants. Moreover, a simple arithmetic relationship between logarithmic values of subcooled liquid vapor pressures in pairs of chloro- and bromo-analogues has been found. This relationship can be used for estimating log PL of a brominated compound, whenever log PL of its chlorinated counterpart is known, without necessity of performing any time-consuming computations.

  18. Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure, Part I: Experimental results

    E-print Network

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure online 4 May 2013 Keywords: Pool boiling Heat transfer enhancement Open microchannels Cylindrical tube boiling heat transfer over enhanced cylindrical microchannel test surfaces with water at atmospheric

  19. Hydrothermal plume measurements: a regional perspective.

    PubMed

    Baker, E T; Massoth, G J

    1986-11-21

    An extensive deep-tow survey around an active submarine vent field was conducted to map the three-dimensional distribution of hydrothermal emissions and calculate the hydrothermal discharge of heat and manganese. Emissions from the 10-kilometer-long vent field formed a nearly isopycnal plume about 250 meters thick and elongated in the direction of the local net current. Net export of hydrothermal discharge from both point and diffuse sources was estimated from the advective transport of the plume; the heat flux was 5.8 +/- 2.9 x 10(8) watts and the dissolved manganese flux was 0.2 +/- 0.1 moles per second. Flux measurements of this type could be expanded to encompass entire ridge segments, allowing comparison with theoretical thermal and chemical process models on a common spatial scale. PMID:17771339

  20. Thermodynamics of Strecker synthesis in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Shock, Everett

    1995-01-01

    Submarine hydrothermal systems on the early Earth may have been the sites from which life emerged. The potential for Strecker synthesis to produce biomolecules (amino and hydroxy acids) from starting compounds (ketones, aldehydes, HCN and ammonia) in such environments is evaluated quantitatively using thermodynamic data and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state. Although there is an overwhelming thermodynamic drive to form biomolecules by the Strecker synthesis at hydrothermal conditions, the availability and concentration of starting compounds limit the efficiency and productivity of Strecker reactions. Mechanisms for concentrating reactant compounds could help overcome this problem, but other mechanisms for production of biomolecules may have been required to produce the required compounds on the early Earth. Geochemical constraints imposed by hydrothermal systems provide important clues for determining the potential of these and other systems as sites for the emergence of life.

  1. Hydrothermal pretreatment of bamboo and cellulose degradation.

    PubMed

    Ma, X J; Cao, S L; Lin, L; Luo, X L; Hu, H C; Chen, L H; Huang, L L

    2013-11-01

    A systematic hydrothermal pretreatment of bamboo chips had been conducted with an aim to trace the cellulose degradation. The results showed that cellulose chain cleavage basically occurred when the temperature exceeded 150°C. A slightly higher DP (degree of polymerization) than starting material had been observed at low temperature pretreatment. Treatment at higher temperature (? 170°C) caused severe cleavage of cellulose and therefore gave rise to low DP with more soluble species. DP of cellulose declined drastically without additional hemicelluloses dissolution when hemicelluloses removal reached to the limit level. Cellulose degradation under hydrothermal pretreatment generally followed the zero reaction kinetics with the activity energy of 121.0 kJ/mol. Besides, the increase of cellulose crystalline index and the conversion of I?-I? had also observed at the hydrothermal pretreatment. PMID:24077149

  2. Hydrothermal processing of radioactive combustible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, L.A.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.; Le, L.; Padilla, D.D.; Roberts, J.H.

    1998-09-01

    Hydrothermal processing has been demonstrated for the treatment of radioactive combustible materials for the US Department of Energy. A hydrothermal processing system was designed, built and tested for operation in a plutonium glovebox. Presented here are results from the study of the hydrothermal oxidation of plutonium and americium contaminated organic wastes. Experiments show the destruction of the organic component to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, with 30 wt.% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxidant, at 540 C and 46.2 MPa. The majority of the actinide component forms insoluble products that are easily separated by filtration. A titanium liner in the reactor and heat exchanger provide corrosion resistance for the oxidation of chlorinated organics. The treatment of solid material is accomplished by particle size reduction and the addition of a viscosity enhancing agent to generate a homogeneous pumpable mixture.

  3. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  4. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  5. Intra-field variability in microbial community associated with phase-separation-controlled hydrothermal fluid chemistry in the Mariner field, the southern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Ishibashi, J.; Lupton, J.; Ueno, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Hirayama, H.; Horikoshi, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hamasaki, H.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field at the northernmost central Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau Basin was explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. The hydrothermal fluid (max. 365 u^C) emitting from the most vigorous vent site (Snow chimney) was boiling just beneath the seafloor at a water depth of 1908 m and two end-members of hydrothermal fluid were identified. Mineral and fluid chemistry of typical brine-rich (Snow chimney and Monk chimney) and vapor-rich (Crab Restaurant chimney) hydrothermal fluids and the host chimney structures were analyzed. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were also investigated by culture-dependent and - independent analyses. The 16S rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities at the chimney surface zones were different among three chimneys. The bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities of the Snow chimney surface were very similar with those in the dead chimneys, suggesting concurrence of metal sulfide deposition at the inside and weathering at the surface potentially due to its large structure and size. Cultivation analysis demonstrated the significant variation in culturability of various microbial components, particularly of thermophilic H2- and/or S-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella, among the chimney sites. The culturability of these chemolithoautotrophs might be associated with the input of gaseous energy and carbon sources like H2S, H2 and CH4 from the hydrothermal fluids, and might be affected by phase-separation- controlled fluid chemistry. In addition, inter-fields comparison of microbial community structures determined by cultivation analysis revealed novel characteristics of the microbial communities in the Mariner field of the Lau Basin among the global deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

  6. 23. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: North Wall of boiling house. In the original structure the three windows on the right admitted light and air from the outside. A shed occupied the left side of the wall outside (hence no windows). in 1881 the construction of the cooling shed closed in the right three windows. The sorghum is in the foreground. The centrifugals are in the left rear. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  7. On Boiling of Crude Oil under Elevated Pressure

    E-print Network

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V

    2015-01-01

    We construct a thermodynamic model for theoretical calculation of the boiling process of multicomponent mixtures of hydrocarbons (e.g., crude oil). The model governs kinetics of the mixture composition in the course of the distillation process along with the boiling temperature increase. The model heavily relies on the theory of dilute solutions of gases in liquids. Importantly, our results are applicable for modelling the process under elevated pressure (while the empiric models for oil cracking are not scalable to the case of extreme pressure), such as in an oil field heated by lava intrusions.

  8. On Boiling of Crude Oil under Elevated Pressure

    E-print Network

    Anastasiya V. Pimenova; Denis S. Goldobin

    2015-10-08

    We construct a thermodynamic model for theoretical calculation of the boiling process of multicomponent mixtures of hydrocarbons (e.g., crude oil). The model governs kinetics of the mixture composition in the course of the distillation process along with the boiling temperature increase. The model heavily relies on the theory of dilute solutions of gases in liquids. Importantly, our results are applicable for modelling the process under elevated pressure (while the empiric models for oil cracking are not scalable to the case of extreme pressure), such as in an oil field heated by lava intrusions.

  9. Simultaneous neutron radiography and infrared thermography measurement of boiling processes

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.H.; Glickstein, S.S.

    1997-02-01

    Boiling of water at 1 to 15 bar flowing upward within a narrow duct and a round test section was observed using both neutron radiography and infrared (IR) thermography. The IR readings of the test section outer wall temperatures show the effects of both fluid temperature and wall heat transfer coefficient variations, producing a difference between liquid and two phase regions. The IR images, in fact, appear very similar to the neutron images; both show clear indications of spatial and temporal variations in the internal fluid conditions during the boiling process.

  10. Simultaneous neutron radiography and infrared thermography measurement of boiling processes

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.H.; Glickstein, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Boiling of water at 1 to 15 bar flowing upward within a narrow duct and a round test section was observed using both neutron radiography and infrared (IR) thermography. The IR readings of the test section outer wall temperatures show the effects of both fluid temperature and wall heat transfer coefficient variations, producing a difference between liquid and two phase regions. The IR images, in fact, appear very similar to the neutron images; both show clear indications of spatial and temporal variations in the internal fluid conditions during the boiling process.

  11. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  12. Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

  13. Dynamics of changes in the physical characteristics of a hydrothermally altered geological section according to nonisothermal physicochemical simulation (the Mutnovsky Volcano)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonova, E. P.; Gora, M. P.; Shevko, A. Ya.; Chudnenko, K. V.; Cherepanova, V. K.

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical simulation of a subaerial volcanic hydrothermal system. The model is based on the factual data on the rock composition and the geological structure of the Mutnovsky Volcano. We develop a new approach to construct the numerical model of a volcanic hydrothermal system. According to this approach, at each step of the calculation, for each point of the spatiotemporal domain, the thermophysical properties are determined; further, these properties are used in the calculation of the equilibrium state of the system. This procedure allows us to take into account the dynamic changes in the T-P conditions in the cross section and the migration of the phase boundaries. As well, using this approach, we can pass from "conditional" time in the description of the evolution of the magmagenic fluid system to the "virtually dimensional time" of the development of the simulated ore-magmatic system, from the onset of melt crystallization in the intrusive chamber up to the termination of the retrograde boiling of the melt. The simulation shows that, depending on the structure of the lower part of the section, contrasting hydrothermal systems can develop in the originally homogeneous medium. The relation between the temperature, and, therefore, phase composition of the fluid and the features of the hydrothermal alteration in volcanic rocks is demonstrated. Among other questions, in the present paper we discuss the changes in the density and magnetic properties of the volcanogenic section.

  14. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  15. A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field of the ridge. In 2000, a hydrothermal field called Lost City was serendipitously discovered more than 15 km

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ultra-diffuse hydrothermal venting supports

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ultra-diffuse hydrothermal venting supports Fe-oxidizing bacteria and massive University, Bellingham, WA, USA A novel hydrothermal field has been discovered at the base of Lo¯ihi Seamount seawater temperature, derives from a distal, ultra-diffuse hydrothermal source. FeMO Deep is expressed

  17. Belief Change Maximisation for Hydrothermal Vent Hunting Using Occupancy Grids

    E-print Network

    Wyatt, Jeremy

    Belief Change Maximisation for Hydrothermal Vent Hunting Using Occupancy Grids Zeyn Saigol floor for hydrothermal vents. The state of the art in these problems is information lookahead Vehicle (AUV) prospecting for hydrothermal vents, which are superheated outgassings of water found on mid

  18. Recent population expansion and connectivity in the hydrothermal shrimp

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    -sea hydrothermal vents are unstable habitats that are both spatially and temporally fragmented. In vent species of the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, which forms high-density local populations on hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Location Deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Methods We used

  19. 1 INRODUCTION The physico-chemical conditions in hydrothermal

    E-print Network

    Pichler, Thomas

    Submarine hydrothermal venting occurs at Tutum Bay (Figure 1) in shallow (5-10 m) water along the inner of venting are observed. (1) Focused discharge of a clear, hydrothermal fluid occurs at discrete ports, 10 Tutum Bay vents discharge and ultimately they are caused by changes in the hydrology of the hydrothermal

  20. Hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest spreading center: East Pacific Rise,

    E-print Network

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

    Hydrothermal venting along Earth's fastest spreading center: East Pacific Rise, 27.5°­32.3°S E. T by a hydrothermal plume. Plume chemistry mostly reflected discharge from mature vent fields apparently unperturbed March/April 1998 we conducted detailed mapping and sampling of hydrothermal plumes along six segments

  1. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading

    E-print Network

    Graham, David W.

    ............................................................................................................................................................................. Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridgesPublishing Group #12;active hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel ridge, which is the slowest spreading (0.6­1.3 cm yr

  2. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  3. Mechanism and behavior of nucleate boiling heat transfer to the alkalai liquid metals

    E-print Network

    Deane, Charles William

    1969-01-01

    A model of boiling heat transfer to the alkali liquid metals is postulated from an examination of the events and phases of the nucleate boiling cycle. The model includes the important effect of microlayer evaporation which ...

  4. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of... GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR)...

  5. Measurement of Nucleate Pool Boiling with Synchronized Particle Imaging Velocimetry and Infrared Thermometry

    E-print Network

    Duan, X.

    Nucleate boiling is important in many energy systems including light water reactors. Currently significant efforts are underway to develop mechanisticmodels for nucleate boiling based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). ...

  6. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors AGENCY... and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.'' DATES... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power...

  7. Ultra high boiling performance on nano/microstructured surfaces through electrodeposition of copper and graphene

    E-print Network

    Savakis, Andreas

    Ultra high boiling performance on nano/microstructured surfaces through electrodeposition of copper(s):064E, 7237 Program Element Code(s):1406 Short Abstract The proposed project Ultra High Pool Boiling

  8. Forced-convection surface-boiling heat transfer and burnout in tubes of small diameters

    E-print Network

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01

    A basic heat-transfer apparatus was designed and constructed for the study of forced-convection boiling in small channels. The various regions of forced-convection surface boiling were studied experimentally and analytically. ...

  9. Hydrophobic coatings for film boiling based drag reduction on a torpedo model

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Ian J. (Ian James Kenneth)

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that porous, hydrophobic surfaces exhibit a dramatic reduction in critical heat flux (CHF), the amount of heat over a surface area required to initiate film boiling. Film boiling is characterized ...

  10. Compilation of proposals for boiling and evaporation experiments in space environments and proposals concerning experiment projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Humito; Chiba, Kouichi

    1993-03-01

    An overview of the results of the compilation of proposals for boiling and vaporization experiments in the space environment and experiment plans is presented. The results of boiling an vaporization experiment in space proposal compilation, proposals on the experiments, and items to be considered in conducting the experiments are outlined. In utilizing boiling heat transmission in space, some kinds of forced flow patterns are necessary. Items which must be made clear in boiling phenomena in microgravity are as follows: (1) developed nuclear boiling heat transmission and burnout thermal flux; (2) boiling and vaporization heat transmission when convection effects are not so large due to comparatively low flow rate; and (3) unstable boiling phenomena such as flushing. The following activities are deemed necessary to boil down the experiment projects: (1) equipment requiring forced heat rejection and its structure; (2) thermal conditions; (3) appropriate working fluid; and (4) appropriate heat transmission.

