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Sample records for subjects requiring lumbar

  1. Effects of abdominal drawing-in during prone hip extension on the muscle activities of the hamstring, gluteus maximus, and lumbar erector spinae in subjects with lumbar hyperlordosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM), measured using a pressure bio-feedback unit, on the activities of the hamstring, gluteus maximus, and erector spinae muscles during prone hip extension. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy adult subjects (14 male, 16 female), were recruited. Subjects’ lumbar lordosis and pelvic tilt angles were measured, and based on the results, the subjects were divided into two groups: a hyperlordotic lumbar angle (HLLA) group (n=15) and a normal lordotic lumbar angle (NLLA) group (n=15). The muscle activities of the hamstring and gluteus maximus, and of the erector spinae on the right side of the body, were recorded using surface electromyography. [Results] When performing ADIM with prone hip extension, the muscle activity of the gluteus maximus of the HLLA group significantly improved compared with that the NLLA group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that ADIM with prone hip extension was more effective at eliciting gluteus maximus activity in the HLLA group than in the NLLA group. Therefore, ADIM with prone hip extension may be useful for increasing the gluteus maximus activity of individuals with lumbar hyperlordosis. PMID:25729173

  2. Ultrasound evidence of altered lumbar connective tissue structure in human subjects with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the connective tissues forming the fascial planes of the back have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP), there have been no previous studies quantitatively evaluating connective tissue structure in this condition. The goal of this study was to perform an ultrasound-based comparison of perimuscular connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of human subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP for more than 12 months, compared with a group of subjects without LBP. Methods In each of 107 human subjects (60 with LBP and 47 without LBP), parasagittal ultrasound images were acquired bilaterally centered on a point 2 cm lateral to the midpoint of the L2-3 interspinous ligament. The outcome measures based on these images were subcutaneous and perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity measured by ultrasound. Results There were no significant differences in age, sex, body mass index (BMI) or activity levels between LBP and No-LBP groups. Perimuscular thickness and echogenicity were not correlated with age but were positively correlated with BMI. The LBP group had ~25% greater perimuscular thickness and echogenicity compared with the No-LBP group (ANCOVA adjusted for BMI, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion This is the first report of abnormal connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP. This finding was not attributable to differences in age, sex, BMI or activity level between groups. Possible causes include genetic factors, abnormal movement patterns and chronic inflammation. PMID:19958536

  3. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Ko; Hara, Nobuhiro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kunogi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Atsushi, Seichi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Materials and Methods Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years) for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment. Results In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms) had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50–7.31); absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13–5.65); <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46–9.98); and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92–4.78). Conclusions The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year. PMID:26863214

  4. Mechanical Characterization of the Human Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Subjected to Impact Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David, IV

    Low back pain is a large and costly problem in the United States. Several working populations, such as miners, construction workers, forklift operators, and military personnel, have an increased risk and prevalence of low back pain compared to the general population. This is due to exposure to repeated, transient impact shocks, particularly while operating vehicles or other machinery. These shocks typically do not cause acute injury, but rather lead to pain and injury over time. The major focus in low back pain is often the intervertebral disc, due to its role as the major primary load-bearing component along the spinal column. The formation of a reliable standard for human lumbar disc exposure to repeated transient shock could potentially reduce injury risk for these working populations. The objective of this project, therefore, is to characterize the mechanical response of the lumbar intervertebral disc subjected to sub-traumatic impact loading conditions using both cadaveric and computational models, and to investigate the possible implications of this type of loading environment for low back pain. Axial, compressive impact loading events on Naval high speed boats were simulated in the laboratory and applied to human cadaveric specimen. Disc stiffness was higher and hysteresis was lower than quasi-static loading conditions. This indicates a shift in mechanical response when the disc is under impact loads and this behavior could be contributing to long-term back pain. Interstitial fluid loss and disc height changes were shown to affect disc impact mechanics in a creep study. Neutral zone increased, while energy dissipation and low-strain region stiffness decreased. This suggests that the disc has greater clinical instability during impact loading with progressive creep and fluid loss, indicating that time of day should be considered for working populations subjected to impact loads. A finite element model was developed and validated against cadaver specimen

  5. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  6. The Transition from Optional to Required Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, William; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Proposes that the optional subject phenomenon in early child language arises because children have not yet acquired the morphological elements (primarily modal and tense) necessary to distinguish subject-taking verbs (e.g., finite verbs) from their non-subject-taking counterparts (e.g., infinitives). (Author/CB)

  7. Risk of adjacent-segment disease requiring surgery after short lumbar fusion: results of the French Spine Surgery Society Series.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Caroline; Magrino, Baptiste; Gillet, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is an increasingly problematic complication following lumbar fusion surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risk of ASD requiring surgical treatment after short lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. Primary spinal disease and surgical factors associated with an increased risk of revision were also investigated. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study using the French Spine Surgery Society clinical data that included 3338 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 7 years (range 4-10 years). Clinical ASD requiring surgery was the principal judgment criterion; the length of follow-up time and initial spinal disease were also recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. The correlation between primary spinal disease and surgery with an increased risk of revision was investigated. RESULTS During the follow-up period, 186 patients required revision surgery for ASD (5.6%). The predicted risk of ASD requiring revision surgery was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.2%) at 2 years, 3.8% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 4 years, 5.7% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 6 years, and 9% (95% CI 8.7%-10.6%) at 8 years. Initial spinal disease affected the risk of ASD requiring surgery (p = 0.0003). The highest risk was observed for degenerative spondylolisthesis. CONCLUSIONS ASD requiring revision surgery was predicted in 5.6% of patients 7 years after index short lumbar spinal fusion in the French Spine Surgery Society retrospective series. An increased risk of ASD requiring revision surgery associated with initial spinal disease showed the significance of the influence of natural degenerative history on adjacent-segment pathology. PMID:26967992

  8. Novel genetic variants associated with lumbar disc degeneration in northern Europeans: a meta-analysis of 4600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Frances M K; Bansal, Aruna T; van Meurs, Joyce B; Bell, Jordana T; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Suri, Pradeep; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sambrook, Philip N; Hofman, Albert; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita; Menni, Cristina; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P Eline; Hunter, David J; MacGregor, Alex J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Spector, Tim D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is an important cause of low back pain, which is a common and costly problem. LDD is characterised by disc space narrowing and osteophyte growth at the circumference of the disc. To date, the agnostic search of the genome by genome-wide association (GWA) to identify common variants associated with LDD has not been fruitful. This study is the first GWA meta-analysis of LDD. Methods We have developed a continuous trait based on disc space narrowing and osteophytes growth which is measurable on all forms of imaging (plain radiograph, CT scan and MRI) and performed a meta-analysis of five cohorts of Northern European extraction each having GWA data imputed to HapMap V.2. Results This study of 4600 individuals identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms with p<5×10−8, the threshold set for genome-wide significance. We identified a variant in the PARK2 gene (p=2.8×10−8) associated with LDD. Differential methylation at one CpG island of the PARK2 promoter was observed in a small subset of subjects (β=8.74×10−4, p=0.006). Conclusions LDD accounts for a considerable proportion of low back pain and the pathogenesis of LDD is poorly understood. This work provides evidence of association of the PARK2 gene and suggests that methylation of the PARK2 promoter may influence degeneration of the intervertebral disc. This gene has not previously been considered a candidate in LDD and further functional work is needed on this hitherto unsuspected pathway. PMID:22993228

  9. Effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the leg motor area on lumbar spinal network excitability in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Roche, N; Lackmy, A; Achache, V; Bussel, B; Katz, R

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, two techniques have become available for the non-invasive stimulation of human motor cortex: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The effects of TMS and tDCS when applied over motor cortex should be considered with regard not only to cortical circuits but also to spinal motor circuits. The different modes of action and specificity of TMS and tDCS suggest that their effects on spinal network excitability may be different from that in the cortex. Until now, the effects of tDCS on lumbar spinal network excitability have never been studied. In this series of experiments, on healthy subjects, we studied the effects of anodal tDCS over the lower limb motor cortex on (i) reciprocal Ia inhibition projecting from the tibialis anterior muscle (TA) to the soleus (SOL), (ii) presynaptic inhibition of SOL Ia terminals, (iii) homonymous SOL recurrent inhibition, and (iv) SOL H-reflex recruitment curves. The results show that anodal tDCS decreases reciprocal Ia inhibition, increases recurrent inhibition and induces no modification of presynaptic inhibition of SOL Ia terminals and of SOL-H reflex recruitment curves. Our results indicate therefore that the effects of tDCS are the opposite of those previously described for TMS on spinal network excitability. They also indicate that anodal tDCS induces effects on spinal network excitability similar to those observed during co-contraction suggesting that anodal tDCS activates descending corticospinal projections mainly involved in co-contractions. PMID:21502292

  10. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  11. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease. PMID:26761383

  12. Lumbar corsets can decrease lumbar motion in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key pointsRotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back painWearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity.Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  13. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  14. [Lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Teiblum, Sandra Sofie; Hjørne, Flemming Pii; Bisgaard, Thue

    2010-03-22

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition. Lumbar hernia should be considered a rare differential diagnosis to unexplained back pain. Symptoms are scarce and diffuse and can vary with the size and content of the hernia. As there is a 25% risk of incarceration, operation is indicated even in asymptomatic hernias. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a woman with a slow growing mass in the lumbar region. She presented with pain and a computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent open surgery and fully recovered with recurrence within the first half year. PMID:20334799

  15. Inclusion of Regional Poroelastic Material Properties Better Predicts Biomechanical Behavior of Lumbar Discs Subjected to Dynamic Loading

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jamie R.; Natarajan, Raghu N.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between repetitive lifting and the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure is difficult to study in vivo and in vitro. The aim of this investigation was to develop a three-dimensional poroelastic finite element model of a lumbar motion segment that reflects the biological properties and behaviors of in vivo disc tissues including swelling pressure due to the proteoglycans and strain dependent permeability and porosity. It was hypothesized that when modeling the annulus, prescribing tissue specific material properties will not be adequate for studying the in vivo loading and unloading behavior of the disc. Rather, regional variations of these properties, which are known to exist within the annulus, must also be included. Finite element predictions were compared to in vivo measurements published by Tyrrell et al., (Tyrrell et al., 1985) of percent change in total stature for two loading protocols, short-term creep loading and standing recovery and short-term cyclic loading with standing recovery. The model in which the regional variations of material properties in the annulus had been included provided an overall better prediction of the in vivo behavior as compared to the model in which the annulus properties were assumed to be homogenous. This model will now be used to study the relationship between repetitive lifting and disc degeneration. PMID:17156786

  16. 40 CFR 71.3 - Sources subject to permitting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... they are subject to 40 CFR part 60, subpart AAA—-Standards of Performance for New Residential Wood... because they are subject to 40 CFR part 61, subpart M—National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sources subject to...

  17. Interexaminer reliability of the electromagnetic radiation receiver for determining lumbar spinal joint dysfunction in subjects with low back pain

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, H.A.; Jacobson, B.H.; Edwards, S.W.; Heng, B.J.

    1990-03-01

    Twenty subjects (6 male, 14 female) with low back pain were examined by two experienced and licensed chiropractic doctors (E1 and E2). Both examiners examined the patients using a Toftness Electromagnetic Radiation Receiver (EMRR) and by manual palpation (MP) of the spinous processes. Interexaminer reliability was calculated at three sites (L3, L4, L5) for the following combinations: (a) E1,MP--E2,MP; (b) E1,EMRR--E2,EMRR; (c) E1,MP--E2,EMRR; and (d) E2,MP--E1,EMRR, and intraexaminer reliability was calculated for the following variables: (e) E1,MP--E1,EMRR; and (f) E2,MP--E2,EMRR. Results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for interexaminer reliability of the stated combinations and at the specific sites were: (a) -0.071, 0.400, 0.200; (b) -0.013, 0.100, -0.120; (c) 0.286, 0.300, 0.200; (d) -0.081, 0.000, 0.048. These results predominantly indicate a poor to fair interexaminer reliability. The results of a Kappa coefficient analysis for intraexaminer reliability of the stated combinations were: (e) 0.111, 0.400, 0.737; (f) 0.000, 0.100, 0.368. These results indicate a poor to fair reliability. It was concluded that in subjects with low back pain the EMRR may not be a reliable indicator of spinal joint dysfunction.

  18. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational study. Purpose To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. Overview of Literature IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Methods Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. Results For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=–0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=–0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). Conclusions The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain. PMID:27340529

  19. The point-to-point test: A new diagnostic tool for measuring lumbar tactile acuity? Inter and intra-examiner reliability study of pain-free subjects.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Wacław; Sługocka, Anna; Saulicz, Oskar; Saulicz, Edward

    2016-04-01

    A two-point discrimination test (TPD) is commonly used to investigate lumbar tactile acuity. However, low inter-examiner reliability and difficulties in execution significantly limit its application. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of a new approach, the point-to-point test (PTP), with the TPD. Twenty-one pain-free subjects attended the inter-examiner stage of the study. Eighteen of them were further recruited into an intra-examiner (reproducibility and repeatability) reliability study. PTP was performed on the three points plotted at the L3 spinal level. Point '0' overlapped with the L3 spinous process, from which points '1' and '2' were horizontally separated by 5 and 10 cm, respectively. Participants manually indicated a point previously touched by the examiner, while the distance (error) was measured. Reliability was determined with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,3). The results revealed good and moderate inter- and intra-examiner reliability at point '1' (ICC2,3 = 0.68-0.84) and good reliability at point '2' (ICC2,3 = 0.84-0.86). At point '0', reliability was moderate to poor (ICC2,3 = 0.13-0.63). TPD was characterised by a poor to moderate level of inter- (ICC2,1 = 0.51; ICC2,3 = 0.56) and intra-examiner reliability (ICC(2,1) = 0.50; ICC2,3 = 0.74). Our findings suggest that PTP is more reliable than TPD at two investigated points at the L3 spinal level. However, further research on PTP validity data is strongly warranted. PMID:26797175

  20. Mechanical contribution to lumbar stress injuries in female gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Hall, S J

    1986-12-01

    Because female gymnasts as a group display higher than average incidences of stress-related pathologies of the lumbar spine, it was of interest to evaluate mechanical factors which are potential contributors. Lumbar hyperextension and impact forces were quantified for performances of five commonly executed gymnastics skills by four competitive collegiate women gymnasts. The skills performed were the front walkover, the back walkover, and the front handspring, the back handspring, and the handspring vault. Wielke's (1983) radius method was used to quantify lumbar curvatures from film data during normal relaxed standing postures and during subject performances of the five selected skills. A force platform was used to monitor vertical and lateral ground reaction forces at the terminations of the respective skill performances. Of the skills examined, the handspring vault produced the highest vertical and lateral impact forces, and the back handspring and back walkover required the greatest amounts of lumbar hyperextension. During the front and back walkovers and during the back handspring, maximum lumbar hyperextension occurred very close to the time that impact force was sustained by either the hands or the feet. PMID:3784872

  1. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  2. The effect of a lumbar support pillow on lumbar posture and comfort during a prolonged seated task

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several risk factors exist for the development of low back pain, including prolonged sitting and flexed spinal curvature. Several investigators have studied lumbar support devices and spinal curvatures in sitting, however few have investigated a pain population and reported a quantitative measure of comfort. The purpose of the current project was to determine whether a lumbar support pillow, outfitted with a cut-out to accommodate the bulk of posterior pelvic soft tissue volume, is more effective than a standard chair in promoting a neutral spinal posture and improving subjective and objective measures of comfort in healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. Methods Twenty eight male participants with and without a history of low back pain sat in a standard office chair and in a chair with the lumbar support pillow for 30 minutes. Lumbar and thoracolumbar postures were measured through electromagnetic markers. Comfort was determined based on the least squares radius of centre of pressure shifting, measured at the buttock-chair interface as well as reported discomfort through visual analog scales. Chair support effects were assessed through ANOVA methods. The study was approved by the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College research ethics board. Results There was a main effect of condition on lumbar posture (p = 0.006) and thoracolumbar posture (p = 0.014). In the lumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by 2.88° (95% CI; 1.01-4.75), with the lumbar support being closer to neutral than the standard chair. In the thoracolumbar region, the support and standard chair differed by -2.42° (95% CI; -4.22 to -0.62), with the standard chair being closer to neutral than the support device. The centre of pressure measure was significantly improved with the pillow (p = 0.017), however there were no subjective changes in comfort. Conclusions A lumbar support pillow with a cut-out for the posterior pelvic tissues improved an

  3. Differences in symmetry of lumbar region passive tissue characteristics between people with and people without low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Gombatto, Sara P.; Norton, Barbara J.; Scholtes, Sara A.; Van Dillen, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Several investigators have suggested that passive tissue characteristics of the lumbar region may be altered in people with low back pain. Passive stiffness of the lumbar region has been examined during physiological movements in healthy individuals and intersegmental spine mobility and stiffness have been examined in people with and people without low back pain. However, no investigators have examined differences in passive tissue characteristics of the lumbar region during a physiological movement between people with and people without low back pain. Methods Subjects were moved passively through a trunk lateral bending motion on a passive movement device. Lumbar region kinematics were measured with a motion capture system and force required to move the subject was measured with a force transducer. Lumbar region extensibility was defined as the maximum excursion of the lumbar region. Passive elastic energy was defined as the area under the torque-lumbar region angle curve. Differences in lumbar region extensibility and passive elastic energy between sides were examined in people with and people without low back pain (n = 41). Findings People in the Rotation with Extension low back pain subgroup demonstrated greater asymmetry of passive elastic energy than people without low back pain (P = 0.04). There were no differences between groups in symmetry of lumbar region extensibility (P = 0.37). Interpretation Asymmetry in passive elastic energy of the lumbar region may be related to the low back pain problem in the Rotation with Extension subgroup. The asymmetry in passive elastic energy may be associated with asymmetry of loading on the spine, which has been reported to be a risk factor for low back pain. Thus, it may be important to consider the asymmetry when planning an intervention strategy for people in the Rotation with Extension subgroup. PMID:18590942

  4. Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level. PMID:24596600

  5. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  9. Lumbar Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kirkham B

    2016-04-01

    When a patient presents with spine problems, the spine surgeon would do well to avoid use of, reliance on, and acceptance of radiographs as the sole or primary source of information. Measurement of pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, although crucial, does not take into account the effort the patient must make to move, the level of involvement of other parts of the body, and the history of previous procedures and outcomes. Radiographs may show pathology that is not consistent with the appearance of the patient. How should we assess this situation? PMID:27015064

  10. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  11. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vessels operate using only fuels meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 80 for distillate fuel, they... operating requirements and restrictions applicable for engines and vessels subject to 40 CFR part 1042 or the requirements and restrictions applicable for fuels subject to 40 CFR part 80. (f) We may...

  12. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... domestically. Where the vessels operate using only fuels meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 80 for... limits the operating requirements and restrictions applicable for engines and vessels subject to 40 CFR part 1042 or the requirements and restrictions applicable for fuels subject to 40 CFR part 80. (f)...

  13. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vessels operate using only fuels meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 80 for distillate fuel, they... operating requirements and restrictions applicable for engines and vessels subject to 40 CFR part 1042 or the requirements and restrictions applicable for fuels subject to 40 CFR part 80. (f) We may...

  14. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... domestically. Where the vessels operate using only fuels meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 80 for... limits the operating requirements and restrictions applicable for engines and vessels subject to 40 CFR part 1042 or the requirements and restrictions applicable for fuels subject to 40 CFR part 80. (f)...

  15. 40 CFR 1043.60 - Operating requirements for engines and vessels subject to this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... domestically. Where the vessels operate using only fuels meeting the specifications of 40 CFR part 80 for... limits the operating requirements and restrictions applicable for engines and vessels subject to 40 CFR part 1042 or the requirements and restrictions applicable for fuels subject to 40 CFR part 80. (f)...

  16. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Identifying Developments Subject to...

  17. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Identifying Developments Subject to...

  18. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Identifying Developments Subject to...

  19. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Identifying Developments Subject to...

  20. 24 CFR 972.124 - Standards for identifying public housing developments subject to required conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... housing developments subject to required conversion. 972.124 Section 972.124 Housing and Urban Development... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CONVERSION OF PUBLIC HOUSING TO TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE Required Conversion of Public Housing Developments Identifying Developments Subject to...

  1. 29 CFR 453.23 - Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during... STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE BONDING... Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year. Considering the purpose of...

  2. 40 CFR 716.20 - Studies not subject to the reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Studies not subject to the reporting requirements. 716.20 Section 716.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.20 Studies not subject to the reporting requirements....

  3. 40 CFR 716.20 - Studies not subject to the reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Studies not subject to the reporting requirements. 716.20 Section 716.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.20 Studies not subject to the reporting requirements....

  4. 40 CFR 716.20 - Studies not subject to the reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Studies not subject to the reporting requirements. 716.20 Section 716.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.20 Studies not subject to the reporting requirements....

  5. Lumbar paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Dillard-Cannon, Erika; Atsina, Kofi-Buaku; Ghobrial, George; Gnass, Esteban; Curtis, Mark T; Heller, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    Spinal paragangliomas (SP) are benign and overall rare extra-adrenal neuroendocrine tumors often diagnosed during workup for lower back pain. Complete surgical resection achieves both symptomatic relief and cure. We present a 32-year-old man with a longstanding history of lumbago and bilateral lower extremity pain found to have a lumbar paraganglioma at the level of the L3 vertebrae. The clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics are described, including the rare finding of superficial siderosis on MRI of the brain. A laminectomy with microscopic dissection of the intradural mass achieved complete debulking without evidence of residual tumor. Excellent prognosis can be achieved with complete surgical resection of SP without the need for adjuvant therapy. Therefore, care should be taken to distinguish these spinal tumors from those that appear similar but are more aggressive. As such, the radiological finding of superficial siderosis should raise the suspicion for SP when a vascular intradural extramedullary spinal tumor is observed. PMID:27032749

  6. Subjective health complaints in patients with lumbar radicular pain and disc herniation are associated with a sex - OPRM1 A118G polymorphism interaction: a prospective 1-year observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Earlier observations show that development of persistent pain may be associated with the genetic variability in the gene encoding for the μ-opioid receptor 1, the OPRM1 A118G (rs1799971). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between OPRM1 genotype and subjective health complaints in patients with radicular pain and disc herniation. Methods A prospective, 1-year observational study was conducted at a hospital back clinic, including 118 Caucasian patients with lumbar radicular pain and MRI confirmed disc herniation. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping regarding the OPRM1 A118G was performed. The data of individuals with AA versus AG or GG were analysed separately by linear mixed models. The Subjective Health Complaints Inventory (0-81) including 27 common complaints experienced the previous month on a scale from not at all (0) to severe (3) was used as outcome. Pain, prior duration of leg pain, age, smoking status, and lumbar disc surgery were considered as covariates. Results In total 23 of 118 patients were carriers of the OPRM1 G-allele. All patients except female carriers of the G-allele reported a decrease in pain from baseline to 1 year. Female carriers of the G-allele reported significantly higher subjective health complaints score during the study time span than male carriers of the G-allele when controlling for pain and pain duration. Conclusion The present data indicate that, when controlling for pain intensity and duration, subjective health complaints are associated with a sex - OPRM1 A118G polymorphism interaction in patients with radicular pain. PMID:24884878

  7. Relationship between physical work load and lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Matin, T; Ali, M I; Ali, M Y; Awwal, M A; Sakeb, N

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a disabling problem. This retrospective case control study was done to evaluate the possible relevance of physical work load with Lumbar Disc Herniation. We have performed this study in the Spinal Surgery Unit of Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2007 to June 2010 where 200 cases with Lumbar Disc Herniation and 200 control subjects matched by age, gender and area of residence were taken and analyzed. Chi-square test was computed for sex, area of residence, type of physical work and effort at work, whereas Odds ratio was computed for physical work load, stress at work and daily working period. The highest odds ratio (OR) was with the physical work load (OR: 03.48, CI: 01.84-06.59), hard work (OR: 03.14, CI: 01.74-05.65) and working period of >8 hours (OR: 01.34, CI: 0.75-02.38). Odds ratio for heavy load carrying at work was 03.48 and less job satisfaction or stress at work was 02.45. There was a statistically significant positive association between cumulative exposure of physical work load and lumbar disc herniation indicating an increased occurrence of herniation in heavy physical work load and occupation requiring harder efforts. PMID:23982545

  8. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of... not include the volume and benzene content of the oxygenate in any compliance calculations or...

  9. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... filter turbidity requirements? 141.560 Section 141.560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements § 141.560 Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements? If your system is a...

  10. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... filter turbidity requirements? 141.560 Section 141.560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements § 141.560 Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements? If your system is a...

  11. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... filter turbidity requirements? 141.560 Section 141.560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements § 141.560 Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements? If your system is a...

  12. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... filter turbidity requirements? 141.560 Section 141.560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Individual Filter Turbidity Requirements § 141.560 Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements? If your system is a...

  13. Lumbar reservoir for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1985-06-15

    The Ommaya ventricular reservoir has been the standby of intrathecal chemotherapy for more than a decade, in spite of some specific drawbacks. A general anaesthetic is often required. The scalp must be shaven. Ventricular puncture may not always be easy and keeping the ventricular catheter patent is sometimes difficult. Hence the author has adapted a commercially available lumbar peritoneal shunt system to function as a lumbar intrathecal reservoir. The procedure is simple and can be performed expeditiously under local anaesthesia. To date, eight cases have received intrathecal chemotherapy by this means. PMID:3838918

  14. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.400 Who is subject to the...

  15. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  16. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  17. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  18. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  19. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  20. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter. 27.203 Section 27.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights...

  1. 48 CFR 27.203 - Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security requirements for patent applications containing classified subject matter. 27.203 Section 27.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights...

  2. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  3. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  4. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  5. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... watershed control requirements? 141.520 Section 141.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.520 Is my system subject to the updated watershed...

  6. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... watershed control requirements? 141.520 Section 141.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.520 Is my system subject to the updated watershed...

  7. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... watershed control requirements? 141.520 Section 141.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.520 Is my system subject to the updated watershed...

  8. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... watershed control requirements? 141.520 Section 141.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.520 Is my system subject to the updated watershed...

  9. 40 CFR 141.520 - Is my system subject to the updated watershed control requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... watershed control requirements? 141.520 Section 141.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.520 Is my system subject to the updated watershed...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11081 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart R (§§ 63.422, 63.423, and 63.424) or 40 CFR part 63... the control requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart R (§§ 63.423 and 63.424). (3) A pipeline pumping... under 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 as a result of being subject to this subpart. However, you...

  11. 40 CFR 63.11081 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart R (§§ 63.422, 63.423, and 63.424) or 40 CFR part 63... the control requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart R (§§ 63.423 and 63.424). (3) A pipeline pumping... under 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 as a result of being subject to this subpart. However, you...

  12. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  13. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems...

  14. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., that produce vinyl chloride monomer or other raw materials used in the production of polyvinyl chloride... Chloride and Copolymers Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.11865 Am I subject to the requirements in... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are...

  15. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., that produce vinyl chloride monomer or other raw materials used in the production of polyvinyl chloride... Chloride and Copolymers Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.11865 Am I subject to the requirements in... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are...

  16. 40 CFR 63.11865 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., that produce vinyl chloride monomer or other raw materials used in the production of polyvinyl chloride... Chloride and Copolymers Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.11865 Am I subject to the requirements in... polyvinyl chloride and copolymers production process units (PVCPU) as defined in § 63.12005 that are...

  17. 40 CFR 141.560 - Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is my system subject to individual filter turbidity requirements? 141.560 Section 141.560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems...

  18. 30 CFR 250.400 - Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is subject to the requirements of this subpart? 250.400 Section 250.400 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling...

  19. 40 CFR 63.7985 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conveyance and treatment of wastewater. (3) Ancillary equipment such as boilers and incinerators (only those... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Am I subject to the requirements in... CFR part 63. Affiliated operations include, but are not limited to, mixing or dissolving of...

  20. 40 CFR 141.501 - Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is subject to the requirements of subpart T? 141.501 Section 141.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  1. 40 CFR 1060.1 - Which products are subject to this part's requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Which products are subject to this part's requirements? 1060.1 Section 1060.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Overview and Applicability...

  2. 21 CFR 1314.115 - Distributions not subject to reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements. 1314.115 Section 1314.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RETAIL SALE OF SCHEDULED LISTED CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Mail-Order Sales § 1314.115 Distributions not subject... section for an individual regulated person if the Administrator finds that drug products distributed...

  3. 77 FR 32128 - Cancellation of Bond Subject to Enhanced Bonding Requirements Upon CBP's Acceptance of Qualified...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ...'s satisfaction, that no contingent liability remains secured by the predecessor EBR bond and that... requirements (EBR) on importers of shrimp subject to AD/CVD. See 71 FR 62276, dated October 24, 2006. II... documentation that includes a statement as to the date the EBR no longer secured contingent liability, as...

  4. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  5. 40 CFR 60.5421 - What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5421 What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  6. 40 CFR 60.5421 - What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5421 What are my additional recordkeeping requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  7. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  8. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency. PMID:26849859

  9. Lumbar (Open) Microscopic Discectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common surgical treatment for ruptured or herniated discs of the lumbar spine. When the outer wall ... a slipped or bulging disc. (See discussion of herniated disc for more information.) Once the inner disc material ...

  10. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  11. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  12. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  13. 43 CFR 429.3 - What types of uses are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What types of uses are subject to the... are subject to the requirements and processes established under this part? Possession or occupancy of... appropriate by Reclamation, subject to the exclusions listed in § 429.4....

  14. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false United States flag vessels subject to the requirements... (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-1 United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter. (a) This subchapter is applicable to all U.S.-flag...

  15. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false United States flag vessels subject to the requirements... (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-1 United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter. (a) This subchapter is applicable to all U.S.-flag...

  16. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter. 70.05-1 Section 70.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-1 United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter....

  17. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false United States flag vessels subject to the requirements... (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Application § 70.05-1 United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter. (a) This subchapter is applicable to all U.S.-flag...

  18. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  19. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  20. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  1. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  2. 40 CFR 721.160 - Notification requirements for new chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and other specific requirements for each new chemical substance that is the subject of a final order... substance, unless EPA determines that significant new use notification requirements are not needed for the substance. (2) If EPA determines that significant new use notification requirements are not needed for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.160 - Notification requirements for new chemical substances subject to section 5(e) orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and other specific requirements for each new chemical substance that is the subject of a final order... substance, unless EPA determines that significant new use notification requirements are not needed for the substance. (2) If EPA determines that significant new use notification requirements are not needed for...

  4. Establishment of a new animal model for ischemic lumbar vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Changlong; Tan, Guosheng; Zhuang, Wenquan; Yang, Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration and ischemia of lumbar intervertebral disc has become a more and more important issue for elder people. However the mechanism for this is still known, largely due to a lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, we constructed a new animal model for the study of ischemic lumbar vertebrae. 42 New Zealand white rabbits were chosen for the study. For each rabbit, two vertebrae were used. L5 was set as the experimental group and L4 was set as the control group. Percutaneous lumbar puncture needles were applied in vertebrae adjacent to endplate for L5 and L4. For L4 1 ml saline was injected and for L5 1 ml pingyangmycin (2 mg/mL) was used. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 weeks; 2 and 3 months after surgery, 6 rabbits at each time point were randomly chosen and underwent MRI, pathological test. The results in L5 and L4 were compared. Another 6 rabbits were used for DSA (Digital Subtraction Angiography) and vascular cast to study the length and diameters of the branches of lumbar artery. It was identified that since the third week, slightly hyperintense signal on T2-weighted image (T2WI) and fat-suppression T2-weighted image (FS T2WI) were detected. Lumbar vertebrae damage could be identified since the fourth week. Results of MRI and the size of pathological area were positively related (r=0.965, P<0.05). DSA and vascular cast could both clearly show the third level branches of lumbar artery. Our study suggested that injection of pingyangmycin via percutaneous lumbar needle could successfully induce ischemia in lumbar endplate. This method had little trauma, required a simple operation process and is highly repetitive. Besides, by vascular cast, the most important source of blood supply is the media branch of the lumbar artery. This branch could be a new therapy pathway for the degeneration of lumbar vertebrae. PMID:26379856

  5. Lumbar Repositioning Accuracy as a Measure of Proprioception in Patients with Back Dysfunction and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A control group cross-sectional design. Purpose To compare the difference in repositioning accuracy, as a measure of lumbar proprioception, between patients with back dysfunction and healthy subjects. Overview of Literature Evidence suggests that spinal stability might be compromised in patients with back dysfunction. Lumbar proprioception in back dysfunction has not, however, been adequately investigated. Methods Forty-five participants, representing three groups, took part in the study. Subjects in group one (n = 15) were healthy subjects. Subjects in group two (n = 15) had a history of non-specific mechanical back dysfunction, while subjects in group three (n = 15) had discogenic back dysfunction. Subjects were required to reproduce a target position of 30° lumbar flexion and the absolute error (AE) was calculated. Results The AEs between target and reproduced positions were calculated. The average repositioning AEs were 2.8, 7.5, and 7.1° for the control, mechanical, and discogenic back dysfunction groups respectively. Analysis of variance revealed significant difference between the three groups (p < 0.0002). The AEs were greater in the two back dysfunction groups compared to the control group. Post-hoc tests revealed significant difference in AEs between the control and mechanical group (p < 0.0003), and discogenic group (p < 0.0001), while there was no significant difference between the mechanical and discogenic back dysfunction groups (p = 0.73). Conclusions Differences in proprioception do exist between subjects with back dysfunction and normal subjects. The proprioceptive deficits do exist regardless of the cause of the back dysfunction, and may represent an important aspect of the patho-physiology of such a condition. PMID:22164313

  6. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  7. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  8. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  9. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard A Appendix A to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A Appendix A to Part 541—Light Duty Truck Lines Subject...

