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Sample records for submarine volcano located

  1. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  2. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano.

    PubMed

    Embley, Robert W; Chadwick, William W; Baker, Edward T; Butterfield, David A; Resing, Joseph A; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Lupton, John E; Juniper, S Kim; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stern, Robert J; Lebon, Geoffrey T; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Merle, Susan G; Hein, James R; Wiens, Douglas A; Tamura, Yoshihiko

    2006-05-25

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. PMID:16724063

  3. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  5. A Submarine Perspective on Hawaiian Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Postwar improvements in navigation, sonar-based mapping, and submarine photography enabled the development of bathymetric maps, which revealed submarine morphologic features that could be dredged or explored and sampled with a new generation of manned and unmanned submersibles. The maps revealed debris fields from giant landslides, the great extent of rift zones radiating from volcanic centers, and two previously unknown submarine volcanoes named Mahukona and Loihi, the youngest Hawaiian volcano. About 70 major landslides cover half the flanks of the Hawaiian Ridge out to Midway Island. Some of the landslides attain lengths of 200 km and have volumes exceeding 5,000 km3. More recent higher resolution bathymetry and sidescan data reveal that many submarine eruptions construct circular, flat-topped, monogenetic cones; that large fields of young strongly alkalic lava flows, such as the North Arch and South Arch lava fields, erupt on the seafloor within several hundred km of the islands; and that alkalic lavas erupt during the shield stage on Kilauea and Mauna Loa. The North Arch flow field covers about 24,000 km2, has an estimated volume between about 1000 and 1250 km3, has flows as long as 108 km, and erupted from over 100 vents. The source and melting mechanisms for their production is still debated. The maps also displayed stair-step terraces, mostly constructed of drowned coral reefs, which form during early rapid subsidence of the volcanoes during periods of oscillating sea level. The combination of scuba and underwater photography facilitated the first motion pictures of the mechanism of formation of pillow lava in shallow water offshore Kilauea. The age progression known from the main islands was extended westward along the Hawaiian Ridge past Midway Island, around a bend in the chain and northward along the Emperor Seamounts. Radiometric dating of dredged samples from these submarine volcanoes show that the magma source that built the chain has been active for over 80 Ma and established the remarkable linearity of the age-progression along the chain. Glass rinds on submarine lava quenched at depth contain initial magmatic volatiles and yield data on the juvenile water, sulfur, CO2, and rare gas contents of basaltic magmas, and continue to reveal nuances of the volatile contents of lava. Rock sampling at Loihi Seamount led to the discovery of the pre-shield alkalic phase of Hawaiian volcanism, which mirrors the well-known post-shield alkalic phase. Lava compositions from the Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamounts have clear affinities to present-day Hawaiian lavas, but subtle source differences as well. The progression from small to large and back to small degrees of melting at individual volcanoes and the compositional changes along the chain constrain the melting processes and source compositions of Hawaiian volcanism. Coupling the age of lavas with that of submerged coral reefs has provided data on the growth and subsidence of volcanic centers. This information has meshed nicely with the age, composition, and morphology of lavas from the 3.2-km-deep Hawaiian Scientific Drill Hole. Submarine studies have taught us much about the workings of Hawaiian Volcanoes, and in the process have stimulated new work and concepts on marine volcanism worldwide.

  6. Extreme Spatial Variability in Microbial Mat Communities from Submarine Hydrothermal Vents Located at Multiple Volcanoes along the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    Volcanic arc systems are the most active tectonic feature in the world, but are among the least studied. The Western Pacific contains ~20,000 km of volcanic arcs, of which only ~2% have been systematically surveyed. The lack of comprehensive knowledge of volcanic arcs is compounded by the incredible variability found in relatively short distances. The complex source history of hydrothermal fluids and the variable depths of seamounts found in island arc systems result in highly variable vent chemistries and therefore unique microbial habitats within relatively short distances. The Mariana Island Arc was surveyed in 2003 and areas with suspected hydrothermal activities were identified for targeted remote operating vehicle (ROV) exploration and sampling in 2004. Sixteen microbial mat samples from five seamounts ranging from 145-1742 mbsl and from ambient to 222°C were collected and analyzed with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), cluster analysis of terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) community fingerprints, and by clone library analysis of small subunit ribosomal rDNA genes. The microbial mat communities from the Mariana Island Arc exhibit greater spatial variability within their community structure than microbial mats sampled from mid-ocean ridge or hotspot hydrothermal vents from a comparable scale. Microbial communities from the summit of NW Eifuku Volcano are dominated by putative iron-oxidizing phylotypes at the Yellow Top and Yellow Cone Vent sites, but are dominated by sulfur-oxidizing ?-Proteobacteria at the Champagne Vent site. Mats collected at the Mat City Vent site on E Diamante Seamount contained nearly three times as much biomass as any other mat sample collected, and is dominated by a Planctomyces phylotype. Hydrothermal sediments at the Fish Spa site located on Daikoku Seamount contained the second highest biomass detected and supported a large community of flatfish indicating a direct route for biomass being channeled up the food chain. The microbial community at Fish Spa consists of a highly diverse assemblage of Bacteroidetes, ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. While in contrast, the microbial mat at the Iceberg Vent site on NW Rota I is dominated by a single phylotype of ?-Proteobacteria.

  7. Geomechanical Characterization of Submarine Volcano-Flank Sediments, Martinique, Lesser

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    Chapter 7 Geomechanical Characterization of Submarine Volcano-Flank Sediments, Martinique, Lesser of Montagne Pel´ee that generated large submarine mass wasting deposits. Here, we evaluate the preconditioning.), Submarine Mass Movements and Their Consequences, Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research 37

  8. Integrated volcanologic and petrologic analysis of the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantner, Kathleen; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini, Greece in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD. Submarine and subaerial explosive activity lasted for a period of about four months and led to the formation of thick (~ 250 m) highly stratified pumice deposits on the upper crater walls as well as extensive pumice rafts that were dispersed throughout the southern Aegean Sea. Subaerial tephra fallout from eruption columns that breached the surface occurred as far east as Turkey.

  9. The 2014 Submarine Eruption of Ahyi Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Chadwick, W.; Merle, S. G.; Buck, N. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Coombs, M. L.; Evers, L. G.; Heaney, K. D.; Lyons, J. J.; Searcy, C. K.; Walker, S. L.; Young, C.; Embley, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    On April 23, 2014, Ahyi Volcano, a submarine cone in the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI), ended a 13-year-long period of repose with an explosive eruption lasting over 2 weeks. The remoteness of the volcano and the presence of several seamounts in the immediate area posed a challenge for constraining the source location of the eruption. Critical to honing in on the Ahyi area quickly were quantitative error estimates provided by the CTBTO on the backazimuth of hydroacoustic arrivals observed at Wake Island (IMS station H11). T-phases registered across the NMI seismic network at the rate of approximately 10 per hour until May 8 and were observed in hindsight at seismic stations on Guam and Chichijima. After May 8, sporadic T-phases were observed until May 17. Within days of the eruption onset, reports were received from NOAA research divers of hearing explosions underwater and through the hull on the ship while working on the SE coastline of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas), a distance of 20 km NW of Ahyi. In the same area, the NOAA crew reported sighting mats of orange-yellow bubbles on the water surface and extending up to 1 km from the shoreline. Despite these observations, satellite images showed nothing unusual throughout the eruption. During mid-May, a later cruise leg on the NOAA ship Hi'ialakai that was previously scheduled in the Ahyi area was able to collect some additional data in response to the eruption. Preliminary multibeam sonar bathymetry and water-column CTD casts were obtained at Ahyi. Comparison between 2003 and 2014 bathymetry revealed that the minimum depth had changed from 60 m in 2003 to 75 m in 2014, and a new crater ~95 m deep had formed at the summit. Extending SSE from the crater was a new scoured-out landslide chute extending downslope to a depth of at least 2300 m. Up to 125 m of material had been removed from the head of the landslide chute and downslope deposits were up to 40 m thick. Significant particle plumes were detected at all three CTD casts of Ahyi volcano. Plumes with optical anomalies up to 0.4 NTU were found south and west of Ahyi at 100-175 m water depth, corresponding to the depth of the new summit crater. We plan to combine the extensive T-phase, hydroacoustic, CTD, and bathymetry data from Ahyi to characterize submarine volcanic processes and quantify the size and total radiated energy of the eruption.

  10. Submarine venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc volcano

    E-print Network

    Chadwick, Bill

    Submarine venting of liquid carbon dioxide on a Mariana Arc volcano John Lupton NOAA/Pacific Marine, California, 92065, USA [1] Although CO2 is generally the most abundant dissolved gas found in submarine CO2-rich hydrothermal system at 1600-m depth near the summit of NW Eifuku, a small submarine volcano

  11. The submarine flanks of Anatahan Volcano, commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    E-print Network

    Chadwick, Bill

    The submarine flanks of Anatahan Volcano, commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands William W of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA Received 9 August 2004; accepted 3 November 2004 Abstract The submarine that 67% of the volcano's submarine flanks are covered with volcaniclastic debris and 26% is lava flows

  12. Near-specular acoustic scattering from a buried submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Anthony L; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are objects that form on the seafloor due to the emission of gas and fluidized sediment from the Earth's interior. They vary widely in size, can be exposed or buried, and are of interest to the underwater acoustics community as potential sources of active sonar clutter. Coincident seismic reflection data and low frequency bistatic scattering data were gathered from one such buried mud volcano located in the Straits of Sicily. The bistatic data were generated using a pulsed piston source and a 64-element horizontal array, both towed over the top of the volcano. The purpose of this work was to appropriately model low frequency scattering from the volcano using the bistatic returns, seismic bathymetry, and knowledge of the general geoacoustic properties of the area's seabed to guide understanding and model development. Ray theory, with some approximations, was used to model acoustic propagation through overlying layers. Due to the volcano's size, scattering was modeled using geometric acoustics and a simple representation of volcano shape. Modeled bistatic data compared relatively well with experimental data, although some features remain unexplained. Results of an inversion for the volcano's reflection coefficient indicate that it may be acoustically softer than expected. PMID:18247739

  13. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  14. H2O Contents of Submarine and Subaerial Silicic Pyroclasts from Oomurodashi Volcano, Northern Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Tani, K.; Nichols, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oomurodashi volcano is an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc, located ~20 km south of the inhabited active volcanic island of Izu-Oshima. Oomurodashi has a large (~20km diameter) flat-topped summit located at 100 - 150 metres below sea level (mbsl), with a small central crater, Oomuro Hole, located at ~200 mbsl. Surveys conducted during cruise NT12-19 of R/V Natsushima in 2012 using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin revealed that Oomuro Hole contains numerous active hydrothermal vents and that the summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with little biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s) from Oomuro Hole. Given the shallow depth of the volcano summit, such eruptions are likely to have generated subaerial eruption columns. A ~10ka pumiceous subaerial tephra layer on the neighbouring island of Izu-Oshima has a similar chemical composition to the submarine Oomurodashi rocks collected during the NT12-19 cruise and is thought to have originated from Oomurodashi. Here we present FTIR measurements of the H2O contents of rhyolitic pumice from both the submarine deposits sampled during ROV dives and the subaerial tephra deposit on Izu-Oshima, in order to assess magma degassing and eruption processes occurring during shallow submarine eruptions.

  15. A Miocene submarine volcano at Low Layton, Jamaica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1982-01-01

    A submarine fissure eruption of Upper Miocene age produced a modest volume of alkaline basalt at Low Layton, on the north coast of Jamaica. The eruption occurred in no more than a few hundred meters of water and produced a series of hyaloclastites, pillow breccias and pillow lavas, massive lavas, and dikes with an ENE en echelon structure. The volcano lies on the trend of one of the island's major E-W strike-slip fault zones; the Dunavale Fault Zone. The K-Ar age of the eruption of 9.5 plus or minus 0.5 Ma. B.P. corresponds to an extension of the Mid-Cayman Rise spreading center inferred from magnetic anomalies and bathymetry of the Cayman Trough to the north and west of Jamaica. The Low Layton eruption was part of the response of the strike-slip fault systems adjacent to this spreading center during this brief episode of tectonic readjustment.

  16. Remote Analysis of Grain Size Characteristic in Submarine Pyroclastic Deposits from Kolumbo Volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Whitesell, D. P.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Grain size characteristics of pyroclastic deposits provide valuable information about source eruption energetics and depositional processes. Maximum size and sorting are often used to discriminate between fallout and sediment gravity flow processes during explosive eruptions. In the submarine environment the collection of such data in thick pyroclastic sequences is extremely challenging and potentially time consuming. A method has been developed to extract grain size information from stereo images collected by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). In the summer of 2010 the ROV Hercules collected a suite of stereo images from a thick pumice sequence in the caldera walls of Kolumbo submarine volcano located about seven kilometers off the coast of Santorini, Greece. The highly stratified, pumice-rich deposit was likely created by the last explosive eruption of the volcano that took place in 1650 AD. Each image was taken from a distance of only a few meters from the outcrop in order to capture the outlines of individual clasts with relatively high resolution. Mosaics of individual images taken as the ROV transected approximately 150 meters of vertical outcrop were used to create large-scale vertical stratigraphic columns that proved useful for overall documentation of the eruption sequence and intracaldera correlations of distinct tephra units. Initial image processing techniques, including morphological operations, edge detection, shape and size estimation were implemented in MatLab and applied to a subset of individual images of the mosiacs. A large variety of algorithms were tested in order to best discriminate the outlines of individual pumices. This proved to be challenging owing to the close packing and overlapping of individual pumices. Preliminary success was achieved in discriminating the outlines of the large particles and measurements were carried out on the largest clasts present at different stratigraphic levels. In addition, semi-quantitative analysis of the size distribution could also be determined for individual images. Although a complete size distribution is not possible with this technique, information about the relative distribution of large and medium size clasts is likely to provide a reasonable proxy for the overall sorting of submarine deposits. Our preliminary work represents the first attempt to carry out an in situ granulometric analysis of a thick submarine pyroclastic sequence. This general technique is likely to be valuable in future studies of submarine explosive volcanism given the recent discoveries of extensive pumiceous deposits in many submarine calderas associated with subduction zone environments.

  17. Seafloor seismic monitoring of an active submarine volcano: Local seismicity at Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoa

    E-print Network

    Shearer, Peter

    Seafloor seismic monitoring of an active submarine volcano: Local seismicity at Vailulu'u Seamount'u Seamount, the youngest and easternmost volcano in the Samoan Archipelago. Four instruments were placed within the seamount, based on their similar waveforms. Two linear trends are defined by 21

  18. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the polygenetic Kolumbo submarine volcano/Santorini (Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübscher, Christian; Ruhnau, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we show for the first time the 3D-structural evolution of an explosive submarine volcano by means of reflection seismic interpretation. Four to five vertically stacked circular and cone-shaped units consisting mainly of volcaniclastics build the Kolumbo underwater volcano which experienced its first eruption > 70 ka ago and its last explosive eruption 1650 AD, 7 km NE of Santorini volcano (southern Aegean Sea). The summed volume of volcaniclastics is estimated to range between 13-22 km3. The entire Kolumbo volcanic complex has a height of ? 1 km and a diameter of ? 11 km. All volcaniclastic units reveal the same transparent reflection pattern strongly suggesting that explosive underwater volcanism was the prevalent process. Growth faults terminate upwards at the base of volcaniclastic units, thus representing a predictor to an eruption phase. Similarities in seismic reflection pattern between Kolumbo and near-by volcanic cones imply that the smaller cones evolved through explosive eruptions as well. Hence, the central Aegean Sea experienced several more explosive eruptions (? 23) than previously assumed, thus justifying further risk assessment. However, the eruption columns from the smaller volcanic cones did not reach the air and- consequently - no sub-aerial pyroclastic surge was created. The Anydros basin that hosts Kolumbo volcanic field opened incrementally NW to SE and parallel to the Pliny and Strabo trends during four major tectonic pulses prior to the onset of underwater volcanism.

  19. Distribution of tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption of Kolumbo volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, S. A.; Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of Santorini in the Aegean Sea, last erupted in 1650 AD resulting in about 70 fatalities on Thera from gas discharge and significant coastal destruction from tsunamis. Extensive pumice rafts were reported over a large area surrounding Santorini, extending as far south as Crete. Tephra from the 1650 AD submarine eruption has been correlated in sediment box cores using a combination of mineralogy and major element composition of glass shards. The biotite-bearing rhyolite of Kolumbo can be readily discriminated from other silicic pyroclastics derived from the main Santorini complex. In general the tephra deposits are very fine grained (silt to fine sand-size), medium gray in color, and covered by about 10 cms of brown hemipelagic sediment. This corresponds to an average background sedimentation rate of 29 cm/kyr. The distribution of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tephra extends over an area larger than previously inferred from seismic profiles on the volcano's slopes and in adjacent basins. The cores indicate tephra deposits at least 19 km from the caldera, more than double the approximate 9 km inferred from seismic data. The preferential occurrence of the tephra within basins and sedimentological features such as cross bedding and laminations suggests that emplacement was dominated by sediment gravity flows generated from submarine and subaerial eruption plumes. We suggest that generation of the sediment gravity flows took place by collapse of submarine eruption columns and by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that formed on the sea surface as subaerial fallout accumulated from parts of the columns that breached the surface. Additionally, SEM imaging reveals particle morphologies that can be attributed to fragmentation by both primary volatile degassing (bubble wall shards) and phreatomagmatic activity (blocky equant grains). It is likely that phreatomagmatic activity became more important in the latter stages of the eruptive sequence when eruptions columns broke the surface and a small ephemeral island was formed. The fine grain marine tephra deposits surrounding Kolumbo represent the compliment to the very fines-poor proximal pumice sequence exposed in the crater walls and demonstrates the very effective fractionation of fine tephra that can take place during explosive submarine eruptions.

  20. Submarine sliver in North Kona: A window into the early magmatic and growth history of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    E-print Network

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    Submarine sliver in North Kona: A window into the early magmatic and growth history of Hualalai rights reserved. Keywords: ocean islands; basalt; hawaiite; sulfur; submarine landslide; geochemistry 1. Introduction Interest in the processes affecting submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes has grown in recent

  1. Mapping the sound field of an erupting submarine volcano using an acoustic glider

    E-print Network

    Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne

    Mapping the sound field of an erupting submarine volcano using an acoustic glider Haru Matsumoto a wide-band sound source, recordings from the two-day survey produced a two-dimensional sound level map spanning 1 km (depth) Â 40 km (distance). The observed sound field shows depth- and range

  2. New submarine volcanoes in the Okinawa back-arc opening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.

    2008-12-01

    The results of a series of geological and geophysical observations, it is now better known that about 11 new submarine volcanoes are developing in the southern part of the Okinawa back-arc spreading center. These volcanoes, at the water depth from 200 V 1500 meters, were first detected by a 38 kHz single-beam echo- sounding system. The images not only show the shape of volcano, but also the hydrothermal venting, from several tens to several hundred meters above the top of a volcano. The multi-beam echo-sounder images provide the size and 3-D view. The CDT surveys show that the bottom layer has an anomalous high of turbidity ratio. The heat flow values are very high, up to 25 HFU. The ocean bottom seismometer monitoring indicate an average of 250 earthquake events per day from magnitude of 0.9 V 4.0. The tomographic modeling provides the possible route of magma upwelling and migrating. At the southern tip of Okinawa opening system, close to Taiwan, there is an active volcanic island, the Turtle Island. This volcano was erupted about 7,000 years ago. All the above observations indicate that new submarine volcanoes are developing at the vicinity of Okinawa back-arc spreading center with a half rate of 4-6 cm/year and oriented in N-S direction.

  3. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  4. The study of active submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Tsai, C.; Lee, C.

    2004-12-01

    The study area is located in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough (SPOT), which is a back-arc basin formed by extension of Eurasian plate. Previous research indicated two extensional stages in SPOT area. Many normal-fault structures were come into existence during both extensional processes. The SPOT is presently in an activity tectonic episode. Therefore, the area becomes a frequent earthquake and abundant magmatism. The purpose of this study is to discuss which relationship between tectonics, submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in SPOT area. The investigations are continued from 1998 to 2004, we have found at least twelve active hydrothermal vents in study area. Compare the locations hydrothermal vents with fault systems, we find both of them have highly correlated. We can distinguish them into two shapes, pyramidal shape and non-pyramidal shape. According to plumes height, we are able to divide these vents into two groups near east longitude 122.5° . East of this longitude, the hydrothermal plumes are more powerful and west of it are the weaker. This is closely related to the present extensional axis (N80° E) of the southern part of the Okinawa Trough. This can be explained the reason of why the more powerful vents coming out of the east group. The east group is associated with the present back-arc spreading system. West of 122.5° , the spreading system are in a primary stage. The andesitic volcanic island, the Turtle Island, is a result of N60° E extensional tectonism with a lot of faults. Besides the pyramidal shape, this can be proved indirectly. The vents located in the west side were occurred from previous extensional faults and are weaker than the eastern. Therefore, we suggest that if last the extension keeps going on, the hydrothermal vents located at the west side of the longitude 122.5° will be intensified.

  5. Predicting the Timing and Location of the next Hawaiian Volcano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph; Mattox, Stephen; Kildau, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of geologic data on Hawaiian volcanoes makes them ideal for study by middle school students. In this paper the authors use existing data on the age and location of Hawaiian volcanoes to predict the location of the next Hawaiian volcano and when it will begin to grow on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. An inquiry-based lesson is also…

  6. Transition from circular to stellate forms of submarine volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.

    2001-02-01

    Large volcanic islands and guyots have stellate forms that reflect the relief of radiating volcanic rift zones, multiple volcanic centers, and embayments due to giant flank failures. Small mid-ocean ridge volcanoes, in contrast, are commonly subcircular in plan view and show only embryonic rift zones. In order to characterize the transition between these two end-members the morphology of 141 seamounts and guyots was studied using the shape of the depth contour at half the height of each edifice. Irregularity was characterized by measuring perimeter distance, elongation, and moment of inertia of the contours, assuming an "ideal" edifice is circular. The analysis reveals a general transition over 2-4 km edifice height (best transition estimate 3 km), while some large edifices 4-5 km high show no major embayments or ridges, suggesting considerable variation in the effectiveness of mechanisms that cause flank instability and growth of rift zones. The various origins of the transition are discussed, and the upper limit of magma chambers, many of which lie above the basement of the larger edifices, is proposed to affect the morphologic complexity via a number of mechanisms and is an important factor affecting the mode of growth. The origins of the truncated cone shape of mid-ocean ridge volcanoes are also discussed. Of the eruption mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their flat summits, the most likely mechanisms involve eruption from small ephemeral magma bodies lying within the low-density upper oceanic crust. The discussion includes speculations on factors affecting the depths of magma chambers beneath oceanic volcanoes. Supporting table is available via Web browser or via Anonymous FTP from ftp://kosmos.agu.org, directory "append" (Username = "anonymous", Password ="guest"); subdirectories in the ftp site are arranged by paper number. Information on searching and submitting electronic supplements is found at http://www.agu.org/pubs/csupp_about.html.

  7. A large submarine sand-rubble flow on kilauea volcano, hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornari, D.J.; Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.

    1979-01-01

    Papa'u seamount on the south submarine slope of Kilauea volcano is a large landslide about 19 km long, 6 km wide, and up to 1 km thick with a volume of about 39 km3. Dredge hauls, remote camera photographs, and submersible observations indicate that it is composed primarily of unconsolidated angular glassy basalt sand with scattered basalt blocks up to 1 m in size; no lava flows were seen. Sulfur contents of basalt glass from several places on the sand-rubble flow and nearby areas are low (< 240 ppm), indicating that the clastic basaltic material was all erupted on land. The Papa'u sandrubble flow was emplaced during a single flow event fed from a large near-shore bank of clastic basaltic material which in turn was formed as lava flows from the summit area of Kilauea volcano disintegrated when they entered the sea. The current eruptive output of the volcano suggests that the material in the submarine sand-rubble flow represents about 6000 years of accumulation, and that the flow event occurred several thousand years ago. ?? 1979.

  8. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 ?m in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) (?= BCRC AR10044(T)?= DSM 29354(T)). PMID:25855623

  9. Hydrothermal Venting at Kick'Em Jenny Submarine Volcano (West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Croff Bell, K. L.; Dondin, F. J. Y.; Roman, C.; Smart, C.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Ballard, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Kick'em Jenny is a frequently-erupting, shallow submarine volcano located ~8 km off the northwest coast of Grenada in the West Indies. The last eruption took place in 2001 but did not breach the sea surface. Focused and diffuse hydrothermal venting is taking place mainly within a small (~100 x 100 m) depression within the 300 m diameter crater of the volcano at depths of about 265 meters. Near the center of the depression clear fluids are being discharged from a focused mound-like vent at a maximum temperature of 180o C with the simultaneous discharge of numerous bubble streams. The gas consists of 93-96% CO2 with trace amounts of methane and hydrogen. A sulfur component likely contributes 1-4% of the gas total. Gas flux measurements on individual bubble streams ranged from 10 to 100 kg of CO2 per day. Diffuse venting with temperatures 5 to 35o C above ambient occurs throughout the depression and over large areas of the main crater. These zones are extensively colonized by reddish-yellow bacterial mats with the production of loose Fe-oxyhydroxides largely as a surface coating and in some cases, as fragile spires up to several meters in height. A high-resolution photo mosaic of the crater depression was constructed using the remotely operated vehicle Hercules on cruise NA039 of the E/V Nautilus. The image revealed prominent fluid flow patterns descending the sides of the depression towards the base. We speculate that the negatively buoyant fluid flow may be the result of second boiling of hydrothermal fluids at Kick'em Jenny generating a dense saline component that does not rise despite its elevated temperature. Increased density may also be the result of high dissolved CO2 content of the fluids, although we were not able to measure this directly. The low amount of sulphide mineralization on the crater floor suggests that deposition may be occurring mostly subsurface, in accord with models of second boiling mineralization from other hydrothermal vent systems.

  10. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  11. Research Article Evolution of West Rota Volcano, an extinct submarine volcano in the

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    volcanoes: (i) it consists of a lower, predominantly andesite section overlain by a bimodal rhyolite-basalt layered sequence; (ii) andesitic rocks are locally intensely altered and mineralized; (iii) it has a large Ar dating indi- cates that andesitic volcanism comprising the lower volcanic section occurred 0

  12. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kilias, Stephanos P.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe3+-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe2+-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  13. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    PubMed

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  14. Submarine geology of the Hilina slump and morpho-structural evolution of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John R.; Malahoff, Alexander; Shor, Alexander N.

    1999-12-01

    Marine geophysical data, including SEA BEAM bathymetry, HAWAII MR1 sidescan, and seismic reflection profiles, along with recent robot submersible observations and samples, were acquired over the offshore continuation of the mobile Kilauea volcano south flank. This slope comprises the three active hot spot volcanoes Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Loihi seamount and is the locus of the Hawaiian hot spot. The south flank is the site of frequent low-intensity seismicity as well as episodic large-magnitude earthquakes. Its sub-aerial portion creeps seaward at a rate of approximately 10 cm/year. The Hilina slump is the only large submarine landslide in the Hawaiian Archipelago thought to be active, and this study is one of the first to more highly resolve submarine slide features there. The slump is classified into four distinct zones from nearshore to the island's base. Estimates of size based on these data indicate a slumped area of 2100 km 2 and a volume of 10,000-12,000 km 3, equivalent to about 10% of the entire island edifice. The overall picture gained from these data sets is one of mass wasting of the neovolcanic terrain as it builds upward and seaward, though reinforcement by young and pre-Hawaii seamounts adjacent to the pedestal is apparent. Extensive lava delta deposits are formed by hyaloclastites and detritus from recent lava flows into the sea. These deposits dominate the upper submarine slope offshore of Kilauea, with pillow breccia revealed at mid-depths. Along the lower flanks, massive outcrops of volcanically derived sedimentary rocks were found underlying Kilauea, thus necessitating a rethinking of previous models of volcanic island development. The morphologic and structural evolutionary model for Kilauea volcano and the Hilina slump proposed here attempts to incorporate this revelation. A hazard assessment for the Hilina slump is presented where it is suggested that displacement of the south flank to date has been restrained by a still developing northeast lateral submarine boundary. When it does fully mature, the south flank may be more subject to land slips triggered by large, long duration earthquakes and thus Kilauea may undergo more frequent episodes of failure with increased displacements.

  15. Submarine Location Estimation via a Network of Detection-Only Sensors

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shengli

    Submarine Location Estimation via a Network of Detection-Only Sensors Shengli Zhou and Peter by the source/target receive-geometry and the target aspect can detect the return signal. Thus, submarines can. Traditional Approach and Low-Visibility Targets Submarine detection and localization is one major applica

  16. Submarine volcanoes of the Kolumbo volcanic zone NE of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, P.; Carey, S.; Papanikolaou, D.; Croff Bell, K.; Sakellariou, D.; Alexandri, M.; Bejelou, K.

    2012-06-01

    The seafloor northeast of Santorini volcano in Greece consists of a small, elongated rifted basin that has been the site of recent submarine volcanism. This area lies within the Cyclades back-arc region of the present Hellenic subduction zone where the seafloor of the eastern Mediterranean Sea is descending beneath the Aegean microplate. The Cycladic region and the Aegean Sea as a whole are known to be regions of north-south back-arc extension and thinning of continental crust. Nineteen submarine volcanic cones occur within this small rift zone, the largest of these being Kolumbo which last erupted explosively in 1650 AD, causing significant damage and fatalities on the nearby island of Santorini. Previous SEABEAM mapping and seismic studies from HCMR indicate that many of the smaller v'olcanic cones have been built above the present seafloor, while others are partly buried, indicating a range of ages for the activity along this volcanic line. None of the cones to the northeast of Kolumbo had been explored in detail prior to a cruise of the E/V Nautilus (NA007) in August 2010. The ROV Hercules was used to explore the slopes, summits and craters of 17 of the 19 centers identified on multibeam maps of the area. Water depths of the submarine volcano's summits ranged from 18 to 450 m. In general, the domes/craters northeast of Kolumbo were sediment covered and showed little evidence of recent volcanic activity. Outcrops of volcanic rock were found in the crater walls and slopes of some of the cones but they typically consisted of volcanic fragments of pumice and lava that have been cemented together by biological activity, indicative of the lack of recent eruptions. Geochemical analysis of samples collected on the northeast cones showed evidence of low temperature hydrothermal circulation on the summit and upper flanks in the form of stream-like manganese precipitates emanating from pits and fractures.

  17. Newly discovered submarine flank eruption at Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagnini, A.; di Roberto, A.; Pompilio, M.; Gamberi, F.; Marani, M.; Rosi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The NW submarine portion of Stromboli volcano has been investigated by deep-towed sidescan sonar, bathymetric surveys, video camera runs and dredging during two research cruises in 2002 and 2004. The surveys resulted in the identification of an extensive pillow lava field (106-107 m3)at about 2300 m of water depth and 9 km from the shoreline of Stromboli Island. Marine geology data coupled with volcanological observation and volatile content in the glass, demonstrate that this lava flow-field is in place and is related to a recent submarine effusive eruption originating from a nearby eruptive fissure. Anyway bulk rock and glass composition of the lava differs significantly from present day summit products and from those erupted during the historical flank eruptions. Pillow lavas compositions show a high K2O content and a general geochemical pattern more similar to the less evolved K-alkaline products erupted between 13 and 6 ka during the Neostromboli period. However, the silica content is outside of the known compositional range of Neostromboli, hence the pillow lava could represent a not yet documented stage of the structural evolution of the volcano. The compositional and volcanological evolution within the subaerial Neostromboli products is relatively well constrained, including the early stages of the period; on the other hand, the passage between Neostromboli period and early stages of development (6-2 ka) of the Recent Stromboli period (after the Neostromboli collapse) are still poorly known. The unique composition of the pillow lavas is interpreted as the result of the interaction between magmas feeding the new cycle and batches of previous Neostromboli magmas, still present after the emptying of the Neostromboli magma chamber. In this perspective, the investigated flank eruption could be the 'missing link' of early Recent Stromboli evolution by representing the beginning of this new intrusive cycle. In addition to its structural and volcanological significance this eruption opens new scenarios in Stromboli volcanic hazard: while flank eruptions on the subaerial part of the volcano could have an obvious direct impact on inhabited areas, submarine eruptions have the potential to trigger slope instability. Processes of flank inflation, opening of the eruptive fissures and gravitational loading due to the lava flows piling-up, are all able to induce sediment destabilization and possible flank failure.

  18. Hydrodynamic modeling of magmatic-hydrothermal activity at submarine arc volcanoes, with implications for ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Gillian; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2014-10-01

    Subduction-related magmas have higher volatile contents than mid-ocean ridge basalts, which affects the dynamics of associated submarine hydrothermal systems. Interaction of saline magmatic fluids with convecting seawater may enhance ore metal deposition near the seafloor, making active submarine arcs a preferred modern analogue for understanding ancient massive sulfide deposits. We have constructed a quantitative hydrological model for sub-seafloor fluid flow based on observations at Brothers volcano, southern Kermadec arc, New Zealand. Numerical simulations of multi-phase hydrosaline fluid flow were performed on a two-dimensional cross-section cutting through the NW Caldera and the Upper Cone sites, two regions of active venting at the Brothers volcanic edifice, with the former hosting sulfide mineralization. Our aim is to explore the flow paths of saline magmatic fluids released from a crystallizing magma body at depth and their interaction with seawater circulating through the crust. The model includes a 3×2 km sized magma chamber emplaced at ?2.5 km beneath the seafloor connected to the permeable cone via a ?200 m wide feeder dike. During the simulation, a magmatic fluid was temporarily injected from the top of the cooling magma chamber into the overlying convection system, assuming hydrostatic conditions and a static permeability distribution. The simulations predict a succession of hydrologic regimes in the subsurface of Brothers volcano, which can explain some of the present-day hydrothermal observations. We find that sub-seafloor phase separation, inferred from observed vent fluid salinities, and the temperatures of venting at Brothers volcano can only be achieved by input of a saline magmatic fluid at depth, consistent with chemical and isotopic data. In general, our simulations show that the transport of heat, water, and salt from magmatic and seawater sources is partly decoupled. Expulsion of magmatic heat and volatiles occurs within the first few hundred years of magma emplacement in the form of rapidly rising low-salinity vapor-rich fluids. About 95% of the magmatically derived salt is temporarily trapped in the crust, either as dense brine or as precipitated halite. This retained salt can only be expelled by later convection of seawater during the waning period of the hydrothermal system (i.e., “brine mining”). While the abundant mineralization of the NW Caldera vent field at Brothers could not be classified as an economic ore deposit, our model has important implications for submarine metal enrichment and the origin of distinct ore types known from exposed systems on land. Sulfide-complexed metals (notably Au) will preferentially ascend during early vapor-dominated fluid expulsion, potentially forming gold ± copper rich vein and replacement deposits in near-seafloor zones of submarine volcanoes. Dense magmatic brine will initially accumulate chloride-complexed base metals (such as Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) at depth before they are mobilized by seawater convection. The resulting mixed brines can become negatively buoyant when they reach the seafloor and may flow laterally towards depressions, potentially forming layers of base metal sulphides with distinct zonation of metals.

  19. A GIS typology to locate sites of submarine groundwater discharge.

    PubMed

    Rapaglia, John; Grant, Carley; Bokuniewicz, Henry; Pick, Tsvi; Scholten, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Although many researchers agree on the importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), it remains difficult to locate and quantify this process. A groundwater typology was developed based on local digital elevation models and compared to concurrent radon mapping indicative of SGD in the Niantic River, CT USA. Areas of high radon activity were located near areas of high flow accumulation lending evidence to the utility of this approach to locate SGD. The benefits of this approach are three-fold: fresh terrestrial SGD may be quickly located through widely-available digital elevation models at little or no cost to the investigator; fresh SGD may also be quantified through the GIS approach by multiplying pixelated flow accumulation with the expected annual recharge; and, as these data necessarily quantify only fresh SGD, a comparison of these data with SGD as calculated by Rn activity may allow for the separation of the fresh and circulated fractions of SGD. This exercise was completed for the Niantic River where SGD as calculated by the GIS model is 1.2 m(3)/s, SGD as calculated by Rn activity is 0.73-5.5 m(3)/s, and SGD as calculated via a theoretical approach is 1.8-4.3 m(3)/s. Therefore fresh, terrestrial SGD accounts for 22-100% of total SGD in the Niantic River. PMID:25863321

  20. Discovery of an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc: volcanic structure and potential hazards of Oomurodashi Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Nichols, A. R.; Hirahara, Y.; Carey, R.; McIntosh, I. M.; Masaki, Y.; Kondo, R.; Miyairi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oomurodashi is a bathymetric high located ~20 km south of Izu-Oshima, an active volcanic island of the northern Izu-Bonin Arc. Using the 200 m bathymetric contour to define its summit dimensions, the diameter of Oomurodashi is ~20 km. Oomurodashi has been regarded as inactive, largely because it has a vast flat-topped summit at 100 - 150 meters below sea level (mbsl). During cruise NT07-15 of R/V Natsushima in 2007, we conducted a dive survey in a small crater, Oomuro Hole, located in the center of the flat-topped summit, using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin. The only heat flow measurement conducted on the floor of Oomuro Hole during the dive recorded an extremely high value of 4,200 mW/m2. Furthermore, ROV observations revealed that the southwestern wall of Oomuro Hole consists of fresh rhyolitic lavas. These findings suggest that Oomurodashi is in fact an active silicic submarine volcano. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted detailed geological and geophysical ROV Hyper-Dolphin (cruise NT12-19). In addition to further ROV surveys, we carried out single-channel seismic (SCS) surveys across Oomurodashi in order to examine the shallow structures beneath the current edifice. The ROV surveys revealed numerous active hydrothermal vents on the floor of Oomuro Hole, at ~200 mbsl, with maximum water temperature measured at the hydrothermal vents reaching 194°C. We also conducted a much more detailed set of heat flow measurements across the floor of Oomuro Hole, detecting very high heat flows of up to 29,000 mW/m2. ROV observations revealed that the area surrounding Oomuro Hole on the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with minimum biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s). These findings strongly indicate that Oomurodashi is an active silicic submarine volcano, with recent eruption(s) occurring from Oomuro Hole. Since the summit of Oomurodashi is in shallow water, it is possible that eruption columns are likely to breach the sea surface and generate subaerial plumes. A ~10 ka pumiceous tephra layer with a similar composition to the rocks recovered during the dives has been discovered in the subaerial outcrops of Izu-Oshima, suggesting that this tephra may have originated from Oomurodashi. The deeper slopes of Oomurodashi are composed of effusive and intrusive rocks that are bimodal in composition, with basaltic dikes and lavas on the northern flank and dacite volcaniclastics on the eastern flank. This suggests that Oomurodashi is a complex of smaller edifices of various magma types, similar to what has been observed at silicic submarine calderas in the southern part of the Izu-Bonin Arc (e.g. Sumisu Caldera; Tani et al., 2008, Bull. Vol.). Furthermore, the SCS surveys revealed the presence of a buried caldera structure, ~8 km in diameter, beneath the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi, indicating that voluminous and explosive eruptions may have occurred in the past.

  1. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; Santana-Casiano, J.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.

    2013-12-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. (A) Natural color composite from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument aboard ENVISAT Satellite (European Space Agency), (November 9, 2011 at 14:45 UTC). Remote sensing data have been used to monitor the evolution of the volcanic emissions, playing a fundamental role during field cruises in guiding the Spanish government oceanographic vessel to the appropriate sampling areas. The inset map shows the position of Canary Islands west of Africa and the study area (solid white box). (B) Location of the stations carried out from November 2011 to February 2012 at El Hierro. Black lines denote transects A-B and C-D.

  2. Historical bathymetric charts and the evolution of Santorini submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Nomikou, P.; Parks, M.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Historical bathymetric charts are a potential resource for better understanding the dynamics of the seafloor and the role of active processes such as those associated with submarine faulting, landsliding, and magmatism. The UK Hydrographic Office, for example, has been involved in lead line measurements of seafloor depth since the early 1790s in a range of geological settings including ocean islands. Here, we report on an analysis of historical bathymetric charts in the region of Santorini volcano, Greece. Repeat lead line surveys in 1848, 1866 and 1928 and multibeam swath bathymetric surveys in 2001 and 2006 have been used to document changes in the depth of the seafloor in Santorini caldera. The data reveal that the flanks of the Kameni islands, a volcanic dome and dacitic lava complex in the caldera centre, have shallowed by up to 215 m and deepened by up to 60 m since 1848. The largest shallowing occurred between the 1866 and 1928 surveys and was accompanied by a significant increase in the surface area of the island of Nea Kameni, especially its southeast flank. Field observations by the French Geologist, F. A. Fouqué, during 1866-1870 suggest the shallowing is associated with the formation of the Giorgos and Aphroessa domes and their associated lava flows. Other shallowing probably occurred during 1925-1928 when lava flows filled the narrow strait between Nea Kameni and Mikra Kameni. The largest deepenings occurred between the 1928 and 2001 and 2006 surveys, on the shelf and slope of Nea Kameni. One possibility is that the deepening is caused by mass wasting due to large-scale slope failure and debris flow. Another is that it reflects a stress-induced viscoelastic relaxation of the crust following dome loading. Irrespective, the rates implied from the volumes and duration of the 19th century submarine magmatic activity are up to 0.11 km3/yr, which is significantly larger than rates inferred from mapping of surface lava flows.

  3. Dive and Explore: An Interactive Web Visualization that Simulates Making an ROV Dive to an Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2004-12-01

    Several years ago we created an exciting and engaging multimedia exhibit for the Hatfield Marine Science Center that lets visitors simulate making a dive to the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named ROPOS. The exhibit immerses the user in an interactive experience that is naturally fun but also educational. The public display is located at the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. We are now completing a revision to the project that will make this engaging virtual exploration accessible to a much larger audience. With minor modifications we will be able to put the exhibit onto the world wide web so that any person with internet access can view and learn about exciting volcanic and hydrothermal activity at Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The modifications address some cosmetic and logistic ISSUES confronted in the museum environment, but will mainly involve compressing video clips so they can be delivered more efficiently over the internet. The web version, like the museum version, will allow users to choose from 1 of 3 different dives sites in the caldera of Axial Volcano. The dives are based on real seafloor settings at Axial seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (NE Pacific) that is also the location of a seafloor observatory called NeMO. Once a dive is chosen, then the user watches ROPOS being deployed and then arrives into a 3-D computer-generated seafloor environment that is based on the real world but is easier to visualize and navigate. Once on the bottom, the user is placed within a 360 degree panorama and can look in all directions by manipulating the computer mouse. By clicking on markers embedded in the scene, the user can then either move to other panorama locations via movies that travel through the 3-D virtual environment, or they can play video clips from actual ROPOS dives specifically related to that scene. Audio accompanying the video clips informs the user where they are going or what they are looking at. After the user is finished exploring the dive site they end the dive by leaving the bottom and watching the ROV being recovered onto the ship at the surface. Within the three simulated dives there are a total of 6 arrival and departure movies, 7 seafloor panoramas, 12 travel movies, and 23 ROPOS video clips. This virtual exploration is part of the NeMO web site and will be at this URL http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/dive.html

  4. Historical bathymetric charts and the evolution of Santorini submarine volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Nomikou, P.; Moore, J. D. P.; Parks, M. M.; Alexandri, M.

    2015-03-01

    Historical bathymetric charts are a potential resource for better understanding the dynamics of the seafloor and the role of active processes, such as submarine volcanism. The British Admiralty, for example, have been involved in lead line measurements of seafloor depth since the early 1790s. Here, we report on an analysis of historical charts in the region of Santorini volcano, Greece. Repeat lead line surveys in 1848, late 1866, and 1925-1928 as well as multibeam swath bathymetry surveys in 2001 and 2006 have been used to document changes in seafloor depth. These data reveal that the flanks of the Kameni Islands, a dacitic dome complex in the caldera center, have shallowed by up to ˜175 m and deepened by up to ˜80 m since 1848. The largest shallowing occurred between the late 1866 and 1925-1928 surveys and the largest deepening occurred during the 1925-1928 and 2001 and 2006 surveys. The shallowing is attributed to the emplacement of lavas during effusive eruptions in both 1866-1870 and 1925-1928 at rates of up to 0.18 and 0.05 km3 a-1, respectively. The deepening is attributed to a load-induced viscoelastic stress relaxation following the 1866-1870 and 1925-1928 lava eruptions. The elastic thickness and viscosity that best fits the observed deepening are 1.0 km and ˜1016 Pa s, respectively. This parameter pair, which is consistent with the predictions of a shallow magma chamber thermal model, explains both the amplitude and wavelength of the historical bathymetric data and the present day rate of subsidence inferred from InSAR analysis.

  5. 3104 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 55, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 Submarine Location Estimation Via a

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shengli

    3104 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 55, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 Submarine Location by the source/target receive geometry, and the target aspect can detect the return signal. Thus, submarines can and missed detections. Index Terms--Active sonar, cross section, multistatic, sensor net- work, submarine

  6. Episodic massive mud eruptions from submarine mud volcanoes examined through topographical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioka, Arata; Ashi, Juichiro

    2015-10-01

    The role of mud volcanism on subsurface fluid migration and material cycling has long been debated. Here we compile the heights and radii of offshore mud volcanoes and estimate a mean volume of episodic massive mud eruptions based on previous studies into granular flows. The volume is estimated as a function of the ratio of height to basal radius of the mud volcano's body under reasonable assumptions of the sizes of the mud conduit. Nearly all known offshore mud volcanoes are found to be polygenetic with the mean individual eruption volume of the pie-type mud volcano being several orders of magnitude larger than that of the cone type. The frequent occurrence of pie-type mud volcanoes in accretionary margins characterized by high-sediment influx is explained by their efficiency in the transport of large amounts of fluidized sediments from deep depths to the seafloor.

  7. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor

    2014-05-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments.

  8. The submarine volcano eruption at the island of El Hierro: physical-chemical perturbation and biological response

    PubMed Central

    Fraile-Nuez, E.; González-Dávila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Arístegui, J.; Alonso-González, I. J.; Hernández-León, S.; Blanco, M. J.; Rodríguez-Santana, A.; Hernández-Guerra, A.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.; Eugenio, F.; Marcello, J.; de Armas, D.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Montero, M. F.; Laetsch, D. R.; Vélez-Belchí, P.; Ramos, A.; Ariza, A. V.; Comas-Rodríguez, I.; Benítez-Barrios, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    On October 10 2011 an underwater eruption gave rise to a novel shallow submarine volcano south of the island of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain. During the eruption large quantities of mantle-derived gases, solutes and heat were released into the surrounding waters. In order to monitor the impact of the eruption on the marine ecosystem, periodic multidisciplinary cruises were carried out. Here, we present an initial report of the extreme physical-chemical perturbations caused by this event, comprising thermal changes, water acidification, deoxygenation and metal-enrichment, which resulted in significant alterations to the activity and composition of local plankton communities. Our findings highlight the potential role of this eruptive process as a natural ecosystem-scale experiment for the study of extreme effects of global change stressors on marine environments. PMID:22768379

  9. Cold seeps associated with a submarine debris avalanche deposit at Kick'em Jenny volcano, Grenada (Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Steven; Ballard, Robert; Bell, Katherine L. C.; Bell, Richard J.; Connally, Patrick; Dondin, Frederic; Fuller, Sarah; Gobin, Judith; Miloslavich, Patricia; Phillips, Brennan; Roman, Chris; Seibel, Brad; Siu, Nam; Smart, Clara

    2014-11-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) exploration at the distal margins of a debris avalanche deposit from Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano in Grenada has revealed areas of cold seeps with chemosynthetic-based ecosystems. The seeps occur on steep slopes of deformed, unconsolidated hemipelagic sediments in water depths between 1952 and 2042 m. Two main areas consist of anastomosing systems of fluid flow that have incised local sediments by several tens of centimeters. No temperature anomalies were observed in the vent areas and no active flow was visually observed, suggesting that the venting may be waning. An Eh sensor deployed on a miniature autonomous plume recorder (MAPR) recorded a positive signal and the presence of live organisms indicates at least some venting is still occurring. The chemosynthetic-based ecosystem included giant mussels (Bathymodiolus sp.) with commensal polychaetes (Branchipolynoe sp.) and cocculinid epibionts, other bivalves, Siboglinida (vestimentiferan) tubeworms, other polychaetes, and shrimp, as well as associated heterotrophs, including gastropods, anemones, crabs, fish, octopods, brittle stars, and holothurians. The origin of the seeps may be related to fluid overpressure generated during the collapse of an ancestral Kick'em Jenny volcano. We suggest that deformation and burial of hemipelagic sediment at the front and base of the advancing debris avalanche led to fluid venting at the distal margin. Such deformation may be a common feature of marine avalanches in a variety of geological environments especially along continental margins, raising the possibility of creating large numbers of ephemeral seep-based ecosystems.