  11. How Does Boiling in the Earth's Crust Influence Metal Speciation and Transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, K.; Lemke, K.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of large quantities of precious metals, such as gold and copper, near the Earth's surface (upper crust) is commonly attributed to transport in aqueous solution and precipitation upon variations in temperature and pressure. As a consequence, gold exploration is closely linked to solution chemistry, i.e. hydrothermal processes involving aqueous fluids with densities of around unity. However, as crustal fluids buoyantly ascend, boiling produces a coexisting low-density aqueous liquid with fundamentally different physical and chemical properties, and a, most importantly, a high affinity for coinage metals (Heinrich et al., Econ Geol., 1992, 87, 1566). From recent experimental studies of Au (Hurtig and Williams-Jones, 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,, 127, 304), we know that metal speciation in this low-density phase differs fundamentally from that observed in bulk solution, clearly, with important implications for Au, and metal speciation in general, transport and ore concentrations processes (these processes would also be operable in industrial geothermal plants given the quite special solvent properties of steam). In brief, this study focuses on the speciation of select metal halides in bulk solution as well as in water vapor, and is driven by our need to understand the solvent properties of around 2.0x109 cubic kilometers of free water (or 2,500 times as much water as stored in all lakes and rivers) present in the Earth's crust. The scope of this study has particular applications in the geothermal and oil industries, as both deal with high temperature low-density aqueous fluids. Understanding how metal halide species behave upon boiling can also provide insight into how metals, such as copper and silver, coat turbine equipment and steam piping in geothermal plants, ultimately rendering these components inoperable. This study will also provide preliminary results from mass spectrometric experiments of transition metal halides, and will be augmented with results from molecular simulations of metal halides that are aimed at characterizing the nature (i.e. relativistic structures and energies) of metal clusters in water vapor.

  12. Hydrothermal Alteration Processes in the Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration processes occurring in oceanic crust impact the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the Earth system. These hydrothermal systems are manifested in vents ranging from 350 °C black smokers, found exclusively in the axial zone of some ridge segments, to 20 °C low-temperature vents at the ridge axis or flanks. Collectively, these systems are responsible for ˜20% of Earth's total heat loss (11 TW; C. A. Stein and S. Stein (1994a, b)) and have major impact on ocean and solid earth chemistry. Elderfield and Schultz (1996) estimate black-smoker water fluxes to be ˜3.5×1012 kg yr-1 and low-temperature fluxes to be ˜6.4×1014 kg yr-1 (at 20 °C). These hydrothermal fluxes also carry substantial elemental flux between seawater and the oceanic crust. Combined with ocean-crust generation and recycling, these processes produce a two-way geochemical pathway between the oceans and the mantle. Recycling of altered oceanic crust into the mantle is likely to produce some of the mantle's chemical heterogeneity (e.g., Hofmann, 1988; see Chapter 2.04) and the delivery of mantle-derived materials to seawater through hydrothermal systems has profound effects on seawater chemistry (e.g., Wheat and Mottl, 2000; Chapters 3.15 and 6.07). Hydrothermal vents in mid-ocean ridges offer a unique habitat for very diverse biological communities that derive much of their energy needs from chemical energy in vent fluids (Jannasch and Mottl, 1985; Jannasch, 1995). The interior of the oceanic crust is likely to host a deep-ocean biosphere that reaches to at least 500 m depth ( Furnes and Staudigel, 1999).It is important to quantify hydrothermal chemical fluxes because they bear on the chemical and biological evolution of the Earth, the chemical composition of seawater, geochemical mass balance at arcs, and the heterogeneity of the mantle. Hydrothermal fluxes can be independently determined by analyzing the composition of hydrothermal fluids or by analyzing the alteration-related chemical changes in the oceanic crust. Ideally these two methods should yield the same results, but a comparison of data shows that there are major discrepancies between these types of estimates (e.g., Hart and Staudigel, 1982; Chapter 3.15). Reconciling these discrepancies is important for improving our understanding of this central theme in Earth system sciences.This review focuses on chemical flux estimates derived from studies of the oceanic crust, exploring in detail how such estimates are made, and the underlying assumptions and uncertainties. Three main themes will be covered. The first focuses the role of the original igneous characteristics of the crust in determining the nature of hydrothermal alteration processes. This includes how primary lithology and composition influence alteration, and difficulties encountered in determining an unaltered "fresh-rock" baseline composition for any particular ocean-crust section. The second theme focuses on the methods by which the bulk-altered oceanic composition is determined, and the attendant uncertainties. These include the difficulty of determining an average composition of a very heterogeneous medium by the analyses of rather small samples, and the limitations imposed by an incomplete sampling process on the ocean floor. Finally, hydrothermal fluxes inferred from ocean-crust data are compared to fluxes from hydrothermal vent studies and the reasons behind their differences are explored.

  13. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United States and Indonesia, and (5) plutonic igneous rocks from the Henderson Climax-type Mo deposit, United States, and the un-mineralized Inner Zone Batholith granodiorite, Japan. These five settings represent a diverse suite of geological settings and cover a wide range of formation conditions. The main discriminator elements for magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, and Ga. These elements are commonly present at detectable levels (10 to > 1000 ppm) and display systematic variations. We propose a combination of Ni/(Cr + Mn) vs. Ti + V, Al + Mn vs. Ti + V, Ti/V and Sn/Ga discriminant plots and upper threshold concentrations to discriminate hydrothermal from igneous magnetite and to fingerprint different hydrothermal ore deposits. The overall trends in upper threshold values for the different settings can be summarized as follows: (I) BIF (hydrothermal) — low Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Ga and Sn; (II) Ag–Pb–Zn veins (hydrothermal) — high Mn and low Ga and Sn; (III) Mg-skarn (hydrothermal) — high Mg and Mn and low Al, Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Ga; (IV) skarn (hydrothermal) — high Mg, Al, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zn and low Sn; (V) porphyry (hydrothermal) — high Ti and V and low Sn; (VI) porphyry (igneous) — high Ti, V and Cr and low Mg; and (VII) Climax-Mo (igneous) — high Al, Ga and Sn and low Mg and Cr.

  14. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  15. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  16. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  17. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  18. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  19. Characteristic boiling curve of carbon nanotube nanofluid as determined by the transient calorimeter technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H. S.; Fan, J. R.; Hong, R. H.; Hu, Y. C.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel-plated copper sphere is employed as the transient calorimeter to explore the boiling heat transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluid. As compared to water, aqueous gum arabic (GA) solution has an enhanced critical heat flux (CHF), transition boiling, and minimum heat flux in film boiling (Leidenfrost point). CNT nanofluid has higher CHF than GA solution. Better wettability and deposits on the heating surface distort the characteristic boiling curve.

  20. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  1. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Ultrathin Graphite Hybrid Foams for Increased Thermal Conductivity and Suppressed Subcooling in Composite Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Kholmanov, Iskandar; Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Ruoff, Rodney S; Shi, Li

    2015-12-22

    Continuous ultrathin graphite foams (UGFs) have been actively researched recently to obtain composite materials with increased thermal conductivities. However, the large pore size of these graphitic foams has resulted in large thermal resistance values for heat conduction from inside the pore to the high thermal conductivity graphitic struts. Here, we demonstrate that the effective thermal conductivity of these UGF composites can be increased further by growing long CNT networks directly from the graphite struts of UGFs into the pore space. When erythritol, a phase change material for thermal energy storage, is used to fill the pores of UGF-CNT hybrids, the thermal conductivity of the UGF-CNT/erythritol composite was found to increase by as much as a factor of 1.8 compared to that of a UGF/erythritol composite, whereas breaking the UGF-CNT bonding in the hybrid composite resulted in a drop in the effective room-temperature thermal conductivity from about 4.1 ± 0.3 W m(-1) K(-1) to about 2.9 ± 0.2 W m(-1) K(-1) for the same UGF and CNT loadings of about 1.8 and 0.8 wt %, respectively. Moreover, we discovered that the hybrid structure strongly suppresses subcooling of erythritol due to the heterogeneous nucleation of erythritol at interfaces with the graphitic structures. PMID:26529570

  2. Geochemistry of the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yuri; Fischer, Tobias P.; Pokrovsky, Boris; Sano, Yuji; Armienta, Maria Aurora; Macias, Jose Luis

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano ejected more than 1km3 of anhydrite-bearing trachyandesite pyroclastic material to form a new 1-km-wide and 300-m-deep crater and uncovered the upper 500m of an active volcano-hydrothermal system. Instead of the weak boiling-point temperature fumaroles of the former lava dome, a vigorously boiling crater spring now discharges / 20kg/s of Cl-rich ( 15 000mg/kg) and sulphur-poor ( / 200mg/kg of SO4), almost neutral (pHup to 6.7) water with an isotopic composition close to that of subduction-type magmatic water (?D=-15‰, ?18O=+6.5‰). This spring, as well as numerous Cl-free boiling springs discharging a mixture of meteoric water with fumarolic condensates, feed the crater lake, which, compared with values in 1983, is now much more diluted ( 3000mg/kg of Cl vs 24 030mg/kg), less acidic (pH=2.6 vs 0.56) and contains much lower amounts of S ( / 200mg/kg of SO4, vs 3550mg/kg) with ?34S=0.5-4.2‰ (+17‰ in 1983). Agua Caliente thermal waters, on the southeast slope of the volcano, have an outflow rate of approximately 100kg/s of 71 °C Na-Ca-Cl water and are five times more concentrated than before the eruption (B. R. Molina, unpublished data). Relative N2, Ar and He gas concentrations suggest extensional tectonics for the El Chichón volcanic centre. The 3He/4He and 4He/20Ne ratios in gases from the crater fumaroles (7.3Ra, 2560) and Agua Caliente hot springs (5.3Ra, 44) indicate a strong magmatic contribution. However, relative concentrations of reactive species are typical of equilibrium in a two-phase boiling aquifer. Sulphur and C isotopic data indicate highly reducing conditions within the system, probably associated with the presence of buried vegetation resulting from the 1982 eruption. All Cl-rich waters at El Chichón have a common source. This water has the appearence of a "partially matured" magmatic fluid: condensed magmatic vapour neutralized by interaction with fresh volcaniclastic deposits and depleted in S due to anhydrite precipitation. Shallow ground waters emerging around the volcano from the thick cover of fresh pumice deposits (Red waters) are Ca-SO4-rich and have a negative oxygen isotopic shift, probably due to ongoing formation of clay at low temperatures.

  3. Evolution of the hydrothermal system at Los Azufres, Mexico, based on petrologic, fluid inclusion and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Partida, E.; Birkle, P.; Torres-Alvarado, I. S.

    2000-12-01

    The Los Azufres geothermal reservoir, formed in a fractured, Upper Miocene to Pliocene andesite and basalt base complex, is sealed to the surface by a silicic, mainly rhyolitic sequence of Pleistocene age. Almost the entire sequence is affected by hydrothermal alteration to varying extent. Petrological and fluid inclusion studies confirmed vertical zonation of the reservoir by secondary processes: Hydrothermal alteration processes under low temperature conditions (<170°C) caused argillitization of the shallow zone of the reservoir (depth <500 m). Smectite, zeolite, calcite, and chlorite predominate the mineral assemblage in the shallow zone. At a depth of 1200-1500 m, the maximum ice melting temperatures ( Tmi) values of -0.7 to -4°C and salinities of 6.4 wt% NaCl eq. indicate boiling conditions of the geothermal brine in a vapor-rich zone. Chlorite, calcite, quartz, zeolite, anhydrite, albite, sphene, pyrite, hematite, and illite form the hydrothermal mineral paragenesis with maximum temperatures of 250°C and pressure conditions of 150 bar. Below 1500 m, Tmi reach maximum values of -0.1°C and low salinities of 0.2 wt% NaCl eq. The minerals epidote, amphibole, prehnite, and garnet indicate temperatures above 250°C and pressure conditions between 150 and 200 bar. The measured homogenization temperatures ( Th) of fluid inclusions (FI) are consistently higher than the in-situ measured temperatures, which indicates retrograde cooling of the Los Azufres geothermal reservoir since the time of the hydrothermal mineral formation. Updoming temperature isotherms at the center of the geothermal field (below well Az-9, Az-23, and Az-25) indicate the heating up of the fluids by a shallow magma chamber. Stable isotope data ( ?18O, ?D) of the geothermal brine indicates mixing processes between meteoric water and a minor magmatic component. Secondary reactions forming sericite may have caused a further positive shift in 18O in the shallow part of the geothermal reservoir.

  4. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space 

    E-print Network

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05

    on pool boiling. In the study, confinement was achieved by placing a flat plate over heated surface. The flat plate has a hole in the middle, and there is a gap between the flat plate and the heater. The diameters of hole are 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm; the gap...

  5. Boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Murshed, S M Sohel; de Castro, C A Nieto

    2013-11-01

    Nanofluids- a new class of heat transfer fluids have recently been a very attractive area of research due to their fascinating thermophysical properties and numerous potential benefits and applications in many important fields. However, there are many controversies and inconsistencies in reported arguments and experimental results on various thermal characteristics such as effective thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and boiling heat transfer rate of nanofluids. As of today, researchers have mostly focused on anomalous thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Although investigations on boiling and droplet spreading are very important for practical application of nanofluids as advanced coolants, considerably fewer efforts have been made on these thermal features of nanofluids. In this paper, recent research and development in boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids are reviewed together with summarizing most related patents on nanofluids published in literature. Review reveals that despite some inconsistent results nanofluids exhibit significantly higher boiling heat transfer performance compared to their base fluids and show great promises to be used as advanced heat transfer fluids in numerous applications. However, there is a clear lack of in-depth understanding of heat transport mechanisms during phase change of nanofluids. It is also found that the nanofluids related patents are limited and among them most of the patents are based on thermal conductivity enhancement and synthesising processes of specific type of nanofluids. PMID:24330044

  6. Developing a numerical model of frost boils dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolsky, D. J.; Tipenko, G. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2003-12-01

    The research was initiated as a part of biocomplexity project, which investigates cryoturbation in continuous permafrost regions in the Arctic. The project explores influence of climate (mean annual and summer temperatures, and snow cover depth and density), vegetation layer composition and physical properties, soil textures and moisture content on evolution of frost boils. The work deals with analysis of temperature regimes and moisture distribution and dynamics during seasonal cycles of freezing and thawing. The research focuses on the development of a computational approach to the study of frost boils as a self-organized system. The model is calibrated using temperature and moisture content data collected from a field experiment at two study sites. A thermo-mechanical model of the frost boil phenomena based on principles of macroscopic thermodynamics and continuum mechanics will be presented. The model includes the energy and mass conservation equations, continuity equation, the Clausius-Claiperon equation, and an empirical formula which relates unfrozen water content to temperature. The complete system is reduced to a computationally convenient set of coupled equations for temperature, pore water pressure and porosity in a two-dimensional domain. A finite element method and an implicit scheme in time were utilized to construct a non-linear system of equations, which was solved iteratively. The model describes dynamics of frost boils and helps to explain geometric form and size of distinctly visible patterned ground north of the Alaska's Brook Range.

  7. Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high purity water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Legault, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high-purity water includes an equation relating current and electrochemical potential derived on the basis of a physical model of the corrosion process. The work involved an examination of the cathodic polarization behavior of 1100 aluminum during aqueous oxidation.

  8. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  9. Research on radiation detectors, boiling transients, and organic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of a space projects research facility are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) a study of radiation resistant semiconductor devices, (2) synthesis of high temperature organic lubricants, (3) departure from phase equilibrium during boiling transients, (4) effects of neutron irradiation on defect state in tungsten, and (5) determination of photon response function of NE-213 liquid scintillation detectors.