  11. 40 CFR 80.820 - What gasoline is subject to the toxics performance requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the toxics... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Gasoline Toxics Performance Requirements § 80.820 What gasoline is subject to the toxics...

  12. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-5 U.S.-flag vessels subject to the... solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or...

  13. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-5 U.S.-flag vessels subject to the... solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or...

  14. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-5 U.S.-flag vessels subject to the... solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or...

  15. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-5 U.S.-flag vessels subject to the... solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or...

  16. 46 CFR 42.03-5 - U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S.-flag vessels subject to the requirements of this... LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Application § 42.03-5 U.S.-flag vessels subject to the... solely Great Lakes voyages. (1) All U.S. flag vessels which engage in foreign voyages or...

  17. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. PMID:27384734

  18. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  19. Biomechanical comparison of three stand-alone lumbar cages — a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), stand-alone cages can be supplemented with vertebral plate, locking screws, or threaded cylinder to avoid the use of posterior fixation. Intuitively, the plate, screw, and cylinder aim to be embedded into the vertebral bodies to effectively immobilize the cage itself. The kinematic and mechanical effects of these integrated components on the lumbar construct have not been extensively studied. A nonlinearly lumbar finite-element model was developed and validated to investigate the biomechanical differences between three stand-alone (Latero, SynFix, and Stabilis) and SynCage-Open plus transpedicular fixation. All four cages were instrumented at the L3-4 level. Methods The lumbar models were subjected to the follower load along the lumbar column and the moment at the lumbar top to produce flexion (FL), extension (EX), left/right lateral bending (LLB, RLB), and left/right axial rotation (LAR, RAR). A 10 Nm moment was applied to obtain the six physiological motions in all models. The comparison indices included disc range of motion (ROM), facet contact force, and stresses of the annulus and implants. Results At the surgical level, the SynCage-open model supplemented with transpedicular fixation decreased ROM (>76%) greatly; while the SynFix model decreased ROM 56-72%, the Latero model decreased ROM 36-91%, in all motions as compared with the INT model. However, the Stabilis model decreased ROM slightly in extension (11%), lateral bending (21%), and axial rotation (34%). At the adjacent levels, there were no obvious differences in ROM and annulus stress among all instrumented models. Conclusions ALIF instrumentation with the Latero or SynFix cage provides an acceptable stability for clinical use without the requirement of additional posterior fixation. However, the Stabilis cage is not favored in extension and lateral bending because of insufficient stabilization. PMID:24088294

  20. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. In reply to a question, lumbar spinal stenosis, commonly a multifactorial disease that can have profound functional consequences, is considered, along with a discussion of physical and pharmacologic treatments and quality of life. PMID:27145444

  1. Factors to consider in identifying critical points in lumbar spine flexion relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zwambag, Derek P; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-12-01

    Flexion relaxation (FR), a myoelectric silence of extensor muscles near end range of lumbar flexion, is commonly reported as the lumbar flexion angle at the instant the extensor muscles become silent. However, lumbar flexion angle alone is insufficient to characterize mechanisms that modulate FR. As FR requires the moment generated by passive lumbar extensor tissues to equilibrate the moment due to gravity, the inter-relationships between lumbar moment, flexion angle, and myoelectrical silence will provide added information in the understanding of FR. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between lumbar moment and flexion angle throughout various flexion manoeuvres. It was hypothesized that lumbar moment and flexion angle would not be linearly related and would be affected by lower limb position, range of motion, and the addition of mass to the torso. Eleven participants performed four different lumbar flexion trials. Results showed that lumbar flexion was correlated with the lumbar moment (r = 0.92); however an analysis of residuals found that these measures were not linearly related. The moment was, however, correlated (r = 0.99) and linearly related to the sine of trunk inclination (T12 rigid body with respect to global horizontal). Future studies of FR could use trunk inclination as a simple kinematic measure to predict relative changes in lumbar moment with flexion. PMID:26559463

  2. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 544 - Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements Only in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements Only in Designated States B Appendix B to Part 544 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. B Appendix B to Part 544—Issuers...

  3. The cortical and cerebellar representation of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Boendermaker, Bart; Meier, Michael L; Luechinger, Roger; Humphreys, B Kim; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2014-08-01

    Eight decades after Penfield's discovery of the homunculus only sparse evidence exists on the cortical representation of the lumbar spine. The aim of our investigation was the description of the lumbar spine's cortical representation in healthy subjects during the application of measured manual pressure. Twenty participants in the prone position were investigated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An experienced manual therapist applied non-painful, posterior-to-anterior (PA) pressure on three lumbar spinous processes (L1, L3, and L5). The pressure (30 N) was monitored and controlled by sensors. The randomized stimulation protocol consisted of 68 pressure stimuli of 5 s duration. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses were analyzed in relation to the lumbar stimulations. The results demonstrate that controlled PA pressure on the lumbar spine induced significant activation patterns. The major new finding was a strong and consistent activation bilaterally in the somatosensory cortices (S1 and S2). In addition, bilateral activation was located medially in the anterior cerebellum. The activation pattern also included other cortical areas probably related to anticipatory postural adjustments. These revealed stable somatosensory maps of the lumbar spine in healthy subjects can subsequently be used as a baseline to investigate cortical and subcortical reorganization in low back pain patients. PMID:24464423

  4. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  5. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  6. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G.; Norvell, Daniel C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Hart, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  7. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  8. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required to be completely or substantially torn down into individual components parts; and (ii... following conditions exist: (i) The item or equipment is required to be completely or substantially...

  9. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required to be completely or substantially torn down into individual components parts; and (ii... following conditions exist: (i) The item or equipment is required to be completely or substantially...

  10. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... required to be completely or substantially torn down into individual components parts; and (ii... following conditions exist: (i) The item or equipment is required to be completely or substantially...

  11. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... required to be completely or substantially torn down into individual components parts; and (ii... following conditions exist: (i) The item or equipment is required to be completely or substantially...

  12. 29 CFR 4.117 - Work subject to requirements of Walsh-Healey Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required to be completely or substantially torn down into individual components parts; and (ii... following conditions exist: (i) The item or equipment is required to be completely or substantially...

  13. 40 CFR 63.2435 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary product of each PUG, and comply with the requirements of the subpart in 40 CFR part 63 that... plastics products), and 325992 (except the requirements do apply to photographic chemicals). (6) Tall...

  14. Lumbar discography: an update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results. PMID:14976837

  15. Spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings in congenital lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Thawait, Shrey; Belzberg, Alan J; Eng, John; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether congenital lumbar spinal stenosis (CLSS) is associated with a specific degenerative changes of the lumbar spine. METHODS: The lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging studies of 52 subjects with CLSS and 48 control subjects were retrospectively evaluated. In each examination, the five lumbar levels were assessed for the presence or absence of circumferential or shallow annular bulges, annular tears, anterior or posterior disc herniations, epidural lipomatosis, Schmorl’s nodes, spondylolisthesis, pars defects, and stress reactions of the posterior vertebral elements. RESULTS: Compared to control individuals, subjects with CLSS exhibited increased incidence of circumferential and shallow annular bulges, annular tears, disc herniations and spondylolisthesis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CLSS is associated with increased incidence of degenerative changes in specific osseous and soft-tissue elements of the lumbar spine. PMID:25516864

  16. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  17. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. PMID:27263067

  18. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  19. A methodology for quantifying seated lumbar curvatures.

    PubMed

    Leitkam, Samuel T; Bush, Tamara Reid; Li, Mingfei

    2011-11-01

    To understand the role seating plays in the support of posture and spinal articulation, it is necessary to study the interface between a human and the seat. However, a method to quantify lumbar curvature in commercially available unmodified seats does not currently exist. This work sought to determine if the lumbar curvature for normal ranges of seated posture could be documented by using body landmarks located on the anterior portion of the body. The development of such a methodology will allow researchers to evaluate spinal articulation of a seated subject while in standard, commercially available seats and chairs. Anterior measurements of boney landmarks were used to quantify the relative positions of the ribcage and pelvis while simultaneous posterior measurements were made of lumbar curvature. The relationship between the anterior and the posterior measures was compared. The predictive capacity of this approach was evaluated by determining linear and second-order regressions for each of the four postures across all subjects and conducting a leave-one-out cross validation. The relationships between the anterior and posterior measures were approximated by linear and second-order polynomial regressions (r(2 ) =  0.829, 0.935 respectively) across all postures. The quantitative analysis showed that openness had a significant relationship with lumbar curvature, and a first-order regression was superior to a second-order regression. Average standard errors in the prediction were 5.9° for the maximum kyphotic posture, 9.9° for the comfortable posture, 12.8° for the straight and tall, and 22.2° for the maximum lordotic posture. These results show predictions of lumbar curvature are possible in seated postures by using a motion capture system and anterior measures. This method of lumbar curvature prediction shows potential for use in the assessment of seated spinal curvatures and the corresponding design of seating to accommodate those curvatures; however

  20. Lumbar spine chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  1. Lumbar spinal surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (intervertebral discs). ... Lumbar (lower back) spine disease is usually caused by herniated ... bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and ...

  2. Safety of CT-Guided Lumbar Nerve Root Infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Summary Selective nerve root infiltrations are frequently performed in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) is now commonly used for image guidance. Despite the widespread use of CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations few studies have systematically examined the safety of this approach. In a two-year period, 231 lumbar nerve root infiltrations were performed on in-patients and were retrospectively reviewed. No major complications like inflammation (especially spondylodiscitis), large haematomas requiring surgery, severe allergic reactions or spinal ischaemia occurred. In accordance with other published studies, CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations seem to be safe. To minimize the risk of catastrophic neurological complications due to spinal ischaemia, careful needle placement dorsal to the nerve root and the use of a non-particulate corticosteroid, like dexamethasone, are advocated. PMID:25363255

  3. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John; Gebbeken, Norbert; Dendorfer, Sebastian

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the influence of defined geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilising five parametrised musculoskeletal lumbar spine models for four different postures. The influence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine was studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most influential. These parameters can be easily acquired from X-rays and should be used to morph a musculoskeletal lumbar spine model for subject-specific approaches with respect to bone geometry. Furthermore, the model was very sensitive to uncommon configurations and therefore, it is advised that stiffness properties of discs and ligaments should be individualised. PMID:26680014

  4. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements of this subpart, regardless of ocean area of catch. (a) Bluefin tuna. (1) The requirements of this subpart apply to bluefin tuna products including those identified by the following subheading numbers from the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS): (i) Fresh or chilled bluefin tuna (No....

  5. 50 CFR 300.184 - Species subject to permitting, documentation, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of this subpart, regardless of ocean area of catch. (a) Bluefin tuna. (1) The requirements of this subpart apply to bluefin tuna products including those identified by the following subheading numbers from the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS): (i) Fresh or chilled bluefin tuna (No....

  6. 46 CFR 188.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., except those covered by columns 2 and 3. All vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR... required by 46 CFR part 98. None. None. All vessels carrying cargoes in bulk that are listed in part 153... conditions. The provisions of 49 CFR parts 171 through 179 apply whenever packaged hazardous materials are...

  7. 46 CFR 24.05-1 - Vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by columns 2 and 3. All vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 All..., when required by 46 CFR part 98 None None All vessels carrying cargoes in bulk that are listed in part... conditions. The provisions of 49 CFR parts 171 through 179 apply whenever packaged hazardous materials are...

  8. 46 CFR 90.05-1 - Vessels subject to requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 All vessels not covered by columns 2... dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 None None All vessels carrying cargoes in bulk that are... conditions. The provisions of 49 CFR parts 171 through 179 apply whenever packaged hazardous materials are...

  9. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; Kim, Youngki; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional distribution. Then firefighters were stratified by gender, age and their job and randomly selected among the strata. A questionnaire survey and MRI scans were performed, and then four radiologists used Pfirrmann classification methods to determine the grade of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Results Pfirrmann grade increased with lumbar intervertebral disc level. Analysis of covariance showed that age was significantly associated with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (p<0.05). The value of β (parameter estimate) was positive at all lumbar intervertebral disc levels and was higher in the field group than in the administrative group at each level. In logistic regression analysis, type of job was statistically significant only with regard to the L4–5 intervertebral disc (OR 3.498, 95% CI 1.241 to 9.860). Conclusions Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with age, and field work such as firefighting, emergency and rescue may accelerate degeneration in the L4–5 intervertebral disc. The effects of field work on lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration were not clear in discs other than at the level L4–5. PMID:27354080

  10. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics. PMID:25162173

  11. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity? 62.15035 Section 62.15035 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is my small municipal waste combustion... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Applicability of This Subpart § 62.15035 Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 541 - Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Light Duty Truck Lines Subject to the Requirements of This Standard A Appendix A to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD Pt....

  14. Elevating Instruction for Secondary-School Students with Learning Disabilities by Demystifying the Highly Qualified Subject Matter Requirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The highly qualified mandate of the No Child Left Behind Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act has created unnecessary confusion, particularly among secondary-school special educators and administrators with respect to instruction in core academic subjects. The pursuit of compliance solutions to meet this requirement has generally…

  15. 40 CFR 62.15035 - Is my small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... combustion capacity greater than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. (See the definition of municipal... capacity of no more than 250 tons per day of municipal solid waste. (See the definition of municipal waste... small municipal waste combustion unit subject to different requirements based on plant capacity?...

  16. 40 CFR 63.2435 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary product of each PUG, and comply with the requirements of the subpart in 40 CFR part 63 that... coating ingredients; coating mixing for viscosity adjustment, color tint or additive blending, or...

  17. 40 CFR 63.2435 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary product of each PUG, and comply with the requirements of the subpart in 40 CFR part 63 that... the Printing and Publishing Industry), JJJJ (NESHAP: Paper and Other Web Coating), future MMMM...

  18. 40 CFR 262.203 - How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. 262.203 Section 262.203 Protection of... entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. (a) An eligible academic entity... Identification Form (EPA Form 8700-12), that it is electing to be subject to the requirements of this subpart...

  19. 40 CFR 63.2435 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polymer into its end use); compounding operations (in which blending, melting, and resolidification of a... melting or mixing the polymer and then forcing it or pulling it through an orifice to create an extruded... primary product of each PUG, and comply with the requirements of the subpart in 40 CFR part 63...

  20. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510...

  1. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim...

  2. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim...

  3. 40 CFR 63.2435 - Am I subject to the requirements in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary product of each PUG, and comply with the requirements of the subpart in 40 CFR part 63 that... 112(b) of the CAA or hydrogen halide and halogen HAP, as defined in § 63.2550. (3) The MCPU is not...

  4. 29 CFR 453.23 - Persons becoming subject to bonding requirements during fiscal year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fiscal year. 453.23 Section 453.23 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS GENERAL STATEMENT CONCERNING THE BONDING REQUIREMENTS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Miscellaneous Provisions §...

  5. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim...

  6. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim...

  7. 28 CFR 28.23 - Evidence subject to the preservation requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirement. 28.23 Section 28.23 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM... guilt or innocence through DNA testing to determine whether the defendant is the source of the material... excluding the defendant as the source of its DNA. Example 1. In a murder case in which the victim...

  8. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. PMID:25662569

  9. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain. PMID:25538126

  10. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  11. Optimisation of Composite Sandwich Structures Subjected to Combined Torsion and Bending Stiffness Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Gangyan; Wang, Chun H.

    2012-06-01

    This research is motivated by the rapidly increasing use of composite sandwich structures to reduce weight and improve energy efficiency in a wide range of industries such as automotive, aerospace and civil infrastructure. The paper presents a minimum-weight optimization method for sandwich structures to meet both torsion and bending rigidity requirements. This multiple inequality-constrained optimisation problem is formulated using the Lagrange multiplier method. Solving the resulting equations reveals the optimum solution that can satisfy both flexural and torsion stiffness requirements depend on the stiffness ratio relative to elastic modulus ratio. To illustrate the newly developed optimum design solutions, numerical examples are presented for sandwich structures made of either isotropic face skins or orthotropic composite face skins.

  12. The effects of gait with use of smartphone on repositioning error and curvature of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Oh; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of smartphone use on lumbar spine repositioning error and lumbar curvature while walking on a treadmill. [Subjects] A total of 20 healthy individuals (18 males and 2 females) volunteered for this study. [Methods] The subjects walked for 20 min on a treadmill while using a smartphone. To determine the effect of smartphone use, lumbar repositioning error was measured using an electronic goniometer while lumbar curvature was assessed using a Spinal Mouse before and immediately after treadmill use. Differences in the lumbar repositioning error and lumbar curvature data between the pre- and post-walking were compared using the paired t-test. [Results] The lumbar spine repositioning error was significantly greater post-walking compared with pre-walking (6.70±2.91° vs. 3.02±1.79°). There was no significant difference in lumbar curvature between pre- and post-walking (14.24±3.18° vs. 13.94±3.12°). [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the lumbar repositioning error increased immediately after walking while using a smartphone, but that the lumbar curvature was unchanged. PMID:26357430

  13. Lumbar disk herniation surgery: outcome and predictors.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Study Design A retrospective cohort study. Objectives To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous process osteotomy) by using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire, Resumption of Activities of Daily Living scale and changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and radicular pain. Our study questionnaire addressed patient subjective satisfaction with the operation, residual complaints, and job resumption. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States). Statistical significance was set at 0.05. For statistical analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and repeated measure analysis were performed. For determining the confounding factors, univariate analysis by chi-square test was used and followed by logistic regression analysis. Results Ninety-four percent of our patients were satisfied with the results of their surgeries. VAS documented an overall 93.3% success rate for reduction of radicular pain. Laminectomy resulted in better outcome in terms of JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire. The outcome of surgery did not significantly differ by age, sex, level of education, preoperative VAS for back, preoperative VAS for radicular pain, return to previous job, or level of herniation. Conclusion Surgery for lumbar disk herniation is effective in reducing radicular pain (93.4%). All three surgical approaches resulted in significant decrease in preoperative radicular pain and low back pain, but intergroup variation in the outcome was not achieved. As indicated

  14. Herniated lumbar disc

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgery for herniated lumbar disc? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 37 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdiscectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction. PMID:21711958

  15. Insulin requirement profiles in Japanese hospitalized subjects with type 2 diabetes treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Seiya; Okubo, Mina; Koga, Kotaro; Sekigami, Taiji; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Igata, Motoyuki; Ishii, Norio; Shimakawa, Akiko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishida, Kenro; Araki, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the total daily inulin dose (TDD) and contribution of basal insulin to TDD and to identify the predictive factors for insulin requirement profiles in subjects with type 2 diabetes, we retrospectively examined insulin requirement profiles of 275 hospitalized subjects treated with basal-bolus insulin therapy (BBT) (mean age, 60.1 ± 12.9 years; HbA1c, 10.2 ± 4.5%). Target plasma glucose level was set between 80 and 129 mg/dL before breakfast and between 80 and 179 mg/dL at 2-hour after each meal without causing hypoglycemia. We also analyzed the relationship between the insulin requirement profiles (TDD and basal/total daily insulin ratio [B/TD ratio]) and insulin-associated clinical parameters. The mean TDD was 0.463 ± 0.190 unit/kg/day (range, 0.16-1.13 unit/kg/day). The mean B/TD ratio was 0.300 ± 0.099 (range, 0.091-0.667). A positive correlation of TDD with B/TD ratio was revealed by linear regression analysis (r=0.129, p=0.03). Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified post-breakfast glucose levels before titrating insulin as an independent determinant of the insulin requirement profile [Std β (standard regression coefficient) = 0.228, p<0.01 for TDD, Std β = -0.189, p<0.01 for B/TD ratio]. The TDD was <0.6 unit/kg/day and the B/TD ratio was <0.4 in the majority (70.2%) of subjects in the present study. These findings may have relevance in improving glycemic control and decreasing the risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain in subjects with type 2 diabetes treated with BBT. PMID:25392020

  16. Microvesicle phenotypes are associated with transfusion requirements and mortality in subjects with severe injuries

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Holcomb, John B.; Kozar, Rosemary; Cardenas, Jessica C.; Wade, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe injury often results in substantial bleeding and mortality. Injury provokes cellular activation and release of extracellular vesicles. Circulating microvesicles (MVs) are predominantly platelet-derived and highly procoagulant. They support hemostasis and vascular function. The roles of MVs in survival after severe injury are largely unknown. We hypothesized that altered MV phenotypes would be associated with transfusion requirements and poor outcomes. Methods This single-centre study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study cohort consisted of patients with major trauma requiring blood product transfusion and 26 healthy controls. Plasma samples for MVs were collected upon admission to the emergency department (n=169) and post-resuscitation (n=42), and analysed by flow cytometry for MV counts and cellular origin: platelet (PMV), erythrocyte (RMV), leukocyte (LMV), endothelial (EMV), tissue factor (TFMV), and annexin V (AVMV). Twenty-four hour mortality is the outcome measurement used to classify survivors versus non-survivors. Data were compared over time and analysed with demographic and clinical data. Results The median age was 34 (IQR 23, 51), 72% were male, Injury Severity Score was 29 (IQR 19, 36), and 24 h mortality was 13%. MV levels and phenotypes differed between patients and controls. Elevated admission EMVs were found both in survivors (409/µL) and non-survivors (393/µL) compared to controls (23/µL, p<0.001) and persisted over time. Admission levels of PMV, AVMV, RMV, and TFMV were significantly lower in patients who died compared to survivors, but were not independently associated with the 24 h mortality rate. Patients with low MV levels at admission received the most blood products within the first 24 h. AVMV and PMV levels either increased over time or stabilized in survivors but decreased in non-survivors, resulting in significantly lower levels at intensive care unit admission in non-survivors (1,048 vs. 1

  17. A study on difference and importance of sacral slope and pelvic sacral angle that affect lumbar curvature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoung; Lee, Minsun; Kwon, Byongan

    2014-01-01

    Individual pelvic sacral angle was measured, compared and analyzed for the 6 male and female adults who were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis, foraminal stenosis and mild spondylolisthesis in accordance with spinal parameters, pelvic parameters and occlusion state of sacroiliac joint presented by the author of this thesis based on the fact that the degree of lumbar excessive lordosis that was one of the causes for lumbar pain was determined by sacral slope. The measured values were compared with the standard values of the average normal range from 20 s to 40 s of normal Koreans stated in the study on the change in lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope in accordance with the age by Oh et al. [5] and sacral slope and pelvic sacral slope of each individual of the subjects for measurement were compared. Comparing the difference between the two tilt angles possessed by an individual is a comparison to determine how much the sacroiliac joint connecting pelvis and sacral vertebrae compensated and corrected the sacral vertebrae slope by pelvic tilt under the condition of synarthrodial joint.Under the condition that the location conforming to the line in which the sagittal line of gravity connects with pelvic ASIS and pubic pubic tuberele is the neutral location of pelvic tilt, sacral slope being greater than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic anterior tilting, whereas sacral slope being smaller than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic posterior tilting. On that account, male B, female A and female C had a pelvic posterior tilting of 16 degrees, 1 degree and 5 degrees respectively, whereas male A, male C and female B had a pelvic anterior tilting of 3 degrees, 9 degrees and 4 degrees respectively. In addition, the 6 patients the values of lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope that were almost twice as much as the normal standard values of Koreans. It is believed that this is because the pelvic sacral slope maintaining an angle that is

  18. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40 degrees at a force level of not less than 18 pounds and not more than 22 pounds, and straighten upon... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  19. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  20. The Changes of Trunk Motion Rhythm and Spinal Loading During Trunk Flexion and Extension Motions Caused by Lumbar Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that lumbar extensor muscle fatigue could potentially affect lumbar-pelvic rhythm and influence spinal loading during trunk motions. In this study, the effects of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on the normalized lumbar-pelvic rotation rhythm and the associated L5/S1 joint loading during weight lifting and lowering tasks were investigated. Thirteen volunteers performed lifting and lowering of a 20-lbs box both before and after lumbar extensor muscle fatigue, which was generated through a static weight holding task. The normalized lumbar-pelvic motion ratio (L/P ratio) and the external moment on the L5/S1 joint were calculated and compared. Results showed that subjects demonstrated significantly larger normalized L/P ratios during both weight lifting and lowering tasks with the influence of fatigue. In addition, although the spinal loadings remain unchanged at the beginning and ending of both lifting and lowering motions, significantly larger L5/S1 joint moments were observed during both motions after fatigue. Such changes indicate potentially elevated risk of back injury. In a clinical setting, the current results demonstrated that lumbar muscle fatigue could cause transient changes in lumbar-pelvic motion rhythm. Therefore, lumbar muscle fatigue must be avoided when using lumbar-pelvic motion rhythms for patient diagnosis or rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25589373

  1. Contribution of Hamstring Fatigue to Quadriceps Inhibition Following Lumbar Extension Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Fritz, Julie M.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls. Key Points A neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue. QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group. More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors. PMID:24198683

  2. Lumbar corpectomy for correction of degenerative scoliosis from osteoradionecrosis reveals a delayed complication of lumbar myxopapillary ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Lawson, Kevin A; Kent, Sean L; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-08-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is a known complication following radiation therapy, presenting most commonly in the cervical spine as a delayed consequence of radiation that is often necessary in the management of head and neck cancers. In contrast, osteoradionecrosis has rarely been described in the lumbar spine. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lumbar spine osteoradionecrosis, after adjuvant radiation for a primary spinal cord tumor, leading to progressive degenerative scoliosis which required subsequent operative management. Established guidelines recommend that mature bone can tolerate a dose of up to 6000 cGy without injury. However, once bone has been exposed to radiation over this level progressive soft tissue changes may lead to devascularization, leaving the bone vulnerable to osteonecrosis, specifically when manipulated. Radiation necrosis can be progressive and lead to eventual mechanical instability requiring debridement and surgical fixation. In the setting of the lumbar spine, osseous necrosis can lead to biomechanical instability, deformity, pain, and neurologic deficit. PMID:27056674

  3. Effects of muscle extension strength exercise on trunk muscle strength and stability of patients with lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Taeyoung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide the data for constructing an integrated exercise program to help restore muscle strength and stability through extension strength exercise in adult females with lumbar disc herniation. [Subjects and Methods] An 8-week exercise program for lumbar muscle extension strength and stabilization was performed by 26 females older than 20 with lumbar disc herniation findings. [Results] Significant differences were found in lumbar extension muscle strength at every angle of lumbar flexion after participation in the 8-week stabilization exercise program; but there was no significant difference in the weight distribution index. [Conclusion] An integrated exercise program aiming to strengthen lumbar spine muscles, reduce pain and stabilize the trunk can help to maintain muscle strength and balance. In addition, improvement in extension strength is expected to be helpful in daily life by securing the range of joint motion and improving the strength and stability. PMID:27313342

  4. Effects of muscle extension strength exercise on trunk muscle strength and stability of patients with lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Taeyoung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide the data for constructing an integrated exercise program to help restore muscle strength and stability through extension strength exercise in adult females with lumbar disc herniation. [Subjects and Methods] An 8-week exercise program for lumbar muscle extension strength and stabilization was performed by 26 females older than 20 with lumbar disc herniation findings. [Results] Significant differences were found in lumbar extension muscle strength at every angle of lumbar flexion after participation in the 8-week stabilization exercise program; but there was no significant difference in the weight distribution index. [Conclusion] An integrated exercise program aiming to strengthen lumbar spine muscles, reduce pain and stabilize the trunk can help to maintain muscle strength and balance. In addition, improvement in extension strength is expected to be helpful in daily life by securing the range of joint motion and improving the strength and stability. PMID:27313342

  5. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercises and thoracic mobilization and exercises on chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Min-Yeong; Kim, Kyoung; Hur,, Beom-Young; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate whether pain, balance, and stabilization of the lumbar region can be improved through thoracic mobilization in addition to lumbar stabilizaing exercises. [Subjects and Methods] This study recruited 36 subjects with chronic low back pain lasting more than 12 weeks. The subjects recruited for this study participated voluntarily, and provided their signed consent to participation. [Results] Improvement in balance was largest in the lumbar stabilization exercise group, followed by the thoracic mobilization and exercise group, and the traditional physical therapy group, in decreasing order of effect. [Conclusion] In conclusion, lumbar stabilization exercises combined with thoracic mobilization had greater effects on stabilization of the lumbar region pain relief, and improvement of the function of the patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:26834365

  6. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  7. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  8. Diagnosis, treatment, and complications of adult lumbar disk herniation: evidence-based data for the healthcare professional.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, Eric; Ching, Alexander; Mundis, Greg; Burton, Douglas; Bess, Shay

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disk herniation is a commonly seen disorder that requires care by spinal surgeons and healthcare professionals. Although there has been substantial research on the diagnosis, treatment, complications, and outcomes of lumbar disk herniation, patient management varies. A review and evaluation of the literature (with special regard for high-quality randomized studies) and familiarity with best practices guidelines for the evaluation, management, and treatment of adult lumbar disk herniation will enhance the optimal delivery of health care to affected patients. PMID:25745924

  9. The relationship between sagittal curvature and extensor muscle volume in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Meakin, Judith R; Fulford, Jonathan; Seymour, Richard; Welsman, Joanne R; Knapp, Karen M

    2013-06-01

    A previous modelling study predicted that the forces applied by the extensor muscles to stabilise the lumbar spine would be greater in spines that have a larger sagittal curvature (lordosis). Because the force-generating capacity of a muscle is related to its size, it was hypothesised that the size of the extensor muscles in a subject would be related to the size of their lumbar lordosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were obtained, together with age, height, body mass and back pain status, from 42 female subjects. The volume of the extensor muscles (multifidus and erector spinae) caudal to the mid-lumbar level was estimated from cross-sectional area measurements in axial T1-weighted MRIs spanning the lumbar spine. Lower lumbar curvature was determined from sagittal T1-weighted images. A stepwise linear regression model was used to determine the best predictors of muscle volume. The mean lower lumbar extensor muscle volume was 281 cm(3) (SD = 49 cm(3)). The mean lower lumbar curvature was 30 ° (SD = 7 °). Five subjects reported current back pain and were excluded from the regression analysis. Nearly half the variation in muscle volume was accounted for by the variables age (standardised coefficient, B = -3.2, P = 0.03) and lower lumbar curvature (B = 0.47, P = 0.002). The results support the hypothesis that extensor muscle volume in the lower lumbar spine is related to the magnitude of the sagittal curvature; this has implications for assessing muscle size as an indicator of muscle strength. PMID:23600615

  10. A minimally invasive technique for percutaneous lumbar facet augmentation: Technical description of a novel device

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary A.; Armin, Sean; Raphael, Dan; Khoo, Larry T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: We describe a new posterior dynamic stabilizing system that can be used to augment the mechanics of the degenerating lumbar segment. The mechanism of this system differs from other previously described surgical techniques that have been designed to augment lumbar biomechanics. The implant and technique we describe is an extension-limiting one, and it is designed to support and cushion the facet complex. Furthermore, it is inserted through an entirely percutaneous technique. The purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate a novel posterior surgical approach for the treatment of lumbar degenerative. Methods: This report describes a novel, percutaneously placed, posterior dynamic stabilization system as an alternative option to treat lumbar degenerative disk disease with and without lumbar spinal stenosis. The system does not require a midline soft-tissue dissection, nor subperiosteal dissection, and is a truly minimally invasive means for posterior augmentation of the functional facet complex. This system can be implanted as a stand-alone procedure or in conjunction with decompression procedures. Results: One-year clinical results in nine individual patients, all treated for degenerative disease of the lower lumbar spine, are presented. Conclusions: This novel technique allows for percutaneous posterior dynamic stabilization of the lumbar facet complex. The use of this procedure may allow a less invasive alternative to traditional approaches to the lumbar spine as well as an alternative to other newly developed posterior dynamic stabilization systems. PMID:22145084