  10. Chemical Characteristics of Plumes above and Around NW-Rota Submarine Volcano: Before and During the March 2004 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, G.; Resing, J.; Baker, E.; Embley, R.; Lupton, J.

    2004-12-01

    During the March 2004 Ocean Exploration cruise to the Mariana Arc, a small-scale volcanic eruption was observed at the NW Rota-1 submarine volcano by the Canadian ROV ROPOS. CTD tows and casts were conducted above and around the seamount to sample the water for dissolved and particulate chemical species during the eruption. The water column around NW Rota-1 was also sampled in March 2003, providing a baseline for evaluating eruption-induced changes in the chemical composition of the seawater. These investigations mark the first time that water around an erupting underwater volcano has been sampled before and during an eruption. During the 2003 cruise, only an above-summit plume between 400-600 m was observed originating from NW Rota-1. This plume was distinctly hydrothermal, with high values of iron oxides and its associated oxyhdroxides, elemental sulfur, and aluminum in the form of natroalunite. In addition, the natroalunite co-occurs with a silica phase that suggests these Al-rich particles must have formed within the hydrothermal system where magmatic SO2 attacked the host rocks. During the 2004 cruise, prominent plumes were detected both around the flanks and above the summit. The flank plume completely surrounded the volcano from about 700 m to the seafloor (at least 2000 m). Bulk XRF analysis and SEM particle imagery show this plume to consist primarily of glass fragments. This plume may be caused by earthquake tremor associated with the eruption, causing resuspension of eruption debris. The summit plume consisted of a mixture of minerals similar to those sampled during the 2003 cruise, including highly elevated levels of Fe consistent with fresh lava/water interactions and/or release of subsurface rock that has previously interacted with SO2.

  11. Earthquakes, Subaerial and Submarine Landslides, Tsunamis and Volcanoes in Aysén Fjord, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastras, G.; Amblas, D.; Calafat-Frau, A. M.; Canals, M.; Frigola, J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Lafuerza, S.; Longva, O.; Micallef, A.; Sepulveda, S. A.; Vargas Easton, G.; Azpiroz, M.; Bascuñán, I.; Duhart, P.; Iglesias, O.; Kempf, P.; Rayo, X.

    2014-12-01

    The Aysén fjord, 65 km long and east-west oriented, is located at 45.4ºS and 73.2ºW in Chilean Patagonia. It has a maximum water depth of 345 m. It collects the inputs of Aysén, Pescado, Condor and Cuervo rivers, which drain the surrounding Patagonian Andes. The fjord is crossed by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone, a seismically active trench parallel intra-arc fault system. On 21 April 2007, an Mw 6.2 earthquake triggered numerous subaerial and submarine landslides along the fjord flanks. Some of the subaerial landslides reached the water mass, generating tsunami-like displacement waves that flooded the adjacent coastlines, withlocal >50 m high run-ups, causing ten fatalities and damage to salmon farms. The research cruise DETSUFA on board BIO Hespérides in March 2013, aiming to characterise the landslides and their effects, mapped with great detail the submerged morphology of the fjord. Multibeam data display deformation structures created by the impact of the landslides in the inner fjord floor. Landslide material descended and accelerated down the highly sloping fjord flanks, and reached the fjord floor at 200 m water depth generating large, 10-m-deep impact depressions. Fjord floor sediment was pushed and piled up in arcuate deformation areas formed by 15-m-high compressional ridges, block fields and a narrow frontal depression. Up to six >1.5 km2 of these structures have been identified. In addition, the cruise mapped the outer fjord floor beyond the Cuervo ridge. This ridge, previously interpreted as a volcanic transverse structure, most probably acted as a limit for grounding ice in the past, as suggested by the presence of a melt-water channel. The fjord smoothens and deepens to more than 330 m forming an enclosed basin, before turning SW across a field of streamlined hills of glacial origin. Three volcanic cones, one of them forming Isla Colorada and the other two totally submerged and previously unknown, have been mapped in the outer fjord. The largest one is 160 m high, 1.3 km in diameter and tops at 67 m water depth. This high-resolution data set illustrates a wide set of geohazards in the recent lively geological history of Aysén fjord.

  12. Volcanoes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Protection Main Content Volcanoes A volcano is a mountain that opens downward to a reservoir of molten ... below the surface of the earth. Unlike most mountains, which are pushed up from below, volcanoes are ...

  13. Morphometric analysis of the submarine arc volcano Monowai (Tofua-Kermadec Arc) to decipher tectono-magmatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormald, Sarah C.; Wright, Ian C.; Bull, Jonathan M.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Sanderson, David J.

    2012-09-01

    Morphometric analysis of multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data is applied to Monowai, a submarine volcano of the active Tofua-Kermadec Arc to map and document the structure and evolution of the volcanic centre. Low rates of erosion and sedimentation, and pervasive tectonic and magmatic processes, allow quantification through detailed structural analysis and measurement of deformation. The Slope, Aspect, Curvature, Rugosity, and Hydrology (flow) tools of ArcGIS provide a robust structural interpretation and the development of a model of Monowai evolution. A nested caldera structure with a volume of ~ 31 km3 and a stratovolcano of ~ 18 km3 dominate the magmatic constructs. The outer caldera is elongate along 125°, and the inner caldera along 135°. Numerous parasitic cones and fissure ridges are also observed, oriented at 039° and 041°, respectively. Northeast trending faults (with a regional average strike of 031°) are widespread within this part of the backarc, forming a nascent rift graben to the west of the Monowai caldera complex. The distribution of throw varies spatially, reaching a maximum total along-rift of 320 m and across rift of 120 m, with greater throw values measured in the west. Elongation directions of the two nested calderas are near-perpendicular to the trends of faults and fissure ridges. The inner caldera is more orthogonal to the magmatic constructs (fissure ridges and aligned vent cones) and the outer caldera is approximately orthogonal to the regional fault fabric, suggesting a strong interaction between magmatic and tectonic processes, and the directions of the horizontal principal stress. We present a detailed morphometric analysis of these relationships and the data are used to interpret the spatial and temporal evolution of the tectono-magmatic system at Monowai, and classify the type of rifting as transtensional. Similar analysis is possible elsewhere in the Kermadec backarc and within other regions of submarine volcanism.

  14. SeaMARC 2 side-scan images of submarine volcanoes: Potential analogues for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, P.; Hussong, D.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth's surface beneath the oceans may be very similar, in terms of ambient pressures, to the surface of Venus. For that reason it is particularly important for geologists studying the surface of Venus to understand the processes which form features on the floors of the oceans. With the SeaMARC 2 seafloor mapping system, it is possible to view a swath of seafloor that is 10 km wide (about 6.2 mi). Side scan images of the Mariana region show that volcanoes of the island arc are more complicated than previously realized and that features of the fore-arc region, which resemble volcanoes morphologically, may result from processes other than volcanism. By comparing data obtained from the ocean floor with radar images of Venus, the geological evolution of that planet may be more fully understood.

  15. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  16. Molecular Comparison of Bacterial Communities within Iron-Containing Flocculent Mats Associated with Submarine Volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc?

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Tyler W.; Olson, Julie B.

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide sheaths and filaments are commonly found in hydrothermal environments and have been shown to have a biogenic origin. These structures were seen in the flocculent material associated with two submarine volcanoes along the Kermadec Arc north of New Zealand. Molecular characterization of the bacterial communities associated with the flocculent samples indicated that no known Fe-oxidizing bacteria dominated the recovered clone libraries. However, clones related to the recently described Fe-oxidizing bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans were obtained from both the iron-containing flocculent (Fe-floc) and sediment samples, and peaks corresponding to Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as the related clones, were observed in several of our terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles. A large group of epsilonproteobacterial sequences, for which there is no cultured representative, dominated clones from the Fe-floc libraries and were less prevalent in the sediment sample. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that several operational taxonomic units appeared to be site specific, and statistical analyses of the clone libraries found that all samples were significantly different from each other. Thus, the bacterial communities in the Fe-floc samples were not more closely related to each other than to the sediment communities. PMID:19114513

  17. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:25627249

  18. Unravelling the Geometry of Unstable Flanks of Submarine Volcanoes by Magnetic Investigation: the Case of the "sciara del Fuoco" Scar (stromboli Volcano, Aeolian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.; Speranza, F.; Marziani, F.

    2012-12-01

    Stromboli is the easternmost island of the Aeolian Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea) and one of the most active Mediterranean volcanoes. The volcanic edifice rises over 3000 m above the surrounding seafloor, from a depth of about 2000 m b.s.l. to 924 m a.s.l. The north-western flank of volcano is deeply scarred by a destructive collapse event occurred ca. 5000 years ago, and forming a big horseshoe-shaped depression, known as "Sciara del Fuoco" (SdF). This depression, 3 Km long and 2 Km wide, is supposed to extend into the sea down to 700 m b.s.l., while further basinward it turns into a fan-shaped mounted deposit down to about 2600 m b.s.l., where it merges the so-called "Stromboli Canyon". Since its formation, emerged and submerged portions of the SdF have been progressively filled by the volcanic products of the persistent activity of the Stromboli Volcano. In the last 10 years, two paroxysmal eruptions occurred in the Stromboli Volcano, during 2002-2003 and February-April 2007. During both events, the SdF has been partially covered by lava flows and affected by slope failures, also causing (for the 2002-2003 event) a local tsunami. Since the 1990's, and especially after the last two paroxysms, the submerged extension of the SdF has been intensively investigated by using swath bathymetry data. We focused principally on the magnetic anomaly pattern of the submerged SdF since the chaotic depositional system virtually cancels magnetic remanence (which at Stromboli can reach 5-10 A/m values), thus lowering magnetic residual intensity. On July 2012 we acquired new detailed sea-surface magnetic data of the SdF from the shoreline to about 7 km offshore, where the depth is more than 1800 m b.s.l. We collected data thanks to the Italian Navy ship "Nave Aretusa" and by using the Marine Magnetics SeaSPY magnetometer. At the same time, new bathymetric data were acquired in the same area by using a Kongsberg Marine multibeam systems. Although the morphologic features of the submarine prosecution of the SdF system were already studied and unveiled, the complete description of the in-depth extension of the system and the overall volume estimation is still poorly known. This has important implications for the hazard assessment of the landslide structure and most generally of the entire volcanic edifice. The application of a classical geomagnetic prospection to describe a landslide feature is an uncommon procedure yet it can be considered as innovative approach, having the advantages of effectiveness, low cost and expedition typical of the geomagnetic survey. Here we present the interpretation of the newly acquired high-resolution magnetic dataset, thanks to susceptibility and magnetic remanence values gathered from on-land rock samples at Stromboli. A 3D inverse model is here proposed, allowing a full definition of the submerged SdF structure geometry.

  19. Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoa: Life and Death at the Edge of An Active Submarine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vailulu'U Research Group, T.

    2005-12-01

    Exploration of Vailulu'u seamount (14°13'S; 169°04'W) by manned submersible, ROV, and surface ship revealed a new, 300m tall volcano that has grown in the summit crater in less than four years. This shows that Vailulu'u's eruption behavior is at this stage not predictable and continued growth could allow Vailulu'u to breach sea level within decades Several types of hydrothermal vents fill Vailulu'u crater with particulates that reduce visibility to less than a few meters in some regions. Hydrothermal solutions mix with seawater that enters the crater from its breaches to produce distinct biological habitats. Low temperature hydrothermal vents can produce Fe-oxide chimneys or up to one meter-thick microbial mats. Higher temperature vents (85°C) produce low salinity acidic fluids containing buoyant droplets of immiscible CO2. Low temperature hydrothermal vents at Nafanua summit (708m depth) support a thriving population of eels (Dysommia rusosa). The areas around the high temperature vents and the moat and remaining crater around the new volcano is almost devoid of any macroscopic life and is littered with fish, and mollusk carcasses that apparently died from exposure to hydrothermal fluid components in deeper crater waters. Acid- tolerant polychaetes adapt to this environment and feed near and on these carcasses. Vailulu'u presents a natural laboratory for the study of how seamounts and their volcanic systems interact with the hydrosphere to produce distinct biological habitats, and how marine life can adapt to these conditions or be trapped in a toxic volcanic system that leads to mass mortality. The Vailulu'u research team: Hubert Staudigel, Samantha Allen, Brad Bailey, Ed Baker, Sandra Brooke, Ryan Delaney, Blake English, Lisa Haucke, Stan Hart, John Helly, Ian Hudson, Matt Jackson, Daniel Jones, Alison Koleszar, Anthony Koppers, Jasper Konter, Laurent Montesi, Adele Pile, Ray Lee, Scott Mcbride, Julie Rumrill, Daniel Staudigel, Brad Tebo, Alexis Templeton, Rhea Workman, Craig Young, Robert Zierenberg.

  20. Two-dimensional simulations of explosive eruptions of Kick-em Jenny and other submarine volcanos

    SciTech Connect

    Gisler, Galen R.; Weaver, R. P.; Mader, Charles L.; Gittings, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    Kick-em Jenny, in the Eastern Caribbean, is a submerged volcanic cone that has erupted a dozen or more times since its discovery in 1939. The most likely hazard posed by this volcano is to shipping in the immediate vicinity (through volcanic missiles or loss-of-buoyancy), but it is of interest to estimate upper limits on tsunamis that might be produced by a catastrophic explosive eruption. To this end, we have performed two-dimensional simulations of such an event in a geometry resembling that of Kick-em Jenny with our SAGE adaptive mesh Eulerian multifluid compressible hydrocode. We use realistic equations of state for air, water, and basalt, and follow the event from the initial explosive eruption, through the generation of a transient water cavity and the propagation of waves away from the site. We find that even for extremely catastrophic explosive eruptions, tsunamis from Kick-em Jenny are unlikely to pose significant danger to nearby islands. For comparison, we have also performed simulations of explosive eruptions at the much larger shield volcano Vailuluu in the Samoan chain, where the greater energy available can produce a more impressive wave. In general, however, we conclude that explosive eruptions do not couple well to water waves. The waves that are produced from such events are turbulent and highly dissipative, and don't propagate well. This is consistent with what we have found previously in simulations of asteroid-impact generated tsunamis. Non-explosive events, however, such as landslides or gas hydrate releases, do couple well to waves, and our simulations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and sub-aqueous landslides demonstrate this.

  1. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  2. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  3. Submarine evidence of a debris avalanche deposit on the eastern slope of Santorini volcano, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Katherine Lynn Croff; Carey, Steven N.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2013-06-01

    Hummocky seafloor features were discovered on the eastern flank of Santorini volcano, Greece. Multibeam bathymetric mapping, airgun seismic profiling, side scan sonar survey, and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives have been carried out to characterize the nature of the hummocks. These hummocks appear to be composed of several tens of blocks that are up to several hundred meters in diameter, and are the surface expression of a much larger deposit than is observed in the bathymetry. The sidescan and airgun data show that the deposit covers an area of approximately 6 km wide by 20 km long, and is up to 75 m thick. We estimate the total volume of the deposit to be approximately 4.4 × 109 m3. Sampling of these blocks show they are composed of pyroclastic flow deposits produced during the Minoan eruption of Santorini (ca. 3600 BP). We propose that the deposit is the result of a multi-stage landslide event that was caused by one of the several large earthquakes or volcanic eruptions that have occurred in the vicinity of Santorini since the Minoan eruption. One or more of these events likely triggered the destabilization of a part of the eastern flank of Santorini, which led to a debris avalanche, depositing blocks and forming a hummocky terrain at the base of the island's slope. The mass movement later evolved into a turbulent suspension flow that traveled 20 km or more from the presumed initial failure. Given the size of the landslide deposit, it might have a tsunami potentially affecting the islands across the southern Aegean Sea. The understanding of earthquake-landslide dynamics has important implications for hazard assessment in this seismically active, historical, and highly populated region of the world.

  4. The Submarine Volcano Eruption off El Hierro Island: Effects on the Scattering Migrant Biota and the Evolution of the Pelagic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  5. The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

  6. Morphostructural study and type of volcanism of submarine volcanoes over the Pitcairn hot spot in the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binard, Nicolas; Hékinian, Roger; Stoffers, Peter

    1992-06-01

    Undersea volcanoes found at about 80 km southeast of the island of Pitcairn, are believed to be the manifestation of a hot-spot activity located near 129°30'W 25°10'S, along the strike of the Mururoa-Gambier-Pitcairn volcanic alignment. Hydrothermal activities and recent volcanic flows were observed on the two largest (20 km in basal diameter) and shallowest (60 m and 450 m depth) volcanoes. More than twenty other smaller volcanic edifices ( < 500 m in height) were mapped during a Seabeam survey covering an area of about 8000 km 2. The edifices from the Pitcairn region are conical with a low degree of flatness (summit/basal diameters ratio <0.25), and consist of fresh alkali-enriched lava flows. The other truncated edifices with a high degree of flatness ( > 0.25) made up of ancient MORB-type tholeiitic rocks are inferred to be inherited from the EPR axial regions. The shallow volcanic activity which occurred on the two largest edifices are classified as: (1) reactive eruptions, with hydromagmatic activities, giving rise to volcanic ejecta, bombs, xenoliths, and ash, and (2) quiet eruptions which formed pillows and/or lobated lavas, and large massive flows. Intrusives (dyke and sill) were observed, cutting through the volcanic ejecta near the summit ( < 500 m depth) of the seamounts. The general structural orientations of the rift zones recognized from the bathymetry of individual volcanoes (N160°-180°, N80°, N30° and N120°) are comparable to those observed in the Society and Austral hot-spot regions. These orientations were inferred as corresponding to the structural discontinuities of the ancient oceanic crust, and to the regional stress field of the Pacific plate. Rock samples from the Pitcairn region consist of alkali-basalts, basanites, trachyandesites, and trachytes which are closer in chemical composition to some of the volcanics from the Society rather than to those from the Austral hot-spot regions.

  7. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Drill Site Location Map 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Newberry seeks to explore "blind" (no surface evidence) convective hydrothermal systems associated with a young silicic pluton on the flanks of Newberry Volcano. This project will employ a combination of innovative and conventional techniques to identify the location of subsurface geothermal fluids associated with the hot pluton. Newberry project drill site location map 2010. Once the exploration mythology is validated, it can be applied throughout the Cascade Range and elsewhere to locate and develop “blind” geothermal resources.

  8. The design and testing of a procedure to locate fresh submarine groundwater discharge in Cyprus

    E-print Network

    Olesnavage, Kathryn M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this collaborative project between Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Cyprus Institute was to develop an experimental procedure for identifying fresh submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in Cyprus. ...

  9. An experiment to detect and locate lightning associated with eruptions of Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    A commercially-available lightning-detection system was temporarily deployed near Cook Inlet, Alaska in an attempt to remotely monitor volcanogenic lightning associated with eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. The system became operational on February 14, 1990; lightning was detected in 11 and located in 9 of the 13 subsequent eruptions. The lightning was generated by ash clouds rising from pyroclastic density currents produced by collapse of a lava dome emplaced near Redoubt's summit. Lightning discharge (flash) location was controlled by topography, which channeled the density currents, and by wind direction. In individual eruptions, early flashes tended to have a negative polarity (negative charge is lowered to ground) while late flashes tended to have a positive polarity (positive charge is lowered to ground), perhaps because the charge-separation process caused coarse, rapid-settling particles to be negatively charged and fine, slow-settling particles to be positively charged. Results indicate that lightning detection and location is a useful adjunct to seismic volcano monitoring, particularly when poor weather or darkness prevents visual observation. The simultaneity of seismicity and lightning near a volcano provides the virtual certainty that an ash cloud is present. This information is crucial for aircraft safety and to warn threatened communities of impending tephra falls. The Alaska Volcano Observatory has now deployed a permanent lightning-detection network around Cook Inlet. ?? 1994.

  10. Comparison of the submarine landslide by the sector collapse of Oshima-Oshima island in the northern part of Japan with the debris avalanche of off Kaimon volcano in the southern part of Japan and several landslide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kato, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Oshima-Oshima island is an active volcano located in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea off Hokkaido. Oshima-Oshima consists of Higashi-yama somma, Nishi-yama somma, and the central cone. The latest eruption occurred at the 18th century. In a huge eruption on August 1741 , Nishiyama of western part of Oshima- Oshima collapsed toward the northern submarine slope , and the horseshoe shape caldera was formed. It is proposed by Katsui et al.(1977) , Satake and Kato(2001) that Japan Sea tsunami in 1741 was generated by this collapse. Detailed swath bathymetry surveys have been conducted around Oshima-Oshima by Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan in 1993. As a result, a large area of debris avalanche deposits has been discovered on the northern submarine flanks of Oshima-Oshima island. In addition, sidescan sonar surveys was also conducted by Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan and University of Tokyo in 1995. In 1997, the lower part of the debris avalanche deposit was investigated using submersible 'Shinkai 2000' by JAMSTEC(Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology). It was confirmed that those deposits were Oshima origins (Kato,1997). We compiled and analyzed using these detailed bathymetry data and sidescan data. As a result , we clarified a detailed geographical features of debris avalanche and the limit of their distribution. Scarp of caldera rim continues to approximately 1100m under the sea. Oshima-Oshima has diameter of approximately 16km. Oshima-Oshima has also an estimated total edifice volume (subaerial and submarine) of 127km3 and rises about 2200m from its base in 1500m depth of water. Northern part of Oshima-Oshima, the scarp of caldera rim on the subaerial area consecutively continues up to about 1100m of depth. The scarp has 100m-300m high, and width of landslide valley is about 2km. Hammocky surface starts from 1100m depth of water. Sea mount of like spur is composed of the collapse deposits has almost extended to the whole area in the trough deeper than 1100m. Debris avalanche deposits have been identified up to 2200m depth and 24km from Oshima-Oshima island, H/L is approximately 0.12. Maximum sizes of debris avalanche block is up to 1-2km width and 100m high. We divided the debris avalanche deposits into three areas (Type A-C) by the topography. Type-A is the main sedimentary area in front of the collapse area and the form is like a spur with 100 to 130m height. Type-B has a form like a knoll or block. Type-C shows gradual slope containing a small rise. We compared these feature with debris avalanche of off Kaimon volcano in the southern part of Japan and the other debris avalanche (landslide, submarine landslide).

  11. Submarine seismic monitoring of El Hierro volcanic eruption with a 3C-geophone string: applying new acquisition and data processing techniques to volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lopez, Carmen; Blanco, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2011 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. Right after the eruption onset, in October 2011 a geophone string was deployed by the CSIC-IGN to monitor seismic activity. Monitoring with the seismic array continued till May 2012. The array was installed less than 2 km away from the new vol¬cano, next to La Restinga village shore in the harbor from 6 to 12m deep into the water. Our purpose was to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. Each geophone consists on a 3-component module based on 3 orthogonal independent sensors that measures ground velocity. Some of the geophones were placed directly on the seabed, some were buried. Due to different factors, as the irregular characteristics of the seafloor. The data was recorded on the surface with a seismometer and stored on a laptop computer. We show how acoustic data collected underwater show a great correlation with the seismic data recorded on land. Finally we compare our data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing). This evidence is disclosing new and innovative tecniques on monitoring submarine volcanic activity. Reference Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), "Serie El Hierro." Internet: http://www.ign.es/ign/resources /volcanologia/HIERRO.html [May, 17. 2013

  12. The NeMO Explorer Web Site: Interactive Exploration of a Recent Submarine Eruption and Hydrothermal Vents, Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.

    2001-12-01

    To help visualize the submarine volcanic landscape at NOAA's New Millennium Observatory (NeMO), we have created the NeMO Explorer web site: http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/nemo/explorer.html. This web site takes visitors a mile down beneath the ocean surface to explore Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano 300 miles off the Oregon coast. We use virtual reality to put visitors in a photorealistic 3-D model of the seafloor that lets them view hydrothermal vents and fresh lava flows as if they were really on the seafloor. At each of six virtual sites there is an animated tour and a 360o panorama in which users can view the volcanic landscape and see biological communities within a spatially accurate context. From the six sites there are hyperlinks to 50 video clips taken by a remotely operated vehicle. Each virtual site concentrates on a different topic, including the dynamics of the 1998 eruption at Axial volcano (Rumbleometer), high-temperature hydrothermal vents (CASM and ASHES), diffuse hydrothermal venting (Marker33), subsurface microbial blooms (The Pit), and the boundary between old and new lavas (Castle vent). In addition to exploring the region geographically, visitors can also explore the web site via geological concepts. The concepts gallery lets you quickly find information about mid-ocean ridges, hydrothermal vents, vent fauna, lava morphology, and more. Of particular interest is an animation of the January 1998 eruption, which shows the rapid inflation (by over 3 m) and draining of the sheet flow. For more info see Fox et al., Nature, v.412, p.727, 2001. This project was funded by NOAA's High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) and Vents Programs. Our goal is to present a representative portion of the vast collection of NOAA's multimedia imagery to the public in a way that is easy to use and understand. These data are particularly challenging to present because of their high data rates and low contextual information. The 3-D models create effective context and new video technology allows us to present good quality video at lower data rates. Related curriculum materials for middle- and high-school students are also available from the NeMO web site at http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/nemo/education.html. >http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/nemo/explorer.html

  13. Volcanic evolution of the submarine super volcano, Tamu Massif of Shatsky Rise: New insights from Formation MicroScanner logging imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Masako; Iturrino, Gerardo; Evans, Helen F.

    2015-01-01

    Massif, the southernmost plateau of Shatsky Rise, is recently reported as the largest single volcano known on Earth. This work seeks to understand the type of volcanism necessary to form such an anomalously large single volcano by integrating core and high-resolution wireline logging data. In particular, resistivity imagery obtained by the Formation MicroScanner, in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole U1347A, located on the eastern flank of Tamu Massif, was used to construct a logging-based volcanostratigraphy. This model revealed two different volcanic stages formed Tamu Massif: (i) the core part of the massif's basaltic basement was formed by a "construction phase" of volcanism with cyclic eruption events from a steady state magma supply and (ii) the very topmost basaltic section was formed by a "depositional phase" of volcanism during which long-traveling lava flows were deposited from a distant eruption center.

  14. Numerical modelling of mud volcanoes and their ows using constraints from the Gulf of Cadiz

    E-print Network

    Biggs, Juliet

    Numerical modelling of mud volcanoes and their £ows using constraints from the Gulf of Cadiz of submarine mud volcanoes is between 1000 and 100 000. Because many are associated with greenhouse gases and submarine mud volcanoes is highly significant. Clues to the processes forming submarine mud volcanoes can

  15. Dependence of Moment-tensor Solutions on Source Location Observed at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, F.; Waite, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic modeling aimed at measuring the capability of a seismic network to resolve source mechanisms can provide a guide to the deployment of sensors on volcanoes. Recovering the source mechanisms of events is especially challenging because at frequencies of about 1 Hz, which are common for volcanic sources, scattering strongly influences seismic recordings. The focus of this research is to explore the trade off between the number and location of seismic stations and the accuracy of seismic source reconstructions in the presence of heterogeneous structures. We investigate this relationship at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala. During a fieldwork campaign in October-November 2013, four 3-component broadband seismometers were installed around the central vent at distances between 0.6 and 1.5 km. In addition to tremor, the network recorded a long-period event that repeated thousands of times each day. In order to determine the optimal deployment strategy for the next field campaign, we conduct a sensitivity analysis using synthetic seismograms. The repetitive nature of the source and the accessibility of the volcano will facilitate deployment of a spatially-dense seismic network, in which a subset of stations is moved around the cone to enable records from dozens of sites. We used then different subsets of stations and velocity models to test the expected capability of the network to extract a reliable moment-tensor. Preliminary results highlight a strong dependence of position on the moment tensor solutions. The source mechanism changes from a sill to a dyke as the source becomes deeper. It is therefore critical to get an accurate location to better reconstruct the source mechanism. The results of this study have broad implications for volcano seismic source studies, which often involve repetitive events, but typically face the same challenges of heterogeneous, but poorly constrained structure and weak, shallow sources.

  16. Volcanic Risk Perception in Five Communities Located near the Chichón Volcano, Northern Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Chichón volcano (17° 19’ N and 93° 15’ W) is located in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. This volcano is classified by UNESCO as one of the ten most dangerous volcanos in the world. The eruptions of March and April in 1982 affected at least 51 communities located in the surroundings of the volcano and caused the death of about 2000 people. In this work we evaluate the risk perception in five communities highly populated: Juárez, Ostuacán, Pichucalco, Reforma and Sunuapa. We selected these communities because they have a high possibility to be affected by a volcanic eruption in the future. Our survey was carried out during February and March 2006. A total of 222 families were interviewed using a questionnaire to measure risk perception. These questionnaires retrieved general information as how long people had been living there and their reasons to do so; their experiences during the 1982 events, their opinion about the authorities participation and their perception of volcanic risk; the plans of the community for disaster prevention and mitigation. Some of the most important results are: (1). People perceive a very low volcanic risk and the 70% of interviewees believe that a new eruption in the future is almost improbable because it happened in 1982. This result is particularly interesting because, according to the state government, more than 100,000 inhabitants will be directly affected in case of a new similar eruption; (2). About 95% of the population do not know the current activity of the volcano and consider that the authorities do not inform properly to their communities; (3). The response of the authorities during the events of 1982 was ranked as deficient mainly because they were unable provide shelters, storage facilities, food as well as medicine and health care access; (4). Approximately 60% of the community will accept to be re-located again in case of a new eruption; (5). About 70% of the population will not accept to be re-located because they do not know any plan, strategy, emergency schemes or shelters locations no even evacuation routes. In conclusion, during the 1982 eruption the risk perception of the population played an important role in the social impact on the region. We believe that if the population had had a proper perception of their volcanic risk, the number of casualties would have been lower. Thus, the present low volcanic risk perception of the five studied communities can be considered as an important element of vulnerability. Frances Rodríguez-VanGort1 and David A. Novelo-Casanova2 (1) Posgrado Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México Distrito Federal (2) Departamento de Sismología Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México Distrito Federal

  17. Kinematic variables and water transport control the formation and location of arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Grove, T L; Till, C B; Lev, E; Chatterjee, N; Médard, E

    2009-06-01

    The processes that give rise to arc magmas at convergent plate margins have long been a subject of scientific research and debate. A consensus has developed that the mantle wedge overlying the subducting slab and fluids and/or melts from the subducting slab itself are involved in the melting process. However, the role of kinematic variables such as slab dip and convergence rate in the formation of arc magmas is still unclear. The depth to the top of the subducting slab beneath volcanic arcs, usually approximately 110 +/- 20 km, was previously thought to be constant among arcs. Recent studies revealed that the depth of intermediate-depth earthquakes underneath volcanic arcs, presumably marking the slab-wedge interface, varies systematically between approximately 60 and 173 km and correlates with slab dip and convergence rate. Water-rich magmas (over 4-6 wt% H(2)O) are found in subduction zones with very different subduction parameters, including those with a shallow-dipping slab (north Japan), or steeply dipping slab (Marianas). Here we propose a simple model to address how kinematic parameters of plate subduction relate to the location of mantle melting at subduction zones. We demonstrate that the location of arc volcanoes is controlled by a combination of conditions: melting in the wedge is induced at the overlap of regions in the wedge that are hotter than the melting curve (solidus) of vapour-saturated peridotite and regions where hydrous minerals both in the wedge and in the subducting slab break down. These two limits for melt generation, when combined with the kinematic parameters of slab dip and convergence rate, provide independent constraints on the thermal structure of the wedge and accurately predict the location of mantle wedge melting and the position of arc volcanoes. PMID:19494913

  18. Bayesian statistics applied to the location of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Martini, M.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method for determining the location and spatial extent of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy, based on a Bayesian inversion of the slowness vector derived from frequency-slowness analyses of array data. The method searches for source locations that minimize the error between the expected and observed slowness vectors. For a given set of model parameters, the conditional probability density function of slowness vectors is approximated by a Gaussian distribution of expected errors. The method is tested with synthetics using a five-layer velocity model derived for the north flank of Stromboli and a smoothed velocity model derived from a power-law approximation of the layered structure. Application to data from Stromboli allows for a detailed examination of uncertainties in source location due to experimental errors and incomplete knowledge of the Earth model. Although the solutions are not constrained in the radial direction, excellent resolution is achieved in both transverse and depth directions. Under the assumption that the horizontal extent of the source does not exceed the crater dimension, the 90% confidence region in the estimate of the explosive source location corresponds to a small volume extending from a depth of about 100 m to a maximum depth of about 300 m beneath the active vents, with a maximum likelihood source region located in the 120- to 180-m-depth interval.

  19. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  20. Automated detection and location of seismic events on Piton de la Fournaise volcano by waveform migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, A.; Langet, N.; Brenguier, F.; Michelini, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the continued development of WaveLoc, and automated seismic event detection and location algorithm based on waveform migration, that therefore bypasses the phase-picking and association phases common to most automated location algorithms. WaveLoc is a 3-step process : 1) we filter and calculate the kurtosis of the raw waveforms in order to highlight the non-stationary characteristics of seismic events; 2) we migrate and stack the first derivatives of the kurtosis waveforms, which highlight the P-wave arrivals, according to an a-priori P-wave velocity model (1D or 3D); 3) we detect and simultaneously locate seismic events by analyzing the local maxima of the resulting 3-D time-dependent stacks. We have applied the WaveLoc algorithm to the seismic swarms recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island) between 2009 and 2011, using data from the UnderVolc experiment (Brenguier et al., 2012) and the Prono et al. (2009) 3D velocity model. We compare the locations obtained using WaveLoc to those obtained from manual picking in order to evaluate the robustness of the automated algorithm. Automated location of single events is in general limited by "picking" errors (in our case intrinsic variations in stationarity properties of the seismic signals) and inadequacies in the a-priori velocity models. In order to improve both accuracy and precision of our locations, we have systematically searched for multiplets by cross-correlation, and relocated these multiplets using a simple double-difference algorithm.

  1. Attack submarines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This issue discusses missions for submarines, technology proliferation; implications for U.S. security; U.S. SSN-21 Seawolf versus other submarines; stability and arms control; nuclear propulsion and nuclear proliferation; air independent propulsion.

  2. Source amplitudes of volcano-seismic signals determined by the amplitude source location method as a quantitative measure of event size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Lacson, Rudy; Maeda, Yuta; Figueroa, Melquiades S.; Yamashina, Tadashi; Ruiz, Mario; Palacios, Pablo; Ortiz, Hugo; Yepes, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    The amplitude source location (ASL) method, which uses high-frequency amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation, has been shown to be useful for locating the sources of various types of volcano-seismic signals. We tested the ASL method by using synthetic seismograms and examined the source amplitudes determined by this method for various types of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. Our synthetic tests indicated that, although ASL results are not strongly influenced by velocity structure and noise, they do depend on site amplification factors at individual stations. We first applied the ASL method to volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at Taal volcano, Philippines. Our ASL results for the largest VT earthquake showed that a frequency range of 7-12 Hz and a Q value of 50 were appropriate for the source location determination. Using these values, we systematically estimated source locations and amplitudes of VT earthquakes at Taal. We next applied the ASL method to long-period events at Cotopaxi volcano and to explosions at Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador. We proposed a practical approach to minimize the effects of site amplifications among different volcano seismic networks, and compared the source amplitudes of these various volcano-seismic events with their seismic magnitudes. We found a proportional relation between seismic magnitude and the logarithm of the source amplitude. The ASL method can be used to determine source locations of small events for which onset measurements are difficult, and thus can estimate the sizes of events over a wider range of sizes compared with conventional hypocenter determination approaches. Previously, there has been no parameter widely used to quantify the sources of volcano-seismic signals. This study showed that the source amplitude determined by the ASL method may be a useful quantitative measure of volcano-seismic event size.

  3. Integration of video and infrasound to understand source locations and vent geometry at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. R.; Aster, R. C.; Johnson, J. B.; Kyle, P. R.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2007-05-01

    Infrasound monitoring at Erebus volcano has enabled us to quantify eruption energetics and precisely determine the source location of Strombolian eruptions. Since January 2006 we have operated a three-element network of identical infrasound pressure transducers, to track explosive eruptions, triangulate source locations of the eruptions, and distinguish activity from several vents with diverse activities. In December 2006 the network was expanded to six identical pressure transducers with improved azimuthal distribution sited ~300 m to 700 m from the erupting vents. These sensors have a dynamic range of +/-125 Pa and are able to record non-distorted waveforms for almost all eruptive events. Since January 2006, eruptions have been identified from locations within the ~40 m diameter phonolitic lava lake, an adjacent smaller "active vent", and a vent ~80 m distant from the lava lake known as "Werner's". Since late 2005 until the end of 2006, activity was considerably elevated at the "lava lake", from which frequent (up to six per day) explosions were noted. These events entailed gas bubble bursts, some of which were capable of ejecting bombs more than 1 km distant and producing infrasonic transients in excess of 100 Pa at a distance of 700 m. Activity from "Werner's" vent was much more subdued in terms of eruptive frequency and the radiated acoustic energy, with all signals less than about 5 Pa at 700 m. Activity from the "active vent" was also observed, though notably, these acoustic transients were extended in duration in terms of time (> 5 s to more than 30 s), which reflects extended duration ash-venting source mechanisms, corroborated by video records. The updated infrasound network has operated through a relative lull in eruptive intensity (November - December 2006 - January 2007). Since January 2007 more frequent and larger explosions from the lava lake have been observed and recorded with infrasound and video. We quantify this recent upsurge in lava lake activity and present speculative mechanisms to account for the variable eruptive behavior of Erebus lava lake.

  4. Using seafloor geodesy to monitor volcanic collapse on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Kathleen A.

    2006-01-01

    from within the volcano. A central caldera may also formdynamics of the volcano. 19 30' N Kilauea Caldera Pu'u O'o (Volcanoes Deep submarine stage Explosive eruptions Birth Subaerial sheild-building Post-caldera

  5. Long Period (LP) volcanic earthquake source location at Merapi volcano by using dense array technics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxian, Jean Philippe; Budi Santoso, Agus; Laurin, Antoine; Subandriyo, Subandriyo; Widyoyudo, Wiku; Arshab, Ghofar

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, Merapi shows unusual activity compared to last decades. Powerful phreatic explosions are observed; some of them are preceded by LP signals. In the literature, LP seismicity is thought to be originated within the fluid, and therefore to be representative of the pressurization state of the volcano plumbing system. Another model suggests that LP events are caused by slow, quasi-brittle, low stress-drop failure driven by transient upper-edifice deformations. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of LP events is fundamental for better understanding the physical processes occurring in the conduit, as well as for the monitoring and the improvement of eruption forecasting. LP events recorded at Merapi have a spectral content dominated by frequencies between 0.8 and 3 Hz. To locate the source of these events, we installed a seismic antenna composed of 4 broadband CMG-6TD Güralp stations. This network has an aperture of 300 m. It is located on the site of Pasarbubar, between 500 and 800 m from the crater rim. Two multi-parameter stations (seismic, tiltmeter, S-P) located in the same area, equipped with broadband CMG-40T Güralp sensors may also be used to complete the data of the antenna. The source of LP events is located by using different approaches. In the first one, we used a method based on the measurement of the time delays between the early beginnings of LP events for each array receiver. The observed differences of time delays obtained for each pair of receivers are compared to theoretical values calculated from the travel times computed between grid nodes, which are positioned in the structure, and each receiver. In a second approach, we estimate the slowness vector by using MUSIC algorithm applied to 3-components data. From the slowness vector, we deduce the back-azimuth and the incident angle, which give an estimation of LP source depth in the conduit. This work is part of the Domerapi project funded by French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (https://sites.google.com/site/domerapi2).

  6. Small Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-425, 18 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image, acquired 13 July 2003, shows a small, dust-covered volcano on the plains east of Pavonis Mons. The floor of the caldera--the elliptical depression at the summit of the volcano--has a few windblown ripples on it. The ripples and thick dust mantle, together with the small impact craters on its surface, indicate that the volcano erupted some time ago. There has been no activity at this volcano in geologically recent times. This image covers an area 3 km wide by 6.8 km (1.9 mi by 4.2 mi); the aspect ratio is 1 across by 1.5 down. The volcano is located near 1.6oS, 105.7oW; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  7. Application of near real-time radial semblance to locate the shallow magmatic conduit at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.; Whilldin, D.; Chouet, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radial Semblance is applied to broadband seismic network data to provide source locations of Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic energy in near real time. With an efficient algorithm and adequate network coverage, accurate source locations of VLP energy are derived to quickly locate the shallow magmatic conduit system at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. During a restart in magma flow following a brief pause in the current eruption, the shallow magmatic conduit is pressurized, resulting in elastic radiation from various parts of the conduit system. A steeply dipping distribution of VLP hypocenters outlines a region extending from sea level to about 550 m elevation below and just east of the Halemaumau Pit Crater. The distinct hypocenters suggest the shallow plumbing system beneath Halemaumau consists of a complex plexus of sills and dikes. An unconstrained location for a section of the conduit is also observed beneath the region between Kilauea Caldera and Kilauea Iki Crater.

  8. Detecting and locating volcanic tremors on the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes (Kamchatka) based on correlations of continuous seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droznin, D. V.; Shapiro, N. M.; Droznina, S. Ya.; Senyukov, S. L.; Chebrov, V. N.; Gordeev, E. I.

    2015-11-01

    We analyse daily cross-correlation computed from continuous records by permanent stations operating in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes (Kamchatka). Seismic waves generated by volcanic tremors are clearly seen on the cross-correlations between some pairs of stations as strong signals at frequencies between 0.2 and 2 Hz and with traveltimes typically shorter than those corresponding to interstation propagation. First, we develop a 2-D source-scanning algorithm based on summation of the envelops of cross-correlations to detect seismic tremors and to determine locations from which the strong seismic energy is continuously emitted. In an alternative approach, we explore the distinctive character of the cross-correlation waveforms corresponding to tremors emitted by different volcanoes and develop a phase-matching method for detecting volcanic tremors. Application of these methods allows us to detect and to distinguish tremors generated by the Klyuchevskoy and the Tolbachik, volcanoes and to monitor evolution of their intensity in time.

  9. Strong S-wave attenuation and actively degassing magma beneath Taal volcano, Philippines, inferred from source location analysis using high-frequency seismic amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Lacson, R. _Jr., Jr.; Maeda, Y.; Figueroa, M. S., II; Yamashina, T.

    2014-12-01

    Taal volcano, Philippines, is one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes given its history of explosive eruptions and its close proximity to populated areas. A key feature of these eruptions is that the eruption vents were not limited to Main Crater but occurred on the flanks of Volcano Island. This complex eruption history and the fact that thousands of people inhabit the island, which has been declared a permanent danger zone, together imply an enormous potential for disasters. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) constantly monitors Taal, and international collaborations have conducted seismic, geodetic, electromagnetic, and geochemical studies to investigate the volcano's magma system. Realtime broadband seismic, GPS, and magnetic networks were deployed in 2010 to improve monitoring capabilities and to better understand the volcano. The seismic network has recorded volcano-tectonic (VT) events beneath Volcano Island. We located these VT events based on high-frequency seismic amplitudes, and found that some events showed considerable discrepancies between the amplitude source locations and hypocenters determined by using onset arrival times. Our analysis of the source location discrepancies points to the existence of a region of strong S-wave attenuation near the ground surface beneath the east flank of Volcano Island. This region is beneath the active fumarolic area and above sources of pressure contributing inflation and deflation, and it coincides with a region of high electrical conductivity. The high-attenuation region matches that inferred from an active-seismic survey conducted at Taal in 1993. Our results, synthesized with previous results, suggest that this region represents actively degassing magma near the surface, and imply a high risk of future eruptions on the east flank of Volcano Island.

  10. Fountaining at W. Mata volcano in 2009 Brimstone Pit, NM-Rota smt, 2006

    E-print Network

    Fountaining at W. Mata volcano in 2009 Brimstone Pit, NM-Rota smt, 2006 Erupting lava (below) High effusion rate lavas at NELSC, 2009 New Fall 2014 Course Announcement ­ Submarine Volcanoes course exploring submarine effusive and explosive volcanism, hydrothermal activity, and volcano- hosted

  11. Open-System Magma Reservoir Affects Gas Segregation, Vesiculation, Fragmentation and Lava/Pyroclast Dispersal During the 1.2 km-deep 2007-2010 Submarine Eruption at West Mata Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Soule, S. A.; Resing, J.

    2014-12-01

    West Mata, a small, active rear-arc volcano in the NE Lau Basin, erupts crystal and gas rich boninite magma. Eruptions were observed at the summit (1.2 km water depth) during 5 ROV Jason dives in 2009 (the deepest erupting submarine volcano observed to date). Subsequent ROV and ship-based bathymetric mapping revealed that a pit crater formed and the summit eruption ceased in 2010, with roughly simultaneous eruptions along the SW rift zone. During the summit eruption, a combination of water depth, H2O-CO2-rich and high crystallinity magma, a split in the conduit to feed two vent sites, and waxing/waning magma supply led to a range of effusive/explosive eruption styles and volcanic deposit types. The 2-3 vent Hades cluster and the lone Prometheus vent had different eruption characteristics. Petrographic, petrologic and geochemical studies of erupted products indicate a change in magma composition in time and space over a period of 3.5 yrs, suggesting a small, open-system magma reservoir within the volcano. Prometheus (1174m depth) produced mostly pyroclastic material during our observations (e.g., highly vesicular glowing fluidal ejecta that cooled in the water column and rounded recycled dense clasts), but sampling and 210Po radiometric dating show that several months prior pillowed lava flows, subsequently covered with cm-sized pyroclasts, had flowed >50m from the vent. In contrast, vents at Hades (1200m depth) cycled between lava production and vigorous degassing, 10-20m high fire fountains and bursts of glowing lava-skinned bubbles, the products of which froze/broke in the water column, forming unstable cones of spatter and scoria near the vents. We hypothesize that bubbles collapse rather than form lava balloons because of skin brittleness (from high crystal content) and hydrostatic pressure. Clast settling times and patterns suggest >100m water column rise height for 10+ cm-sized fragments. Pillow flows were also observed to be issuing from the base of the Hades cones some 30-50m below, and had traveled 100 m from the vent in the months before. This, plus hydrophone and water column data (Embley et al., G3, in review), and the occurrence of extensive deposits of young, glassy, identical composition cm-sized fragmental material 250 m from Hades suggest an earlier more vigorous phase of the eruption.