  10. Teachers College Students' Conceptions about Evaporation, Condensation, and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jin-Yi

    1999-01-01

    An open-ended, written test was administered to 364 students divided into four groups according to their scientific learning background at a teachers college. Results indicate that although the science-major students performed better than nonscience majors, their understanding of condensation and boiling concepts still needed to be enhanced.…

  11. Experimental demonstration of contaminant removal from fractured rock by boiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Liu, Xiaoling; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2010-08-15

    This study was conducted to experimentally demonstrate removal of a chlorinated volatile organic compound from fractured rock by boiling. A Berea sandstone core was contaminated by injecting water containing dissolved 1,2-DCA (253 mg/L) and sodium bromide (144 mg/L). During heating, the core was sealed except for one end, which was open to the atmosphere to simulate an open fracture. A temperature gradient toward the outlet was observed when boiling occurred in the core. This indicates that steam was generated and a pressure gradient developed toward the outlet, pushing steam vapor and liquid water toward the outlet. As boiling occurred, the concentration of 1,2-DCA in the condensed effluent peaked up to 6.1 times higher than the injected concentration. When 38% of the pore volume of condensate was produced, essentially 100% of the 1,2-DCA was recovered. Nonvolatile bromide concentration in the condensate was used as an indicator of the produced steam quality (vapor mass fraction) because it can only be removed as a solute, and not as a vapor. A higher produced steam quality corresponds to more concentrated 1,2-DCA removal from the core, demonstrating that the chlorinated volatile compound is primarily removed by partitioning into vapor phase flow. This study has experimentally demonstrated that boiling is an effective mechanism for CVOC removal from the rock matrix. PMID:20666474

  12. Numerical study of high heat ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Numerical study of high heat ¯ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b , Shigeo simulation model of boiling heat transfer is proposed based on a numerical macrolayer model [S. Maruyama, M. Shoji, S. Shimizu, A numerical simulation of transition boiling heat transfer, in: Proceedings

  13. Numerical Study of Spatial Surface Temperature and Nucleation Site Density At High Heat Flux Pool Boiling

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    ] . The results indicate that nucleate boiling curve and critical heat flux point move to the lower superheat Boiling êã--·i"OE`å·H@·j·@"`·³·@·¯Zi·@·³·O·i"OE`å·H·j·@"`·³·@SÛZR·@­Î·v·i"OE`å·H·j Ying He, Masahiro Shoji Boiling, Surface Temperature, Nucleation Site Density INTRODUCTION The macrolayer is widely used

  14. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  15. The Frog-Boiling Attack: Limitations of Secure Network Coordinate Systems

    E-print Network

    Kim, Yongdae

    27 The Frog-Boiling Attack: Limitations of Secure Network Coordinate Systems ERIC CHAN. We describe a new attack on network coordinate systems, Frog-Boiling, that defeats all empirically that the Frog-Boiling attack is more disruptive than the previously known attacks: systems

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

  17. Visualization of convective boiling heat transfer in single microchannels with different shaped cross-sections

    E-print Network

    Tokyo, University of

    Visualization of convective boiling heat transfer in single microchannels with different shaped. Ó 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Convective boiling and two-phase flow heat exchangers [1], and reformers for methane direct micro fuel cells. Convective boiling heat transfer

  18. The hydrothermal power of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, C. J.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We have estimated the power of ventilated hydrothermal heat transport, and its spatial distribution, using a set of recently developed plate models which highlight the effects of axial hydrothermal circulation and thermal insulation by oceanic crust. Testing lithospheric cooling models with these two effects, we estimate that global advective heat transport is about 6.6 TW, significantly lower than most previous estimates, and that the fraction of that extracted by vigorous circulation on the ridge axes (< 1 My old) is about 50 % of the total, significantly higher than previous estimates. These new estimates originate from the thermally insulating properties of oceanic crust in relation to the mantle. Since the crust is relatively insulating, the effective properties of the lithosphere are "crust dominated" near ridge axes (a thermal blanketing effect yielding lower heat flow) and gradually approach mantle values over time. Thus, cooling models with crustal insulation predict low heat flow over young seafloor, implying that the difference of modeled and measured heat flow is due to the heat transport properties of the lithosphere, in addition to ventilated hydrothermal circulation as generally accepted. These estimates may bear on important problems in the physics and chemistry of the Earth because the magnitude of ventilated hydrothermal power affects chemical exchanges between the oceans and the lithosphere, thereby affecting both thermal and chemical budgets in the oceanic crust and lithosphere, the subduction factory, and the convective mantle.

  19. Hydrothermal systems and the emergence of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    The author reviews current thought about life originating in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. Hyperthermophiles obtain food from chemosynthesis of sulfur and have an RNA nucleotide sequence different from bacteria and eucarya. It is postulated that a hyperthermophile may be the common ancestor of all life. Current research efforts focus on the synthesis of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems.

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization of municipal waste streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that can be used to convert municipal waste streams into sterilized, value-added hydrochar. HTC has been mostly applied and studied on a limited number of feedstocks, ranging from pure substances to slightly more complex biomass ...

  1. Hydrothermal stability of high silica zeolites 

    E-print Network

    Young, David

    1988-01-01

    This thesis concerns the hydrothermal stability of two zeolite molecular sieves with the MFI structure, ZSM-5 and its 'aluminium free' form silicalite. Silicalite was synthesised from low pH alkali metal free aqueous gels at 95°C and characterised...

  2. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results indicate that while amino acid formation with thiols as intermediates is favored in some cases, other mechanisms may have been necessary to produce significant amounts of other amino acids. Coupled with our previous results for thiols, these studies imply that sulfur may have been easily incorporated into the organic geochemistry of early Earth hydrothermal systems, leading to its widespread use in biomolecules. Formation of more complex biomolecules in hydrothermal systems may have required sulfur-bearing organic compounds as reaction intermediates.

  3. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400??C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385??C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415??C, 330 bar. A 400??C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500??C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor. ?? 1985.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  5. Evaluation of commercial enhanced tubes in pool boiling: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bergles, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    In support of a study of shellside boiling with enhanced tubes, a pool boiling apparatus was developed and used to test single tubes with various structured boiling surfaces in R-113. The basic design of the tube-bundle test section was carried out and certain critical design features were tested experimentally. Copper tubes, 3/4 in. o.d. and 4 in. long, were selected with 1/4 in. diameter cartridge heaters. Four thermocouples were inserted in 3/32 in. diameter, 2 in. long holes. The pool boiling characteristics of a plain tube agree well with previous tests. Wolverine Turbo-B tubes with small, medium, and large features performed identically for a heat flux greater than 20 kW/m/sup 2/. For lower heat flux, however, the Turbo-B S was slightly superior. In general, the Wolverine Turbo-B tubes had more favorable boiling characteristics than the single Wieland Gewa-T tube that was tested. The test procedure is deemed entirely adequate for screening enhanced tubes to see which ones should be used in the tube-bundle test section. Three different ways of mounting the tubes were tested in R-113 at 65/degree/C and 5 bar gage pressure. As all three constructions sealed well, the simplest design is recommended in which a snap ring fixes the tube to the wall and an O-ring seals against the pressure. The general design features of the tube bundle test chamber are also presented. 14 refs.

  6. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

  7. Experimental constraints on hydrothermal activities in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwatani, T.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most remarkable findings by the Cassini-Huygens mission is perhaps water-rich plumes erupting from the south-pole region of Enceladus [1]. Given such geological activity and the detection of sodium salts in the plume, the interior of Enceladus is highly likely to contain an interior ocean interacting with the rock core [2]. A primary question regarding astrobiology and planetary science is whether Enceladus has (or had) hydrothermal activities in the interior ocean. Because N2 might be formed by thermal dissociation of primordial NH3 [3], the presence of N2 in the plume may be a possible indicator for the presence of hydrothermal activities in Enceladus. However, the Cassini UVIS revealed that the plumes do not contain large amounts of N2 [4]. Although these observations may not support the presence of hydrothermal activities, whether NH3 dissociation proceeds strongly depends on the kinetics of hydrothermal reactions and interactions with the rock components, which remain largely unknown. Furthermore, the Cassini CDA recently showed that small amounts of SiO2 might have been included in the plume dusts [5]. Formation of amorphous SiO2 usually occurs when high-temperature and/or high-pH solution with high concentrations of dissolved SiO2 cools and/or is neutralized. Thus, the presence of SiO2 in the plume dusts may suggest the presence of a temperature and/or pH gradient in the ocean. However, no laboratory experiments have investigated what processes control pH and SiO2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids possibly existing in Enceladus. Here, we show the results of laboratory experiments simulating hydrothermal systems on Enceladus. As the initial conditions, we used both aqueous solution of high concentrations (0.01-2%) of NH3 and NaHCO3 and powdered olivine as an analog for the rock components. Our experimental results show that formation of N2 from NH3 is kinetically and thermodynamically inhibited even under high temperature conditions (< 400°C). This is because NH3 decomposition proceeds inefficiently due to efficient H2 production via serpentinization. Our experimental results also suggest that SiO2 concentration dissolved in hydrothermal fluids simulating Enceladus' condition would be buffered by the serpentine-brucite system. The presence of NH3 in the hydrothermal conditions keeps pH of the solution high (pH 9-11). We suggest that under such conditions, SiO2 concentrations in the fluids would be 0.1 mmol/L or less for temperature < 350°C. Given the SiO2 solubility of 1-10 mmol/L at 0°C and pH 9-11, direct formation of amorphous SiO2 would not occur in Enceladus' hydrothermal systems. To produce amorphous SiO2, large-scale hydrothermal activities and subsequent concentration of dissolved SiO2 in the ocean (due to freezing and/or evaporation of liquid water) would be required, which is consistent with high concentrations of radiogenic Ar and sodium salts in the plume [2, 6]. [1] Porco et al., Science 311, 1393 (2006). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098 (2009). [3] Matson et al., Icarus 187, 569 (2007). [4] Hansen t al., Geophs. Res. Lett. 38, L11202 (2011). [5] Hsu et al., EOS Trans. AGU, (2010). [6] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487 (2009).

  8. Fungal colonization of an Ordovician impact-induced hydrothermal system

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Sturkell, Erik; Ormö, Jens; Siljeström, Sandra; van Zuilen, Mark; Bengtson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Impacts are common geologic features on the terrestrial planets throughout the solar system, and on at least Earth and Mars impacts have induced hydrothermal convection. Impact-generated hydrothermal systems have been suggested to possess the same life supporting capability as hydrothermal systems associated with volcanic activity. However, evidence of fossil microbial colonization in impact-generated hydrothermal systems is scarce in the literature. Here we report of fossilized microorganisms in association with cavity-grown hydrothermal minerals from the 458?Ma Lockne impact structure, Sweden. Based on morphological characteristics the fossilized microorganisms are interpreted as fungi. We further infer the kerogenization of the microfossils, and thus the life span of the fungi, to be contemporaneous with the hydrothermal activity and migration of hydrocarbons in the system. Our results from the Lockne impact structure show that hydrothermal systems associated with impact structures can support colonization by microbial life. PMID:24336641

  9. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 ?m grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron-rich grains from the volcaniclastic components of the sediments and resulting in precipitation of pyrite; (b) the iron may also have been derived by the near-neutral reduced hydrothermal brines and precipitate metal sulfides as a result of cooling, mixing with seawaters; the necessary iron content to form sulfides is mostly derived from primary iron-rich components of the basement; (c) biological activity may have resulted in pyrite deposition (e.g. sulfur is provided by a biogenic reduction of marine sulphate). The mineralogy of hydrothermal precipitates considered in the present study resemble hydrothermal products from other shallow water venting areas elsewhere: Lihir and Ambitle Islands, Papua New Guinea, Kraternaya Bight, Kuriles, Russia, Punta Mita and Bahía Concepción, Mexico and Punta Banda at Baja California. The Paleochori vents contain the first documented occurrence of cinnabar on the sea floor in the Aegean area and provide an important link between offshore hydrothermal activity and the mercury-depositing mineralizing system on Milos Island. An interplay between bacterial activity, pH, Eh, temperature, precipitation rate and iron concentration resulted in precipitation of As-pyrite with interlayered cinnabar, hydrous ferric oxides enriched in thallium, alunite-jarosite solid solution and carbonates.

  10. Hydrothermal systems in small ocean planets.

    PubMed

    Vance, Steve; Harnmeijer, Jelte; Kimura, Jun; Hussmann, Hauke; Demartin, Brian; Brown, J Michael

    2007-12-01

    We examine means for driving hydrothermal activity in extraterrestrial oceans on planets and satellites of less than one Earth mass, with implications for sustaining a low level of biological activity over geological timescales. Assuming ocean planets have olivine-dominated lithospheres, a model for cooling-induced thermal cracking shows how variation in planet size and internal thermal energy may drive variation in the dominant type of hydrothermal system-for example, high or low temperature system or chemically driven system. As radiogenic heating diminishes over time, progressive exposure of new rock continues to the current epoch. Where fluid-rock interactions propagate slowly into a deep brittle layer, thermal energy from serpentinization may be the primary cause of hydrothermal activity in small ocean planets. We show that the time-varying hydrostatic head of a tidally forced ice shell may drive hydrothermal fluid flow through the seafloor, which can generate moderate but potentially important heat through viscous interaction with the matrix of porous seafloor rock. Considering all presently known potential ocean planets-Mars, a number of icy satellites, Pluto, and other trans-neptunian objects-and applying Earth-like material properties and cooling rates, we find depths of circulation are more than an order of magnitude greater than in Earth. In Europa and Enceladus, tidal flexing may drive hydrothermal circulation and, in Europa, may generate heat on the same order as present-day radiogenic heat flux at Earth's surface. In all objects, progressive serpentinization generates heat on a globally averaged basis at a fraction of a percent of present-day radiogenic heating and hydrogen is produced at rates between 10(9) and 10(10) molecules cm(2) s(1). PMID:18163874

  11. Geochemical and isotopic evidence for seawater contamination of the hydrothermal system of Taal Volcano, Luzon, the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Kusakabe, Minoru; Bernard, Alain; Fischer, Tobias; de Brouwer, Simon; del Mundo, Esfeca

    The hydrologic structure of Taal Volcano has favored development of an extensive hydrothermal system whose prominent feature is the acidic Main Crater Lake (pH<3) lying in the center of an active vent complex, which is surrounded by a slightly alkaline caldera lake (Lake Taal). This peculiar situation makes Taal prone to frequent, and sometimes catastrophic, hydrovolcanic eruptions. Fumaroles, hot springs, and lake waters were sampled in 1991, 1992, and 1995 in order to develop a geochemical model for the hydrothermal system. The low-temperature fumarole compositions indicate strong interaction of magmatic vapors with the hydrothermal system under relatively oxidizing conditions. The thermal waters consist of highly, moderately, and weakly mineralized solutions, but none of them corresponds to either water-rock equilibrium or rock dissolution. The concentrated discharges have high Na contents (>3500mg/kg) and low SO4/Cl ratios (<0.3). The Br/Cl ratio of most samples suggests incorporation of seawater into the hydrothermal system. Water and dissolved sulfate isotopic compositions reveal that the Main Crater Lake and spring discharges are derived from a deep parent fluid (T 300 °C), which is a mixture of seawater, volcanic water, and Lake Taal water. The volcanic endmember is probably produced in the magmatic-hydrothermal environment during absorption of high-temperature gases into groundwater. Boiling and mixing of the parent water give rise to the range of chemical and isotopic characteristics observed in the thermal discharges. Incursion of seawater from the coastal region to the central part of the volcano is supported by the low water levels of the lakes and by the fact that Lake Taal was directly connected to the China sea until the sixteenth century. The depth to the seawater-meteoric water interface is calculated to be 80 and 160m for the Main Crater Lake and Lake Taal, respectively. Additional data are required to infer the hydrologic structure of Taal. Geochemical surveillance of the Main Crater Lake using the SO4/Cl, Na/K, or Mg/Cl ratio cannot be applied straightforwardly due to the presence of seawater in the hydrothermal system.