  11. The fibre type composition of thoracic and lumbar paravertebral muscles in man.

    PubMed Central

    Sirca, A; Kostevc, V

    1985-01-01

    Samples of longissimus and multifidi muscles at the thoracic and lumbar levels of the spine were examined histochemically on autopsy specimens from 21 adult male subjects (aged 22 to 46 years) and on biopsies from 17 adult patients during surgery for disorders of the lumbar intervertebral disc. In the superficial and deep thoracic muscles, 74% of fibres were of the Type I variety. In the lumbar region, Type I fibres amounted to 57% in the superficial, and to 63% in the deep muscles. The diameter of Type I fibres was significantly greater than that of Type II fibres. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2934358

  12. The fibre type composition of thoracic and lumbar paravertebral muscles in man.

    PubMed

    Sirca, A; Kostevc, V

    1985-08-01

    Samples of longissimus and multifidi muscles at the thoracic and lumbar levels of the spine were examined histochemically on autopsy specimens from 21 adult male subjects (aged 22 to 46 years) and on biopsies from 17 adult patients during surgery for disorders of the lumbar intervertebral disc. In the superficial and deep thoracic muscles, 74% of fibres were of the Type I variety. In the lumbar region, Type I fibres amounted to 57% in the superficial, and to 63% in the deep muscles. The diameter of Type I fibres was significantly greater than that of Type II fibres. PMID:2934358

  13. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy. PMID:27390442

  14. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy. PMID:27390442

  15. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  16. Efficacy of alfacalcidol and alendronate on lumbar bone mineral density in osteoporotic patients using proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Hojo, Mariko; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Ueyama, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Kohei; Izumi, Kentaro; Takeda, Tsutomu; Komori, Hiroyuki; Akazawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Yuji; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is associated with a loss of the anti-fracture efficacy of alendronate (AD). However, there are few prospective studies that have investigated the efficacy of AD on lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) in osteoporotic patients who are using PPIs. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of alfacalcidol (AC) and AD on lumbar BMD in osteoporotic patients using PPIs. A prospective, randomized, active control study enrolled such osteoporotic patients (age, ≥50 years). The patients were randomly assigned to receive AC (1 µg/day) or AD (35 mg/week) and were followed up for one year. Patient profiles were maintained, and lumbar BMD, bone-specific alkaline-phosphatase (BAP) and collagen type-I cross-linked N-telopeptide (NTX), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results, and the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG) were evaluated. Percentage changes in lumbar BMD, NTX, BAP, and change in FSSG score from baseline to the end of one year of treatment were investigated. Sixteen patients were eligible for analysis (eight assigned to receive AC, eight assigned to receive AD). The percentage change in lumbar BMD from baseline to the end of treatment was −0.4±4.0% for the AC group vs. 6.8±6.3% for the AD group (P=0.015). No significant percentage change of BAP and NTX between the two groups was observed. Subsequent to one year of treatment, the FSSG score did not change from the baseline values for either study group, and no new bone fractures or esophagitis were observed in either group of patients. The findings demonstrated that in osteoporotic patients using concomitant PPIs, there was a greater increase in lumbar BMD after one year of treatment with AD compared with AC. However, the number of study subjects was small; thus, further, large prospective studies are required to determine the effect of AD in osteoporotic patients using concomitant PPIs. PMID

  17. Reliability of lumbar spinal palpation, range of motion, and determination of position

    PubMed Central

    Troke, Michael; Schuit, Dale; Petersen, Cheryl M

    2007-01-01

    Background The study purposes were to investigate the level of agreement of palpation of lumbar spinous processes between examiners, test-retest repeatability of lumbar spine range of motion, and the reliability of upright position measures in asymptomatic subjects. Methods The modified CA 6000 spinal motion apparatus with a new skin fixation system was used by three operators for the test-retest spine measurements (3 days apart), and to obtain measures at one session of spinal position. Mean ranges of motion in all planes for 22 asymptomatic subjects were reported using the Intra-class Correlation Coefficient. Results Overall, differences in palpation agreement for lumbar segments occurred in three subjects and did not affect range of motion values. For upright spinal position, ICC (2,3) values for sagittal, coronal, and horizontal plane positions were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.98 respectively. There were statistically significant differences between examiners for position values, determined by the Bonferroni t-test (p < 0.05), but the magnitude of the differences were 2 degrees or less, and not considered clinically important. Conclusion Results suggest that lumbar spinal motion measurements and position determination between different operators can be consistent particularly if utilizing the modified instrument. Static lumbar position also appears to be recorded reliably between different operators. Results justify progression to multi-center lumbar research using the modified CA 6000 and the work is considered relevant to medical clinicians working with spinal dysfunction, surgical interventions, or occupational health. PMID:17971222

  18. Lumbar discogram resulting from lumbar interlaminar epidural injection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey; Kwa, Andre

    2004-06-01

    Lumbar discography is a diagnostic modality to determine whether the intervertebral disc is the cause of pain. The injection of radiopaque contrast into the nucleus pulposus of the disc can reveal the internal details of the disc. We describe a case of inadvertent lumbar discogram resulting from an attempted lumbar interlaminar epidural injection at L5-S1 under fluoroscopy. The patient did not have a postdural puncture headache or nerve root irritation. The potential triangle in the lateral aspect of spinal cord may be the explanation for this situation, because this triangle is composed of the exiting nerve root laterally, the lateral margin of the dura medially, and the pedicle as its base. The L5-S1 disc is located in the center of the triangle. In our case, the Tuohy needle was placed possibly in the center of the triangle, too laterally to puncture the dura. Hence, the patient did not suffer from postdural puncture headache. The needle was probably inferior to the nerve root, and no obvious nerve root trauma or irritation occurred. This potential triangle may provide alternative access for lumbar discography at the L5-S1 level. PMID:15261324

  19. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  20. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Yohan; Sandén, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied. PMID:19619332

  1. The "temporalis-inhibitory reflex" in post-lumbar puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Wallasch, T M; Niemann, U; Strenge, H

    1992-01-01

    Nausea and rigidity of the neck muscles, typical symptoms of post-lumbar puncture syndrome (PPS), may also be found in patients suffering from chronic headache of the tension-type. A decreased duration of the late suppression period of temporal muscle activity indicating a central disturbance of pericranial muscle control, can be observed in these patients. We have studied the temporalis-inhibitory reflex in 47 neurological inpatients requiring lumbar puncture. There were no significant differences of latencies or durations of temporalis silent periods between patients with and without PPS before, and 48 h following, lumbar puncture. PMID:1292957

  2. The effects of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Jung, Gil Su; Baek, Seung Ok; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effectiveness of three different neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocols for the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with LDK were recruited. Three stimulation protocols were investigated: stimulation of the abdominal muscles (protocol A); stimulation of the lumbar muscles (protocol B); and simultaneous stimulation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles (protocol A+B). Images of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI), transversus abdominis (TrA), and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles were captured by real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI). [Results] The thickness of LM was significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for all three protocols. Thicknesses of the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for protocols A and A+B. Thickness increases in LM were significantly greater during protocols B and A+B, but not during protocol A. Thickness increases in the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during protocols A and A+B, but not during protocol B. [Conclusion] NMES can significantly activate the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with LDK. Protocol A+B of NMES is recommended to aid postural correction and low back pain (LBP) in patients with LDK. PMID:27064323

  3. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  4. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  5. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  6. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization and Dynamic Lumbar Strengthening Exercises in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Dae Ha; Kim, Ha Jeong; Cho, Young Ki; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Jung Hoo; Choi, Yoo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises and lumbar dynamic strengthening exercises on the maximal isometric strength of the lumbar extensors, pain severity and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients suffering nonspecific LBP for more than 3 months were included prospectively and randomized into lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=11) or lumbar dynamic strengthening exercise group (n=10). Exercises were performed for 1 hour, twice weekly, for 8 weeks. The strength of the lumbar extensors was measured at various angles ranging from 0° to 72° at intervals of 12°, using a MedX. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used to measure the severity of LBP and functional disability before and after the exercise. Results Compared with the baseline, lumbar extension strength at all angles improved significantly in both groups after 8 weeks. The improvements were significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group at 0° and 12° of lumbar flexion. VAS decreased significantly after treatment; however, the changes were not significantly different between the groups. ODQ scores improved significantly in the stabilization exercise group only. Conclusion Both lumbar stabilization and dynamic strengthening exercise strengthened the lumbar extensors and reduced LBP. However, the lumbar stabilization exercise was more effective in lumbar extensor strengthening and functional improvement in patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. PMID:23525973

  7. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  8. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  9. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 544 - Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements in Each State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Issuers of Motor Vehicle Insurance Policies Subject to the Reporting Requirements in Each State in Which They Do Business A Appendix A to Part 544... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. A Appendix A to...

  10. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will...

  11. 36 CFR 51.78 - Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will the franchise fee be subject to adjustment? 51.78 Section 51.78 Parks... Concession Contract Provisions § 51.78 Will a concession contract require a franchise fee and will...

  12. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  13. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  14. Return to Work After Lumbar Microdiscectomy - Personalizing Approach Through Predictive Modeling.

    PubMed

    Papić, Monika; Brdar, Sanja; Papić, Vladimir; Lončar-Turukalo, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is the most common disease among working population requiring surgical intervention. This study aims to predict the return to work after operative treatment of LDH based on the observational study including 153 patients. The classification problem was approached using decision trees (DT), support vector machines (SVM) and multilayer perception (MLP) combined with RELIEF algorithm for feature selection. MLP provided best recall of 0.86 for the class of patients not returning to work, which combined with the selected features enables early identification and personalized targeted interventions towards subjects at risk of prolonged disability. The predictive modeling indicated at the most decisive risk factors in prolongation of work absence: psychosocial factors, mobility of the spine and structural changes of facet joints and professional factors including standing, sitting and microclimate. PMID:27225576

  15. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  16. Impact loading of the lumbar spine during football blocking.

    PubMed

    Gatt, C J; Hosea, T M; Palumbo, R C; Zawadsky, J P

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the impact force to the lumbar spine when football players hit a blocking sled. We quantified the loads at the L4-5 motion segment throughout the blocking sequence. Five Division I-A college football linemen were subjects for our study. Kinematic data were obtained while the subjects hit a blocking sled instrumented with a force plate. Three plane forces were then calculated from these data. The average impact force measured at the blocking sled was 3013 +/- 598 N. The average peak compression force at the L4-5 motion segment was 8679 +/- 1965 N. The average peak anteroposterior shear force was 3304 +/- 1116 N, and the average peak lateral shear force was 1709 +/- 411 N. The magnitude of the loads on the L4-5 motion segment during football blocking exceed those determined during fatigue studies to cause pathologic changes in both the lumbar disk and the pars interarticularis. These data suggest that the mechanics of repetitive blocking may be responsible for the increased incidence of lumbar spine injury incurred by football linemen. PMID:9167810

  17. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  18. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... together the entire ensemble required to deliver the care we provide. You know, besides my valuable colleague, ... modalities that are available are excellent, including chiropractic care. I do not -- you know, for some reason ...

  19. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  20. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans. PMID:22052243

  1. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  2. Lumbar discectomy: developing and implementing a day surgery protocol.

    PubMed

    Doerksen, Kathy; Dusik-Sharpe, Jodi

    2003-09-01

    In some centres, patients who require a lumbar discectomy are successfully discharged the day of surgery. With the ongoing pressure to provide safe care for patients within certain bed limitations, this option was considered. Using a continuous quality improvement method, a prospective review of patients undergoing a single-level lumbar discectomy was monitored. Based on pre-set criteria, patients were included or excluded in the day surgery protocol and both groups were monitored. A large component of nursing education was provided for all patients, and will be highlighted. Data retrieved for both groups included demographics, length of operation, length in recovery room, length of hospital stay required, and the re-admission rate. There were 47 patients monitored over 11 months. Of the 34 patients entered in the protocol, seven required an overnight length of stay. The reasons for the extended length admission will be described. Of the 13 patients excluded from the protocol, one did not require an overnight stay. Following review of the data, the criteria for inclusion of patients into the protocol has been altered and patients can safely proceed with day surgery for lumbar discectomy. PMID:14618998

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of lumbar stenosis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koompairojn, Soontharee; Hua, Kathleen; Hua, Kien A.; Srisomboon, Jintavaree

    2010-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are indispensable tools for patients' healthcare in modern medicine. Nevertheless, the only fully automatic CAD system available for lumbar stenosis today is for X-ray images. Its performance is limited due to the limitations intrinsic to X-ray images. In this paper, we present a system for magnetic resonance images. It employs a machine learning classification technique to automatically recognize lumbar spine components. Features can then be extracted from these spinal components. Finally, diagnosis is done by applying a Multilayer Perceptron. This classification framework can learn the features of different spinal conditions from the training images. The trained Perceptron can then be applied to diagnose new cases for various spinal conditions. Our experimental studies based on 62 subjects indicate that the proposed system is reliable and significantly better than our older system for X-ray images.

  4. Chronic lumbar spine and radicular pain: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Anthony H; Murrey, Daniel B

    2002-04-01

    The lumbar spine forms the foundation and infrastructure of an organic skyscraper equipped with the physiologic capacity to act as a crane for lifting and a crankshaft for walking. Subjected to aging like other "human machinery," the lumbar spine adapts to the wear and tear of gravity and biomechanical loading through structural and neurochemical changes. Many of the changes are maladaptive, resulting in pain, physical and functional disability, and altered neurophysiologic circuitry. Some compensatory reactions are constructive, but others cause more interference with the organism's capacity to cope. A conceptional understanding of the multifaceted structural, biomechanical, biochemical, medical, and psychosocial influences that compose this mix elucidates the complexity of applying effective treatments. PMID:11872180

  5. [Influence of the weather on the course of lumbar syndromes].

    PubMed

    Machalek, A; Tilscher, H; Friedrich, M; Polt, E

    1980-01-01

    Sensation of pain during lumbar syndromes is correlated with weather situations, the definition of which takes into consideration traditional as well as new methods of weather classification. To this end, it was necessary to develop an algesia index for the purpose of defining the subjective pain sensation by classifying it in different groups enabling the application of medico-meteorological statistics. The medical data were correlated with the following meteorological arametes: Weather-phase scheme according to Brezowsky-Ungeheuer; temperature-humidity environment; weather situations for Central Europe; synoptic index cycle; advention of temperature in medium altitudes of the atmosphere; vorticity for cyclogenesis. The following results were obtained: Pain sensation in the lumbar area shows a significant dependence on weather situations. Althoguh singular meteorological parameters are not important, the human body is affected primarily by the sum total of all weather elements. PMID:6447957

  6. Relationship of body composition, knee extensor strength, and standing balance to lumbar bone mineral density in postmenopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsub; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate correlations between lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) and general characteristics of postmenopausal females, including body composition, knee extensor strength, standing balance, and femur BMD. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 postmenopausal females (55.6 ± 4.6 years) who were caregivers or guardians of patients in the K hospital were included in the study. The weight, height, body composition, left and right knee extensor strength, standing balance, femur BMD, and lumbar BMD measurements of the subjects were obtained. [Results] The effect of measurement variables on lumbar BMD was examined. Increases in age and menopausal duration were observed to significantly increase lumbar BMD, whereas an increase in height was found to significantly decrease lumbar BMD. An increase in soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, fat-free mass, and femur BMD was also associated with significantly decreased lumbar BMD. [Conclusion] Age, menopausal duration, soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, and fat-free mass were factors that decreased lumbar BMD in menopausal females. This study is expected to provide basic knowledge for osteoporosis prevention and treatment programs for postmenopausal females. PMID:27512276

  7. Relationship of body composition, knee extensor strength, and standing balance to lumbar bone mineral density in postmenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungsub; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate correlations between lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) and general characteristics of postmenopausal females, including body composition, knee extensor strength, standing balance, and femur BMD. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 postmenopausal females (55.6 ± 4.6 years) who were caregivers or guardians of patients in the K hospital were included in the study. The weight, height, body composition, left and right knee extensor strength, standing balance, femur BMD, and lumbar BMD measurements of the subjects were obtained. [Results] The effect of measurement variables on lumbar BMD was examined. Increases in age and menopausal duration were observed to significantly increase lumbar BMD, whereas an increase in height was found to significantly decrease lumbar BMD. An increase in soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, fat-free mass, and femur BMD was also associated with significantly decreased lumbar BMD. [Conclusion] Age, menopausal duration, soft lean mass, skeletal muscle mass, and fat-free mass were factors that decreased lumbar BMD in menopausal females. This study is expected to provide basic knowledge for osteoporosis prevention and treatment programs for postmenopausal females. PMID:27512276

  8. Perioperative and short-term advantages of mini-open approach for lumbar spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vela, J.; Joven-Aliaga, E.; Herrera, A.; Vicente, J.; Suñén, E.; Loste, A.; Tabuenca, A.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported a vascular and neurologic damage of the lumbar muscles produced in the classic posterior approach for lumbar spinal fusions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a better clinical and functional outcome in the postoperative and short term in patients undergoing minimal invasive surgery (“mini-open”) for this lumbar spinal arthrodesis. We designed a prospective study with a 30 individuals cohort randomized in two groups, depending on the approach performed to get a instrumented lumbar circumferential arthrodesis: “classic posterior” (CL group) or “mini-open” approach (MO group). Several clinical and functional parameters were assessed, including blood loss, postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and daily life activities during hospital stay and at the 3-month follow-up. Patients of the “mini-open approach” group had a significant lower blood loss and hospital stay during admission. They also had significant lower analgesic requirements and faster recovery of daily life activities (specially moderate efforts) when compared to the patients of the “classic posterior approach” group. No significant differences were found between two groups in surgery timing, X-rays exposure or sciatic postoperative pain. This study, inline with previous investigations, reinforces the concept of minimizing the muscular lumbar damage with a mini-open approach for a faster and better recovery of patients’ disability in the short term. Further investigations are necessary to confirm these findings in the long term, and to verify the achievement of a stable lumbar spinal fusion. PMID:19399538

  9. A sloped seat wedge can change the kinematics of the lumbar spine of seated workers with limited hip flexion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether a wedge type seat decreases the lumbar flexion angle of seated workers with limited hip flexion. [Subjects] Twelve sedentary workers with limited hip flexion were recruited. [Methods] Three seat surfaces were used: a level surface, a forward-inclining wedge, and a backward-reclining wedge. The angles of lumbar flexion and pelvic tilt were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Differences in kinematic data of the subjects seated on the three seat surfaces were analyzed using repeated one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The degree of lumbar flexion decreased significantly when using the forward-inclining wedge compared with the level surface and backward-reclining wedge. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that sitting on a forward-inclining wedge may be useful for minimizing the compensatory lumbar flexion of individuals with limited hip flexion who work in a seated position. PMID:25202175

  10. Effect of Foot Hyperpronation on Lumbar Lordosis and Thoracic Kyphosis in Standing Position Using 3-Dimensional Ultrasound-Based Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Farokhmanesh, Khatere; Shirzadian, Toraj; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Shahri, Mina Neyakan

    2014-01-01

    Based on clinical observations, foot hyperpronation is very common. Excessive pronation (hyperpronation) can cause malalignment of the lower extremities. This most often leads to functional and structural deficits. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot hyperpronation on lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. Thirty five healthy subjects (age range, 18030 years) were asked to stand on 4 positions including a flat surface (normal position) and on wedges angled at 10, 15, and 20 degrees. Sampling was done using simple random sampling. Measurements were made by a motion analysis system. For data analysis, the SPSS software (ver. 18) using paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied. The eversion created by the wedges caused a significant increase in lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis. The most significant change occurred between two consecutive positions of flat surface and the first wedge. The t-test for repeated measures showed a high correlation between each two consecutive positions. The results showed that with increased bilateral foot pronation, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis increased as well. In fact, each of these results is a compensation phenomenon. Further studies are required to determine long-term results of excessive foot pronation and its probable effect on damage progression. PMID:25169004

  11. The lumbar shield: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Feild, J R; McHenry, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative perineural adhesions between the lumbar nerve root and the partially removed intervertebral disc are thought to be a cause of failure of the standard operative procedure for the removal of a ruptured lumbar intervertebral disc. Attempts have been made to reduce postoperative perineural adhesions by the use of epidural muscle, fat, gelatin sponge, silicone, and steroids. The present communication introduces a new implantable silicone device, a lumbar shield, designed to: (a) provide a radiopaque marker on the dorsal perimeter of the excavated lumbar disc so that the presence or absence of a recurrent disc herniation can easily be determined on plain postoperative x-ray films, (b) provide ready access to the operative site in the event of a recurrent disc herniation, (c) prevent postoperative perineural adhesions between the lumbar dura and the nerve root and the partially removed intervertebral disc, and (d) prevent postoperative adhesions between the lumbar dura and the nerve root and the paraspinal muscles. Satisfactory results of lumbar disc surgery over the past 44 years have occurred in about 90% of routine patients. The value of the lumbar shield in 82 patients (59 routine and 23 workmen's compensation/medicolegal patients) followed for 6 months is described. A satisfactory result, i.e., relief of pain or the presence of occasional postoperative pain, occurred in 85% of routine patients at 1 month, 97% at 3 months, and 95% at 6 months. PMID:683493

  12. [Neonatal occlusion due to a lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Hunald, F A; Ravololoniaina, T; Rajaonarivony, M F V; Rakotovao, M; Andriamanarivo, M L; Rakoto-Ratsimba, H

    2011-10-01

    A Petit lumbar hernia is an uncommon hernia. Congenital forms are seen in children. Incarceration may occur as an unreducible lumbar mass, associated with bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Abdominal X-ray shows sided-wall bowel gas. In this case, reduction and primary closure must be performed as emergency repair. PMID:21868206

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  15. 46 CFR 70.05-1 - United States flag vessels subject to the requirements of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... covered by columns 2 and 3. All vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 All... dangerous cargoes, when required by 46 CFR part 98 None None All vessels carrying cargoes in bulk that are... conditions. The provisions of 49 CFR parts 171 through 179 apply whenever packaged hazardous materials are...

  16. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Table 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table...

  17. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Table 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table...

  18. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Table 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table...

  19. Lumbar Mechanics in Tennis Groundstrokes: Differences in Elite Adolescent Players With and Without Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Amity; Straker, Leon; Whiteside, David; O'Sullivan, Peter; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2016-02-01

    Adolescent tennis players are at risk for low back pain (LBP). Recent research has demonstrated a potential mechanical etiology during serves; however, groundstrokes have also been suggested to load this region. Therefore, this study compared lumbar mechanics between players with and without a history of LBP during open and square stance tennis forehands and backhands. Nineteen elite, adolescent, male tennis players participated, 7 with a history of recurrent disabling LBP and 12 without. Differences in three-dimensional lumbar kinetics and kinematics were compared between pain/no pain groups and groundstrokes using linear mixed models (P < .01). There were no significant differences between pain/no pain groups. Relative to a right-handed player, groundstroke comparisons revealed that forehands had greater racquet velocity, greater lumbar right lateral flexion force, as well as upper lumbar extension/rightward rotation and lower lumbar right rotation/lateral flexion movements that were closer to or further beyond end of range than backhands. Backhands required upper lumbar leftward rotation that was beyond end range, while forehands did not. Given that players typically rotated near to their end of range during the backswing of both forehands and backhands, independent of pain, groundstrokes may contribute to the cumulative strain linked to LBP in tennis players. PMID:26367081

  20. Plexiform Schwannoma of Lumbar Region

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Asmita; Verma, Sarika; Suri, Tarun; Agarwal, Anil; Bansal, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is an unusual peripheral nerve sheath tumor. It can mimic plexiform neurofibroma. A five-year-old girl presented with painful swelling in left lumbar region. Radiologic investigations showed a multinodular tumor in the subcutaneous plane of lumbosacral region. A complete excision and histopathologic examination revealed a plexiform tumor composed of hypocellular and hypercellular areas with verocay bodies. The tumor cells showed strong positivity for S-100 protein, rendering a final diagnosis of plexiform schwannoma. The child has been free of recurrence in 12-month follow-up. PMID:26064806

  1. Comparison of lumbar spine stabilization exercise versus general exercise in young male patients with lumbar disc herniation after 1 year of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chaoqun; Ren, Jixin; Zhang, Jianzheng; Wang, Chongwei; Liu, Zhi; Li, Fang; Sun, Tiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The safest and most effective conservative treatment for patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has not been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lumbar spine stabilization exercise (LSSE) and general exercise (GE) on pain intensity and functional capacity in young male patients with LDH. Methods: Sixty-three young male adults aged 20 to 29 years with the diagnosis of LDH were enrolled and divided into an LSSE group (n=30) and a GE group (n=33). Patients in both groups received low-power laser (LPL) therapy during the first week of the onset of LDH. Patients in the GE group underwent a GE program. Patients in the LSSE group followed an LSSE program for 3 months. All of the patients were subjected to pain intensity and functional capacity evaluations four times: at pre-and post-LPL therapy, and at 3 months and 1 year post-exercise. Pain intensity of the lower back and legs was evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS), and functional capacity was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Both groups showed a significant reduction in VAS and ODI scores at 3 and 12 months post-exercise compared with before treatment (P<0.001). The LSSE group showed a significant reduction in the average score of the VAS for low back pain (P=0.012) and the ODI (P=0.003) at 12 months post-exercise compared with the GE group. Conclusions: LSSE and GE are considered as effective interventions for young male patients with LDH. Moreover, LSSE is more effective than GE, and physical therapy, such as LPL, is required during acute LDH. PMID:26309670

  2. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 744 - List of Items Subject to the Military End-Use License Requirement of § 744.21

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false List of Items Subject to the Military End-Use License Requirement of § 744.21 No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 744 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT...

  3. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 744 - List of Items Subject to the Military End-Use License Requirement of § 744.21

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false List of Items Subject to the Military End-Use License Requirement of § 744.21 No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 744 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT...

  4. 40 CFR 262.203 - How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How an eligible academic entity... Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.203 How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. (a) An eligible academic...

  5. 40 CFR 262.203 - How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How an eligible academic entity... Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.203 How an eligible academic entity indicates it will be subject to the requirements of this subpart. (a) An eligible academic...

  6. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  7. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  8. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 63.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for Control Technology Determinations for Major Sources in Accordance With Clean Air Act Sections,...

  9. 12 CFR 208.36 - Reporting requirements for State member banks subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... data prepared in accordance with GAAP and disclose any material contingencies, as required by Article 10 of the Commission's Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.10-01), in the Management's Discussion and Analysis...'s rules shall be paid to the Board. (3) Public inspection. Copies of the registration...

  10. 12 CFR 208.36 - Reporting requirements for State member banks subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... data prepared in accordance with GAAP and disclose any material contingencies, as required by Article 10 of the Commission's Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.10-01), in the Management's Discussion and Analysis...'s rules shall be paid to the Board. (3) Public inspection. Copies of the registration...

  11. 12 CFR 208.36 - Reporting requirements for State member banks subject to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... data prepared in accordance with GAAP and disclose any material contingencies, as required by Article 10 of the Commission's Regulation S-X (17 CFR 210.10-01), in the Management's Discussion and Analysis...'s rules shall be paid to the Board. (3) Public inspection. Copies of the registration...

  12. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the reopening procedures in 40 CFR part 70 or part 71, whichever is relevant, to incorporate the... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for... determination under section 112(j) of the Act that is applicable to a stationary source or group of...

  13. 40 CFR 63.44 - Requirements for constructed or reconstructed major sources subject to a subsequently promulgated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the reopening procedures in 40 CFR part 70 or part 71, whichever is relevant, to incorporate the... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES Requirements for... determination under section 112(j) of the Act that is applicable to a stationary source or group of...

  14. Digestible Lysine Requirements of Male Broilers From 14 to 28 Days of Age Subjected to Different Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary amino acid requirements are influenced by environmental conditions. Two experiments examined growth responses of Ross × Ross TP 16 male broilers fed diets varying in digestible (dig) Lys concentrations from 14 to 28 d of age under different environmental conditions. Experiment 1 was conduc...

  15. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  16. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Alpoim, Bruno; Rodrigues, Elisa; Félix, António; Silva, Luís; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation. PMID:26229836

  17. Postural strategy changes with fatigue of the lumbar extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin L; Madigan, Michael L; Davidson, Bradley S; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation. Anteriorly-directed force perturbations were applied to the upper back with a padded pendulum and attempted to challenge the postural control system without eliciting a stepping response. In three separate sessions, subjects were perturbed both before and after a fatiguing protocol that induced lumbar extensor fatigue to one of three different fatigue levels. Postural strategy was quantified using center of pressure position along with joint angles and joint torques for the ankle, knee, hip, and "low back" joints. Results showed both proactive and reactive changes in postural strategy. Proactive changes involved a slight anterior lean prior to the perturbation, and reactive changes were consistent with a shift toward more of a hip strategy with fatigue. In addition, results suggested that subjects classified as moving mostly at the hip prior to fatigue were more affected by fatigue compared to subjects classified as moving roughly equal amounts at the ankle and hip prior to fatigue. Increasing fatigue level exaggerated some, but not all, of the changes in postural strategy with fatigue. These findings illustrate that neuromuscular fatigue can influence postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation. PMID:16023345

  18. [Occupation and lumbar disk prolapse].

    PubMed

    Jensen, M V; Tüchsen, F

    1995-03-13

    All Danish occupational groups were screened for an increased risk of hospitalization due to a prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc (PLID) (ICD-8: 725.11). A cohort of all gainfully employed Danes aged 20 to 59 years in 1981 was followed-up for 10 years for first hospitalization with PLID. A Standardized Hospitalization Ratio was calculated using all economically active persons as the reference group. Male groups with an elevated risk were found in building and construction, the iron and metal industry, in the food and nutrition sector and in occupational driving. Almost all groups of professional drivers had an elevated risk. Female groups with an elevated risk were mainly found in the same industries, but home helps, service workers in the private sector and sewing machine operators also had an elevated risk. We conclude that there are significant and systematic differences between occupational groups as concerns the risk of hospital admission due to PLID. PMID:7725550

  19. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  20. Spontaneous resolution of lumbar vertebral eosinophilic granuloma.

    PubMed

    Bavbek, M; Atalay, B; Altinörs, N; Caner, H

    2004-02-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare disease but is more common in adults than children. It's often self-limiting. Spinal involvement is rare. It is the localized and most benign form of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (previously known as histiocytosis X), characterised by lytic lesions in one or more bones. Spontaneous resolution of vertebral body lesions is very rare. In this case, the patient had one EG in a cervical vertebra and a similar lesion in a lumbar vertebra. This case is important because it featured a symptomatic lesion in the cervical spine accompanied by an asymptomatic lesion in a lumbar vertebra. We treated the cervical lesion by surgical fusion and followed the lumbar lesion up conservatively, with the patient in a corset. After 8 years of follow-up, control MRI showed that the lumbar lesion had spontaneously resolved. PMID:14963750

  1. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION...

  2. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wastewater-Periodic Reporting Requirements for Control Devices Subject to § 63.139 Used To Comply With §§ 63.13 Through 63.139 20 Table 20 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION...

  3. In vivo Loads in the Lumbar L3-4 Disc during a Weight Lifting Extension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge of in vivo human lumbar loading is critical for understanding the lumbar function and for improving surgical treatments of lumbar pathology. Although numerous experimental measurements and computational simulations have been reported, non-invasive determination of in vivo spinal disc loads is still a challenge in biomedical engineering. The object of the study is to investigate the in vivo human lumbar disc loads using a subject-specific and kinematic driven finite element approach. Methods Three dimensional (3D) lumbar spine models of three living subjects were created using MR images. A 3D finite element model of the L3-4 disc, including the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, was built for each subject. The endplate kinematics of the L3-4 segment of each subject during a dynamic weight lifting extension was determined using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. The endplate kinematics was used as displacement boundary conditions of the subject specific finite element model of the L3-4 disc to calculate the in-vivo disc forces and moments during the weight lifting activity. Findings During the weight lifting extension, the L3-4 disc experienced maximum shear load of about 230 N or 0.34 bodyweight at the flexion position and maximum compressive load of 1500 N or 2.28 bodyweight at the upright position. The disc experienced a primary flexion-extension moment during the motion which reached a maximum of 4.2 Nm at upright position with stretched arms holding the weight. Interpretation This study provided quantitative data on in vivo disc loading that could help understand intrinsic biomechanics of the spine and improve surgical treatment of pathological discs using fusion or arthroplasty techniques. PMID:24345591

  4. Asystole during lumbar discectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vikas; Tiwari, Ankita; Rath, Girija Prasad; Banik, Sujoy

    2016-06-01

    Hemodynamic derangements have been reported after surgery involving upper cervical spine. Similar observations, however, are rare during a lumbar spine surgery. We share our experience in a patient who had 2 episodes of bradycardia leading to transient asystole while undergoing lumbar discectomy for prolapsed intervertebral disc. The risk of life-threatening hemodynamic disturbances during seemingly uncomplicated surgery in prone position has been emphasized. PMID:27185724

  5. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  6. A normative database of lumbar spine ranges of motion.