  12. Microbial communities in sunken wood are structured by wood-boring bivalves and location in a submarine canyon.

    PubMed

    Fagervold, Sonja K; Romano, Chiara; Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Borowski, Christian; Nunes-Jorge, Amandine; Martin, Daniel; Galand, Pierre E

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstones of sunken wood ecosystems are microorganisms involved in cellulose degradation. These can either be free-living microorganisms in the wood matrix or symbiotic bacteria associated with wood-boring bivalves such as emblematic species of Xylophaga, the most common deep-sea woodborer. Here we use experimentally submerged pine wood, placed in and outside the Mediterranean submarine Blanes Canyon, to compare the microbial communities on the wood, in fecal pellets of Xylophaga spp. and associated with the gills of these animals. Analyses based on tag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene showed that sunken wood contained three distinct microbial communities. Wood and pellet communities were different from each other suggesting that Xylophaga spp. create new microbial niches by excreting fecal pellets into their burrows. In turn, gills of Xylophaga spp. contain potential bacterial symbionts, as illustrated by the presence of sequences closely related to symbiotic bacteria found in other wood eating marine invertebrates. Finally, we found that sunken wood communities inside the canyon were different and more diverse than the ones outside the canyon. This finding extends to the microbial world the view that submarine canyons are sites of diverse marine life. PMID:24805961

  13. Microbial Communities in Sunken Wood Are Structured by Wood-Boring Bivalves and Location in a Submarine Canyon

    PubMed Central

    Fagervold, Sonja K.; Romano, Chiara; Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Borowski, Christian; Nunes-Jorge, Amandine; Martin, Daniel; Galand, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstones of sunken wood ecosystems are microorganisms involved in cellulose degradation. These can either be free-living microorganisms in the wood matrix or symbiotic bacteria associated with wood-boring bivalves such as emblematic species of Xylophaga, the most common deep-sea woodborer. Here we use experimentally submerged pine wood, placed in and outside the Mediterranean submarine Blanes Canyon, to compare the microbial communities on the wood, in fecal pellets of Xylophaga spp. and associated with the gills of these animals. Analyses based on tag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene showed that sunken wood contained three distinct microbial communities. Wood and pellet communities were different from each other suggesting that Xylophaga spp. create new microbial niches by excreting fecal pellets into their burrows. In turn, gills of Xylophaga spp. contain potential bacterial symbionts, as illustrated by the presence of sequences closely related to symbiotic bacteria found in other wood eating marine invertebrates. Finally, we found that sunken wood communities inside the canyon were different and more diverse than the ones outside the canyon. This finding extends to the microbial world the view that submarine canyons are sites of diverse marine life. PMID:24805961

  14. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. White submarine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    While not everyone gets to live in a yellow submarine, the scientific community may get to have a decommissioned U.S. Navy nuclear submarine dedicated to it. The Sturgeon class of submarines, which scientists say are the ideal choice for the project, will be coming up for decommissioning in this next decade. So the time is ripe, scientists say. Two weeks ago, oceanographers, submarine specialists, marine biologists, and geophysicists, among others met at AGU headquarters in Washington to discuss how to get the project in the water. If all goes well, the project would be the "biggest thing that ever happened in ocean and Earth science," according to Lloyd Keigwin of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, who convened the meeting. For example, the submarine could make many types of "compelling" research possible that can not be done now by other means, such as studies in the Arctic that may have significant bearing on global change research, Keigwin says. However, the imposing hurdles that the project must overcome are as big as the opportunities it offers. Foremost, there is a question as to who will pick up the tab for such an endeavor.

  16. Submarine atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, D.R.; Tappan, D.V.; Bowman, J.S.; O'Neill, H.J.; Gordon, S.M.

    1990-07-01

    Nuclear submariners live and work in an atmosphere composed of approximately 80% naturally occurring nitrogen, 19% oxygen (manufactured aboard ship), and a complex mixture of inorganic and organic contaminants. The concentrations of contaminants exist as a balance between the rates of production from human and operational activities and the rate of removal by engineering systems. The biological effects of inorganic gases, particularly carbon dioxide, have been extensively studied. Investigators are now attempting to define the composition and concentration of volatile organic compounds that accumulate during 9O-day submergences. Medical studies have not conclusively shown that crewmembers incur adverse health effects from continuous exposures to the sealed atmospheres of nuclear submarines.

  17. Submarine atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Knight, D R; Tappan, D V; Bowman, J S; O'Neill, H J; Gordon, S M

    1989-12-01

    Nuclear submariners live and work in an atmosphere composed of approximately 80% naturally occurring nitrogen, 19% oxygen (manufactured aboard ship), and a complex mixture of inorganic and organic contaminants. The concentrations of contaminants exist as a balance between the rates of production from human and operational activities and the rate of removal by engineering systems. The biological effects of inorganic gases, particularly carbon dioxide, have been extensively studied. Investigators are now attempting to define the composition and concentration of volatile organic compounds that accumulate during 90-day submergences. Medical studies have not conclusively shown that crewmembers incur adverse health effects from continuous exposures to the sealed atmospheres of nuclear submarines. PMID:2574918

  18. Cutting Costs by Locating High Production Wells: A Test of the Volcano seismic Approach to Finding ''Blind'' Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon Shalev; Peter E. Malin; Wendy McCausland

    2002-06-06

    In the summer of 2000, Duke University and the Kenyan power generation company, KenGen, conducted a microearthquake monitoring experiment at Longonot volcano in Kenya. Longonot is one of several major late Quaternary trachyte volcanoes in the Kenya Rift. They study was aimed at developing seismic methods for locating buried hydrothermal areas in the Rift on the basis of their microearthquake activity and wave propagation effects. A comparison of microearthquake records from 4.5 Hz, 2 Hz, and broadband seismometers revealed strong high-frequency site and wave-propagation effects. The lower frequency seismometers were needed to detect and record individual phases. Two-dozen 3-component 2- Hz L22 seismographs and PASSCAL loggers were then distributed around Longonot. Recordings from this network located one seismically active area on Longonot's southwest flank. The events from this area were emergent, shallow (<3 km), small (M<1), and spatially restricted. Evidently, the hydrothermal system in this area is not currently very extensive or active. To establish the nature of the site effects, the data were analyzed using three spectral techniques that reduce source effects. The data were also compared to a simple forward model. The results show that, in certain frequency ranges, the technique of dividing the horizontal motion by the vertical motion (H/V) to remove the source fails because of non-uniform vertical amplification. Outside these frequencies, the three methods resolve the same, dominant, harmonic frequencies at a given site. In a few cases, the spectra can be fit with forward models containing low velocity surface layers. The analysis suggests that the emergent, low frequency character of the microearthquake signals is due to attenuation and scattering in the near surface ash deposits.

  19. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Drill Site Location Map 2010

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Newberry project drill site location map 2010. Once the exploration mythology is validated, it can be applied throughout the Cascade Range and elsewhere to locate and develop “blind” geothermal resources.

  20. Introduction Submarine debris-flow deposits are often accompanied

    E-print Network

    Introduction Submarine debris-flow deposits are often accompanied by isolated blocks located some landslides. A more general review on the mobility of submarine debris flows is given in this spe- cial issue-307. Trondheim 2006. ISSN 029-196X. Submarine debris flows are often accompanied by isolated blocks located some

  1. Quantitative constraints on the growth of submarine lava pillars from a monitoring instrument that was caught in a lava flow

    E-print Network

    Chadwick, Bill

    Quantitative constraints on the growth of submarine lava pillars from a monitoring instrument that are common features within the collapsed interiors of submarine sheet flows on intermediate and fast beneath each crust. During the submarine eruption of Axial Volcano in 1998 on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

  2. Submarine fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    Seisimic evidence from a study of 35-m.y.-old sediment contradicts the prevailing theory that bottom currents are the main cause of sediment distribution patterns and the shape of the continental rise.In the research area 200 miles offshore from New Jersey to Cape Hatteras, N.C., Stanley D. Locker of the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, has found that submarine fans and deep-sea sediment drifts may develop simultaneously as companion systems. He presented his work at the Geological Society of America meeting in St. Louis, Mo., November 6-9.

  3. An efficient algorithm for double-difference tomography and location in heterogeneous media, with an application to the Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monteiller, V.; Got, J.-L.; Virieux, J.; Okubo, P.

    2005-01-01

    Improving our understanding of crustal processes requires a better knowledge of the geometry and the position of geological bodies. In this study we have designed a method based upon double-difference relocation and tomography to image, as accurately as possible, a heterogeneous medium containing seismogenic objects. Our approach consisted not only of incorporating double difference in tomography but also partly in revisiting tomographic schemes for choosing accurate and stable numerical strategies, adapted to the use of cross-spectral time delays. We used a finite difference solution to the eikonal equation for travel time computation and a Tarantola-Valette approach for both the classical and double-difference three-dimensional tomographic inversion to find accurate earthquake locations and seismic velocity estimates. We estimated efficiently the square root of the inverse model's covariance matrix in the case of a Gaussian correlation function. It allows the use of correlation length and a priori model variance criteria to determine the optimal solution. Double-difference relocation of similar earthquakes is performed in the optimal velocity model, making absolute and relative locations less biased by the velocity model. Double-difference tomography is achieved by using high-accuracy time delay measurements. These algorithms have been applied to earthquake data recorded in the vicinity of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes for imaging the volcanic structures. Stable and detailed velocity models are obtained: the regional tomography unambiguously highlights the structure of the island of Hawaii and the double-difference tomography shows a detailed image of the southern Kilauea caldera-upper east rift zone magmatic complex. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i?the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008....

  5. Expulsion of Barium and Methane at Mud Volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, D. G.; Dickens, G. R.; Snyder, G. T.; Gilhooly, W. P.; Ruppel, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins transfer methane from gas-charged marine sediments to the water column. Such methane venting is dynamic and may provide an important and variable supply of carbon to the ocean and atmosphere through time. Barite mounds and chimneys have been found around some modern mud volcanoes and seeps, and similar structures can be identified in the geological record (e.g., bedded barite deposits). These observations suggest that expelled methane-rich fluids are greatly enriched in dissolved barium. However, there are very few analyses of barium concentrations in these systems. Here, we examine the dissolved barium of pore fluids from a series of shallow piston cores across two submarine mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico. Dissolved barium concentrations at 1.5 m below the seafloor at the Garden Bank volcano range from 18200 ? M at the center of the feature to 0.56 ? M on its flanks approximately 1 km away. Similarly, dissolved barium concentrations at the Mississippi Canyon volcano range from 15600 ? M to 0.50 ? M. Thus, the concentrations in the cores of the mud volcanoes are nominally 5 orders of magnitude greater than in mean ocean water ( ˜0.1 ? M). Anaerobic oxidation of upward flowing methane consumes sulfate, which leads to the dissolution of barite and release of barium to pore fluids. Because this mechanism alone cannot explain the extreme concentrations in the mud volcanoes, a deep source of barium may exist in the Gulf of Mexico strata. Our current work is focused on quantifying the fluxes and sedimentary fate of expelled barium at these locations. However, even if a large fraction of the barium precipitates adjacent to the sites of methane venting, fluid expulsion at mud volcanoes must significantly impact the barium cycle in the Gulf of Mexico. Conceivably, submarine mud volcanoes and cold-seeps along continental margins are a major source of barium to the deep ocean, a concept that has profound implications with respect to certain paleoceanographic reconstructions.

  6. Submarine Silicic Explosive Eruptions: what can submarine pyroclasts tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Allen, S.; McPhie, J.; Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of submarine volcanism is in its infancy with respect to subaerial eruption processes. Two fundamental differences between eruptions in seawater compared to those on land are that (1) eruptions occur at higher confining pressures, and (2) in a seawater medium, which has a higher heat capacity, density and viscosity than air. Together with JAMSTEC collaborators we have a sample suite of submarine pumice deposits from modern volcanoes of known eruption depths. This sample suite spans a spectrum of eruption intensities, from 1) powerful explosive caldera-forming (Myojin Knoll caldera); to 2) weakly explosive cone building (pre-caldera Myojin Knoll pumice and Kurose-Nishi pumice); to 3) volatile-driven effusive dome spalling (Sumisu knoll A); to 4) passive dome effusion (Sumisu knoll B and C). This sample suite has exceptional potential, not simply because the samples have been taken from well-constrained, sources but because they have similar high silica contents, are unaltered and their phenocrysts contain melt inclusions. Microtextural quantitative analysis has revealed that (i) clast vesicularities remain high (69-90 vol.%) regardless of confining pressure, mass eruption rate or eruption style , (ii) vesicle number densities scale with inferred eruption rate, and (iii) darcian and inertial permeabilities of submarine effusive and explosive pyroclasts overlap with explosively-erupted subaerial pyroclasts.

  7. Small Tharsis Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano located southwest of the giant volcano, Pavonis Mons, near 2.5oS, 109.4oW. Lava flows can be seen to have emanated from the summit region, which today is an irregularly-shaped collapse pit, or caldera. A blanket of dust mantles this volcano. Dust covers most martian volcanoes, none of which are young or active today. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  8. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at the area that lies between the town of Fira on the main island of Santorini and Nea Kammeni has been revealed. The lower slopes were covered with landslide debris which consisted of lava blocks mostly mantled with soft sediment. At the upper slopes an abrupt cliff face was exposed that was highly indurated by biologic material. At the top of a volcanic dome, a crater with its deepest part at 43m, its rim at about 34m with an approximately 8m diameter was also found. Shimmery water with temperatures as much as 25°C above ambient was observed there but the source of venting has not yet been found. The combination of ROV video footage and multibeam data provide new information about the main morphological characteristics of Santorini Caldera which demonstrates the intense geodynamic processes occurring at the central part of the active Hellenic volcanic arc. These results will be useful for the interpretation of understanding the offshore volcanic area and its linkage with the onshore structures.

  9. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  10. Shallow-water longshore drift-fed submarine fan deposition (Moisie River Delta, Eastern Canada)

    E-print Network

    St-Ong, Guillaume

    Submarine canyons and associated submarine fans are in some cases located at the end of a littoral cell in submarine canyons and associated fans during sea-level highstands when canyon heads become disconnected fromORIGINAL Shallow-water longshore drift-fed submarine fan deposition (Moisie River Delta, Eastern

  11. Examination of the constructional processes of submarine Cerro Azul and the Galapagos Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. K.; Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D. J.; Fornari, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.; Koleszar, A. M.; Rollins, N. A.

    2004-05-01

    One of the primary goals of the 2001 Drift04 cruise was to examine the constructional processes responsible for the Galapagos platform and to investigate the relationship between the platform and the overlying volcanoes. Cerro Azul volcano is located above the steep escarpment that marks the southwestern limit of the Galapagos platform, at the leading edge of the hotspot. This area is of particular interest in light of a recent seismic tomography experiment by Toomey, Hooft, et al., which suggests that the root of the Galapagos plume is centered between Cerro Azul and adjacent Fernandina Island. During the Drift04 cruise, detailed bathymetric and sidescan sonar studies were carried out across the submarine sector of Cerro Azul and 14 dredges were collected from the same area. Major element analyses of the submarine lavas indicate that the lavas from the platform edge and the subaerial Cerro Azul lavas constitute a suite of petrologically-related lavas. The dredged glasses of the Drift04 cruise have MgO contents of <7.5% and are indistinguishable from published data on Cerro Azul. Whole rock analyses include a highly primitive sample (20 wt% MgO), which probably contains accumulated olivine. All the submarine and subaerial lavas define coherent trends in major element space that are consistent with variable amounts of olivine and olivine+cpx fractionation. Incompatible trace element (ITE) ratios indicate that the mantle source for the submarine platform flows is intermediate in composition between the magmas supplying Fernandina and Cerro Azul. Previous researchers have proposed that two mantle endmembers are interacting across the leading edge of the plume, one focused at Fernandina and the other at Floreana Island. The intermediate ITE ratios of the submarine and subaerial Cerro Azul lavas are consistent both geographically and compositionally with this hypothesis. Naumann and co-workers concluded that the lavas erupted at Cerro Azul were stored in small, ephemeral magma chambers, which formed as the result of a low magma supply to the edge of the platform. We propose that the lavas of the western edge of the Galapagos Platform originate from either the same or a similar network of magma chambers as those responsible for Cerro Azul volcano.

  12. Argon geochronology of Kilauea's early submarine history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.T.; Lanphere, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Submarine alkalic and transitional basalts collected by submersible along Kilauea volcano's south flank represent early eruptive products from Earth's most active volcano. Strongly alkalic basalt fragments sampled from volcaniclastic deposits below the mid-slope Hilina Bench yield 40Ar/39Ar ages from 212 ?? 38 to 280 ?? 20 ka. These ages are similar to high-precision 234 ?? 9 and 239 ?? 10 ka phlogopite ages from nephelinite clasts in the same deposits. Above the mid-slope bench, two intact alkalic to transitional pillow lava sequences protrude through the younger sediment apron. Samples collected from a weakly alkalic basalt section yield 138 ?? 30 to 166 ?? 26 ka ages and others from a transitional basalt section yield 138 ?? 115 and 228 ?? 114 ka ages. The ages are incompatible with previous unspiked K-Ar studies from samples in deep drill holes along the east rift of Kilauea. The submarine birth of Kilauea volcano is estimated at <300 ka. If the weakly alkalic sequence we dated is representative of the volcano as a whole, the transition from alkalic to tholeiitic basalt compositions is dated at ??? 150 ka. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  14. Deep Research Submarine

    E-print Network

    Woertz, Jeff

    2002-02-01

    The Deep Sea Research Submarine (Figure 1) is a modified VIRGINIA Class Submarine that incorporates a permanently installed Deep Sea Operations Compartment (Figure 2). Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of the Deep ...

  15. The preliminary results of new submarine caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigane, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Shimoda, G.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Arc occurs between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan with approximately 1200 km in the full length. This volcanic arc is caused by subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Eurasia Plate along the Ryukyu trench, and is composed of forearc islands, chains of arc volcanoes, and a back-arc rift called Okinawa Trough. The Ryukyu Arc is commonly divided into three segments (northern, central and southern) that bounded by the Tokara Strait and the Kerama Gap, respectively (e.g., Konishi 1965; Kato et al., 1982). Sato et al. (2014) mentioned that there is no active subaerial volcano in the southwest of Iotori-shima in the Central Ryukyu Arc whereas the Northern Ryukyu Arc (i.e., the Tokara Islands) has active frontal arc volcanoes. Therefore, the existence of volcanoes and volcanotectonic history of active volcanic front in the southwestern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc are still ambiguous. Detailed geophysical and geological survey was mainly conducted using R/V Kaiyou-maru No.7 during GK12 cruise operated by the Geological Survey of Japan/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan. As a result, we have found a new submarine volcanic caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, where located the southwestern part of Central Ryukyu Arc. Here, we present (1) the bathymetrical feature of this new submarine caldera for the first time and (2) the microstructural and petrological observations of volcanic rocks (20 volcanic samples in 13 dredge sites) sampled from the small volcanic cones of this caldera volcano. The dredged samples from the caldera consist of mainly rhyolite pumice with minor andesites, Mn oxides-crust and hydrothermally altered rocks. Andesite has plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts. Key words: volcanic rock, caldera, arc volcanism, active volcanic front, Kume-jima island, Ryukyu Arc

  16. Small Dusty Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    3 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small, dust-covered, volcano in the Jovis Fossae region of Mars. While Mars is known for its extremely large volcanoes, such as Olympus Mons, many small volcanoes also occur on the red planet, particularly in the Tharsis region. This small volcano is a good example of those. It was originally found by members of the MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) team during the MGS primary mission. The volcano is old, and cratered. Its surface is mantled by dust, and its caldera (summit depression) has some dust-covered wind ripples on its floor.

    Location near: 20.7oN, 111.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season Northern Autumn

  17. Location and source mechanism of sound signals at Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean: Submarine Strombolian activity in the 1999-2001 volcanic episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Gakkel ridge is the slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge with full spreading rates <10 mm/yr. In 1999, a teleseismic earthquake swarm signaled the onset of an eruptive episode at 85°E. The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge expedition in 2001 detected a hydrothermal event plume and explosive seismoacoustic signals. In 2007, the Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition found direct evidence for recent submarine explosive activity on the seafloor at ˜4000 m. The newest data motivated a reassessment of the seismoacoustic events of 2001. We undertake 2-D finite difference wavefield modeling to relocate the source of the signals and investigate the possible source mechanism; the explosion sounds likely result from submarine Strombolian eruptions with bursting gas bubbles rising from a magma reservoir along a major fault at the southern rift valley wall.

  18. Geochronology, geochemistry and geophysics of Mahukona Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanano, D.; Garcia, M. O.; Weis, D. A.; Flinders, A. F.; Ito, G.; Kurz, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Mahukona is an extinct submarine volcano that fills a gap in the Loa-trend of paired Hawaiian volcanoes between Hualalai and Kaho`olawe. A new marine survey of the seamount was undertaken in an attempt to resolve the location of the volcano’s summit. The multibeam bathymetry showed no clear summit. The gravity data reveals a central oval-shaped residual gravity anomaly with a maximum density 85 kg/m3 greater than the surrounding edifice, which could be the frozen magmatic center of Mahukona. Eighteen weakly to strongly olivine-phyric samples were collected by submersible from the shallower parts (>2 km) of the volcano to supplement previous dredged samples. These fresh, mostly glassy samples vary from low-silica tholeiites to weakly alkali basalts. Ar-Ar weighted plateau ages range from 653 ka for a tholeiite to 479 and 351 ka for transitional basalts. These ages straddle the predicted age for the end of shield building (435 ka) and are older than previous ages for transitional basalts (310-298 ka; Clague and Calvert, 2008). Trace elements show a moderate range of variability (33% for Ba and Nb) and parallel primitive mantle normalized patterns suggesting variable degrees of melting of a similar source. Zr/Nb ratios for this Loa chain volcano (11-14) span the Loa-Kea boundary. Pb, Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios for 12 samples are distinct from adjacent Kohala volcano with Loihi-like values, although they are slightly higher in Hf and Nd at a given Pb isotope value. Most samples have Loa-like Pb isotope ratios, although two tholeiites have Kea-like ratios but high, Loa-like Zr/Nb. Sr isotopes are well correlated with the other isotopic systems indicating no ancient carbonate-rich sediment source component is needed. Mahukona He isotope ratios overlap with those found at Lo`ihi Seamount. Higher values are found in transitional basalts and lower in the tholeiites (16-21 vs. 12-14 Ra), which is opposite to other Hawaiian volcanoes. With high-precision data sets for more volcanoes along the Hawaiian chain in multiple stages of growth, we will be able to resolve the fine structure and evolution of the Hawaiian plume. Clague, D. and Calvert, A. 2008. Bull. Volcanol.

  19. Mud Volcanoes - Analogs to Martian Cones and Domes (by the Thousands!)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Mud volcanoes are mounds formed by low temperature slurries of gas, liquid, sediments and rock that erupt to the surface from depths of meters to kilometers. They are common on Earth, with estimates of thousands onshore and tens of thousands offshore. Mud volcanoes occur in basins with rapidly-deposited accumulations of fine-grained sediments. Such settings are ideal for concentration and preservation of organic materials, and mud volcanoes typically occur in sedimentary basins that are rich in organic biosignatures. Domes and cones, cited as possible mud volcanoes by previous authors, are common on the northern plains of Mars. Our analysis of selected regions in southern Acidalia Planitia has revealed over 18,000 such features, and we estimate that more than 40,000 occur across the area. These domes and cones strongly resemble terrestrial mud volcanoes in size, shape, morphology, associated flow structures and geologic setting. Geologic and mineralogic arguments rule out alternative formation mechanisms involving lava, ice and impacts. We are studying terrestrial mud volcanoes from onshore and submarine locations. The largest concentration of onshore features is in Azerbaijan, near the western edge of the Caspian Sea. These features are typically hundreds of meters to several kilometers in diameter, and tens to hundreds of meters in height. Satellite images show spatial densities of 20 to 40 eruptive centers per 1000 square km. Many of the features remain active, and fresh mud flows as long as several kilometers are common. A large field of submarine mud volcanoes is located in the Gulf of Cadiz, off the Atlantic coasts of Morocco and Spain. High-resolution sonar bathymetry reveals numerous km-scale mud volcanoes, hundreds of meters in height. Seismic profiles demonstrate that the mud erupts from depths of several hundred meters. These submarine mud volcanoes are the closest morphologic analogs yet found to the features in Acidalia Planitia. We are also conducting laboratory analyses of surface samples collected from mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan, Taiwan and Japan. X-ray diffraction, visible / near infrared reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy show that the samples are dominated by mixed-layer smectite clays, along with quartz, calcite and pyrite. Thin section analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy confirms the mineral identifications. These samples also contain chemical and morphological biosignatures, including common microfossils, with evidence of partial replacement by pyrite. The bulk samples contain approximately 1 wt% total organic carbon and 0.4 mg / gm volatile hydrocarbons. The thousands of features in Acidalia Planitia cited as analogous to terrestrial mud volcanoes clearly represent an important element in the sedimentary record of Mars. Their location, in the distal depocenter for massive Hesperian-age floods, suggests that they contain fine-grained sediments from a large catchment area in the martian highlands. We have proposed these features as a new class of exploration target that can provide access to minimally-altered material from significant depth. By analogy to terrestrial mud volcanoes, these features may also be excellent sites for the sampling martian organics and subsurface microbial life, if such exist or ever existed.

  20. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts on surface, often of plane-conical shape, rising for 5 to 400 m and more over the country (for example, mud volcano Toragay, 400 m height). The base diameter is from 100 m to 3-4 km and more. Like the magmatic ones, the mud volcanoes are crowned with crater of convex-plane or deeply-seated shape. In Azerbaijan there are all types of mud volcanoes: active, extinct, buried, submarine, island, abundantly oil seeping. According to their morphology they are defined into cone-shaped, dome-shaped, ridge-shaped, plateau-shaped. The crater shapes are also various: conical, convex-plane, shield-shaped, deeply-seated, caldera-like. The most complete morphological classification was given in "Atlas of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan" (Yakubov et al., 1971). Recently (Aliyev Ad. et al., 2003) it was proposed a quite new morphological classification of mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. For the first time the mud volcanic manifestations had been defined. Volcanoes are ranged according to morphological signs, crater shape and type of activity.

  1. Using Ambient Noise Fields for Submarine Team #525 for the Mathematical Contest in Modeling

    E-print Network

    Mitchener, W. Garrett

    Using Ambient Noise Fields for Submarine Location Team #525 for the Mathematical Contest or click, and storms. Our job is to determine if this noise can be used to detect a submarine, and determine its location, direction of travel, speed, and size. The submarine is assumed not to make any noise

  2. Estimation of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient fluxes in Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong

    E-print Network

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Estimation of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient fluxes in Tolo Harbour, Hong 2012 Keywords: Submarine groundwater discharge Nutrients Radium isotope Groundwater Estuary Tolo Harbour, located in the northeastern part of Hong Kong's New Territories, China, has a high frequency

  3. Summit crater lake observations, and the location, chemistry, and pH of water samples near Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska: 2004-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Wang, Bronwen; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Mount Chiginagak is a hydrothermally active volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, approximately 170 km south–southwest of King Salmon, Alaska (fig. 1). This small stratovolcano, approximately 8 km in diameter, has erupted through Tertiary to Permian sedimentary and igneous rocks (Detterman and others, 1987). The highest peak is at an elevation of 2,135 m, and the upper ~1,000 m of the volcano are covered with snow and ice. Holocene activity consists of debris avalanches, lahars, and lava flows. Pleistocene pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows, interlayered with andesitic lava flows, dominate the edifice rocks on the northern and western flanks. Historical reports of activity are limited and generally describe “steaming” and “smoking” (Coats, 1950; Powers, 1958). Proximal tephra collected during recent fieldwork suggests there may have been limited Holocene explosive activity that resulted in localized ash fall. A cluster of fumaroles on the north flank, at an elevation of ~1,750 m, commonly referred to as the “north flank fumarole” have been emitting gas throughout historical time (location shown in fig. 2). The only other thermal feature at the volcano is the Mother Goose hot springs located at the base of the edifice on the northwestern flank in upper Volcano Creek, at an elevation of ~160 m (fig. 2, near sites H1, H3, and H4). Sometime between November 2004 and May 2005, a ~400-m-wide, 100-m-deep lake developed in the snow- and ice-filled summit crater of the volcano (Schaefer and others, 2008). In early May 2005, an estimated 3 million cubic meters (3×106 m3) of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water exited the crater through tunnels at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. More than 27 km downstream, these acidic flood waters reached approximately 1.3 m above normal water levels and inundated a fertile, salmon-spawning drainage, acidifying the entire water column of Mother Goose Lake from its surface waters to its maximum depth of 45 m (resulting pH ~2.9), and preventing the annual salmon run in the King Salmon River. A simultaneous release of gas and acidic aerosols from the crater caused widespread vegetation damage along the flow path. Since 2005, we have been monitoring the crater lake water that continues to flow into Mother Goose Lake by collecting surface water samples for major cation and anion analysis, measuring surface-water pH of affected drainages, and photo-documenting the condition of the summit crater lake. This report describes water sampling locations, provides a table of chemistry and pH measurements, and documents the condition of the summit crater between 2004 and 2011. In September 2013, the report was updated with results of water-chemistry samples collected in 2011 and 2012, which were added as an addendum.

  4. Submarine explosive volcanism in the southeastern Terceira Rift/São Miguel region (Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, B. J.; Hübscher, C.; Wolf, D.; Lüdmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    Morphologic studies with sonar data and in situ observations of modern eruptions have revealed some information suggesting how submarine volcanic cones develop, but the information only addresses the modern surfaces of these features. Here, we describe a study combining morphological data with high-resolution seismic reflection data collected over cones within the southeastern Terceira Rift - a succession of deep basins, volcanic bathymetric highs and islands (e.g. São Miguel) representing the westernmost part of the Eurasian-Nubian plate boundary. The cones (252) are distributed in depths down to 3200 m and exhibit an average diameter of 743 m, an average slope of 20° and heights mainly between 50 and 200 m. The cones are here classified into three different categories by physiographic or tectonic setting (we find no particular morphometric differences in cone shapes between these areas). First, numerous cones located at the submarine flanks of São Miguel's Sete Cidades and Fogo Volcano are considered to be parasitic structures. Second, in the southeast of the island, they form a superstructure possibly reflecting an early submarine stadium of a posterior subaerial stratovolcano. Third, some cones are controlled by faults, mostly in a graben system southwest of the island. High-resolution multichannel seismic data indicates that the graben cones evolved synchronously with the graben formation. Bottom currents then probably removed the surficial fine grain-size fraction, leaving rough surface textures of the cones, which backscatter sonar signals strongly in the data recorded here. However, a young cone investigated in detail is characterized by a smooth surface, a marked increase of internal stratification with increasing distance from the summit and upwards concave flanks. Others exhibit central craters, suggesting an explosive than an effusive evolution of these structures. The morphological characteristics of these submarine cones show that they have similar sizes and shapes to cinder cones onshore São Miguel.

  5. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-print Network

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have to right: Hawaii, Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Map

  6. Earthquake classification, location, and error analysis in a volcanic environment: implications for the magmatic system of the 1989-1990 eruptions at redoubt volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahr, J.C.; Chouet, B.A.; Stephens, C.D.; Power, J.A.; Page, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the precise locations of seismic events associated with the 1989-1990 eruptions of Redoubt Volcano posed a number of problems, including poorly known crustal velocities, a sparse station distribution, and an abundance of events with emergent phase onsets. In addition, the high relief of the volcano could not be incorporated into the hypoellipse earthquake location algorithm. This algorithm was modified to allow hypocenters to be located above the elevation of the seismic stations. The velocity model was calibrated on the basis of a posteruptive seismic survey, in which four chemical explosions were recorded by eight stations of the permanent network supplemented with 20 temporary seismographs deployed on and around the volcanic edifice. The model consists of a stack of homogeneous horizontal layers; setting the top of the model at the summit allows events to be located anywhere within the volcanic edifice. Detailed analysis of hypocentral errors shows that the long-period (LP) events constituting the vigorous 23-hour swarm that preceded the initial eruption on December 14 could have originated from a point 1.4 km below the crater floor. A similar analysis of LP events in the swarm preceding the major eruption on January 2 shows they also could have originated from a point, the location of which is shifted 0.8 km northwest and 0.7 km deeper than the source of the initial swarm. We suggest this shift in LP activity reflects a northward jump in the pathway for magmatic gases caused by the sealing of the initial pathway by magma extrusion during the last half of December. Volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes did not occur until after the initial 23-hour-long swarm. They began slowly just below the LP source and their rate of occurrence increased after the eruption of 01:52 AST on December 15, when they shifted to depths of 6 to 10 km. After January 2 the VT activity migrated gradually northward; this migration suggests northward propagating withdrawal of magma from a plexus of dikes and/or sills located in the 6 to 10 km depth range. Precise relocations of selected events prior to January 2 clearly resolve a narrow, steeply dipping, pencil-shaped concentration of activity in the depth range of 1-7 km, which illuminates the conduit along which magma was transported to the surface. A third event type, named hybrid, which blends the characteristics of both VT and LP events, originates just below the LP source, and may reflect brittle failure along a zone intersecting a fluid-filled crack. The distribution of hybrid events is elongated 0.2-0.4 km in an east-west direction. This distribution may offer constraints on the orientation and size of the fluid-filled crack inferred to be the source of the LP events. ?? 1994.

  7. Paint-Stirrer Submarine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn; Hardy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a unique and challenging laboratory exercise called, the paint-stir-stick submarine, that keeps the students enthralled. The paint-stir-stick submarine fits beautifully with the National Science Education Standards Physical Science Content Standard B, and with the California state science standards for physical…

  8. Thomas A. Jaggar, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thomas A. Jaggar founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and served as its Director until 1940.  Shown here in 1925, Jaggar is at work in HVO's first building, which, at the time, was located on the northeast rim of K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera, near the present-day Volc...

  9. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  10. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  11. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  12. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light... off-period. The light will be located where it can best be seen, as near as practicable, all...

  13. Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of conning tower atop the submarine. Note the wire rope wrapped around the base of the tower, which may have been used in an attempt to pull the submarine offshore. - Sub Marine Explorer, Located along the beach of Isla San Telmo, Pearl Islands, Isla San Telmo, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  14. Primitive Submarine Basalts and Magmatic Variation of Pagan and Daon, Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Stern, R. J.; Nunokawa, A.; Shukuno, H.; Kawabata, H.; Embley, R. W.; Bloomer, S. H.; Nichols, A. R.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Pagan is an active volcano located in the central island province of the Mariana arc (18°07'N) and is one of the largest volcanoes in the Mariana arc; its main edifice rises from a base ~3,000 m below sea level (b.s.l.) and has a volume of 2,160 km3 (Bloomer et al., 1989). Daon is a small reararc seamount 25 km SW of Pagan (17°58'N). We visited the submarine portions of the two volcanoes in 2010 (NT10-12), using ROV Hyper-Dolphin and RV Natsushima. Rocks were collected from the northeastern and southwestern flanks of the Pagan volcano at 1,500-2,000 m b.s.l. (dive HPD1147) and at 2,020-2,330 m b.s.l. (HPD1148), respectively, and from the southern flank of Daon at 2,360-2,580 m b.s.l. (HPD1149). Fresh pillow lavas dominate in all three dives, but the rocks recovered from HPD1147 seem to be the youngest based on very light sediment cover and no Mn coating. Sediment cover is considerably more extensive at HPD1148, and all rocks from Daon (HPD1149) had 0-10 mm thick Mn coating. Submarine Pagan lavas show major element compositions typical of subaerial Pagan basalts (Marske et al., 2011; Elliott et al., 1997; Woodhead, 1989), although the least fractionated compositions recovered from HPD1147 extend to much higher MgO (7-11 wt %) and Mg# (60-70), than the subaerial lavas. We recognize two types of primitive basalts from Pagan and Daon. Daon has plagioclase-olivine basalt (POB) and clinopyroxene-olivine basalt (COB), petrographic types that are similar to those reported from NW Rota-1 volcano (Tamura et al., 2011). Pagan has two types of COB, both having 10-11 wt % MgO; COB-1 has higher Ba/Zr and Sr/Zr and lower Zr/Y than COB-2 at the same MgO content, indicating that COB-1 has a greater subduction component and formed from higher degrees of mantle melting than COB-2. Similar distinct primitive magmas like those recognized from NW Rota-1 also coexist at Pagan and Daon.

  15. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location...Washington whenever any U.S. Navy submarine is operating in the Hood Canal and is being...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. 165.1302 Section...District § 165.1302 Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location...Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location...Washington whenever any U.S. Navy submarine is operating in the Hood Canal and is being...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location...Washington whenever any U.S. Navy submarine is operating in the Hood Canal and is being...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location...Washington whenever any U.S. Navy submarine is operating in the Hood Canal and is being...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. 165.1302 Section...District § 165.1302 Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location...Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. 165.1302 Section...District § 165.1302 Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location...Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section...Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location...Washington whenever any U.S. Navy submarine is operating in the Hood Canal and is being...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. 165.1302 Section...District § 165.1302 Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location...Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  4. SUBMARINE MASS MOVEMENTS IN THE BETSIAMITES AREA, GENEVIEVE CAUCHON-VOYER1

    E-print Network

    St-Ong, Guillaume

    SUBMARINE MASS MOVEMENTS IN THE BETSIAMITES AREA, GENEVIEVE CAUCHON-VOYER1 , JACQUES LOCAT1 A complex submarine geomorphology was revealed from multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection surveys. Introduction Investigating submarine mass movements in order to evaluate slope stability for a region

  5. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. 165.1302 Section...District § 165.1302 Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location...Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base... Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location. The following is a security zone: The waters of... States Naval vessels. (ii) Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base... Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location. The following is a security zone: The waters of... States Naval vessels. (ii) Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to...

  8. Morphodynamics in sediment-starved inner-shelf submarine canyons (Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada)

    E-print Network

    Morphodynamics in sediment-starved inner-shelf submarine canyons (Lower St. Lawrence Estuary Available online 3 September 2014 Keywords: Submarine canyons Inner-shelf Internal waves Slope failures in a series of inner-shelf submarine canyons located in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary were examined using

  9. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  10. THE SUBMARINE REVIEW SUMMER 2012

    E-print Network

    THE SUBMARINE REVIEW 1 SUMMER 2012 SPURRING INNOVATION AT THE DECKPLATE LEVEL IN THE SUBMARINE FORCE LT Ryan P. Hilger, USN Submarine Student at the Naval Postgraduate School he phenomenal success to alter how we design and operate our submarines. Vice Admiral Richardson happily announced after

  11. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate cones parallel to NW-SE to N-S oriented tectonic structures. In the forearc, the existence of N-S and NE-SW oriented volcanic features indicates a rotation in the stress field orientation compared to the arc.

  12. Submarine neutrino communication

    E-print Network

    Patrick Huber

    2010-08-20

    We discuss the possibility to use a high energy neutrino beam from a muon storage ring to provide one way communication with a submerged submarine. Neutrino interactions produce muons which can be detected either, directly when they pass through the submarine or by their emission of Cerenkov light in sea water, which, in turn, can be exploited with sensitive photo detectors. Due to the very high neutrino flux from a muon storage ring, it is sufficient to mount either detection system directly onto the hull of the submersible. The achievable data transfer rates compare favorable with existing technologies and do allow for a communication at the usual speed and depth of submarines.

  13. Submarine neutrino communication

    E-print Network

    Huber, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the possibility to use a high energy neutrino beam from a muon storage ring to provide one way communication with a submerged submarine. Neutrino interactions produce muons which can be detected either, directly when they pass through the submarine or by their emission of Cerenkov light in sea water, which, in turn, can be exploited with sensitive photo detectors. Due to the very high neutrino flux from a muon storage ring, it is sufficient to mount either detection system directly onto the hull of the submersible. The achievable data transfer rates compare favorable with existing technologies and do allow for a communication at the usual speed and depth of submarines.

  14. Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Svensen, H.; Akhmanov, G. G.; Aloisi, G.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Istadi, B.

    2007-09-01

    Mud volcanoes are geologically important manifestations of vertical fluid flow and mud eruption in sedimentary basins worldwide. Their formation is predominantly ascribed to release of overpressure from clay- and organic-rich sediments, leading to impressive build-up of mud mountains in submarine and subaerial settings. Here we report on a newly born mud volcano appearing close to an active magmatic complex in a backarc sedimentary basin in Indonesia. The location of the mud volcano close to magmatic volcanoes results in a high background temperature gradient that triggers mineralogical transformations and geochemical reactions at shallow depth. The eruption of 100 °C mud and gas that started the 29th of May 2006 flooded a large area within the Sidoarjo village in Northeast Java. Thousands of people have so far been evacuated due to the mud flood hazards from the eruption. Since the initial eruption, the flow rate escalated from 5000 to 120,000 m 3/d during the first eleven weeks. Then the erupted volume started to pulsate between almost zero and 120,000 m 3/d in the period August 14 to September 10, whereas it increased dramatically following swarms of earthquakes in September, before reaching almost 180,000 m 3/d in December 2006. Sampling and observations were completed during two fieldwork campaigns on the site. The eruption of boiling water is accompanied by mud, aqueous vapour, CO 2 and CH 4. Based on geochemical and field results, we propose a mechanism where the eruptions started following the 27th of May earthquake due to fracturing and accompanied depressurization of > 100 °C pore fluids from > 1700 m depth. This resulted in the formation of a quasi-hydrothermal system with a geyser-like surface expression and with an activity influenced by the regional seismicity.

  15. Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano as viewed to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. The mushroom-shaped plume rose from avalanches of hot debris (pyroclastic flows) that cascaded down the north flank of the volcano. A smaller, white steam plume rises from the summit crater. ...

  16. Discovery of the Largest Historic Silicic Submarine Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Rebecca J.; Wysoczanski, Richard; Wunderman, Richard; Jutzeler, Martin

    2014-05-01

    It was likely twice the size of the renowned Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980 and perhaps more than 10 times bigger than the more recent 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland. However, unlike those two events, which dominated world news headlines, in 2012 the daylong submarine silicic eruption at Havre volcano in the Kermadec Arc, New Zealand (Figure 1a; ~800 kilometers north of Auckland, New Zealand), passed without fanfare. In fact, for a while no one even knew it had occurred.

  17. In search of ancestral Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Ui, T.; Naka, J.

    2000-01-01

    Submersible observations and samples show that the lower south flank of Hawaii, offshore from Kilauea volcano and the active Hilina slump system, consists entirely of compositionally diverse volcaniclastic rocks; pillow lavas are confined to shallow slopes. Submarine-erupted basalt clasts have strongly variable alkalic and transitional basalt compositions (to 41% SiO2, 10.8% alkalies), contrasting with present-day Kilauea tholeiites. The volcaniclastic rocks provide a unique record of ancestral alkalic growth of an archetypal hotspot volcano, including transition to its tholeiitic shield stage, and associated slope-failure events.

  18. Utilization of reactor bays of decommissioned submarines

    SciTech Connect

    Lugavtsov, O.V.; Malakhov, A.G.; Popkov, K.K.

    1994-11-01

    Radiation concerns regarding dismantling and storage of decommissioned reactors and reactor bays from nuclear submarines are briefly summarized. Calculation results are presented for gamma dose rates, contamination density, and the expected location of maximum exposure dose rate on the submarine hull. However, it is noted that radiation measurements must be obtained for each ship due to differences in operating conditions. Long-term storage options for containerized reactors and reactor bays are very briefly outlined; these include placing them in concrete-lined trenches shielded from the atmosphere or in underground tunnels shielded from water. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  20. Physical and chemical properties of submarine basaltic rocks from the submarine flanks of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yokose, H.; Lipman, P.W.; Kanamatsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate physical and chemical diversity in submarine basaltic rocks, approximately 280 deep submarine samples recovered by submersibles from the underwater flanks of the Hawaiian Islands were analyzed and compared. Based on observations from the submersibles and hand specimens, these samples were classified into three main occurrence types (lavas, coarse-grained volcaniclastic rocks, and fine-grained sediments), each with several subtypes. The whole-rock sulfur content and porosity in submarine basaltic rocks, recovered from depths greater than 2000 m, range from < 10 ppm and 2 vol.% to 2200 ppm and 47 vol.%, respectively. These wide variations cannot be due just to different ambient pressures at the collection depths, as inferred previously for submarine erupted lavas. The physical and chemical properties of the recovered samples, especially a combination of three whole-rock parameters (Fe-oxidation state, Sulfur content, and Porosity), are closely related to the occurrence type. The FSP triangular diagram is a valuable indicator of the source location of basaltic fragments deposited in deep submarine areas. This diagram can be applied to basaltic rocks such as clasts in debris-flow deposits, submarine-emplaced lava flows that may have crossed the shoreline, and slightly altered geological samples. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  2. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  3. Cascade Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The volcanoes from closest to farthest are Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Jefferson. This picture is taken from Middle Sister looking north in the Cascade Range, Three Sisters Wilderness Area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon....

  4. Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface structures beneath active volcanoes have frequently been investigated (e.g., Oikawa et al., 1994: Sudo et al., 1996), and seismic attenuation beneath some active volcanoes are reported to be strong. On the other hand, few local subsurface structures beneath volcanoes whose volcanic activities are low have been investigated in detail, though it is important to study them to understand the potential of volcanic activity of these volcanoes. Then, we analyzed the seismic attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano (Midagahara volcano) located in central Japan, whose volcanic activity is quite low. We used seismograms obtained by Hi-net deployed by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention). Hi-net is one of the densest seismic station networks in the world, and the spatial interval of their seismographs is about 20 km, which is suitable for investigating local structure beneath an individual volcano. We estimated S-wave attenuation using seismograms at five stations near Tateyama volcano for nineteen small, local, shallow earthquakes (M 2.7-4.0) that occurred from January 2012 to December 2013. We divided these earthquakes into six groups according to their hypocenter locations. We used twofold spectral ratios around the first S-arrivals to investigate the S-wave attenuation when S-waves passed through the region beneath Tateyama volcano. We focused on station pairs located on opposite sides of Tateyama volcano to each other, and earthquake pairs whose epicenters were located almost along the line connecting Tateyama volcano and the two stations, so that the spectral ratios reflect a local structure beneath Tateyama volcano. Twofold spectral ratios of all seismograms for S waves having northwestern or southeastern sources show strong attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano. On the other hand, those of seismograms having northeastern or southwestern sources show much weaker attenuation, which suggested that the region of strong attenuation is anisotropic and/or has complicated shape.

  5. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Making a Submarine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornacchia, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Archimedes principle and why a ship sinks when it gets a hole in it. Suggests an activity for teaching the concept of density and water displacement through the construction of a simple submarine. Includes materials and procedures for this activity. (KHR)

  7. Chilean Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the border between Chile and the Catamarca province of Argentina lies a vast field of currently dormant volcanoes. Over time, these volcanoes have laid down a crust of magma roughly 2 miles (3.5 km) thick. It is tinged with a patina of various colors that can indicate both the age and mineral content of the original lava flows. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 15, 1999. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  8. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  9. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  10. Intermediate products of sulfur disproportional reaction and their physical role in effusive to explosive submarine volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takano, B.; Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Recent direct observations of submarine volcanic activity in the Mariana Arc are giving us a chance to examine the role of volcanic gas in submarine volcanic conduits. Unlike subaerial volcanoes, where hydrogeologic conditions have different character from place to place, the overlying water mass above submarine volcanoes gives a uniform hydrographic setting. Currently, the places where we can directly observe submarine volcanic activity are located deeper than 400 m, which raises the boiling point of seawater to over 240 deg C. This situation allows us to examine the interaction of volcanic gases with ambient seawater at a shorter distance from the magma source than at subaerial volcanic settings. Arc volcano settings give us longer and more frequent opportunities to make observations and provide a more diverse range of submarine volcanism than ridge settings. Among the three major components of volcanic gases (i.e., H2O, CO2 and SO2), water follows a two phase boundary below the critical temperature after volatile components leave from the magmatic source. Milky sulfur sol bearing hydrothermal fluid is commonly observed throughout Mariana active sites. Most of the sulfur sol (colloidal elemental sulfur and polysulfides) might be formed by disproportional reaction of sulfur dioxide with seawater when water vapor shrinks to liquid water. The reaction creates not only sulfur sol but also various types of sulfite, which affects the pH of seawater. We detected short-lived sulfite species in the water column above several active Mariana volcanoes such as NW Rota-1, Daikoku and Nikko by on-board HPLC. Because most observations are made on the liquid phase side of H2O boundary, it is very hard to get data to investigate the physical and chemical sulfur sol forming process occurring on the vapor phase side or at the critical state (i.e., near the magma source process). Carbon dioxide behaves as a gas at a wide range of pressures and temperatures and carries heat and sulfur dioxide effectively and quickly to the seafloor. At Nikko Seamount carbon dioxide bubbles penetrated the intentionally excavated liquid sulfur pond beneath a hydrothermal vent. The bubbles have misty surfaces, which indicated progressive disproportional reaction of carried sulfur dioxide with ambient seawater. Although the temperature along most of the conduit up to the seafloor is above the freezing point of elemental sulfur, coalescence of sulfur sol, which creates masses of liquid sulfur, mostly occur when the mixture of hydrothermal fluid and volcanic gas leaves the two phase boundary of water near the seafloor. The polymerization state of liquid sulfur governs the resistance against volcanic gas flow near the surface of volcanic conduits. Several types of liquid sulfur spherules were sampled at NW Rota-1 eruption site.