  12. Isotope hydrology of El Chichón volcano-hydrothermal system; a coupled system of crater lake and hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.; Rouwet, D.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic 1982 eruption of El Chichón (>1.5 km3 of erupted material) opened the upper hundred meters of the existing volcano-hydrothermal system. In the new formed 200m-deep crater a large shallow crater lake and numerous hot springs were formed. The lake existence and its salinity depend on the precipitation (~4000 mm/y) as well as a group of geyser-like neutral saline springs (source of Cl and SO4) and hydrothermal steam vents discharging into the lake (source of SO4). The chemistry of these “Soap Pool” (SP) springs evolved from >13,000 ppm of Cl in 1995 to ~2000-3000 ppm of Cl in 2006. Since 2006, this Cl-concentration in SP waters is constant. Similar concentrations of Cl are observed in most flank hot springs located at altitudes of ~ 600 m asl, 2-3 km from the crater. Therefore, it can be suggested that the flank springs, crater lake and crater hot springs are manifestations of the upper, relatively shallow volcano-hydrothermal system developed beneath the crater in the volcano edifice. Water isotopic composition of all types of thermal and fresh waters including fumarolic steam condensates (>100 samples collected in 1995-2010) allow to classify and distinguish different processes of shallow mixing, boiling, evaporation and water-rock isotope exchange. All spring waters from the upper system have meteoric origin, with the isotopic composition plotting close to the meteoric water line. Crater waters are strongly evolved due to shallow boiling and loss of steam. Isotopic composition of water from the lower, deep hydrothermal system is characterized by a significant positive oxygen isotopic shift and a strong Cl-d18O linear correlation. Waters from numerous cold springs that drain pyroclastic deposits demonstrate a clear negative oxygen shift. Some problems related to water isotopic composition are still remain unresolved: (1) we cannot find any traces of the infiltrated isotopically heavy lake waters, i.e., the seepage from the lake at the volcano slopes; and (2) we cannot explain the constancy and independence of d18O values (-2±1 ‰) of SP springs from Cl concentration which varied from 13,000 to 2,000 ppm over the observation time.

  13. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E?37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon Well West field (49.6°E, 37.8°S), Dragon Well East field (49.8°E, 37.8°S), and Landing Stage field (51.0°E, 37.5°S), respectively.

  14. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would be to actively cool the shield in the hydrogen tank to reduce the parasitic losses. This would allow the use of less expensive, presently available coolers (80 K vs. 20 K) and potentially simplify the system by requiring only a single compressor on the pad amd a single disconnect line. The compressor could be a hefty commercial unit, with only the cold head requiring expensive flight development and qualification. While this is actually a reduced boil off configuration rather than a zero-boil off case, if the cryogen loss could be cut significantly, the increase in hold time and reduced need for draining and refilling the propellant tanks could meet the vehicle operations needs in the majority of instances.Bearing in mind the potential benefits of ZBO, NASA AMES and SNECMA Moteurs decided to exchange their technical views on the subject. This paper will present a preliminary analysis for a multi-mission module using a fairly low thrust cryogenic engine and ZBO during cruise. Initial mass is 5.5. tons (in ETO). The cryogenic engine will be used near each periapsis in order to minimize the AV requirement. The payload obtained by this propulsion system is compared to a classical storable bipropellant propulsion system for several cases (e. g. Mars lander, Jupiter orbiter, Saturn orbiter). For the Jupiter and Saturn cases, the power source could be an RTG or a large parabolic mirror illuminating a solar panel. It is shown -that - due to its much larger specific impulse - the cryogenic ZBO solution provides much higher payloads, especially for exploration missions involving landing on planets, asteroids, comets, or other celestial bodies.

  15. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal. [Heat and hydrothermal treatment at 350 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1990-05-30

    We recently examined Argonne supplied Wyodak coal under both thermal (no added water, under N{sub 2}) and hydrothermal (liquid water present, under N{sub 2}) conditions at 350{degrees}C for periods of 30 min. and 5 hr. We found that the coal produces a tar that is deposited on the reactor insert walls solely at hydrothermal conditions. The shift from 30 min. to 5 hr. yields a tar that is more volatile and has a slightly increased molecular weight. The coals recovered from thermal and hydrothermal treatments are different by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS). Specifically, the hydrothermal condition yields py-FIMS volatiles with a higher weight average molecular weight and greater volatility. They are thus less polar, a conclusion consistent with other py-FIMS data showing that the volatiles from the hydrothermally treated coal are lower in phenolics. Our results show that the phenols and catechols in the coal behave very differently. Our data are consistent with a scheme in which the catechol units in the coal engage in condensation at thermal conditions, probably through a catalyzed process related to acidic sites on the mineral matter. The phenols in contrast are unreactive. At hydrothermal conditions, on the other hand, both are released hydrolytically. Thus it appears that the presence of added water decreases or eliminates thermally promoted crosslinking tied to catechol condensation. Unexpectedly, we see acetone and other simple ketones in the Wyodak pyrolysate from both the thermal and hydrothermal treatment. Acetone in some cases is the single most prominent product. These ketones are not seen, however, in the unconfined py-FIMS heating. The difference between confined and unconfined heating suggest that water evolved from the coal itself in confined heating acts in some hydrolytic fashion to liberate the ketones.

  16. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer rates specific to nucleate pool boiling under various conditions are determined by the dynamics of vapour bubbles that are originated and grow at nucleation sites of a superheated surface. A new dynamic theory of these bubbles has been recently developed on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. In contrast to other existing models based on empirically postulated equations for bubble growth and motion, this theory does not contain unwarrantable assumptions, and both the equations are rigorously derived within the framework of a unified approach. The conclusions of the theory are drastically different from those of the conventional models. The bubbles are shown to detach themselves under combined action of buoyancy and a surface tension force that is proven to add to buoyancy in bubble detachment, but not the other way round as is commonly presumed. The theory ensures a sound understanding of a number of so far unexplained phenomena, such as effect caused by gravity level and surface tension on the bubble growth rate and dependence of the bubble characteristics at detachment on the liquid thermophysical parameters and relevant temperature differences. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. When being applied to heat transfer at nucleate pool boiling, this bubble dynamic theory offers an opportunity to considerably improve the main formulae that are generally used to correlate experimental findings and to design boiling heat removal in various industrial applications. Moreover, the theory makes possible to pose and study a great deal of new problems of essential impact in practice. Two such problems are considered in detail. One problem concerns the development of a principally novel physical model for the first crisis of boiling. This model allows for evaluating critical boiling heat fluxes under various conditions, and in particular at different gravity levels, with a good agreement with experimental evidence. The other problem bears upon equilibrium shapes of a detached bubble near a heated surface in exceedingly low gravity. In low gravity or in weightlessness, the bubble can remain in the close vicinity of the surface for a long time, and its shape is greatly affected by the Marangoni effect due to both temperature and possible surfactant concentration being nonuniform along the interface. The bubble performs at these conditions like a heat pipe, with evaporation at the bubble lower boundary and condensation at its upper boundary, and ultimately ensures a substantial increase in heat removal as compared with that in normal gravity. Some other problems relevant to nucleate pool and forced convection boiling heat transfer are also discussed.

  17. Seismic identification of along-axis hydrothermal flow on the East Pacific Rise

    E-print Network

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

    . Here we show that hypocentres beneath a well-studied hydrothermal vent field on the East Pacific Rise to the distribution and temper- ature of hydrothermal vents along this section of the ridge suggests that hydrothermal by hydrothermal circu- lation at the mid-ocean-ridge axis has been studied widely since deep-sea hydrothermal vent

  18. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  19. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  20. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  1. Characteristics of Pool Boiling on Graphite-Copper Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2002-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling performance of different liquids on graphite-copper composite (Gr-Cu) surfaces has been experimentally studied and modeled. Both highly wetting fluids, such as freon-113 and pentane, and a moderately wetting fluid (water) were tested on the Gr-Cu surfaces with different graphite-fiber volume fractions to reveal the enhancement effects of the composite surfaces on the nucleate pool boiling. Results of the experiments show that the graphite-fiber volume fraction has an optimum value. The Gr-Cu composite surface with 25 percent graphite-fiber volume (f=0.25) has a maximum enhancement effect on the nucleate boiling heat transfer comparing to the pure copper surface. For the highly wetting fluid, the nucleate boiling heat transfer is generally enhanced on the Gr- Cu composite surfaces by 3 to 6 times shown. In the low heat flux region, the enhancement is over 6 times, but in the high heat flux region, the enhancement is reduced to about 40%. For the moderately wetting fluid (water), stronger enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer is achieved on the composite surface. It shown the experimental results in which one observes the nucleate boiling heat transfer enhancement of 5 to 10 times in the low heat flux region and an enhancement of 3 to 5 times in the high heat flux region. Photographs of bubble departure during the initial stage of nucleate boiling indicate that the bubbles detached from the composite surface are much smaller in diameter than those detached from the pure copper surface. Typical photographs are presented.It shows that the bubbles departed from the composite surface have diameters of only O(0.1) mm, while those departed from the pure copper surface have diameters of O(1) mm. It is also found that the bubbles depart from the composite surface at a much higher frequency, thus forming vapor columns. These two phenomena combined with high thermal conductivity of the graphite fiber are considered the mechanisms for such a significant augmentation in nucleate boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces. A physical model is developed to describe the phenomenon of bubble departure from the composite surface: The preferred site of bubble nucleation is the fiber tip because of higher tip temperature than the surrounding copper base and poor wettability of the graphite tip compared with that of the base material (copper). The high evaporation rate near the contact line produces the vapor cutback due to the vapor recoil pushing the three-phase line outwards from the fiber tip, and so a neck of the bubble is formed near the bubble bottom. Evaporation and surface tension accelerate the necking process and finally result in the bubble departure while a new small bubble is formed at the tip when the surface tension pushes the three-phase line back to the tip. The process is schematically shown. The proposed model is based on and confirmed by experimental results.

  2. 15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: North side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue, with furnace-end in background. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace end (in background) to the smokestack end (in foreground). After the hot cane juice moved through the separate compartments until it reached the final compartment (now missing two sides) where it was drawn out from the copper lip in the corner. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  3. Conversion of kraft lignin under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-Fei

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to explore hydrothermal conversion of kraft lignin for value-added products. With ranging between 5.4% and 10.6%, total oil yield decreased with the increase of temperature (130, 180, and 230°C), the longer reaction time (15-60min) led to increased total oil yield. Main compound of oils characterized by GC-MS was guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol) in the range of 19-78% of oil depending on different reaction conditions. Residual kraft lignins were characterized by GPC and FTIR with respect to the conversion mechanism of kraft lignin by this process. The conversion of kraft lignin under hydrothermal conditions had something to do with the degradation of ?-O-4 linkages, hydroxyl groups, carbonyl groups, aromatic rings resulting in the increased amount of phenolic OH groups in kraft lignin. PMID:25176169

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  5. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  6. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA); Zilberstein, Vladimir A. (Brookline, MA)

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  7. Frontispiece: Hydrothermal Formation of Calcium Copper Tetrasilicate.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Comer, Sara; Kolis, Joseph W; Salguero, Tina T

    2015-12-01

    Crystal Engineering CaCuSi4 O10 is a famous pigment (Egyptian blue), rare mineral (cuprorivaite), and unique near-infrared luminescent material. Now CaCuSi4 O10 can be prepared hydrothermally using conditions vastly different from the historic salt-flux and solid-state routes. But mind the details-too hot a reaction and you get calcium silicate, too cold and you get a porous calcium copper silicate. 350?°C is just right. Additional parameters that strongly influence the hydrothermal chemistry leading to CaCuSi4 O10 include the copper precursor, the mineralizer, and reaction duration. This new synthesis of CaCuSi4 O10 sheds light on the formation of cuprorivaite in select mineral deposits around the world. For more information, see the Communication by T.?T. Salguero and co-workers on page?17560?ff. PMID:26599876

  8. Heat flux determination for nucleate boiling in subsurface tunnel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Poniewski, Mieczyslaw E.; Koziol, Monika

    2012-08-01

    The paper focuses on theoretical analysis of boiling heat transfer on surfaces with tunnel structures formed by fins with microfins and covered with perforated foil. The investigations were conducted for water, ethanol and R-123. The theoretical heat flux, based on modified Chien and Webb model, when compared to the experiments, showed satisfying agreement in low and medium ranges for water and ethanol, and in all heat flux ranges for R-123.

  9. Effect of Running Parameters on Flow Boiling Instabilities in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lu-Xiang; Xu, Jin-Liang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Flow boiling instability (FBI) in microchannels is undesirable because they can induce the mechanical vibrations and disturb the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, the synchronous optical visualization experimental system was set up. The pure acetone liquid was used as the working fluid, and the parallel triangle silicon microchannel heat sink was designed as the experimental section. With the heat flux ranging from 0-450 kW/m2 the microchannel demand average pressure drop-heater length (?p(ave)L) curve for constant low mass flux, and the demand pressure drop-mass flux (?p(ave)G) curve for constant length on main heater surface were obtained and studied. The effect of heat flux (q = 188.28, 256.00, and 299.87 kW/m2), length of main heater surface (L = 4.5, 6.25, and 8.00 mm), and mass flux (G = 188.97, 283.45, and 377.94 kg/m2s) on pressure drops (Ap) and temperatures at the central point of the main heater surface (Twc) were experimentally studied. The results showed that, heat flux, length of the main heater surface, and mass flux were identified as the important parameters to the boiling instability process. The boiling incipience (TBI) and critical heat flux (CHF) were early induced for the lower mass flux or the main heater surface with longer length. With heat flux increasing, the pressure drops were linearly and slightly decreased in the single liquid region but increased sharply in the two phase flow region, in which the flow boiling instabilities with apparent amplitude and long period were more easily triggered at high heat flux. Moreover, the system pressure was increased with the increase of the heat flux. PMID:26353523

  10. Modeling Microbiological Interactions with Hydrothermal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori

    2006-01-01

    All organisms require energy. Characterizing and quantifying the biological demand for energy places constraints on the possible interactions of organisms with each other and with the environment. This talk will consider energetic and mass transfer constraints on the ecology of hydrothermal vent microbes. Following a general introduction to the biological energy requirements and their link to environmental conditions, energy constraints will be applied to several vent-relevant case studies.