    PubMed

    Troke, Michael; Moore, Ann P; Maillardet, Frederick J; Cheek, Elizabeth

    2005-08-01

    The overall aim of the work was to develop a comprehensive normative database of indices for ranges of motion in the lumbar spine, in an asymptomatic sample of the general population. This was a repeated measures prospective study utilizing a reliable and valid instrument, the modified CA6000 Spine Motion Analyzer (Orthopedic Systems Inc. Union City CA & Troke/University of Brighton). The portable equipment was used to collect data in a variety of community settings (e.g. schools, GP surgeries, offices, leisure centres, emergency services stations). A total of 405 asymptomatic subjects (196 female, 209 male) aged 16-90 yr from sedentary, mixed and physically demanding occupations participated in the study and data were collected in standing, at different times of the day, following a standardized methodology for lumbar spine motion in the sagittal, coronal and horizontal planes. Age-related centile graphs were derived separately for male and female subjects in flexion, extension, left and right lateral flexion and left and right axial rotation. All 12 graphs are presented as an appendix located on the Manual Therapy website. Overall, flexion (73-40 degrees) and lateral flexion (28-14 degrees, L&R) declined 45% and 48%, respectively, across the age range. Extension (29-6 degrees) declined the greatest at 79%. By contrast, no overall decline in axial rotational RoMs was recorded, and the median RoM remained at 7 degrees each way across the age spectrum examined. A comprehensive database of indices of lumbar spine ranges of motion has thus been developed which is gender specific, age related, drawn from a wide age range and presents data for all three planes of motion. It is considered that the new database has a number of potential clinical and research applications. PMID:16038855

  7. Inversion devices: their role in producing lumbar distraction.

    PubMed

    Gianakopoulos, G; Waylonis, G W; Grant, P A; Tottle, D O; Blazek, J V

    1985-02-01

    Twenty persons with chronic low back pain participated in a clinical study to evaluate the effects of gravity traction. Each subject was instructed in the use of three devices, two for inversion and one for upright suspension traction. Baseline pulse and rate blood pressure were recorded before and after traction. Periods of traction did not exceed 20 minutes. The order of use of the devices was randomized. Each participant was monitored for significant side effects and was questioned to determine which device was best tolerated, easiest to use, or caused changes in back symptoms. Lateral lumbar spine radiographs were taken with the subject in the standing position and after varying periods of inversion. Observations included the following: An average increase in blood pressure of 17.2 systolic (range 4-34) and 16.4 diastolic (range 2-50) while in the inverted position. An average decrease in heart rate of 16.4 beats per minute (range, 4-32). No significant physiologic changes of blood pressure or pulse were observed in patients using GLR suspension traction; distraction of the lower lumbar intervertebral spaces (range, 0.3 to 4.0 mm) with inverted traction in all cases; side effects including periorbital and pharyngeal petechiae (one patient), persistent headaches (three patients), persistent blurred vision (three patients), and contact lense discomfort (one patient); and improvement of low back symptoms in 13 of the 16 symptomatic patients. Although these devices make lumbar traction practical in a home setting, their use should be under medical supervision because of possible side effects. PMID:3155939

  8. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Plus Lumbar Mini-Open Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyon Su; Kim, Hak Sun; Ankur, Nanda; Kho, Phillip Anthony; Kim, Sung Jun; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Jin Oh; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study are to describe the outcome of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated with Video Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) plus supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region for thoracic and lumbar deformity correction and fusion. Materials and Methods This is a case series of 13 patients treated with VATS plus lumbar mini-open surgery for AIS. A total of 13 patients requiring fusions of both the thoracic and lumbar regions were included in this study: 5 of these patients were classified as Lenke type 1A and 8 as Lenke type 5C. Fusion was performed using VATS up to T12 or L1 vertebral level. Lower levels were accessed via a small mini-incision in the lumbar area to gain access to the lumbar spine via the retroperitoneal space. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Results The average number of fused vertebrae was 7.1 levels. A significant correction in the Cobb angle was obtained at the final follow-up (p = 0.001). The instrumented segmental angle in the sagittal plane was relatively well-maintained following surgery, albeit with a slight increase. Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) scores were noted have significantly improved at the final follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusion Indications for the use of VATS may be extended from patients with localized thoracic scoliosis to those with thoracolumbar scoliosis. By utilizing a supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region, a satisfactory deformity correction may be accomplished with minimal post-operative scarring. PMID:21155045

  9. Clinical results of XMR-assisted percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) has shown favorable outcomes in the majority of lumbar discectomy cases, there were also some failures. The most common cause of failure is the incomplete removal of disc fragments. The skin entry point for the guide-needle trajectory and the optimal placement of the working sleeve are largely blind, which might lead to the inadequate removal of disc fragments. The objective of this study was to present our early experiences with image-guided PELD using a specially designed fluoroscope with magnetic resonance imaging-equipped operative suite (XMR) for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Methods This prospective study included 89 patients who had undergone PELD via the transforaminal approach using an XMR protocol. Pre- and postoperative examinations (at 12 weeks) included a detailed clinical history, visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and radiological workups. The results were categorized as excellent, good, fair, and poor according to MacNab's criteria. At the final follow-up, the minimum follow-up time for the subjects was 2 years. The need for revision surgeries and postoperative complications were noted on follow-up. Results Postoperative mean ODI decreased from 67.4% to 5.61%. Mean VAS score for back and leg pain improved significantly from 4 to 2.3 and from 7.99 to 1.04, respectively. Four (4.49%) patients underwent a second-stage PELD after intraoperative XMR had shown remnant fragments after the first stage. As per MacNab's criteria, 76 patients (85.4%) showed excellent, 8 (8.89%) good, 3 (3.37%) fair, and 2 (2.25) poor results. Four (4.49%) patients had remnant disc fragments on XMR, which were removed during the same procedure. All of these patients had either highly migrated or sequestrated disc fragments preoperatively. Four (4.49%) other patients needed a second, open surgery due to symptomatic postoperative hematoma (n = 2) and recurrent disc

  10. An update on the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease without disc herniation, also known as discogenic pain, is an elusive diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Lumbar provocation discography and fusion surgery have been frequently utilized for several decades as the gold standards for the diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic lumbar discogenic pain, though controversial, based on conjecture, rather than evidence. In addition to lumbar fusion, various other operative and nonoperative modalities of treatments are available in managing chronic lumbar discogenic pain. This review provides an updated assessment of the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain with a critical look at the many modalities of treatments that are currently available. PMID:26255722

  11. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  12. Monoamine metabolite concentrations in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid of patients with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A M; Sims, N R; Bowen, D M; Neary, D; Palo, J; Wikstrom, J; Davison, A N

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 5-hydroxy indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were determined in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from control subjects and patients of both presenile and senile age with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia. CSF HVA increased with age in control but not in Alzheimer patients. HVA and 5-HIAA in the CSF of presenile Alzheimer patients was lower than that of age matched control subjects. PMID:6204017

  13. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  14. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  15. Management of severe pain due to lumbar disk protrusion.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Liam

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disk protrusion can cause excruciating pain in severe cases, which can be exacerbated by activity such as sitting down and straining at stool. Acute sciatica due to disk rupture will improve within 1 to 3 months. The efficacy of drugs used for the management of sciatica in primary care is unclear. Severe cases can require opioid analgesia, however people taking opioids for pain relief frequently present with opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. The use of transforaminal steroid injections is a controversial issue and repeat steroid injections should be considered in light of the risk-benefit profile of the individual patient. PMID:25643230

  16. Alkaptonuria and lumbar disc herniation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Farzannia, Akbar; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Hadidchi, Shahram

    2003-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disease caused by deficiency of homogentisic acid oxidase and characterized by bluish-black discoloration of cartilages and skin (ochronosis). The authors report the cases of three patients with lumbar disc herniation who underwent discectomy and in whom the nucleus pulposus was discovered to be black. Alkaptonuria was diagnosed after discectomy. Discal herniation requiring surgery is unusual in alkaptonuria, with only a few reports. The symptoms in the three patients disappeared after surgery and no symptoms were demonstrated on follow-up examination. PMID:12546396

  17. Comparison of the Oswestry Disability Index and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Lumbar Canal Stenosis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G; Hampannavar, Aravind; Singh, Paramjeet; Sudesh, Pebam; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; BK, Shashidhar; Sament, Radheshyam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose The aim of the study was to determine relationship between the degrees of radiologically demonstrated anatomical lumbar canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its correlation with the patient's disability level, using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Overview of Literature The relationship between the imaging studies and clinical symptoms has been uncertain in patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar canal stenosis. There is a limited number of studies which correlates the degree of stenosis with simple reproducible scoring methods. Methods Fifty patients were selected from 350 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The patients answered the national-language translated form of ODI. The ratio of disability was interpreted, and the patients were grouped accordingly. They were subjected to MRI; and the anteroposterior diameters of the lumbar intervertebral disc spaces and the thecal sac cross sectional area were measured. Comparison was performed between the subdivisions of the degree of lumbar canal stenosis, based on the following: anteroposterior diameter (three groups: normal, relative stenosis and absolute stenosis); subdivisions of the degree of central canal stenosis, based on the thecal sac cross-sectional area, measured on axial views (three groups: normal, moderately stenotic and severely stenotic); and the ODI outcome, which was also presented in 20 percentiles. Results No significant correlation was established between the radiologically depicted anatomical lumbar stenosis and the Oswestry Disability scores. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging alone should not be considered in isolation when assessing and treating patients diagnosed with lumbar canal stenosis. PMID:24596604

  18. A model of the human lumbar vertebral column: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Vanneuville, G; Cluzel, P; Massaux, M; Bressolette, P; Kyndt, T; Garcier, J M; Guillot, M; Gabrillargues, J; Chandezon, R; Poumarat, G

    1995-01-01

    Finite element modelling of the human lumbar vertebral column employs data-processing procedures for study of the linear and nonlinear elasticity of materials such as are currently used in mechanics or in civil engineering. Thanks to developments in computer science, requiring a close collaboration between doctors and engineers, we put forward in this preliminary study a linear computerised model of the lumbar column comprising 4824 meshes and 6813 nodes. By reducing the simplificatory hypotheses and integrating new parameters, this model as developed is capable of important clinical applications in surgery and ergonomics. PMID:7597566

  19. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  20. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  1. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  2. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... lumbar cable by tightening the adjustment nut for the lumbar vertebrae until the spring is compressed...

  3. Lumbar Spine Injury/Pathology as a Predictor of Outcomes in National Football League Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas Sean; Schroeder, Greg; Gibbs, Daniel; Chow, Ian; LaBelle, Mark; Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh; Hsu, Wellington; Nuber, Gordon W.

    2014-01-01

    , p = 0.13), games played (46.5 vs. 50.7, respectively, p = 0.15), games started (28.1 vs. 30.6, respectively, p = 0.39) or performance score (1.4 vs. 1.8, respectively, p = 0.3) (Figure 1). Conclusion: The data in this study suggests that a pre-existing lumbar spine diagnosis was associated with a significantly lower draft status for NFL athletes. However, the data in our study suggests that such a diagnosis did not affect a player’s career longevity or performance. Further study will be required to determine the individual effects of specific conditions on performance.

  4. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on foot pressure of older individuals while walking.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunmi; Shim, Jemyung; Mun, Dongchul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of lumbar stabilization on pressure distribution in old women. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 14 women aged 65 or older who agreed to participate in this study. They had a sufficient range of motion and muscle strength to perform the postures in this study's program and were without gait problems, congenital deformity, orthopedic disorder, or neurological disorder. [Methods] The participants performed a group exercise program that promotes lumbar stabilization for 50 minutes per session by following the instructions of a physical therapist. Gait Analyzer was used to measure the foot pressure of individual participants from three measurements for each lumbar stabilization exercise, and the mean values were used. The mean values were then compared between before and after the exercises by paired t-test. [Results] Pressure in F3 and F6 statistically significantly decreased from 2.06±1.23% N/cm(2) to 1.55±1.02% N/cm(2) and from 7.40±1.52% N/cm(2) to 5.95±1.76% N/cm(2), respectively, after the intervention, but no significant differences were found in the other foot areas. [Conclusion] The lumbar stabilization exercises affected the pressure evenly over the entire foot and, in particular, in the inner area of the forefoot. PMID:25642067

  5. Transthyretin-derived amyloidosis: Probably a common cause of lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Suhr, Ole B.; Berg, Svante

    2014-01-01

    Background Senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) derived from wild-type transthyretin is a fairly common condition of old individuals, particularly men. The main presentation is by cardiac involvement, which can lead to severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. SSA is, however, a systemic disease, and amyloid deposits may appear in many other tissues but are thought to be without clinical symptoms outside the heart. Amyloid is a very common finding in cartilage and ligaments of elderly subjects, and transthyretin has been demonstrated in some deposits. Lumbar spinal stenosis is also a condition of usually elderly individuals in whom narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal leads to compression of nerves to the lower limbs. Results We questioned whether lumbar spinal stenosis sometimes could be a manifestation of undiagnosed SSA. In this first report we have studied the presence of amyloid in material obtained at surgery for spinal stenosis in 26 patients. Amyloid was found in 25 subjects. Transthyretin was demonstrated immunohistochemically in 5 out of 15 studied resected tissues. Four of the positive materials were analyzed with Western blot revealing both full-length transthyretin (TTR) and C-terminal TTR fragments, typically seen in SSA. Conclusion We conclude that lumbar spinal stenosis quite frequently may be a consequence of SSA and that further studies are warranted. PMID:24620715

  6. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  7. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  8. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  9. A musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Christophy, Miguel; Faruk Senan, Nur Adila; Lotz, Jeffrey C; O'Reilly, Oliver M

    2012-01-01

    A new musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine is described in this paper. This model features a rigid pelvis and sacrum, the five lumbar vertebrae, and a rigid torso consisting of a lumped thoracic spine and ribcage. The motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae was defined as a fraction of the net lumbar movement about the three rotational degrees of freedom: flexion-extension lateral bending, and axial rotation. Additionally, the eight main muscle groups of the lumbar spine were incorporated using 238 muscle fascicles with prescriptions for the parameters in the Hill-type muscle models obtained with the help of an extensive literature survey. The features of the model include the abilities to predict joint reactions, muscle forces, and muscle activation patterns. To illustrate the capabilities of the model and validate its physiological similarity, the model's predictions for the moment arms of the muscles are shown for a range of flexion-extension motions of the lower back. The model uses the OpenSim platform and is freely available on https://www.simtk.org/home/lumbarspine to other spinal researchers interested in analyzing the kinematics of the spine. The model can also be integrated with existing OpenSim models to build more comprehensive models of the human body. PMID:21318374

  10. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  11. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  12. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  13. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  14. Return to Play After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ralph W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of lumbar spine conditions can produce excellent outcomes in athletes. Microdiscectomy for lumbar disc herniation has favorable outcomes; most athletes return to play at preoperative performance levels. Direct pars repair is successful in younger athletes, with high rates of return to play for a variety of fixation techniques. Fusion in athletes with scoliosis is a negative predictor. There are few evidence-based return to play criteria. Athletes should demonstrate full resolution of symptoms and flexibility, endurance, and strength before returning to play. Deciding when to return an athlete to sport depends on particular injury sustained, sport, and individual factors. PMID:27543402

  15. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ . PMID:27364424

  16. Microdiscectomy for a Paracentral Lumbar Herniated Disk.

    PubMed

    Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Savage, Jason W

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniations occur frequently and are often associated with leg pain, weakness, and paresthesias. Fortunately, the natural outcomes of radiculopathy due to a disk herniation are generally favorable, and the vast majority of patients improve with nonoperative care. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who have significant pain that is refractory to at least 6 weeks of conservative care, patients who have a severe or progressive motor deficit, or patients who have any symptoms of bowel or bladder dysfunction. This paper reviews the preoperative and postoperative considerations, as well as the surgical technique, for a microdiscectomy for a lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. PMID:26710186

  17. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  18. Progression of a lumbar disc extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael S; Alitz, Curtis

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 34-year-old woman who was referred to a physical therapist for a chief complaint of progressively worsening right buttock pain with paresthesias of the right posterior thigh and calf. Prior magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed a large left paracentral disc extrusion at L5-S1. Following physical therapist intervention, the patient reported a new onset of left posterior thigh pain, with paresthesias of the dorsolateral aspect of the left foot. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed an increase in the size of the disc extrusion at L5-S1. PMID:25361862

  19. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  20. Ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Akino, Minoru; Seki, Toshitaka; Yano, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2005-05-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of ligamentum flavum hematoma manifesting as low back pain and gait difficulty beginning 1 month before consulting our institute. He had no history of lumbar spine surgery or lumbar puncture. However, he might have suffered forgotten back injury while practicing martial arts. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous intensity mass lesion with a cystic component at the L3-4 levels. The lesion was totally removed through a hemilaminectomy. Intraoperative and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of old hematoma with granulomatous change in the ligamentum flavum. Postoperatively, his low back pain and gait difficulty resolved within a few days. PMID:15914970

  1. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy. PMID:27534095

  2. Lumbar intervertebral disc puncture under C-arm fluoroscopy: a new rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yang, Huilin; Huang, Yonghui; Wu, Yan; Sun, Taicun; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To establish a minimally invasive rat model of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) to better understand the pathophysiology of the human condition. The annulus fibrosus of lumbar level 4-5 (L4-5) and L5-6 discs were punctured by 27-gauge needles using the posterior approach under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after disc puncture surgery to determine the degree of degeneration. All sixty discs (thirty rats) were punctured successfully. Only two of thirty rats subjected to the procedure exhibited immediate neurological symptoms. The MRI results indicated a gradual increase in Pfirrmann grade from 4 to 8 weeks post-surgery (P<0.05), and H&E staining demonstrated a parallel increase in histological grade (P<0.05). Expression levels of aggrecan, type II collagen (Col2), and Sox9 mRNAs, which encode disc components, decreased gradually post-surgery. In contrast, mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col1), an indicator of fibrosis, increased (P<0.05). The procedure of annular puncture using a 27-gauge needle under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance had a high success rate. Histological, MRI, and RT-PCR results revealed that the rat model of disc degeneration is a progressive pathological process that is similar to human IDD. PMID:24770648

  3. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  4. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  5. Lumbar interbody expanding cage. A preliminary study on an animal model.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Careddu, G M; Masala, G; Columbano, N; Doria, C; Crissantu, L; Sanna Passino, E

    2008-01-01

    Interbody fusion devices are used in human medicine for treating degenerative diseases of the spine. Currently, there is not a universally accepted assessment tool for determining fusion, and the definitive criteria for diagnosing a successful interbody fusion remain controversial. The aim of this study was to describe microscopic and helical computed tomography (CT) imaging in the assessment of lumbar interbody fusion using cylindrical threaded titanium expanding cage in sheep. One cylindrical threaded expanding titanium cage (Proconcept--SA, Orange, France) was inserted through a transperitoneal approach after radical discectomy and packed with cancellous bone autograft in five adult sheep. The subjects were euthanatized after three, six, 12, 18 and 24 months. CT images revealed lumbar fusion at 12 months post operation, whereas microscopic evaluations indicated the presence of lumbar fusion at 18 months. CT and histological grades were the same in 65% of the cases observed. There were not a significant difference between CT, histological and micro radiographic grades. Helical CT scanning can be considered to be a suitable method for the monitoring of lumbar fusion as it enables observation of the deposition of bony bridging within the cage. PMID:18704248

  6. A hundred years of lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Dugacki, V

    1992-01-01

    In the years 1991 and 1992 the 100th anniversary of the announcement of the lumbar puncture method (1891) and 150th anniversary of the birth of its inventor Heinrich Irenaeus Quincke (1842) are celebrated. In the article a short review is given of the development of this method. PMID:1463808

  7. Decision-making in burst fractures of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Heary, Robert F; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2007-01-01

    The most common site of injury to the spine is the thoracolumbar junction which is the mechanical transition junction between the rigid thoracic and the more flexible lumbar spine. The lumbar spine is another site which is more prone to injury. Absence of stabilizing articulations with the ribs, lordotic posture and more sagitally oriented facet joints are the most obvious explanations. Burst fractures of the spine account for 14% of all spinal injuries. Though common, thoracolumbar and lumbar burst fractures present a number of important treatment challenges. There has been substantial controversy related to the indications for nonoperative or operative management of these fractures. Disagreement also exists regarding the choice of the surgical approach. A large number of thoracolumbar and lumbar fractures can be treated conservatively while some fractures require surgery. Selecting an appropriate surgical option requires an in-depth understanding of the different methods of decompression, stabilization and/or fusion. Anterior surgery has the advantage of the greatest degree of canal decompression and offers the benefit of limiting the number of motion segments fused. These advantages come at the added cost of increased time for the surgery and the related morbidity of the surgical approach. Posterior surgery enjoys the advantage of being more familiar to the operating surgeons and can be an effective approach. However, the limitations of this approach include inadequate decompression, recurrence of the deformity and implant failure. Though many of the principles are the same, the treatment of low lumbar burst fractures requires some additional consideration due to the difficulty of approaching this region anteriorly. Avoiding complications of these surgeries are another important aspect and can be achieved by following an algorithmic approach to patient assessment, proper radiological examination and precision in decision-making regarding management. A detailed

  8. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  9. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID

  10. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 7: lumbar fusion for intractable low-back pain without stenosis or spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Eck, Jason C; Sharan, Alok; Ghogawala, Zoher; Resnick, Daniel K; Watters, William C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Groff, Michael W; Wang, Jeffrey C; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Establishing an appropriate treatment strategy for patients presenting with low-back pain, in the absence of stenosis or spondylolisthesis, remains a controversial subject. Inherent to this situation is often an inability to adequately identify the source of low-back pain to justify various treatment recommendations, such as lumbar fusion. The current evidence does not identify a single best treatment alternative for these patients. Based on a number of prospective, randomized trials, comparable outcomes, for patients presenting with 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease, have been demonstrated following either lumbar fusion or a comprehensive rehabilitation program with a cognitive element. Limited access to such comprehensive rehabilitative programs may prove problematic when pursuing this alternative. For patients whose pain is refractory to conservative care, lumbar fusion is recommended. Limitations of these studies preclude the ability to present the most robust recommendation in support of lumbar fusion. A number of lesser-quality studies, primarily case series, also support the use of lumbar fusion in this patient population. PMID:24980584

  11. The Effect of Kinesio Taping in Forward Bending of the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping® technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping® influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility. PMID:25276018

  12. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension–flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation. PMID:27390450

  13. The effect of kinesio taping in forward bending of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Albino, Anna Carolina Gonçalves; Matheus, Joao Paulo C; Barbosa, Aurélio de Melo

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a lumbar fascia Kinesio Taping(®) technique forward bending range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] This was a longitudinal study with a randomized clinical trial composed of 39 subjects divided into three groups (control, Kinesio Without Tension-KWT, and Kinesio Fascia Correction-KFC). The subjects were assessed by Schober and fingertip-to-floor tests and left the tape in place for 48 hours before being reassessed 24 hours, 48 hours and 30 days after its removal. [Results] In all three experimental groups no significant differences were observed with the Schober test, but it was possible to observe an increase in lumbar flexion after 30 days. With the fingertip-to-floor distance assessment, the KFC and KWT groups showed significantly improved flexibility 24 hours and 48 hours after tape removal. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping(®) influenced fascia mobility, allowing for slight improvement of lumbar flexibility. PMID:25276018

  14. Absolute and relative reliability of lumbar interspinous process ultrasound imaging measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tozawa, Ryosuke; Katoh, Munenori; Aramaki, Hidefumi; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Fujinawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of lumbar interspinous process distances measured by ultrasound imaging were examined. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 10 males who had no history of orthopedic diseases or dysfunctions. Ten lumbar interspinous images from 360 images captured from 10 subjects were selected. The 10 images were measured by nine examiners. The lumbar interspinous process distance measurements were performed five times by each examiner. In addition, four of the nine examiners measured the distances again after 4 days for test-retest analysis. In statistical analysis, the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to investigate relative reliability, and Bland-Altman analysis was used to investigate absolute reliability. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 1) for intra-examiner reliability ranged from 0.985 to 0.998. For inter-rater reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (2, 1) was 0.969. The intraclass correlation coefficients (1, 2) for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.991 to 0.999. The Bland-Altman analysis results indicated no systematic error. [Conclusion] The results indicate that ultrasound measurements of interspinous process distance are highly reliable even when measured only once by a single person.

  15. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension-flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation. PMID:27390450

  16. A quantitative assessment of the mechanical effects on the lumbar spine and the effects on straight leg raising and lumbar flexion of segmental sustained rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yoetsu; Kamijo, Masayoshi; Hanaoka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study were to examine the strength and relative direction of the applied force from lumbar segmental sustained rotation (LSSR) on the lumbar spinous process, and to clarify the effects of LSSR on straight leg raising (SLR) and lumbar flexion (LF). [Subjects] 18 pain-free healthy adults volunteered for this study. [Methods] Applied force and direction were measured between the L5–S1 segments using tri-axial pressure sensors. Subjects participated in 3 trials. Subjects underwent localized right rotation, held for 10 seconds, of the L5 in relation to the S1. Sham group subjects followed LSSR group protocols; however L5–S1 rotation was absent. Control subjects rested on a plinth. SLR and LF were measured pre and post-trial. [Results] Outcome data for LSSR forces were as follows; x (0.06N (±0.29)), y (‒5.26N (±0.01)), z (6.16N (±1.33)), and resultant vector magnitude (8.19N (±1.12)). LSSR relative direction results were as follows: x-axis angle, 89. 6 ° (±1.5); y-axis, 130.9 ° (±5.6); and z-axis, 41.6 ° (±4.7). The LSSR group’s LF and SLR were significantly increased compared with those of the sham and control groups. [Conclusion] The identified resultant vector magnitude was 8.19N, less than other techniques. LSSR effectively improves LF and bilateral SLR. PMID:27190475

  17. Two-level total lumbar disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Vommaro, Francesco; Parisini, Patrizio

    2009-01-01

    Total lumbar disc replacement (TDR) has been widely used as a treatment option for 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease. However, recent studies have presented conflicting results and some authors concluded that outcome deteriorated when disc replacement was performed bisegmentally, with an increase of complications for bisegmental replacements in comparison with monosegmental disc arthroplasty. The goal of the present retrospective study is to investigate results in a group of patients who have received bisegmental TDR with SB Charitè III artificial disc for degenerative disc disease with a minimum follow-up of 3 years, and to compare the results of 2-level disc replacement versus 1-level patients treated with the same prosthesis. A total of 32 patients had at least 3-years follow-up and were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 38.5 years. There were 11 males and 21 females. About 16 patients received 2-level TDR (SB Charitè III) and 16 received 1-level TDR (SB Charitè III). Both radiographic and functional outcome analysis, including patient’s satisfaction, was performed. There were no signs of degenerative changes of the adjacent segments in any case of the 2- or 1-level TDR. There was no statistically significant difference between 2- and 1-level TDR both at 12 months and at 3-years follow-up on functional outcome scores. There was a statistically insignificant difference concerning the patients satisfaction between 1- and 2-level surgeries at the last follow-up (P = 0.46). In the 2-level TDR patients, there were 5 minor complications (31.25%), whereas major complications occurred in 4 more patients (25%) and required a new surgery in 2 cases (12.5%). In the 1-level cases there were 2 minor complications (12.5%) and 2 major complications (12.5%) and a new revision surgery was required in 1 patient (6.25%). In conclusion, the use of 2-level disc replacement at last follow-up presented a higher incidence of complications than in cases

  18. Lumbar facet injection for the treatment of chronic piriformis myofascial pain syndrome: 52 case studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jen-Ting; Chen, Han-Yu; Hong, Chang-Zern; Lin, Ming-Ta; Chou, Li-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Tsai, Chien-Tsung; Chang, Wen-Dien

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of lumbar facet joint injection for piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Fifty-two patients with chronic myofascial pain in the piriformis muscle each received a lumbar facet injection into the ipsilateral L5–S1 facet joint region, using the multiple insertion technique. Subjective pain intensity, trunk extension range, and lumbar facet signs were measured before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after injection. Thirty-six patients received follow-up for 6 months. Results Immediately after the injection, 27 patients (51.9%) had complete pain subsidence, 19 patients (36.5%) had pain reduction to a tolerable level, and only 6 patients (11.5%) had no pain relief to a tolerable level. Mean pain intensity was reduced from 7.4±0.9 to 1.6±2.1 after injection (P<0.01). This effectiveness lasted for 2 weeks in 49 patients (94.2%), and lasted for approximately 6 months in 35 (97.2%) of 36 patients. The mean range of motion increased from 13.4±6.8 degrees to 22.1±6.0 degrees immediately after injection, and further increased 2 weeks and 6 months later. Immediately after injection, 45 patients (86.5%) had no facet sign. In addition, 90.4% and 94.4% of patients had no facet sign after 2 weeks and after 6 months, respectively. Conclusions It is important to identify the possible cause of piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. If this pain is related to lumbar facet lesions, lumbar facet joint injection can immediately suppress piriformis myofascial pain symptoms. This effectiveness may last for at least 6 months in most patients. This study further supports the importance of eliminating the underlying etiological lesion for complete and effective relief of myofascial pain syndrome. PMID:25170256

  19. Optical, Spectroscopic, and Doppler Evaluation of “Normal” and “Abnormal” Reflexology Areas in Lumbar Vertebral Pathology: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Krishna; Elanchezhiyan, D.; Maran, V. B.; Das, Raunak Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Singh, S. P.; Murali Krishna, C.; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2012-01-01

    Scientific validation of reflexology requires an in-depth and noninvasive evaluation of “reflexology/reflex areas” in health and disease. The present paper reports the differential properties of “normal” and “abnormal” reflexology areas related to the lumbar vertebrae in a subject suffering from low back pain. The pathology is supported by radiological evidence. The reflexology target regions were clinically assessed with respect to colour and tenderness in response to finger pressure. Grey scale luminosity and pain intensity, as assessed by visual analogue scale scores, differentiated “normal” from “abnormal” skin. Skin swept source-optical coherence tomography recorded their structural differences. Infrared thermography revealed temperature variations. A laser Doppler study using a combined microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen monitoring system indicated alterations in blood flow and oxygen perfusion. Raman spectroscopy showed differences in chemical signatures between these areas. The present findings may indicate a potential correlation between the reflexology areas and subsurface pathological changes, showing an association with the healthy or unhealthy status of the lumbar vertebrae. PMID:23365581

  20. Electromyographic and haemodynamic activities in lumbar muscles during bicycle ergometer exercise and walking.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Hirata, J; Ohtsuki, K; Watanabe, S

    2010-01-01

    Although bicycle ergometer exercise and walking are recommended as aerobic exercise for patients with lumbago, little research has been done to examine the muscular activities and circulatory dynamics during these exercises. In this study, we aimed at obtaining basic information on aerobic exercises effective for patients with lumbago by investigating the activities and circulatory dynamics of their lumbar muscles during bicycle ergometer exercise and walking. As subjects, we selected 10 healthy adults (23.7 +/- 3.4 years old) with no anamnestic history of lumbago. The measurement conditions were 4 types of exercise: walking (4.0 km/h); 25W, 50W and 75W bicycle ergometer exercises. The activities of the lumbar muscles during the exercises were measured by a surface electromyograph, and percent of MVC was calculated from the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). With regard to the circulatory dynamics of the lumbar muscles, we measured oxygenated hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) before and after the exercises with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The change rates during the exercises were calculated based on the values before the exercises. Paired t test was employed to analyse the comparison of the circulatory dynamics of the lumbar muscles between, before and during the exercises. With respect to the comparison of the change rates of the muscular activities and circulatory dynamics among each of the exercises, we employed the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p < .05). The lumbar muscular activities during the walking were significantly higher than those during the bicycle ergometer exercise were at each load level. The Oxy-Hb increased significantly during the 25W and 50W bicycle ergometer exercises, as opposed to before the exercises. It showed a tendency to decrease during the 75W bicycle ergometer exercise and walking, but not significant. The change rate of the Oxy-Hb during the 25W bicycle ergometer exercise indicated a higher

  1. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  2. Lumbar spinal epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary venous drainage after endoscopic lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Toshiharu; Wada, Takeshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with perimedullary venous drainage are rare. This report describes a case of lumbar epidural AVF in a patient with a history of endoscopic lumbar discectomy at the same level 8 years prior to presenting with progressive myelopathy secondary to retrograde venous reflux into the perimedullary vein. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory disturbance and loss of sphincter control 8 years after endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a disc herniation at L4–5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord edema and dilated intradural perimedullary vessels. Spinal angiography revealed an epidural AVF at the site of the previous endoscopic lumbar surgery with intradural perimedullary venous drainage. The fistula was successfully occluded via endovascular transarterial embolization, and the patient had stabilization of his neurological deficits. Lumbar spinal epidural AVFs, especially those associated with iatrogenic trauma, are rare. Endoscopic surgical procedure can occlude the epidural venous plexus and disturb venous drainage, thereby inducing local venous hypertension and leading to epidural AVF with perimedullary venous drainage. This type of pathology should be considered within the differential diagnosis of delayed neurological deterioration after spinal surgery. PMID:25948114

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio requirements for detection of multiple pulses subject to partially correlated fading with chi-squared statistics of various degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Albert H.; Eby, Edward S.