  11. Klyuchevskaya Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Klyuchevskaya Volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula continued its ongoing activity by releasing another plume on May 24, 2007. The same day, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image, at 01:00 UTC. In this image, a hotspot marks the volcano's summit. Outlined in red, the hotspot indicates where MODIS detected unusually warm surface temperatures. Blowing southward from the summit is the plume, which casts its shadow on the clouds below. Near the summit, the plume appears gray, and it lightens toward the south. With an altitude of 4,835 meters (15,863 feet), Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) is both the highest and most active volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula. As part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Klyuchevskaya is estimated to have experienced more than 100 flank eruptions in the past 3,000 years. Since its formation 6,000 years ago, the volcano has seen few periods of inactivity. NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. The Rapid Response Team provides daily images of this region.

  12. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    ... of which are so thick that they block the penetration of light from CALIPSO's lidar to the surface. The yellow layer near the surface over France is believed to be primarily air pollution, but could also contain ash from the volcano. Highlighting its ...

  13. Subtle and Not-So-Subtle Variability in Very-Long-Period Earthquakes at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala Reveal Details on Vent Location and Eruption Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lyons, J. J.; Nadeau, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Repeated short-term deployments of seismic, infrasound, video, and gas-emission instruments at Fuego volcano, Guatemala have revealed three types of very-long-period (VLP) earthquakes associated with conduit sealing, pressure accumulation, and release. Major differences in waveforms are due to changes in vent locations. Vulcanian explosions and gas puffing from the summit vent produce waveforms that differ only slightly in peak period. Vulcanian explosions from a flank vent produce very different VLP waveforms. In January 2008, ash-rich, vulcanian explosions issued from a vent on the western flank and produced a distinct type of VLP (Type 1). Bomb-rich explosions from the summit vent in January 2009 produced a much shorter duration VLP (Type 2), but a vulcanian-style ash release. Type 3 VLP events occurred during ash-free exhalations from the summit vent in January 2008; waveforms for Type 2 and 3 VLP events were similar although Type 3 were lower amplitude and shorter in duration. Weak infrasound records for Type 1 explosions compared to Type 2 suggest lower magma pressures and higher porosity for Type 1. Type 3 events correlate with spikes in SO2 emission rate and are driven by partial sealing and rapid release of ash-free gas at the summit vent. In 2012, both vents were active again and produced waveforms like those observed in earlier deployments. We also had a 9-station network of broadband stations that allow for improved waveform modeling. We suggest variations in the VLP period may provide a new tool for monitoring conditions within the conduit.xamples of VLP waveforms from Type 1 explosions (red, in a), Type 2 explosions (blue in b) and Type 3 puffing exhalations (black in c) and their spectra (d) highlight the waveform shape and frequency content of each. All data were deconvolved and filtered with the same 2-pole acausal Butterworth filter with corners at 60 and 12 seconds. In each of the plots, the fine lines are for individual events and the thick lines are stacked waveforms or spectra. The spectra (d) are stacks of normalized spectra for all the events.

  14. A new species of Copepoda Harpacticoida, Xylora calyptogenae spec. n., with a carnivorous life-style from a hydrothermally active submarine volcano in the New Ireland Fore-Arc system (Papua New Guinea) with notes on the systematics of the Donsiellinae Lang, 1948

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, Elke

    2006-12-01

    A new species of harpacticoid copepods, Xylora calyptogenae spec. n., from Edison Seamount, a hydrothermally active submarine volcano in the New Ireland Fore-Arc system (Papua New Guinea) is described. The new species belongs to the Donsiellinae Lang, 1944, a highly specialised taxon, the members of which have previously been encountered only in association with decaying wood and/or wood-boring isopods. A closer relationship of the Donsiellinae with the Pseudotachidiidae Lang, 1936, can be stated on the basis of characteristics concerning the setation and/or segmentation of A1, A2, Mxl, Mxp, the shape of the female P5, anal somite, sexual dimorphisms on P2 and P3 and missing caudal seta I. Within the Pseudotachidiidae, the Donsiellinae again can be well characterized, e.g. by the setation and segmentation of A2, Mxl, swimming-legs, the shape of P1, female P5, male P2, sexual dimorphism and male P5. The Donsiellinae share some apomorphies with the pseudotachidiid subtaxon Paranannopinae Por, 1986: setation/segmentation of Mx, P1, A1. X. calyptogenae spec. n. is more closely related to Xylora bathyalis Hicks 1988 living in the deep sea wood substrata in New Zealand waters. Some traits of the evolutionary history of the Donsiellinae become evident, probably starting from the more primitive deep sea taxa X .calyptogenae spec. n., which lives in the hydrothermal seafloor in the absence of decaying wood, and X. bathyalis, which is found in decaying wood but not necessarily associated with the wood-boring isopod Limnoria Leach, 1814, towards the more advanced genera such as Donsiella Stephensen, 1936, which invades shallow waters and, further, clings to Limnoria, forming a close and, for the copepod, probably obligatory association. The specialised mouthparts of X. calyptogenae spec. n. seem to facilitate the grabbing and fixing of larger and/or active food items. This is confirmed by the presence of a large prey organism, presumably a copepod, consumed either alive or dead, in the gut of one of the available specimens. This morphology of the mouthparts is also shared by the closely related X. bathyalis.

  15. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  16. Investigation of Surtsey Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Norrman, John O.

    The volcanic island of Surtsey, Iceland, was built during the period November 1963 to June 1967 and is one of the few oceanic volcanic islands that has formed and survived in recent times. New stimulus to geologic work on the island was provided in 1979 by completion of a 181-m-deep hole that was drilled to investigate the structure of the volcano and the active hydrothermal system below.During August 1985 an international group of researchers undertook a series of geologic and biologic investigations on the island. This work was facilitated by new aerial photographs taken by the Icelandic Geodetic Survey and a new bathymetric map of the Surtsy region made by the Icelandic Hydrographic Service (both in Reykjavik). Ground surveying of markers appearing in the photographs will permit a major revision of the to pographic map of the island (scale 1:5000). The new bathymetry defines the extent of continuing erosion of three volcanic vents, two of which formed short-lived islands during the Surtsey eruptive episode. Since 1967, when the first bathymetry of these submarine features was made, the summitt errace of Syrtlingur has been reduced from 23 to 32 m below sea level; that of Jolnir, from 15 to 37 m; and that of Surtla, from 32 t o 46 m.

  17. Submarine Paleoseismology Based on Turbidite Records

    E-print Network

    Goldfinger, Chris

    from submarine canyons, shelf edges, and seamount edifices is becoming reasonably well knownSubmarine Paleoseismology Based on Turbidite Records Chris Goldfinger College of Oceanic trigger processes such as turbidity currents, submarine landslides, tsunami (which may be recorded both

  18. Near-bottom water column anomalies associated with active hydrothermal venting at Aeolian arc volcanoes, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Carey, S.; Bell, K. L.; Baker, E. T.; Faure, K.; Rosi, M.; Marani, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrothermal deposits such as metalliferous sediments, Fe-Mn crusts, and massive sulfides are common on the submarine volcanoes of the Aeolian arc (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), but the extent and style of active hydrothermal venting is less well known. A systematic water column survey in 2007 found helium isotope ratios indicative of active venting at 6 of the 9 submarine volcanoes surveyed plus the Marsili back-arc spreading center (Lupton et al., 2011). Other plume indicators, such as turbidity and temperature anomalies were weak or not detected. In September 2011, we conducted five ROV Hercules dives at Eolo, Enarete, and Palinuro volcanoes during an E/V Nautilus expedition. Additionally, two dives explored the Casoni seamount on the southern flank of Stromboli where a dredge returned apparently warm lava in 2002 (Gamberi, 2006). Four PMEL MAPRs, with temperature, optical backscatter (particles), and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors, were arrayed along the lowermost 50 m of the Hercules/Argus cable during the dives to assess the relationship between seafloor observations and water column anomalies. Active venting was observed at each of the volcanoes visited. Particle anomalies were weak or absent, consistent with the 2007 CTD surveys, but ORP anomalies were common. Venting at Eolo volcano was characterized by small, localized patches of yellow-orange bacteria; living tubeworms were observed at one location. ORP anomalies (-1 to -22 mv) were measured at several locations, primarily along the walls of the crescent-shaped collapse area (or possible caldera) east of the Eolo summit. At Enarete volcano, we found venting fluids with temperatures up to 5°C above ambient as well as small, fragile iron-oxide chimneys. The most intense ORP anomaly (-140 mv) occurred at a depth of about 495 m on the southeast side of the volcano, with smaller anomalies (-10 to -20 mv) more common as the ROV moved upslope to the summit. At Palinuro volcano, multiple dives located several active sites along the 50-km-long summit. The distribution of ORP anomalies seen during these dives correlates quite well with the locations of anomalous helium samples from 2007. An ORP anomaly of -160 mv was located at the west end of Palinuro where vent fluids up to 54°C were found. Living tubeworms, bacterial mats of various colors and textures, and small chimneys and globular spires coated with iron oxide having bright-green interiors indicative of the iron-rich hydrothermal clay nontronite were found at actively venting areas on Palinuro. ORP anomalies were generally only detected in the near-bottom MAPR mounted on Hercules. In a few locations the MAPRs on Argus (10-30 meters above bottom) and 25 meters above Argus registered anomalies not seen by the MAPR on Hercules indicating active venting nearby, but not observed along the trackline of the ROV. Only the higher-temperature vent site at the west end of Palinuro generated a plume that had an appreciable particle anomaly and rise height (seen by the Argus+25m MAPR). No anomalies were measured by the MAPR located 50 meters above Argus.

  19. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  20. Geodetic observations and modeling of time-varying deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    E-print Network

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    Geodetic observations and modeling of time-varying deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines Gerald associated with magmatic activity at Taal Volcano, an active tholeiitic volcano located in southwestern Luzon Accepted 6 November 2013 Available online 1 December 2013 Keywords: Volcano geodesy Crustal deformation

  1. Flushing submarine canyons.

    PubMed

    Canals, Miquel; Puig, Pere; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Heussner, Serge; Palanques, Albert; Fabres, Joan

    2006-11-16

    The continental slope is a steep, narrow fringe separating the coastal zone from the deep ocean. During low sea-level stands, slides and dense, sediment-laden flows erode the outer continental shelf and the continental slope, leading to the formation of submarine canyons that funnel large volumes of sediment and organic matter from shallow regions to the deep ocean(1). During high sea-level stands, such as at present, these canyons still experience occasional sediment gravity flows(2-5), which are usually thought to be triggered by sediment failure or river flooding. Here we present observations from a submarine canyon on the Gulf of Lions margin, in the northwest Mediterranean Sea, that demonstrate that these flows can also be triggered by dense shelf water cascading (DSWC)-a type of current that is driven solely by seawater density contrast. Our results show that DSWC can transport large amounts of water and sediment, reshape submarine canyon floors and rapidly affect the deep-sea environment. This cascading is seasonal, resulting from the formation of dense water by cooling and/or evaporation, and occurs on both high- and low-latitude continental margins(6-8). DSWC may therefore transport large amounts of sediment and organic matter to the deep ocean. Furthermore, changes in the frequency and intensity of DSWC driven by future climate change may have a significant impact on the supply of organic matter to deep-sea ecosystems and on the amount of carbon stored on continental margins and in ocean basins. PMID:17108962

  2. Submarine laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConathy, D. R.

    The Department of the Navy and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) are sponsoring a joint study to investigate the use of blue-green laser technology to comunicate with submarines at operating depths. Two approaches are under investigation - one in which the laser itself is space-based, and the other in which the laser is ground-based with its beam redirected to the earth's surface by an orbiting mirror. This paper discusses these two approaches, and presents a brief history of activities which led to the current studies.

  3. Submarine landslides in Society and Austral Islands, French Polynesia: Evolution with the age of the edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouard, V.; Bonneville, A.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents descriptions of numerous submarine landslides in French Polynesia. This inventory shows an evolution of the landslide type with the age of oceanic islands. Submarine active volcanoes are subject to superficial landslides of fragmental material whereas young islands exhibit marks of mass wasting corresponding to giant lateral collapses due to debris avalanche that occurred during the period of volcanic activity. Later, erosional processes generate sand-rubble flows and lead the islands to the stellate morphology known on atolls and guyots. In addition, Tupai atoll and Rurutu Island have been subject to giant slump that deeply modify their shape.

  4. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cables and pipelines on nautical charts. 209.310 Section 209.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts. (a) The policy of the Corps of Engineers with respect to showing the locations of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts published by...

  5. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cables and pipelines on nautical charts. 209.310 Section 209.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts. (a) The policy of the Corps of Engineers with respect to showing the locations of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts published by...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1328 - Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... personnel. 33 CFR Section 165, Subpart B, contains additional provisions applicable to the RNA created in.... Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. 165.1328 Section 165.1328 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1328 Regulated Navigation Area; U.S. Navy submarines, Hood Canal, WA. (a) Location. The...

  7. Current submarine atmosphere control technology.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, W

    1998-01-01

    Air purification in submarines was introduced towards the end of World War II and was limited to the use of soda lime for the removal of carbon dioxide and oxygen candles for the regeneration of oxygen. The next major advances came with the advent of nuclear-powered submarines. These included the development of regenerative and, sometimes, energy-intensive processes for comprehensive atmosphere revitalization. With the present development of conventional submarines using air-independent propulsion there is a requirement for air purification similar to that of the nuclear-powered submarines but it is constrained by limited power and space. Some progress has been made in the development of new technology and the adoption of air purification equipment used in the nuclear-powered submarines for this application. PMID:11876194

  8. Observations of Local Seismicity and Harmonic Tremor Using an Ocean Bottom Hydrophone Array at Brothers Volcano, South Kermadec Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Lau, T. K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2005-12-01

    The submarine Brothers volcano is an important link in the volcanic chain of the southern Kermadec Arc system in the Southwest Pacific Ocean north of New Zealand. The 3-3.5 km wide caldera has a center depth of 1850m and steep surrounding walls of 300-450m. Active hydrothermal venting distinguished Brothers as a point of focus for the New Zealand American Submarine Ring of Fire (NZASRoF) expeditions in 2004 and 2005. Due to its remote location, moderate to small magnitude seismicity around the Brothers area is largely unknown. In late September 2004, four ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs) were deployed on the caldera floor. In April 2005, three of the four instruments were recovered intact. These three OBHs continuously recorded, for seven months, the low frequency (0-110Hz) acoustic field around Brothers volcano, in particular seismic P- and S-waves propagating through the crust and acoustic T-waves in the water column . Preliminary analysis reveals seismicity rates on the order of 106 earthquakes per month. In addition to seismic arrivals, low frequency harmonic tremor is frequently and independently observed on each of the OBH instruments, often occurring subsequent to the larger seismic events. Qualitative comparisons of these signals with tremor observed from the Volcano Islands south of Japan (Dziak and Fox, 2002) show them to be nearly equivalent in frequency structure, suggesting the origin of the tremor observed at Brothers may also be attributed to resonance of a magma-gas mixture in a large chamber or conduit near the water/ seafloor boundary.

  9. Relationship between morphological feature of submarine landslides and geological condition -focus on Oshima-Oshima, Kaimon and Hawaii regions-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kato, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Huge submarine landslides which generate the tsunami are found in the world. Those submarine landslides are generated by the collapse of the volcano and an unstable slope of sediments on the continental shelf. It is thought that a generation mechanism and morphological features of submarine landslides are different according to the environment (geological condition, topography, and transportation mechanism, etc) in each region. We compared submarine landslides in three different regions to clarify the relation of them. The comparison items are geological condition, morphological feature, form of submarine landslide and transportation mechanism. Oshima-Oshima is a volcanic island and tsunami was generated by collapse of volcanic edifice in 1741 eruption. Kaimon submarine landslide was generated by collapse of continental shelf slope off Kaimon volcano which has acted since 4000BP. There are many submarine landslides around Hawaii Islands. Nuuanu-Wailau submarine landslides are peculiar in those submarine landslides. Moreover, we compare some submarine landslides around Hawaii islands with Oshima-Oshima debris avalanche. Both Oshima-Oshima and Hawaii islands are volcanic islands, however the morphological features are different. As a morphological feature, Oshima-Oshima has thick sediment of 100-120m in front of collapse area and those sediment thins with distance. Nuuanu-Wailau submarine landslides have sediment including a huge blocks of 2km height at equal intervals around Hawaii islands. On the other hand, Kaimon submarine landslide has evenly thin sediment as a non volcanic type. In addition, in the case of Nuuanu-Wailau slides are smaller than Oshima-Oshima's case when we think about sediment extension to lateral side. Especially, sediment extension of Kaimon submarine landslide is small. These sediment distributions are related to the transportation mechanism. In general, sediment gravity flow is divided into 4 types (turbidity current, fluidized sediment flow, grain flow, debris flow). In general, if the speed is large during transportation, the extension to the lateral side is small. In addition, those flows show that coarse grains settle toward the base of the flow, and their speed and density reduce. The transportation mechanism of Oshima-Oshima debris avalanche is thought a debris flow, however in the case of Kaimon is thought turbidity current which has high speed and density. We clarify the relation among the transportation mechanism, the geological condition and the morphological features of submarine landslides.

  10. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the importance of this more realistic description in gravity calculations. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  11. The Initiation of Submarine Debris Flow after 2006 Pingtung Earthquake Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. C.; Liu, J. T.; Chiu, H. T.; Li, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    On 26?27 December 2006, a series of submarine cables were damaged offshore southwestern Taiwan from Gaoping Slope to the northern terminus of the Manila Trench. The cable breakages were caused by gravity flows which triggered by the Pingtung earthquake doublet occurred on 26 December 2006 at 20:26 (21.9°N, 120.6°E; ML 7.0) and 20:34 (21.97°N, 120.42°E; ML 7.0) offshore of Fangliao Twonship and meanwhile the local fishermen reported disturbed waters at the head of Fangliao submarine canyon. Although many researchers conjectured the disturbed waters may cause by the eruption of submarine volcanoes which has been widely discovered off the southwestern Taiwan, the actual mechanism is still unclear. In previous studies, a series of faults, liquefaction strata, pockmarks and acoustically transparent sediments with doming structures were observed at the head of Fanliao submarine canyon and may highly related to the submarine groundwater discharge off southwestern Taiwan. Recently, further multi-beam surveys were conducted at the east of Fangliao submarine canyon head and the result shows large area of seafloor subsidence after Pingtung Earthquake. The area of subsidence is over 60 km2 with maximum depth around 5 meters. The north end of the subsidence is connected to the Fangliao submarine canyon where the first cable was failed (CH-US CN-W2-1: 22°13.287'N, 120°33.722'E) after Pingtung Earthquake. All the evidences point out the large earthquake might triggered liquefaction process and generated large debris flow and swept the submarine cables away from the Fangliao submarine canyon head to the abyss.

  12. Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This 150 kilometer stretch of the Pacific coastal plain of Nicaragua (12.0N, 86.5W) from the Gulf of Fonseca to Lake Managua. The large crater on the peninsula is Coseguina, which erupted in 1835, forming a 2 km. wide by 500 meter deep caldera and deposited ash as far away as Mexico City, some 1400 km. to the north. A plume of Steam can be seen venting from San Cristobal volcano, in the Marabios Range, the highest mouintain in Nicaragua.

  13. The Betsiamites-Colombier slides along the St. Lawrence Estuary: linking a 7250 years BP submarine slide to a 1663 coastal landslide

    E-print Network

    the largest documented historic landslides in Canada. The presence of submarine scars, left by the early with subaerial and submarine landslide scars. The largest scars are identified in the vicinity of the Betsiamites submarine slide to a 1663 coastal landslide Locat, Jacques Université Laval, Département de géologie et

  14. Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, H.; Mazzini, A.; Akhmanov, G. G.; Aloisi, G.; Planke, S.; Sørenssen, A.; Istadi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are geologically important manifestations of vertical fluid flow and mud eruption in sedimentary basins worldwide. Their formation is predominantly ascribed to release of overpressure from clay- and organic- rich sediments, leading to impressive buildup of mud mountains in submarine and subaerial settings. Here we report data from two fieldworks on a newly born mud volcano named LUSI eruption in Eastern Java (Indonesia). The eruption site appears close to an active magmatic complex in a backarc sedimentary basin in Indonesia. Its specific location results in a high background temperature gradient that triggers mineralogical transformations and geochemical reactions at shallow depth. The eruption of 100 deg.C mud and gas that started the 29th of May 2006 flooded a large area within the Sidoarjo village in Northeast Java. Thousands of people have so far been evacuated and, since the initial eruption, the flow rate escalated from 5000 to 120,000 m3/d during the first eleven weeks. Then the erupted volume started to pulsate between almost zero and 120,000 m3/d in the period August-September, whereas it increased dramatically following swarms of earthquakes in September, before reaching almost 180,000 m3/d in December 2006. Fifteen months after the initial burst, LUSI is still vigorously erupting up to 111,000 m3/d, the average subsidence of the area reached 11 m. Seismic images show that a pre-existing structure was present before the eruption. Based on geochemical and field results, we propose a mechanism where the eruptions started following the 27th of May earthquake due to fracturing and accompanied depressurization of >100 deg.C pore fluids from > 1700 m depth released from a structure in already critical conditions. This resulted in the formation of a quasi-hydrothermal system with a geyser-like surface expression and with an activity influenced by the regional seismicity.

  15. Submarine fresh water outflow detection with a dual-frequency microwave and an infrared radiometer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Since infrared measurements are only very slightly affected by whitecap and banking angle influences, the combined multifrequency radiometric signatures of the L-band, the S-band, and an infrared radiometer are used in identifying freshwater outflows (submerged and superficial). To separate the river and lagoon outflows from the submarine outflows, geographical maps with a scale of 1:100,000 are used. In all, 44 submarine freshwater springs are identified. This is seen as indicating that the submarine freshwater outflow locations are more numerous around the island than had earlier been estimated. Most of the submarine springs are located at the northwest and southeast portion of the Puerto Rican coastline; the success in detecting the submarine springs during both missions at the northwest portion of the island is 39%. Salinity and temperature distribution plots along the flight path in longitude and latitude coordinates reveal that runoff direction can be determined.

  16. The chronology of the martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Saunders, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The volcanoes of Mars have been divided into three groups based on morphology: basaltic shields, domes and composite cones, and highland patera. A fourth group can be added to include the volcano-tectonic depressions. Using crater counts and the absolute chronology of Soderblom, an attempt is made to estimate the history of the volcanoes. Early in the martian history, about 2.5 b.y. ago, all three styles of volcanoes were active at various locations on the surface. At approximately 1.7-1.8 b.y. ago a transition occurred in the style and loci of volcanic construction. Volcanoes of younger age appear to be only of the basaltic shield group and are restricted to the Tharsis region. This same transition was noted by a change in the style of the basaltic shield group. Older shields were small low features, while the younger shields are significantly broader and taller.

  17. Transport of Fine Ash Through the Water Column at Erupting Volcanoes - Monowai Cone, Kermadec-Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; Leybourne, M. I.; de Ronde, C. E.; Greene, R.; Faure, K.; Chadwick, W.; Dziak, R. P.; Lupton, J. E.; Lebon, G.

    2010-12-01

    Monowai cone is a large, active, basaltic stratovolcano, part of the submarine Monowai volcanic center (MVC) located at ~26°S on the Kermadec-Tonga arc. At other actively erupting submarine volcanoes, magma extrusions and hydrothermal vents have been located only near the summit of the edifice, generating plumes enriched with hydrothermal components and magmatic gasses that disperse into the ocean environment at, or shallower than, the summit depth. Plumes found deeper than summit depths are dominated by fresh volcaniclastic ash particles, devoid of hydrothermal tracers, emplaced episodically by down-slope gravity flows, and transport fine ash to 10’s of km from the active eruptions. A water column survey of the MVC in 2004 mapped intensely hydrothermal-magmatic plumes over the shallow (~130 m) summit of Monowai cone and widespread plumes around its flanks. Due to the more complex multiple parasitic cone and caldera structure of MVC, we analyzed the dissolved and particulate components of the flank plumes for evidence of additional sources. Although hydrothermal plumes exist within the adjacent caldera, none of the parasitic cones on Monowai cone or elsewhere within the MVC were hydrothermally or volcanically active. The combination of an intensely enriched summit plume, sulfur particles and bubbles at the sea surface, and ash-dominated flank plumes indicate Monowai cone was actively erupting at the time of the 2004 survey. Monowai cone is thus the fourth erupting submarine volcano we have encountered, and all have had deep ash plumes distributed around their flanks [the others are: Kavachi (Solomon Island arc), NW Rota-1 (Mariana arc) and W Mata (NE Lau basin)]. These deep ash plumes are a syneruptive phenomenon, but it is unknown how they are related to eruptive style and output, or to the cycles of construction and collapse that occur on the slopes of submarine volcanoes. Repeat multibeam bathymetric surveys have documented two large-scale sector collapse events at Monowai and one at NW Rota-1, as well as constructional deposits extending down the flanks of these volcanoes. Acoustic records at Monowai and NW Rota-1 suggest sector collapse events are infrequent while eruptions, and the resulting supply of depositional material, have been nearly continuous. The sector collapse events occurred at times remote from our plume surveys, so, large landslide events are not a prerequisite for the presence of deep ash plumes. Despite a wide range of summit depths (<10 m at Kavachi to 1500 m at W Mata), lava types (basaltic-andesite, boninite, and basalt), and eruptive styles (Surtseyan, Strombolian, and effusive flows with active pillow formation), the deep particle plumes at each of these volcanoes are remarkably similar in their widespread distribution (to 10’s of km from the summit and at multiple depths down the flanks) and composition (dominantly fresh volcanic ash). Moderate eruption rates, lava-seawater interaction and steep slopes below an eruptive vent may be sufficient to initiate the transport of fine ash into the ocean environment and distal sediments via these types of plumes.

  18. Hawaiian submarine manganese-iron oxide crusts - A dating tool?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Black manganese-iron oxide crusts form on most exposed rock on the ocean floor. Such crusts are well developed on the steep lava slopes of the Hawaiian Ridge and have been sampled during dredging and submersible dives. The crusts also occur on fragments detached from bedrock by mass wasting, on submerged coral reefs, and on poorly lithified sedimentary rocks. The thickness of the crusts was measured on samples collected since 1965 on the Hawaiian Ridge from 140 dive or dredge localities. Fifty-nine (42%) of the sites were collected in 2001 by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The thinner crusts on many samples apparently result from post-depositional breakage, landsliding, and intermittent burial of outcrops by sediment. The maximum crust thickness was selected from each dredge or dive site to best represent crusts on the original rock surface at that site. The measurements show an irregular progressive thickening of the crusts toward the northwest-i.e., progressive thickening toward the older volcanic features with increasing distance from the Hawaiian hotspot. Comparison of the maximum crust thickness with radiometric ages of related subaerial features supports previous studies that indicate a crust-growth rate of about 2.5 mm/m.y. The thickness information not only allows a comparison of the relative exposure ages of two or more features offshore from different volcanoes, but also provides specific age estimates of volcanic and landslide deposits. The data indicate that some of the landslide blocks within the south Kona landslide are the oldest exposed rock on Mauna Loa, Kilauea, or Loihi volcanoes. Crusts on the floors of submarine canyons off Kohala and East Molokai volcanoes indicate that these canyons are no longer serving as channelways for downslope, sediment-laden currents. Mahukona volcano was approximately synchronous with Hilo Ridge, both being younger than Hana Ridge. The Nuuanu landslide is considerably older than the Wailau landslide. The Waianae landslide southwest of Oahu has yielded samples with the greatest manganese-iron oxide crusts (9.5 mm thick) and therefore apparently represents the oldest submarine material yet found in the study area. The submarine volcanic field 100 km southwest of Oahu is apparently younger than the Waianae landslide. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  19. Submarine lithification of carbonate sediments.

    PubMed

    Milliman, J D

    1966-08-26

    Recrystallized planktonic limestones from two guyots in the North Atlantic are in oxygen-isotopic equilibrium with their present ambient waters, suggesting submarine lithifica tion and recrystallization. The early stages of submarine lithification of carbonates may involve precipitation of, and replacement by, magnesium-rich calcite; with time this may invert to magnesium-poor calcite. This type of lithification probably requires very low rates of sediment accumulation. PMID:17837254

  20. Multifrequency radiometer detection of submarine freshwater sources along the Puerto Rican coastline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The surface area above submarine springs of fresh water exhibit temperatures and salinities lower than the surrounding sea waters. A multifrequency radiometer system which earlier demonstrated an accuracy of 1 degree C and 1 part per thousand in remotely detecting the surface temperature and salinities, respectively, was used to detect submarine freshwater springs. The first mission on February 4, 1978, consisted of overflight measurements over three fourths of the coastal areas around the Island of Puerto Rico. During the second mission on February 6, 1978, special attention was directed to the northwest portion of Puerto Rico where several submarine springs had been reported. The previously reported spring locations correlated well with the locations detected by the radiometers. After separating the surface runoffs such as rivers, lagoons, marshes, and bays, 44 submarine freshwater springs were identified which indicates that the submarine freshwater outflow locations are more numerous around the island than had earlier been estimated. The majority of the submarine springs are located at the northwest and southeast portion of the Puerto Rican coastline. The success of detecting the same submarine springs during both missions at the northwest portion of the island was 39%.

  1. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...charts published by the Corps of Engineers is as follows: (1) Within protected waters such as harbors, rivers, bays, estuaries or other inland waterways the location of submarine cables and pipelines is to be indicated by shaded areas marked...

  2. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...charts published by the Corps of Engineers is as follows: (1) Within protected waters such as harbors, rivers, bays, estuaries or other inland waterways the location of submarine cables and pipelines is to be indicated by shaded areas marked...

  3. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...charts published by the Corps of Engineers is as follows: (1) Within protected waters such as harbors, rivers, bays, estuaries or other inland waterways the location of submarine cables and pipelines is to be indicated by shaded areas marked...

  4. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...charts published by the Corps of Engineers is as follows: (1) Within protected waters such as harbors, rivers, bays, estuaries or other inland waterways the location of submarine cables and pipelines is to be indicated by shaded areas marked...

  5. 33 CFR 209.310 - Representation of submarine cables and pipelines on nautical charts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...charts published by the Corps of Engineers is as follows: (1) Within protected waters such as harbors, rivers, bays, estuaries or other inland waterways the location of submarine cables and pipelines is to be indicated by shaded areas marked...

  6. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would enable global comparisons of plate boundary structures and processes and could facilitate a more coordinated approach to optimizing the future acquisition of these high-value data by the global research community.

  7. Volcano-Tectonic Deformation at Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Galgana, G.; Corpuz, E.; Bartel, B.

    2004-12-01

    Taal Volcano, located in southern Luzon, Philippines, is an unusual, tholeiitic volcano situated within a calc-alkaline arc. It is one of the most active volcanic centers in the Philippines, with some 33 historic volcanic eruptions over the past four centuries. Volcanism at Taal is at least partly tectonically controlled, suggested by its location at the intersection of regional fault structures and by the location and shape of both Taal's caldera and Volcano Island. The alignment of modern eruption centers, are controlled by regional and local structures. Here, we review geomorphic and geodetic observations that constrain both tectonic and volcanic deformation in the vicinity of Taal volcano. We use GPS measurements from a 52-station GPS network measured from 1996 - 2001 to investigate overall plate interaction and microplate (intra-arc) deformation. The velocity field indicates that the majority of the Philippine Sea - Eurasia plate convergence is taking place west of Luzon, presumably largely by subduction at the Manila trench. A relatively small fraction of the convergence appears to be taking place within Luzon or across the East Luzon trough. The major intra-arc deformation is accommodated by strike-slip motion along the Philippine Fault, ranging from 25-40 mm/yr left-lateral slip. Detailed measurements in southern Luzon also indicate significant intra-arc deformation west of the Philippine Fault. GPS measurements in southwestern Luzon indicate significant motion within the arc, which could be explained by 11-13 mm/yr of left-lateral shear along the "Macolod Corridor", within which Taal Volcano resides. A dense network of continuous single- and dual-frequency GPS receivers at Taal Volcano, Philippines reveals highly time-variable deformation behavior, similar to that observed at other large calderas. While the caldera has been relatively quiescent for the past 2-3 years, previous deformation includes two major phases of intra-caldera deformation, including two phases of inflation and deflation in 1998-2000. The February-November 2000 period of inflation was characterized by approximately 120 mm of uplift of the center of Volcano Island relative to the northern caldera rim, at average rates up to 216 mm/yr. The source of deflation in 1999 was modeled as a contractional Mogi point source centered at 4.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island; the source of inflation in 2000 was modeled as a dilatational Mogi point source centered at 5.2 km depth beneath Volcano Island. The locations of the two sources are indistinguishable within the 95% confidence estimates. Modeling using a running four-month time window from June 1999-March 2001 reveals little evidence for source migration. We find marginal evidence for an elongate source whose long axis is oriented NW-SE, paralleling the caldera-controlling fault system. We suggest that the two periods of inflation observed at Taal represent episodic intrusions of magma into a shallow reservoir centered beneath Volcano Island whose position is controlled at least in part by regional tectonic structures.

  8. Character of seismic motion at a location of a gas hydrate-bearing mud volcano on the SW Barents Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, Peter; Mienert, Jürgen; Buenz, Stefan; Géli, Louis

    2014-08-01

    The Håkon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV) at 1270 m water depth on the SW Barents Sea slope has been intensively studied since its discovery in 1989. A variety of sensors monitored morphological, hydrological, geochemical, and biological parameters in the HMMV area. An ocean bottom seismometer deployment allowed us to register seismic motion for 2 years, from October 2008 to October 2010. The analysis of seismic records documents two types of seismic signals. The first type are harmonic tremors with frequency peaks around 4-5 and 8-10 Hz that occur in swarms. Their origin could be from fluid flow circulation or resonant vibrations of gas bubbles or from delayed movement of fluid-rich sediments in the conduit or in a deeper pseudo-mud chamber of the HMMV. Because swarms occur with a periodicity of ~ 6 h, tide-related effects are suspected to influence the mechanism originating the tremors. The second type of signals are regional earthquakes that were in 15 cases recognized in seismic records. The activity of harmonic tremors was not significantly affected by earthquakes.

  9. Ol Doinyo Lengai Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program team and the Geological Survey of Tanzania take a sample of the most recent ashfall from Ol Doinyo Lengai as the volcano looms in the background....

  10. Exploration of the 1891 Foerstner submarine vent site (Pantelleria, Italy): insights into the formation of basaltic balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Joshua T.; Carey, Steven; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro; Croff-Bell, Katherine Lynn; Roman, Chris; Marani, Michael

    2014-07-01

    On October 17, 1891, a submarine eruption started at Foerstner volcano located within the Pantelleria Rift of the Strait of Sicily (Italy). Activity occurred for a period of 1 week from an eruptive vent located 4 km northwest of the island of Pantelleria at a water depth of 250 m. The eruption produced lava balloons that discharged gas at the surface and eventually sank to the seafloor. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) video footage and high-resolution multi-beam mapping of the Foerstner vent site were used to create a geologic map of the AD 1891 deposits and conduct the first detailed study of the source area associated with this unusual type of submarine volcanism. The main Foerstner vent consists of two overlapping circular mounds with a total volume of 6.3 × 105 m3 and relief of 60 m. It is dominantly constructed of clastic scoriaceous deposits with some interbedded pillow lavas. Petrographic and geochemical analyses of Foerstner samples by X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry reveal that the majority of the deposits are vesicular, hypocrystalline basanite scoria that display porphyritic, hyaloophitic, and vitrophyric textures. An intact lava balloon recovered from the seafloor consists of a large interior gas cavity surrounded by a thin lava shell comprising two distinct layers: a thin, oxidized, quenched crust surrounding the exterior of the balloon and a dark gray, tachylite layer lying beneath it. Ostwald ripening is proposed to be the dominant bubble growth mechanism of four representative Foerstner scoria samples as inferred by vesicle size distributions. Characterization of the diversity of deposit facies observed at Foerstner in conjunction with quantitative rock texture analysis indicates that submarine Strombolian-like activity is the most likely mechanism for the formation of lava balloons. The deposit facies observed at the main Foerstner vent are very similar to those produced by other known submarine Strombolian eruptions (short pillow flow lobes, large scoriaceous clasts, spatter-like vent facies). Balloons were likely formed from the rapid cooling of extremely vesicular magma fragments as a result of a gas-rich frothy magma source. The exterior of these fragments hyperquenched forming a vesicular glassy shell that acted as an insulating layer preventing magmatic gas in its interior from escaping and thus allowing flotation as densities reached less than 1,000 kg/m3. We believe that lava balloons are a common eruptive product, as the conditions required to generate these products are likely to be present in a variety of submarine volcanic environments. Additionally, the facies relationships observed at Foerstner may be used as a paleoenvironmental indicator for modern and ancient basaltic shallow submarine eruptions because of the relatively narrow depth range over which they likely occur (200-400 m).

  11. Bathymetry of the southwest flank of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the seafloor topography in the map area is on the southwest submarine flank of the currently active Mauna Loa Volcano. The benches and blocky hills shown on the map were shaped by giant landslides that resulted from instability of the rapidly growing volcano. These landslides were imagined during a 1986 to 1991 swath sonar program of the United States Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone, a cooperative venture by the U.S. Geological Survey and the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (Lipman and others, 1988; Moore and others, 1989). Dana Seamount (and probably also the neighboring Day Seamount) are apparently Cretaceous in age, based on paleomagnetic studies, and predate the growth of the Hawaiian Ridge volcanoes (Sager and Pringle, 1990).

  12. Publications Volcano geodesy

    E-print Network

    ), Analytical modeling of gravity changes and crustal deformation at volcanoes: the Long Valley caldera (CAPublications Volcano geodesy · Johnson D.J. et al (2010). Shallow magma accumulation at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, revealed by microgravity surveys. Geology 38 (12), p. 1139-1142, doi: 10.1130/G31323

  13. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater....

  14. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  15. Volcano Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2003

    This low-relief shield volcano imaged with the THEMIS visible camera has two large vents which have erupted several individual lava flows. The positions of the origins of many of the flows indicate that it is probable that the vents are secondary structures that formed only after the shield was built up by eruptions from a central caldera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17.6, Longitude 243.6 East (116.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Infrared science of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, William A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, R.C.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs is- suing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  17. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  18. Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Relict Arctic Submarine Permafrost and Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the circum-Arctic continental shelves. Degradation of this shallow water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several factors, such as the lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, and the salinity of the pore water. The salinity of the pore water is especially relevant because it partially controls the freezing point for both ice and gas hydrate. Measurements of deep pore water salinity are few and far between, but show that deep off-shore sediments are fresh. Deep freshening has been attributed to large-scale topographically-driven submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater into deep marine sediments. We investigate the role of submarine ground water discharge on the salinity field and its effects on the seaward extent of relict submarine permafrost and gas hydrate stability on the Arctic shelf with a 2D shelf-scale model based on the finite volume method. The model tracks the evolution of the temperature, salinity, and pressure fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of water ice and hydrate formation included. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. Results show that pore fluid is strongly influenced by the permeability variations imposed by the overlying permafrost layer. Groundwater discharge tends to travel horizontally off-shore beneath the permafrost layer and the freshwater-saltwater interface location displays long timescale transient behavior that is dependent on the groundwater discharge strength. The seaward permafrost extent is in turn strongly influenced by the salinity field and location of the freshwater-saltwater transition. Our results suggest that the role of salt transport and its effect on permafrost evolution can provide context for the interpretation of recent permafrost maps and methane observations in the Arctic.

  19. Submarine Warfare in the A Bibliography

    E-print Network

    Submarine Warfare in the 20th & 21st Centuries: A Bibliography Compiled by Michaele Lee Huygen 3D, 1966. p. 205. This bibliography is a revised edition of the bibliography Submarine Warfare in the 20th & 21st Centuries, 2003, which is in turn a revised and expanded version of Submarine Warfare in the 20

  20. Direct measures of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD)

    E-print Network

    Page: 1 Direct measures of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) over a fractured rock aquifer of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) have been made, but measurements along the South American coast of submarine, freshwater springs have been recognized in the folk wisdom of millennia, the scientific inquiry

  1. Absolute and relative locations of earthquakes at Mount St. Helens, Washington, using continuous data: implications for magmatic processes: Chapter 4 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Crosson, Robert S.; Creager, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a combination of absolute and relative locations from earthquake multiplets to investigate the seismicity associated with the eruptive sequence at Mount St. Helens between September 23, 2004, and November 20, 2004. Multiplets, a prominent feature of seismicity during this time period, occurred as volcano-tectonic, hybrid, and low-frequency earthquakes spanning a large range of magnitudes and lifespans. Absolute locations were improved through the use of a new one-dimensional velocity model with excellent shallow constraints on P-wave velocities. We used jackknife tests to minimize possible biases in absolute and relative locations resulting from station outages and changing station configurations. In this paper, we show that earthquake hypocenters shallowed before the October 1 explosion along a north-dipping structure under the 1980-86 dome. Relative relocations of multiplets during the initial seismic unrest and ensuing eruption showed rather small source volumes before the October 1 explosion and larger tabular source volumes after October 5. All multiplets possess absolute locations very close to each other. However, the highly dissimilar waveforms displayed by each of the multiplets analyzed suggest that different sources and mechanisms were present within a very small source volume. We suggest that multiplets were related to pressurization of the conduit system that produced a stationary source that was highly stable over long time periods. On the basis of their response to explosions occurring in October 2004, earthquakes not associated with multiplets also appeared to be pressure dependent. The pressure source for these earthquakes appeared, however, to be different from the pressure source of the multiplets.

  2. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  3. Volcano Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.

    - A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic regimes and determining their physical and chemical properties; and (3) quantitatively understanding multiphase fluid flow behavior under dynamic volcanic conditions. To realize these goals, not only must we learn how to translate seismic observations into quantitative information about fluid dynamics, but we also must determine the underlying physics that governs vesiculation, fragmentation, and the collapse of bubble-rich suspensions to form separate melt and vapor. Refined understanding of such processes-essential for quantitative short-term eruption forecasts-will require multidisciplinary research involving detailed field measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling.

  4. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic regimes and determining their physical and chemical properties; and (3) quantitatively understanding multiphase fluid flow behavior under dynamic volcanic conditions. To realize these goals, not only must we learn how to translate seismic observations into quantitative information about fluid dynamics, but we also must determine the underlying physics that governs vesiculation, fragmentation, and the collapse of bubble-rich suspensions to form separate melt and vapor. Refined understanding of such processes-essential for quantitative short-term eruption forecasts-will require multidisciplinary research involving detailed field measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling.

  5. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  6. Wide Angle View of Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Arsia Mons (above) is one of the largest volcanoes known. This shield volcano is part of an aligned trio known as the Tharsis Montes--the others are Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons. Arsia Mons is rivaled only by Olympus Mons in terms of its volume. The summit of Arsia Mons is more than 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) higher than the surrounding plains. The crater--or caldera--at the volcano summit is approximately 110 km (68 mi) across. This view of Arsia Mons was taken by the red and blue wide angle cameras of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system. Bright water ice clouds (the whitish/bluish wisps) hang above the volcano--a common sight every martian afternoon in this region. Arsia Mons is located at 120o west longitude and 9o south latitude. Illumination is from the left.

  7. We wish to develop a new method of detecting submarines that does not require the generation of sound, as sonar does. Rather, it should employ changes in the water's ambient

    E-print Network

    Mitchener, W. Garrett

    We wish to develop a new method of detecting submarines that does not require the generation the location, size, and velocity of the submarine. Our model suggests using transducer arrays suspended from of determining the amplitude and directionof echoes froma submarine. From the amplitudeof the echoes, we can

  8. Dynamics of deep submarine silicic explosive eruptions in the Kermadec arc, as reflected in pumice vesicularity textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotella, Melissa D.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Barker, Simon J.; Ian Schipper, C.; Wright, Ian C.; Wysoczanski, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Despite increasing recognition of silicic pumice-bearing deposits in the deep marine environment, the processes involved in explosive silicic submarine eruptions remain in question. Here we present data on bubble sizes and number densities (number of bubbles per unit of melt matrix) for deep submarine-erupted pumices from three volcanoes (Healy, Raoul SW and Havre) along the Kermadec arc (SW Pacific) to investigate the effects of a significant (>~1 km) overlying water column and the associated increased hydrostatic pressure on magma vesiculation and fragmentation. We compare these textural data with those from chemically similar, subaerially-erupted pyroclasts from nearby Raoul volcano as well as submarine-erupted 'Tangaroan' fragments derived by non-explosive, buoyant detachment of foaming magma from Macauley volcano, also along the Kermadec arc. Deep submarine-erupted pumices are macroscopically similar (colour, density, texture) to subaerial or shallow submarine-erupted pumices, but show contrasting microscopic bubble textures. Deep submarine-erupted pyroclasts have fewer small (< 10 ?m diameter) bubbles and narrower bubble size distributions (BSDs) when compared to subaerially erupted pyroclasts from Raoul (35-55 ?m vs. 20-70 ?m range in volume based median bubble size, respectively). Bubble number density (BND) values are consistently lower than subaerial-erupted pyroclasts and do not display the same trends of decreasing BND with increasing vesicularity. We interpret these textural differences to result from deep submarine eruptions entering the water column at higher pressures than subaerial eruptions entering the atmosphere (~ 10 MPa vs. 0.1 MPa for a vent at 1000 mbsl). The presence of an overlying water column acts to suppress rapid acceleration of magma, as occurs in the upper conduit of subaerial eruptions, therefore suppressing coalescence, permeability development and gas loss, amounting to closed-system degassing conditions. The higher confining pressure environment of deep submarine settings hinders extensive post-fragmentation clast expansion, coalescence of bubbles, and thinning of bubble walls, causing clasts to have similar BND values regardless of their vesicularity. Although deep submarine-erupted pyroclasts are closely similar to their subaerial counterparts on the basis of bulk vesicularities and macroscopic appearance, they differ markedly in their microscopic textures, allowing them to be fingerprinted in modern and ancient pumiceous marine sediments.

  9. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-05-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (Northwest Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby number and Burger number were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (?) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10 day model period, however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. Offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate) as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies were explained within this new dynamic framework.