  11. Wire deposition by a laser-induced boiling front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Vänskä, Mikko; Salminen, Antti; Fahlström, Karl; Hedegård, Joakim

    2015-06-01

    In laser materials processing the addition of material by wire is an option for techniques like laser welding, laser cladding or rapid prototyping. The stability of the wire deposition is strongly dependent on the wire interaction with the laser beam. For leading position wire feeding, high speed imaging was applied to study the melt transfer from the wire tip to the workpiece during keyhole welding. The observations revealed that a very stable concave processing front forms at the wire tip. A boiling front is established as an extension of the keyhole and the melt film at the front is sheared downwards by the ablation pressure of boiling. The deposition of the molten wire into the weld zone is smooth and controllable. Various wire front geometries and melt transitions are compared for different parameters. The option of laterally oscillating the laser beam is investigated and the interaction mechanism involved is discussed. Wire deposition by inducing a boiling front is explained here for the first time, which should promote future applications use of this very promising technique.

  12. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  13. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches. PMID:26281890

  14. Multidisciplinary constraints of hydrothermal explosions based on the 2013 Gengissig lake events, Kverkfjöll volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Reynolds, Hannah Iona; Dürig, Tobias; Strehlow, Karen; Rott, Stefanie; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions frequently occur in geothermal areas showing various mechanisms and energies of explosivity. Their deposits, though generally hardly recognised or badly preserved, provide important insights to quantify the dynamics and energy of these poorly understood explosive events. Furthermore the host rock lithology of the geothermal system adds a control on the efficiency in the energy release during an explosion. We present results from a detailed study of recent hydrothermal explosion deposits within an active geothermal area at Kverkfjöll, a central volcano at the northern edge of Vatnajökull. On August 15th 2013, a small jökulhlaup occurred when the Gengissig ice-dammed lake drained at Kverkfjöll. The lake level dropped by approximately 30 m, decreasing pressure on the lake bed and triggering several hydrothermal explosions on the 16th. Here, a multidisciplinary approach combining detailed field work, laboratory studies, and models of the energetics of explosions with information on duration and amplitudes of seismic signals, has been used to analyse the mechanisms and characteristics of these hydrothermal explosions. Field and laboratory studies were also carried out to help constrain the sedimentary sequence involved in the event. The explosions lasted for 40-50 s and involved the surficial part of an unconsolidated and hydrothermally altered glacio-lacustrine deposit composed of pyroclasts, lavas, scoriaceous fragments, and fine-grained welded or loosely consolidated aggregates, interbedded with clay-rich levels. Several small fans of ejecta were formed, reaching a distance of 1 km north of the lake and covering an area of approximately 0.3 km2, with a maximum thickness of 40 cm at the crater walls. The material (volume of approximately 104 m3) has been ejected by the expanding boiling fluid, generated by a pressure failure affecting the surficial geothermal reservoir. The maximum thermal, craterisation and ejection energies, calculated for the explosion areas, are on the order of 1011, 1010 and 109 J, respectively. Comparison of these with those estimated by the volume of the ejecta and the crater sizes, yields good agreement. We estimate that approximately 30% of the available thermal energy was converted into mechanical energy during this event. The residual energy was largely dissipated as heat, while only a small portion was converted into seismic energy. Estimation of the amount of freshly-fragmented clasts in the ejected material obtained from SEM morphological analyses, reveals that a low but significant energy consumption by fragmentation occurred. Decompression experiments were performed in the laboratory mimicking the conditions due to the drainage of the lake. Experimental results confirm that only a minor amount of energy is consumed by the creation of new surfaces in fragmentation, whereas most of the fresh fragments derive from the disaggregation of aggregates. Furthermore, ejection velocities of the particles (40-50 m/s), measured via high-speed videos, are consistent with those estimated from the field. The multidisciplinary approach used here to investigate hydrothermal explosions has proven to be a valuable tool which can provide robust constraints on energy release and partitioning for such small-size yet hazardous, steam-explosion events.

  15. Diffuse flow from hydrothermal vents. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Trivett, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    The effluent from a collection of diffuse hydrothermal vents was modelled to determine the fate of the source of flow under typical environmental conditions at seafloor spreading centers. A laboratory simulation was conducted to test an analytic model of diffuse plume rise. The results showed that diffuse plumes are likely to remain near the seafloor, with their maximum rise height scaled with the diameter of the source of diffuse flow. The entrainment of ambient seawater into these plumes is limited by the proximity to the seafloor, thus slowing the rate of dilution. The model of diffuse plume behaviour was used to guide the design and implementation of a scheme for monitoring the flow from diffuse hydrothermal vents in the ocean. A deployment of an array at the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge yielded measurements of a variety of diffuse plume properties, including total heat output. Two distinct sources of hydrothermal flow were detected during the field deployment. The larger source was 1-1.5km north of the instrument array, and its energy output was 450 + or - 270MW. A smaller source was located 100m east of one instrument in the array. The energy output of the source was 12 + or - 8MW. The rise heights of the centerlines of these plumes were 45m and 10m, respectively.

  16. Surface roughened zirconia: towards hydrothermal stability.

    PubMed

    Camposilvan, Erik; Flamant, Quentin; Anglada, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Surface roughness is needed in several yttria-stabilized zirconia components used in restorative dentistry for osseointegration or adhesion purposes. This can be achieved by different treatments, which may also modify the microstructure of the surface. Among them, sandblasting and chemical etching are widely used, but their effect on hydrothermal aging of zirconia is not fully understood. In the present work, the zirconia long-term stability of rough surfaces prepared by these techniques is analyzed and a method is proposed for preventing hydrothermal aging while maintaining the original surface appearance and mechanical properties. The method involves pressure infiltration of a Cerium salt solution on the roughened surfaces followed by a thermal treatment. The solution, trapped by surface defects and small pores, is decomposed during thermal treatment into Cerium oxide, which is diffused at high temperature, obtaining Ce co-doping in the near-surface region. In addition, the microstructural changes induced in the near-surface by sandblasting or chemical etching are removed by the thermal treatment together with surface defects. No color modification was observed and the final roughness parameters were in the range of existing implants of proved good osseointegration. The aging resistance of Ce co-doped materials was strongly enhanced, showing the absence of aging after artificial degradation, increasing in this way the surface mechanical integrity. The proposed treatment is easily applicable to the current manufacturing procedures of zirconia dental posts, abutments, crowns and dentures, representing a solution to hydrothermal aging in these and other biomedical applications. PMID:25867636

  17. Hydrothermal carbonization of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Woszidlo, S; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization in subcritical water at 180-260 °C. Dehydrochlorination increased with increasing reaction temperature. The release of chlorine was almost quantitative above ?235 °C. The fraction of organic carbon (OC) recovered in the hydrochar decreased with increasing operating temperature from 93% at 180 °C to 75% at 250 °C. A wide array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be detected in the aqueous phase, but their combined concentration amounted to only ?140 ?g g(-1) PVC-substrate at 240 °C. A pathway for the formation of cyclic hydrocarbons and O-functionalized organics was proposed. Chlorinated hydrocarbons including chlorophenols could only be identified at trace levels (low ppb). Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) could not be detected. The sorption potential of the hydrochar turned out to be very low, in particular for polar organic pollutants. Our results provide strong evidence that hydrothermal carbonization of household organic wastes which can be tied to co-discarded PVC-plastic residues is environmentally sound regarding the formation of toxic organic products. Following these findings, hydrothermal treatment of PVC-waste beyond operating temperatures of ?235 °C to allow complete release of organic chlorine should be further pursued. PMID:25150971

  18. Hydrothermal Formation of Calcium Copper Tetrasilicate.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Comer, Sara; Kolis, Joseph W; Salguero, Tina T

    2015-12-01

    We describe the first hydrothermal synthesis of CaCuSi4 O10 as micron-scale clusters of thin platelets, distinct from morphologies generated under salt-flux or solid-state conditions. The hydrothermal reaction conditions are surprisingly specific: too cold, and instead of CaCuSi4 O10 , a porous calcium copper silicate forms; too hot, and calcium silicate (CaSiO3 ) forms. The precursors also strongly impact the course of the reaction, with the most common side product being sodium copper silicate (Na2 CuSi4 O10 ). Optimized conditions for hydrothermal CaCuSi4 O10 formation from calcium chloride, copper(II) nitrate, sodium silicate, and ammonium hydroxide are 350?°C at 3000?psi for 72?h; at longer reaction times, competitive delamination and exfoliation causes crystal fragmentation. These results illustrate that CaCuSi4 O10 is an even more unique material than previously appreciated. PMID:26482329

  19. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  20. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    PubMed

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems. Astrobiology 15, 1091-1095. PMID:26684507

  1. Theoretical constraints of physical and chemical properties of hydrothermal fluids on variations in chemolithotrophic microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Takai, Ken

    2014-12-01

    In the past few decades, chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents have received attention as plausible analogues to the early ecosystems of Earth, as well as to extraterrestrial ecosystems. These ecosystems are sustained by chemical energy obtained from inorganic redox substances (e.g., H2S, CO2, H2, CH4, and O2) in hydrothermal fluids and ambient seawater. The chemical and isotope compositions of the hydrothermal fluid are, in turn, controlled by subseafloor physical and chemical processes, including fluid-rock interactions, phase separation and partitioning of fluids, and precipitation of minerals. We hypothesized that specific physicochemical principles describe the linkages among the living ecosystems, hydrothermal fluids, and geological background in deep-sea hydrothermal systems. We estimated the metabolic energy potentially available for productivity by chemolithotrophic microorganisms at various hydrothermal vent fields. We used a geochemical model based on hydrothermal fluid chemistry data compiled from 89 globally distributed hydrothermal vent sites. The model estimates were compared to the observed variability in extant microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal environments. Our calculations clearly show that representative chemolithotrophic metabolisms (e.g., thiotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and methanotrophic) respond differently to geological and geochemical variations in the hydrothermal systems. Nearly all of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems provide abundant energy for organisms with aerobic thiotrophic metabolisms; observed variations in the H2S concentrations among the hydrothermal fluids had little effect on the energetics of thiotrophic metabolism. Thus, these organisms form the base of the chemosynthetic microbial community in global deep-sea hydrothermal environments. In contrast, variations in H2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids significantly impact organisms with aerobic and anaerobic hydrogenotrophic metabolisms. Particularly in H2-rich ultramafic rock-hosted hydrothermal systems, anaerobic and aerobic hydrogenotrophy is more energetically significant than thiotrophy. The CH4 concentration also has a considerable impact on organisms with aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic metabolisms, particularly in sediment-associated hydrothermal systems. Recently clarified patterns and functions of existing microbial communities and their metabolisms are generally consistent with the results of our thermodynamic modeling of the hydrothermal mixing zones. These relationships provide important directions for future research addressing the origin and early evolution of life on Earth as well as for the search for extraterrestrial life.

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis map of bismuth titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Sardar, Kripasindhu; Walton, Richard I.

    2012-05-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of four bismuth titanate materials from common bismuth and titanium precursors under hydrothermal conditions is described. Reaction of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and anatase TiO{sub 2} in concentrated NaOH solution at 240 Degree-Sign C is shown to produce perovskite and sillenite phases Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20}, depending on the ratio of metal precursors used. When KOH solution is used and a 1:1 ratio of the same precursors, a pyrochlore Bi{sub 1.43}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 0.29}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.66} is formed. The use of a mixture of HNO{sub 3} and NaOH is shown to facilitate the formation of the Aurivillius-type bismuth titanate Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The phases have been isolated separately as phase-pure powders and profile refinement of powder X-ray diffraction data allows comparisons with comparable materials reported in the literature. Analysis of Bi L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the materials shows the oxidation state of bismuth is +3 in all of the hydrothermally derived products. - Graphical abstract: Use of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} as reagents under hydrothermal conditions allows the phase-pure preparation of four crystalline bismuth titanate materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaBiO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} under hydrothermal conditions allow formation of bismuth titanates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of four distint phases has been mapped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi LIII-edge XANES shows Bi is reduced to oxidation state +3 in all materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new hydrated bismuth titanate pyrochlore has been isolated.

  3. The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field: A hydrothermal system on an active detachment fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2015-11-01

    Over the last ten years, geophysical studies have revealed that the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field (26°08?N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is located on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. This is particularly important in light of the recognition that detachment faulting accounts for crustal accretion/extension along a significant portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and that the majority of confirmed vent sites on this slow-spreading ridge are hosted on detachment faults. The TAG hydrothermal field is one of the largest sites of high-temperature hydrothermal activity and mineralization found to date on the seafloor, and is comprised of active and relict deposits in different stages of evolution. The episodic nature of hydrothermal activity over the last 140 ka provides strong evidence that the complex shape and geological structure of the active detachment fault system exerts first order, but poorly understood, influences on the hydrothermal circulation patterns, fluid chemistry, and mineral deposition. While hydrothermal circulation extracts heat from a deep source region, the location of the source region at TAG is unknown. Hydrothermal upflow is likely focused along the relatively permeable detachment fault interface at depth, and then the high temperature fluids leave the low-angle portion of the detachment fault and rise vertically through the highly fissured hanging wall to the seafloor. The presence of abundant anhydrite in the cone on the summit of the TAG active mound and in veins in the crust beneath provides evidence for a fluid circulation system that entrains significant amounts of seawater into the shallow parts of the mound and stockwork. Given the importance of detachment faulting for crustal extension at slow spreading ridges, the fundamental question that still needs to be addressed is: How do detachment fault systems, and the structure at depth associated with these systems (e.g., presence of plutons and/or high permeability zones) influence the pattern of hydrothermal circulation, mineral deposition, and fluid chemistry, both in space and time, within slowly accreted ocean crust?