    1986-06-01

    The transmitted signal in a fading medium is composed of several pulses separated in time so as to achieve diversity and thereby combat deep fades and loss of signal. Receiver processing consists of matched filtering of each of the pulses, followed by summation of the squared envelopes of all the filter outputs. In addition to additive Gaussian background noise, the signal is subject to slow medium fading which has a chi-squared first-order distribution and which may be correlated from pulse to pulse to an arbitrary degree. The false alarm and detection probabilities of this system are derived in various series expansions which are amenable to efficient computer evaluation. Programs are presented and exercised for various combinations of signal-to-noise ratio, number of pulses, degree of correlated fading, and (noninteger) number of degrees of freedom of the chi-squared fading. Required input signal-to-noise ratios for several false alarm and detection probabilities are computed and plotted for cases of the fading normalized correlation coefficient ranging from 0 to 1; results for a nonfading medium are superposed for easy comparison. Special cases are dependent and independent Rayleigh amplitude fading.

  4. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  5. Symptomatic Pneumocephalus after Lumbar Disc Surgery: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Ismailoglu, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic pneumocephalus is frequently seen after traumatic fracture of the skull base bone. However, it has rarely been reported after spinal surgery and its mechanism has not been fully explained. In this paper, we present a 30 year old male patient who had lumbar discectomy due to a symptomatic midline lumbar disc herniation. He had developed symptomatic pneumocephalus after the lumbar disc surgery associated with application of a vacuum suction device. We present and discuss our patient in the light of the literatures.

  6. [Idiopathic Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Takuya; Inamoto, Teruo; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Minami, Koichiro; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman, complained of an indolent lump about 60 × 70 mm in size in the left lower back. We conducted a computed tomography scan, which exhibited a hernia of Gerota'sfascia-commonly called superior lumbar hernia. In the right lateral position, the hernia contents were observed to attenuate, hence only closure of the hernial orifice was conducted by using Kugel patch, without removal of the hernia sack. Six months after the surgery, she has had no relapse of the hernia. Superior lumbar hernia, which occurs in an anatomically brittle region in the lower back, is a rare and potentially serious disease. The urologic surgeon should bear in mind this rarely seen entity. PMID:26699890

  7. Primary lumbar extradural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paek, Matthew; Glass, Eric; Kent, Marc; Clifford, Craig A; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 9 yr old castrated male golden retriever weighing 36 kg was presented for evaluation of progressive left pelvic limb paresis and fecal and urinary incontinence. MRI demonstrated an extradural, ovoid mass compressing the lumbar spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Histologically, the mass was consistent with hemangiosarcoma with no involvement of the adjacent vertebrae. The dog underwent a doxorubicin-based chemotherapy protocol with the addition of oral cyclophosphamide. After completion of chemotherapy, the dog was evaluated q 4 mo for restaging. Clinicopathological evidence of primary tumor recurrence or metastatic disease was not detected for 15 mo after initial diagnosis and treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a primary extradural hemangiosarcoma in the lumbar vertebral column in a dog. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome are also discussed. PMID:25955146

  8. Intradural herniation of lumbar intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C J; Binet, E F; Kieffer, S A

    1978-12-01

    A case of intradural rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disc is reported, and the literature is reviewed. The majority of intradural disc herniations occur at the L4--5 level. These patients usually have neurologic deficits more severe than those found in the much more common extradural disc herniations. The myelographic picture varies from an irregularly marginated intradural lesion overlying the disc space to a complete block. The common factor allowing intradural disc herniation is probably dense adhesions between the dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament, preventing the more common lateral extradural disc herniation. Intradural disc herniation should be included in the differential diagnosis of lumbar intradural lesions causing nerve root or cauda equina compression. PMID:741242

  9. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-11-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  10. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  11. Surgical vs Nonoperative Treatment for Lumbar Disk Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, James N.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Hanscom, Brett; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Herkowitz, Harry; Fischgrund, Jeffrey; Cammisa, Frank P.; Albert, Todd; Deyo, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    effect, 12.0; 95% CI; 7.9-16.1), and Oswestry Disability Index (mean change: surgery −37.6 vs nonoperative care −24.2; treatment effect, −13.4; 95% CI, −17.0 to −9.7). Conclusions Patients with persistent sciatica from lumbar disk herniation improved in both operated and usual care groups. Those who chose operative intervention reported greater improvements than patients who elected nonoperative care. However, nonrandomized comparisons of self-reported outcomes are subject to potential confounding and must be interpreted cautiously. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000410 PMID:17119141

  12. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy. PMID:6372123

  13. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  14. Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

  15. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae.

    PubMed

    Park, San-Seong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population. PMID:27390399

  16. Analysis of electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae caused by inversion traction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung Yoo; Kang, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in the electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae caused by inversion traction in order to verify the relaxation effect. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 60 healthy male adults who were equally and randomly assigned to a 30–30° group, a 30–60° group, and a 60–60° group. Inversion traction was performed for six minutes, and the electromyographic activities of the lumbar erector spinae (L2, L4) were measured before and after inversion traction. [Results] The root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides were statistically significantly higher after inversion traction compared with before inversion traction. Before inversion traction, the root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides in the 30–60° group and 60–60° group were significantly higher than those in the 30–30° group, while the root mean square values at the L2 and L4 levels on both sides showed no significant differences between the groups before inversion traction. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicated that IT is more likely to elicits an increase in muscle tension and prevent relaxation of the lumbar erector spinae. PMID:27190459

  17. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae

    PubMed Central

    Park, San-seong; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population. PMID:27390399

  18. Optimal duration of conservative management prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alentado, Vincent J; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Since the 1970s, spine surgeons have commonly required 6 weeks of failed conservative treatment prior to considering surgical intervention for various spinal pathologies. It is unclear, however, if this standard has been validated in the literature. The authors review the natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the current standard of 6 weeks of nonoperative care prior to surgery for patients with spinal pathologies. Methods A systematic Medline search from 1953 to 2013 was performed to identify natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the optimal period of conservative management prior to surgical intervention for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Demographic information, operative indications, and clinical outcomes are reviewed for each study. Results A total of 5,719 studies were identified; of these, 13 studies were selected for inclusion. Natural history studies demonstrated that 88% of patients with cervical radiculopathy and 70% of patients with lumbar radiculopathy showed improvement within 4 weeks following onset of symptoms. Outcomes and cost-effectiveness studies supported surgical intervention within 8 weeks of symptom onset for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Conclusions There are limited studies supporting any optimal duration of conservative treatment prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Therefore, evidence-based conclusions cannot be made. Based on the available literature, we suggest that an optimal timing for surgery following cervical radiculopathy is within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. A shorter period of 4 weeks may be appropriate based on natural history studies. Additionally, we found that optimal timing for surgery following lumbar radiculopathy is between 4 and 8 weeks. A prospective study is needed to explicitly identify the optimal duration of conservative therapy prior to surgery so that costs

  19. Lumbar spine endplate fractures: Biomechanical evaluation and clinical considerations through experimental induction of injury.

    PubMed

    Curry, William H; Pintar, Frank A; Doan, Ninh B; Nguyen, Ha Son; Eckardt, Gerald; Baisden, Jamie L; Maiman, Dennis J; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Stemper, Brian D

    2016-06-01

    Lumbar endplate fractures were investigated in different experimental scenarios, however the biomechanical effect of segmental alignment was not outlined. The objectives of this study were to quantify effects of spinal orientation on lumbar spine injuries during single-cycle compressive loads and understand lumbar spine endplate injury tolerance. Twenty lumbar motion segments were compressed to failure. Two methods were used in the preparation of the lumbar motion segments. Group 1 (n = 7) preparation maintained pre-test sagittal lordosis, whereas Group 2 (n = 13) specimens had a free-rotational end condition for the cranial vertebra, allowing sagittal rotation of the cranial vertebra to create parallel endplates. Five Group 1 specimens experienced posterior vertebral body fracture prior to endplate fracture, whereas two sustained endplate fracture only. Group 2 specimens sustained isolated endplate fractures. Group 2 fractures occurred at approximately 41% of the axial force required for Group 1 fracture (p < 0.05). Imaging and specimen dissection indicate endplate injury consistently took place within the confines of the endplate boundaries, away from the vertebral periphery. These findings indicate that spinal alignment during compressive loading influences the resulting injury pattern. This investigation identified the specific mechanical conditions under which an endplate breach will take place. Development of endplate injuries has significant clinical implication as previous research identified internal disc disruption (IDD) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) as long-term consequences of the axial load-shift that occurs following a breach of the endplate. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1084-1091, 2016. PMID:26610067

  20. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  1. Linear Lumbar Localized Lysis of Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tschen, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The absence or loss of elastic fibers in the skin is referred to as dermal elastolysis. Purpose: This paper describes a woman with a distinctive clinical presentation of mid-dermal elastolysis characterized morphologically by multiple horizontal raised bands on the lower back. Methods: A 20-year-old Filipino woman presented with multiple asymptomatic, flesh-colored, raised, firm, linear, cord-like bands on the lumbar area of her back. There were neither similar lesions elsewhere nor a family member with this condition. Results: Microscopic examination of the raised band showed nearly complete absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. In contrast, a biopsy of symmetrically located normal-appearing skin showed a uniform distribution of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. Linear lumbar localized elastolysis is a descriptive designation that accurately reflects a correlation of the clinical and pathological changes of this condition. Conclusion: The clinical differential of raised horizontal cord-like bands on the lower back (without a family history of an inherited elastic fiber disorder, a prior history of trauma, or a significant change in weight or exercise habit) includes linear focal elastosis and linear lumbar localized elastolysis. Microscopic evaluation of a Verhoeff-van Gieson stained lesion specimen (which may be accompanied by a biopsy of normal-appearing skin for comparison) will readily differentiate these conditions. The former is usually characterized by increased elastic fibers, whereas the latter, as in this patient, shows a paucity or absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. PMID:23882313

  2. Quantifying the centre of rotation pattern in a multi-body model of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Abouhossein, Alireza; Weisse, Bernhard; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the kinematics of the spine provides paramount knowledge for many aspects of the clinical analysis of back pain. More specifically, visualisation of the instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR) enables clinicians to quantify joint laxity in the segments, avoiding a dependence on more inconclusive measurements based on the range of motion and excessive translations, which vary in every individual. Alternatively, it provides motion preserving designers with an insight into where a physiological ICR of a motion preserving prosthesis can be situated in order to restore proper load distribution across the passive and active elements of the lumbar region. Prior to the use of an unconstrained dynamic musculoskeletal model system, based on multi-body models capable of transient analysis, to estimate segmental loads, the model must be kinematically evaluated for all possible sensitivity due to ligament properties and the initial locus of intervertebral disc (IVD). A previously calibrated osseoligamentous model of lumbar spine was used to evaluate the changes in ICR under variation of the ligament stiffness and initial locus of IVD, when subjected to pure moments from 0 to 15 Nm. The ICR was quantified based on the closed solution of unit quaternion that improves accuracy and prevents coordinate singularities, which is often observed in Euler-based methods and least squares principles. The calculation of the ICR during flexion/extension revealed complexity and intrinsic nonlinearity between flexion and extension. This study revealed that, to accommodate a good agreement between in vitro data and the multi-body model predictions, in flexion more laxity is required than in extension. The results showed that the ICR location is concentrated in the posterior region of the disc, in agreement with previous experimental studies. However, the current multi-body model demonstrates a sensitivity to the initial definition of the ICR, which should be recognised as a

  3. Emerging Techniques for Posterior Fixation of the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kushagra; Boniello, Anthony; Rihn, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Pedicle screw fixation is the preferred method of posterior fusion in lumbar spinal surgery. The technique provides three-column support of the vertebrae, contributing to the biomechanical strength of the construct. However, open pedicle screw fixation often necessitates wide posterior exposure and dissection with soft-tissue disruption of the facet joint. Alternative posterior fixation techniques have been developed to reduce surgical time, soft-tissue dissection, disruption of the adjacent facet joint capsule, neurologic risk, and implant cost. Results of these techniques are comparable to those of standard pedicle screw fixation systems. Certain patients, especially those at a lower risk of nonunion or those who require posterior fixation only as an adjunct to anterior column support, may benefit from the shorter surgical time and limited posterior exposure of the alternative techniques. However, the decreased rigidity of these alternative constructs can result in excessive motion, which can lead to nonunion and early hardware failure. PMID:27077477

  4. A stress fracture of the lumbar spine in a professional rugby player.

    PubMed

    Castinel, Bernard H; Adam, Philippe; Prat, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    In modern rugby, the spine is subjected to great physical pressure, with an increased number of impacts, on both the cervical and the lumbar spine. This case report illustrates overuse injuries of the lumbar spine in international professional rugby players. A 32-year-old sportsman had been practising rugby for 24 years and was playing for a championship level French team when he started suffering from a right lateral pain in the lumbosacral spine. A CT scan showed a unilateral isthmolysis and a coronal irregular fracture of the right pars interarticularis of L5. This led to discussion of (1) the importance of the decision on the date of return to playing rugby and (2) the future of professional rugby players with chronic spinal injuries. PMID:17138643

  5. Dexamethasone in the management of symptoms due to herniated lumbar disc.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L N

    1975-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with radicular pain due to myelographically proven herniated lumbar intervertebral discs were treated with initially high but tapering doses of intramuscular dexamethasone for seven days. All patients had reflief of pain within 24-48 hours. Bed rest was eliminated as a significant factor in the improvement. Nine patients required surgery at the end of the hospital treatment period. Another 11 required surgery during the follow-up of 15 months. Review of work status and recurrent pain during the follow-up indicates that the non-surgically treated patients in this series fared better. It is concluded that nerve root inflammation is the immediate cause of radicular symptoms in case of ruptured lumbar disc and that treatment with dexamethasone gives prompt relief of pain and may avoid the need for surgery in most cases. Images PMID:1219086

  6. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy. PMID:22123489

  7. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on lumbosacral alignment and the low back pain disability index in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (group A) and a lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise group (group B). Group B did 15 min of lumbar stabilization exercises and 15 min of thoracic extension exercises, while group A did 30 min of lumbar stabilization exercises five times a week for 4 weeks. For assessing lumbosacral alignment, the lordotic angle, lumbosacral angle, and sacral angle were evaluated. The Oswestry disability index was used for assessment of disability due to low back pain. [Results] Both groups showed improvement in lumbosacral alignment and in the disability index. Group B showed greater changes in the lordotic angle and in the Oswestry disability index than group A, although the differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise can be recommended for improvement of chronic low back pain, although the improvements seen in lumbosacral alignment and low back pain disability index in this study did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:27065563

  8. The effects of infrared laser therapy and weightbath traction hydrotherapy as components of complex physical treatment in disorders of the lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, Csaba; Oláh, Mihály; Demeter, Béla; Jancsó, Zoltán; Páll, Valéria; Bender, Tamás

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: The therapeutic modalities available for the conservative management of chronic lumbar pain included infrared laser therapy and underwater traction, which usefulness is not universally acknowledged. This study was intended to ascertain any beneficial impact of infrared laser therapy and weightbath treatment on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy. Material and methods: The study population comprised 54 randomised subjects. I. group of 18 patents received only infrared laser therapy to lumbar region and painful Valley points. II. group of 18 subjects each received underwater traction therapy of lumbar spine with add-on McKenzie exercise and iontophoresis. The remaining III. group treated with exercise and iontophoresis, served as control. VAS, Oswestry index, SF36 scores, range of motion, neurological findings and thermography were monitored to appraise therapeutic afficacy in lumbar discopathy. A CT or MRI scan was done at baseline and after 3 months follow-up. Result:Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction for discopathy achieved significant improvement of all study parameters, which was evident 3 months later. Among the controls, significant improvement of only a single parameter was seen in patients with lumbar discopathy. Conclusions: Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction treatment effectively mitigate pain, muscle spasms, enhance joint flexibility, and improve the quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy.

  9. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  10. The Effects of Bridge Exercise on an Unstable Base of Support on Lumbar Stability and the Thickness of the Transversus Abdominis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Misuk; Jeon, Hyewon

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effects of an abdominal drawing-in bridge exercise using a pressure biofeedback unit on different bases on the thickness of trunk and abdominal muscles, and lumbar stability. [Subjects] Thirty healthy young adults (2 males, 28 females) took part in this study. The subjects were randomly and equally assigned to a stable bridge exercise group and an unstable bridge exercise group. [Methods] The subjects performed bridge exercises using an abdominal drawing-in method on a stable base and on an unstable base, and changes in their abdominal muscle thickness and on the stable and on unstable bases lumbar stability were evaluated. [Results] After the intervention, the stable bridge exercise group showed a statistically significantly increased muscle thickness in the transversus abdominis, and the unstable bridge exercise group showed significantly increased muscle thicknesses of the transversus abdominis and internal obliques in static and dynamic lumbar stability. The unstable bridge exercise group showed significant increase after performing the exercise. [Conclusion] Lumbar stability exercise, with the compensation of the lumbar spine minimized, using an abdominal drawing-in method on an unstable support of base is effective and efforts to prevent the compensation may induce a greater exercise effect. PMID:24259841

  11. Lumbar spine side bending is reduced in end range extension compared to neutral and end range flexion postures.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ryan; Campbell, Amity; Kemp-Smith, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Lumbar side bending movements coupled with extension or flexion is a known low back pain (LBP) risk factor in certain groups, for example, athletes participating in sports such as hockey, tennis, gymnastics, rowing and cricket. Previous research has shown that sagittal spinal postures influence the degree of spinal rotation, with less rotation demonstrated at end of range extension and flexion. To date it is unknown whether sagittal spinal postures influence side bending. The aim of this study was to determine whether side bend range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar spine is decreased in end-range flexion and extension postures compared to a neutral spine. Twenty subjects between 18 and 55 years of age [mean age = 22.8 yrs (6.8)] with no history of LBP were recruited for this study. Upper (L1-L3) and lower (L3-L5) lumbar side bend, were measured utilising a 14 camera system (Vicon, Oxford metrics, inc.) in end-range flexion, extension and neutral postures, in both sitting and standing positions. The results revealed no statistically significant difference in upper and lower lumbar side bend ROM in an end-range flexion posture compared to a neutral spinal posture. A reduction was found in the range of upper and lower lumbar side bend ROM in an end-range extended posture (p < 0.05), compared to neutral and end range flexion postures. This ROM reduction was found in sitting and standing. These findings allow clinicians to better interpret combined movements involving side bending of the lumbar spine in clinical and real life settings. PMID:24315299

  12. Work intensity in sacroiliac joint fusion and lumbar microdiscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Clay; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Meyer, S Craig; Dix, Gary; Lorio, Morgan; Kovalsky, Don; Cher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence base supporting minimally invasive sacroiliac (SI) joint fusion (SIJF) surgery is increasing. The work relative value units (RVUs) associated with minimally invasive SIJF are seemingly low. To date, only one published study describes the relative work intensity associated with minimally invasive SIJF. No study has compared work intensity vs other commonly performed spine surgery procedures. Methods Charts of 192 patients at five sites who underwent either minimally invasive SIJF (American Medical Association [AMA] CPT® code 27279) or lumbar microdiscectomy (AMA CPT® code 63030) were reviewed. Abstracted were preoperative times associated with diagnosis and patient care, intraoperative parameters including operating room (OR) in/out times and procedure start/stop times, and postoperative care requirements. Additionally, using a visual analog scale, surgeons estimated the intensity of intraoperative care, including mental, temporal, and physical demands and effort and frustration. Work was defined as operative time multiplied by task intensity. Results Patients who underwent minimally invasive SIJF were more likely female. Mean procedure times were lower in SIJF by about 27.8 minutes (P<0.0001) and mean total OR times were lower by 27.9 minutes (P<0.0001), but there was substantial overlap across procedures. Mean preservice and post-service total labor times were longer in minimally invasive SIJF (preservice times longer by 63.5 minutes [P<0.0001] and post-service labor times longer by 20.2 minutes [P<0.0001]). The number of postoperative visits was higher in minimally invasive SIJF. Mean total service time (preoperative + OR time + postoperative) was higher in the minimally invasive SIJF group (261.5 vs 211.9 minutes, P<0.0001). Intraoperative intensity levels were higher for mental, physical, effort, and frustration domains (P<0.0001 each). After taking into account intensity, intraoperative workloads showed substantial overlap. Conclusion

  13. Lumbar Facet Joint Motion in Patients with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qi; Wang, Shaobai; Shin, Jae-Hyuk; Li, Guoan; Wood, Kirkham B.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Objective To investigate the in vivo biomechanical effect of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) on the motion of the facet joint during various functional weight-bearing activities. Summary of Background Data Although the morphological changes of the facet joints in patients with DLS have been reported in a few studies, no data has been reported on the kinematics of these facet joints. Methods Ten patients with DLS at L4–L5 were studied. Each patient underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to obtain three-dimensional (3D) models of the lumbar vertebrae from L2–L5 as well as a dual fluoroscopic imaging scan in different postures: flexion-extension, left-right bending and left-right torsion. The positions of the vertebrae were reproduced by matching the MRI-based vertebral models to the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the facet joint and the ranges of motion (ROMs) were compared with those of healthy subjects and those of patients with degenerative disc diseases (DDD) previously published. Results In DLS patients, the range of rotation of the facet joints was significantly less at the DLS level (L4–L5) than that at the adjacent levels (L2–L3 and L3–L4), while the range of translation was similar at all levels. The range of rotation at the facet joints of the DLS level decreased compared to those of both the DDD patients and healthy subjects at the corresponding vertebral level (L4–L5), while no significant difference was found in the range of translation. The ROM of facet joints in DLS and in DDD patients was similar at the adjacent levels (L2–L3 and L3–L4). Conclusion The range of rotation decreased at the facet joints at the DLS level (L4–L5) in patients compared to those in healthy subjects and DDD patients. This decrease in range of rotation implies that the DLS disease may cause restabilization of the joint. The data may help the selection of conservative treatment or different

  14. [Dorso-lumbar pain caused by a schmorl hernia].

    PubMed

    Esteban Navarro, Pedro Luis; García Casas, Oscar; Girvent Montllor, Francesc

    2008-09-01

    Thoracic and lumbar spine conditions cause primarily mechanical back pain, although the clinician has to ensure that the symptoms are not from another etiology. We present the case of a patient with thoracic and lumbar non mechanical pain, resistant to treatment, diagnosed with a herniation of the intervertebral disc through the vertebral end-plate. We also performed a literature review. PMID:21794532

  15. The Robotic Lumbar Spine: Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    PubMed Central

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  16. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen...

  17. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen...

  18. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Port System for the Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Rhonda Pung; Lester McCully, Cynthia M; Bacher, John; Thomas Iii, Marvin L; Cruz, Rafael; Wangari, Solomon; Warren, Katherine E

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical translational research frequently incorporates collection of CSF from NHP, because CSF drug levels are used as a surrogate for CNS tissue penetration in pharmacokinetic and dynamic studies. Surgical placement of a CNS ventricular catheter reservoir for CSF collection is an intensive model to create and maintain and thus may not be feasible or practical for short-term studies. Furthermore, previous NHP lumbar port models require laminectomy for catheter placement. The new model uses a minimally invasive technique for percutaneous placement of a lumbar catheter to create a closed, subcutaneous system for effective, repeated CSF sample collection. None of the rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 10) implanted with our minimally invasive lumbar port (MILP) system experienced neurologic deficits, postoperative infection of the surgical site, or skin erosion around the port throughout the 21.7-mo study. Functional MILP systems were maintained in 70% of the macaques, with multiple, high-quality, 0.5- to 1.0-mL samples of CSF collected for an average of 3 mo by using aspiration or gravitational flow. Among these macaques, 57% had continuous functionality for a mean of 19.2 mo; 50% of the cohort required surgical repair for port repositioning and replacement during the study. The MILP was unsuccessful in 2 macaques, at an average of 9.5 d after surgery. Nonpatency in these animals was attributed to the position of the lumbar catheter. The MILP system is an appropriate replacement for temporary catheterization and previous models requiring laminectomy and is a short-term alternative for ventricular CSF collection systems in NHP. PMID:27538866

  19. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Demir, Caner F.; Varol, Sefer; Arslan, Demet; Yıldız, Mustafa; Akil, Eşref

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP). Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1%) of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3%) of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%). Forty-seven (41.5%) patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH) and 13 (11.5%) patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH). No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05). Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH. PMID:25883480

  20. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Management of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with trans-pedicular screws fixation for management of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Overview of Literature Recurrent lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of surgical failure, occurring in 5%–11% of cases. The optimal technique for treatment is controversial. Some authors believe that repeated simple discectomy is the treatment of choice, but approach-related complications can be considerable. Other surgeons prefer more removal of posterior elements (as lamina and facet joints) with posterior fusion. Methods The study included 15 patients who presented with symptomatic recurrent lumbar disc herniation who underwent reoperation through posterior trans-pedicular screws and TLIF in our department from April 2008 to May 2010, with a 24-month follow-up. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale (JOA) was used for low back pain. The results of surgery were also evaluated with the MacNab classification. Results The mean JOA score showed significant improvement, increasing from 9.5 before surgery to 24.0 at the end of follow-up (p<0.001). Clinical outcome was excellent in 7 patients (46% of cases), good in 6 patients (40%) and fair in only 2 patients (14%). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between patients presenting with recurrent disc at the ipsilateral side and those at the contralateral side. Conclusions In spite of the small number of patients and the short follow-up period, the good clinical and radiological outcome achieved in this study encourage the belief that TLIF is an effective option for the treatment of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26949458

  1. Provocation Lumbar Diskography at Previously Fused Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dulai, H.S.; Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.S.; Gerszten, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recurrent or persistent low back pain (LBP) after lumbar fusion can be related to many factors. We reviewed the provocation lumbar diskogram (PLD) features and redo-fusion outcome in our patients evaluated for recurrent/persistent LBP after technically successful fusion. LD was performed in 27 patients with recurrent/persistent LBP after prior successful lumbar surgical fusion (31 fused levels: single-level fusion-23; two-level fusion-4). PLD response and imaging characteristics at fused and non-fused levels were assessed including: intra-diskal lidocaine response, diskogram-image/post-diskogram CT appearance, presence/absence of diskographic contrast leakage, and evidence of fusion integrity or hardware failure. Outcomes in patients having redo-fusion were assessed. Concordant pain was encountered at 15 out of 23 (65%) single-level fusions, non-concordant pain in one fusion with non-painful response in seven. Adjacent-level concordant pain was identified in seven out of 23 (30%) patients (three of 15 with painful fused levels; four of seven with non-painful fusions). In two-level fusions, concordant pain was encountered at one fused level in each patient. In painful fused levels, leaking and contained disks were encountered with partial or complete pain elimination after intra-diskal lidocaine injection. In anterior fusions, space or contrast surrounding the cage was noted at five of 11 levels. Pseudoarthrosis was noted only with trans-sacral screw fusions. Redo-fusion in 13 patients resulted in significant improvement in nine and moderate improvement in one. Patients with recurrent/persistent LBP after technically successful fusion may have a diskogenic pain source at the surgically fused or adjacent level confirmed by lidocaine-assisted PLD. PMID:20977869

  2. Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by a Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Myun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Woo, Sungmin; Son, Kyu Ri; Cho, Seong Whi; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the radiologic findings and imaging response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the lumbar artery.MethodsBetween April 2004 and December 2012, we encountered HCC supplied by a lumbar artery in 21 patients. Two investigators retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiological findings of HCC supplied by the lumbar artery using computed tomography (CT) scans and digital subtraction angiograms.ResultsPatients had received 1–27 sessions of previous chemoembolization procedures (mean 7.7 sessions, median 4 sessions). Mean tumor size was 5.3 cm. The locations of HCC supplied by lumbar artery were the bare area (n = 14, 67 %) and segment VI (n = 7, 33 %). Tumor-feeding arteries arose from the main lumbar artery (n = 7), proximal anterior division (n = 4), and distal anterior division (n = 14). In 20 patients, selective chemoembolization through the tumor-feeding arteries of the lumbar artery was achieved. In 1 patient, nonselective embolization at the main lumbar artery was performed. There was no complication such as skin necrosis or paralysis. On the first follow-up enhanced CT scan, target tumors fed by the lumbar artery showed complete response (n = 6), partial response (n = 4), stable disease (n = 3), and progressive disease (n = 8), but overall tumor response was partial response (n = 1) and progressive disease (n = 20).ConclusionWhen HCC is located in the inferior tip or bare area of the liver, a lumbar artery may supply the tumor. Although selective chemoembolization via the tumor-feeding vessel of the lumbar artery can be achieved in most cases, overall tumor response is commonly unfavorable.

  3. A Biomechanical Comparison of Shape Design and Positioning of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cages

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Garet C.; Behn, Anthony; Ravi, Shashank; Cheng, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Cadaveric biomechanical analysis. Objective  The aim of this study was to compare three interbody cage shapes and their position within the interbody space with regards to construct stability for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Methods  Twenty L2–L3 and L4–L5 lumbar motion segments from fresh cadavers were potted in polymethyl methacrylate and subjected to testing with a materials testing machine before and after unilateral facetectomy, diskectomy, and interbody cage insertion. The three cage types were kidney-shaped, articulated, and straight bullet-shaped. Each cage type was placed in a common anatomic area within the interbody space before testing: kidney, center; kidney, anterior; articulated, center; articulated, anterior; bullet, center; bullet, lateral. Load-deformation curves were generated for axial compression, flexion, extension, right bending, left bending, right torsion, and left torsion. Finally, load to failure was tested. Results  For all applied loads, there was a statistically significant decrease in the slope of the load-displacement curves for instrumented specimens compared with the intact state (p < 0.05) with the exception of right axial torsion (p = 0.062). Among all instrumented groups, there was no statistically significant difference in stiffness for any of the loading conditions or load to failure. Conclusions  Our results failed to show a clearly superior cage shape design or location within the interbody space for use in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:27433426

  4. Prospective medium-term results of multimodal pain management in patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, A.; Madl, M.; Loher, M.; Grifka, J.; Boluki, D.; Linhardt, O.