  10. Flow dynamics around downwelling submarine canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, J. M.; Allen, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    Flow dynamics around a downwelling submarine canyon were analysed with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model. Blanes Canyon (northwestern Mediterranean) was used for topographic and initial forcing conditions. Fourteen scenarios were modelled with varying forcing conditions. Rossby and Burger numbers were used to determine the significance of Coriolis acceleration and stratification (respectively) and their impacts on flow dynamics. A new non-dimensional parameter (?) was introduced to determine the significance of vertical variations in stratification. Some simulations do see brief periods of upwards displacement of water during the 10-day model period; however, the presence of the submarine canyon is found to enhance downwards advection of density in all model scenarios. High Burger numbers lead to negative vorticity and a trapped anticyclonic eddy within the canyon, as well as an increased density anomaly. Low Burger numbers lead to positive vorticity, cyclonic circulation, and weaker density anomalies. Vertical variations in stratification affect zonal jet placement. Under the same forcing conditions, the zonal jet is pushed offshore in more uniformly stratified domains. The offshore jet location generates upwards density advection away from the canyon, while onshore jets generate downwards density advection everywhere within the model domain. Increasing Rossby values across the canyon axis, as well as decreasing Burger values, increase negative vertical flux at shelf break depth (150 m). Increasing Rossby numbers lead to stronger downwards advection of a passive tracer (nitrate), as well as stronger vorticity within the canyon. Results from previous studies are explained within this new dynamic framework.

  11. Elysium Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1998--the first anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing--Mars Global Surveyor's latest images were radioed to Earth with little fanfare. The images received on July 4, 1998, however, were very exciting because they included a rare crossing of the summit caldera of a major martian volcano. Elysium Mons is located at 25oN, 213oW, in the martian eastern hemisphere. Elysium Mons is one of three large volcanoes that occur on the Elysium Rise-- the others are Hecates Tholus (northeast of Elysium Mons) and Albor Tholus (southeast of Elysium Mons). The volcano rises about 12.5 kilometers (7.8 miles) above the surrounding plain, or about 16 kilometers (9.9 miles) above the martian datum-- the 'zero' elevation defined by average martian atmospheric pressure and the planet's radius.

    Elysium Mons was discovered by Mariner 9 in 1972. It differs in a number of ways from the familiar Olympus Mons and other large volcanoes in the Tharsis region. In particular, there are no obvious lava flows visible on the volcano's flanks. The lack of lava flows was apparent from the Mariner 9 images, but the new MOC high resolution image--obtained at 5.24 meters (17.2 feet) per pixel--illustrates that this is true even when viewed at higher spatial resolution.

    Elysium Mons has many craters on its surface. Some of these probably formed by meteor impact, but many show no ejecta pattern characteristic of meteor impact. Some of the craters are aligned in linear patterns that are radial to the summit caldera--these most likely formed by collapse as lava was withdrawn from beneath the surface, rather than by meteor impact. Other craters may have formed by explosive volcanism. Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars has been very difficult to identify from previous Mars spacecraft images. This and other MOC data are being examined closely to better understand the nature and origin of volcanic features on Mars.

    The three MOC images, 40301 (red wide angle), 40302 (blue wide angle), and 40303 (high resolution, narrow angle) were obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 403rd orbit around the planet around 9:58 - 10:05 p.m. PDT on July 2, 1998. The images were received and processed at Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) around 4:00 p.m. PDT on July 4, 1998.

    This image: MOC image 40303, shown at 25% of its original size. North is approximately up, illumination is from the right. Resolution of picture shown here is 21 meters (69 feet) per pixel. Image was received with bright slopes saturated at DN=255.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  12. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  13. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    SciTech Connect

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  14. How volcano monitoring in New Zealand can contribute to a global volcano dataset: The GeoNet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, G. E.; Scott, B.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanism plays an important role in New Zealand. Much of the landscape of the central North Island owes its shape to volcanism, with the soils supporting forestry and farming economies, geothermal systems providing renewable electricity production and the spectacular landscape supporting tourism and adventure. However volcanism also has it disadvantages: eruptive activity brings physical damage and economic losses and, sometimes, tragically the loss of life. Historically, in New Zealand, volcanoes represent the largest single source of fatalities from natural disasters. To better mitigate the hazard from New Zealand’s volcanoes, a multidisciplinary approach is applied. In 2001 the NZ Earthquake Commission (EQC) commenced funding the GeoNet project, providing the first totally national modern geological hazard monitoring system in New Zealand. The GeoNet project is responsibly for monitoring and assessing all of the active volcanoes (and other geological hazards) in New Zealand. The volcano monitoring programme is integrated into the national seismograph and geodetic networks. The volcano monitoring covers active volcanic cones, resting calderas, volcanic fields, and submarine volcanoes. Monitoring techniques include volcano seismology, geodesy, gas and water chemistry, remote sensing and other geophysical techniques, producing a wide variety of data sets, with both temporal and spatial distribution. These data sets form the basis for detailed research to achieve in depth understanding of these volcanoes and will contribute to the global knowledge of volcanic processes. However to achieve this the data sets need to be accessible by a range of end users, so that they can be used to underpin fundamental research and applied hazard assessments. This presentation will outline the NZ data sets and the problems of presenting and sharing them globally.

  15. Obstacle avoidance sonar for submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Albert C.; Webman, Kenneth M.

    2002-05-01

    The Advanced Mine Detection Sonar (AMDS) system was designed to operate in poor environments with high biological and/or shallow-water boundary conditions. It provides increased capability for active detection of volume, close-tethered, and bottom mines, as well as submarine and surface target active/passive detection for ASW and collision avoidance. It also provides bottom topography mapping capability for precise submarine navigation in uncharted littoral waters. It accomplishes this by using advanced processing techniques with extremely narrow beamwidths. The receive array consists of 36 modules arranged in a 15-ft-diameter semicircle at the bottom of the submarine sonar dome to form a chin-mounted array. Each module consists of 40 piezoelectric rubber elements. The modules provide the necessary signal conditioning to the element data prior to signal transmission (uplink) through the hull. The elements are amplified, filtered, converted to digital signals by an A/D converter, and multiplexed prior to uplink to the inboard receiver. Each module also has a downlink over which it receives synchronization and mode/gain control. Uplink and downlink transmission is done using fiberoptic telemetry. AMDS was installed on the USS Asheville. The high-frequency chin array for Virginia class submarines is based on the Asheville design.

  16. Tlie Submarine Caves of Bermuda

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    consists .;f a small group of islands situated atop a volcanic seamount in the Northwest Atlantic. The islands themselves are composed of marine and eolian, Pleistocene and Recent limestone completely capping the volcanic pedistal. Three types of submarine limestone cave morphology have so far been identified

  17. Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,, H. Svensen a

    E-print Network

    Svensen, Henrik

    Triggering and dynamic evolution of the LUSI mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,, H. Svensen a , G Subroto 42, 12710, Jakarta Indonesia Received 20 March 2007; received in revised form 12 June 2007 in Indonesia. The location of the mud volcano close to magmatic volcanoes results in a high background

  18. An assessment of shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation data for studies of volcano morphology

    E-print Network

    Wright, Robert

    An assessment of shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation data for studies of volcano's volcanoes. Although these data were acquired with a nominal spatial resolution of 30 m, such data are only available for volcanoes located within the U.S.A. and its Territories. For the overwhelming majority

  19. Seismic structure of Taal volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Shuei-Huei; Gung, Yuancheng; Konstantinou, Konstantinos I.; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Chang, Emmy T. Y.

    2010-05-01

    In order to investigate seismicity and tectonic structure under Taal volcano, Philippines, a temporary seismic array consisting of 8 stations was deployed in this area since March 2008. As a pioneer seismic study in this area, our first goal is to build a robust 1-D velocity model using local earthquakes. In the mean time, we also apply ambient noise cross-correlation technique to the continuous records, aiming to search for the potential volcanic structure perturbations. While we were trying to retrieve Empirical Green's functions from cross-correlation functions (CCF) of ambient noise, unexpected linear drifting of clock time are clearly identified by the gradual shifting of symmetric center of daily CCFs. The clock errors have been further confirmed by comparing earthquake signals from teleseismic events. The errors are corrected before further data processing. Over 1100 local events are recorded in the duration from March 2008 to November 2008. Phase pickings from about 450 events are used to invert for event locations and 1-D velocity model by using the standard packages HYPO71 and VELEST. The obtained 1-D velocity model of Taal volcano is lower than the global average (AK135) at the depths less than 10 km, and most events (~90%) are also located at this shallow depth range. Two groups of seismicity are noticed, with the major one clustered under the western shore of Taal lake ranging, and the other spread from Main Crater Lake to the eastern of Taal volcano complex.

  20. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic decision-makers so as to better life here, while developing the technologies needed to explore the universe and search for life beyond our home planet.

    Size: 40.5 x 40.5 km (25.1 x 25.1 miles) Location: 16.7 deg. North lat., 62.2 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: October 29, 2002

  1. Cladistic analysis applied to the classification of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hone, D. W. E.; Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Martin, K. T.

    2007-11-01

    Cladistics is a systematic method of classification that groups entities on the basis of sharing similar characteristics in the most parsimonious manner. Here cladistics is applied to the classification of volcanoes using a dataset of 59 Quaternary volcanoes and 129 volcanic edifices of the Tohoku region, Northeast Japan. Volcano and edifice characteristics recorded in the database include attributes of volcano size, chemical composition, dominant eruptive products, volcano morphology, dominant landforms, volcano age and eruptive history. Without characteristics related to time the volcanic edifices divide into two groups, with characters related to volcano size, dominant composition and edifice morphology being the most diagnostic. Analysis including time based characteristics yields four groups with a good correlation between these groups and the two groups from the analysis without time for 108 out of 129 volcanic edifices. Thus when characters are slightly changed the volcanoes still form similar groupings. Analysis of the volcanoes both with and without time yields three groups based on compositional, eruptive products and morphological characters. Spatial clusters of volcanic centres have been recognised in the Tohoku region by Tamura et al. ( Earth Planet Sci Lett 197:105 106, 2002). The groups identified by cladistic analysis are distributed unevenly between the clusters, indicating a tendency for individual clusters to form similar kinds of volcanoes with distinctive but coherent styles of volcanism. Uneven distribution of volcano types between clusters can be explained by variations in dominant magma compositions through time, which are reflected in eruption products and volcanic landforms. Cladistic analysis can be a useful tool for elucidating dynamic igneous processes that could be applied to other regions and globally. Our exploratory study indicates that cladistics has promise as a method for classifying volcanoes and potentially elucidating dynamic and evolutionary volcanic processes. Cladistics may also have utility in hazards assessment where spatial distributions and robust definitions of a volcano are important, as in locating sensitive facilities such as nuclear reactors and repositories.

  2. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  3. Iceland's Grímsvötn volcano erupts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    About 13 months after Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano began erupting on 14 April 2010, which led to extensive air traffic closures over Europe, Grímsvötn volcano in southeastern took its turn. Iceland's most active volcano, which last erupted in 2004 and lies largely beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, began its eruption activity on 21 May, with the ash plume initially reaching about 20 kilometers in altitude, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office. Volcanic ash from Grímsvötn has cancelled hundreds of airplane flights and prompted U.S. president Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland. As Eos went to press, activity at the volcano was beginning to subside.

  4. Geomorphic evolution of the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island, Indian Ocean): Competition between volcanic construction and erosion since 1.4 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvany, Tiffany; Lahitte, Pierre; Nativel, Pierre; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Réunion Island (Indian Ocean) is a volcanic complex whose eruptive history was dominated by the activity of two main edifices: Piton des Neiges (PN) and Piton de la Fournaise (PF) volcanoes. The tropical climate induces erosion processes that permanently compete with volcanic constructional processes. Exposed to the trade winds and associated heavy rainfalls, the northeastern part of the island exhibits the most complex morphological evolution. Geomorphological analysis, performed on a 50 m DEM and associated to new K-Ar ages has clarified the overall history of PN volcano. Each massif is assigned to one of the main building stages of the edifice. In addition, the arrangement of these different massifs reveals that the eruptive phases have led to successive relief inversions and successive excavations of large central depressions in the proximal area. As a result, the younger massifs are always located in more proximal parts of the volcano, the youngest being close to the edifice center. In distal areas, early lava flows were channeled into valleys incised along the massif boundaries, leading to a more complex geochronological organization. Quantitative study of the dissection of PN volcano allows us to propose a minimum eroded volume of 101 ± 44 and 105 ± 41 km 3 for the Mafate and Cilaos "Cirques" (depressions), respectively, during the last 180 kyr and a minimum average long-term erosion rate of 1.2 ± 0.4 km 3/ka. This leads us to estimate the removed volume during the whole history of PN volcano (> 1000 km 3) as equivalent to the volume of the deposits identified on the submarine flanks of Piton des Neiges volcano. Therefore, as regressive erosion appears to be the prevailing geomorphic process during the whole PN history, it questions the presence of major flank collapses younger than 1.4 Ma on this volcano. Erosion processes have largely been neglected in recent models, but our study emphasizes them as a key component of landscape development and a major process in the morphological evolution of Réunion Island that has to be fully integrated in future studies.

  5. 30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 2 JUNE 1930. SUBMARINE TRAINING TANK - STEELWORK 98% COMPLETE; BRICKWORK 95% COMPLETE, PIPING 10% IN PLACE. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  6. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another important concern is a suite of products from chemical reactions among oxidizing compounds with biological chemicals such as amines, thiols and carbonyls. SAMAP Meeting We (Armin and Joachim) attended the 2011 SAMAP conference in Taranto, Italy (10-14 October), which occurred just a few weeks after the IABR meeting in Parma, Italy (11-15 September 2011). It was held at the Officers' Club of the Taranto Naval Base under the patronage of the Italian navy; the local host was Lucio Ricciardi of the University of Insubria, Varese, Italy. At the 2011 SAMAP meeting, the theme was air-independent propulsion (AIP), meaning the capability of recharging the main batteries of the submarine without the need to surface. Only a few navies (e.g. US, UK, France, Russia, China) have historically had this capability using nuclear-powered submarines that can function underwater for extended periods of time (months). Most navies operate submarines with conventional diesel-electric propulsion, wherein diesel-powered generators charge battery banks which then drive an electric motor connected to the propeller. The batteries are charged while the boat is on the surface or during snorkelling, when the boat is submerged a few meters below the surface and a snorkel tube is extended to the surface. The period between battery charges can vary from several hours to one or two days depending on the power requirements and the nature of the mission. The process is necessary for breathing air revitalization (flushing out accumulated contaminants) and for the operation of the diesel engines. However, during this period the submarine is vulnerable to detection. Since the 1940s there have been various attempts to develop a power generation system that is independent of external air (AIP). To this end hydrogen peroxide was initially used and later liquid oxygen (LOX). Currently, most AIP submarines use fuel cell technology (LOX and hydrogen) to supplement the conventional diesel-electric system in order to extend the underwater endurance to 2-3 weeks. These propulsion engineering changes also reduce per

  7. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  8. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-09-10

    Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

  9. Flank tectonics of Martian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.J. ); Squyres, S.W. ); Carr, M.H. )

    1990-08-30

    On the flanks of Olympus Mons is a series of terraces, concentrically distributed around the caldera. Their morphology and location suggest that they could be thrust faults caused by compressional failure of the cone. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of faulting and the possible influences of the interior structure of Olympus Mons, the authors have constructed a numerical model for elastic stresses within a Martian volcano. In the absence of internal pressurization, the middle slopes of the cone are subjected to compressional stress, appropriate to the formation of thrust faults. These stresses for Olympus Mons are {approximately}250 MPa. If a vacant magma chamber is contained within the cone, the region of maximum compressional stress is extended toward the base of the cone. If the magma chamber is pressurized, extensional stresses occur at the summit and on the upper slopes of the cone. For a filled but unpressurized magma chamber, the observed positions of the faults agree well with the calculated region of high compressional stress. Three other volcanoes on Mars, Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons, possess similar terraces. Extending the analysis to other Martian volcanoes, they find that only these three and Olympus Mons have flank stresses that exceed the compressional failure strength of basalt, lending support to the view that the terraces on all four are thrust faults.

  10. Mud volcanoes of the Orinoco Delta, Eastern Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aslan, A.; Warne, A.G.; White, W.A.; Guevara, E.H.; Smyth, R.C.; Raney, J.A.; Gibeaut, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Mud volcanoes along the northwest margin of the Orinoco Delta are part of a regional belt of soft sediment deformation and diapirism that formed in response to rapid foredeep sedimentation and subsequent tectonic compression along the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Field studies of five mud volcanoes show that such structures consist of a central mound covered by active and inactive vents. Inactive vents and mud flows are densely vegetated, whereas active vents are sparsely vegetated. Four out of the five mud volcanoes studied are currently active. Orinoco mud flows consist of mud and clayey silt matrix surrounding lithic clasts of varying composition. Preliminary analysis suggests that the mud volcano sediment is derived from underlying Miocene and Pliocene strata. Hydrocarbon seeps are associated with several of the active mud volcanoes. Orinoco mud volcanoes overlie the crest of a mud-diapir-cored anticline located along the axis of the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. Faulting along the flank of the Pedernales mud volcano suggests that fluidized sediment and hydrocarbons migrate to the surface along faults produced by tensional stresses along the crest of the anticline. Orinoco mud volcanoes highlight the proximity of this major delta to an active plate margin and the importance of tectonic influences on its development. Evaluation of the Orinoco Delta mud volcanoes and those elsewhere indicates that these features are important indicators of compressional tectonism along deformation fronts of plate margins. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bukharin, O.; Handler, J.

    1995-11-01

    Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems.

  12. Seismic unrest at Katla Volcano- southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jeddi, zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Bödvarsson, Reynir; SIL Seismology Group

    2014-05-01

    Katla volcano is located on the propagating Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) in South Iceland. It is located beneath Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap which covers an area of almost 600 km2, comprising the summit caldera and the eruption vents. 20 eruptions between 930 and 1918 with intervals of 13-95 years are documented at Katla which is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. Eruptions at Katla are mainly explosive due to the subglacial mode of extrusion and produce high eruption columns and catastrophic melt water floods (jökulhlaups). The present long Volcanic repose (almost 96 years) at Katla, the general unrest since 1955, and the 2010 eruption of the neighbouring Eyjafjallajökull volcano has prompted concerns among geoscientists about an imminent eruption. Thus, the volcano has been densely monitored by seismologists and volcanologists. The seismology group of Uppsala University as a partner in the Volcano Anatomy (VA) project in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) installed 9 temporary seismic stations on and around the Mýrdalsjökull glacier in 2011. Another 10 permanent seismic stations are operated by IMO around Katla. The project's data collection is now finished and temporary stations were pulled down in August 2013. According to seismicity maps of the whole recording period, thousands of microearthquakes have occurred within the caldera region. At least three different source areas are active in Katla: the caldera region, the western Godaland region and a small cluster at the southern rim of Mýrdalsjökull near the glacial stream of Hafursarjökull. Seismicity in the southern flank has basically started after June 2011. The caldera events are mainly volcano-tectonic, while western and southern events are mostly long period (lp) and can be related to glacial or magmatic movement. One motivation of the VA Katla project is to better understand the physical mechanism of these lp events. Changes in seismicity arising from magma movement in the crust are characteristic properties of almost all active volcanoes. Meanwhile the study of the seismicity and propagation of elastic waves through the earth have the potential to give us important information about the internal structure of volcanoes. As very little is known of the 3D structure of Katla volcano and in order to define the 3D velocity structure and the geometry of the possible magma chamber, both P and S-wave travel time data from the most active period of seismicity (July-November 2011) are inverted simultaneously for both hypocenter locations and 3D velocity structure by using Local Earthquake Tomography (LET).

  13. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section...ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a distinctive...

  14. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section...ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a distinctive...

  15. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section...ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a distinctive...

  16. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine

    E-print Network

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine groundwater discharge rates based on tidal signal and hydraulic gradient analysis indicate a fresh submarine groundwater discharge in this high rainfall region. Ó 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: submarine groundwater

  17. 34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION OF BLISTERS IN 1959, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  18. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section 707.7 National Defense...WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a...

  19. 32 CFR 707.7 - Submarine identification light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Submarine identification light. 707.7 Section 707.7 National Defense...WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.7 Submarine identification light. Submarines may display, as a...

  20. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  1. Novel microbial communities of the Haakon Mosby mud volcano and their role as a methane sink.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Helge; Lösekann, Tina; de Beer, Dirk; Elvert, Marcus; Nadalig, Thierry; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Sauter, Eberhard J; Schlüter, Michael; Klages, Michael; Foucher, Jean Paul; Boetius, Antje

    2006-10-19

    Mud volcanism is an important natural source of the greenhouse gas methane to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Recent investigations show that the number of active submarine mud volcanoes might be much higher than anticipated (for example, see refs 3-5), and that gas emitted from deep-sea seeps might reach the upper mixed ocean. Unfortunately, global methane emission from active submarine mud volcanoes cannot be quantified because their number and gas release are unknown. It is also unclear how efficiently methane-oxidizing microorganisms remove methane. Here we investigate the methane-emitting Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV, Barents Sea, 72 degrees N, 14 degrees 44' E; 1,250 m water depth) to provide quantitative estimates of the in situ composition, distribution and activity of methanotrophs in relation to gas emission. The HMMV hosts three key communities: aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (Methylococcales), anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) thriving below siboglinid tubeworms, and a previously undescribed clade of archaea (ANME-3) associated with bacterial mats. We found that the upward flow of sulphate- and oxygen-free mud volcano fluids restricts the availability of these electron acceptors for methane oxidation, and hence the habitat range of methanotrophs. This mechanism limits the capacity of the microbial methane filter at active marine mud volcanoes to <40% of the total flux. PMID:17051217

  2. Correlation of submarine deposits and witness accounts of the 1952 Myojinsho submarine eruption, Izu-Bonin arc, by bathymetric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, T.; Tani, K.; Maeno, F.; Fiske, R. S.; Shukuno, H.; Ito, K.; Shimoda, G.; Suzuki, Y. J.; Yoshida, T.; Taniguchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between eruptive phenomena during the 1952 phreatomagmatic eruption and consequent deposits under seawater is discussed, on the basis of bathymetric survey of Myojinsho volcano, Izu-Bonin island arc (32°55’N, 140°00’E). We carried out some research cruises by the ship Natsushima (JAMSTEC) in 2006-2008. We used unmanned bathymetric vehicle, Hyperdolphin, for observation and sampling of the submarine deposit. Myojinsho volcano is an active post-caldera volcano that grew on the northeastern rim of Myojinsho caldera (8 x 6 km in diameter). There have been many reports of colored seawater, and we also recognized a bubbly column above the summit of Myojinsho (Myojin reef; ca. 50 m below sea level) during acoustic survey. The 1952 eruption was the latest eruption that formed and destroyed new island above sea level, and would have been the first submarine eruption to be recorded by good scientific standard. This eruption was firstly recognized at the middle of September, 1952, and explosions and dome growth have been documented for about 1 year till the middle of September, 1953. There are many time series color photographs of explosions so that we can evaluate these explosions quantitatively (Ossaka, 1991). These records indicate that most of the cock’s tail jets are limited within the proximal area (ca. 500m) from the center of explosions, whereas the base surges and lateral steam clouds reach farther than ca. 500 m. During the bathymetric survey, we found several small lobes of pumice-rich deposits (< 1 m thick, several meter wide, several tens of meter long) on the sandy flat slope father than ca. 500 m from the summit of Myojinsho (deeper than ca. 300 m below sea level). Large pumices are concentrated at the front of each lobe, and the lobes become thinner toward the summit. On the other hand, the proximal deposit (<500 m from the summit) is characterized by scattered large angular blocky rocks or pumices. The largest blocks are as large as several meters in diameter. The compositional variations and textural features of these pumices and blocks are similar to those reported for samples obtained during the eruption. The correspondence of the lateral changes in witnessed phenomena (cock’s tail jets to base surges) and in depositional features (scattered blocks to pumice lobes) would indicate that (1) the lobes of pumices are derived either by base surges or by lateral steam clouds, and that (2) large angular blocks are derived by cock’s tail jets during explosions or dome collapse occurred at the end of the eruption.

  3. Hot spot and trench volcano separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is suggested that the distribution of separations between trench volcanos located along subduction zones reflects the depth of partial melting, and that the separation distribution for hot spot volcanoes near spreading centers provides a measure of the depth of mantle convection cells. It is further proposed that the lateral dimensions of mantle convection cells are also represented by the hot-spot separations (rather than by ridge-trench distances) and that a break in the distribution of hot spot separations at 3000 km is evidence for both whole mantle convection and a deep thermal plume origin of hot spots.

  4. Segmentation and Tracking of Anticyclonic Eddies during a Submarine Volcanic Eruption Using Ocean Colour Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Javier; Eugenio, Francisco; Estrada-Allis, Sheila; Sangrà, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The eruptive phase of a submarine volcano located 2 km away from the southern coast of El Hierro Island started on October 2011. This extraordinary event provoked a dramatic perturbation of the water column. In order to understand and quantify the environmental impacts caused, a regular multidisciplinary monitoring was carried out using remote sensing sensors. In this context, we performed the systematic processing of every MODIS and MERIS and selected high resolution Worldview-2 imagery to provide information on the concentration of a number of biological, physical and chemical parameters. On the other hand, the eruption provided an exceptional source of tracer that allowed the study a variety of oceanographic structures. Specifically, the Canary Islands belong to a very active zone of long-lived eddies. Such structures are usually monitored using sea level anomaly fields. However these products have coarse spatial resolution and they are not suitable to perform submesoscale studies. Thanks to the volcanic tracer, detailed studies were undertaken with ocean colour imagery allowing, using the diffuse attenuation coefficient, to monitor the process of filamentation and axisymmetrization predicted by theoretical studies and numerical modelling. In our work, a novel 2-step segmentation methodology has been developed. The approach incorporates different segmentation algorithms and region growing techniques. In particular, the first step obtains an initial eddy segmentation using thresholding or clustering methods and, next, the fine detail is achieved by the iterative identification of the points to grow and the subsequent application of watershed or thresholding strategies. The methodology has demonstrated an excellent performance and robustness and it has proven to properly capture the eddy and its filaments. PMID:25875193

  5. Segmentation and tracking of anticyclonic eddies during a submarine volcanic eruption using ocean colour imagery.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Javier; Eugenio, Francisco; Estrada-Allis, Sheila; Sangrà, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The eruptive phase of a submarine volcano located 2 km away from the southern coast of El Hierro Island started on October 2011. This extraordinary event provoked a dramatic perturbation of the water column. In order to understand and quantify the environmental impacts caused, a regular multidisciplinary monitoring was carried out using remote sensing sensors. In this context, we performed the systematic processing of every MODIS and MERIS and selected high resolution Worldview-2 imagery to provide information on the concentration of a number of biological, physical and chemical parameters. On the other hand, the eruption provided an exceptional source of tracer that allowed the study a variety of oceanographic structures. Specifically, the Canary Islands belong to a very active zone of long-lived eddies. Such structures are usually monitored using sea level anomaly fields. However these products have coarse spatial resolution and they are not suitable to perform submesoscale studies. Thanks to the volcanic tracer, detailed studies were undertaken with ocean colour imagery allowing, using the diffuse attenuation coefficient, to monitor the process of filamentation and axisymmetrization predicted by theoretical studies and numerical modelling. In our work, a novel 2-step segmentation methodology has been developed. The approach incorporates different segmentation algorithms and region growing techniques. In particular, the first step obtains an initial eddy segmentation using thresholding or clustering methods and, next, the fine detail is achieved by the iterative identification of the points to grow and the subsequent application of watershed or thresholding strategies. The methodology has demonstrated an excellent performance and robustness and it has proven to properly capture the eddy and its filaments. PMID:25875193

  6. Geochemical monitoring network at El Hierro (Canary Islands) before and during 2011 submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, P. A.; Meletlidis, S.; Luengo-Oroz, N.; Moure, D.; Rodero, C.; Villasante-Marcos, V.; Abella, R.; López, C.; Blanco, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Since 17 July 2011 an important increase in the number of seismic events located in El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain) was detected by the seismic network of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (I.G.N.). This increment was interpreted as a precursory signal of a potential eruption, which in fact took place three months later (10th October 2011). In order to improve and complete the volcano monitoring network several geochemical parameters were measured since the beginning of the anomalous seismic activity. Measurements of CO2 diffuse flux through the soil were carried out in the major part of the island: the central zone, El Golfo (northern area) and the zone delimitated by the western rift. More than 450 measurements were accomplished during July, August, and September 2011. Analysis of the data revealed the existence of a spatial anomaly with relative high CO2 diffuse flux in the southwest part of the El Golfo area, close to the zone where the anomalous seismicity was located. This abnormal flux, almost aligned with the western limit of the seismic swarm, was not detected again in measurements accomplished on September in the same area. Between July and August, four geochemical stations were installed in three sub-horizontal galleries and in one well. Air and soil temperature were measured in all galleries and air 222Rn concentration was determined in the four stations. Two of the galleries were also equipped with a sensor in order to obtain measurements of CO2 concentration in the air. The sampling period for each parameter was established in ten minutes. Anomalous high 222Rn concentrations were detected in the station located in the well, apparently related to increases in the seismic accumulated energy and the GPS deformation rates. Taking into account the location of the earthquake epicentres and in order to study the evolution over the time of some physicochemical parameters of groundwater, four wells in the El Golfo area were regularly sampled since July 2011. Temperature, pH, electric conductivity and total dissolved solids were periodically measured. Water samples were also collected in order to determine major and trace elements. In situ measurements did not show any significant changes that could be related directly to the volcanic-seismic activity. However, the highest water temperature and the lowest pH value were obtained in the well located closer to the zone where the maximum values of CO2 diffuse flux were detected. Water samples were also taken on the stain generated by the submarine eruption and the nearby area since the beginning of the eruptive process. Chemical analysis revealed that seawater directly affected by the volcanic emissions, experimented an important increase in the concentration of several heavy metals.

  7. Renewed Unrest at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, John

    2004-10-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a Cooperative Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has detected unrest at Mount Spurr volcano, located about 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska, at the northeast end of the Aleutian volcanic arc. This activity consists of increased seismicity, melting of the summit ice cap, and substantial rates of CO2 and H2S emission. The current unrest is centered beneath the volcano's 3374-m-high summit, whose last known eruption was 5000-6000 years ago. Since then, Crater Peak, 2309 m in elevation and 4 km to the south, has been the active vent. Recent eruptions occurred in 1953 and 1992.

  8. Geology of Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    1990-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is located in an E-W extensional environment on the Modoc Plateau just east of the main arc of the Cascades. It consists mainly of mafic lavas, although drillhole data indicate that a larger volume of rhyolite is present than is indicated by surface mapping. The most recent eruption was rhyolitic and occurred about 900 years ago. At least seventeen eruptions have occurred since 12,000 years ago, or between 1 and 2 eruptions per century on average, although activity appears to be strongly episodic. The calculated eruptive rate is about 0.6 km3 per thousand years during the entire history of the volcano. Drillhole data indicate that the plateau surface underlying the volcano has been downwarped by 0.5 km under the center of MLV. The volcano may be even larger than the estimated 600 km3, already the largest volcano by volume in the Cascades.

  9. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Size: 7.5 x 7.5 km (4.5 x 4.5 miles) Location: 23.6 deg. South lat., 67.6 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3, and thermal band 12 Original Data Resolution: 15 m and 90 m Date Acquired: January 6, 2002 and November 19, 2000

  10. Living with volcanoes: The sustainable livelihoods approach for volcano-related opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelman, Ilan; Mather, Tamsin A.

    2008-05-01

    Although the negative impacts of volcanism on society are well documented and accepted, many possible benefits from volcanoes are not always fully considered. This paper provides suggestions for understanding and implementing volcanoes' benefits by suggesting further application of existing risk management frameworks to volcanology: living with risk by using the sustainable livelihoods approach at the local level. This paper presents an overview bringing established paradigms into volcanic risk management where they are sometimes absent despite their advantages. The sustainable livelihoods approach is important in its application to volcanic scenarios in four ways: Understanding, communicating, and managing vulnerability and risk and local perceptions of vulnerability and risk beyond immediate threats to life. Maximising the benefits to communities of their volcanic environment, especially during quiescent periods, without increasing vulnerability. Managing crises. Managing reconstruction and resettlement after a crisis. An overview of case studies is provided showing how volcanic opportunities could be used for sustainable livelihoods. The approach of living with volcanic risks and benefits could be adopted and implemented as an integral part of changing perceptions of volcanoes and of managing volcano-related crisis and non-crisis situations. However, the sustainable livelihoods approach is not a panacea, so limitations are discussed along with why living near a volcano cannot solve all livelihood concerns. In particular, livelihood diversity and livelihood transferability to other locations assists in living with volcanoes.

  11. Reference PMHS Sled Tests to Assess Submarining.

    PubMed

    Uriot, Jérôme; Potier, Pascal; Baudrit, Pascal; Trosseille, Xavier; Petit, Philippe; Richard, Olivier; Compigne, Sabine; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Douard, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Sled tests focused on pelvis behavior and submarining can be found in the literature. However, they were performed either with rigid seats or with commercial seats. The objective of this study was to get reference tests to assess the submarining ability of dummies in more realistic conditions than on rigid seat, but still in a repeatable and reproducible setup. For this purpose, a semi-rigid seat was developed, which mimics the behavior of real seats, although it is made of rigid plates and springs that are easy to reproduce and simulate with an FE model. In total, eight PMHS sled tests were performed on this semirigid seat to get data in two different configurations: first in a front seat configuration that was designed to prevent submarining, then in a rear seat configuration with adjusted spring stiffness to generate submarining. All subjects sustained extensive rib fractures from the shoulder belt loading. No pelvis fractures and no submarining were observed in the front seat configuration, but two subjects sustained lumbar vertebrae fractures. In the rear seat configuration, all subjects sustained pelvic fractures and demonstrated submarining. Corridors were constructed for the external forces and the PMHS kinematics. They are provided in this paper as new reference tests to assess the biofidelity of human surrogates in different configurations that either result in submarining or do not. In future, it is intended to analyze further seat and restraint system configurations to be able to define a submarining predictor. PMID:26660745

  12. Identification and Implications of a Submarine Monogenetic Field in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    Short-lived, volcanism at discrete, closely spaced volcanic cones and low lying lava flows in the NE corner of the Lau backarc basin shares many characteristics with subaerial monogenetic fields. We use geological, morphological, petrological, and geochemical observations of this volcanic field made on five research expeditions since 2008, along with comparisons to well-known terrestrial monogenetic fields to assess whether the Mata volcanic group is best thought of as a submarine mongenetic volcanic field (a term rarely, if ever, applied to submarine settings). The volcanism has constructed a series of 9 small, very closely spaced, hydrothermally-active, elongate volcanic edifices near the east-west portion of the Tonga Trench, which are 1.5 to 7.5 km apart (summit to summit) and are 450 to 1400m tall. Only one of the volcanoes (West Mata) is currently active, erupting boninite pillow lavas along with explosively-generated volcaniclastic sediments. The ages of the youngest volcanics on the other Mata volcanoes are not yet determined but most are hydrothermally active and are surfaced with relatively young lava flows without significant sediment cover. The volcanoes are all formed predominantly of low effusion rate pillow lavas with variable amounts of pyroclastic deposits mantling the constructional topography, suggesting relatively long-lived volcanism (ca 100-200 yrs) at each center, similar to large lava shields in Iceland (e.g., skjaldbreidur). Detailed stratigraphic observations are as yet only available for one volcano (with more to come during an ROV field campaign in Sept. 2012). Bottom photographs provide no clear evidence for long-lived hiatuses at any of these cones and bathymetric data do not intricate overlapping constructional structures, resurgent construction, or large scale collapse or mass wasting structures, as might be expected for a protracted, many-eruption volcanic history at any single volcano. However, the oldest edifice does show evidence of post-volcanic tectonism and several of the smallest volcanoes appear to be built on a basement of either failed earlier volcanoes or rifted lithosphere. All but one of the cones are built of broadly boninitic volcanic products (the other is meimikite), yet major and trace element compositions are distinct enough (Glancy et al., this volume) to imply that each is fed by separate, poorly mixed, small magma batches, much like the MGVF in central western Mexico. The northern portion of the Lau Basin is the fastest opening backarc on Earth; this rapid extension combined with thin lithosphere, and episodic and dispersed magma supply from the nearby subduction system, appears to promote conditions favoring dispersed monogenetic volcanism over longer lived volcanic edifices or ridges.erspective view of the Matas from the west

  13. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  14. Currents in monterey submarine canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Flow fields of mean, subtidal, and tidal frequencies between 250 and 3300 m water depths in Monterey Submarine Canyon are examined using current measurements obtained in three yearlong field experiments. Spatial variations in flow fields are mainly controlled by the topography (shape and width) of the canyon. The mean currents flow upcanyon in the offshore reaches (>1000 m) and downcanyon in the shallow reaches (100-m amplitude isotherm oscillations and associated high-speed rectilinear currents. The 15-day spring-neap cycle and a ???3-day??? band are the two prominent frequencies in subtidal flow field. Neither of them seems directly correlated with the spring-neap cycle of the sea level.

  15. Primary Initiation of Submarine Canyons

    E-print Network

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2011-02-02

    The discovery of close-to-star gas-giant exo-planets lends support to the idea of Earth's origin as a Jupiter-like gas-giant and to the consequences of its compression, including whole-Earth decompression dynamics that gives rise, without requiring mantle convection, to the myriad measurements and observations whose descriptions are attributed to plate tectonics. I propose here another, unanticipated consequence of whole-Earth decompression dynamics: namely, a specific, dominant, non-erosion, underlying initiation-mechanism precursor for submarine canyons that follows as a direct consequence of Earth's early origin as a Jupiter-like gas-giant.

  16. Primary Initiation of Submarine Canyons

    E-print Network

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of close-to-star gas-giant exo-planets lends support to the idea of Earth's origin as a Jupiter-like gas-giant and to the consequences of its compression, including whole-Earth decompression dynamics that gives rise, without requiring mantle convection, to the myriad measurements and observations whose descriptions are attributed to plate tectonics. I propose here another, unanticipated consequence of whole-Earth decompression dynamics: namely, a specific, dominant, non-erosion, underlying initiation-mechanism precursor for submarine canyons that follows as a direct consequence of Earth's early origin as a Jupiter-like gas-giant.

  17. Seismic Structure Beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S. H.; Gung, Y.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Lin, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very active Taal Volcano is situated 60 km south of Metro Manila in the southern part of Luzon Island. Based on its frequent explosive eruptions and high potential hazards to nearby population of several million, Taal Volcano is chosen as one of the 15 most dangerous "Decade Volcanoes" in the world. We deployed a temporary seismic network consisting of 8 stations since March 2008. The temporal network was operated from late March 2008 to mid March 2010 and recorded over 2270 local earthquakes. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified from ambient noise cross-correlation functions for a number of stations. The drifting rates of all problematic stations were determined as references to correct timing errors prior to further processing. Initial locations of earthquakes were determined from manually picking P- and S-phases arrivals with a general velocity model based on AK135. We used travel times of 305 well-located local events to derive a minimum 1-D model using VELEST. Two major earthquake groups were noticed from refined locations. One was underneath the western shore of Taal Lake with a linear feature, and the other spread at shallower depths showing a less compact feature around the eastern flank of Taal Volcano Island. We performed seismic tomography to image the 3D structure beneath Taal Volcano using a well-established algorithm, LOTOS. Some interesting features are noted in the tomographic results, such as a probable solidified past magma conduit below the northwestern corner of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by high Vp, Vs, and low Vp/Vs ratio, and a potential large hydrothermal reservoir beneath the central of Taal Volcano Island, characterized by low Vs and high Vp/Vs ratio. Combining the results of seismicity and tomographic images, we also suggest the potential existence of a magma chamber beneath the southwestern Taal Lake, and a magma conduit or fault extending from there to the northwestern shore of Taal Lake. Such magmatic signatures have never been reported in previous studies, suggesting that new eruption centers might be forming in places away from the historical craters on Taal Volcano Island.

  18. Sediment-laden flow induced submarine cable failures off southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Su, C. C.

    2012-04-01

    Taiwan is located on the convergent boundary between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, where has a highly frequency of earthquakes. Furthermore, the interaction between the largest continent (Eurasia Continent) and ocean (Pacific Ocean) leads to torrential-rain-induced flooding in the plume rain (May-June) and typhoon seasons (July-October). According to statistics from Water Resources Agency, in the last few decades, the mean annual sediment load was 384 million tons from the island of Taiwan into the sea. Off southwestern Taiwan, two major submarine canyons, the Gaoping submarine canyon (GPSC) and Fangliao submarine canyon (FLSC), are incising from continental shelf to deep sea floor and both of them transport considerable amounts of sediment to the South China Sea. In contrast to the GPSC which is directly connected to the Gaoping River, the FLSC which is smaller, younger and confined to the slope, does not associate with any river on land. Since 2006, southern Taiwan has been through several big typhoons and earthquakes which triggered submarine landslides and turbidity currents and damaged many submarine cables. The analytical results from sediment cores which taken from the GPSC and FLSC during 2005 to 2010 show these submarine cable break events may caused by different processes. In the upper GPSC, hyperpycnal flow might be the major process which caused the cable damages. On the contrary, cable failures in FLSC are due to sediment liquefaction.

  19. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes. Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001. This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; (2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (4) station parameters and velocity models used for earthquake locations; (5) a summary of daily station usage throughout the catalog period; and (6) all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations presented in this report.

  20. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ocean from submarine groundwater discharge in a groundwater-dominated system: Relation to land use (Kona coast, Hawaii, U.S.A.)

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    also been associated with high groundwater nutrient concentrations in various locations (Wong et alNutrient inputs to the coastal ocean from submarine groundwater discharge in a groundwater activity, and nutrient concentrations) of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) fluxes at 11 sites

  1. Iceland: Grímsvötn Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... title:  Grímsvötn Volcano Injects Ash into the Stratosphere     View Larger ... which means that the ash has been injected into the stratosphere, the stratified portion of Earth's upper atmosphere. On this date, ...

  2. Vent of Sand Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

  3. Observations of regional seismicity and local harmonic tremor at Brothers volcano, south Kermadec arc, using an ocean bottom

    E-print Network

    (OBHs) were deployed for 7 months on the caldera floor of Brothers volcano, located within the southern of the caldera and the east flank of Brothers volcano. In addition, regional seismicity was observed along a NEObservations of regional seismicity and local harmonic tremor at Brothers volcano, south Kermadec

  4. Vailulu'u undersea volcano: The New Samoa Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543 (shart@whoi.edu)

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    model in its total lack of tholeiitic basalt compositions. Keywords: Samoa; volcano; VailuluVailulu'u undersea volcano: The New Samoa S. R. Hart Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods: Vailulu'u Seamount is identified as an active volcano marking the current location of the Samoan hotspot

  5. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

  6. Seafloor geodetic reference station branched from submarine cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Asakawa, K.; Yokobiki, T.; Iwase, R.; Goto, T.; Sato, M.; Nagahashi, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2008-12-01

    We launched a project supported by the Japan Society for the Science Promotion as the Grants in Aid for Scientific Research. In this project, we are aiming at developing new-generation seafloor geodetic observation system that conquers difficulties inherent with the current system. Central idea of this project is to utilize techniques of underwater robot (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and submarine cable to make measurements in place of using the research vessels. Combination of underwater robot and submarine cable make it possible to provide permanent seafloor reference point, to conduct the observation with selecting favorable condition of sea and GPS satellite distributions, to make much more frequent observations and to enable flexible planning of observation in response to sudden geodetic events. Prototype of the on-board system which should be installed on an AUV was finished. Several trials had been done with the system in the sea. The results from them showed that the new on-board system will reach to the higher level in performance than the current system in the near future. And then we started to dedicate ourselves mainly to developing new seafloor transponder. The current seafloor transponder system is stand-alone one which runs on internal batteries. We expect five to ten years for the lifetime of the current seafloor transponder, even though it depends on how often we perform measurements with the transponder. Replacement of the seafloor transponder will be needed when we target seafloor crustal deformation that has long time cycle more than several decades. Continuity of seafloor geodetic observation will be stopped. New seafloor transponder which we have been developing is one which can be connected to a submarine cable by wet-mate connectors. Power is supplied through submarine cable and then the new seafloor transponder will be a permanent reference station for seafloor geodetic survey. Submarine cable can supply accurate GPS time (1pps) and clock to the transponder as well as power. The new cable transponder can realize acoustic ranging between sea surface and bottom with much higher accuracy than the current system. Submarine cable system off Toyohashi (Tokai-SCANNER) in central Japan is located on the source region of the huge repeated earthquakes. It is under the control of the JAMSTEC and used for long-term geophysical monitoring. This cable is one to which we are planning to connect newly developed seafloor transponder. The cruise of JAMSTEC"fS ROV "KAIKO 7000 II" and R/V "KAIREI" is scheduled to deploy and connect the seafloor transponder to the Tokai-SCANNER cable system from Sep. 18, 2008. We will report the overview of the cable transponder system and its deployment procedure in this presentation.

  7. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2003-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to an EARTHWORM detection system. AVO located 7430 earthquakes during 2002 in the vicinity of the monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2002; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2002.

  8. Estimating the empirical probability of submarine landslide occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical probability for the occurrence of submarine landslides at a given location can be estimated from age dates of past landslides. In this study, tools developed to estimate earthquake probability from paleoseismic horizons are adapted to estimate submarine landslide probability. In both types of estimates, one has to account for the uncertainty associated with age-dating individual events as well as the open time intervals before and after the observed sequence of landslides. For observed sequences of submarine landslides, we typically only have the age date of the youngest event and possibly of a seismic horizon that lies below the oldest event in a landslide sequence. We use an empirical Bayes analysis based on the Poisson-Gamma conjugate prior model specifically applied to the landslide probability problem. This model assumes that landslide events as imaged in geophysical data are independent and occur in time according to a Poisson distribution characterized by a rate parameter ?. With this method, we are able to estimate the most likely value of ? and, importantly, the range of uncertainty in this estimate. Examples considered include landslide sequences observed in the Santa Barbara Channel, California, and in Port Valdez, Alaska. We confirm that given the uncertainties of age dating that landslide complexes can be treated as single events by performing statistical test of age dates representing the main failure episode of the Holocene Storegga landslide complex.

  9. Southeastern Australia's Submarine Landslides : a Model for Their Occurence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubble, T.; Clarke, S. L.; Yu, P.; Airey, D.; Keene, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has identified an extensive region of the eastern Australian Continental Margin offshore Northern NSW and Southern Queensland which has experienced intense submarine erosion dominated by large-scale, submarine-landsliding that has removed enormous amounts of Neogene to recent sediment from the upper and middle continental slope. Preliminary findings demonstrate that i) some upper slope slides are geologically very young (< 20 kA), ii) the most recent slides occurred in relatively shallow depths and were volumetrically large enough (~3 cu km) to have been capable of generating damaging tsunami if shed as single masses and iii) the mid-slope slides are comprised of compacted Neogene sediments; iv) some of the mid-slope slide scars are huge (several 10's of cu km); and v) some of the mid-slope slide masses probably remained largely intact during sliding, potentially generated megatsunami, and are suspected to located on the abyssal Tasman Sea plain adjacent to the margin. A conceptual model that accounts for the apparent onset of sliding approximately 15 million years ago and the continuing deconstruction of the margin has been developed. This model posits that erosion of material from the middle and lower slope by deep, cold-water, ocean currents originating in Antartica occurred contemporaneously with an increase in the frequency and intensity of earthquakes due to increasing tectonic interaction between Australia and Asia. These two processes acted together to initiate and then sustain the submarine landsliding.