  4. Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Product Characterization of Barley Straw in Sub-and

    E-print Network

    Rosendahl, Lasse

    Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Product Characterization of Barley Straw in Sub, G. (2013). Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Product Characterization of Barley Straw in Sub- and Super Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark INTRODUCTION MATERIALS AND METHODS Hydrothermal Liquefaction

  5. Innate immunity in the deep sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus Raul Bettencourt a,

    E-print Network

    Allam, Bassem

    Innate immunity in the deep sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus Raul Bettencourt a hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus. Cellular constituents in the hemolymph and extrapallial fluid October 2008 Available online 13 November 2008 Keywords: Hydrothermal Bivalve Bathymodiolus azoricus

  6. Boiling and Evaporation on Micro/nanoengineered Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xianming

    Two-phase transport is widely used in energy conversion and storage, energy efficiency and thermal management. Surface roughness and interfacial wettability are two major impact factors for two-phase transport. Micro/nanostructures play important roles in varying the surface roughness and improving interfacial wettability. In this doctoral study, five types of micro/nanoengineered surfaces were developed to systematically study the impacts of interfacial wettability and flow structures on nucleate boiling and capillary evaporation. These surfaces include: 1) superhydrophilic atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings; 2) partially hydrophobic and partially hydrophilic composite interfaces; 3) micromembrane-enhanced hybrid wicks; 4) superhydrophilic micromembrane-enhnaced hybrid wicks, and 5) functionalized carbon nanotube coated micromembrane-enhnaced hybrid wicks. Type 1 and 2 surfaces were developed to investigate the impacts of intrinsic superhydrophilicity and hydrophobic-hydrophilic composite wettability on nucleate boiling. Superhydrophilicity was achieved by depositing nano-thick ALD TiO 2 coatings, which were used to enable intrinsically superhydrophilic boiling surfaces on the microscale copper woven meshes. Critical heat flux (CHF) was substantially increased because of the superwetting property and delayed local dryout. Carbon nanotube (CNT) enabled partially hydrophobic and partially hydrophilic interfaces were developed to form ideal cavities for nucleate boiling. The hydrophobic-hydrophilic composite interfaces were synthesized from functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (FMWCNTs) by introducing hydrophilic functional groups on the surfaces of pristine MWCNTs. The nanoscale FMWCNTs with heterogeneous wettabilities were coated on the micromeshes to form hierarchical surfaces, which effectively increase the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and CHF of pool boiling. To enhance capillary evaporation, micromembrane-enhanced capillary evaporating surfaces, i.e., type 3 surfaces, were developed to separate liquid flows and capillary pressure generation. This new type of surfaces consists of a microchannel array and a micromembrane made from a single layer of micromesh. The capillary evaporation CHF were substantially increased because of the increased capillary pressure provided by micromeshes and the reduced friction drag resulted from microchannels. Based on this newly developed hybrid wick, the effect of interfacial wettability on capillary evaporation was systematically studied. Firstly, superhydrophilic ALD SiO2 was deposited on this type of hybrid wick to create intrinsically superhydrophilic interfaces, i.e., type 4 surfaces, resulting in significantly increased HTC because of the enhanced thin film evaporation on micromeshes. Secondly, CNT-enabled hydrophobic-hydrophilic composite interfaces were deposited on the hybrid wicks to increase the nucleate site density, bubble departure frequency and reduce friction drag. Both nucleate boiling and thin film evaporation were improved, resulting in enhanced HTC and CHF. In conclusion, the interfacial wettability of micro/nanoengineered surfaces can significantly alter bubble dynamics such as nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and frequency. Superhydrophilic surface can substantially increase the boiling CHF because of the superwetting property. In addition, more hydrophobic surfaces yield higher HTC, while more hydrophilic surfaces result in higher CHF. The partially hydrophobic and partially hydrophilic surfaces perform better than both superhydrphobic and superhydrophilic surfaces. The separation of liquid flow and capillary pressure generation can be achieved using micromembranes, resulting in dramatically increased CHF. Improved wettability can result in better wettings and enhanced thin film evaporation. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoporous coatings can improve the wetting and reduce the friction, resulting in enhanced HTC and CHF simultaneously.

  7. Catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced from different thermo-chemical conversion routes of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Wang, Bing; Xu, Yuping

    2015-06-01

    This study presents experimental results that compare the use of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), alcoholysis (Al), pyrolysis (Py) and hydropyrolysis (HPy) for the production of bio-oil from a microalga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and the catalytic hydrothermal upgrading of crude bio-oils produced by these four conversion routes. The yields and compositions of bio-oil, solid residue, and gases were evaluated and compared. HTL resulted in a bio-oil that has a higher energy density and superior fuel properties, such as thermal and storage stabilities, compared with the other three conversion routes. The N in crude bio-oils produced from Py and HPy is more easily removed than that in the bio-oils produced from HTL and Al. The upgraded bio-oils contain reduced amounts of certain O-containing and N-containing compounds and significantly increased saturated hydrocarbon contents. All of the upgraded bio-oils have a larger fraction boiling below 350°C than their corresponding crude bio-oils. PMID:25802049

  8. Application of acoustic noise and self-potential localization techniques to a buried hydrothermal vent (Waimangu Old Geyser site, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Roux, P.; Gouédard, P.; Legaz, A.; Revil, A.; Hurst, A. W.; Bolève, A.; Jardani, A.

    2010-02-01

    A seismo-acoustic and self-potential survey has been performed in the hydrothermal area of the old Waimangu Geyser (New Zealand), which was violently erupting a century ago. Nowadays, no surface activity is visible there. We set-up an array of 16 geophones and recorded a high and steady acoustic ambient noise. We applied the matched field processing (MFP) approach to the acoustic data to locate the sources responsible for the ambient noise. The white noise constraint processor reveals the presence of a unique and well-focused acoustic source at a depth of 1.5 m below the seismic array. For this very shallow source, the application of MFP enabled the determination of both the source location and the dispersion curve of seismic velocity. The study was completed by self-potential (SP) measurements on several profiles around the acoustic noise source, which displayed a large positive anomaly above it. The results of the SP inversion gave an electric streaming current density source very close to the acoustic one. Both sources likely belong to a shallow hydrothermal structure interpreted as a small convective cell of boiling water beneath an impermeable layer. The joint application of these methods is a promising technique to recognize hydrothermal structures and to study their dynamics.

  9. Targeting organic molecules in hydrothermal environments on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Lindgren, P.; Wilson, R.; Cooper, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrothermal deposits on Mars Hydrothermal systems are proposed as environments that could support organic synthesis, the evolution of life or the maintenance of life [1,2,3]. They have therefore been suggested as primary targets for exploration on Mars [1,2,4,].There is now confidence that hydrothermal deposits occur at the martian surface. This is based on a range of criteria that could point towards hydrothermal activity, including volcanic activity, magmatic-driven tectonism, impact cratering in icy terrains, hydrous alteration of minerals and typical hydrothermal mineralogies [4]. The proposals to search for evidence of life at martian hydrothermal sites have been focussed on seeking morphological evidence of microbial activity [5]. Here we discuss the potential to seek a chemical signature of organic matter in hydrothermal systems. Organics in terrestrial hydrothermal systems Terrestrial hydrothermal systems can have large quantities of organic matter because they intersect organic-rich sedimentary rocks or oil reservoirs. Thus the signatures that they contain reflect some preexisting concentration of fossil organic compounds, rather than life which was active in the hydrothermal system. If any extant life was incorporated in these hydrothermal systems, it is swamped by the fossil molecules. Examples of environments where organic materials may become entrained include subsurface hydrothermal mineral deposits, generation of hydrothermal systems by igneous intrusions, and hot fluid venting at the seafloor. Nevertheless, there is value in studying the interactions of hydrothermal systems with fossil organic matter, for information about the survivability of organic compounds, phase relationships between carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous materials, and where in hydrothermal deposits to find evidence of organic matter. Microbial colonization of hot spring systems is feasible at depth within the systems and at the surface where the hydrothermal waters discharge. Discharging fluids will also precipitate minerals due to drop in temperature and pressure, and colonising organisms are likely to become entrained by the minerals. Attempts to find evidence of microbial activity related to hydrothermal systems in the geological record have therefore been focussed on hydrothermal mineral precipitates. Organic matter is found in hydrothermal precipitates back into the Precambrian [6]. Fig. 1 Settings for organic matter in hydrothermal systems. Surface discharge could be in subaerial or subaqueous environment. Application of SERS Studies using conventional laser Raman instruments have made a good case for application of this type of spectroscopy to planetary exploration. The detection of pigments sited in microbial matter in a range of samples from extreme environments (e.g. [7]) has supported development of the technique for space exploration generally, and Mars exploration in particular [8]. A major advantage of conventional Raman spectroscopy is that it can be applied to simultaneous characterization of bond types in both organic and inorganic materials. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and overcomes the problems created by natural fluorescence [9]. SERS is achieved by adsorbing the target analyte onto the surface of a metal. We are combining the additional sample processing necessary for SERS with sample preparation in a microfluidic format (including extraction and sample concentration). The final result will be a very rapid assay, capable of detecting ppb concentrations of certain organic analytes. This approach was tested at a site in Iceland, where young/active hydrothermal systems are focussed in a rift environment. Sulphur species are prevalent, in a range of oxidation states, including sulphates, sulphides and native sulphur. Thus they are a useful model for systems that might exist on Mars, where sulphur species are widespread and therefore likely to be incorporated into hydrothermal systems. Microbial colonization of the Iceland sites is evident as pigme

  10. A Novel Role of Three Dimensional Graphene Foam to Prevent Heater Failure during Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG). PMID:23743619

  11. Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naphon, Paisarn

    2015-11-01

    The main focus of the present study is to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics on the cylindrical surface of nanofluids. The nanofluids with suspended {TiO}2 nanoparticles in the base fluid refrigerant R141b are used as the working fluid. Effects of magnetic field strength, nanoparticle concentration, and boiling pressure on the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient and the boiling bubble characteristics are considered. In this study, magnetic fields with strengths of 5.0× 10^{-4} {T} , 7.5× 10^{-4} {T} , and 10.0× 10^{-4} {T} are applied to exert a force on the boiling surface with permanent magnets. According to the experimental results, it is found that the magnetic fields have a significant effect on the pool boiling heat transfer enhancement with a maximum enhancement of 27.91 %.

  12. Boil-off gas vapors are recovered by reliquefaction in LNG

    SciTech Connect

    Levay, M.; Petit, P.; Paradowski, H.

    1986-02-24

    Although great care is taken to prevent heat leaks into cryogenic equipment in LNG terminals, boil-off vapors evolve from LNG stored at thermodynamic equilibrium. The quantities of boil-off vapors may be quite considerable. They account for about 1% of the total gas quantity received and sent out at the monitor-de-bretagne LNG terminal of Gaz de France. A novel process has significantly cut boil-off vapor handling costs. It is free of technical problems which would arise from local utilization of the gas and makes boil-off recovery possible under optimum conditions. In addition, the process shows an excellent degree of reliability. Boil-off vapors have a lower heating value than the stored LNG. However, since they mainly consist of methane, their economic usefulness makes vapor recovery necessary. This boil-off gas, with widely fluctuating quantities and qualities, cannot be readily used locally. The vapors must be sent out into the grid.

  13. First hydrothermal active vent discovered on the Galapagos Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Wu, G.; Su, X.; Zhang, G.; Chinese DY115-21 Leg 3 Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    The Galapagos Microplate (GM) lies on the western Gaplapagos Spreading Center (GSC), representing one of the classic Ridge-Ridge-Ridge (R-R-R) plate boundaries of the Nazca, Cocos, and Pacific plates. The presence of the 'black smoke' and hydrothermal vent community were firstly confirmed on the GSC. Lots of hydrothermal fields were discovered on the center and eastern GSC, while the western GSC has not been well investigated. During 17th Oct. to 9th Nov. 2009, the 3rd leg of Chinese DY115-21 cruise with R/V Dayangyihao has been launched along 2°N-5°S near equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR). Two new hydrothermal fields were confirmed. One is named 'Precious Stone Mountain', which is the first hydrothermal field on the GM. The other is found at 101.47°W, 0.84°S EPR. The 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field (at 101.49°W, 1.22°N) is located at an off-axial seamount on the southern GM boundary, with a depth from 1,450 to 1,700m. Hydrothermal fluids emitting from the fissures and hydrothermal fauna were captured by deep-tow video. Few mineral clasts of pyrite and chalcopyrite were separated from one sediment sample, but no sulfide chimney was found yet. Hydrothermal fauna such as alive mussels, crabs, shrimps, tubeworms, giant clams, as well as rock samples were collected by TV-Grab. The study of the seafloor classification with Simrad EM120 multi-beam echosounder has been conducted on the 'Precious Stone Mountain' hydrothermal field. The result indicates that seafloor materials around the hydrothermal field can be characterized into three types, such as the fresh lava, hydrothermal sediment, and altered rock.

  14. The effect of sulfur on vapor liquid fractionation of metals in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Borisova, Anastassia Yu.; Harrichoury, Jean-Claude

    2008-02-01

    Despite the growing evidence that the vapor phase, formed through magma degassing and ore fluid boiling, can selectively concentrate and transport metals, the effects of major volatile components like sulfur, chlorine or carbon dioxide on the metal vapor-liquid fractionation and vapor-phase transport under magmatic-hydrothermal conditions remain poorly known. We performed systematic experiments to investigate the effect of sulfur ligands on metal vapor-liquid partitioning in model H 2O-S-NaCl-KCl-NaOH systems at temperatures from 350 to 500 °C. Results show that at acidic-to-neutral conditions, vapor-liquid equilibrium distribution coefficients, Km = mvapor / mliquid, where m is the mass concentration of the metal in corresponding phase, of metalloids (As, Sb) and base metals (Zn, Fe, Pb, Ag) are in the range 0.1-1.0 and 0.001-0.1, respectively, and are not significantly affected by the presence of geologically common sulfur concentrations, up to 1-3 wt.% S. In contrast, the partitioning of Cu, Au, and Pt into the vapor increases by a factor of 100 in comparison to the S-free water-salt system, yielding Km values of 0.5-1.0, 1-10, and 10-20, respectively, due to formation of volatile neutral complexes with H 2S and, possibly, SO 2. In neutral-to-basic systems, Zn, Pb, Fe and Ag show 10-100-fold increase of their partition coefficients, whereas Cu, Au and Pt exhibit Km values of up to several orders of magnitude lower, compared to acidic conditions at similar temperature, pressure and sulfur contents. These vapor-liquid distribution patterns result from combined effects of i) formation of volatile species with reduced sulfur ligands in the vapor phase, ii) changes in the metal speciation in the coexisting liquid phase as a function of pH, and iii) solute-solvent interactions in both phases. Our data explain the vapor-liquid fractionation trends for many metals as inferred in coexisting brine and vapor inclusions from magmatic-hydrothermal deposits, and provide a first experimental evidence for the dramatic increase of the mobility of Cu, Au and Pt in sulfur-enriched acidic magmatic-hydrothermal vapors, consistent with geological models of Au ± Cu ores formation and distribution in porphyry-epithermal settings.