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is one of the most common diseases of modern civilisation. Multimodal pain management (MPM) represents a central approach to avoiding surgery. Only few medium-term results have been published in the literature so far. This study compared subjective and objective as well as anamnestic and clinical parameters of 60 patients who had undergone inpatient MPM because of lumbar radiculopathy before and 1 year ±2 weeks after treatment. The majority of patients were very satisfied (35%) or satisfied (52%) with the treatment outcome. Merely 8 patients commented neutrally and none negatively. The finger-floor distance had decreased significantly (p < 0.01), and 30 patients (50%) had shown improved mobility of the spine after therapy. The need for painkillers had also been significantly reduced after 1 year. The arithmetical average of pain on a visual analogue scale was 7.21 before treatment, which had significantly decreased to 3.58 at follow-up (p < 0.01). MPM is an effective approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy by mechanical nerve root irritation. Therefore, in the absence of an absolute indication for surgery or an absolute contradiction for MPM, patients should first be treated with this minimally invasive therapy. PMID:27305956

  5. Lumbar Morel-Lavallée lesion: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zairi, F; Wang, Z; Shedid, D; Boubez, G; Sunna, T

    2016-06-01

    The Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) is a rarely reported closed degloving injury, in which shearing forces have lead to break off subcutaneous tissues from the underlying fascia. Lumbar MLL have been rarely reported to date, explaining that patients are frequently misdiagnosed. While patients could be treated conservatively or with non-invasive procedures, delayed diagnosis may require open surgery for its cure. Indeed, untreated lesions can cause pain, infection or growing subcutaneous mass that can be confused with a soft tissue tumor. We report the clinical and radiological features of a 45-year old man with voluminous lumbar MLL initially misdiagnosed. We also reviewed the relevant English literature to summarize the diagnostic tools and the main therapeutic options. PMID:26965645

  6. Management of Deep Infection after Instrumentation on Lumbar Spinal Surgery in a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Tung; Liao, Wen-Jui; Chang, Cheng-Siu; Chen, Yung-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common complications after spinal surgery. SSIs often require extended hospitalisation and may worsen overall clinical outcomes. A retrospective database review of consecutive patients with traditional open lumbar spinal surgery was performed. SSIs patients were identified and reviewed for clinically relevant details, and postoperative SSIs' incidence was calculated for the entire cohort as well as for subgroups with or without spinal implants. In 15 years, 1,176 patients underwent open lumbar spinal surgery with spinal implants and 699 without. Thirty-eight developed postoperative SSIs. Total SSI rate for the entire group was 2.03%. The incidence of postoperative SSIs in the nonimplant group was relatively low. Patients received antibiotics, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and wet dressing. We provided the precise rates of postoperative SSIs in traditional open spinal surgery obtained from a single-centre data. Patients with spinal implants had higher SSIs' incidence than those without. PMID:26273650

  7. Moving beyond the neutral spine: stabilizing the dancer with lumbar extension dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Dancers commonly suffer from low back pain. This is often associated with the extreme lumbar extension range of motion and prolonged lordotic postures required by some dance forms. There is ample literature documenting extension-related instabilities such as spondylolisthesis in dancers. The aim of this article is to review the changes in motor control that occur in patients with subtle clinical instability and recurrent low back pain. Recent studies have consistently demonstrated changes in neuromuscular function in patients with back pain, and spinal stability retraining has become a popular component of treatment. However, most research to date has focused on maintenance of neutral spinal postures during assessment and treatment, whereas dancers must be trained to move with control through full lumbar extension range of motion. PMID:19754983

  8. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  9. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is performed via tubular dilators thereby preserving the integrity of the paraspinal musculature. The decreased soft tissue disruption in the MIS technique has been associated with significantly decreased blood loss, shorter length of hospitalization, and an expedited return to work while maintaining comparable arthrodesis rates when compared with the open technique particularly in the setting of spondylolisthesis (isthmic and degenerative), recurrent symptomatic disk herniation, spinal stenosis, pseudoarthrosis, iatrogenic instability, and spinal trauma. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video wass to demonstrate the techniques for a primary, single-level MIS TLIF. PMID:26079840

  10. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  11. Lumbar spondylolysis: a life long dynamic condition? A cross sectional survey of 4.151 adults

    PubMed Central

    Sonne-Holm, Stig; Rovsing, H. C.; Monrad, Henrik; Gebuhr, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis (LS) has been the subject of several studies focusing on adolescent athletes. Few, if any, studies have examined LS in the general population. Lysis of the pars interarticularis of the vertebra may be associated with slipping (olisthesis), or it may be stable. In the present survey of lumbar radiographs and general epidemiological data recorded from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study cohort of 4.151 subjects (age range, 22–93 years), we identified the distribution and individual risk factors for LS-development. Men were significantly more at risk of L5 spondylolysis (P = 0.002). There were no sex-specific significant differences regarding LS-incidence at the L4 level. We found no significant differences of risk of LS between nulliparous or multiparous women (L4 P = 0.54/L5 P = 0.35). Furthermore, we found no significant relationship between age at menopause and LS-development. Increased lumbar lordosis was associated to L4/L5 spondylolysis in men (L4 P < 0.001/L5 P = 0.008). In women increased lumbar lordosis had a significant association with L5 spondylolysis (P < 0.001). Increased pelvic inclination was associated with L5 spondylolysis in both men and women (P < 0.001). There were no sex-specific differences regarding the occurrence of simultaneous slips/non-slips. In men, no individual risk factors for L4 slips with concomitant LS were found. In women slipped LS of L4 were significantly associated to aging (P < 0.001) and with decreased pelvic inclination (P = 0.001). In men slipped LS of L5 was significantly associated to increased BMI (P = 0.002), but not to aging (P = 0.10). In women, slips of L5 LS were significantly correlated to aging (P = 0.005), to BMI recorded at the time of radiographic examination (P = 0.006), and BMI measured 17 years before radiographic index examination (P = 0.004). The present study contrasts with commonly held views regarding lumbar spondylolysis. The prevalence of LS

  12. Body Mass Index May Positively Correlate with Bone Mineral Density of Lumbar Vertebra and Femoral Neck in Postmenopausal Females

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shi-Feng; Du, Xin-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in postmenopausal females. Material/Methods From September 2012 to September 2014, 236 healthy postmenopausal females who underwent physical examinations at the Women & Children’s Health Care Hospital of Linyi were enrolled into our study. These subjects were divided into 3 groups: underweight group, normal weight group, and overweight group. In addition, there were 2 age stratifications: <60 years old and ≥60 years old. DPX-L type dual-energy X-ray bone densitometry (American Lunar Company) was used to measure the BMD of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in the recruited subjects. Pearson test was used for correlation analysis. Results BMDs and T-scores of lumbar vertebra (L1–L4), femoral neck, proximal femur, and Ward’s triangle region among the groups were ranked as follows: underweight group < normal weight group < overweight group. There were significant differences in body weight and BMI among the underweight, normal weight, and overweight groups (P<0.05). The T-scores of all examined anatomic locations showed significant differences between the underweight group and normal weight group, as well as between the underweight group and overweight group (both P<0.05). Only the T-scores of lumbar vertebra L2–L4 had significant differences between the normal weight group and overweight group (P<0.05). The BMDs of all anatomic components under study showed statistical differences in both age stratifications between the overweight group and underweight group, as well as between the overweight group and normal weight group (both P<0.05). When stratified above 60 years old, the BMDs of lumbar vertebra (L1, L2 and L4) showed statistical differences between the normal weight group and underweight group (P<0.05). Various factors could be ranked according to the absolute values of correlation coefficients as below

  13. Combined Anterior and Posterior Lumbar Rhizotomy for Treatment of Mixed Dystonia and Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Mohamed; Mahran, Mahmoud A.; Aboud, Ahmed; Mahran, Moustafa G.; Nasef, Marwa A.A.; Gaber, Mohamed; Sabry, Tamer; Ibrahim, Mohamed H.; Taha, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) can present with severe secondary dystonia with or without associated spasticity of their extremities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcomes of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy for the treatment of mixed hypertonia in the lower extremities of children with CP. METHODS: Fifty children with CP were subjected to combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies in a prospective study. Clinical outcome measurements were recorded preoperatively and were evaluated at 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The operative techniques were performed by laminotomy from L1-S1, and intraoperative monitoring was used in all cases. All patients underwent intensive postoperative physiotherapy programs. RESULTS: Changes in muscle tone, joint range of motion, and dystonia were significant (P = .000) at postoperative assessment visits. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the potential of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies to improve activities of daily living in children with CP and with mixed spasticity and dystonia. ABBREVIATIONS: BAD, Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale CAPR, combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy CP, cerebral palsy ITB, intrathecal baclofen MAS, modified Ashworth Scale ROM, range of motion SDR, selective dorsal rhizotomy PMID:27244465

  14. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  15. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  16. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology

    PubMed Central

    K. L., Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  17. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, G; K L, Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-06-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  18. 48 CFR 252.204-7010 - Requirement for Contractor To Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... any of its activities in accordance with Department of Commerce regulations (15 CFR part 781 et seq.) or Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations (10 CFR part 75) in order to implement the declarations... To Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting Under the...

  19. 48 CFR 252.204-7010 - Requirement for Contractor To Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... any of its activities in accordance with Department of Commerce regulations (15 CFR part 781 et seq.) or Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations (10 CFR part 75) in order to implement the declarations... To Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting Under the...

  20. 48 CFR 252.204-7010 - Requirement for Contractor to Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... any of its activities in accordance with Department of Commerce regulations (15 CFR part 781 et seq.) or Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations (10 CFR part 75) in order to implement the declarations... to Notify DoD if the Contractor's Activities are Subject to Reporting Under the...

  1. 43 CFR 429.4 - What types of uses are not subject to the requirements and processes established under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-commercial use of Reclamation land, facilities, or waterbodies for occasional activities such as hiking... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What types of uses are not subject to the... LAND, FACILITIES, AND WATERBODIES Purpose, Definitions, and Applicability § 429.4 What types of...

  2. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (33–85 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexion–extension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexion–extension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 5–10 times, with marked relief (70–90%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent

  3. Instrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Hsiao; Wang, Chen-Ti

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether using artificial cages increases fusion rates compared with use of bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. We hypothesized artificial cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion would provide better clinical and radiographic outcomes than bone chips alone. We assumed solid fusion would provide good clinical outcomes. We clinically and radiographically followed 34 patients with spondylolisthesis having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with mixed autogenous and allogeneic bone chips alone and 42 patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of artificial cages packed with morselized bone graft. Patients with the artificial cage had better functional improvement in the Oswestry disability index than those with bone chips alone, whereas pain score, patient satisfaction, and fusion rate were similar in the two groups. Postoperative disc height ratio, slip ratio, and segmental lordosis all decreased at final followup in the patients with bone chips alone but remained unchanged in the artificial cage group. The functional outcome correlated with radiographic fusion status. We conclude artificial cages provide better functional outcomes and radiographic improvement than bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis, although both techniques achieved comparable fusion rates. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18846411

  4. Morphological structure and variations of lumbar plexus in human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Soner; Kaya, Serdar; Temiz, Cağlar; Tehli, Ozkan; Kural, Cahit; Izci, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to study the anatomy of lumbar plexus on human fetuses and to establish its morphometric characteristics and differences compared with adults. Twenty lumbar plexus of 10 human fetal cadavers in different gestational ages and genders were dissected. Lumbar spinal nerves, ganglions, and peripheral nerves were exposed. Normal anatomical structure and variations of lumbar plexus were investigated and morphometric analyses were performed. The diameters of lumbar spinal nerves increased from L1 to L4. The thickest nerve forming the plexus was femoral nerve, the thinnest was ilioinguinal nerve, the longest nerve through posterior abdominal wall was iliohypogastric nerve, and the shortest nerve was femoral nerve. Each plexus had a single furcal nerve and this arose from L4 nerve in all fetuses. No prefix or postfix plexus variation was observed. In two plexuses, L1 nerve was in the form of a single branch. Also, in two plexuses, genitofemoral nerve arose only from L2 nerve. Accessory obturator nerve was observed in four plexuses. According to these findings, the morphological pattern of the lumbar plexus in the fetus was found to be very similar to the lumbar plexus in adults. PMID:22696243

  5. Clinicoradiological Images of a Rare Type of Lumbar Hernia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Arjun; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Garg, Cheena

    2015-12-01

    A surgeon will rarely see a case of lumbar hernia in his lifetime. They are usually divided into superior and inferior types, but in cases of huge hernias where anatomical delineation is not possible, they are called as diffuse. Further classification into primary and secondary types (on the basis of etiology) and congenital and acquired types is done. Evisceration in a lumbar hernia can be present due to secondary causes but never spontaneously. This is therefore probably the first reported case of a primary eviscerated diffuse lumbar hernia. PMID:26884669

  6. The lumbar interspinous bursae and Baastrup's syndrome. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Bywaters, E G; Evans, S

    1982-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, distribution, pathology and pathogenesis of lumbar interspinous bursitis (described as a clinical syndrome by Baastrup in 1933). It is based on an anatomic study of 152 lumbar spines derived from routine and random postmortem material, together with selected specimens from autopsies on patients with various rheumatic diseases. From a statistical study of 50 randomly chosen spines, bursae are found when the interspinous distance is small compared with the total height of the lumbar spine ('bursal index'): nearly all bursal spaces show some sign of inflammation and a few show severe bony erosion. Crystal deposits therein are also described. PMID:7178764

  7. Influence Of Lumbar Spine Kinematics On Feet Pressure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Săftescu-Jescu, C.; Bereteu, L.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the center of pressure trajectories, as an indicator of postural stability or lumbar pathology, has been a challenging issue for researchers during the last decades. The paper advances an investigational method in order to determine a correlation between lumbar spine movements and feet center of pressure distribution. Five young healthy volunteers were simultaneously tested using an ultrasound based motion analyzing system and a force platform, while performing imposed tasks. Results showed specific patterns described by the center of pressure trajectories and a good coordination of angular amplitudes during lumbar spine movement.

  8. A global CT to US registration of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Simrin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Ungi, Tamas; Rasoulian, Abtin; Osborn, Jill; Lessoway, Victoria A.; Rohling, Robert N.; Borschneck, Daniel P.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2014-03-01

    During percutaneous lumbar spine needle interventions, alignment of the preoperative computed tomography (CT) with intraoperative ultrasound (US) can augment anatomical visualization for the clinician. We propose an approach to rigidly align CT and US data of the lumbar spine. The approach involves an intensity-based volume registration step, followed by a surface segmentation and a point-based registration of the entire lumbar spine volume. A clinical feasibility study resulted in mean registration error of approximately 3 mm between CT and US data.

  9. Two Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Dilokhuttakarn, Thitinut

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with percutaneous endoscopic decompression, focusing on the results of clinical evaluations. Overview of Literature There are no studies about two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods Medical and surgical complications were examined and clinical results were analyzed for 30 patients who consecutively underwent two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis were reviewed. The operations were performed by unilateral laminotomy for bilateral decompression. Results All patients displayed clinical improvement when were evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS) score of pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Macnab criteria. The improvement of VAS and ODI was 8.3±0.7 to 2.3±2.6 and 65.2±13.7 to 24.0±15.5, respectively (both p<0.05). Complications were the same as for open decompression. The most common complication was transient nerve root paresthesia. Conclusions Surgical decompression with two portal percutaneous endoscopic decompression has initial benefits, but long-term studies should pay more attention to the risks of postoperative instability and restenosis as well as the need for re-operation. Further investigations with long-term results are thus required. PMID:27114776

  10. Extramedullary Conus Ependymoma Involving a Lumbar Nerve Root with Filum Terminale Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Takashi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ninomiya, Koshi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In the current report, we describe a case of an extramedullary ependymoma involving a lumbar nerve root near conus medullaris. Spinal ependymomas commonly present as intramedullary tumors in the cervical or thoracic cord or as tumors arising from the conus medullaris or the filum terminale. In this case, we showed an extramedullary conus ependymoma involving a lumbar nerve root with filum terminale attachment. CASE PRESENTATION A 69-year-old woman presented with lower back pain, but without sensory disturbance or motor weakness in her lower extremities. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural mass at T12–L1 at the conus medullaris, which was totally resected. Histopathology revealed a non-myxopapillary ependymoma (WHO grade 2). Postoperatively, the patient did well and displayed no neurological deficits. Moreover, no radiotherapy was required. CONCLUSIONS This report documented a rare case of intradural extramedullary ependymoma located at the conus medullaris, involving the lumbar nerve root, and attached to the filum terminale. Although extramedullary ependymomas at this region are more frequently classified as myxopapillary, histopathological examination revealed this tumor as a non-myxopapillary ependymoma. PMID:26648765

  11. [Iatrogenic meningitis after diagnosis lumbar puncture: 3 cases reports in the paediatric Children's Hospital of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Smaoui, H; Hariga, D; Hajji, N; Bouziri, A; Ben Jaballah, N; Barsaoui, S; Bousnina, S; Sammoud, A; Kechrid, A

    2011-02-01

    We have collected cases of iatrogenic meningitis managed in the Children's Hospital of Tunis, between January 1998 and December 2006. Clinical information about each patient were collected, all bacterial samples were investigated in the microbiology laboratory of the hospital. Bacterial isolates were identified according to conventional criteria. In the interval under study, we recorded three cases of iatrogenic meningitis after lumbar puncture. Two cases occurred in newborn admitted for suspicion of neonatal infection and one in a 2-month-old infant admitted for exploration of hyperpyretic convulsion. In all patients, the initial cerebrospinal fluid was normal. All patients developed symptoms of acute meningitis within 72 hours after lumbar puncture; the second cerebrospinal fluid was, then, typical for purulent meningitis. The causal agents isolated in the three cases were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Serratia marcescens, all resistant to beta-lactams by extended spectrum beta-lactamase production. The use of quinolones was required in all cases. Different complications were recorded: hydrocephalus and brain abscess in one case, respiratory and hemodynamic failure managed in the intensive care unit in the second, and brain hygroma in the third case. This study shows high morbidity of iatrogenic meningitis. Simple aseptic precautions undertaken before the procedure of lumbar puncture can prevent such cases. The urgent need for increasing the awareness among medical personnel in hospitals of developing countries cannot be overemphasized. PMID:21103965

  12. Effect of intraoperative navigation on operative time in 1-level lumbar fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arjun R; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2016-10-01

    The use of intraoperative image guided navigation (NAV) in spine surgery is increasing. NAV is purported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement but has been criticized for potentially increasing surgical cost, a component of which may be prolongation of total operative time due to time required for setup and intra-operative imaging and registration. In this study, we examine the effect of the introduction of O-Arm conical CT spinal navigation on surgical duration. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive freehand (FH) (n=63) and NAV (n=70) 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation cases at a single institution by a single surgeon. We recorded setup and procedure time for each case. NAV was associated with significantly shorter total operative time for 1-level lumbar fusions compared to FH (4:30+/-0:42 hours vs. 4:53+/-0:39hours, p=0.0013). This shortening of total operative time was realized despite a trend toward slightly longer setup times with NAV. We also found a significant decrease in operative length over time in NAV but not FH cases, indicative of a "learning curve" associated with NAV. The use of NAV in 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation surgery is associated with significantly shorter total operative time compared to the FH technique, and its efficiency improves over time. These data should factor into cost-effectiveness analyses of the use of NAV for these cases. PMID:27364319

  13. [Lumbar puncture training using simulation-based educational strategies: Experience in a clinical pediatric residency].

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Juan C; Gouguenheim, Bárbara; Ghiglione, Analía; Bravo, Nélida; Prudencio, Carla I; Villois, Florencia; Abadie, Yamila; Zubieta, Ana; Golini, Carol; Villar, Victoria; Rodríguez, Susana P

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians should acquire multiple skills during their professional training, including procedural skills. Skill acquisition requires knowledge on theoretical bases, direct observation and, lastly, supervised repetitive practice. Training using simulators allows to learn procedures in a controlled setting, ensuring patients' safety, integrating this as a learning stage prior to the actual contact with patients. Here we report on the teaching experience of a simulated lumbar puncture procedure. Training was provided to 112 first year pediatric residents who entered Hospital Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan in the 2013-2014 period. Educational contents included communication with parents regarding the procedure, material preparation, compliance with biosafety standards, sepsis and general patient care, puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid collection, and specimen collection. Strategies included, in a sequential order, the introduction of theoretical aspects using the bibliography and audiovisual resources available at the hospital's online campus and subsequent practice of lumbar puncture in a 3-month-old infant phantom on a lateral recumbent position that allowed to make a puncture and collect cerebrospinal fluid. At each training session, the level of confidence was measured before and after the procedure, and a checklist was developed to verify an adequate compliance with each step of the procedure. The simulated lumbar puncture training model has been introduced as an educational strategy of our Pediatric Residency Program. PMID:26593801

  14. [Morphological rationale for medial facetectomy during microsurgical removal of herniated lumbar disks].

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, P I; dreval', O N

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken to provide an anatomic and morphological rationale for the use of medial facetectomy in the microsurgical treatment of herniated lumbar disks and to assess the results of performed operations. Morphological studies were conducted on corpses, by comparing coronal and transverse sections of the lumbar spine. The concept "nervous root canal" was used during the study. The detected features of the anatomical and topographic structure of the nervous root canal permitted the substantiation of the necessity and volume of medial facetectomy at different levels. When an approach is applied into the discal area, the highest and least volume of bone resection at medial facetectomy is required at the levels of L3-L4 and L5-S1, respectively. The clinical study involved an analysis of the results of microsurgical treatment of 530 patients with herniated lumbar disks. The analysis of clinical findings revealed that medial facetectomy had been used during 382 (72%) operations. When the operations were performed at different levels, the usage of this technique differs: at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 in 30 (100%), 206 (91%), and 145 (53%) cases, respectively. The data on the usage of medial facetectomy during operations correspond to the revealed specific features of the anatomic and topographic structure of the nervous root canal at each of the operated levels. PMID:16739929

  15. The DHEW Requirements for the Protection of Human Subjects: Analysis and Impact at the University of California, Berkeley. One of a Series of Analysis and Impact Reports of Major Federal Requirements Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Eugene J.

    This project identifies institutional research management problems imposed by certain requirements of the sponsoring Federal agencies; assesses the impact on the institution when meeting the requirements; and, where appropriate, recommends standardization or modification of the requirements or their implementation. One fundamental DHEW requirement…

  16. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  17. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  18. A randomized double-blind prospective study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic fields for interbody lumbar fusions

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, V. )

    1990-07-01

    A randomized double-blind prospective study of pulsed electromagnetic fields for lumbar interbody fusions was performed on 195 subjects. There were 98 subjects in the active group and 97 subjects in the placebo group. A brace containing equipment to induce an electromagnetic field was applied to patients undergoing interbody fusion in the active group, and a sham brace was used in the control group. In the active group there was a 92% success rate, while the control group had a 65% success rate (P greater than 0.005). The effectiveness of bone graft stimulation with the device is thus established.

  19. Lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction for the management of a patient with a lumbar herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Allison R; Hasson, Scott M

    2010-05-01

    Low back pain resulting from lumbar disc herniation is a common reason for referral for physical therapy. There is no evidence to support the management of lumbar disc herniation and derangement using mechanical traction combined with lumbar extension exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this case report was to describe and discuss the use of mechanical traction in conjunction with lumbar extension exercises for a patient with a lumbar herniated disc. The patient was a 49-year-old male referred to physical therapy with a medical diagnosis of a lumbar herniated disc at L5-S1 with compression of the L5 nerve root confirmed by MRI. The patient's chief complaint was pain over the left lumbosacral and central lumbar region with radiating pain into the left buttock accompanied by numbness and tingling in the left lower leg and foot. The patient was seen for a total of 14 visits. The first 5 days (2 weeks) of therapy consisted of lumbar extension exercises. For the following nine visits (over a 3-week period), mechanical traction was added as an adjunct to the extension exercises. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Back Pain Function Scale (BPFS), and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). Results from initial evaluation to discharge (Oswestry: 36% to 0%; BPFS: 33/60 to 57/60; NPRS: 7/10 to 0/10) demonstrated that the patient no longer experienced low back pain and improved in terms of functional status and pain-related disability. The patient no longer complained of numbness and tingling in the left lower extremity and the goals for the patient had been attained. The data from this case report suggests lumbar extension exercises in conjunction with mechanical traction facilitated the patient's improvement in pain and return to prior level of function. PMID:20397860

  20. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  1. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: Mini-open TLIF and Corrective TLIF

    PubMed Central

    HARA, Masahito; NISHIMURA, Yusuke; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; UMEBAYASHI, Daisuke; TAKEMOTO, Masaya; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; HAIMOTO, Shoichi

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) as a short fusion is widely accepted among the spine surgeons. However in the long fusion for degenerative kyphoscoliosis, corrective spinal fixation by an open method is thought to be frequently selected. Our objective is to study whether the mini-open TLIF and corrective TLIF contribute to the improvement of the spinal segmental and global alignment. We divided the patients who performed lumbar fixation surgery into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of mini-open TLIF procedures without complication. Group 2 (G2) consisted of corrective TLIF without complication. Group 3 (G3) consisted of corrective TLIF with instrumentation-related complication postoperatively. In all groups, the lumbar lordosis (LL) highly correlated with developing surgical complications. LL significantly changed postoperatively in all groups, but was not corrected in the normal range in G3. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and mean difference between the pelvic incidence (PI) and LL between G3 and other groups. The most important thing not to cause the instrumentation-related failure is proper correction of the sagittal balance. In the cases with minimal sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, short fusion by mini-open TLIF or long fusion by corrective TLIF contributes to good clinical results if the lesion is short or easily correctable. However, if the patients have apparent sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, we should perform proper correction of the sagittal spinal alignment introducing various technologies. PMID:26119895

  2. Biomechanical comparison between lumbar disc arthroplasty and fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Jer; Hung, Chinghua

    2009-03-01

    The artificial disc is a mobile implant for degenerative disc replacement that attempts to lessen the degeneration of the adjacent elements. However, inconsistent biomechanical results for the neighboring elements have been reported in a number of studies. The present study used finite element (FE) analysis to explore the biomechanical differences at the surgical and both adjacent levels following artificial disc replacement and interbody fusion procedures. First, a three-dimensional FE model of a five-level lumbar spine was established by the commercially available medical imaging software Amira 3.1.1, and FE software ANSYS 9.0. After validating the five-level intact (INT) model with previous in vitro studies, the L3/L4 level of the INT model was modified to either insert an artificial disc (ProDisc II; ADR) or incorporate bilateral posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) cages with a pedicle screw fixation system. All models were constrained at the bottom of the L5 vertebra and subjected to 150N preload and 10Nm moments under four physiological motions. The ADR model demonstrated higher range of motion (ROM), annulus stress, and facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the non-modified INT model. At both adjacent levels, ROM and annulus stress were similar to that of the INT model and varied less than 7%. In addition, the greatest displacement of posterior annulus occurred at the superior-lateral region. Conversely, the PLIF model showed less ROM, less annulus stress, and no facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the INT model. The adjacent levels had obviously high ROM, annulus stress, and facet contact pressure, especially at the adjacent L2/3 level. In conclusion, the artificial disc replacement revealed no adjacent-level instability. However, instability was found at the surgical level, which might accelerate degeneration at the highly stressed annulus and facet joint. In contrast to disc replacement results, the posterior

  3. Analysis of basal physical fitness and lumbar muscle function according to indoor horse riding exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Hong, Chul Un; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to verify the effect of indoor horse riding exercise on basal physical exercise and lumbar muscular function. The subjects included were 20 healthy females, who participated in the horse riding exercise using SRider (Rider Co. & ChonbuK National Univ, Korea) for 30 minutes per day, 3 days per week, over a period of 8 weeks. The subjects were divided into 4 groups as follows, with 10 subjects in each group: Postural Balance Exercise mode (PBE), Abdomen Exercise mode (ADE), Whole body Exercise mode (WBE), and Multiple Exercise (MTE). Isokinetic muscular function test was performed before and after the horse riding exercise, to assess the effect of horse riding on basal physical exercise and lumbar muscular function. The test result on basal physical exercise and isokinetic muscular function showed improvements with variable degree in the back muscle strength, maximum joint torque, total work, and muscular acceleration time. The result signifies that the horse riding is an antagonistic exercise mainly performed on waist and abdomen area, and the machine induces persistent muscle contraction and causes myotonic induction enhancing the muscle strength. Indoor horse riding exercise proved its effectiveness for senior or the disabled people who need muscle exercises but have difficulties performing outdoor activities. PMID:25226940

  4. Inter-examiner reproducibility of tests for lumbar motor control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies show a relation between reduced lumbar motor control (LMC) and low back pain (LBP). However, test circumstances vary and during test performance, subjects may change position. In other words, the reliability - i.e. reproducibility and validity - of tests for LMC should be based on quantitative data. This has not been considered before. The aim was to analyse the reproducibility of five different quantitative tests for LMC commonly used in daily clinical practice. Methods The five tests for LMC were: repositioning (RPS), sitting forward lean (SFL), sitting knee extension (SKE), and bent knee fall out (BKFO), all measured in cm, and leg lowering (LL), measured in mm Hg. A total of 40 subjects (14 males, 26 females) 25 with and 15 without LBP, with a mean age of 46.5 years (SD 14.8), were examined independently and in random order by two examiners on the same day. LBP subjects were recruited from three physiotherapy clinics with a connection to the clinic's gym or back-school. Non-LBP subjects were recruited from the clinic's staff acquaintances, and from patients without LBP. Results The means and standard deviations for each of the tests were 0.36 (0.27) cm for RPS, 1.01 (0.62) cm for SFL, 0.40 (0.29) cm for SKE, 1.07 (0.52) cm for BKFO, and 32.9 (7.1) mm Hg for LL. All five tests for LMC had reproducibility with the following ICCs: 0.90 for RPS, 0.96 for SFL, 0.96 for SKE, 0.94 for BKFO, and 0.98 for LL. Bland and Altman plots showed that most of the differences between examiners A and B were less than 0.20 cm. Conclusion These five tests for LMC displayed excellent reproducibility. However, the diagnostic accuracy of these tests needs to be addressed in larger cohorts of subjects, establishing values for the normal population. Also cut-points between subjects with and without LBP must be determined, taking into account age, level of activity, degree of impairment and participation in sports. Whether reproducibility of these tests is as good

  5. Total disc arthroplasty: consequences for sagittal balance and lumbar spine movement.

    PubMed

    Tournier, C; Aunoble, S; Le Huec, J C; Lemaire, J P; Tropiano, P; Lafage, V; Skalli, W

    2007-03-01

    This in vivo biomechanical study was undertaken to analyze the consequences for sagittal balance and lumbar spine movement in three different lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 105 patients underwent total disc replacement in three different centers. The Maverick prosthesis was used in 46 patients, the SB Charité device was used in 49 patients and the Prodisc device was utilized in 10 patients. The analysis was computer assisted, using Spineview and Matlab softwares. The intra and inter-observer reliability and measurement uncertainty was performed. The analysis of lateral X-ray films in flexion-extension allowed to measure the prosthesis positioning, the range of motion (ROM), the localization of the mean center of rotation (MCR), the vertebral translation and the disc height, for each prosthesis device. The sagittal balance was analyzed on a full spine film. The parameters studied were described by Duval-Beaupère. The results were compared to the data found in literature, and compared to 18 asymptomatic volunteers, and 61 asymptomatic subjects, concerning the sagittal balance. The prostheses allowed an improvement of the ROM of less than 2 degrees. The ROM of L5-S1 prostheses ranged from 11.6 to 15.6% of the total lumbar motion during flexion-extension. At L4-L5 level, the ROM decreased when there was an arthrodesis associated at the L5-S1 level. There was no difference of ROM between the three prostheses devices. The MCR was linked to the ROM, but did not depend on the prosthesis offcentering. The disc height improved for any prosthesis, and decreased in flexion or in extension, when the prosthesis was offcentered. An increase of translation indicated a minor increase of the ROM at L4-L5 level after Maverick or SB Charité implantation. The L5-S1 arthrodesis was linked with an increase of the pelvic tilt. The lumbar lordosis curvature increased between L4 and S1, even more when a prosthesis was placed at the L3-L4 level. Total disc arthroplasty is useful in

  6. [Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2014-12-10

    A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

  7. An unexpectedly progressed lumbar herniated disk.

    PubMed

    Lipton, James A; McLeod, Geoffrey A

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe a case of a 26-year-old female military veteran who presented with low back pain that she attributed to a recent foot injury. The patient reported a history of lumbar pain while in the military that had been treated successfully with high-velocity, low-amplitude osteopathic manipulative treatment. The patient's current pain was improved with osteopathic manipulative treatment and gait correction. Several weeks after her initial presentation, the patient reported that she had had a herniated disk diagnosed 2 years earlier by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Updated magnetic resonance imaging was performed, the results of which revealed a large herniated disk that had caused severe stenosis. The patient was immediately referred to a neurosurgeon for consultation and subsequently underwent surgical treatment. PMID:24285036

  8. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K.; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  9. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K; Rao, Prashanth J

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  10. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Durão, Carlos; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event. PMID:27579204

  11. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event.