  10. Fuel-cell-propelled submarine-tanker-system study

    SciTech Connect

    Court, K E; Kumm, W H; O'Callaghan, J E

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a systems analysis of a commercial Arctic Ocean submarine tanker system to carry fossil energy to markets. The submarine is to be propelled by a modular Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell system. The power level is 20 Megawatts. The DOE developed electric utility type fuel cell will be fueled with methanol. Oxidant will be provided from a liquid oxygen tank carried onboard. The twin screw submarine tanker design is sized at 165,000 deadweight tons and the study includes costs and an economic analysis of the transport system of 6 ships. The route will be under the polar icecap from a loading terminal located off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to a transshipment facility postulated to be in a Norwegian fjord. The system throughput of the gas-fed methanol cargo will be 450,000 barrels per day. The total delivered cost of the methanol including well head purchase price of natural gas, methanol production, and shipping would be $25/bbl from Alaska to the US East Coast. Of this, the shipping cost is $6.80/bbl. All costs in 1981 dollars.

  11. Sediment wave-forms and modes of construction on Mariana (and other) intra-oceanic arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Stern, R. J.; Chadwick, B.; Tamura, Y.; Merle, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Most intra-oceanic arc volcanoes are composite edifices constructed primarily in the submarine environment, built up by volcaniclastic sediments derived from hydroclastic and pyroclastic processes at/near the summits, punctuated by occasional lava flows and intrusions. Of particular interest in the mode of construction are extensive fields of large sediment waveforms (SWFs), up to >2 km wavelength and >100 m amplitude, on the submarine flanks of many islands and seamounts within the Mariana and other intra-oceanic subduction zones. These SWFs are composed of coarse-grained volcaniclastic sediments derived from the (approximate) point source summits of the island and submarine volcanoes. SWFs around some seamounts and islands, particularly those with large calderas, define quasi-concentric ring-like ridges, suggesting formation by density currents generated during submarine and island eruptions, and preserved for 10s of thousands of years. Some types of SWFs appear to have formed by progressive slumping of oversteepened slopes without fluidization. General conclusions about the origin of SWFs are hampered by the dearth of samples and high resolution seismic reflection profiles. However, large coherent slumps and debris avalanches documented for some ocean islands (e.g., Hawaiian Islands) are (mostly) are not as evident on the composite arc volcanoes. Submarine Mariana arc (and other intra-oceanic arc) volcanism probably spread volcaniclastic material primarily during submarine "Neptunian" eruptions and by progressive slides and other sediment flow rather than by catastrophic flank collapse. These processes could mitigate the Hawaiian-style of tsumami hazard, but Krakatoa-type tsunami hazards exist.

  12. 32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. OCTOBER 3, 1932. COMPLETION OF ERECTION OF STEELWORK FOR ELEVATOR. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  13. 29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT POINT JUST ABOVE THE SUBMARINE SECTION AT THE 110-FOOT LEVEL 1929-1930 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  14. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  15. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  16. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  17. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  18. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  19. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  20. Timing of occurrence of large submarine landslides on the Atlantic Ocean margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Submarine landslides are distributed unevenly both in space and time. Spatially, they occur most commonly in fjords, active river deltas, submarine canyon-fan systems, the open continental slope and on the flanks of oceanic volcanic islands. Temporally, they are influenced by the size, location, and sedimentology of migrating depocenters, changes in seafloor pressures and temperatures, variations in seismicity and volcanic activity, and changes in groundwater flow conditions. The dominant factor influencing the timing of submarine landslide occurrence is glaciation. A review of known ages of submarine landslides along the margins of the Atlantic Ocean, augmented by a few ages from other submarine locations shows a relatively even distribution of large landslides with time from the last glacial maximum until about five thousand years after the end of glaciation. During the past 5000??yr, the frequency of occurrence is less by a factor of 1.7 to 3.5 than during or shortly after the last glacial/deglaciation period. Such an association likely exists because of the formation of thick deposits of sediment on the upper continental slope during glacial periods and increased seismicity caused by isostatic readjustment during and following deglaciation. Hydrate dissociation may play a role, as suggested previously in the literature, but the connection is unclear.

  1. A submarine shipboard smoking cessation program.

    PubMed

    Scali, W K

    1989-11-01

    The discouragement of tobacco abuse in the military requires effective smoking cessation assistance for all active duty and dependent personnel. Specifically tailoring this assistance to the unique features of the various military communities will help to make it more effective. The program presented herein was designed for use in the submarine fleet. It combines basic proven workplace smoking cessation techniques with lessons learned from experience in submarines. It is believed that other military populations can benefit from similar efforts. This paper is an abridged version of the author's Submarine Medical Officer qualification thesis. PMID:2511509

  2. Boron-rich mud volcanoes of the Black Sea region: modern analogues to ancient sea-floor tourmalinites associated with Sullivan-type Pb-Zn deposits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Turner, R.J.W.; Ware, P.L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Large submarine mud volcanoes in the abyssal part of the Black Sea south of the Crimean Peninsula are similar in many respects to synsedimentary mud volcanoes in the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell basin. One of the Belt-Purcell mud volcanoes directly underlies the giant Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit in southeastern British Columbia. Footwall rocks to the Sullivan deposit comprise variably tourmalinized siltstone, conglomerate, and related fragmental rock; local thin pyrrhotite-rich and spessartine-quartz beds are interpreted as Fe and Fe-Mn exhalites, respectively. Analogous Fe- and Mn-rich sediments occur near the abyssal Black Sea mud volcanoes. Massive pyrite crusts and associated carbonate chimneys discovered in relatively shallow waters (~200 m depth) west of the Crimean Peninsula indicate an active sea-floor-hydrothermal system. Subaerial mud volcanoes on the Kerch and Taman Peninsulas (~100 km north of the abyssal mud volcanoes) contain saline thermal waters that locally have very high B contents (to 915 mg/L). These data suggest that tourmalinites might be forming in or near submarine Black Sea mud volcanoes, where potential may also exist for Sullivan-type Pb-Zn mineralization.

  3. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  4. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  5. Mayon volcano, southeast Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mayon volcano is the most active volcano in the Philippines, located just north of the coastal town of Legaspi in southern Luzon about 325 km southeast of Manila. Mayon is a near-perfect cone; its steep, forested slopes look rather like a bull's eye when viewed from above. For scale, Mayon's circular footprint is about 16 km in diameter. This photograph was taken from the Space Shuttle on April 8, 1997. At the time the photo was taken, Mayon sported a steam plume from the summit. The lighter (non-forested) regions that radiate from the summit to the southern slopes are flows from eruptions that have occurred over the past twenty-five years. The current eruption, which started June 24, 2001, is sending flows down the southeast slope in the general direction of Legaspi. Image STS083-747-88 was provided by the by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  6. A preliminary seismic study of Taal Volcano, Luzon Island Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, S.-H.; Gung, Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Chang, T.-M.; Chang, E. T. Y.; Solidum, R.

    2013-03-01

    The very active Taal Volcano lies in the southern part of Luzon Island only 60 km from Manila, the capital of the Philippines. In March 2008 we deployed a temporary seismic network around Taal that consisted of 8 three-component short period seismometers. This network recorded during the period from March to November 2008 about 1050 local events. In the early data processing stages, unexpected linear drifting of clock time was clearly identified for a number of stations. The drifting rates of each problematic station were determined and the errors were corrected before further processing. Initial location of each event was derived by manually picked P-/S-phases arrival times using HYPO71 and a general velocity model based on AK135. Since the velocity structure beneath Taal is essentially unknown, we used travel times of 338 well-located events in order to derive a minimum 1D velocity model using VELEST. The resulting locations show that most events occurred at the shallow depth beneath the Taal Volcano, and two major earthquake groups were noticed, with one lying underneath the western shore of Taal lake and the other one spread around the eastern flank of the Taal Volcano. Since there is no reported volcano activities during the operation period of our seismic array, we are still not confident to interpret these findings in terms of other natures of volcano at the current stage. However, our work represents an important pioneer step towards other more advanced seismic studies in Taal Volcano.

  7. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement

    PubMed Central

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R.; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R.; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4?m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO2 from the seafloor. PMID:25384354

  8. Eruption of a deep-sea mud volcano triggers rapid sediment movement.

    PubMed

    Feseker, Tomas; Boetius, Antje; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Blandin, Jerome; Olu, Karine; Yoerger, Dana R; Camilli, Richard; German, Christopher R; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are important sources of methane to the water column. However, the temporal variability of their mud and methane emissions is unknown. Methane emissions were previously proposed to result from a dynamic equilibrium between upward migration and consumption at the seabed by methane-consuming microbes. Here we show non-steady-state situations of vigorous mud movement that are revealed through variations in fluid flow, seabed temperature and seafloor bathymetry. Time series data for pressure, temperature, pH and seafloor photography were collected over 431 days using a benthic observatory at the active Håkon Mosby Mud Volcano. We documented 25 pulses of hot subsurface fluids, accompanied by eruptions that changed the landscape of the mud volcano. Four major events triggered rapid sediment uplift of more than a metre in height, substantial lateral flow of muds at average velocities of 0.4?m per day, and significant emissions of methane and CO? from the seafloor. PMID:25384354

  9. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths because of different crustal regimes or because of different primary magma compositions? Do magmas degas until they physically stall, or do they stall when they start to degas? One test of this is whether H2O contents correlate with tracers from the subduction zone that are not fractionated easily during crystal fractionation or degassing. We find a strong negative correlation between H2O/Ce (based on the maximum H2O measured in a given inclusion population) and Nb/Ce in eight Aleutian volcanoes, which is well explained by variable amounts of a slab fluid, but would be fortuitous, or strongly disturbed, if major degassing took place in the crust during magma ascent. Thus, geochemical data point to a strong slab-mantle control on H2O, that may set the future course of magma ascent, storage and eruption. Integrated studies are needed to test this prediction, including seismic imaging and geodetic response of the volcanic system, from the slab to the surface. [1] Plank, et al. (2011) Min. Mag. 75: 1648. [2] Zimmer, et al. (2010) J. Pet. 51: 2411-2444.

  10. GPS monitoring of Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory uses a variety of ground- and satellite-based techniques to monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes.  Here, an HVO scientist sets up a portable GPS receiver to track surface changes during an island-wide survey of Hawai‘i’s volcanoes. &n...

  11. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-03-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep-sided domes or 'pancake domes', larger than 20 km in diameter, were included with the small volcanic domes. For the purposes of this study, only volcanic edifices less than 20 km in diameter are discussed. This forms a convenient cutoff since most of the steep-sided domes ('pancake domes') and scalloped margin domes ('ticks') are 20 to 100 km in diameter, are much less numerous globally than are the smaller diameter volcanic edifices (2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower in total global number), and do not commonly occur in large clusters or fields of large numbers of edifices.

  12. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep-sided domes or 'pancake domes', larger than 20 km in diameter, were included with the small volcanic domes. For the purposes of this study, only volcanic edifices less than 20 km in diameter are discussed. This forms a convenient cutoff since most of the steep-sided domes ('pancake domes') and scalloped margin domes ('ticks') are 20 to 100 km in diameter, are much less numerous globally than are the smaller diameter volcanic edifices (2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower in total global number), and do not commonly occur in large clusters or fields of large numbers of edifices.

  13. Explosion craters associated with shallow submarine gas venting off Panarea island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Hannington, Mark D.; Anzidei, Marco; Esposito, Alessandra; Giordano, Guido; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Augustin, Nico; Melchert, Bernd; Hocking, Mike

    2012-11-01

    Explosions of hot water, steam, and gas are common periodic events of subaerial geothermal systems. These highly destructive events may cause loss of life and substantial damage to infrastructure, especially in densely populated areas and where geothermal systems are actively exploited for energy. We report on the occurrence of a large number of explosion craters associated with the offshore venting of gas and thermal waters at the volcanic island of Panarea, Italy, demonstrating that violent explosions similar to those observed on land also are common in the shallow submarine environment. With diameters ranging from 5 to over 100 m, the observed circular seafloor depressions record a history of major gas explosions caused by frequent perturbation of the submarine geothermal system over the past 10,000 years. Estimates of the total gas flux indicate that the Panarea geothermal system released over 70 Mt of CO2 over this period of time, suggesting that CO2 venting at submerged arc volcanoes contributes significantly to the global atmospheric budget of this greenhouse gas. The findings at Panarea highlight that shallow submarine gas explosions represent a previously unrecognized volcanic hazard around populated volcanic islands that needs to be taken into account in the development of risk management strategies.

  14. Exterior view of submarine with survey crew posed in front. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view of submarine with survey crew posed in front. From left to right: Todd Croteau - U.S. National Park Service, Joshua Price - U.S. Navy, Bert Ho - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Michael McCarthy - Western Australia Maritime Museum, Larry Murphy - U.S. National Park Service, Don Johnson- University of Nebraska Engineering School, James Delgado- Institute for Nautical Archeology, Jacinto Ahmendra - Government of Panama. - Sub Marine Explorer, Located along the beach of Isla San Telmo, Pearl Islands, Isla San Telmo, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  15. Comparative naval architecture analysis of diesel submarines

    E-print Network

    Torkelson, Kai Oscar

    2005-01-01

    Many comparative naval architecture analyses of surface ships have been performed, but few published comparative analyses of submarines exist. Of the several design concept papers, reports and studies that have been written ...

  16. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  17. Personality characteristics of successful Navy submarine personnel.

    PubMed

    Moes, G S; Lall, R; Johnson, W B

    1996-04-01

    This study evaluated the personality characteristics of senior enlisted and occupationally successful Navy submarine personnel. One hundred subjects completed the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP). Results indicated that the traits of detachment, propriety, and workaholism were most descriptive of the sample. Thirty-seven percent met SNAP criteria for a personality disorder, typically antisocial, obsessive-compulsive, or avoidant. The results are discussed in terms of adaptation to environmental demands aboard submarines. Suggestions for further research are offered. PMID:8935516

  18. Hydraulic and Morphodynamic Characteristics of Submarine Channel Confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, H.; Viparelli, E.; Ezz, H.; Imran, J.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine channel systems are receiving increased attention recently for their potential in transporting and depositing hydrocarbons via turbidity currents into the deep ocean. In order to better predict the locations of hydrocarbon reserves, a more complete understanding of the hydraulic behavior of flows within the channels is necessary. Past field observations have shown that submarine channels have straight and meandering reaches, along with junctions in channel systems; flows in the submarine environment (i.e. density currents) may propagate as a single pulse or as a sustained flow over a prolonged period. This work aims to further the understanding of submarine channel systems by focusing on the hydraulic behavior of submarine channel confluences due to both sudden release (i.e. pulse events) and sustained flows. The associated morphodynamic consequences at and near the confluence are also assessed as they relate to the observed hydraulic conditions. Observational goals include comparisons to heavily studied characteristics of subaerial river channel confluences. These include flow separation zones, helical flow cells, existence of vertical shear layers, avalanche faces upstream of the junction, and deep central scours in the junction. For this investigation, a physical model was built to simulate a 45 degree submarine channel junction with an erodible bed in which two fully conservative density currents are released in each upstream reach and allowed to collide before creating a single combined current in the downstream reach. The pulse events focused on the head of the density currents and were simulated using a lock-exchange mechanism in which a fixed volume of salt water was locked in each upstream reach of the flume before being suddenly released into the ambient water downstream. HD images were used to obtain 1D velocity both up- and down-stream of the junction, and bathymetry measurements were obtained using an ultrasonic probe after each experiment. The sustained (i.e. steady) events focus on the body of the current and were simulated by continuously releasing salt water into the flume initially filled with ambient water. In this case, 2D velocity measurements were obtained around the junction at five elevations, and bed evolution is tracked qualitatively after each test. It has been observed that: 1) a clear shear layer forms between contributing flows; 2) there is evidence of flow separation near the bed downstream of the junction; 3) the current accelerates as it reforms after the collision in the junction; 4) the location and orientation of the central scour differs from river junctions in the sustained case; 5) the sudden release case shows very little scour in the junction zone. This data is used to develop and validate a numerical simulation of both types of density current releases in which further variations on initial conditions can be assessed for their impact on the velocity field and sediment transport in submarine channel junctions.

  19. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2012-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 4,364 earthquakes, of which 3,651 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity above background levels in 2011 at these instrumented volcanic centers. This catalog includes locations, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2011 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  20. [Tuberculosis in the crew of a submarine].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Nakabayashi, K; Ohkouchi, H; Hatada, J; Kawaguchi, S; Sakai, M; Sasaki, N; Ito, A

    1997-01-01

    We report the apparent spread of mycobacterial tuberculosis among a submarine crew from a crew member with a low grade of infectivity. The air-conditioning system of submarines requires completely closed recirculation of ambient air. If a person with pulmonary tuberculosis were in a submarine, one would expect to find a high incidence of tuberculosis among others on the ship. The index patient was a 35-year-old member of a submarine crew. An abnormal shadow was found on a chest roentgenogram during an annual medical checkup, and he was hospitalized for examination. Acid-fast bacilli were found in his gastric secretions, but he did not complain of coughing and no tuberculosis bacilli were found in his sputum. All members of the submarine crew were examined, and some who were on board with the index patient reacted strongly. Because those who were also suspected to be infected were usually not close to the index patient's living quarters and had little contact with the patient in the submarine, we strongly suspect that the closed ventilation system contributed to the spread of the infection. Control of tuberculosis in a sealed environment requires detailed investigation of the environment and completion of chemoprophylaxis. Adequate ventilation and ultraviolet radiation are more effective than decontamination with disinfectants for the control of infectious droplet nuclei. Ships should be equipped with those systems. PMID:9071158

  1. Submarine landslides: processes, triggers and hazard prediction.

    PubMed

    Masson, D G; Harbitz, C B; Wynn, R B; Pedersen, G; Løvholt, F

    2006-08-15

    Huge landslides, mobilizing hundreds to thousands of km(3) of sediment and rock are ubiquitous in submarine settings ranging from the steepest volcanic island slopes to the gentlest muddy slopes of submarine deltas. Here, we summarize current knowledge of such landslides and the problems of assessing their hazard potential. The major hazards related to submarine landslides include destruction of seabed infrastructure, collapse of coastal areas into the sea and landslide-generated tsunamis. Most submarine slopes are inherently stable. Elevated pore pressures (leading to decreased frictional resistance to sliding) and specific weak layers within stratified sequences appear to be the key factors influencing landslide occurrence. Elevated pore pressures can result from normal depositional processes or from transient processes such as earthquake shaking; historical evidence suggests that the majority of large submarine landslides are triggered by earthquakes. Because of their tsunamigenic potential, ocean-island flank collapses and rockslides in fjords have been identified as the most dangerous of all landslide related hazards. Published models of ocean-island landslides mainly examine 'worst-case scenarios' that have a low probability of occurrence. Areas prone to submarine landsliding are relatively easy to identify, but we are still some way from being able to forecast individual events with precision. Monitoring of critical areas where landslides might be imminent and modelling landslide consequences so that appropriate mitigation strategies can be developed would appear to be areas where advances on current practice are possible. PMID:16844646

  2. Preliminary radon measurements at Villarrica volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigolini, C.; Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.; Ulivieri, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report data from a radon survey conducted at Villarrica volcano. Measurements have been obtained at selected sites by E-PERM® electrets and two automatic stations utilizing DOSEman detectors (SARAD Gmbh). Mean values for Villarrica are 1600 (±1150) Bq/m3 are similar to values recorded at Cerro Negro and Arenal in Central America. Moderately higher emissions, at measurement sites, were recorded on the NNW sector of the volcano and the summit, ranging from 1800 to 2400 Bq/m3. These measurements indicate that this area could potentially be a zone of flank weakness. In addition, the highest radon activities, up to 4600 Bq/m3, were measured at a station located near the intersection of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone with the Gastre Fault Zone. To date, the Villarrica radon measurements reported here are, together with those collected at Galeras (Colombia), the sole radon data reported from South American volcanoes. This research may contribute to improving future geochemical monitoring and volcano surveillance.

  3. Mapping tremor at K?lauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, A.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping the magma pathway geometry beneath active volcanoes is vital to providing an understanding of how each system works, what drives its dynamics and what eventually controls the surface expression of volcanism. Seismicity can provide clues about the subsurface plumbing, but the seismic catalog is often incomplete. The broad spectrum of seismic phenomena at volcanoes, from discrete earthquakes to the continuous hum of tremor, hampers event identification, and there are no standard seismological tools to resolve this problem. Even at K?lauea, one of the best-instrumented and most studied volcanoes in the world, a detailed source geometry remains elusive. Here we present the first map of a volcano's deep plumbing system by taking a new approach to seismic monitoring. Using envelope cross-correlation, we systematically scan through 2.5 years of continuous seismic data to identify and locate thousands of undocumented volcanic sources, which we interpret to map the path of magma ascent from the deep mantle, offshore south of the Big Island, to the lava lake in K?lauea's crater. The results offer a fundamental insight into the source of K?lauea volcanism and generate a baseline understanding that increases our ability to interpret pre- and co-eruptive observations.

  4. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sanchez, John J.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Estes, Steve; Paskievitch, John

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of this program are the near real time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2003. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at twenty-seven volcanoes within Alaska in 2003. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Monitoring highlights in 2003 include: continuing elevated seismicity at Mount Veniaminof in January-April (volcanic unrest began in August 2002), volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year, and low-level tremor at Okmok Caldera throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2003 were the installation of subnetworks on Tanaga and Gareloi Islands, the installation of broadband installations on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera, and the establishment of telemetry for the Okmok Caldera subnetwork. AVO located 3911 earthquakes in 2003. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2003; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2003.

  5. Colima Volcano, State of Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Located about 125 km south of Guadalajara, state of Jalisco, Mexico, the 13,325 ft. Colima (19.5N, 103.5W) is the most active volcano in Mexico. The activity depicted occurred in early March 1991 with avalanches followed soon after by lava extrusion with ash and steam emission from the caldera. The steam plume can be seen drifting eastward from the summit and groundscars from the earlier avalanches can also be seen on the southwest slope.

  6. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2011-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3,405 earthquakes, of which 2,846 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity in 2010 at these monitored volcanic centers. Seismograph subnetworks with severe outages in 2009 were repaired in 2010 resulting in three volcanic centers (Aniakchak, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being relisted in the formal list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes locations and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2010 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  7. Topographic analysis of submarine cable failures offshore southwestern taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Pei Cheng; Shine Liu, Char; Hsu, Ho Han

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, there was large scale of the submarine cable failures offshore southern Taiwan right after the Pingtung Earthquake. Apparently the December 26 Pingtung Earthquake triggered submarine mass movements which generated turbidity currents in the submarine canyons and damaged cables lying across the canyons. In addition, the Typhoon Morakot on August 8-9, 2009 and the Jiashian Earthquake on March 4, 2010 also caused many submarine cable failures offshore southwestern Taiwan. The most of broken cable sites are along the axis of the Gaoping Submarine Canyon (GPSC) and Fangliao Submarine Canyon (FLSC), topography should be an important factor controlling transport processes of submarine mass movement. The cable broken sites indicate that there were submarine mass movement pass through. Therefore, the topographic factor of the cable broken sites can be the threshold to index submarine mass movement. And as, submarine cables are distributed widely offshore southwestern Taiwan, why only a total of 35 sites of submarine cable failures occurred in 2006, 2009 and 2010? We use bathymetry data, CHIRP (compressed high-intensity radar pulse) sonar profile data and the time series of the cable breakage to investigate the characteristics of submarine mass movement and to develop a model for the series of submarine cable failure. Using the Geographic Information System (GIS) software, we analyze the bathymetric data collected before the 35 sites of submarine cable failures offshore southwestern Taiwan. Applying the hydrology in GIS software, the flow movement could be derived from the factors of slope and aspect. We quantify the transport process of submarine mass movement and combine with the time series of the cable breakage to discuss the effect between submarine cable failures. Based on the CHIRP sonar data, we identified the distinct CHIRP echo character patterns after the submarine cable failures and classify the distinct CHIRP echo characters. Using the threshold of topographic factor to expect where will be potential area of submarine mass movement and evidence the result by CHIRP sonar profile data.

  8. Methane and radioactive isotopes in submarine hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: 1) methane and 2) radioactive isotopes, especially radon, in submarine hydrothermal systems. Both parts deal with the use of these gases as tracers for mapping hydrothermal vents at sea, and with their relationships to other sensitive tracers such as helium, manganese, and temperature. Hydrothermal methane was used as a real-time tracer for locating new submarine hydrothermal systems along spreading axes, discovering new hydrothermal systems at two locations in Pacific Ocean: 1) 20/sup 0/S on East Pacific Rise, and 2) Mariana Trough Back-arc Basin. Methane shows good correlations with helium-3 and temperature with similar ratios in various hydrothermal systems, 3 to 42 x 10/sup 6/ for the methane to helium-3 ratio, and 3 to 19 ..mu.. cc/kg/sup 0/C for the methane to temperature anomaly. These similar ratios from different areas provide evidence for chemical homogeneity of submarine hydrothermal waters. A good correlation between methane and manganese appears to be associated only with high-temperature hydrothermal systems. Radioisotopes in the vent waters of 21/sup 0/N high-temperature hydrothermal system have end-member concentrations of 7.5 to 40 dpm/kg for Ra-226, 360 dpm/kg for Rn 222, 62 dpm/kg for Pb-210, and 19 dpm/kg for Po-210. The radon activity for this system is one order of magnitude lower, and the Pb-210 activity is one order or magnitude higher, than those a the low temperature Galapagos system. All these observations suggest that the high radon, and low Pb-210 activity observed in Galapagos system may originate from the extensive subsurface mixing and water-rock interaction in this system (direct injection of radon and scavenging of Pb-210).

  9. The use of rotational invariants for the interpretation of marine CSEM data with a case study from the North Alex mud volcano, West Nile Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölz, Sebastian; Swidinsky, Andrei; Sommer, Malte; Jegen, Marion; Bialas, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Submarine mud volcanos at the seafloor are surface expressions of fluid flow systems within the seafloor. Since the electrical resistivity of the seafloor is mainly determined by the amount and characteristics of fluids contained within the sediment's pore space, electromagnetic methods offer a promising approach to gain insight into a mud volcano's internal resistivity structure. To investigate this structure, we conducted a controlled source electromagnetic experiment, which was novel in the sense that the source was deployed and operated with a remotely operated vehicle, which allowed for a flexible placement of the transmitter dipole with two polarization directions at each transmitter location. For the interpretation of the experiment, we have adapted the concept of rotational invariants from land-based electromagnetics to the marine case by considering the source normalized tensor of horizontal electric field components. We analyse the sensitivity of these rotational invariants in terms of 1-D models and measurement geometries and associated measurement errors, which resemble the experiment at the mud volcano. The analysis shows that any combination of rotational invariants has an improved parameter resolution as compared to the sensitivity of the pure radial or azimuthal component alone. For the data set, which was acquired at the `North Alex' mud volcano, we interpret rotational invariants in terms of 1-D inversions on a common midpoint grid. The resulting resistivity models show a general increase of resistivities with depth. The most prominent feature in the stitched 1-D sections is a lens-shaped interface, which can similarly be found in a section from seismic reflection data. Beneath this interface bulk resistivities frequently fall in a range between 2.0 and 2.5 ?m towards the maximum penetration depths. We interpret the lens-shaped interface as the surface of a collapse structure, which was formed at the end of a phase of activity of an older mud volcano generation and subsequently refilled with new mud volcano sediments during a later stage of activity. Increased resistivities at depth cannot be explained by compaction alone, but instead require a combination of compaction and increased cementation of the older sediments, possibly in connection to trapped, cooled down mud volcano fluids, which have a depleted chlorinity. At shallow depths (?50 m) bulk resistivities generally decrease and for locations around the mud volcano's centre 1-D models show bulk resistivities in a range between 0.5 and 0.7 ?m, which we interpret in terms of gas saturation levels by means of Archie's Law. After a detailed analysis of the material parameters contained in Archie's Law we derive saturation levels between 0 and 25 per cent, which is in accordance with observations of active degassing and a reflector with negative polarity in the seismics section just beneath the seafloor, which is indicative of free gas.

  10. Human-Powered Submarine Competition: World Submarine International 1996 [and] Design Technology Exhibit: A School Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibberd, John C.; Edwards, Don

    1996-01-01

    Hibbard describes the process used by students at Millersville University to build a human-powered submarine for entry in an international submarine competition. Edwards discusses the Design Technology Exhibit held at Lu Sutton Elementary School, the purpose of which was to challenge students to design a useful structure and provide them with the…

  11. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... of the plume features between camera views. A quantitative computer analysis is necessary to separate out wind and height (see  Volcano ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  12. Augustine Volcano Sampling

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Students climb out of ravine on north flank of Augustine Volcano during descent from sampling the 2006 lava flow during 2010 summer field campaign. From left: Laurel Morrow (junior geology major at CSUF), Matthew Bidwell (Science teacher at South Junior High School in Anaheim, CA), Ashley Melendez (...

  13. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  14. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  15. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  16. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, Arthur D.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Lahr, John C.; Paskievitch, John; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Moran, Seth C.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Hammond, William R.

    2001-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained a seismic monitoring program at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. Between 1994 and 1999, the AVO seismic monitoring program underwent significant changes with networks added at new volcanoes during each summer from 1995 through 1999. The existing network at Katmai –Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) was repaired in 1995, and new networks were installed at Makushin (1996), Akutan (1996), Pavlof (1996), Katmai - south (1996), Aniakchak (1997), Shishaldin (1997), Katmai - north (1998), Westdahl, (1998), Great Sitkin (1999) and Kanaga (1999). These networks added to AVO's existing seismograph networks in the Cook Inlet area and increased the number of AVO seismograph stations from 46 sites and 57 components in 1994 to 121 sites and 155 components in 1999. The 1995–1999 seismic network expansion increased the number of volcanoes monitored in real-time from 4 to 22, including Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Mount Snowy, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin, Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski volcano, Shisaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl volcano, Akutan volcano, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (see Figures 1-15). The network expansion also increased the number of earthquakes located from about 600 per year in1994 and 1995 to about 3000 per year between 1997 and 1999. Highlights of the catalog period include: 1) a large volcanogenic seismic swarm at Akutan volcano in March and April 1996 (Lu and others, 2000); 2) an eruption at Pavlof Volcano in fall 1996 (Garces and others, 2000; McNutt and others, 2000); 3) an earthquake swarm at Iliamna volcano between September and December 1996; 4) an earthquake swarm at Mount Mageik in October 1996 (Jolly and McNutt, 1999); 5) an earthquake swarm located at shallow depth near Strandline Lake; 6) a strong swarm of earthquakes near Becharof Lake; 7) precursory seismicity and an eruption at Shishaldin Volcano in April 1999 that included a 5.2 ML earthquake and aftershock sequence (Moran and others, in press; Thompson and others, in press). The 1996 calendar year is also notable as the seismicity rate was very high, especially in the fall when 3 separate areas (Strandline Lake, Iliamna Volcano, and several of the Katmai volcanoes) experienced high rates of located earthquakes. This catalog covers the period from January 1, 1994, through December 31,1999, and includes: 1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; 2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations and magnifications; 3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival; 4) velocity models used for earthquake locations; 5) phase arrival times recorded at individual stations; and 6) a summary of daily station usage from throughout the report period. We have made calculated hypocenters, station locations, system magnifications, velocity models, and phase arrival information available for download via computer network as a compressed Unix tar file.

  17. Submarine landslide hazard off Northeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Hsu, S. K.; Tsai, C. H.; Doo, W. B.; Lin, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    In the northern margin of the western end of the Okinawa Trough, three major submarine channels running across the continental margin are distinctive. From east to west, they are the North Mein-Hua Submarine Canyon, Mein-Hua Submarine Canyon and the Keelung Valley. To the east of the Mein-Hua Submarine Canyon, the slope of the continental margin is quite gentle, implying that the risk of slope instability is low. However, between the Keelung Valley and the Mei-Hua Submarine Canyon, the slope is rather steep. We have conducted multi-channel reflection seismics, sub-bottom profilers and multi-beam bathymetry in this area. The results show two general trends of fracture or faulting. The NE-SW trending faults generally follow the major orientation of the Taiwan mountain belt. Thus, these faults could be reverse faults from the former collisional thrust faults to currently post-collisional normal faults. Another almost E-W trending faults are consistent with the N-S extending of the Southern Okinawa Trough. Because the most significant faulting in the northwest end of the study is probably associated with the offshore extension of the Kenchiao Fault or the Sanchiao Fault, we consider either of these two faults as the northeast boundary (headwall) of the potential submarine landslide. Taking the stability slope angle of 0.5 degree as the stable landslide slope as shown in the area to the northeast of the study area, we estimate the total volume of the potential submarine landslide could be 300 cubic kilometers. Such a landslide volume may generate a local tsunami and affect especially the northeast coast of Taiwan.

  18. Estimates of elastic plate thicknesses beneath large volcanos on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Megellan radar imaging and topography data are now available for a number of volcanos on Venus greater than 100 km in radius. These data can be examined to reveal evidence of the flexural response of the lithosphere to the volcanic load. On Earth, flexure beneath large hotspot volcanos results in an annual topographic moat that is partially to completely filled in by sedimentation and mass wasting from the volcano's flanks. On Venus, erosion and sediment deposition are considered to be negligible at the resolution of Magellan images. Thus, it may be possible to observe evidence of flexure by the ponding of recent volcanic flows in the moat. We also might expect to find topographic signals from unfilled moats surrounding large volcanos on Venus, although these signals may be partially obscured by regional topography. Also, in the absence of sedimentation, tectonic evidence of deformation around large volcanos should be evident except where buried by very young flows. We use analytic solutions in axisymmetric geometry for deflections and stresses resulting from loading of a plate overlying an inviscid fluid. Solutions for a set of disk loads are superimposed to obtain a solution for a conical volcano. The deflection of the lithosphere produces an annular depression or moat, the extent of which can be estimated by measuring the distance from the volcano's edge to the first zero crossing or to the peak of the flexural arch. Magellan altimetry data records (ARCDRs) from data cycle 1 are processed using the GMT mapping and graphics software to produce topographic contour maps of the volcanos. We then take topographic profiles that cut across the annular and ponded flows seen on the radar images. By comparing the locations of these flows to the predicted moat locations from a range of models, we estimate the elastic plate thickness that best fits the observations, together with the uncertainty in that estimate.

  19. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  20. Asymmetric caldera-related structures in the area of the Avacha group of volcanoes in Kamchatka as revealed by ambient noise tomography and

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    Asymmetric caldera-related structures in the area of the Avacha group of volcanoes in Kamchatka: Kamchatka Avachinsky volcano Ambient noise tomography Deep seismic sounding Caldera forming Avacha group includes two active and potentially dangerous volcanoes, Avachinsky and Koryaksky, located close

  1. Submarine Volcanology: 1950 to 2050 and Beyond (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The vigorous pursuit of submarine volcanism as a major field emerged in the mid 1900’s with the post WWII recognition that there is a Mid-Ocean Ridge System that is a 70,000 km long volcanic mountain chain stretching around the world like the strings on a baseball. By the mid 1960’s it emerged that rocks from volcanic feature were consistently basaltic in character and that they were the direct result of major melting processes associated with rise of much deeper mantle material beneath the spreading ridges in a global plate tectonics framework. More than 60% of the volcanism on the planet occurs in submarine environments. The next major discovery, using the deep diving submarine ALVIN, was in the late 1970’s involving hydrothermal systems near active ridges close to the Galapagos Islands and Baja California. The idea that these vent sites were the locus of major biological productivity based on volcanically-driven chemosynthesis was a fundamental new insight in the deep ocean ecology of our planet. This was a major planetological discovery and was followed within about 15 years with an even more powerful realization: our planet has a vast sub seafloor microbial biosphere thriving in the pores and the cracks of the oceanic crust driven by circulation of modified ocean fluids through large portions of the lithosphere. These organisms are largely supported by degassing and water-rock reactions associated with submarine volcanoes. Some estimates have posited that: 1) these thermally active systems and the chemosynthetic lifestyle are a natural consequence of certain types of planetary evolution, 2) that life may have originated in these systems, and, 3) that the biomass associated with the modern sub seafloor systems rivals most other living carbon on the continents. Indeed, parallel exploration of the outer solar system has lead to propositions that the second moon of Jupiter, Europa, has (or had) a high potential to harbor analogous hydrothermal life forms owing to the fact that it is covered with water ice and is the next door neighbor to the most volcanically active body in the solar system - Io. Future approaches to studying both terrestrial and off-planet volcanic systems will involve an increasingly sophisticated use of cutting edge technologies enabled by robotic systems, novel and mobile sensor modalities in four dimensions, very high bandwidth communication systems, power extraction from the environment, massive computational power, nanotech systems, unparalleled in situ imaging capabilities, and the capacity to support human telepresence and machine autonomy in remote environments at levels that are totally unprecedented. Earth’s oceans will be the experimental test bed for deploying and maturing these capabilities, but oceans in our solar system and beyond will become the ultimate targets for exploration of one of the ultimate questions: Are we alone

  2. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals and current monitoring level; associated hazards; and detailed descriptions of possible eruption scenarios. Where data allows, the likelihood of different eruption scenarios will also be depicted by probabilistic event trees. The chapters are illustrated with a number of figures, interactive maps and photographs.

  3. Tharsis Volcanoes and Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    It is northern summer on Mars and clouds are very common over the famous Tharsis volcanoes during the afternoon. At the far left, a white patchy cloud denotes the location of Olympus Mons. Ascraeus Mons is under the brightest cloud toward the center left, but the volcanoes Pavonis Mons and Arsia Mons (toward lower left below Ascraeus Mons) have much less cloud cover. The patch of clouds toward the upper left mark the location of the Alba Patera volcano. The Valles Marineris trough system--so long that it would stretch across North America--is seen in the lower third of this picture. This is a color composite of 9 red and 9 blue image strips taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera on 9 successive orbits from pole-to-pole during the calibration phase of the mission in March 1999. The color is computer-enhanced and is not shown as it would actually appear to the human eye.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  4. Open architecture framework for improved early stage submarine design

    E-print Network

    Sewell, Eli A. (Eli Anthony)

    2010-01-01

    Could transparency between current disparate methods improve efficiency in early stage submarine design? Does the lack of transparency between current design methods hinder the effectiveness of early stage submarine design? ...

  5. Non-cooperative Diagnosis of Submarine Cable Faults

    E-print Network

    Chang, Rocky Kow-Chuen

    to the Hengchun earthquake in 2006 [1]. Moreover, a submarine cable fault requires considerable time for tracing communication is to reroute the affected traffic to other submarine/terrestrial/satellite links. However

  6. Frequency based satellite monitoring of small scale explosive activity at remote North Pacific volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, Anna; Dehn, Jonathan; Webley, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring of volcanoes in the North Pacific can be an expensive and sometimes dangerous task, specifically for those located in Alaska (USA) and Kamchatka (Russia). An active frequency detection method previously used at Stromboli, Italy, uses the thermal- and mid-infrared wavelength bands from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data to detect anomalies at a volcano. This method focuses on small scale explosive activity, often referred to as Strombolian activity which can produce small spatter fields near a volcano's active vent. In the North Pacific, there are a number of volcanoes which exhibit small scale explosive activity and three are the focus of this study: Chuginadak (Mt. Cleveland) and Shishaldin in Alaska, and Karymsky Volcano in Kamchatka. Satellite images from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used to monitor the frequency of thermal features as well as the occurrence of ash plumes at each volcano. This data was then used to produce a time series spanning 2005-2010 for all three volcanoes. During this time period, each volcano underwent a series of eruptive cycles including background levels of activity, heightened frequency of small explosions (identified as precursory activity), and heightened activity typified by ash plume-producing eruptions. Each location has a unique precursory signal, both in timing and magnitude. The use of a previously developed method on a new sample set of volcanoes has proved the validity of this method as a monitoring tool for volcanoes with small scale explosive activity. This method should be applied to a larger set of volcanoes to continue the development and database production for its use as a volcano monitoring tool.

  7. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  8. Submarine hot springs: Origin of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The observations of hydrothermal systems along midoceanic spreading centers by the deep-diving submarine, Alvin, have led to numerous geological theories to explain phenomena ranging from heat flow to the formation of massive sulfide deposits. Unusual life in the forms of giant tube worms and mussels (Eos, Dec. 29, 1981) have been found to live along the submarine hot springs in chemically reducing and normally toxic sulfurous environments. Analyses of data over the past year or two have formed the basis of new life-evolution schemes. J.B. Corliss, J.A. Baross, and S.E. Hoffman have outlined a process by which concentrations of methane, ammonia, hydrogen, and metals may have reacted, in several steps, to produce living organisms within or adjacent to submarine hydrothermal systems (Oceanol. Acta, 59-69, 1981).

  9. Seasonal variation in a tropical lagoon with submarine groundwater discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio, L.; Gómez-Valdés, J.; Enriquez, C.; Treviño, C.; Marino-Tapia, I.; López-Aguiar, K.

    2013-05-01

    The Chelem-Chuburna-Yucalpeten lagoon system is located at 21°17'N and 89°40'W in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. Temperature, conductivity, sea level, atmospheric pressure, solar radiation, and wind speed measurements were recorded in this lagoon, during various oceanographic surveys within 2010-2012. During the experiments, which included diurnal variations during spring and neap tidal cycles, CTD profiles were collected in 35 oceanographic stations and moored instruments were deployed at strategic locations. The aim of this work is to investigate transitions of thermohaline properties in a tropical lagoon with submarine groundwater discharges (SGDs) to increase the knowledge of the principal processes that control circulation and mixing in this kind of bodies of water. Results show that the lagoon is saltier than the ocean in the dry season and the opposite pattern is observed in the rain season. During the rain season could be more freshwater supplied from SGDs.

  10. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  11. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700.1058 National...Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine shall be an officer of the line in...

  12. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700.1058 National...Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine shall be an officer of the line in...

  13. Optimal control design for the nonlinear manoeuvrability of a submarine

    E-print Network

    Optimal control design for the nonlinear manoeuvrability of a submarine Javier Garc´ia , Diana M, submarine, optimal control, gradient descent method. 1 Introduction In the development of a naval architecture tool for the guidance and autopilot of a submarine is important to choose both an accurate

  14. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700.1058 National...Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine shall be an officer of the line in...

  15. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700.1058 National...Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine shall be an officer of the line in...

  16. Submarine Floating Antenna Model for LORAN-C Signal

    E-print Network

    Monin, André

    Submarine Floating Antenna Model for LORAN-C Signal Processing A. MONIN LAAS-CNRS France An electromagnetic model of the floating antenna used by submarines for LORAN-C radionavigation and very low The antenna used by submarines, for LORAN-C radionavigation and very low frequency (VLF) communications

  17. 32 CFR 700.1058 - Command of a submarine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Command of a submarine. 700.1058 Section 700.1058 National...Detail to Duty § 700.1058 Command of a submarine. The officer detailed to command a submarine shall be an officer of the line in...

  18. 1 INTRODUCTION Submarine channels systems are the conduits that al-

    E-print Network

    Métivier, François

    1 INTRODUCTION Submarine channels systems are the conduits that al- low turbidity currents conditions and the dynamics of submarine erosional channels inception? Are they produced by catastrophic dynamics and shear stress measurements in submarine channels experiments. P. Lancien, F. Métivier, E

  19. Reducing Unsteady Loads on a Piggyback Miniature Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John

    2009-01-01

    A small, simple fixture has been found to be highly effective in reducing destructive unsteady hydrodynamic loads on a miniature submarine that is attached in piggyback fashion to the top of a larger, nuclear-powered, host submarine. The fixture, denoted compact ramp, can be installed with minimal structural modification, and the use of it does not entail any change in submarine operations.

  20. Deep submarine pyroclastic eruptions: theory and predicted landforms and deposits

    E-print Network

    Head III, James William

    Deep submarine pyroclastic eruptions: theory and predicted landforms and deposits James W. Head III October 2001; received in revised form 19 August 2002; accepted 19 August 2002 Abstract Submarine and illustrate the full range of submarine eruption styles, we model several possible scenarios for the ascent

  1. 35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, PRIOR TO ENLARGEMENT OF ROOM AND INSTALLATION OF TRIPLE-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER IN 1957 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  2. 31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ELEVATOR AND PASSAGEWAYS TO THE 18- AND 50-FOOT LOCKS AND CUPOLA 1932 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  3. 36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING RESCUE BELL SUSPENDED ABOVE TANK, WITH TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER AT REAR, LOOKING WEST. Photo taken after installation of recompression chamber in 1956. - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  4. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32...Sheet Accounts § 32.2424 Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall...the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea cable and other material used...

  5. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32...Sheet Accounts § 32.2424 Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall...the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea cable and other material used...

  6. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32...Sheet Accounts § 32.2424 Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall...the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea cable and other material used...

  7. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32...Sheet Accounts § 32.2424 Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall...the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea cable and other material used...

  8. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32...Sheet Accounts § 32.2424 Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall...the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea cable and other material used...

  9. Geomorphic process fingerprints in submarine canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Twichell, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Submarine canyons are common features of continental margins worldwide. They are conduits that funnel vast quantities of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. Though it is known that submarine canyons form primarily from erosion induced by submarine sediment flows, we currently lack quantitative, empirically based expressions that describe the morphology of submarine canyon networks. Multibeam bathymetry data along the entire passive US Atlantic margin (USAM) and along the active central California margin near Monterey Bay provide an opportunity to examine the fine-scale morphology of 171 slope-sourced canyons. Log–log regression analyses of canyon thalweg gradient (S) versus up-canyon catchment area (A) are used to examine linkages between morphological domains and the generation and evolution of submarine sediment flows. For example, canyon reaches of the upper continental slope are characterized by steep, linear and/or convex longitudinal profiles, whereas reaches farther down canyon have distinctly concave longitudinal profiles. The transition between these geomorphic domains is inferred to represent the downslope transformation of debris flows into erosive, canyon-flushing turbidity flows. Over geologic timescales this process appears to leave behind a predictable geomorphic fingerprint that is dependent on the catchment area of the canyon head. Catchment area, in turn, may be a proxy for the volume of sediment released during geomorphically significant failures along the upper continental slope. Focused studies of slope-sourced submarine canyons may provide new insights into the relationships between fine-scale canyon morphology and down-canyon changes in sediment flow dynamics.

  10. Pairing the Volcano

    E-print Network

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  11. A model for the submarine depthkeeping team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, J. R.; Best, J. F.; Bozzi, P. J.; Kleinman, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The most difficult task the depthkeeping team must face occurs during periscope-depth operations during which they may be required to maintain a submarine several hundred feet long within a foot of ordered depth and within one-half degree of ordered pitch. The difficulty is compounded by the facts that wave generated forces are extremely high, depth and pitch signals are very noisy and submarine speed is such that overall dynamics are slow. A mathematical simulation of the depthkeeping team based on the optimal control models is described. A solution of the optimal team control problem with an output control restriction (limited display to each controller) is presented.

  12. Transporting submarine engines to power the PRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The city of Hampton was unable to supply adequate electric power to operate the PRT. Navy Captain Walter S. Diehl, Bureau of Aeronautics, acquired two 1000 hp submarine engines which were to be disposed of. BuAer 'loaned' the engines to the NACA, one of which is shown here. Next to the engine is Donald H. Wood, a mechanical engineer from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Fred Weick's assistant. Propeller Research Tunnel (PRT) engineer Donald H. Wood ponders the unlikely transfer of a submarine engine from rail car to NACA truck, May 1926. Two such diesel engines powered the PRT.