  15. Stable isotope fractionation at a glacial hydrothermal field: implications for biogeochemistry and biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, C.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M.; Cockell, C.; Crawford, I.; Gunn, M.; Karlsson, M. T.; Thorsteinsson, T.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal environments that arise through the interaction between volcanogenic heat and glacial ice are ideal sites for understanding microbial biogeochemical processes on Earth, and also potentially on Mars where similar volcano-cryosphere interactions are thought to have occurred in the past. The Kverkfjöll subglacial basaltic volcano in central Iceland is geographically isolated, with little influence from flora, fauna, and human activity. Major environmental inputs include geothermal heat, meltwater from ice and snow, and outgassing of CO2, H2S, and SO2. Large physiochemical gradients exist, from steaming fumaroles and boiling hydrothermal pools, to frozen geothermal ground and glacial ice. Stable isotope measurements of total organic carbon, total sulphur, and total nitrogen were coupled with metagenomic analysis of the residing microbial communities, with the aim to identify biogeochemical relationships and processes operating within the Kverkfjöll geothermal environment, and also to identify any isotopic biosignatures that could be preserved within geothermal sediments. This study focused on a variety of samples taken along a hot spring stream that fed into a large ice-confined geothermal lake. Samples analysed range from unconsolidated hot spring sediments, well-developed microbial mats, and dissolved sulphate from hot spring fluids. From the anoxic spring source, the stream water increases in dissolved oxygen, decreases in temperature, yet maintains a pH of ~4. The spring environment is dominated by dissolved sulphate (~2.3 mM), with lower levels of nitrate (~50 ?M), phosphorus (~5?M), and ammonium (~1.5 ?M). Stable S isotope analysis reveals a fractionation of ~3.2 ‰ between sediment sulphide (as pyrite; ?34S ~0‰), and dissolved water sulphate (?34S ~3.2 ‰) consistently along the hot spring stream, indicating the presence of an active sulphur cycle, although not one dominated by sulphate reduction (e.g. very negative sulphide ?34S). This fractionation trend was absent within lake sediments, possibly due to a number of mixed sources feeding into the lake, in addition to the spring stream. ?13C in sediments becomes increasingly more negative going downstream, along with increasing removal of TOC. Microbial mats were largely similar with very positive C isotope ratios (?13C -9.4 to -12.6 ‰) typical of sulphur oxidizing microbes. Bulk genomic DNA was extracted from sediments and mats in order to identify firstly the community composition via 454-pyrosequencing, and secondly the functional diversity within these physiochemically varied environments. This metagenomic data will be combined with stable isotope patterns to elucidate the metabolic potential of hydrothermal environments at Kverkfjöll, which can be used to infer potential biogeochemical pathways of signatures of such pathways on Mars in similar, past environments.

  16. Geochemistry and solute fluxes of volcano-hydrothermal systems of Shiashkotan, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Shiashkotan Island belongs to the Northern Kuril island arc and consists of two joined volcanoes, Sinarka and Kuntomintar, with about 18 km of distance between the summits. Both volcanoes are active, with historic eruptions, and both emit fumarolic gases. Sinarka volcano is degassing through the extrusive dome with inaccessible strong and hot (> 400 °C) fumaroles. A large fumarolic field of the Kuntomintar volcano situated in a wide eroded caldera-like crater hosts many fumarolic vents with temperatures from boiling point to 480 °C. Both volcanoes are characterized by intense hydrothermal activity discharging acid SO4-Cl waters, which are drained to the Sea of Okhotsk by streams. At least 4 groups of near-neutral Na-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO4 springs with temperatures in the range of 50-80 °C are located at the sea level, within tide zones and discharge slightly altered diluted seawater. Volcanic gas of Kuntomintar as well as all types of hydrothermal manifestations of both volcanoes were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements and water isotopes. Volcanic gases are typical for arc volcanoes with 3He/4He corrected for air contamination up to 6.4 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10- 6, the air ratio) and ?13C (CO2) within - 10‰ to - 8 ‰ VPDB. Using a saturation indices approach it is shown that acid volcanic waters are formed at a shallow level, whereas waters of the coastal springs are partially equilibrated with rocks at ~ 180 °C. Trace element distribution and concentrations and the total REE depend on the water type, acidity and Al + Fe concentration. The REE pattern for acidic waters is unusual but similar to that found in some acidic crater lake waters. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from the island associated with volcanic activity is estimated at ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, based on the measurements of flow rates of the draining streams and their chemistry. The chemical erosion of the island by surface and thermal waters is estimated at 27 and 140 ton/km2/year, respectively, which is 2-3 times lower than chemical erosion of tropical volcanic islands.

  17. Extended hydrodynamic theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linehard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of the extreme pool boiling heat fluxes is expanded to embrace a variety of problems that have not previously been analyzed. These problems include the prediction of the peak heat flux on a variety of finite heaters, the influence of viscosity on the Taylor and Helmoltz instability mechanisms with application to film boiling and to the peak heat flux in viscous liquids, the formalization of the analogy between high-current-density electrolysis and boiling, and the description of boiling in the low-gravity limit. The predictions are verified with a large number of new data.

  18. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid-metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Speculation concerning the effects of an overlying pool of boiling water on a molten LWR core/concrete interaction varying widely and range from no effect other than a source of steam to complete quenching of the debris. In the effort to quantify the effects, the experimental investigation to be described was initiated. Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid-metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported. It was observed that water boiling on liquid-metal melts was unstable with respect to disturbances, and that liquid-liquid contacts were occurring at the boiling interface well into the film boiling superheat regime. The presence of these liquid-liquid contacts in film boiling was substantiated by photographic observations in transparent test sections. Narrow liquid-metal jets were observed to spike upward into the boiling water pool above, smearing out the interface between the two fluids into a mixing zone of water and liquid metal. The thickness of this mixing zone appeared from visual observations to be in the range of 1 to 2 cm. It is not presently clear what physical phenomena were responsible for this behavior; however, liquid-solid contacts as well as liquid-liquid contacts in the film boiling regime will be investigated in a future test series.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of hexagonal magnesium hydroxide nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Chunhong; Guo, Ming; Sun, Lingna; Hu, Changwen

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of PEG-20,000. Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake yielded different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. - Highlights: • Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method. • PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of hexagonal nanostructure. • Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes show different crystalline structures at different positions. • The probable formation mechanism of hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes was reported. - Abstract: Hexagonal magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanoflakes were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of the surfactant polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG-20,000). Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The composition, morphologies and structure of the Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake show different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis were performed to investigate the porous structure and surface area of the as-obtained nanoflakes.

  20. Porosity evolution in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, B.; Kosakowski, G.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced hydrothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems, grant number CRSII2_141843/1) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. These are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. These shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. Field observations suggest that active and fossil Icelandic hydrothermal systems are built from a superposition of completely altered and completely unaltered layers. With help of 1D and 2D reactive transport models (OpenGeoSys-GEM code), we investigate the reasons for this finding, by studying the mineralogical evolution of protoliths with different initial porosities at different temperatures and pressures, different leaching water composition and gas content, and different porosity geometries (i.e. porous medium versus fractured medium). From this study, we believe that the initial porosity of protoliths and volume changes due to their transformation into secondary minerals are key factors to explain the different alteration extents observed in field studies. We also discuss how precipitation and dissolution kinetics can influence the alteration time scales.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of lutetium disilicate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaoping; Gao Yanfeng; Chen Hongfei; Luo Hongjie

    2012-04-15

    A simple, low-cost hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize irregular-and rod-shaped lutetium disilicate (Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}) powders with sizes ranging from 71 to 340 nm. The synthesis temperature was 260 Degree-Sign C, which is nearly 1300 Degree-Sign C lower than that required for the solid-state reaction. The results indicated that both the hydrothermal temperature and pH values had great influences on the composition, crystalline phase and morphology of the powders. The formation mechanism, basic thermophysical properties, stability and anticorrosion properties of the Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders were also investigated. The obtained powders possessed low thermal conductivity, a suitable thermal expansion coefficient (3.92-5.17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}) with the silicon-based substrate and excellent thermal and structural stability. During hot corrosion testing, the surfaces of the samples appeared to react with the water and molten salt vapors, but no serious failure occurred. - Graphical abstract: An image for the as-prepared Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders (left) and XRD pattern (right) (inset shows the SEM graph of powders). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders via a hydrothermal process at 260 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystalline phase and morphology of the powders changed with experimental parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot corrosion was determined in an airflow environment containing alkaline vapor.

  2. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  3. The Hydrothermal Circulation of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellsson, J.; Doos, K.; Laliberté, F. B.; Zika, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric circulation maintains the energy balance between the warm/moist regions and the colder/drier regions of the Earth. A well-studied aspect of the atmospheric circulation is the time-averaged zonal-mean meridional overturning circulation. The meridional overturning describes the Hadley, Ferrel and Polar Cells in each hemisphere. However, in isobaric coordinates, the zonal average is unable to capture zonally asymmetric features such as the Walker circulation and transient exchanges of heat and moisture. The Walker Circulation is restricted to equatorial regions, and is commonly studied using a meridional mean over a limited region with ill-defined latitudinal boundaries. The Walker Circulation is thus neither mass-conserving nor uniquely defined. To overtcome these limitations, the Walker circulation is often diagnosed using vertical velocity. As a consequence, it is difficult to distinguish between the zonal-mean circulation (Hadley Circulation) and the zonal asymmetries (Walker Circulation). Global mass and energy transport is here investigated using a moisture-heat perspective. A hydrothermal streamfunction is defined where latent heat and dry static energy act as coordinates. Because the hydrothermal streamfunction resides in purely thermodynamical space, it does not differentiate between zonal, meridional, or vertical transports. The hydrothermal streamfunction shows the global overturning circulation as a unified cycle. It describes a cycle with three branches: i) a convective branch where latent heat is converted into sensible heat along moist adiabats, ii) a cooling branch where dry air loses energy due to radiative damping and iii) a return branch where cold, dry air is heated and moistened following the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. These three branches form a single cell of more than 400 Sv with at least 100 Sv due to zonal motions such as the Walker Circulation. The cell is also found fairly stationary on seasonal and inter-annual timescales. The hydrothermal streamfunction thus diagnoses the Hadley and Walker circulations in a common coordinate system and allows for measuring their combined strength unambiguously. Moreover, it highlights similarities and differences between the tropical convectively-driven circulations and the midlatitude eddy-driven circulation by joining them into a single, global cycle. This simple yet complete diagnostic is furthermore proposed as a tool for the intercomparison of climate simulations.

  4. Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal mineralising systems as critical systems. Bruce E Hobbs1,2, Alison Ord1 and Mark A. Munro1. 1. Centre for Exploration Targeting, The University of Western Australia, M006, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. 2. CSIRO Earth and Resource Engineering, Bentley, WA, Australia Hydrothermal mineralising systems are presented as large, open chemical reactors held far from equilibrium during their life-time by the influx of heat, fluid and dissolved chemical species. As such they are nonlinear dynamical systems and need to be analysed using the tools that have been developed for such systems. Hydrothermal systems undergo a number of transitions during their evolution and this paper focuses on methods for characterising these transitions in a quantitative manner and establishing whether they resemble first or second (critical) phase transitions or whether they have some other kind of nature. Critical phase transitions are characterised by long range correlations for some parameter characteristic of the system, power-law probability distributions so that there is no characteristic length scale and a high sensitivity to perturbations; as one approaches criticality, characteristic parameters for the system scale in a power law manner with distance from the critical point. The transitions undergone in mineralised hydrothermal systems are: (i) widespread, non-localised mineral alteration involving exothermic mineral reactions that produce hydrous silicate phases, carbonates and iron-oxides, (ii) strongly localised veining, brecciation and/or stock-work formation, (iii) a series of endothermic mineral reactions involving the formation of non-hydrous silicates, sulphides and metals such as gold, (iv) multiple repetitions of transitions (ii) and (iii). We have quantified aspects of these transitions in gold deposits from the Yilgarn craton of Western Australia using wavelet transforms. This technique is convenient and fast. It enables one to establish if the transition is multifractal (and if so, quantify the multifractal spectrum) and determine the scale dependence of long range correlations or anti-correlations. The availability of long drill holes with detailed chemical analyses and mineral abundances derived from hyperspectral data enables individual ore bodies to be characterised in a quantitative manner and constraints placed on whether the various transition are possibly critical or of some other form. We also present some simple nonlinear models that produce the multifractal character and correlation scaling relations observed in these data sets,

  5. Economic Environmental Scheduling of Hydrothermal Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanayak, D. N.; Chakrabarti, R. N.; Basu, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an interactive fuzzy satisfying method based on simulated annealing technique to determine the economic environmental scheduling of hydrothermal power system consisting of multi-reservoir cascaded hydro plants with time delay and thermal plants with nonsmooth fuel cost and emission level functions. This paper treats cost and emission as competing objectives. Assuming that the decision maker (DM) has fuzzy goals for each of the objective functions, fuzzy satisfying method based on simulated annealing technique is applied for generating a corresponding optimal noninferior solution for the DM's goals. Test results obtained from the proposed method are compared with those obtained by using evolutionary programming.

  6. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems. ?? 1994.

  7. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Smith, M.F.; Jonasson, I.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85{degree}49 feet W and 85{degree} 55 feet W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens` equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (<10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems. 50 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Hydrothermal systems as environments for the emergence of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the chemical disequilibrium provided by the mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater in present-day systems indicates that organic synthesis from CO2 or carbonic acid is thermodynamically favoured in the conditions in which hyperthermophilic microorganisms are known to live. These organisms lower the Gibbs free energy of the chemical mixture by synthesizing many of the components of their cells. Primary productivity is enormous in hydrothermal systems because it depends only on catalysis of thermodynamically favourable, exergonic reactions. It follows that hydrothermal systems may be the most favourable environments for life on Earth. This fact makes hydrothermal systems logical candidates for the location of the emergence of life, a speculation that is supported by genetic evidence that modern hyperthermophilic organisms are closer to a common ancestor than any other forms of life. The presence of hydrothermal systems on the early Earth would correspond to the presence of liquid water. Evidence that hydrothermal systems existed early in the history of Mars raises the possibility that life may have emerged on Mars as well. Redox reactions between water and rock establish the potential for organic synthesis in and around hydrothermal systems. Therefore, the single most important parameter for modelling the geochemical emergence of life on the early Earth or Mars is the composition of the rock which hosts the hydrothermal system.

  9. MICROBIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION IN DEEP-SEA HYDROTHERMAL PLUMES

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    MICROBIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION IN DEEP-SEA HYDROTHERMAL PLUMES A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED;ABSTRACT Autotrophic ammonia oxidation has been documented for the first time in deep- sea hydrothermal autotrophic ammonia oxidation at ~ 91 nM d-1 , and potentially produces de novo organic carbon at a rate (0

  10. Generic safety insights for inspection of boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.C.; Taylor, J.H.; Fresco, A.N.; Hillman, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    As the number of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) increases, safety inspection has increased in importance. Over the last 2 yr, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques have been developed to aid in the inspection process. Broad interest in generic PRA-based methods has arisen in the past year, since only approx. 25% of the US nuclear power plants have completed PRAs, and also, inspectors want PRA-based tools for these plants. This paper describes the Brookhaven National Lab. program to develop generic boiling water reactor (BWR) PRA-based inspection insights or inspection guidance designed to be applied to plants without PRAs.

  11. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  12. Quality and high yield synthesis of Ag nanowires by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method.