  12. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choll W

    2016-08-01

    Commentary On: Ahn J, Iqbal A, Manning BT, Leblang S, Bohl DD, Mayo BC, et al. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression-the surgical learning curve. Spine J 2016:16:909-16. (in this issue). PMID:27545398

  13. Lumbar stabilization: core concepts and current literature, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Barr, Karen P; Griggs, Miriam; Cadby, Todd

    2005-06-01

    The factors that affect lumbar stability have been an area of extensive research. The clinical application of this research in the form of lumbar stabilization exercise programs has become a common treatment of low back pain and is also increasingly used by athletes to improve performance and by the general public for health and the prevention of injury. This article includes a review of the key concepts behind lumbar stabilization. The literature regarding how those with low back pain differ in their ability to stabilize the spine from those without low back pain is discussed, and an overview of current research that assesses the benefits of a lumbar stabilization program to treat low back pain is provided. PMID:15905663

  14. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  15. Intradural lumbar disc herniations: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J; Schattke, H H

    1995-09-01

    Intradural lumbar disc herniation is a rare pathological entity. Three new cases among a series of 5000 lumbar spine operations are added to the about 60 previous case reports in the literature. None of our patients had undergone lumbar spine surgery before. In one patient the location of the free disc fragment was medial within the dural sac; in two patients the free disc fragment had penetrated the dural sac from the axilla of the nerve root. Pathogenesis is discussed (congenital adhesions of the dura mater to the posterior longitudinal ligament at the lower lumbar spine; weakness of the dura mater ventrally and at the axilla of the nerve root). By multiplanar MRI, the free disc hernia within the dural sac may be shown preoperatively. PMID:8542333

  16. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan; Bruniera, Gustavo; Brunale, Fernando; Mangueira, Cristóvão; Senne, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks. PMID:27556380

  17. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  18. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and its imposters: three case studies

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis causing neurogenic claudicaton is a common condition impacting walking ability in older adults. There are other highly prevalent conditions in this patient population that have similar signs and symptoms and cause limited walking ability. The purpose of this study is to highlight the diagnostic challenges using three case studies of older adults who present with limited walking ability who have imaging evidence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25202160

  19. Hemorrhage from lumbar artery following percutaneous renal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Devi, B. Vijayalakshmi; Lakshmi, B. Sangeetha; Supraja, C.; Vanajakshmma, V.; Ram, R.; Rajasekhar, D.; Lakshmi, A. Y.; Sivakumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    We present a 58-year-old lady who underwent ultrasound-guided renal biopsy for suspected acute glomerulonephritis. Within minutes, the radiologist noticed an echogenic band around left kidney and in the muscular planes. Computerized tomography revealed focal active contrast extravasation from arcuate or interlobular artery in lower pole of left kidney and lumbar artery at third lumbar vertebra. The bleeding vessel was occluded with gelfoam. PMID:26199475

  20. Type III-IV muscle afferents are not required for steady-state exercise hyperpnea in healthy subjects and patients with COPD or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Song, Gang

    2015-09-15

    Blockade of group III-IV muscle afferents by intrathecal injection of the μ-opioid agonist fentanyl (IF) in humans has been variously reported to depress exercise hyperpnea in some studies but not others. A key unanswered question is whether such an effect is transient or persists in the steady state. Here we show that in healthy subjects undergoing constant-load cycling exercise IF significantly slows the transient exercise ventilatory kinetics but has no discernible effect on the ventilatory response when exercise is sufficiently prolonged. Thus, the ventilatory response to group III-IV muscle afferents input in healthy subjects is not a simple reflex but acts like a high-pass filter with maximum sensitivity during early-phase exercise and is reset in the late phase. In patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) IF causes sustained CO2 retention not only during exercise but also in the resting state, where muscle afferents feedback is minimal. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), IF also elicits sustained decreases in the exercise ventilatory response but with little or no resultant CO2 retention due to concomitant decreases in physiological VD/VT (dead space-to-ventilation ratio). These results support the proposition that optimal long-term regulation of exercise hyperpnea in health and in disease is determined centrally by the respiratory controller through the continuing adaptation of an internal model which dynamically tracks the metabolic CO2 load and the ventilatory inefficiency 1/1-VD/VT that must be overcome for the maintenance of arterial PCO2 homeostasis, rather than being reflexively driven by group III-IV muscle afferents feedback per se. PMID:25911558

  1. Postural Cueing to Increase Lumbar Lordosis Increases Lumbar Multifidus Activation During Trunk Stabilization Exercises: Electromyographic Assessment Using Intramuscular Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Beneck, George J; Story, John W; Donald, Shelby

    2016-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Background Diminished multifidus activation and cross-sectional area are frequent findings in persons with low back pain. Increasing lumbar lordosis has been shown to increase activation of the multifidus with a minimal increase in activation of the long global extensors during unsupported sitting. Objectives To examine the influence of postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis on lumbar extensor activation during trunk stabilization exercises. Methods Thirteen asymptomatic participants (9 male, 4 female) were instructed to perform 6 trunk stabilization exercises using a neutral position and increasing lumbar lordosis. Electrical activity of the deep multifidus and longissimus thoracis was recorded using fine-wire intramuscular electrodes. The mean root-mean-square of the electromyography (EMG) signal obtained during each exercise was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A 2-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance (posture by exercise) was performed for each muscle. Results When averaged across the 6 exercises, postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis resulted in greater multifidus EMG activity compared to performing the exercises in a neutral posture (35.3% ± 15.1% versus 29.5% ± 11.2% MVIC). No significant increase in longissimus thoracis EMG activity was observed when exercising with cueing to increase lumbar lordosis. Conclusion This study suggests that postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis during trunk stabilization exercises may better promote multifidus activation than traditional stabilization exercises alone. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing lumbar lordosis improves multifidus activation in persons with low back pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(4):293-299. Epub 8 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6174. PMID:26954268

  2. The effect of lumbar total disc replacement on the spinopelvic alignment and range of motion of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung Soo; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Chang Seok; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2006-07-01

    A lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is a type of motion-preserving surgery, which aims to restore and maintain the normal range of motion (ROM) and the sagittal balance of the spine. However, little is known regarding how the spinopelvic alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine are influenced by the lumbar TDR with ProDisc. This study retrospectively analyzed the sagittal alignment and ROM of the lumbar spine in 26 consecutive patients who had undergone the TDR with ProDisc with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A standing lateral radiograph, which included the femoral heads and dynamic flexion-extension lateral radiographs of the spine were taken before surgery and at the follow-up visit. The radiological parameters included the sacral tilt, the pelvic tilt, and the lumbar lordosis. The segmental lordosis and ROM were also measured at each operative level. Nineteen patients underwent a single-level TDR and 7 patients underwent a double-level TDR. The mean lumbar lordosis increased significantly from 30.5 degrees to 40.8 degrees in all patients who underwent TDR without any significant changes in the sacral tilt and pelvic tilt at the latest follow-up (P<0.05). In the patients who underwent single-level TDR, the mean segmental lordosis at the L5-S1 and L4-5 operative levels increased significantly from 15.8 degrees to 23.2 degrees and from 14.1 degrees to 24.9 degrees, respectively. The mean ROM at L5-S1 and L4-5 increased significantly from 7.1 degrees to 11.2 degrees and from 11.4 degrees to 14.6 degrees, respectively. The sagittal balance and ROM of the lumbar spine improved significantly after the lumbar TDR. PMID:16825999

  3. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  4. Is Surgical Drain Useful for Lumbar Disc Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho Seok; Kim, Woo Kyung; Son, Seong; Jeong, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical drains are commonly used after the spine surgeries for minimizing hematoma formation, which can delay wound healing and may become a source of fibrosis, infection, and pain. The drain, however, may provide a direct route for infection if it is contaminated. Our objective was to survey the relationship between surgical drains and infection. Methods The 70 patients who had undergone single-level lumbar discectomy from April 2011 to March 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient's medical chart and magnetic resonance image were thoroughly reviewed after all the patients had been divided into the drainage and the nondrainage groups. The amounts and durations of the surgical drains in the drainage group were analyzed. Additionally, the levels of C-reactive protein, rates of infection, scores of preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS), and lengths of hospital stay after operation were compared between the 2 groups. Results In this study, 70 patients were retrospectively analyzed; out of which, 42 and 28 patients were included in the drainage and the nondrainage groups, respectively. Two of the postoperative infection cases in the nondrainage group required to undergo repeated operations. The frequency of the postoperative infection cases was higher in the nondrainage group than in the drainage group; however, there was no significant statistical difference between the 2 groups (p=0.157). Conclusion Surgical drains did not elevate postoperative infection. Furthermore, drain tip cultures allowed us to detect postoperative infection at an early stage, and it led to faster initiation of antibiotics treatment. PMID:27123026

  5. Management of Acute Lumbar Injuries in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2016-01-01

    Occupational acute lumbar injuries are a common injury. One intervention that is unique to occupational health is the determination of the amount of physical activity that an injured worker can perform without increasing the risk of further injury. Clinical recommendations suggest that workers continue to stay active; however, it is still the clinician's responsibility to determine the level of activity. The level of work activity is determined on a case-to-case basis and is done by evaluating the physical capacity of an injured worker and the job description. Current evidence-based guidelines suggest that staying active may actually reduce pain levels. The purpose of this evidence-based literature review is to outline the proper assessment and management of workers who have sustained a work-related low back injury. The related literature has been reviewed as well as red flags for more severe neurological conditions that require more in-depth evaluation. Determining the safe level of activity and guided return to work have been discussed. PMID:27187219

  6. Revision of a lumbar disc arthroplasty following late infection

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzo, Anthony M.

    2009-01-01

    Anterior removal of a lumbar total disc replacement implant is often a very technically demanding procedure. The anterior retroperitoneal anatomy is prone to scarring, limiting remobilization and making a direct anterior exposure above the L5–S1 level difficult if not impossible to achieve safely. Anterolateral approach strategies can be more safely achieved at L4–L5 and above, but may require vertebral osteotomy in order to remove a keeled prosthesis. Successful conversion to a fusion with implant removal can be achieved, even when osteotomy is needed for implant removal. This Grand Rounds case presentation involves an unusual late retroperitoneal abscess following two-level TDR with direct extension to one of the implants, and the subsequent nonoperative and operative management. Removal of a well-fixed keeled implant at the L4–L5 level following nonoperative treatment of a surrounding retroperitoneal abscess and conversion to fusion represents close to, if not a ‘worst-case’ scenario for revision TDR. However, with proper preoperative planning and surgical experience, a safe and successful procedure can be the end result. PMID:19937351

  7. [Update on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-xuan; Hong, Dun

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural adhesion is one of the most common causes of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), which can lead to back and leg pain or neurological deficit. Prevention of epidural adhesion after laminectomy is critical for improving the outcomes of lumbar surgery. The main origins of epidural fibrosis are raw surface of erector muscles and rupture fibers of intervertebral disc. The main current preventive methods for epidural adhesion include the usage of implants, chemicals and low dose radiation. However, most of them are still in experiment period. There are still controversies on the clinic usage of autograft free fat, ADCON-L, and Mitomycin C (MMC). The optimal implants are characteristics of better biocompatibility, degradable absorption and capability of existing for a certain period in body. The optimal medicine should have good effect on anti-desmoplasia, less side effects and long half-life. Besides, the combination of biodegradable medical film and drug and the mixture of two or more medical films are also the research frontlines of epidural adhesion. Further researches are required to explore new materials and drugs with stable and most favorable effect in preventing epidural adhesion. PMID:26757539

  8. Aperius interspinous device for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ashwanth; Lyons, Frank; Kelleher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    With an aging population, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) leading to neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) is a growing problem. For patients suffering from this condition, interspinous process distraction devices (IPDs) offer an effective and cheap alternative to conservative or decompressive surgery. Aperius is one such device that has been gaining popularity for its percutaneous insertion under local anesthetic, short operative time, and low risk of complications. The main objective of this review was to carry out a comprehensive search of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness and potential complications of Aperius. A database search, including PubMed, Clinical trials.gov, Cochrane (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Scopus, was carried out to identify relevant articles written in English reporting on complications with a minimum 12-month follow-up. The literature search resulted in six eligible studies; two nonrandomized comparative and four prospective case series were available. The analysis revealed that in total, 433 patients underwent treatment with Aperius, with all studies demonstrating an improvement in outcome measures. The average follow-up was 17 months with an overall complication rate of 10.62 %. Overall, the quality of evidence is low, suggesting that currently, the evidence is not compelling and further prospective randomized trials including cost-effectiveness studies are required. PMID:26324829

  9. Inequality in leg length is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Kanat, Ayhan; Erkut, Adem; Ozdemir, Bulent; Batcik, Osman Ersagun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inequality in leg length may lead to to abnormal transmission of load across the endplates and degeneration lumbar spine and the disc space. There has been no study focusing on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and leg length discrepancy. This subject was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients with leg length discrepancy and low back pain (LBP) admitted to our department were respectivelly studied. Results: A total number of 39 subjects (31 women and eight men) with leg length discrepancy and LBP and 43 (25 females and 18 males) patients with LBP as a control group were tested. Occurrence of disc herniation is statistically different between patients with hip dysplasia and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a statistically significant association between leg length discrepancy and occurrence of LDH. The changes of spine anatomy with leg length discrepancy in hip dysplastic patients are of importance in understanding the nature of LDH. PMID:27217654

  10. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    .93 additional points; 95% CI 0.10 to 1.77; p = 0.029) and higher leg pain at baseline (0.83 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative leg pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). In both models the L3/4 segment showed 2.36 points (95% CI -4.27 to -0.45; p = 0.016) and 3.69 points (95% CI -5.66 to -1.71; p < 0.001) less pain relief than L5/S1. Discussion Significantly higher back and leg pain relief were observed after viscoelastic total disc replacement in comparison with anterior lumbar interbody fusion. The new less rigid materials used in the second generation total disc replacements (TDRs) may make artificial disc replacement an increasingly attractive option for patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease. Further controlled and long-term follow-up studies are required for more detailed comparisons of the outcomes of these types of disc implants. The Freedom Lumbar Disc is limited by U.S. federal law to investigational use only. PMID:26196033

  11. Surgical results of dynamic nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases with instability: Minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Morishita, Yuichirou; Sakai, Tsubasa; Huang, George; Kida, Hirotaka; Takemitsu, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background When spinal fusion is applied to degenerative lumbar spinal disease with instability, adjacent segment disorder will be an issue in the future. However, decompression alone could cause recurrence of spinal canal stenosis because of increased instability on operated segments and lead to revision surgery. Covering the disadvantages of both procedures, we applied nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System (Ulrich Medical, Ulm, Germany) and decompression. Methods The surgical results of 52 patients (35 men and 17 women) with a minimum 2-year follow-up were analyzed: 10 patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis, 15 with lumbar canal stenosis with disc herniation, 20 with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 with disc herniation, and 1 with lumbar discopathy. Results The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was improved, from 14.4 ± 5.3 to 25.5 ± 2.8. The improvement rate was 76%. Range of motion of the operated segments was significantly decreased, from 9.6° ± 4.2° to 2.0° ± 1.8°. Only 1 patient had adjacent segment disease that required revision surgery. There was only 1 screw breakage, but the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusions Over a minimum 2-year follow-up, the results of nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for unstable degenerative lumbar disease were good. It is necessary to follow up the cases with a focus on adjacent segment disorders in the future. PMID:25802671

  12. [Degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine Total disc replacement as an alternative to lumbar fusion?].

    PubMed

    Mayer, H M

    2005-10-01

    Spinal fusion is accepted worldwide as a therapeutic option for the treatment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. Because there are only few evidence-based data available supporting the usefulness of lumbar spinal fusion, its questionable benefit as well as the potential for complications are the reasons for an ongoing discussion. In recent years, total disc replacement with implants has emerged as an alternative treatment. Although early results are promising, there is still a lack of evidence-based data as well as of long-term results for this technology. This article gives a critical update on the implant systems currently in use (SB Charité, Prodisc II L, Maverick, Flexicore, Mobidisc), which all have to be considered as "first-generation" implants. Morphological and clinical sequelae of the different biomechanical properties, designs, and materials have not yet been sufficiently investigated. There is no international consensus on the indication spectrum and on the preoperative diagnosis of discogenic low back pain. The same is true for the (minimally invasive) surgical access strategies. Complication rates seem to be somewhat lower compared to spinal fusion techniques. There are no standardized revision concepts in cases of implant failure. Lumbar disc replacement has opened a new era in spinal surgery with a still unproven benefit for the patient. It is strongly recommended that these techniques should only be applied by experienced and well-trained spine surgeons. Until evidence-based data are available, all patients should be treated under scientific study conditions with close postoperative follow-up. PMID:16034627

  13. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  14. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Right Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Sugimori, Natsuki; Igarashi, Saya; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the right lumbar artery. Eleven patients with HCC supplied by the right lumbar artery were treated with chemoembolization. The patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 6.7 {+-} 3.7 (mean {+-} SD) chemoembolization sessions, and the hepatic arterial branches were noted as being attenuated. The right inferior phrenic artery (IPA) was also embolized in 10 patients. The interval between initial chemoembolization and chemoembolization of the lumbar artery supply was 53.2 {+-} 26.9 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.1 {+-} 2.4 cm and was located at the surface of S7 and S6. The feeding-branch arose proximal to the bifurcation of the dorsal ramus and muscular branches (n = 8) or from the muscular branches (n = 3) of the right first (n = 10) or second lumbar artery (n = 1). The anterior spinal artery originated from the tumor-feeding lumbar artery in one patient. All feeders were selected, and embolization was performed after injection of iodized oil and anticancer drugs (n = 10) or gelatin sponge alone in a patient with anterior spinal artery branching (n = 1). Eight patients died from tumor progression 10.1 {+-} 4.6 months later, and two patients survived 2 and 26 months, respectively. The remaining patient died of bone metastases after 32 months despite liver transplantation 10 months after chemoembolization. The right lumbar artery supplies HCC located in the bare area of the liver, especially in patients who undergo repeated chemoembolization, including chemoembolization by way of the right IPA. Chemoembolization by way of the right lumbar artery may be safe when the feeder is well selected.

  15. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis. PMID:26424334

  16. Performing lumbar punctures for suspected CNS infections: experience and practice of trainee doctors.

    PubMed

    Defres, Sylviane; Mayer, Josephine; Backman, Ruth; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar punctures are essential in the management of suspected CNS infections. However, despite clear guidelines their use can be haphazard. This survey investigated the training, knowledge and experience of UK doctors in training in relation to lumbar punctures. PMID:26551497

  17. Lumbar spinal stenosis CAD from clinical MRM and MRI based on inter- and intra-context features with a two-level classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Jaehan; Alomari, Raja S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    An imaging test has an important role in the diagnosis of lumbar abnormalities since it allows to examine the internal structure of soft tissues and bony elements without the need of an unnecessary surgery and recovery time. For the past decade, among various imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has taken the significant part of the clinical evaluation of the lumbar spine. This is mainly due to technological advancements that lead to the improvement of imaging devices in spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and multi-planar capabilities. In addition, noninvasive nature of MRI makes it easy to diagnose many common causes of low back pain such as disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc diseases. In this paper, we propose a method to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a narrowing of the spinal canal, from magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images. Our method segments the thecal sac in the preprocessing stage, generates the features based on inter- and intra-context information, and diagnoses lumbar disc stenosis. Experiments with 55 subjects show that our method achieves 91.3% diagnostic accuracy. In the future, we plan to test our method on more subjects.

  18. CAPSIZE: A personal computer program and cross-section library for determining the shielding requirements, size, and capacity of shipping casks subject to various proposed objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    A new interactive program called CAPSIZE has been written for the IBM-PC to rapidly determine the likely impact that proposed design objectives might have on the size and capacity of spent fuel shipping casks designed to meet those objectives. Given the burnup of the spent fuel, its cooling time, the thickness of the internal basket walls, the desired external dose rate, and the nominal weight limit of the loaded cask, the CAPSIZE program will determine the maximum number of PWR fuel assemblies that may be shipped in a lead-, steel-, or uranium-shielded cask meeting those objectives. The necessary neutron and gamma shield thicknesses are determined by the program in such a way as to meet the specified external dose rate while simultaneously minimizing the overall weight of the loaded cask. The one-group cross-section library used in the CAPSIZE program has been distilled from the intermediate results of several hundred 1-D multigroaup discrete ordinates calculations for different types of casks. Neutron and gamma source terms, as well as the decay heat terms, are based on ORIGEN-S analyses of PWR fuel assemblies having exposures of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 gigawatt days per metric tonne of initial heavy metal (GWD/MTIHM). In each case, values have been tabulated at 17 different decay times between 120 days and 25 years. Other features of the CAPSIZE program include a steady-state heat transfer calculation which will minimize the size and weight of external cooling fins, if and when such fins are required. Comparisons with previously reported results show that the CAPSIZE program can generally estimate the necessary neutron and gamma shield thicknesses to within 0.16 in. and 0.08 in., respectively. The corresponding cask weights have generally been found to be within 1000 lbs of previously reported results. 13 refs., 20 figs., 54 tabs.

  19. Sagittal plane rotation center of lower lumbar spine during a dynamic weight-lifting activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Wang, Shaobai; Wu, Minfei; Zhong, Weiye; Li, Jing-Sheng; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirk; Li, Guoan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the center of rotation (COR) of the intervertebral segments of the lower lumbar spine (L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments) in sagittal plane during a weight-lifting (3.6 kg in each hand) extension activity performed with the pelvis constrained. Seven healthy subjects were studied using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. Using the non-weightbearing, supine position during MRI scan as a reference, the average intervertebral flexion angles of the L4-L5 and L5-S1 were 6.6° and 5.3° at flexion position of the body, respectively, and were -1.8° and -3.5° at extension position of the body, respectively. The CORs of the lower lumbar spine were found segment-dependent and changed with the body postures. The CORs of the L4-L5 segment were at the location about 75% posterior from the anterior edge of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved to about 92% of the posterior portion of the disc at extension positions of the body. The CORs of the L5-S1 segment were at 95% posterior portion of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved outside of the posterior edge of the disc by about 12% of the disc length at extension positions of the body. These results could help understand the physiological motion characters of the lower lumbar spine. The data could also provide important insights for future improvement of artificial disc designs and surgical implantation of the discs that are aimed to reproduce normal spinal functions. PMID:26805460

  20. Lifestyle-Related Diseases Affect Surgical Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Hyperlipidemia (HL) and hypertension (HT) lead to systemic atherosclerosis. Not only atherosclerosis but also bone fragility and/or low bone mineral density result from diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine whether these lifestyle-related diseases affected surgical outcomes after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Methods The subjects comprised 122 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The clinical results were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery and at 2 years postoperatively. The fusion status was graded as union in situ, collapsed union, or nonunion at 2 years after surgery. The abdominal aorta calcification (AAC) score was assessed using preoperative lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine. Results HL did not significantly affect the JOA score recovery rate. On the other hand, HT and CKD (stage 3 to 4) had a significant adverse effect on the recovery rate. The recovery rate was also lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group, but the difference was not significant. The AAC score was negatively correlated with the JOA score recovery rate. The fusion status was not significantly affected by HL, HT, DM, or CKD; however, the AAC score was significantly higher in the collapsed union and nonunion group than in the union in situ group. Conclusions At 2 years after PLIF, the presence of HT, CKD, and AAC was associated with significantly worse clinical outcomes, and advanced AAC significantly affected fusion status. PMID:26835195

  1. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  2. Fractures of the thoraco-lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lifeso, R M; Arabie, K M; Kadhi, S K

    1985-08-01

    A personal prospective study of 98 consecutive patients presenting with neurological impairment and fractures or dislocations between the 9th thoracic and 2nd lumbar vertebrae bodies. Fifty-three patients underwent Harrington instrumentation, and 45 patients were treated recumbently. Neurological improvement was much better following Harrington rods in the complete paraplegia group but there was no difference in neurological recovery between the two groups in those with incomplete paraplegia. Forty-two patients who had been stabilised with Harrington rods underwent post-operative myelography or tomography to assess the adequacy of spinal decompression. The best results were in patients with adequate neural canal decompression. In 21 cases decompression had not been adequate, usually due to a stereotyped pattern in which the postero-superior aspect of the fractured body remained in the neural canal. All 21 underwent anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete paraplegics (nine patients) regained the ability to walk, three of the 12 complete paraplegics improved and regained the ability to walk with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses. Neurological improvement was dependent upon the adequacy of spinal cord decompression and not upon Harrington rods. per se. Harrington rods alone were not adequate to decompress the spinal canal in 50 per cent of cases. The best results after anterior decompression occurred where neural compression was caused by a minimally displaced wedge fracture distal to T12. PMID:4047711

  3. Lumbar puncture refusal in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Ling, S G; Boey, C C

    2000-10-01

    A descriptive study was carried out on patients admitted for febrile convulsion over a two-year period to determine rate of lumbar puncture (LP) refusal, factors associated with LP refusal and outcome of such patients. From 77 patients indicated and requested for LP, 19 (25%) patients refused the procedure. Refusal of LP was significantly more common among the Malay ethnic group (p = 0.01) but not significantly associated with age,gender or whether the patient was admitted for a first or recurrent febrile convulsion. Half of the patients who refused LP had to be started empirically on antibiotics for meningitis. Patients who refused LP were also 8.5 times more likely to discharge themselves "at own risk" (AOR), compared to other patients with febrile convulsion (p = 0.004). In conclusion, LP refusal is a common problem in the local setting and is a hindrance to the proper management of patients with fever and seizure. Appropriate measures must be carried out to educate the public, particularly those from the Malay ethnic group on the safety and usefulness of the procedure. Reasons for patients discharging AOR following LP refusal also need to be addressed and problems rectified. PMID:11281439

  4. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  5. Osteolytic lumbar discal cyst: case report.

    PubMed

    Marushima, Aiki; Uemura, Kazuya; Sato, Naoaki; Maruno, Toru; Matsumura, Akira

    2008-08-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with left lumboischialgia refractory to medical treatment. Neurological examination revealed L5 and S1 radiculopathy which rapidly worsened over a short period. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated disk bulging with a discal cyst at the L4-5 intervertebral space and disk herniation at the L5-S1 intervertebral space. Computed tomography showed osteolytic change of the L5 vertebral body adjacent to the cyst. Resection of the cyst and removal of the herniated disk were performed following fenestration of the L4-5 and L5-S1 interlaminar spaces. Bloody serous fluid followed by clear serous fluid was recognized during the aspiration and partial resection of the cyst at the L4-5 level. Histological examination demonstrated a cyst wall consisting of fibrous connective tissue without a single-layer lining of cells, and fibrin deposits. The patient's symptoms disappeared immediately after the operation. This osteolytic lumbar discal cyst possibly occurred subsequent to hemorrhage from the epidural venous plexus following intervertebral disk injury, hematoma encapsulation by connective fibrous tissue, and cyst wall formation in reaction to the disk injury and hemorrhage. The cyst may have enlarged due to the inflow of the serous fluid from the water-containing degenerated disk. PMID:18719328

  6. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  7. Analysis of post-operative pain patterns following total lumbar disc replacement: results from fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Korge, Andreas; Grochulla, Frank; Mehren, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Although a variety of biomechanical laboratory investigations and radiological studies have highlighted the potential problems associated with total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), no previous study has performed a systematic clinical failure analysis. The aim of this study was to identify the post-operative pain sources, establish the incidence of post-operative pain patterns and investigate the effect on post-operative outcome with the help of fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations in patients from an ongoing prospective study with ProDisc II. Patients who reported unsatisfactory results at any of the FU-examinations received fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations as part of a semi-invasive diagnostic and conservative treatment program. Pain sources were identified in patients with reproducible (≥2×) significant (50–75%) or highly significant (75–100%) pain relief. Results were correlated with outcome parameters visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the subjective patient satisfaction rate. From a total of 175 operated patients with a mean follow-up (FU) of 29.3 months (range 12.2–74.9 months), n = 342 infiltrations were performed in n = 58 patients (33.1%) overall. Facet joint pain, predominantly at the index level (86.4%), was identified in n = 22 patients (12.6%). The sacroiliac joint was a similarly frequent cause of post-operative pain (n = 21, 12.0%). Pain from both structures influenced all outcome parameters negatively (P < 0.05). Patients with an early onset of pain (≤6 months) were 2–5× higher at risk of developing persisting complaints and unsatisfactory outcome at later FU-stages in comparison to the entire study cohort (P < 0.05). The level of TDR significantly influenced post-operative outcome. Best results were achieved for the TDRs above the lumbosacral junction at L4/5 (incidence of posterior joint pain 14.8%). Inferior outcome and a significantly higher incidence of posterior joint

  8. Analysis of post-operative pain patterns following total lumbar disc replacement: results from fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations.

    PubMed

    Siepe, Christoph J; Korge, Andreas; Grochulla, Frank; Mehren, Christoph; Mayer, H Michael

    2008-01-01

    Although a variety of biomechanical laboratory investigations and radiological studies have highlighted the potential problems associated with total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), no previous study has performed a systematic clinical failure analysis. The aim of this study was to identify the post-operative pain sources, establish the incidence of post-operative pain patterns and investigate the effect on post-operative outcome with the help of fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations in patients from an ongoing prospective study with ProDisc II. Patients who reported unsatisfactory results at any of the FU-examinations received fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations as part of a semi-invasive diagnostic and conservative treatment program. Pain sources were identified in patients with reproducible (> or =2x) significant (50-75%) or highly significant (75-100%) pain relief. Results were correlated with outcome parameters visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the subjective patient satisfaction rate. From a total of 175 operated patients with a mean follow-up (FU) of 29.3 months (range 12.2-74.9 months), n = 342 infiltrations were performed in n = 58 patients (33.1%) overall. Facet joint pain, predominantly at the index level (86.4%), was identified in n = 22 patients (12.6%). The sacroiliac joint was a similarly frequent cause of post-operative pain (n = 21, 12.0%). Pain from both structures influenced all outcome parameters negatively (P < 0.05). Patients with an early onset of pain (< or =6 months) were 2-5x higher at risk of developing persisting complaints and unsatisfactory outcome at later FU-stages in comparison to the entire study cohort (P < 0.05). The level of TDR significantly influenced post-operative outcome. Best results were achieved for the TDRs above the lumbosacral junction at L4/5 (incidence of posterior joint pain 14.8%). Inferior outcome and a significantly higher incidence of posterior joint pain were observed

  9. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  10. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  11. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  12. Three-dimensional static modeling of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional static modeling of the human lumbar spine to be used in the formation of anatomically-correct movement patterns for a fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The mathematical model incorporates five lumbar vertebrae between the first lumbar vertebra and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. The vertebrae are connected to each other by elastic elements, torsional springs and a spherical joint located at the inferoposterior corner in the mid-sagittal plane of the vertebral body. Elastic elements represent the ligaments that surround the facet joints and the torsional springs represent the collective effect of intervertebral disc which plays a major role in balancing torsional load during upper body motion and the remaining ligaments that support the spinal column. The elastic elements and torsional springs are considered to be nonlinear. The nonlinear stiffness constants for six motion types were solved using a multiobjective optimization technique. The quantitative comparison between the angles of rotations predicted by the proposed model and in the experimental data confirmed that the model yields angles of rotation close to the experimental data. The main contribution is that the new model can be used for all motions while the experimental data was only obtained at discrete measurement points. PMID:22938364

  13. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  14. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  15. Microsurgical approach to lumbar synovial cysts. Technical notes.

    PubMed

    Cipri, S; Cafarelli, F; Ielo, A; Gambardella, G

    2004-03-01

    Intraspinal extradural synovial cysts are quite common in the lumbar spine. With respect to clinical presentation and surgical treatment, juxta-facet cysts (ganglion and synovial cysts) share identical characteristics and results. Nowadays, current treatment strategies of intraspinal juxta-facet cysts continue to inspire controversy regarding appropriate surgical approaches, and include many technical options. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the advantage of minimally invasive approaches in 3 cases of lumbar synovial cysts. We performed a small flavectomy in the 1st case, a transarticular partial facectomy, followed by etherologous bone graft fusion in the 2nd case, and a flavectomy and partial facectomy in the 3rd case. In our cases, a microsurgical approach to lumbar synovial cysts yielded to complete excision of the lesions and excellent pain relief, with early mobilization and hospital discharge of the patients. In our opinion, minimally invasive approaches and microsurgical excision of lumbar juxta-facet cysts are advantageous over conventional lumbar laminectomy because they reduce later development of segmental instability at the operative level, and therefore a less invasive strategy for intraspinal synovial cysts removal should be recommended. PMID:15257263

  16. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  17. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  18. Validation of a web-based training tool for lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, K; Jiwanji, M; Shah, J; Bello, F; Munz, Y; Darzi, A

    2003-01-01

    WebSET is an Internet based educational tool that can be used on any standard personal computer. It has been developed by a European collaboration and integrates high quality courseware, self-assessment exercises, video clips and VR simulation. This pilot study was carried out to validate the lumbar puncture (LP) module in training. Subjects who had never performed an LP participated in the study. The subjects were randomized into 2 groups: 1) underwent training and 2) control group. Both groups performed a pre-test and post-test LP on a synthetic mannequin. There was a significant improvement in the training group in terms of performance assessment as compared to the control group. This study showed that there was a significant improvement in the performance of the procedure and in procedural knowledge after training with WebSET. PMID:15455897

  19. The immediate effect of lumbar spine patterns of neuromuscular joint facilitation in young amateur baseball players.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ming; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Takasumi; Naito, Daiki; Koiso, Yuta

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in baseball pitching velocity, the functional reach test (FR) and the simple reaction times (SRT) in young amateur baseball players after lumbar spine patterns of neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF) treatment. [Subjects] The subjects were 11 young amateur baseball players. An NJF intervention and a proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) intervention were performed. The interventions were performed one after the other with one week between them. The order of the interventions was completely randomized. [Methods] The baseball pitching velocity, the FR and the SRT were evaluated before and after treatment. [Results] In the NJF group, there were significant differences in baseball pitching velocity, FR and SRT after treatment. In the PNF group, there was a significant difference in SRT after treatment. [Conclusion] NJF intervention shortens the SRT, increases the baseball pitching velocity and FR, and may be recommended to improve performance in baseball players. PMID:24409011

  20. Midline lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst mimicking an epidural tumor: case report and review of pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Azzam, C J

    1988-08-01

    A case of a midline lumbar extradural ganglion/synovial cyst causing lumbar canal stenosis and mimicking an epidural tumor is presented. The lesion was demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging study, and relief of symptoms was achieved with decompressive laminectomy and total removal of the mass. The pathogenesis of lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst is reviewed. PMID:2972941

  1. Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement compared with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Ting; Liu, Gabriel; Thambiah, Joseph; Wong, Hee Kit

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement (ADR) compared to that of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease (DDD) in an Asian population. METHODS This was a retrospective review of 74 patients who had surgery performed for discogenic lower backs that involved only the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. All the patients had lumbar DDD without radiculopathy or spondylolithesis, and concordant pain with discogram at the pathological level. The patients were divided into two groups – those who underwent ADR and those who underwent TLIF. RESULTS A trend suggesting that the ADR group had better perioperative outcomes (less blood loss, shorter operating time, shorter hospital stay and shorter time to ambulation) than the TLIF group was observed. However, a trend indicating that surgical-approach-related complications occurred more frequently in the ADR group than the TLIF group was also observed. The rate of revision surgery was comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that for the treatment of discogenic lower back pain, lumbar ADR has better perioperative outcomes and a similar revision rate when compared with TLIF. However, the use of ADR was associated with a higher incidence of surgical-approach-related complications. More studies with bigger cohort sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of ADR in lumbar DDD. PMID:25917472

  2. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  3. Microsurgical lumbar discectomy: preliminary report of 83 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D H; Kenning, J

    1979-02-01

    The application of microsurgical technique to lumbar discectomy may be of dual value: minimal disruption of the integrity of normal anatomy and meticulous hemostasis may help to speed the process of convalescence, and the retention of epidural fat around the nerve root may help to prevent adhesions, a common cause of the late, "failed disc" syndrome. The authors report their experience with 83 consecutive microdiscectomies for lumbar disc protrusions. The results must be considered as tentative because the follow-up period has been short and the authors found it difficult to quantify the quality of health during the convalescent phase, although this seemed to be excellent. Their short term results are similar to those of the larger series reported by Williams, whose experience with microsurgical lumbar discectomies began 6 years ago. No other series have been reported. The authors describe their technique and compare it to that of Williams. PMID:440544

  4. [Endovascular repair of iliocaval arteriovenous fistula complicating lumbar disc surgery].