  13. Submarine glaciated landscapes of central and northern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Lintern, Gwyn

    2015-04-01

    Recent systematic multibeam sonar mapping and ground-truthing surveys in the fjords and coastal waters of central and northern British Columbia, Canada, provide information on glacial processes associated with the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, and also on postglacial processes that have strongly modified the glacial terrain. During the last glacial maximum, ice covered the Coast Range, except for nunataks. Convergent streamlined glacial landforms in the Strait of Georgia testify to a strong flow of ice towards the southeast, between Vancouver Island and the mainland. During ice retreat, thick deposits of acoustically stratified glaciomarine mud were deposited in glacially over deepened basins. Retreat through the Douglas Channel fjord system was punctuated by still stands, resulting in a series of submarine moraines. Postglacial processes have created a suite of landforms that mask the primary glacial terrain: 1) Fjord floors host thick deposits of acoustically transparent postglacial mud with highly variable distribution: banks up to 80-m thick are commonly adjacent to erosional zones with glaciomarine mud exposed at the seafloor; 2) In this region of high precipitation and snowpack melt, numerous cone-shaped Holocene fan deltas developed on the fjord sidewalls transport coarse sediment to the fjord floors. Larger deltas are developed at fjord heads, notably at Kitimat and Kildala; 3) Submarine slope failures in this tectonically active area have resulted in a suite of mass transport deposits on sidewalls and fjord floors. The very large submarine slope failures at Camano Sound and KitKat Inlet occurred on the steep, rear facets of large transverse moraines, and involved the failure of glaciomarine sediment that moved into deeper basins, perhaps as a retrogressive failure. The ages of these events are unknown, although the presence of postglacial mud in the slide scar at Caamano suggests that the event at that location occurred in the late glacial or early Holocene. Also, sub-bottom profiling shows that some mass transport deposits apparent on the multibeam imagery are not recent, and are blanketed by postglacial mud. Thus, submarine slope failure has been occurring throughout postglacial time; 4) Large, detached bedrock blocks on the fjord sidewall are currently being investigated with a view to understanding their rates of movement. They are provisionally interpreted as creep features, similar to terrestrial sackung.

  14. Addressing submarine geohazards through scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlenghi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural submarine geohazards (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, volcanic island flank collapses) are geological phenomena originating at or below the seafloor leading to a situation of risk for off-shore and on-shore structures and the coastal population. Addressing submarine geohazards means understanding their spatial and temporal variability, the pre-conditioning factors, their triggers, and the physical processes that control their evolution. Such scientific endeavour is nowadays considered by a large sector of the international scientific community as an obligation in order to contribute to the mitigation of the potentially destructive societal effects of submarine geohazards. The study of submarine geohazards requires a multi-disciplinary scientific approach: geohazards must be studied through their geological record; active processes must be monitored; geohazard evolution must be modelled. Ultimately, the information must be used for the assessment of vulnerability, risk analysis, and development of mitigation strategies. In contrast with the terrestrial environment, the oceanic environment is rather hostile to widespread and fast application of high-resolution remote sensing techniques, accessibility for visual inspection, sampling and installation of monitoring stations. Scientific Drilling through the IODP (including the related pre site-survey investigations, sampling, logging and in situ measurements capability, and as a platform for deployment of long term observatories at the surface and down-hole) can be viewed as the centre of gravity of an international, coordinated, multi-disciplinary scientific approach to address submarine geohazards. The IODP Initial Science Plan expiring in 2013 does not address openly geohazards among the program scientific objectives. Hazards are referred to mainly in relation to earthquakes and initiatives towards the understanding of seismogenesis. Notably, the only drilling initiative presently under way is the multi-platform drilling of the Nankai seismogenic zone. Scientific initiatives are flourishing to drive IODP towards the study of submarine geohazards. In the last three years international workshops, were held to address the topic: ESF-ECORD sponsored a Magellan Workshop focussed on submarine landslides (Barcelona, Spain, 2006); IODP sponsored a world-wide Geohazard Workshop (Portland, Oregon, 2007); ESF-ECORD sponsored another Magellan Workshop focussed on Mediterranean submarine geohazards (Luleå, Sweden, 2008). In addition, following the ECORD-Net Conference on the Deep Sea Frontier (Naples, Italy, 2006), the history, monitoring and prediction of geohazards was identified as one of the 6 major areas for a European science plan to integrate Ocean Drilling, Ocean Margin, and Seabed research. More than 200 scientists and private companies representatives have been mobilized world-wide to attend these meetings, from where it emerged that Ocean Drilling will play a key role in the future to answer the following basic open questions on submarine geohazards: - What is the frequency, magnitude, and distribution of geohazard events? - Do precursory phenomena exist and can they be recognized? - What are the physical and mechanical properties of materials prone to failure? - What are the roles of preconditioning vs. triggering in rapid seafloor deformation? - Can the tsunamigenic potential of past and future events be assessed? Within the global-ocean geohazards, worth of note is the attention given in this preparatory phase to submarine geohazards in the Mediterranean basin, a miniature ocean often called a "natural laboratory" because of the diversity of geological environments it contains. The coastline is very densely-populated, totalling 160 million inhabitants sharing 46,000 km of coastline. The Mediterranean is the World's leading holiday destination, receiving an average of 135 million visitors annually. Submarine landslides, volcanic flank collapses, volcanic island eruptions, earthquakes and the associated tsunamis can lead to destruction of seaf

  15. Study of Tatun Volcanoes by Fluxgate Geomagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Yen, H. Y.; Chen, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Tatun volcanoes, located at northern Taipei city, the capital city of Taiwan, are still active according to the previous studies. Thus, construct the geometry of the volcanic structures of Tatun volcanoes is necessary. We used 3-component geomagnetic data from two temporal fluxgate magnetometers and YMM(Yangming mountain) a permanent station from April to August 2014. The susceptibility of igneous rock is generally larger than metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, thus we use the Parkinson vectors derived from 3-component geomagnetic data through the magnetic transfer function to find out the location and geometry of the igneous rock under Tatun volcanoes. In order to know the depth of the anomalies, we used the magnetotelluric data of previous study that are in the vicinity of three stations to compute the skin depth, which show the relationship between frequency and the penetration depth of the electromagnetic wave. Then, we use the magnetic transfer function to calculate the azimuth of the anomalies at a specific depth.

  16. Local seismicity following the 1998 eruption of Axial Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Robert A.; Crawford, Wayne C.; Webb, Spahr C.

    A local network of seven ocean bottom hydrophones was deployed on Axial volcano 14 days after the onset of seismic activity from the January 1998 diking/eruption episode. Eighty-one locatable microearthquakes were observed during a 166 day deployment. The first group of events, observed immediately after the eruption, cluster around the rim of the central caldera. These events are believed to be aftershocks from the major caldera collapse at the beginning of the diking event. The second group of events, observed 2-5 months after the eruption, are primarily located on a line striking 125° from the caldera onto the southeast shoulder of the volcano, with a few events extending into Helium basin to the north. These events are interpreted to result from horizontal shear associated with the CoAxial and Vance ridge segment offset, or extension across the Juan de Fuca/Pacific plate boundary underlying the eastern flank of Axial volcano.

  17. Gravity, Bathymetry and Submarine Volcanism in the Mesozoic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.; Kalnins, L. M.

    2007-12-01

    Submarine volcano loading studies suggest that the effective elastic thickness, Te, of oceanic lithosphere increases with age at the time of loading. Therefore, a seamount formed on a ridge crest will be characterised by a lower Te than a similar size feature that formed off-ridge. Compilations of data where both crustal and sample ages are known show that Te is given approximately by the depth to the 450° oceanic isotherm, based on plate cooling models. By comparing observed bathymetry and gravity anomalies to predictions based on simple elastic plate models it is possible to estimate Te and hence the age of oceanic lithosphere at the time of loading at bathymetric features of unknown tectonic setting. Early results based on ~100 features suggested that Hess Rise, Necker ridge, Line Islands, and Manihiki Plateaus formed on-ridge and, hence, that there was a major period of volcanism in the central Pacific ~90- 120 Ma. This 'event' appears to have been accompanied by deep-water volcanism, as shown by the pioneering work of Roger L. Larson in the Nauru Basin. Recently, Watts et al. (2006) used a bathymetric prediction technique to estimate the Te at >9000 seamounts in the Wessel (2001) database. Plots of Te Vs. age at features of known age, however, revealed considerable scatter with many lower values at old ages than expected. Te maps show that these low values form a broad swath from East Pacific Rise crest in the SE, through the Tuamotu Plateau region, to the Line and Marshall Islands and Mid-Pacific Mountains in the NW. The SE end of the swath includes the region dubbed the South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA) and some features (e.g. Marcus Wake Guyots, Lines Islands) at the NW end backtrack into the SOPITA. Therefore, some of the scatter maybe caused by a regional shallowing of the controlling isotherm. This has been verified using a moving window admittance technique which suggest controlling isotherms of <~350° as the SOPITA region is approached. These new constraints on the controlling isotherms are used here to estimate the distribution of submarine volcanism in the Mesozoic Pacific Ocean through time.

  18. Transient Changes in Bacterioplankton Communities Induced by the Submarine Volcanic Eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Isabel; Arístegui, Javier; González, José M.; Montero, María F.; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Gasol, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    The submarine volcanic eruption occurring near El Hierro (Canary Islands) in October 2011 provided a unique opportunity to determine the effects of such events on the microbial populations of the surrounding waters. The birth of a new underwater volcano produced a large plume of vent material detectable from space that led to abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of the water column. We combined flow cytometry and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons (V1–V3 regions for Bacteria and V3–V5 for Archaea) to monitor the area around the volcano through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases (November 2011 to April 2012). Flow cytometric analyses revealed higher abundance and relative activity (expressed as a percentage of high-nucleic acid content cells) of heterotrophic prokaryotes during the eruptive process as compared to post-eruptive stages. Changes observed in populations detectable by flow cytometry were more evident at depths closer to the volcano (~70–200 m), coinciding also with oxygen depletion. Alpha-diversity analyses revealed that species richness (Chao1 index) decreased during the eruptive phase; however, no dramatic changes in community composition were observed. The most abundant taxa during the eruptive phase were similar to those in the post-eruptive stages and to those typically prevalent in oceanic bacterioplankton communities (i.e. the alphaproteobacterial SAR11 group, the Flavobacteriia class of the Bacteroidetes and certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria). Yet, although at low abundance, we also detected the presence of taxa not typically found in bacterioplankton communities such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and members of the candidate division ZB3, particularly during the eruptive stage. These groups are often associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vents or sulfur-rich springs. Both cytometric and sequence analyses showed that once the eruption ceased, evidences of the volcano-induced changes were no longer observed. PMID:25671714

  19. Transient changes in bacterioplankton communities induced by the submarine volcanic eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Isabel; Arístegui, Javier; González, José M; Montero, María F; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Gasol, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    The submarine volcanic eruption occurring near El Hierro (Canary Islands) in October 2011 provided a unique opportunity to determine the effects of such events on the microbial populations of the surrounding waters. The birth of a new underwater volcano produced a large plume of vent material detectable from space that led to abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of the water column. We combined flow cytometry and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons (V1-V3 regions for Bacteria and V3-V5 for Archaea) to monitor the area around the volcano through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases (November 2011 to April 2012). Flow cytometric analyses revealed higher abundance and relative activity (expressed as a percentage of high-nucleic acid content cells) of heterotrophic prokaryotes during the eruptive process as compared to post-eruptive stages. Changes observed in populations detectable by flow cytometry were more evident at depths closer to the volcano (~70-200 m), coinciding also with oxygen depletion. Alpha-diversity analyses revealed that species richness (Chao1 index) decreased during the eruptive phase; however, no dramatic changes in community composition were observed. The most abundant taxa during the eruptive phase were similar to those in the post-eruptive stages and to those typically prevalent in oceanic bacterioplankton communities (i.e. the alphaproteobacterial SAR11 group, the Flavobacteriia class of the Bacteroidetes and certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria). Yet, although at low abundance, we also detected the presence of taxa not typically found in bacterioplankton communities such as the Epsilonproteobacteria and members of the candidate division ZB3, particularly during the eruptive stage. These groups are often associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vents or sulfur-rich springs. Both cytometric and sequence analyses showed that once the eruption ceased, evidences of the volcano-induced changes were no longer observed. PMID:25671714

  20. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  1. Psychiatric aspects of adaptation to long submarine missions.

    PubMed

    Weybrew, B B; Noddin, E M

    1979-06-01

    The case histories of 261 submarines disqualified psychiatrically for further submarine duty revealed that the major symptomatology was emotional in nature, with character pathology second in frequency. The latter pathology resulted in disqualification much earlier than the former, a fact indicative of effective neurotic defenses. The submariners who show these slow-developing neurotic symptoms appear to be reacting maladaptively to the stresses of the 60-d submarine patrols. Some etiological factors appear to be related to the role of man occupies within the crew, to the nature of the mission itself and, perhaps, to the length of the submarine patrols. PMID:475704

  2. Deformation time series at Llaima volcano, southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, Hannes; Walter, Thomas; Motagh, Mahdi; Shirzaei, Manoochehr

    2010-05-01

    Llaima volcano, with an edifice height of 3125 m and a volume of about 400 km³, is one of the largest and most active volcanoes in South America. Its eruptive history suggest a potential for very large and hazardous eruptions including pyroclastic flows, air falls and material remobilization in the form of lahars affecting regions even at the lower apron and beyond, posing a significant risk to civilizations, infrastructure and traffic ways. Llaima volcano is near constantly active; since the 17th century strombolian eruptions occurred at a mean frequency of one eruptive phase every five years. Although this strong activity and socioeconomic importance the source of magma, possible magma reservoirs and deformations prior to or associated with eruptions are hitherto unknown. One of the problems for establishing a monitoring system is that Llaima is difficult to access and located in vegetated and topographically rough terrain. To better understand the volcano physics, we created an InSAR time series based on the PS technique using 18 Envisat images from Dezember 2002 to November 2008. Using the StaMPS software we obtained 24,000 stable pixels in the vicinity of the volcano, that allow to investigate a spatiotemporal displacement field. Associated with the recent eruptions, we observed non-linear subsidence at the vicinity of the volcano base. We assessed the validiy of the deformation signal, using statistical tests and discussed the possible influence of athmospheric and topographic errors. To investigate the cause of the observed spatiotemporal deformation we employed an inverse source modelling approach, and simulated the dislocation source as an analytical pressurized spherical model. The inverted source can reproduce the observed deformation and allows to constrain the location of the magma reservoir under Llaima. Moreover we observed a signal might be associated to a slow landslide at the eastern flank of the volcano between December 2007 and Januar 2008. In this presentation we will give the detail of data processing, modelling and interpretation.

  3. Magmatically Greedy Reararc Volcanoes of the N. Tofua Segment of the Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Arculus, R. J.; Lupton, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanism along the northernmost Tofua Arc is enigmatic because edifices of the arc's volcanic front are mostly, magmatically relatively anemic, despite the very high convergence rate of the Pacific Plate with this section of Tonga Arc. However, just westward of the arc front, in terrain generally thought of as part of the adjacent NE Lau Backarc Basin, lie a series of very active volcanoes and volcanic features, including the large submarine caldera Niuatahi (aka volcano 'O'), a large composite dacite lava flow terrain not obviously associated with any particular volcanic edifice, and the Mata volcano group, a series of 9 small elongate volcanoes in an extensional basin at the extreme NE corner of the Lau Basin. These three volcanic terrains do not sit on arc-perpendicular cross chains. Collectively, these volcanic features appear to be receiving a large proportion of the magma flux from the sub-Tonga/Lau mantle wedge, in effect 'stealing' this magma flux from the arc front. A second occurrence of such magma 'capture' from the arc front occurs in an area just to the south, on southernmost portion of the Fonualei Spreading Center. Erupted compositions at these 'magmatically greedy' volcanoes are consistent with high slab-derived fluid input into the wedge (particularly trace element abundances and volatile contents, e.g., see Lupton abstract this session). It is unclear how long-lived a feature this is, but the very presence of such hyperactive and areally-dispersed volcanism behind the arc front implies these volcanoes are not in fact part of any focused spreading/rifting in the Lau Backarc Basin, and should be thought of as 'reararc volcanoes'. Possible tectonic factors contributing to this unusually productive reararc environment are the high rate of convergence, the cold slab, the highly disorganized extension in the adjacent backarc, and the tear in the subducting plate just north of the Tofua Arc.

  4. Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcano's existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations ofColombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companiesfor the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtange-legenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency,Agenzia SpazialeItaliana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft undRaumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science,operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  5. First Use of an Autonomous Glider for Exploring Submarine Volcanism in the SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Embley, R. W.; Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Stalin, S.; Meinig, C.

    2010-12-01

    A 1000-m Slocum glider® (Teledyne Webb Research Corporation) with CTD, turbidity, and hydrophone sensors was operated for two days in the Northeast Lau Basin. The survey was conducted near West Mata Volcano, where in November of 2008 the NOAA PMEL Vents program observed an active eruption at its 1207 m summit—the deepest submarine activity ever before witnessed. Our goal was to use the glider as a forensic tool to search for other nearby eruption sites with onboard sensors that detect the chemical and hydroacoustic signatures associated with the volcanic and hydrothermal plumes. The glider was launched approximately 40 km to the west of West Mata. It flew toward West Mata and was recovered near the summit of the volcano after repeating 13 yos during a 41-hour mission. Although the recordings were affected by mechanical noise from the glider’s rudder, the data demonstrate that the system can detect the wide-band noises (>1 kHz) associated with submarine volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity. The glider recorded complex acoustic amplitudes due to the multiple raypaths from West Mata as well as temporal variations in the volcano’s rate of activity, and demonstrated that these geologic processes contribute to the region’s high ambient noise levels. With the exception of the deployment and recovery, the mission was managed entirely by the shore teams in PMEL (Seattle, WA) and OSU labs (Newport, OR), ~5000 miles away without an engineer onboard. The dive cycle of the 950-m dives was ~3.5 hours and the average speed was ~0.27 cm/s. The CTD data were downloaded at every surface cycle and appeared to be of high quality. However we found that the sensitivity of the Wetlabs ECO flntu turbidity sensor was not adequate for the detection of volcanic plumes. The mission demonstrated PMEL’s ability to use autonomous gliders to monitor a variety of environmental parameters including ambient sound levels, temperature, salinity and turbidity for the purpose of finding subsea volcanism. Our plan is to add a more sensitive turbidity sensor and design a near realtime interface between the NOAA’s acoustic system and glider.

  6. Volcano-Ice Interactions During Recent Eruptions of Aleutian Arc Volcanoes and Implications for Melt Water Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    Recent eruptions in Alaska (Redoubt 2009; Pavlof 2007, 2013; Veniaminof 2013) all involved ice eruptive-product interactions that led to variable amounts of melt water generation. Production of melt water during explosive eruptions is the primary mechanism for lahar generation, which is a significant and sometimes-deadly hazard at snow and ice clad volcanoes. During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, pyroclastic flows produced by explosive destruction of lava domes swept across and eroded glacier ice and generated large quantities of melt water that formed correspondingly large lahars (107-109 m3) in the Drift River valley north of the volcano. Three of the twenty lahars generated during the eruption were large enough to threaten an oil storage facility 40 km from the volcano. During eruptions of Pavlof Volcano in 2007 and 2013 spatter-fed lava flows and minor pyroclastic flows descended over snow and ice on the upper flanks of the volcano and produced some melt water that generated lahars in the associated drainages. These lahars were smaller than those associated with the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano because the melt water generation mechanism was different. At Veniaminof Volcano, a low-level eruption beginning in June 2013 produced small lava flows that flowed passively over glacier ice and produced only limited amounts of melt water. Although melt pits surrounding the lava flows eventually developed, the rate of melt water production was gradual and no significant outflows of water occurred. These eruptions and comparison with past events highlight the various mechanisms for melt water production during eruptive activity at snow and ice clad Alaskan volcanoes. Dynamic emplacement of eruptive products over glacier ice that involves significant erosion of ice and snow leads to production of large volumes of melt water. Less dynamic, but still energetic interactions such as those that have occurred at Pavlof Volcano, produce smaller amounts of melt and correspondingly smaller volume lahars whose distribution is controlled in part by changes in the location of the summit vent. Effusive, subaerial eruptions at Veniaminof Volcano result in the smallest amount of meltwater production, mainly because the lava-ice interaction is not very dynamic and only a small proportion of the heat flux goes to melt ice.

  7. THE SUBMARINE REVIEW FIXED SONAR SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    THE SUBMARINE REVIEW 1 APRIL 2011 FIXED SONAR SYSTEMS THE HISTORY AND FUTURE OF THE UNDEWATER is the detection of submerged vessels approaching our shores. Since World War I, sonar has been used with varying consuming. A method was sought that could provide the detection capability of sonar without the prohibitive

  8. Exploration models for submarine slope sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Slatt, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    Recent published studies have demonstrated a far greater potential than previously recognized for submarine slope sandstones to contain significant oil and gas reserves in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere. Comparison of modern slopes with outcrop and subsurface analogs from several areas provided the framework for developing the following submarine slope sandstone exploration models: submarine canyon fill, slope gully/channel fill, slope spillover sand sheets, and intraslope basin fill. Submarine canyon fill is mainly shale, but sandstone beds that form stratigraphic traps may be present. Canyon shale fill juxtaposed against older sandstones can also form stratigraphic traps. Gully/channel fills are sandstones deposited on shallow-gradient slopes or ramps. The proximity of these sandstones to slope shales provides opportunities for stratigraphic traps to develop. Spillover sand sheets are resedimented from a shelf to a shallow-gradient slope and are associated with gully/channel fills. Intraslope basin fill is mainly shale, but elongate, sheetlike, or fan-shaped turbidite sandstones can provide stratigraphic traps. In all of these deposits, slope shales may be sufficiently enriched in organic carbon to be potential hydrocarbon source rocks; the potential for organic-rich shales to accumulate is highest in intraslope basin fill.

  9. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  10. Numerical simulations of tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2014-02-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world provoke the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami run-ups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of the Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, the Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  11. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-11-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  12. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such determinations rely on studies of pieces of deep oceanic crust uplifted by tectonic forces such as along the Southwest Indian Ridge, or more complete sections of oceanic crust called ophiolite sequences which are presently exposed on continents owing to tectonic emplacement. Much of what is thought to happen in submarine hydrothermal systems is inferred from studies of ophiolite sequences, and especially from the better-exposed ophiolites in Oman, Cyprus and North America. The focus of much that follows is on a few general features: pressure, temperature, oxidation states, fluid composition and mineral alteration, because these features will control whether organic synthesis can occur in hydrothermal systems.

  13. Phase 1 Final Report: Titan Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Paul, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design of a submarine for Saturn's moon Titan was a funded NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase 1 for 2014. The proposal stated the desire to investigate what science a submarine for Titan's liquid hydrocarbon seas might accomplish and what that submarine might look like. Focusing on a flagship class science system (100 kg), it was found that a submersible platform can accomplish extensive science both above and below the surface of the Kraken Mare. Submerged science includes mapping using side-looking sonar, imaging and spectroscopy of the lake, as well as sampling of the lake's bottom and shallow shoreline. While surfaced, the submarine will not only sense weather conditions (including the interaction between the liquid and atmosphere) but also image the shoreline, as much as 2 km inland. This imaging requirement pushed the landing date to Titan's next summer period (2047) to allow for lighted conditions, as well as direct-to-Earth communication, avoiding the need for a separate relay orbiter spacecraft. Submerged and surfaced investigation are key to understanding both the hydrological cycle of Titan as well as gather hints to how life may have begun on Earth using liquid, sediment, and chemical interactions. An estimated 25 Mb of data per day would be generated by the various science packages. Most of the science packages (electronics at least) can be safely kept inside the submarine pressure vessel and warmed by the isotope power system.The baseline 90-day mission would be to sail submerged and surfaced around and through Kraken Mare investigating the shoreline and inlets to evaluate the sedimentary interaction both on the surface and then below. Depths of Kraken have yet to be sensed (Ligeia to the north is thought to be 200 m (656 ft) deep), but a maximum depth of 1,000 m (3,281 ft) for Kraken Mare was assumed for the design). The sub would spend 20 d at the interface between Kraken Mare and Ligeia Mare for clues to the drainage of liquid methane into the currently predicted predominantly ethane Kraken Mare. During an extended ninety-day mission, it would transit the throat of Kraken (now Seldon Fretum) and perform similar explorations in other areas of Kraken Mare. Once this half year of exploration is completed the submarine could be tasked to revisit points of interest and perhaps do a complete sonar mapping of the seas. All in all, the submarine could explore over 3,000 km (1,864 mi) in its primary mission at an average speed of 0.3 meters per second.

  14. Geological background and geodynamic mechanism of Mt. Changbai volcanoes on the China-Korea border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-qi; Chen, Shuang-shuang; Guo, Zheng-fu; Guo, Wen-feng; He, Huai-yu; You, Hai-tao; Kim, Hang-min; Sung, Gun-ho; Kim, Haenam

    2015-11-01

    The intense Cenozoic volcanism of Mt. Changbai provides a natural laboratory for investigating the characteristics of volcanism and the dynamical evolution of the Northeast Asian continental margin. Mt. Changbai volcanoes predominantly consist of Wangtian'e volcano in China, Tianchi volcano spanning China and DPR Korea, and Namphothe volcano in DPR Korea. Geochronology data and historical records of volcanism indicate that the three eruption centers were formed in the following sequence: Wangtian'e volcano to Namphothe and Tianchi volcano, advancing temporally and spatially from southwest to northeast. The three eruption centers of Mt. Changbai volcano are located close together, have similar magma evolution trends, bimodal volcanic rock distribution, and an enriched mantle source, etc. Although the Cenozoic volcanism in Mt. Changbai is thought to be somewhat related to the subduction of the Western Pacific Plate, the regularity of volcanic activity and petrography characteristics have continental rift affinity. We therefore conclude that the occurrence of synchronous and similar volcanic activity on both sides of the Japan Sea (i.e., the Japan Arc and Northeast China) likely respond to the rift expansion and the back-arc spreading of Japan Sea. From many perspectives, Mt. Changbai volcano is a giant active volcano with hidden potentially eruptive risks.

  15. Cataloging tremor at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.; Wech, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tremor is a ubiquitous seismic feature on Kilauea volcano, which emanates from at least three distinct sources. At depth, intermittent tremor and earthquakes thought to be associated with the underlying plumbing system of Kilauea (Aki and Koyanagi, 1981) occurs approximately 40 km below and 40 km SW of the summit. At the summit of the volcano, nearly continuous tremor is recorded close to a persistently degassing lava lake, which has been present since 2008. Much of this tremor is correlated with spattering at the lake surface, but tremor also occurs in the absence of spattering, and was observed at the summit of the volcano prior to the appearance of the lava lake, predominately in association with inflation/deflation events. The third known source of tremor is in the area of Pu`u `O`o, a vent that has been active since 1983. The exact source location and depth is poorly constrained for each of these sources. Consistently tracking the occurrence and location of tremor in these areas through time will improve our understanding of the plumbing geometry beneath Kilauea volcano and help identify precursory patterns in tremor leading to changes in eruptive activity. The continuous and emergent nature of tremor precludes the use of traditional earthquake techniques for automatic detection and location of seismicity. We implement the method of Wech and Creager (2008) to both detect and localize tremor seismicity in the three regions described above. The technique uses an envelope cross-correlation method in 5-minute windows that maximizes tremor signal coherency among seismic stations. The catalog is currently being built in near-realtime, with plans to extend the analysis to the past as time and continuous data availability permits. This automated detection and localization method has relatively poor depth constraints due to the construction of the envelope function. Nevertheless, the epicenters distinguish activity among the different source regions and serve as starting points for more sophisticated location techniques using cross-correlation and/or amplitude-based locations. The resulting timelines establish a quantitative baseline of behavior for each source to better understand and forecast Kilauea activity.

  16. The natural ocean acidification and fertilization event caused by the submarine eruption of El Hierro

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Casiano, J. M.; González-Dávila, M.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; de Armas, D.; González, A. G.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Escánez, J.

    2013-01-01

    The shallow submarine eruption which took place in October 10th 2011, 1.8?km south of the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands) allowed the study of the abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of seawater caused by volcanic discharges. In order to monitor the evolution of these changes, seven oceanographic surveys were carried out over six months (November 2011-April 2012) from the beginning of the eruptive stage to the post-eruptive phase. Here, we present dramatic changes in the water column chemistry including large decreases in pH, striking effects on the carbonate system, decreases in the oxygen concentrations and enrichment of Fe(II) and nutrients. Our findings highlight that the same volcano which was responsible for the creation of a highly corrosive environment, affecting marine biota, has also provided the nutrients required for the rapid recuperation of the marine ecosystem. PMID:23355953

  17. The natural ocean acidification and fertilization event caused by the submarine eruption of El Hierro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Casiano, J. M.; González-Dávila, M.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; de Armas, D.; González, A. G.; Domínguez-Yanes, J. F.; Escánez, J.

    2013-01-01

    The shallow submarine eruption which took place in October 10th 2011, 1.8 km south of the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands) allowed the study of the abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of seawater caused by volcanic discharges. In order to monitor the evolution of these changes, seven oceanographic surveys were carried out over six months (November 2011-April 2012) from the beginning of the eruptive stage to the post-eruptive phase. Here, we present dramatic changes in the water column chemistry including large decreases in pH, striking effects on the carbonate system, decreases in the oxygen concentrations and enrichment of Fe(II) and nutrients. Our findings highlight that the same volcano which was responsible for the creation of a highly corrosive environment, affecting marine biota, has also provided the nutrients required for the rapid recuperation of the marine ecosystem.

  18. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400?km2 raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  19. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption.

    PubMed

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J; White, James D L; Talling, Peter J; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km(2) raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  20. Hydrothermal mineralogy of core from geothermal drill holes at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Keith E.; Keith, Terry E.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrothermal mineralogy studies of specimens collected from nine geothermal drill holes suggest that, at the locations and depths drilled, past temperatures have been hottest (exceeding 300?C) near ring fractures on the south and west sides of Newberry Volcano.

  1. Space Radar Image of Teide Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Teide volcano on the island of Tenerife in the Canary Islands. The Canary Islands, part of Spain, are located in the eastern Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Morocco. Teide has erupted only once in the 20th Century, in 1909, but is considered a potentially threatening volcano due to its proximity to the city of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, shown in this image as the purple and white area on the lower right edge of the island. The summit crater of Teide, clearly visible in the left center of the image, contains lava flows of various ages and roughnesses that appear in shades of green and brown. Different vegetation zones, both natural and agricultural, are detected by the radar as areas of purple, green and yellow on the volcano's flanks. Scientists are using images such as this to understand the evolution of the structure of Teide, especially the formation of the summit caldera and the potential for collapse of the flanks. The volcano is one of 15 identified by scientists as potentially hazardous to local populations, as part of the international The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 11, 1994. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered at 28.3 degrees North latitude and 16.6 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The area shown measures 90 kilometers by 54.5 kilometers (55.8 miles by 33.8 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received.

  2. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  3. Preliminary Geologic Map of Mount Pagan Volcano, Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.; Sako, Maurice K.

    2006-01-01

    Pagan Island is the subaerial portion of two adjoining Quaternary stratovolcanoes near the middle of the active Mariana Arc, [FAT1]north of Saipan. Pagan and the other volcanic islands that constitute part of the Arc form the northern half of the East Mariana Ridge[FAT2], which extends about 2-4 km above the ocean floor. The > 6-km-deep Mariana Trench adjoins the East Mariana Ridge on the east, and the Mariana Trough, partly filled with young lava flows and volcaniclastic sediment, lies on the west of the Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge. The submarine West Mariana Ridge, Tertiary in age, bounds the western side of the Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trench and Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge) overlie an active subduction zone where the Pacific Plate, moving northwest at about 10.3 cm/year, is passing beneath the Philippine Plate, moving west-northwest at 6.8 cm/year. Beneath the Northern Mariana Islands, earthquake hypocenters at depths of 50-250 km identify the location of the west-dipping subduction zone, which farther west becomes nearly vertical and extends to 700 km depth. During the past century, more than 40 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-8.1 have shaken the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Islands form two sub-parallel, concentric, concave-west arcs. The southern islands comprise the outer arc and extend north from Guam to Farallon de Medinilla. They consist of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks and uplifted Tertiary and Quaternary limestone. The nine northern islands extend from Anatahan to Farallon de Pajaros and form part of the inner arc. The active inner arc extends south from Anatahan, where volcanoes, some of which are active, form seamounts west of the older outer arc. Other volcanic seamounts of the active arc surmount the East Mariana Ridge in the vicinity of Anatahan and Sarigan and north and south of Farallon de Pajaros. Six volcanoes (Farallon de Pajaros, Asuncion, Agrigan, Mount Pagan, Guguan, and Anatahan) in the northern islands have erupted during the past century, and Ruby Seamount erupted in 1996.

  4. Microbial Communities in Erupting Fluids from West Mata Volcano, Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Cantin, H.; Resing, J.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Eruptions provide unique opportunities for sampling the subseafloor microbial habitat due to the release of crustal fluids and microbes into the overlying water column via plumes and new diffuse vents. Work at mid-ocean ridges show that as post-eruption fluids evolve chemically, the subseafloor microbial communities also experience shifts in population structure and diversity. Timely sampling of plume and venting fluids is critical to understanding the microbial response to active volcanic eruptions, as well as resolving the relationship between stability and diversity. In response to eruption indicators observed in the water column during a November 2008 NOAA PMEL cruise, a multidisciplinary expedition funded by NSF and NOAA was mounted in May 2009 with the ROV Jason 2 to survey and observe eruption-related processes at West Mata volcano and the Northeast Lau Spreading Center (NELSC). While eruptive activity was not found at NELSC, explosive and effusive activity was found at W. Mata, located about 200 km southwest of Samoa at a depth of 1200 m. Diffuse venting and eruptive plumes were observed around the summit, and fluids were collected for cell counts, culturing, and DNA- and RNA-based analyses. Despite many vents having a pH of less than 3, all diffuse fluids contained cell concentrations elevated above background seawater, with large clumps of cells and filaments often present. Positive enrichments of anaerobic microbes, including thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, were obtained from a variety of vent and plume samples at 37, 55, 70, and 85 degrees Celsius. DNA- and RNA-based 16S rRNA clone libraries were built from all vent and plume samples. Results indicate that all sites are dominated by bacteria, but at relatively low diversity compared to other diffuse vent sites studied to date, suggesting that the microbial community may be at the early stages of development. Similar to other diffuse vents, most fluids hosted members of the mesophilic sulfur-oxidizing epsilon- and gamma- proteobacteria, although some putatively thermophilic bacteria were also recovered. The dominant genera found, Sulfurimonas spp., is also found at recently erupted fluids at NW Rota-1, a volcano of the Mariana Arc. A comparison of active (RNA-based) bacteria versus total bacteria (DNA-based) is on-going and indicates that many members of the bacterial community are active in the sampled fluids. All microbial data will be presented along with geochemical data to provide further insight into submarine volcanic-hosted ecosystems.

  5. What can we learn about the history of oceanic shield volcanoes from deep marine sediments? Example from La Reunion volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelery, Patrick; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jorry, Stephan; Mazuel, Aude

    2014-05-01

    The discovery in 2006, during the oceanographic survey FOREVER, of large volcaniclastic sedimentary systems off La Réunion Island (western Indian ocean) revealed a new image of the evolution of oceanic shield volcanoes and their dismantling. Marine data obtained from 2006 to 2011 during the oceanographic surveys ERODER 1 to ERODER 4 included bathymetry, acoustic imagery, echosounding profiles, dredging and coring. Six major turbidite systems were mapped and described on the submarine flanks of La Reunion volcanic edifice and the surrounding oceanic plate. The interpretation of sediment cores enable us to characterise the processes of gravity-driven sediment transfer from land to deep sea and also to revisit the history of the volcanoes of La Réunion Island. Turbidite systems constitute a major component of the transfer of volcanic materials to the abyssal plain (Saint-Ange et al., 2011; 2013; Sisavath et al., 2011; 2012; Babonneau et al., 2013). These systems are superimposed on other dismantling processes (slow deformation such as gravity sliding or spreading, and huge landslides causing debris avalanches). Turbidite systems mainly develop in connection with the hydrographic network of the island, and especially at the mouths of large rivers. They show varying degrees of maturity, with canyons incising the submarine slope of the island and feeding depositional areas, channels and lobes extending over 150 km from the coast. The cores collected in turbidite systems show successions of thin and thick turbidites alternating with hemipelagic sedimentation. Sedimentological and stratigraphic analysis of sediment cores yielded a chronology of submarine gravity events. First-order information was obtained on the explosive activity of these volcanoes by identifying tephra layers in the cores (glass shards and pumice). In addition, major events of the volcanic and tectonic history of the island can be identified and dated. In this contribution, we focus most attention on the southernmost turbidite system (St-Joseph system). Sedimentary records allow us to establish a link between two major landslides affecting the flanks of Piton de la Fournaise volcano and the triggering of major turbidity currents. Thus, the age of these events could be obtained; their chronology being far too difficult to establish otherwise. In short: a beautiful example of the contribution of sedimentology to the study of the structural evolution of the volcanoes. References Babonneau N., Delacourt C., Cancouet R., Sisavath E., Bachelery P., Deschamps A., Mazuel A., Ammann J., Jorry S.J., Villeneuve N., 2013, Marine Geology, 346, 47-57. Saint-Ange F., Bachèlery P., Babonneau N., Michon, L., Jorry S.J., 2013, Marine Geology. 337, 35-52. Saint-Ange, F., Savoye, B., Michon, L., Bachelery, P., Deplus, C., De Voogd, B., Dyment, J., Le Drezen, E., Voisset, M., Le Friant, A., and Boudon, G., 2011. Geology, 39, 271-274, doi: 10.1130/G31478.1. Sisavath, E., Mazuel, A., Jorry, S., Babonneau, N., Bachèlery P., De Voogd, B., Salpin, M., Emmanuel, L., Beaufort, L., Toucanne, S., 2012, Sedimentary Geology, 281, p. 180-193, doi :10.1016/j.sedgeo.2012.09.010. Sisavath, E., Babonneau N., Saint-Ange F., Bachèlery P., Jorry S., Deplus C., De Voogd B., Savoye B., 2011, Marine Geology, v. 288, p. 1-17, doi:10.1016/j.margeo.2011.06.011.

  6. Volcano monitoring with an infrared camera: first insights from Villarrica Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Sotomayor, Florencia; Amigo Ramos, Alvaro; Velasquez Vargas, Gabriela; Medina, Roxana; Thomas, Helen; Prata, Fred; Geoffroy, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the first trials of the, almost 24/7 monitoring of Villarrica volcano with an infrared camera. Results must be compared with other SO2 remote sensing instruments such as DOAS and UV-camera, for the ''day'' measurements. Infrared remote sensing of volcanic emissions is a fast and safe method to obtain gas abundances in volcanic plumes, in particular when the access to the vent is difficult, during volcanic crisis and at night time. In recent years, a ground-based infrared camera (Nicair) has been developed by Nicarnica Aviation, which quantifies SO2 and ash on volcanic plumes, based on the infrared radiance at specific wavelengths through the application of filters. Three Nicair1 (first model) have been acquired by the Geological Survey of Chile in order to study degassing of active volcanoes. Several trials with the instruments have been performed in northern Chilean volcanoes, and have proven that the intervals of retrieved SO2 concentration and fluxes are as expected. Measurements were also performed at Villarrica volcano, and a location to install a ''fixed'' camera, at 8km from the crater, was discovered here. It is a coffee house with electrical power, wifi network, polite and committed owners and a full view of the volcano summit. The first measurements are being made and processed in order to have full day and week of SO2 emissions, analyze data transfer and storage, improve the remote control of the instrument and notebook in case of breakdown, web-cam/GoPro support, and the goal of the project: which is to implement a fixed station to monitor and study the Villarrica volcano with a Nicair1 integrating and comparing these results with other remote sensing instruments. This works also looks upon the strengthen of bonds with the community by developing teaching material and giving talks to communicate volcanic hazards and other geoscience topics to the people who live "just around the corner" from one of the most active volcanoes in Chile.

  7. Nyiragongo Volcano Erupts in the Congo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Nyiragongo, located in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, erupted today (January 17, 2002), ejecting a large cloud of smoke and ash high into the sky and spewing lava down three sides of the volcano. Mount Nyiragongo is located roughly 10 km (6 miles) north of the town of Goma, near the Congo's border with Rwanda. According to news reports, one river of lava is headed straight toward Goma, where international aid teams are evacuating residents. Already, the lava flows have burned through large swaths of the surrounding jungle and have destroyed dozens of homes. This false-color image was acquired today (January 17) by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) roughly 5 hours after the eruption began. Notice Mount Nyiragongo's large plume (bright white) can be seen streaming westward in this scene. The plume appears to be higher than the immediately adjacent clouds and so it is colder in temperature, making it easy for MODIS to distinguish the volcanic plume from the clouds by using image bands sensitive to thermal radiation. Images of the eruption using other band combinations are located on the MODIS Rapid Response System. Nyiragongo eruptions are extremely hazardous because the lava tends to be very fluid and travels down the slopes of the volcano quickly. Eruptions can be large and spectacular, and flows can reach up to 10s of kilometers from the volcano very quickly. Also, biomass burned from Nyriagongo, and nearby Mount Nyamuragira, eruptions tends to create clouds of smoke that adversely affect the Mountain Gorillas living in the adjacent mountain chain. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  8. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a <1500-m-thick sequence of mid-Pleistocene to recent, basaltic to dacitic pyroclastic-, block-and-ash- and lava-flow deposits built on Jurassic tonalite. Magma-ice contact features are common. A dissected earlier cone underlies the E flank of Redoubt. Alunite-bearing debris flows to the SE, E and N suggest multiple flank collapses over Redoubt's history. Most recent eruptions occurred in 1966-68, and 1989-90. In March 2009, Redoubt erupted to produce pyroclastic flows, voluminous lahars, and tephra that fell over large portions of south-central Alaska. Regional and local air traffic was significantly disrupted, Anchorage airport was closed for over 12 hours, and oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and produced ash plumes that reached 6-18 km asl. Tephra was deposited along variable azimuths including trace to minor amounts on Anchorage and Kenai Peninsula communities, and reached Fairbanks, ~800 km to the N. Several lahars were produced by explosive disruption and melting of the “Drift” glacier. The largest lahars followed explosions on March 23 and April 4 and inundated the Drift River valley to the coast, causing temporary evacuation of the Drift River Oil Terminal, ~40 km from the vent. Time-lapse images captured pyroclastic flows and lahars in the “Drift” glacier valley during several of the explosions. Ballistics and pyroclastic flow deposits were observed on the crater rim and upper glacier on the south flank. After April 4, the volcano moved into a non-explosive period of dome building. Lava dome growth was tracked by satellite and thermal imagery and photogrammetry from web-camera and overflight images. Between April 4-June 9, the extrusion rate ranged from 35 m3/sec to 4 m3/sec. Seismicity and volcanic gas emissions remained high during this period. Estimated dome volume in mid-June was 68 M m3. August data suggest no further dome growth.

  9. Oliver, M.J., M.A. Moline, I. Robbins, W. Fraser, D. Patterson, and O. Schofield. 2012. Letting penguins lead: Dynamic modeling of penguin locations guides autonomous robotic sampling.

    E-print Network

    with a submarine canyon that pro- vides a conduit for warm, nutrient-rich Upper circumpolar deep Water to stimulate be that while submarine canyons offer predictable prey populations, different foraging strategies may allow are near the submarine canyon (Figure 1a). We sampled historic penguin forag- ing locations according

  10. Long-term flow monitoring of submarine gas emanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, K.; Faber, E.; Poggenburg, J.; Seeger, C.

    2009-04-01

    One of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study is the sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is the possibility of leaks from the reservoirs. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. Technically, however, these systems are not limited to CO2 but can be used for monitoring of any free gas emission (bubbles) on the seafloor. The basic design of the gas flow sensor system was derived from former prototypes developed for monitoring CO2 and CH4 on mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan. This design was composed of a raft floating on the surface above the gas vent to collect the bubbles. Sensors for CO2 flux and concentration and electronics for data storage and transmission were mounted on the raft, together with battery-buffered solar panels for power supply. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, which is then guided above water level through a flexible tube. Besides some technical problems (condensed water in the tube, movement of the buoys due to waves leading to biased measurement of flow rates), this setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. To allow unattended long-term monitoring in a submarine environment, such a system has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system consists of gas collector, sensor head and pressure housing for electronics and power supply. The collector is a plastic funnel, enclosed in a stainless-steel frame to add weight and stability. The whole unit is fixed to the sediment by nails or sediment screws. The sensor head is equipped with an "inverted tipping-bucket" sensor, which basically works like a turned upside-down rain gauge. It fills with the collected gas until full, then empties completely and starts again, which allows the calculation of the flow rate by container volume and frequency of the cycle. This sensor type is very robust due to a design nearly without moving parts and suitable for very low to medium flow rates. For higher flow rates different sensor heads using turbine wheels or pressure differences can be used. The pressure housing for this prototype is made of aluminium and contains a Hobo Pendant data logger with integrated battery supply. Since this setup is inexpensive, it can be deployed in numbers to cover larger areas. By addition of multi-channel data loggers, data transmission by acoustic modem or cable, relay stations on the seafloor or buoys etc. the infrastructure can be adapted to the environmental setting and financial budget. Prototype tests under laboratory conditions as well as field tests on natural submarine gas vents as an analogue to leaking storage sites have demonstrated the capabilities and robustness of the systems.

  11. Aerial View of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists monitor Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth. In this 1985 aerial photo, Mauna Loa looms above K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera (left center) and nearly obscures Hual?lai in the far distance (upper right)....

  12. Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Bjorn Scheuermann

    E-print Network

    Mannheim, Universität

    Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades Bj¨orn Scheuermann Vortrag im Rahmen des Seminars Datenbanken, WS 03/04 Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.1/23 #12;Zielsetzung Entwicklung von ¨angig von konkretem Datenmodell Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.2/23 #12;Volcano

  13. The natural ocean acidification and fertilization event caused by the submarine eruption of El Hierro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Casiano, J.; Fraile-Nuez, E.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.

    2013-12-01

    The shallow submarine eruption which took place in October 10th 2011, 1.8 km south of the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands) allowed the study of the abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of seawater caused by volcanic discharges. In order to monitor the evolution of these changes, seven oceanographic surveys were carried out over six months (November 2011-April 2012) from the beginning of the eruptive stage to the post-eruptive phase. It was observed dramatic changes in the water column chemistry including large decreases in pH, striking effects on the carbonate system, decreases in the oxygen concentrations and enrichment of Fe(II) and nutrients. The findings highlight that the same volcano which was responsible for the creation of a highly corrosive environment, affecting marine biota, has also provided the nutrients required for the rapid recuperation of the marine ecosystem. In January 2013, a new project, the VULCANO project, was iniciated to study the post-eruptive phase in the submarine volcanic area.

  14. The natural ocean acidification and fertilization event caused by the submarine eruption of El Hierro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The shallow submarine eruption which took place in October 10th 2011, 1.8 km south of the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands) allowed the study of the abrupt changes in the physical-chemical properties of seawater caused by volcanic discharges. In order to monitor the evolution of these changes, seven oceanographic surveys were carried out over six months (November 2011-April 2012) from the beginning of the eruptive stage to the post-eruptive phase. Important changes in the water column chemistry including large decreases in pH, striking effects on the carbonate system, decreases in the oxygen concentrations and enrichment of Fe(II) and nutrients were produced. As a result of the ongoing magmatic activity, the submarine eruption produced an unprecedented episode of severe acidification and fertilization. The findings highlight that the same volcano which was responsible for the creation of a highly corrosive environment, affecting marine biota, has also provided the nutrients required for the rapid recuperation of the marine ecosystem.

  15. Submarine geology of South Kona landslide complex: investigation using ROV Kaiko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokose, H.; Yoshida, S.