    PubMed

    Meléndrez, Manuel F; Medina, Carlos; Solis-Pomar, Francisco; Flores, Paulo; Paulraj, Mani; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) were obtained using microwave-assisted hydrothermal method (MAH). The main advantage of the method is its high NWs production which is greater than 90%. It is also easy, fast, and highly reproducible process. One of the drawbacks presented so far in the synthesis of nanostructures by polyol path is the high temperature used in the process, which is superior than the boiling point of solvent (ethylene glycol), and also its excessive reaction time. Here, Ag-NWs with diameters of 70 to 110 nm were synthesized in 5 min in large quantities. Results showed that dimensions and shape of nanowires were very susceptible to changes with reaction parameters. The reactor power and reactor fill capacity were important for the synthesis. It was found that the reaction time needs to be decreased because of the NWs which start to deform and break up due to significant increase in the pressure's system. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) did not show corresponding phases of AgO. Some aspects about synthesis parameters which are related to the percent yield and size of nanowires are also discussed. PMID:25852345

  13. Quality and high yield synthesis of Ag nanowires by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndrez, Manuel F.; Medina, Carlos; Solis-Pomar, Francisco; Flores, Paulo; Paulraj, Mani; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    Silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) were obtained using microwave-assisted hydrothermal method (MAH). The main advantage of the method is its high NWs production which is greater than 90%. It is also easy, fast, and highly reproducible process. One of the drawbacks presented so far in the synthesis of nanostructures by polyol path is the high temperature used in the process, which is superior than the boiling point of solvent (ethylene glycol), and also its excessive reaction time. Here, Ag-NWs with diameters of 70 to 110 nm were synthesized in 5 min in large quantities. Results showed that dimensions and shape of nanowires were very susceptible to changes with reaction parameters. The reactor power and reactor fill capacity were important for the synthesis. It was found that the reaction time needs to be decreased because of the NWs which start to deform and break up due to significant increase in the pressure's system. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) did not show corresponding phases of AgO. Some aspects about synthesis parameters which are related to the percent yield and size of nanowires are also discussed.

  14. Hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae for biocrude production: Improving the biocrude properties with vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Eboibi, Blessing Elo-Oghene; Lewis, David Milton; Ashman, Peter John; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a two-part process for producing biocrude with reduced impurities. The biocrude was produced from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of Spirulina sp. and Tetraselmis sp. in a batch reactor at both 300 and 350°C, 5min, and 16%w/w solid feed composition. The resultant biocrudes were vacuum distilled at a maximum temperature of 360°C. It was shown that biocrude quality could be enhanced without using catalyst by vacuum distillation (VD). The biocrude yield for Spirulina sp. was 36wt% at 300°C, 42wt% at 350°C, and for Tetraselmis sp. was 34wt% at 300°C, and 58wt% at 350°C. VD of Spirulina sp. biocrude obtained at 300 and 350°C led to 62 and 67wt% distilled biocrudes yield, respectively. VD of Tetraselmis sp. biocrude obtained at 300°C was 70wt%, and 73wt% at 350°C. The higher heating values (HHV) increased from 32MJ/kg to 40MJ/kg. There were substantial reductions in oxygen, metallic content, and boiling point ranges in distilled biocrudes. PMID:25463802

  15. Thermochemical conversion of raw and defatted algal biomass via hydrothermal liquefaction and slow pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Derek R; Sharma, Brajendra K; Blazina, Grant V; Rajagopalan, Kishore; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2012-04-01

    Thermochemical conversion is a promising route for recovering energy from algal biomass. Two thermochemical processes, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL: 300 °C and 10-12 MPa) and slow pyrolysis (heated to 450 °C at a rate of 50 °C/min), were used to produce bio-oils from Scenedesmus (raw and defatted) and Spirulina biomass that were compared against Illinois shale oil. Although both thermochemical conversion routes produced energy dense bio-oil (35-37 MJ/kg) that approached shale oil (41 MJ/kg), bio-oil yields (24-45%) and physico-chemical characteristics were highly influenced by conversion route and feedstock selection. Sharp differences were observed in the mean bio-oil molecular weight (pyrolysis 280-360 Da; HTL 700-1330 Da) and the percentage of low boiling compounds (bp<400 °C) (pyrolysis 62-66%; HTL 45-54%). Analysis of the energy consumption ratio (ECR) also revealed that for wet algal biomass (80% moisture content), HTL is more favorable (ECR 0.44-0.63) than pyrolysis (ECR 0.92-1.24) due to required water volatilization in the latter technique. PMID:22285293

  16. saturated liquid. The region above the vapor line is superheated vapor; that below the lower line is subcooled liquid. The region enclosed by the pair represents a mixture of liquid and

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    line is subcooled liquid. The region enclosed by the pair represents a mixture of liquid and vapor are as follows: Assume the system is charged with a mixture having a concentration of component A designated, the refrigerant will be a mixture of liquid and vapor, as usually occurs in a single-refrigerant system. One

  17. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Kennish, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The present article reviews studies of the past 15 years of active and inactive hydrothermal vents. The focus of the discussion is on the ecology of the biological communities inhabiting hydrothermal vents. These communities exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. The authors attempt to relate the biology of hydrothermal vent systems to geology. Future directions for hydrothermal vent research are suggested. Since many vent populations are dependent on hydrothermal fluids and are consequently unstable, both short- and long-term aspects of the ecology of the vent organisms and the influence of chemical and geological factors on the biology of vent systems need to be established. 200 refs., 28 figs.

  18. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the ultraslow spreading ridges is also presumable.

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy of marine hydrothermal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppenkastrop, D.; De Carlo, E. H.; Lewis, S.

    1991-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was employed to study the nanometer-scale morphology and topography of marine hydrothermal sediments collected from the Lau Basin and the North Fiji Basin during R/V Sonne cruise SO 35. The mineralogy and bulk chemistry of the sediments were determined prior to STM studies. Samples consist primarily of birnessite or a mixture of todorokite and birnessite. Because manganese oxides are wide bandgap semiconductors that cannot be readily imaged in their natural state, the particles were coated with an approximately 25-nm carbon layer prior to imaging. Low resolution STM images were acquired in the constant current mode. The birnessite surface is characterized by gently sloped topography and smaller scale knolls and depressions; less commonly distinct elongated growth patterns similar to fibrous todorokite crystals are observed. The surface of todorokite-birnessite particles is more homogeneous with the well-defined parallel ridge and valley topography of fibrous todorokite. Ridges and valleys are interrupted by 7-10-nm terraces and step-like features interpreted to represent edges of aligned tunnel structures. Our observations are consistent with results of previous studies of hydrothermal manganese oxides and suggest that STM is useful for investigating the nanometer-scale surface characteristics of aggregates of wide bandgap semiconductor particles. However, because of 2-3-nm scale artifacts imparted by carbon coating, only features larger than approximately 5 nm can be confidently attributed to the underlying particles.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy of marine hydrothermal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppenkastrop, D.; Lewis, S.; De Carlo, E.H. )

    1991-11-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was employed to study the nanometer-scale morphology and topography of marine hydrothermal sediments collected from the Lau Basin and the North Fiji Basin during R/V Sonne cruise SO 35. The mineralogy and bulk chemistry of the sediments were determined prior to STM studies. Samples consist primarily of birnessite or a mixture of todorokite and birnessite. Because manganese oxides are wide bandgap semiconductors that cannot be readily imaged in their natural state, the particles were coated with an approximately 25-nm carbon layer prior to imaging. Low resolution STM images were acquired in the constant current mode. The birnessite surface is characterized by gently sloped topography and smaller scale knolls and depressions; less commonly distinct elongated growth patterns similar to fibrous todorokite crystals are observed. The surface of todorokite-birnessite particles is more homogeneous with the well-defined parallel ridge and valley topography of fibrous todorokite. Ridges and valleys are interrupted by 7-10-nm terraces and step-like features interpreted to represent edges of aligned tunnel structures. The authors observations are consistent with results of previous studies of hydrothermal manganese oxides and suggest that STM is useful for investigating the nanometer-scale surface characteristics of aggregates of wide bandgap semiconductor particles. However, because of 2-3-nm scale artifacts imparted by carbon coating, only features larger than approximately 5 nm can be confidently attributed to the underlying particles.

  1. Hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    1988-09-10

    Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10,000 B.P., into a thermal regime representing 100,000 years of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those observed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drill holes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hydrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old.

  2. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  3. Microgravity experiments on boiling behavior of self-wetting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Iwasaki, A.

    Although most of fluids show a decrease in the surface tension with increasing temperature, some fluids show abnormal behavior- the surface tension increases with the increase in temperature. In the case of boiling phenomena, the thermocapillary flow due t o temperature gradient at the liquid/vapor interface should induce a liquid supply to a dry patch or hot spot developed under bubble. "Self- wetting" termed in this paper came from such a behavior of spontaneous liquid supply. Aqueous solutions of high carbon alcohols have been known as a fluid with such an abnormal surface tension behavior. In addition to the thermocapillary flow induced by temperature gradient, the Marangoni effect due to concentration gradient around liquid/vapor interface should occur, since the component of vapor phase is characterized to be either alcohol-rich or water-rich by preferential evaporation, as far as non-azeotropic components are concerned. In some components, the direction of thermocapillary flow is the same as the direction of the Marangoni flow induced by concentration gradient, which should even enhance the self-wettability. The present authors have carried out a series of microgravity experiments at JAMIC to observe the fundamental boiling behavior of self-wetting fluid (1-butanol aqueous solution, in the present study), and compared with CFC -113 and ethanol aqueous solution. The flow around adjacent dual bubbles and the flow under a single bubble are discussed.

  4. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; Nawrocki, David; Clapper, Randy; Kolacz, John; Butcher, Robert; May, Rochelle; Chao, David; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; O'Neill, Lucas E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  5. Does boiling affect the bioaccessibility of selenium from cabbage?

    PubMed

    Funes-Collado, Virginia; Rubio, Roser; López-Sánchez, J Fermín

    2015-08-15

    The bioaccessible selenium species from cabbage were studied using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) which establishes conditions that simulate the gastric and gastrointestinal phases of human digestion. Samples of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown in peat fortified with different concentrations of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were analysed, and several enzymes (pepsin, pancreatin and amylase) were used in the PBET. The effect of boiling before extraction was also assayed. Selenium speciation in the PBET extracts was determined using anionic exchange and LC-ICP/MS. The selenocompounds in the extracts were Se(IV), SeMet and, mostly, Se(VI) species. The results show that the activity of the enzymes increased the concentration of the selenocompounds slightly, although the use of amylase had no effect on the results. The PBET showed the concentration of inorganic selenium in the extracts from boiled cabbage decreased as much as 4-fold while the release of SeMet and its concentration increased (up to 6-fold), with respect to raw cabbage. PMID:25794754

  6. Boiling on spatially controlled heterogeneous surfaces: Wettability patterns on microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, HangJin; Yu, Dong In; Noh, Hyunwoo; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We investigated nucleate boiling heat transfer with precisely controlled wetting patterns and micro-posts, to gain insights into the impact of surface heterogeneity. To create heterogeneous wetting patterns, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were spatially patterned. Even at a contact angle <90°, bubble nucleation and bubble frequency were accelerated on SAM patterns, since this contact angle is larger than that found on plain surfaces. Micro-posts were also fabricated on the surface, which interrupted the expansion of generated bubbles. This surface structuring induced smaller bubbles and higher bubble frequency than the plain surface. The resistance provided by surface structures to bubble expansion broke the interface between the vapor mushroom and the heating surface, and water could therefore be continuously supplied through these spaces at high heat flux. To induce synergistic effects with wetting patterns and surface structures on boiling, we fabricated SAM patterns onto the heads of micro-posts. On this combined surface, bubble nucleation was induced from the head of the micro-posts, and bubble growth was influenced by both the SAM pattern and the micro-post structures. In particular, separation of the vapor path on the SAM patterns and the liquid path between micro-post structures resulted in high heat transfer performance without critical heat flux deterioration.

  7. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  8. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  9. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  10. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  11. Shallow Hydrothermal Flow in a Strike-Slip Fault System, Mt Isa, Australia: A Proterozoic Analog for Modern Geothermal Systems Along Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M.

    2014-12-01

    Strong E-W shortening during the Isan Orogeny (1590-1500 Ma) led to crustal thickening and compressional inversion of former intracontinental rift basins. The resulting metamorphic/plutonic basement complex is disrupted by conjugate, mutually cross-cutting sets of brittle, late-orogenic strike-slip faults. Dextral strike-slip faults (separations < 25 km) strike NE-NNE, while conjugate sinistral faults strike SE-SSE, defining a wrench regime (?v = ?2) with horizontal maximum compression, ?1, trending c. 100°. The strike-slip faults are recessive except in dilational sites where upwelling hydrothermal fluids have silicified the cataclastic shear zones (CSZ) which protrude as blade-like ridges extending for kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. The mineralized fault segments include sinuous releasing bends where the fault trace is deflected <10° as well as more abrupt dilational stepovers with distributed extension fracturing linking en echelon fault segments. Other components of structural permeability include: (1) innumerable fault-parallel quartz-veins (cm to m thickness) within the CSZ; (2) irregular stringer veins; and (3) a regional set of predominantly extensional, subvertical planar quartz veins oriented 080-120° at moderate angles to the main faults. Broad contemporaneity is indicated by mutual cross-cutting relationships between all structural components. Measured strike separations along shear fractures are consistent with seismic slip increments which refreshed fracture permeability and promoted hydrothermal flow. Textures suggest the faults were exhumed from epithermal boiling environments (<1-2 km depth). Restoration of fault cohesive strength by hydrothermal cementation was critical in allowing continued vein formation by hydraulic extension fracturing. The distribution of hydrothermal quartz within the fault system provides a guide to structural localization of upflow zones in geothermal fields developed along strike-slip faults.

  12. Scale effects on flow boiling heat transfer in microchannels: A fundamental perspective

    E-print Network

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Scale effects on flow boiling heat transfer in microchannels: A fundamental perspective Satish G between heat transfer around a nucleating bubble in pool boiling and in the elongated bubble/slug flow on the basis of experimental data which shows no dependence of heat transfer coefficient on mass flow rate

  13. The effects of boiling on the allergenic properties of tropomyosin of shrimp (litopenaeus vannamei).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shrimp play an important role in human nutrition, and is responsible for severe hypersensitivity reactions. The thermal stability of raw and boiled shrimp tropomyosins (TM) has never been reported. The aims of the study were to compare the stability of raw and boiled shrimp TM of Litopenaeus vanname...

  14. Separation of close-boiling hydrocarbon mixtures by MFI and FAU membranes made by secondary growth

    E-print Network

    Nair, Sankar

    Separation of close-boiling hydrocarbon mixtures by MFI and FAU membranes made by secondary growth January 2001 Abstract We summarize and discuss recent results on the separation of close-boiling hydrocarbon mixtures by means of zeolite membranes. We focus on the separation of xylene isomers using

  15. 77 FR 38338 - Dairyland Power Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... utilized a forced-circulation, direct-cycle boiling water reactor as its heat source. The plant is located... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). The revised regulation stated that it was applicable to all Part 50... Dairyland Power Cooperative; La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor Exemption From Certain Security Requirements...

  16. Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water reactors

    E-print Network

    Demazière, Christophe

    Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden Keywords: Thorium BWR Neutronics a b s t r a c t With the aim of investigating the technical feasibility of fuelling a conventional BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) with thorium

  17. 77 FR 27097 - LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor, Exemption From Certain Requirements, Vernon County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... revised 10 CFR 73.55 through the issuance of a final rule on March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). Section 73.55... LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor, Exemption From Certain Requirements, Vernon County, WI AGENCY...) 73.55, for the LaCrosse Boiling Water Reactor (LACBWR). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has...

  18. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the gas... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. 154.708 Section...

  19. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the gas... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. 154.708 Section...

  20. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the gas... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. 154.708 Section...