    PubMed

    Ben Jemaa, H; Maalej, A; Lazzez, K; Jemal, H; Karray, S; Ben Mahfoudh, K

    2016-05-01

    Vascular complications of lumbar disc surgery are rare. Few cases have been reported. Arteriovenous fistulas are the most common. They are due to anatomical relationships between the last lumbar vertebrae, the corresponding discs, and the iliac vessels; degenerative lesions of the intervertebral discs facilitate instrumental vessel perforation, and operative difficulty. Computed tomography is particularly accurate for making the diagnosis. Treatment strategies consist in surgery or endovascular management. Percutaneous endovascular treatment using a stent-graft is a reasonable option for treating arteriovenous fistula. We describe the case of a 50-year-old patient who developed an iliocaval arteriovenous fistula following lumbar disc hernia surgery. The lesion was excluded by a stent-graft. The postoperative period was uneventful. PMID:26920402

  5. A rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy: spinal gas collection.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, F; Leone, A; Pitta, L

    2000-10-01

    The presence of gas in the intervertebral disk space, known as the vacuum phenomenon, is a relatively common radiologic finding, especially on computed tomographic investigation. In a few cases, the gas can be collected into the lumbar spinal canal and can also compress the nerve root. To date only seven cases of symptomatic lumbar radiculopathy caused by a bubble of gas are reported in the literature. The presence of gas inside a narrowed disk and the collection of gas in the spinal canal suggest a communication between the two structures. A case of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a collection of gas in the spinal canal provided the authors the opportunity to study this rare condition by magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging had not been used before in the referred cases and proved conclusively the discal origin of the gas. PMID:11052357

  6. [Acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation].

    PubMed

    Li, J S

    1989-08-01

    Five cases of acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation are reported. After protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc were treated by violent manipulation, the lumbo-leg pain were severe suddenly. The operations found that the annulus fibrosus had ruptured and the nerve root or cauda equina was constricted by the nucleus pulposus which had entered into the spinal canal. It must be emphasized that their is in danger of more damaging intervertebral disc degenerated by violent manipulation, then the adhesion of the nerve root will occur gradually. We don't suggest to make violent manipulation for the patient with the nerve root injured. We have acquired good results in treating protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc by combined therapy and they are introduced in this article. PMID:2620603

  7. Repeated microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disk herniation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tianyong; Zhou, Qiang; Dai, Fei; Luo, Fei; He, Qingyi; Zhang, Jinsong; Xu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the microendoscopic discectomy technique and inclusion criteria for the treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation and to supply feasible criteria and technical notes to avoid complications and to increase the therapeutic effect. METHODS: A consecutive series of 25 patients who underwent posterior microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniation were included. The inclusion criteria were as follows: no severe pain in the lumbar region, no lumbar instability observed by flexion-extension radiography and no intervertebral discitis or endplate damage observed by magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were diagnosed by clinical manifestations and imaging examinations. RESULTS: Follow-up visits were carried out in all cases. Complications, such as nerve injuries, were not observed. The follow-up outcomes were graded using the MacNab criteria. A grade of excellent was given to 12 patients, good to 12 patients and fair to 1 patient. A grade of excellent or good occurred in 96% of cases. One patient relapsed 3 months after surgery and then underwent lumbar interbody fusion and inner fixation. The numerical rating scale of preoperative leg pain was 7.4± 1.5, whereas it decreased to 2.1±0.8 at 7 days after surgery. The preoperative Oswestry disability index of lumbar function was 57.5±10.0, whereas it was 26.0±8.5 at 7 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: In these cases, microendoscopic discectomy was able to achieve satisfactory clinical results. Furthermore, it has advantages over other methods because of its smaller incision, reduced bleeding and more efficient recovery. PMID:25789521

  8. Lumbopelvic parameters and the extent of lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Yoganandan, Narayan; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Following lumbar fusion, sacroiliac (SI) joint pain has been regarded as a form of adjacent segment disease. Prior studies suggest increased stress to the SI joint and pelvis with lumbar fusion. Limited studies have evaluated the relationship between the extent of lumbar fusion and its potential influence on lumbopelvic parameters, which may provide the insights to persistent back pain. Methods: Three hundred fifty-five patients underwent lumbar fusions at our institution between fall 2010 and winter 2012; 80 patients met criteria for the study. Inclusion criteria included appropriate imaging available (preoperative and postoperative lateral films), follow-up >1-year, fusion where the rostral extent was up to L1 and the caudal extent was at most S1. Exclusion criteria included prior lumbar fusion, history of SI joint syndrome, follow-up <1-year, fusion involving thoracic levels, and inadequate films (inability to visualize appropriate anatomy). The patients were divided into groups based on the extent of fusion. The patients were evaluated based on age, sex, diagnosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope. The preoperative values were compared among the groups, the postoperative values were compared among the groups, and the pre- and post-operative values were compared within each group. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between pre- and post-operative lumbopelvic parameters within each fusion group. Conclusion: The results imply that the extent of instrumentation, including the involvement of the sacrum, may not alter lumbopelvic parameters. This appears to argue against the idea that longer fusion constructs induce more stress on the pelvis and SI joint. PMID:26543673

  9. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  10. Relationship between paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area and relative proprioceptive weighting ratio of older persons with lumbar spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tadashi; Sakai, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Eishi; Yamazaki, Kazunori; Yamada, Ayaka; Sato, Noritaka; Morita, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area and the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio during local vibratory stimulation of older persons with lumbar spondylosis in an upright position. [Subjects] In all, 74 older persons hospitalized for lumbar spondylosis were included. [Methods] We measured the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio of postural sway using a Wii board while vibratory stimulations of 30, 60, or 240 Hz were applied to the subjects’ paraspinal or gastrocnemius muscles. Back strength, abdominal muscle strength, and erector spinae muscle (L1/L2, L4/L5) and lumbar multifidus (L1/L2, L4/L5) cross-sectional areas were evaluated. [Results] The erector spinae muscle (L1/L2) cross-sectional area was associated with the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio during 60Hz stimulation. [Conclusion] These findings show that the relative proprioceptive weighting ratio compared to the erector spinae muscle (L1/L2) cross-sectional area under 60Hz proprioceptive stimulation might be a good indicator of trunk proprioceptive sensitivity. PMID:26311962

  11. Scaling of lumbar vertebrae in anthropoids and implications for evolution of the hominoid axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Masato; Hirose, Youichi

    2003-04-01

    We investigated allometric relationships between vertebral centrum cranial surface areas and body weight and skeletal lumbar length in extant platyrrhine and cercopithecid species. Platyrrhines have smaller lumbar vertebral centra regarding the cranial surface area relative to their body weight than extant catarrhines. However, the stress to the spine of quadrupeds is not only influenced by the body weight but also its length, which contributes to the amount of bending moment. Our results indicated that platyrrhines and cercopithecids have similar lumbar vertebral centrum surface areas when they are scaled on the product of the body weight and skeletal lumbar length. Platyrrhines generally tend to have relatively short lumbar columns for a given body weight. As a result of this tendency, their vertebral centra appear relatively small if only body weight is taken into account. The centrum surface area is rather constant relative to the product of the body weight and skeletal lumbar length within platyrrhines or cercopithecids, despite the fact that skeletal lumbar length is in itself rather variable relative to body weight. This result indicates that the vertebral centrum articular area, the lumbar column length and the body weight are strongly correlated with each other and that such relationships are similar between platyrrhines and cercopithecids. These relationships were observed using both the zygapophyseal and rib definitions of the lumbar vertebrae. However, they were more clearly observed when the zygapophyseal definition was adopted. It appeared that lumbar vertebrae of Proconsul nyanzae (KNM-MW 13142) had distinctively smaller surface areas relative to its body weight and lumbar length than for platyrrhines and cercopithecids, differing from extant hominoids, which have comparatively larger lumbar vertebrae. In the case of Morotopithecus, the lumbar vertebral surface area seems to be as large as in extant platyrrhines and cercopithecids if it had a reduced

  12. Pregabalin for Refractory Radicular Leg Pain due to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Preliminary Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamashita, Masaomi; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Miyako; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ito, Toshinori; Kubota, Go; Suzuki, Munetaka; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Hanaoka, Eiji; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Shimbo, Jun; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of pregabalin (PGB) for neuropathic leg pain in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients with disturbed activities of daily living (ADL)/quality of life (QOL) in a prospective observational study. Subjects were a total of 104 LSS patients with neuropathic pain (NeP) in leg and neurological intermittent claudication (IMC) refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for at least a month. NeP was identified using screening tool, Pain DETECT questionnaire. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores and responses to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) were assessed before and 6 weeks after PGB treatment initiation. Changes in IMC distance and adverse events were also recorded. PGB significantly improved their VAS scores for pain and sleep quality (P < 0.001). With respect to JOABPEQ, significant improvements were observed with regard to the following dimensions: pain-related disorders (P < 0.01), lumbar spine dysfunction (P = 0.031), gait disturbance (P = 0.028), and psychological disorders (P = 0.014). The IMC distance showed an improvement tendency after PGB treatment, albeit with no significance (P = 0.063). Minor adverse events such as dizziness were observed. PGB can be effective for neuropathic leg pain refractory to NSAIDs in LSS patients, resulting in not only pain control but also improving lower back pain-related ADL/QOL scores. PMID:27445615

  13. Association of COL2A1 Gene Polymorphism with Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dae Woo; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) progresses with aging after 50-60 years, and the genetic association of DLS remains largely unclear. In this study, the genetic association between collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1) gene and DLS was investigated. Methods COL2A1 gene polymorphism was investigated in DLS subjects compared to healthy controls to investigate the possibility of its association with COL2A1 gene. Based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) database, SNP (rs2276454) in COL2A1 were selected and genotyped using direct sequencing in 51 patients with DLS and 235 healthy controls. The SNP effects were analyzed using three models of codominant, dominant, and recessive. Logistic regression models were calculated for odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and corresponding p-values, controlling age and gender as co-variables. Results SNP (rs2276454) in COL2A1 was significantly associated with the degenerative lumbar scoliosis in the codominant (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.10; p = 0.008) and dominant models (OR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.59 to 9.29; p = 0.001). Conclusions The results suggest that COL2A1 is associated with the risk of DLS in Korean population. PMID:25436060

  14. Normal motion of the lumbar spine as related to age and gender.

    PubMed

    Dvorák, J; Vajda, E G; Grob, D; Panjabi, M M

    1995-01-01

    The CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer was used to measure the lumbar spine's range of motion (ROM). One hundred and four asymptomatic volunteers were examined to obtain normal values for flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. A detailed error analysis was conducted to investigate the inter- and intraobserver reliability of the measurement equipment, the differences between passive and active examination, the effects of stretching exercises before examination, and the diurnal changes related to lumbar spine ROM. Subjects were divided into groups by age and gender. Values for each group were compared with respect to age and gender. The measurements were found to be consistent and repeatable. Stretching exercises were observed to increase ROM. Passive examination was recommended to achieve maximum ROM. ROM was observed to increase during the course of the day. A normative database was established showing significantly decreased motion as age increased, but no gender differences were discovered. The validity of the axial rotation values due to fixation difficulties is questioned. PMID:7749901

  15. Loss and re-adaptation of lumbar intervertebral disc water signal intensity after prolonged bedrest.

    PubMed

    Kordi, M; Belavý, D L; Armbrecht, G; Sheikh, A; Felsenberg, D; Trudel, G

    2015-09-01

    The adaptation and re-adaptation process of the intervertebral disc (IVD) to prolonged bedrest is important for understanding IVD physiology and IVD herniations in astronauts. Little information is available on changes in IVD composition. In this study, 24 male subjects underwent 60-day bedrest and In/Out Phase magnetic resonance imaging sequences were performed to evaluate IVD shape and water signal intensity. Scanning was performed before bedrest (baseline), twice during bedrest, and three, six and twenty-four months after bedrest. Area, signal intensity, average height, and anteroposterior diameter of the lumbar L3/4 and L4/5 IVDs were measured. At the end of bedrest, disc height and area were significantly increased with no change in water signal intensity. After bedrest, we observed reduced IVD signal intensity three months (p=0.004 versus baseline), six months (p=0.003 versus baseline), but not twenty-four months (p=0.25 versus baseline) post-bedrest. At these same time points post-bedrest, IVD height and area remained increased. The reduced lumbar IVD water signal intensity in the first months after bedrest implies a reduction of glycosaminoglycans and/or free water in the IVD. Subsequently, at two years after bedrest, IVD hydration status returned towards pre-bedrest levels, suggesting a gradual, but slow, re-adaptation process of the IVD after prolonged bedrest. PMID:26350949

  16. Range of Motion of the Intact Lumbar Segment: A Multivariate Study of 42 Lumbar Spines

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Background A thorough understanding of the biomechanical characteristics of the healthy human spine is critical in furthering the treatment of spinal pathology. The goal of this study was to investigate the motion of the intact lumbar spine segment as measured by range of motion (ROM), and to investigate the dependencies thereof on gender and intervertebral level. Materials and Methods Kinematic data was obtained for 42 human lumbar segments (L1-S1) in response to a pure-moment loading protocol in flexion extension (FE), lateral bending (LB) and axial torsion (AT). Data was obtained for 204 individual functional spinal units (91 female, 113 male). Multivariate analysis of variance was conducted to detect differences between genders and intervertebral levels in each mode of loading. Correlations between ROM and donor demographics, including height, weight, and age, were conducted. Results ROM was significantly greater for females than for males in FE, LB and AT (p<0.001). ROM tended to increase down the vertebral column in FE. L3-4 FE ROM was significantly greater than L1-2 (p=0.024), and L4-5 and L5-S1 FE ROM were significantly greater than for every other level (p<0.003). LB ROM tended to be greater toward the center of the segment with L2-3, L3-4 and L4-5 ROM being significantly greater than both L1-2 (p<0.001) and L5-S1 (p=0.006, p<0.001, p=0.043, respectively). A similar trend was found for AT, however only L1-2 was significantly less than all other levels (p=0.042, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.034 for L2-3, L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 respectively). Conclusion The significant differences in lumbar ROM between male and female spine segments and between the intervertebral levels must be taken into account in study design in order to prevent biases in outcomes. The significant differences in ROM between levels may also have critical implications in the design of spinal implants, particularly those designed to maintain or restore healthy motion. PMID:25785241

  17. Clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Control over pain and pain coping strategies are associated with pain intensity as well as psychological status and subjective disability in patients experiencing pain. The present study assessed the clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis using mediation analysis. Methods Sixty-two patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (median age, 70 years; 34 men, 28 women) were evaluated before surgery. The pain intensity and area, psychological status/subjective disability (Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire), and control over pain/pain coping strategies (Coping Strategies Questionnaire) were assessed. Mediation analysis, which consisted of serial regression analyses, mainly tested whether (1) control over pain/pain coping strategies were predicted by pain characteristics and (2) control over pain/pain coping strategies predicted psychological status/subjective disability after controlling for pain characteristics. Results Control over pain was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.33; p = 0.01); moreover, it predicted walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.31; p = 0.01) and social function (0.38; p = 0.00) after controlling for pain intensity. Although increasing activity level, one pain coping strategy, was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.30; p = 0.02), it did not predict walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.07; p = 0.53) or social function (0.13; p = 0.33) when considering pain intensity. Conclusions In this cohort, mediation analysis demonstrated that pain intensity did not directly affect perceived walking ability or social function, but did affect control over pain; moreover, control over pain affected walking ability and social function. Clinical relevance These findings are useful for a deep understanding of the relationships between pain and

  18. Thoracic and lumbar extradural structure examined by extraduroscope.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Shimizu, R; Saitoh, K; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the extradural space using a flexible extraduroscope in 113 patients undergoing extradural anaesthesia. Patients were classified into two groups to receive either thoracic or lumbar extradural anaesthesia as needed for perioperative analgesia. The extraduroscopy showed that the thoracic extradural space becomes widely patent after injecting a given amount of air and that the amount of fatty and fibrous connective tissue is less in the thoracic extradural space compared with the lumbar extradural space. We suggest that differences between the structure of these two vertebral regions may affect the spread of local anaesthetics in the extradural space. PMID:9813508

  19. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  20. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for lumbar infectious spondylitis: a retrospective study in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal infections remain a challenge for clinicians because of their variable presentation and complicated course. Common management approaches include conservative administration of antibiotics or aggressive surgical debridement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic debridement with dilute betadine solution irrigation (PEDI) for treating patients with lumbar infectious spondylitis. Methods From January 2005 to July 2010, a total of 32 patients undergoing PEDI were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The surgical indications of the enrolled patients included single-level infectious spondylodiscitis, postoperative infectious spondylodiscitis, advanced infection with epidural abscess, psoas muscle abscess, pre-vertebral or para-vertebral abscess, multilevel infectious spondylitis, and recurrent infection after anterior debridement and fusion. Clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination, Macnab criteria, regular serologic testing, and imaging studies to determine whether continued antibiotics treatment or surgical intervention was required. Results Causative bacteria were identified in 28 (87.5%) of 32 biopsy specimens. Appropriate parenteral antibiotics for the predominant pathogen isolated from infected tissue biopsy cultures were prescribed to patients. Twenty-seven (84.4%) patients reported satisfactory relief of their back pain after PEDI. Twenty-six (81.3%) patients recovered uneventfully after PEDI and sequential antibiotic therapy. No surgery-related major complications were found, except 3 patients with transient paresthesia in the affected lumbar segment. Conclusions PEDI was successful in obtaining a bacteriologic diagnosis, relieving the patient’s symptoms, and assisting in the eradication of lumbar infectious spondylitis. This procedure could be an effective alternative for patients who have a poor response to conservative treatment before a major open surgery. PMID:24669940

  1. Minimally-invasive posterior lumbar stabilization for degenerative low back pain and sciatica. A review.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, G; Brembilla, C; Cianfoni, A

    2015-05-01

    The most diffused surgical techniques for stabilization of the painful degenerated and instable lumbar spine, represented by transpedicular screws and rods instrumentation with or without interbody cages or disk replacements, require widely open and/or difficult and poorly anatomical accesses. However, such surgical techniques and approaches, although still considered "standard of care", are burdened by high costs, long recovery times and several potential complications. Hence the effort to open new minimally-invasive surgical approaches to eliminate painful abnormal motion. The surgical and radiological communities are exploring, since more than a decade, alternative, minimally-invasive or even percutaneous techniques to fuse and lock an instable lumbar segment. Another promising line of research is represented by the so-called dynamic stabilization (non-fusion or motion preservation back surgery), which aims to provide stabilization to the lumbar spinal units (SUs), while maintaining their mobility and function. Risk of potential complications of traditional fusion methods (infection, CSF leaks, harvest site pain, instrumentation failure) are reduced, particularly transitional disease (i.e., the biomechanical stresses imposed on the adjacent segments, resulting in delayed degenerative changes in adjacent facet joints and discs). Dynamic stabilization modifies the distribution of loads within the SU, moving them away from sensitive (painful) areas of the SU. Basic biomechanics of the SU will be discussed, to clarify the mode of action of the different posterior stabilization devices. Most devices are minimally invasive or percutaneous, thus accessible to radiologists' interventional practice. Devices will be described, together with indications for patient selection, surgical approaches and possible complications. PMID:24906245

  2. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain.

  3. The frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage using a Tuohy needle and the traditional needle.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Gormley, William B; Zamani, Amir A; Dunn, Ian F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2016-08-01

    Background Intraoperative lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage is a well-recognised technique in cranial and vascular surgery. The goal of the study was to assess the frequency and severity of intracranial hypotension post-intraoperative lumbar drainage performed using two different techniques, a 14G Tuohy needle versus an 18G traditional needle. Methods The medical records and imaging studies of 94 patients who had undergone open cranial operation were retrospectively studied: 47 patients had intraoperative lumbar drainage and 47 patients did not. A 14G Tuohy needle was employed in 27 (57.4%) patients and an 18G traditional needle was employed in 20 (42.6%) patients. Results There were signs of intracranial hypotension on MR images in nine (19.1%) patients who had intraoperative lumbar CSF drainage; none of the patients in the control group exhibited the MR signs of intracranial hypotension. A 14G needle was used in 6/9 patients and resulted in severe complications: one patient developed a delayed intracranial epidural hematoma that required emergency evacuation and a blood patch. Another patient developed somnolence that required two epidural blood patches and a third patient had protracted headaches. The 18G needle was used in the remaining 3/9 patients who were asymptomatic or presented with mild headaches. Conclusion The use of the smaller 18G traditional needle was associated with better outcomes with regards to intracranial hypotension, and the frequency of severe complications was higher with the use of the 14G Tuohy needle. PMID:26743824

  4. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  5. An epidemiologic study of non-occupational lifting as a risk factor for herniated lumbar intervertebral disc. The Northeast Collaborative Group on Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Mundt, D J; Kelsey, J L; Golden, A L; Pastides, H; Berg, A T; Sklar, J; Hosea, T; Panjabi, M M

    1993-04-01

    An epidemiologic case-control study of herniated lumbar intervertebral disc was conducted in Springfield, Massachusetts, New Brunswick, New Jersey, and New York, New York, to evaluate the role of several possible risk factors in the etiology of this disorder. Patients with signs and symptoms of herniated lumbar disc (N = 287) were matched to control subjects without back pain by age, sex, source of care, and geographic area. Of the total case-subject group, 177 were confirmed by surgery, computed tomographic scan, myelogram, or magnetic resonance imaging. This article focuses on non-occupational lifting, an activity not previously reported on. Frequent lifting of objects or children weighing 25 or more pounds with knees straight and back bent was associated with increased risk of herniated lumbar disc. This association was particularly strong among confirmed case subjects (relative risk = 3.95). Positive associations among confirmed case subjects were also seen for frequent lifting with arms extended (relative risk = 1.87) and twisting while lifting (relative risk = 1.90). No associations were found for frequent stretching or carrying. If confirmed in other investigations, these data suggest that instruction in lifting techniques should be extended into the home. PMID:8484151

  6. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Shim, Chan Shik; Ahn, Yong; Choi, Young-Geun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation. Methods Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Results Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation. PMID:20062565

  7. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2012-01-01

    Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures), the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management, it is concluded that lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be an effective modality for managing chronic axial or discogenic pain. This treatment appears to be effective for those who have had facet joints as well as sacroiliac joints eliminated as the pain source

  8. The Use of Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Eastern China: Appropriateness and Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liedao; Wang, Xuanwei; Lin, Xiangjin; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is common and costly. While a general scene of back pain related practice in China remains unknown, there are signs of excessive use of lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR). We retrospectively studied 3107 lumbar spine MRIs in Eastern China to investigate the appropriateness of lumbar spine MR use. Simple back pain is the most common chief complaint for ordering a lumbar MR study. Only 41.3% of lumbar spine MR studies identified some findings that may have potential clinical significance. Normal lumbar spine is the most common diagnosis (32.7%), followed by lumbar disc bulging and lumbar disc herniation. Walk difficulties, back injury and referred leg pain as chief complaints were associated with greater chance of detecting potentially clinically positive lumbar MR image findings, as compare with simple back pain. There was no difference in positive rates among orthopedic surgeon and specialists of other disciplines. Lumbar spine MR imaging was generally overused in Eastern China by various specialists, particularly at health assessment centers. For appropriate use of lumbar spine MR, orthopedic surgeons are no better than physicians of other disciplines. Professional training and clinical guidelines are needed to facilitate evidence-based back pain practice in China. PMID:26731106

  9. The Use of Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Eastern China: Appropriateness and Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liedao; Wang, Xuanwei; Lin, Xiangjin; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is common and costly. While a general scene of back pain related practice in China remains unknown, there are signs of excessive use of lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR). We retrospectively studied 3107 lumbar spine MRIs in Eastern China to investigate the appropriateness of lumbar spine MR use. Simple back pain is the most common chief complaint for ordering a lumbar MR study. Only 41.3% of lumbar spine MR studies identified some findings that may have potential clinical significance. Normal lumbar spine is the most common diagnosis (32.7%), followed by lumbar disc bulging and lumbar disc herniation. Walk difficulties, back injury and referred leg pain as chief complaints were associated with greater chance of detecting potentially clinically positive lumbar MR image findings, as compare with simple back pain. There was no difference in positive rates among orthopedic surgeon and specialists of other disciplines. Lumbar spine MR imaging was generally overused in Eastern China by various specialists, particularly at health assessment centers. For appropriate use of lumbar spine MR, orthopedic surgeons are no better than physicians of other disciplines. Professional training and clinical guidelines are needed to facilitate evidence-based back pain practice in China. PMID:26731106

  10. Low reoperation rate following 336 multilevel lumbar laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few reoperations are required in older patients undergoing multilevel lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented fusions for spinal stenosis with/without spondylolisthesis/instability, and they rarely require instrumentation. Methods: We reviewed 336 patients averaging 66.5 years of age undergoing initial average 4.7 level lumbar laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions over an average 7.1-year period (range 2.0–16.5 years). Patients uniformly exhibited spinal stenosis, instability (Grade I [195 patients] or Grade II spondylolisthesis [67 patients]), disc herniations (154 patients), and/or synovial cysts (66 patients). Reoperations, including for adjacent segment disease (ASD), addressed new/recurrent pathology. Results: Nine (2.7%) of 336 patients required reoperations, including for ASD, an average of 6.3 years (range 2–15 years) following initial 4.7 level laminectomies with 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions. Second operations warranted average 4.8 level (range 3–6) laminectomies and average 1.1 level non instrumented fusions addressing stenosis with instability (Grade I [7 patients] or Grade II [1 patient] spondylolisthesis), new disc herniations (2 patients), and/or a synovial cyst (1 patient). Conclusions: Only 9 (2.7%) of 336 patients required reoperations (including for ASD) consisting of multilevel laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions for recurrent/new stenosis even with instability; these older patients were not typically unstable, or were likely already fused, and did not require instrumentation. Alternatively, reoperation rates following instrumented fusions in other series approached 80% at 5 postoperative years. Therefore, we as spinal surgeons should realize that older patients even with instability rarely require instrumentation and that the practice of performing instrumented fusions in everyone, irrespective of age, needs to stop. PMID:27274407

  11. [Major vascular complications following surgery for a herniated lumbar disk].

    PubMed

    Abad, C; Martel, D; Feijóo, J J; Carreira, L

    1993-01-01

    Two cases of arterial injury of the iliac arteries during surgery of the lumbar disc are presented. Both patients were successfully operated, in the first case a primary repair was accomplished, the second patient was treated by means of an ileo-femoral bypass graft. A comment of the pathophysiology, diagnostic and surgical management of this unusual complication is presented. PMID:8285363

  12. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...″ cap screw holes and attach the front mounting at the femur axial rotation joint. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvic-lumbar adapter is horizontal and adjust the femur friction plungers at each hip socket joint to 240 inch-pounds torque. (3) Flex the thorax forward 50° and then rearward as necessary...

  13. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...″ cap screw holes and attach the front mounting at the femur axial rotation joint. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvic-lumbar adapter is horizontal and adjust the femur friction plungers at each hip socket joint to 240 inch-pounds torque. (3) Flex the thorax forward 50° and then rearward as necessary...

  14. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...″ cap screw holes and attach the front mounting at the femur axial rotation joint. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvic-lumbar adapter is horizontal and adjust the femur friction plungers at each hip socket joint to 240 inch-pounds torque. (3) Flex the thorax forward 50° and then rearward as necessary...

  15. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...″ cap screw holes and attach the front mounting at the femur axial rotation joint. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvic-lumbar adapter is horizontal and adjust the femur friction plungers at each hip socket joint to 240 inch-pounds torque. (3) Flex the thorax forward 50° and then rearward as necessary...

  16. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...″ cap screw holes and attach the front mounting at the femur axial rotation joint. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvic-lumbar adapter is horizontal and adjust the femur friction plungers at each hip socket joint to 240 inch-pounds torque. (3) Flex the thorax forward 50° and then rearward as necessary...

  17. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid...

  18. Retrolisthesis as a Compensatory Mechanism in Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ikchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posterior vertebral translation as a type of spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis is observed commonly in patients with degenerative spinal problems. Nevertheless, there is insufficient literature on retrolisthesis compared to anterolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of retrolisthesis, and its developmental mechanism associated with a compensatory role in sagittal imbalance of the lumbar spine. Methods From 2003 to 2012, 230 Korean patients who underwent spinal surgery in our department under the impression of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were enrolled. All participants were divided into four groups : 35 patients with retrolisthesis (group R), 32 patients with simultaneous retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis (group R+A), 76 patients with anterolisthesis (group A), and 87 patients with non-translation (group N). The clinical features and the sagittal parameters related to retrolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed based on the patients' medical records. Results There were different clinical features and developmental mechanisms between retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis. The location of retrolisthesis was affected by the presence of simultaneous anterolisthesis, even though it predominantly manifest in L3. The relative lower pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and lumbar lordosis compared to anterolisthesis were related to the generation of retrolisthesis, with the opposite observations of patients with anterolisthesis. Conclusion Retrolisthesis acts as a compensatory mechanism for moving the gravity axis posteriorly for sagittal imbalance in the lumbar spine under low pelvic incidence and insufficient intra-spinal compensation. PMID:25810857

  19. Lumbar Tuberculosis Associated with Membranous Nephropathy and Interstitial Nephritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Sun, Li; Feng, Jiangmin; Liu, Nan; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jianfei; Wang, Lining

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. However, it now is clear that tuberculosis can affect the kidney more insidiously. We describe a case of lumbar tuberculosis associated with simultaneous membranous nephropathy and interstitial nephritis, in which recovery of renal function occurred after treatment with steroids in addition to antituberculosis agents. PMID:20375238

  20. Obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse after lumbar microdiscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Syme, G; Swamy, GN; Nanjayan, S; Fowler, A; Calthorpe, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between obesity and recurrent intervertebral disc prolapse (IDP) following lumbar microdiscectomy. Methods A retrospective review of case notes from 2008 to 2012 was conducted for all patients who underwent single level lumbar microdiscectomy performed by a single surgeon. All patients were followed up at two weeks and six weeks following surgery, and given an open appointment for a further six months. Results A total of 283 patients were available for analysis: 190 (67%) were in the non-obese group and 93 (32.9%) in the obese group. There was no statistical difference in postoperative infection, dural tear or length of stay between the non-obese and obese groups. Recurrent symptomatic IDP was seen in 27 patients (9.5%) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen (10.0%) were in the non-obese group and eight (8.6%) in the obese group (p>0.8). Conclusions In our study, obesity was not a predictor of recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy. Our literature review confirmed that this study reports the largest series to date analysing the relationship between obesity and recurrent IDP following lumbar microdiscectomy in the British population. PMID:24780673