    2002-12-01

    KR01-12 cruise of Japan Marine Science and Technology Center using ROV KAIKO and its mother ship R/V KAIREI were carried out around Hawaii islands in the early fall of 2001. During this cruise, two dives of ROV KAIKO were made on western submarine flank of the island of Hawaii: South Kona landslide complex (K210:proximal part of the south Kona landslide, K211: distal block of the landslide). One single channel seismic reflection line was collected from vicinity of the above dive sites. These areas have never been systematically studied using submersible due to the bad sea state and /or the depth of outcrops. Valuable information about the submarine geology and in situ rock samples from western franks of the island of Hawaii were obtained. K211 site is one of the distal landslide block and can be divided into 3 geological units from bottom to top: picritic sheet lava and hyaloclastite, volcaniclastic deposit with picritic breccia, muddy breccia with highly vesiculated ol basalt. On the other hand, rocks recovered from K210 are composed mainly of aa clinker and aa lava which are highly vesiculated and reddish in color. The rocks from K210 is similar to the upper part of K211 in their bulk rock chemistry. Based on the geological and bulk rock chemistry, rocks recovered from both sites should be erupted subaerially. It suggests that these landslide blocks were composed subaerial portion of the paleo-Mauna Loa volcano.

  16. Methane anomalies in seawater above the Loihi submarine summit area, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Gamo, Toshitaka; Ishibashi, Junichiro; Sakai, Hitoshi ); Tilbrook, B. )

    1987-10-01

    Hydrothermal activity above Loihi submarine volcano was characterized by water column distributions of methane, pH and helium-3. It was found that the southern Loihi summit is almost covered with hydrothermal plumes, which have anomalously high concentrations of methane (maximum: 569 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3} kg{sup {minus}}1) accompanied by high concentrations of helium-3 and low pH values (minimum: 7.18). The plumes consist of two layers: a shallow plume (about 200 m above the summit) and a deep plume (about 100 m above the summit), probably derived from different hydrothermal vents. The shallow and deep plumes showed different CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He and CH{sub 4}/pH ratios with the same {sup 3}He/pH ratio, which implies that methane concentrations differ between the hydrothermal end members for the two plumes. The variation of methane between the end members is suggested to result from inter-vent inhomogeneity of bacterial activities that consume or produce methane within the vents. Comparison of the CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He ratios of the two plumes with the previous data for Loihi and other submarine hydrothermal areas confirms that the Loihi hotspot has one to two orders of magnitude smaller CH{sub 4}/{sup 3}He value than those of the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos spreading centers.

  17. Small-scale volcanoes on Mars: distribution and types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Petr; Hauber, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes differ in sizes, as does the amount of magma which ascends to a planetary surface. On Earth, the size of volcanoes is anti-correlated with their frequency, i.e. small volcanoes are much more numerous than large ones. The most common terrestrial volcanoes are scoria cones (volcano size might be expected. Martian small-scale volcanoes were not intensely studied for a long time due to a lack of high-resolution data enabling their proper identification; however their existence and basic characteristics were predicted on theoretical grounds. Streams of new high-resolution images now enable discovering and studying kilometer-size volcanoes with various shapes in unprecedented detail. Several types of small-scale volcanoes in various regions on Mars were recently described. Scoria cones provide a record of magmatic volatile content and have been identified in Tharsis (Ulysses Colles), on flanks of large volcanoes (e.g., Pavonis Mons), in the caldera of Ulysses Patera, in chaotic terrains or other large depressions (Hydraotes Colles, Coprates Chasma) and in the northern lowlands. Tuff rings and tuff cones, formed as a result of water-magma interaction, seem to be relatively rare on Mars and were only tentatively identified in three locations (Nepenthes/Amenthes region, Arena Colles and inside Lederberg crater), and alternative interpretations (mud volcanoes) seem possible. Other relatively rare volcanoes seem to be lava domes, reported only from two regions (Acracida Planitia and Terra Sirenum). On the other hand, small shields and rootless cones (which are not primary volcanic landforms) represent widely spread phenomena recognized in Tharsis and Elysium. Based on these new observations, the distribution of small volcanoes on Mars seems to be much more widespread than anticipated a decade ago. There are sometimes significant differences in the final morphologies between Martian hypothesized and possible terrestrial analogs, despite fact that the physical processes behind volcano formation should be similar on both planets. For example, Martian scoria cones are ~2.6 times wider than terrestrial analogues, as lower gravity and atmospheric pressure enable wider dispersion of pyroclasts from the vent. In addition, exit velocities of ejected particles should be increased on Mars because the lower atmospheric pressure favors more rapid exsolution of dissolved gases from the magma, which also favors a wider dispersion of ejected particles. Therefore, care must be taken when applying terrestrial morphometric relationships to the interpretation of hypothesized volcanic features on Mars and other terrestrial bodies. As on Earth, small-scale volcanoes on Mars display diverse shapes and hence provide insight into diverse volcanic processes responsible for such variations. Those diverse processes may point to various mechanisms of magma ascent and eruption styles in dependency on magma properties (e.g., amount of volatiles) and the paleo-environment at the time of formation. Hence the investigation of small-scale volcanoes provides useful tool enabling us to deepen our knowledge about the variety and richness of volcanism on Mars.

  18. Post-eruptive morphological evolution of island volcanoes: Surtsey as a modern case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romagnoli, C.; Jakobsson, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Surtsey is a small volcanic island in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, off the south coast of Iceland. The eruption leading to the island's emersion lasted for 3.5 yr (1963-1967) while destructive forces have been active for over 50 yr (1963-present-day) during which Surtsey has suffered rapid subaerial and submarine erosion and undergone major morphological changes. Surtsey is a well-documented modern example of the post-eruptive degradational stage of island volcanoes, and has provided the unique opportunity to continuously observe and quantify the effects of intense geomorphic processes. In this paper we focus on coastal and marine processes re-shaping the shoreline and shallow-water portions of the Surtsey complex since its formation and on the related geomorphological record. Analogies with the post-eruptive morphological evolution of recently active island volcanoes at the emerging stage, encompassing different climatic conditions, wave regimes and geological contexts, are discussed.

  19. Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 1111

    E-print Network

    Rose, William I.

    Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 11111 Open-File Report 01­431Open-File Report 01

  20. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2010-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2009, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 8,829 earthquakes, of which 7,438 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. Monitoring highlights in 2009 include the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, as well as unrest at Okmok Caldera, Shishaldin Volcano, and Mount Veniaminof. Additionally severe seismograph subnetwork outages resulted in four volcanoes (Aniakchak, Fourpeaked, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being removed from the formal list of monitored volcanoes in late 2009. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2009; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2009; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2009, and a dataless SEED volume for the AVO seismograph network.

  1. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  2. Hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines): Implications to volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.; Alanis, P. B.; Yamaya, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Bornas, M. V.; Cordon, J. M.; Puertollano, J.; Clarito, C. J.; Hashimoto, T.; Mogi, T.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The first recorded eruption was in 1573. Since then it has erupted 33 times resulting in thousands of casualties and large damages to property. In 1995, it was declared as one of the 15 Decade Volcanoes. Beginning in the early 1990s it has experienced several phases of abnormal activity, including seismic swarms, episodes of ground deformation, ground fissuring and hydrothermal activities, which continues up to the present. However, it has been noted that past historical eruptions of Taal Volcano may be divided into 2 distinct cycles, depending on the location of the eruption center, either at Main Crater or at the flanks. Between 1572-1645, eruptions occurred at the Main Crater, in 1707 to 1731, they occurred at the flanks. In 1749, eruptions moved back to the Main Crater until 1911. During the 1965 and until the end of the 1977 eruptions, eruptive activity once again shifted to the flanks. As part of the PHIVOLCS-JICA-SATREPS Project magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric surveys were conducted on Volcano Island in March 2011 and March 2012. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion and 3-D forward modeling reveals a prominent and large zone of relatively high resistivity between 1 to 4 kilometers beneath the volcano almost directly beneath the Main Crater, surrounded by zones of relatively low resistivity. This anomalous zone of high resistivity is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir filled with volcanic fluids. The presence of this large hydrothermal reservoir could be related to past activities of Taal Volcano. In particular we believe that the catastrophic explosion described during the 1911 eruption was the result of the hydrothermal reservoir collapsing. During the cycle of Main Crater eruptions, this hydrothermal reservoir is depleted, while during a cycle of flank eruptions this reservoir is replenished with hydrothermal fluids.

  3. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  4. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  5. Imaging magma storage reservoirs beneath Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepp, G.; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Seats, K.; Ruiz, M. C.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean island volcanoes initiate and grow through repeated eruptions and intrusions of primarily basaltic magma that thicken the oceanic crust above melt production zones within the mantle. The movement of oceanic plates over the hot, melt-rich upwellings produces chains of progressively younger basaltic volcanoes, as in the Galapagos Islands. Rates of surface deformation along the chain of 7 active volcanoes in the western Galápagos are some of the most rapid in the world, yet little is known of the subsurface structure of the active volcanic systems. The 16-station SIGNET array deployed between July 2009 and June 2011 provides new insights into the time-averaged structure beneath Sierra Negra, Cerro Azul, and Alcedo volcanoes, and the ocean platform. We use wavespeed tomography to image volcanic island structure, with focus on the magmatic plumbing system beneath Sierra Negra volcano, which has a deep, ~10 km-wide caldera and last erupted in 2005. We compare our results to those of ambient noise tomography. Our 120 x 100 km grid has a variable mesh of 2.5 - 10 km. We have good resolution at depths between 3 and 15 km, with poorer resolution beneath Cerro Azul volcano. Events from Alcedo volcano, which is just outside our array, cause some N-S smearing. Results from wavespeed tomography provide insights into the major island building processes: accretion through extrusive magmatism, magma chamber geometry and depth, radial dike intrusions, and magmatic underplating/sill emplacement. The wide caldera of Sierra Negra is underlain by high velocity (~7 %) material from depths of 5 - 15, and the flanks correspond to low velocity material at all depths. A high velocity zone corresponds to Cerro Azul (~3%). Aligned chains of eruptive centers correlate with elongate high velocity zones, suggesting that radial dikes are the sites of repeated dike intrusions. These chains are preferentially located along ridges linking nearby volcanoes. A comparison of well-resolved zones with ambient noise tomography shows a close correlation between the shapes and depth distributions. An exception is Cerro Azul volcano, where ambient noise tomography images a low velocity zone at frequencies corresponding to shallow depths, whereas wavespeed tomography in the mid to lower crust shows a moderate high velocity zone. We suggest that the differences can be explained by poor resolution from the wavespeed tomography in the location of Cerro Azul and bias toward the shallow depths with slower velocities in the ambient noise tomography. The high-velocity zone beneath Sierra Negra is consistent with a large volume olivine-gabbro cumulate mush zone proposed from petrological studies.

  6. Nyiragongo Volcano before the Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano situated on the Eastern African Rift; it is part of Africa's Virunga Volcanic Chain. In a massive eruption that occurred on January 17, 2002, Nyiragongo sent a vast plume of smoke and ash skyward, and three swifly-moving rivers of lava streaming down its western and eastern flanks. Previous lava flows from Nyiragongo have been observed moving at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (60 kph). The lava flows from the January 17 eruption destroyed more than 14 villages in the surrounding countryside, forcing tens of thousands to flee into the neighboring country of Rwanda. Within one day the lava ran to the city of Goma, situated on the northern shore of Lake Kivu about 12 miles (19 km) south of Nyiragongo. The lava cut a 200 foot (60 meter) wide swath right through Goma, setting off many fires, as it ran into Lake Kivu. Goma, the most heavily populated city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to about 400,000 people. Most of these citizens were forced to flee, while many have begun to return to their homes only to find their homes destroyed. This true-color scene was captured by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite, on December 11, 2001, just over a month before the most recent eruption. Nyiragongo's large crater is clearly visible in the image. As recently as June 1994, there was a large lava lake in the volcano's crater which had since solidified. The larger Nyamuragira Volcano is located roughly 13 miles (21 km) to the north of Nyiragongo. Nyamuragira last erupted in February and March 2001. That eruption was also marked by columns of erupted ash and long fluid lava flows, some of which are apparent in the image as dark greyish swaths radiating away from Nyamuragira. Both peaks are also notorious for releasing large amounts of sulfur dioxide, which presents another health hazard to people and animals living in close proximity. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data supplied by the NASA GSFC Landsat 7 Science Team

  7. Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS (56.0N, 160.5E) is one of several active volcanoes in the CIS and is 15,584 ft. in elevation. Fresh ash fall on the south side of the caldera can be seen as a dirty smudge on the fresh snowfall. Just to the north of the Kamchatka River is Shiveluch, a volcano which had been active a short time previously. There are more than 100 volcanic edifices recognized on Kamchatka, 15 of which are still active.

  8. Gas hydrate accumulation at the Hakon Mosby Mud Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsburg, G.D.; Milkov, A.V.; Soloviev, V.A.; Egorov, A.V.; Cherkashev, G.A.; Vogt, P.R.; Crane, K.; Lorenson, T.D.; Khutorskoy, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Gas hydrate (GH) accumulation is characterized and modeled for the Hakon Mosby mud volcano, ca. 1.5 km across, located on the Norway-Barents-Svalbard margin. Pore water chemical and isotopic results based on shallow sediment cores as well as geothermal and geomorphological data suggest that the GH accumulation is of a concentric pattern controlled by and formed essentially from the ascending mud volcano fluid. The gas hydrate content of sediment peaks at 25% by volume, averaging about 1.2% throughout the accumulation. The amount of hydrate methane is estimated at ca. 108 m3 STP, which could account for about 1-10% of the gas that has escaped from the volcano since its origin.

  9. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ?2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge of El Hierro. These precursory signals have revealed important to improve and optimize the detection of early warning signals of volcanic unrest episodes at El Hierro.

  10. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Haney, Matthew M.; Parker, Tom; Searcy, Cheryl; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2012, the Alaska Volcano Observatory located 4,787 earthquakes, of which 4,211 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by a seismograph network. There was significant seismic activity at Iliamna, Kanaga, and Little Sitkin volcanoes in 2012. Instrumentation highlights for this year include the implementation of the Advanced National Seismic System Quake Monitoring System hardware and software in February 2012 and the continuation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work in the summer of 2012. The operational highlight was the removal of Mount Wrangell from the list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes hypocenters, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2012 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  11. Shallow S wave attenuation and actively degassing magma beneath Taal Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Lacson, Rudy; Maeda, Yuta; Figueroa, Melquiades S.; Yamashina, Tadashi

    2014-10-01

    Taal Volcano, Philippines, is one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes given its history of explosive eruptions and its close proximity to populated areas. A real-time broadband seismic network was recently deployed and has detected volcano-tectonic events beneath Taal. Our source location analysis of these volcano-tectonic events, using onset arrival times and high-frequency seismic amplitudes, points to the existence of a region of strong attenuation near the ground surface beneath the east flank of Volcano Island in Taal Lake. This region is beneath the active fumarolic area and above sources of pressure contributing inflation and deflation, and it coincides with a region of high electrical conductivity. The high-attenuation region matches that inferred from an active-seismic survey conducted at Taal in 1993. These features strongly suggest that the high-attenuation region represents an actively degassing magma body near the surface that has existed for more than 20 years.

  12. A wireless sensor network for monitoring volcano-seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Pereira, R.; Trindade, J.; Gonçalves, F.; Suresh, L.; Barbosa, D.; Vazão, T.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring of volcanic activity is important for learning about the properties of each volcano and for providing early warning systems to the population. Monitoring equipment can be expensive, and thus the degree of monitoring varies from volcano to volcano and from country to country, with many volcanoes not being monitored at all. This paper describes the development of a wireless sensor network (WSN) capable of collecting geophysical measurements on remote active volcanoes. Our main goals were to create a flexible, easy-to-deploy and easy-to-maintain, adaptable, low-cost WSN for temporary or permanent monitoring of seismic tremor. The WSN enables the easy installation of a sensor array in an area of tens of thousands of m2, allowing the location of the magma movements causing the seismic tremor to be calculated. This WSN can be used by recording data locally for later analysis or by continuously transmitting it in real time to a remote laboratory for real-time analyses. We present a set of tests that validate different aspects of our WSN, including a deployment on a suspended bridge for measuring its vibration.

  13. Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, M.L.; Malone, S.D.; Moran, S.C.; Thelen, W.A.; Vidale, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    The historical database of past disasters is a cornerstone of catastrophe risk assessment. Whereas disasters are fortunately comparatively rare, near-misses are quite common for both natural and man-made hazards. The word disaster originally means 'an unfavourable aspect of a star'. Except for astrologists, disasters are no longer perceived fatalistically as pre-determined. Nevertheless, to this day, historical disasters are treated statistically as fixed events, although in reality there is a large luck element involved in converting a near-miss crisis situation into a disaster statistic. It is possible to conceive a stochastic simulation of the past to explore the implications of this chance factor. Counterfactual history is the exercise of hypothesizing alternative paths of history from what actually happened. Exploring history from a counterfactual perspective is instructive for a variety of reasons. First, it is easy to be fooled by randomness and see regularity in event patterns which are illusory. The past is just one realization of a variety of possible evolutions of history, which may be analyzed through a stochastic simulation of an array of counterfactual scenarios. In any hazard context, there is a random component equivalent to dice being rolled to decide whether a near-miss becomes an actual disaster. The fact that there may be no observed disaster over a period of time may belie the occurrence of numerous near-misses. This may be illustrated using the simple dice paradigm. Suppose a dice is rolled every month for a year, and an event is recorded if a six is thrown. There is still an 11% chance of no events occurring during the year. A variety of perils may be used to illustrate the use of near-miss information within a counterfactual disaster analysis. In the domain of natural hazards, near-misses are a notable feature of the threat landscape. Storm surges are an obvious example. Sea defences may protect against most meteorological scenarios. However, if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  15. Submarine paleoseismology based on turbidite records.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Many of the largest earthquakes are generated at subduction zones or other plate boundary fault systems near enough to the coast that marine environments may record evidence of them. During and shortly after large earthquakes in the coastal and marine environments, a spectrum of evidence may be left behind, mirroring onshore paleoseismic evidence. Shaking or displacement of the seafloor can trigger processes such as turbidity currents, submarine landslides, tsunami (which may be recorded both onshore and offshore), and soft-sediment deformation. Marine sites may also share evidence of fault scarps, colluvial wedges, offset features, and liquefaction or fluid expulsion with their onshore counterparts. This article reviews the use of submarine turbidite deposits for paleoseismology, focuses on the dating and correlation techniques used to establish stratigraphic continuity of marine deposits, and outlines criteria for distinguishing earthquake deposits and the strategies used to acquire suitable samples and data for marine paleoseismology. PMID:21329198

  16. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Figure 1). The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents calculated earthquake hypocenters and seismic phase arrival data, and details changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2005. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at thirty-two volcanoes within Alaska in 2005 (Figure 1). The network was augmented by two new subnetworks to monitor the Semisopochnoi Island volcanoes and Little Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity at these volcanoes was still being studied at the end of 2005 and has not yet been added to the list of permanently monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. Following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at the Mount Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Korovin Volcano, formal monitoring of these volcanoes began in 2005. AVO located 9,012 earthquakes in 2005. Monitoring highlights in 2005 include: (1) seismicity at Mount Spurr remaining above background, starting in February 2004, through the end of the year and into 2006; (2) an increase in seismicity at Augustine Volcano starting in May 2005, and continuing through the end of the year into 2006; (3) volcanic tremor and seismicity related to low-level strombolian activity at Mount Veniaminof in January to March and September; and (4) a seismic swarm at Tanaga Volcano in October and November. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field in 2005; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2005; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2005.

  17. Attributes and origins of ancient submarine slides and filled embayments: Examples from the Gulf Coast basin

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Large submarine slides and associated shelf margin embayments represent an intermediate member in the continuum of unstable shelf margin features. On seismic profiles, they may resemble submarine canyons, but are different in their size, morphology, origin, and hydrocarbon exploration potential. Two large Neogene submarine slides, located in the northwestern Gulf Coast Basin, formed on the upper slope and flanks of prominent shelf-margin deltas. The basal detachment surface of each slide is a structural discontinuity that may be misinterpreted as an erosional unconformity and misidentified as a stratigraphic boundary separating depositional sequences. Regional stratigraphic correlations indicate that both slides were initiated after the continental platform was flooded. The condensed sections deposited during the rise in relative sea level contain the basal detachment surfaces. The relationships between the slides and sea level fluctuations are uncertain. The shelf-margin embayments created by the slides apparently were partly excavated during periods of lowered relative sea level and were filled during sea level rise and highstand. Eventually the preslide morphology of the shelf margin was restored by coalsced prograding deltas. Submarine slides exhibit landward dipping, wavy, mounded, and chaotic seismic reflection that are manifestations of slump blocks and other mass transport material. Composition of these internally derived slide deposits depends on th composition of the pre-existing shelf margin. Embayment fill above the slide consists mostly of externally derived mudstones and sandstones deposited by various disorganized slope processes, as well as more organized submarine channel-level systems. Thickest slope sandstones, which are potential hydrocarbon reservoirs, commonly occur above the basal slide mudstones where seismic reflections change from chaotic patterns to overlying wavy or subhorizontal reflections. 46 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. "Internal Waves" Advancing along Submarine Canyons.

    PubMed

    Shepard, F P; Marshall, N F; McLoughlin, P A

    1974-01-18

    Patterns of alternating up- and downcanyon currents have been traced along the axes of submarine canyons off California. The patterns arrive later at stations nearer the heads of coastal canyons. Where a canyon heads between two islands, the patterns advance down the axis. The propagation speeds of these patterns were estimated as 25 to 88 centimeters per second. Internal waves are the probable explanation. PMID:17777263

  19. Near-Seafloor Magnetic Exploration of Submarine Hydrothermal Systems in the Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, F.; de Ronde, C. E. J.; Tivey, M.; Kinsey, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic data can provide important information about hydrothermal systems because hydrothermal alteration can drastically reduce the magnetization of the host volcanic rocks. Near-seafloor data (?70 m altitude) are required to map hydrothermal systems in detail; Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are the ideal platform to provide this level of resolution. Here, we show the results of high-resolution magnetic surveys by the ABE and Sentry AUVs for selected submarine volcanoes of the Kermadec arc. 3-D magnetization models derived from the inversion of magnetic data, when combined with high resolution seafloor bathymetry derived from multibeam surveys, provide important constraints on the subseafloor geometry of hydrothermal upflow zones and the structural control on the development of seafloor hydrothermal vent sites as well as being a tool for the discovery of previously unknown hydrothermal sites. Significant differences exist between the magnetic expressions of hydrothermal sites at caldera volcanoes ("donut" pattern) and cones ("Swiss cheese" pattern), respectively. Subseafloor 3-D magnetization models also highlight structural differences between focused and diffuse vent sites.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in United States Navy submarine crews.

    PubMed

    Jackman, R P; Schlichting, C; Carr, W; Dubois, A

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is elevated in German submarine crews and in United States Navy (USN) surface fleet personnel, but H. pylori prevalence in USN submariners was unknown. The goal of the study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in the crews of USN nuclear submarines compared to other military personnel and to the general US population. The presence of H. pylori IgG antibodies was determined in serum samples using a commercial ELISA. Only 47 out of 451 submariners (9.4%) were H. pylori positive, which is similar to that of the US general population with a similar level of education. In contrast, H. pylori prevalence is significantly higher in US Army recruits (26%), USN surface fleet personnel (25%), and German diesel submariners (38%). These data demonstrate that submarine service (and by inference activity requiring isolation and close contact, per se) is not a risk factor for H. pylori infection. PMID:16194289

  1. Developing monitoring capability of a volcano observatory: the example of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.; Jolly, G. E.; Sherburn, S.; Scott, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Miller, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Vanuatu lies on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. With 6 active subaerial and 3 submarine (identified so far) volcanoes, monitoring and following up their activities is a considerable work for a national observatory. The Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory is a good example of what can be done from ‘scratch’ to develop a volcanic monitoring capability in a short space of time. A fire in June 2007 completely destroyed the old observatory building and many valuable records leaving Vanuatu with no volcano monitoring capacity. This situation forced the Government of Vanuatu to reconsider the structure of the hazards monitoring group and think about the best way to rebuild a complete volcano monitoring system. Taking the opportunity of the re-awakening of Gaua volcano (North of Vanuatu), the Vanuatu Geohazards section in partnership with GNS Science, New Zealand developed a new program including a strategic plan for Geohazards from 2010-2020, the installation of a portable seismic network with real-time data transmission in Gaua, the support of the first permanent monitoring station installation in Ambrym and the design and implementation of volcano monitoring infrastructure and protocol. Moreover the technology improvements of the last decade and the quick extension of enhanced communication systems across the islands of Vanuatu played a very important role for the development of this program. In less than one year, the implementation of this program was beyond expectations and showed considerable improvement of the Vanuatu Geohazards Observatory volcano monitoring capability. In response to increased volcanic activity (or unrest) in Ambae, the Geohazards section was fully capable of the installation of a portable seismic station in April 2010 and to follow the development of the activity. Ultimately, this increased capability results in better and timelier delivery of information and advice on the threat from volcanic activity to the National Disaster Management Office and to the population of the volcanic islands.

  2. The submarine service of the future?

    PubMed

    Bland, S A

    2000-01-01

    Space missions, although now routine, are unique in terms of their environment and logistical requirements. The number of missions (man-hours) remains relatively small and planning still relies on comparisons with analogous missions, including submarine operations. Antarctic missions, which tend not to be classified, have provided more information about isolated communities because of the number of personnel per base. Space medicine has traditionally been an extension of aviation medicine with high g-forces involved in the transition from Earth to orbit and astronauts such as Neil Armstrong recruited from the test pilot fraternity. As the length of a mission increases and the space habitation relies more on regenerative systems, the environment becomes more analogous with today's nuclear submarines. As well as the air purification implications, radiation still is a significant hazard with even greater impact on future Mars missions requiring the provision of health physics monitoring, advice and countermeasures well established in the submarine flotilla. Nevertheless, the specialty space medicine will progress as a specialty in its own right, pooling expertise from other specialties such as aviation, radiation, emergency and occupational medicine taking human exploration beyond the confines of land and sea. PMID:11346925

  3. A Diminutive Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 October 2003

    The small Tharsis volcano called Biblis Patera is nearly lost amongst its gigantic neighbors. With a height of less than 10,000 feet, it is even dwarfed by many volcanoes on Earth. The gaping caldera of Biblis Patera shows evidence for multiple episodes of collapse, producing the concentric topography seen in the image. Several slope streaks are visible, indicators of a more recent and much smaller form of collapse: avalanches of the dust that thickly mantles the terrain.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.3, Longitude 236.4 East (123.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Nitric acid from volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.; Allen, A. G.; Davison, B. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Oppenheimer, C.; McGonigle, A. J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric cycling of nitric acid and other nitrogen-bearing compounds is an important biogeochemical process, with significant implications for ecosystems and human health. Volcanoes are rarely considered as part of the global nitrogen cycle, but here we show that they release a previously unconsidered flux of HNO 3 vapour to the atmosphere. We report the first measurements of nitric acid vapour in the persistent plumes from four volcanoes: Masaya (Nicaragua); Etna (Italy); and Villarrica and Lascar (Chile). Mean near-source volcanic plume concentrations of HNO 3 range from 1.8 to 5.6 ?mol m -3, an enrichment of one to two orders of magnitude over background (0.1-1.5 ?mol m -3). Using mean molar HNO 3/SO 2 ratios of 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.07 for Villarrica, Masaya, Etna, and Lascar respectively, combined with SO 2 flux measurements, we calculate gaseous HNO 3 fluxes from each of these volcanic systems, and extend this to estimate the global flux from high-temperature, non-explosive volcanism to be ˜0.02-0.06 Tg (N) yr -1. While comparatively small on the global scale, this flux could have important implications for regional fixed N budgets. The precise mechanism for the emission of this HNO 3 remains unclear but we suggest that thermal nitrogen fixation followed by rapid oxidation of the product NO is most likely. In explosive, ash-rich plumes NO may result from, or at least be supplemented by, production from volcanic lightning rather than thermal N fixation. We have calculated NO production via this route to be of the order of 0.02 Tg (N) yr -1.

  5. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2006, AVO located 8,666 earthquakes of which 7,783 occurred on or near the 33 volcanoes monitored within Alaska. Monitoring highlights in 2006 include: an eruption of Augustine Volcano, a volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarm at Mount Martin, elevated seismicity and volcanic unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, and elevated seismicity and low-level tremor at Mount Veniaminof and Korovin Volcano. A new seismic subnetwork was installed on Fourpeaked Mountain. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field during 2006, (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems, (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations, (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2006, and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2006.

  6. Flank tectonics of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.; Carr, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the numerous terraces on the flanks of the Olympus Mons volcano on Mars, seen on space images to be arranged in a roughly concentric pattern, is investigated. The images of the volcano show that the base of each terrace is marked by a modest but abrupt change in slope, suggesting that these terraces could be thrust faults caused by a compressional failure of the cone. The mechanism of faulting and the possible effect of the interior structure of Olympus Mons was investigated using a numerical model for elastic stresses within a Martian volcano, constructed for that purpose. Results of the analysis supports the view that the terraces on Olympus Mons, as well as on other three Martian volcanoes, including Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons are indeed thrust faults.

  7. Analysis of the operational impacts of alternative propulsion configurations on submarine maneuverability

    E-print Network

    Heberley, Brian Douglas.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop submarine designs that deliver reduced size submarines with equivalent capabilities of the current USS VIRGINIA (SSN-774 Class) submarine, a joint Navy/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency ...

  8. 50. PIPING FOR SUBMARINE SECTION, Y&D No. 107728 Scale 3/8' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. PIPING FOR SUBMARINE SECTION, Y&D No. 107728 Scale 3/8' = 1'; August 26, 1929 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  9. 16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110-FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING LADDER TO ESCAPE TANK, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  10. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  11. Infrasound array observation at Sakurajima volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, A.; Suzuki, Y. J.; Iguchi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Showa crater at the southeastern flank of the Sakurajima volcano has erupted since 2006, accompanying intermittent Vulcanian eruptions with small scale ash emissions. We conducted an array observation in the last half of 2011 in order to locate infrasound source generated by the eruptions. The array located 3.5 km apart from the crater was composed of 5 microphones (1kHz sampling) aligned in the radial direction from the crater with 100-m-intervals, and additional 4 microphones (200Hz sampling) in tangential direction to the first line in December 2011. Two peaks, around 2Hz and 0.5Hz, in power spectrum of the infrasound were identified; the former peak would be related to the eigen frequency of the vent of Showa crater, but the latter would be related to ejection of eruption clouds. They should be checked by experimental studies. The first 10 s infrasound signal was made by explosion directly and the following small amplitude infrasound tremors for about 2 min were mostly composed of diffraction and reflection waves from the topography around the volcano, mainly the wall of the Aira Caldera. It shows propagation direction of infrasound tremor after the explosion signals should be carefully examined. Clear change in the height of the infrasound source was not identified while volcanic cloud grew up. Strong eddies of the growing volcanic cloud would not be main sources of such weak infrasound signals, thus, infrasound waves are emitted mainly from (or through) the vent itself.

  12. Morphometric evolution of composite volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Statistical relations between geometry, slope, and age for 26 circum-Pacific composite volcanoes (stratovolcanoes) are presented. Topics considered include morphometry, eruption characteristics, growth rates, repose periods, flow lengths, and petrological/chemical trends. Composite and cinder cones are compared, and it is suggested that, if cinder cones do evolve into composite volcanoes, a fundamental change in cone morphometry, eruption style, and petrology occurs at a basal diameter of 2 km.

  13. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  14. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10.8 and IR 12.0. The GlobVolcano information system and its current experimentation represent a

  15. Eruptions of Hawaiian Volcanoes - Past, Present, and Future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; Heliker, Christina; Swanson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Viewing an erupting volcano is a memorable experience, one that has inspired fear, superstition, worship, curiosity, and fascination since before the dawn of civilization. In modern times, volcanic phenomena have attracted intense scientific interest, because they provide the key to understanding processes that have created and shaped more than 80 percent of the Earth's surface. The active Hawaiian volcanoes have received special attention worldwide because of their frequent spectacular eruptions, which often can be viewed and studied with relative ease and safety. In January 1987, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), located on the rim of Kilauea Volcano, celebrated its 75th Anniversary. In honor of HVO's Diamond Jubilee, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published Professional Paper 1350 (see list of Selected Readings, page 57), a comprehensive summary of the many studies on Hawaiian volcanism by USGS and other scientists through the mid-1980s. Drawing from the wealth of data contained in that volume, the USGS also published in 1987 the original edition of this general-interest booklet, focusing on selected aspects of the eruptive history, style, and products of two of Hawai'i's active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. This revised edition of the booklet-spurred by the approaching Centennial of HVO in January 2012-summarizes new information gained since the January 1983 onset of Kilauea's Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption, which has continued essentially nonstop through 2010 and shows no signs of letup. It also includes description of Kilauea's summit activity within Halema'uma'u Crater, which began in mid-March 2008 and continues as of this writing (late 2010). This general-interest booklet is a companion to the one on Mount St. Helens Volcano first published in 1984 and revised in 1990 (see Selected Readings). Together, these publications illustrate the contrast between the two main types of volcanoes: shield volcanoes, such as those in Hawai'i, which generally are nonexplosive; and composite volcanoes, such as Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Range, which are renowned for their explosive eruptions.

  16. Abstract Unusually magnesian (Mg# ~76) basalts have been sampled from a small submarine volcano

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    . The averaged magmatic temperature estimate from several geothermometers was 1,367°C at 1­1.5 GPa. We propose, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA S. H. Bloomer College of Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331. Kohut Æ Robert J. Stern Æ Adam J. R. Kent Æ Roger L. Nielsen Æ Sherman H. Bloomer Æ Matthew Leybourne

  17. Geochemistry Of Historical Lavas From Guagua Pichincha Volcano (Ecuador) : Inferences On Deep Structure Of Adakitic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeleff, J.; Sigmarsson, O.

    2003-04-01

    Guagua Pichincha is an active Ecuadorian stratovolcano located near the capital city Quito. Violent phreatic and preatomagmatic eruptions since 1999 have sparked a new interest in studying this volcano. Here are presented results of an ongoing geochemical study of historical and actual products. Major and trace elements have shown that this volcano is adakitic (high MgO dacites showing, for example, high La/Yb ratios (between 13 and 17 (Bourdon et al., 2003))). Origin of this particuliar type of volcanism is still a matter of debate with partial melting of underplated basalt or a young and hot subducting oceanic crust being the most popular explanations. Moreover, little is known about the deep structure, for instance absence or presence of magma chambers, beneath adakitic volcanoes. Isotope ratios (Sr and Th) and radioactive disequilibria in the 238U chain show that Guagua Pichincha lava source probably changed with time (Th/U varies from 2.75 to 2.29 in the last 1450 years). Also, a hetereogeneity in Th and Sr isotope ratios between lavas exist, strongly suggesting variable compositon of the magma sources. This source heterogeneity emphasizes the fact that the adakites have not homogenized after their formation. It is possible that absence of magma chamber which effect would be to homogenize magmas and to decrease the importance of source signature recorded by the lavas, could explain these observations. This hypothesis is supported by magma density calculations which suggest that the adakites are generaly less dense than the continental crust. Absence of a collapse caldera at Guagua Pichincha volcano is also consistent with this hypothesis. Therefore, the composition of the adakites are more likely to be derived from a deep source rather than having evolved in a magma chamber. The rapid compositional changes of the Guagua Pichincha adakites from ca. 550 to 1999 are most likely caused by partial melting of an heterogeneous subducting slab.

  18. Haines - Scagway Submarine Cable Intertie Project, Haines to Scagway, Alaska Final Technical and Construction Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alan See; Bennie N. Rinehart; Glen Marin

    1998-11-01

    The Haines to Skagway submarine cable project is located n Taiya Inlet, at the north end of Lynn Canal, in Southeast Alaska. The cable is approximately 15 miles long, with three landings and splice vaults. The cable is 35 kV, 3-Phase, and armored. The cable interconnects the Goat Lake Hydro Project near Skagway with the community of Haines. Both communities are now on 100% hydroelectric power. The Haines to Skagway submarine cable is the result of AP&T's goal of an alternative, economic, and environmentally friendly energy source for the communities served and to eliminate the use of diesel fuel as the primary source of energy. Diesel units will continue to be used as a backup system.

  19. A Versatile Time-Lapse Camera System Developed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for Use at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanoes can be difficult to study up close. Because it may be days, weeks, or even years between important events, direct observation is often impractical. In addition, volcanoes are often inaccessible due to their remote location and (or) harsh environmental conditions. An eruption adds another level of complexity to what already may be a difficult and dangerous situation. For these reasons, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) have, for years, built camera systems to act as surrogate eyes. With the recent advances in digital-camera technology, these eyes are rapidly improving. One type of photographic monitoring involves the use of near-real-time network-enabled cameras installed at permanent sites (Hoblitt and others, in press). Time-lapse camera-systems, on the other hand, provide an inexpensive, easily transportable monitoring option that offers more versatility in site location. While time-lapse systems lack near-real-time capability, they provide higher image resolution and can be rapidly deployed in areas where the use of sophisticated telemetry required by the networked cameras systems is not practical. This report describes the latest generation (as of 2008) time-lapse camera system used by HVO for photograph acquisition in remote and hazardous sites on Kilauea Volcano.

  20. New geophysical views of Mt.Melbourne Volcano (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Gambetta, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Melbourne volcano is located along the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System. Recent volcanic activity is suggested by the occurrence of blankets of pyroclastic pumice and scoria fall around the eastern and southern flanks of Mt Melbourne and by pyroclastic layers interbedded with the summit snows. Geothermal activity in the crater area of Mount Melbourne may be linked to the intrusion of dykes within the last 200 years. Geophysical networks suggest that Mount Melbourne is a quiescent volcano, possibly characterised by slow internal dynamics. During the 2002-2003 Italian Antarctic campaign a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was performed within the TIMM (Tectonics and Interior of Mt. Melbourne area) project. This helicopter-borne survey was flown at low-altitude and in drape-mode configuration (305 m above terrain) with a line separation less than 500 m. Our new high-resolution magnetic maps reveal the largely ice-covered magmatic and tectonic patters in the Mt. Melbourne volcano area. Additionally, in the frame of the UK-Italian ISODYN-WISE project (2005-06), an airborne ice-sounding radar survey was flown. We combine the sub-ice topography with images and models of the interior of Mt. Melbourne volcano, as derived from the high resolution aeromagnetic data and land gravity data. Our new geophysical maps and models also provide a new tool to study the regional setting of the volcano. In particular we re-assess whether there is geophysical evidence for coupling between strike-slip faulting, the Terror Rift, and Mount Melbourne volcano.

  1. Hemispherical Field-of-View Above-Water Surface Imager for Submarines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Farr, William H.; Dannecker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses solutions to the problem of submarines having to rise above water to detect airplanes in the general vicinity. Two solutions are provided, in which a sensor is located just under the water surface, and at a few to tens of meter depth under the water surface. The first option is a Fish Eye Lens (FEL) digital-camera combination, situated just under the water surface that will have near-full- hemisphere (360 azimuth and 90 elevation) field of view for detecting objects on the water surface. This sensor can provide a three-dimensional picture of the airspace both in the marine and in the land environment. The FEL is coupled to a camera and can continuously look at the entire sky above it. The camera can have an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) focal plane array that allows logic circuitry to be built directly in the sensor. The logic circuitry allows data processing to occur on the sensor head without the need for any other external electronics. In the second option, a single-photon sensitive (photon counting) detector-array is used at depth, without the need for any optics in front of it, since at this location, optical signals are scattered and arrive at a wide (tens of degrees) range of angles. Beam scattering through clouds and seawater effectively negates optical imaging at depths below a few meters under cloudy or turbulent conditions. Under those conditions, maximum collection efficiency can be achieved by using a non-imaging photon-counting detector behind narrowband filters. In either case, signals from these sensors may be fused and correlated or decorrelated with other sensor data to get an accurate picture of the object(s) above the submarine. These devices can complement traditional submarine periscopes that have a limited field of view in the elevation direction. Also, these techniques circumvent the need for exposing the entire submarine or its periscopes to the outside environment.

  2. A Seismological Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia, and Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington

    E-print Network

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1 A Seismological Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia, and Mount St. Helens Volcano;4 University of Washington Abstract A Seismologic Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens of Earth and Space Sciences Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, Washington are examples

  3. Understanding Volcano Hazards and Preventing Volcanic Disasters A Science Strategy for the Volcano Hazards Program,

    E-print Network

    Understanding Volcano Hazards and Preventing Volcanic Disasters A Science Strategy for the Volcano active volcanoes, the United States is among the most volcanically active countries in the world. During and property through exposure to volcano hazards continue to increase. Moreover, rapid globalization makes U

  4. The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano geodesy

    E-print Network

    The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano Volcano Observatory, Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718-0051, United States b Department of Earth's active volcanoes. By their very nature, however, the magmatic reservoirs and conduits

  5. When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan

    E-print Network

    Mazzini, Adriano

    When mud volcanoes sleep: Insight from seep geochemistry at the Dashgil mud volcano, Azerbaijan A Available online 18 November 2008 Keywords: Dashgil mud volcano Azerbaijan Dormant Methane Water geochemistry a b s t r a c t The worlds >1500 mud volcanoes are normally in a dormant stage due to the short

  6. Chemistry and isotope ratios of sulfur in basalts and volcanic gases at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen basalts and some volcanic gases from the submarine and subaerial parts of Kilauea volcano were analyzed for the concentration and isotope ratios of sulfur. By means of a newly developed technique, sulfide and sulfate sulfur in the basalts were separately but simultaneously determined. The submarine basalt has 700 ?? 100 ppm total sulfur with ??34S??s of 0.7 ?? 0.1 ???. The sulfate/sulfide molar ratio ranges from 0.15 to 0.56 and the fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide is +7.5 ?? 1.5???. On the other hand, the concentration and ??34S??s values of the total sulfur in the subaerial basalt are reduced to 150 ?? 50 ppm and -0.8 ?? 0.2???, respectively. The sulfate to sulfide ratio and the fractionation factor between them are also smaller, 0.01 to 0.25 and +3.0???, respectively. Chemical and isotopic evidence strongly suggests that sulfate and sulfide in the submarine basalt are in chemical and isotopic equilibria with each other at magmatic conditions. Their relative abundance and the isotope fractionation factors may be used to estimate the f{hook}o2 and temperature of these basalts at the time of their extrusion onto the sea floor. The observed change in sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios from the submarine to subaerial basalts can be interpreted as degassing of the SO2 from basalt thereby depleting sulfate and 34S in basalt. The volcanic sulfur gases, predominantly SO2, from the 1971 and 1974 fissures in Kilauea Crater have ??34S values of 0.8 to 0.9%., slightly heavier than the total sulfur in the submarine basalts and definitely heavier than the subaerial basalts, in accord with the above model. However, the ??34S value of sulfur gases (largely SO2) from Sulfur Bank is 8.0%., implying a secondary origin of the sulfur. The ??34S values of native sulfur deposits at various sites of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanos, sulfate ions of four deep wells and hydrogen sulfide from a geothermal well along the east rift zone are also reported. The high ??34S values (+5 to +6%.o) found for the hydrogen sulfide might be an indication of hot basaltseawater reaction beneath the east rift zone. ?? 1982.

  7. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  8. Submarine fans in a sequence stratigraphic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posamentier, H.W.; Erskine, R.D.; Mitchum, R.M.; Vail, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    Submarine fans are fan- or cone-shaped turbiditic deposits formed in upper bathyal or deeper water depths. Within a sequence stratigraphic framework, these basin-floor turbidites can occur during lowstand-fan or lowstand-wedge systems tract time. During lowstand fan time, streams are rejuvenated and depocenters shift from the coastal plain to the upper slope, causing retrogradational slope failure and canyon formation. The sediment delivered here bypasses the canyon and continues down the slope as a succession of gravity flows and is deposited as fan-shaped turbiditic deposits at the base of the slope. Seismic and outcrop evidence suggest that these sand-prone deposits are abruptly introduced into the basin and are generally characterized by subtle external mounding and internal bidirectionally down lapping seismic reflections where seismically resolvable. Deep-water sediment deposited during this interval has no coeval shelf equivalent. During lowstand wedge time, streams cease down cutting and valleys which have been freshly incised begin to fill. Because coarse sediment will preferentially be deposited within these incised valleys, the sand-to-mud ratio delivered to the upper slope will be decreased and, consequently, there is an inherent difference between submarine fans deposited at this time and those deposited during lowstand fan time. Deposition during lowstand wedge time is characterized seismically by slope front fill or wedge-shaped geometries down lapping the earlier submarine fan (i.e., deposited during lowstand fan time). These shale-prone deposits are largely comprised of thinner-bedded turbidites as well as the occasional leveed channel.

  9. Introduction Deep-sea deposits from submarine landslides, debris

    E-print Network

    Introduction Deep-sea deposits from submarine landslides, debris flows, and turbidity currents have with submarine mass-wasting. An example is the Storegga landslide on the Norwegian margin, which occurred about 9, this landslide dwarfs the largest subaerial landslides. Because large landslides usually reach longer horizontal

  10. Submarine escape trials 1999-2001--provision of medical support.

    PubMed

    Benton, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Since the early 1960s all Royal Navy submarines have been fitted with an escape system comprising a single escape tower (SET) and submarine escape immersion suit (SEIS). This system enables escape from a submarine at a depth of 180 metres (1.9 MPa) provided that the submarine compartment is at a pressure of no greater than 1 bar (0.1 MPa). Due to a variety of causes which may include flooding and leakage of high pressure air systems it is the highly probable that the submarine compartment will be at a pressure in excess of 1 bar (0.1 MPa) at the time of the escape. To investigate and determine what constitutes a 'safe' maximum escape depth from any given compartment pressure (the safe to escape curve), a purpose built chamber complex, the Submarine Escape Simulator (SES) has been constructed at the QinetiQ, formerly the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA), Alverstoke site. Unlike escapes from a submarine where once released from the submarine the escapee's ascent can not be halted, within the SES it is possible to halt the ascent phase. This article describes the systems and procedures developed to enable medical support to be provided rapidly to a subject at any stage of the compression decompression profile. The article also provides details of the results to date that have been obtained from this work. PMID:12838773

  11. Identification of a ship or submarine from its magnetic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioannidis, G.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between the measured time fluctuations of the ambient magnetic field due to the passage of a ship or submarine and the characteristic magnetization properties of this vessel are derived. This relationship would be useful in identifying or classifying ships and submarines according to their magnetization properties.

  12. Sensitivity of Greenland outlet glacier dynamics to submarine melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Johanna; Siegrfied, Merten; Perrette, Mahé; Carlov, Reinhard; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Over the last few decades Greenland ice mass loss has strongly increased due to surface melt and dynamic changes in marine-terminating outlet glaciers. A major reason for the retreat of these glaciers is believed to be related to increased submarine melting, which in turn is caused by surrounding ocean warming and the enhanced subglacial water discharge. These complex physical processes are not yet fully understood. Inspecting the sensitivities of submarine melting to model formulation and model parameters is crucial for investigations of outlet glacier response to future climate change. Different approaches have been used to compute submarine melt rates of outlet glaciers using experimental data, numerical modelling and simplified analytical solutions. To model the process of submarine melting for a selection of Greenland outlet glaciers, a simple submarine melt parameterization is incorporated into a one-dimensional dynamic ice-flow model. The behaviour of this submarine melt parameterization is demonstrated by running a suite of simulations to investigate the sensitivity of submarine melt to changes in ocean properties and the amount and distribution of subglacial water discharge. A comparison of the simple parameterization with three-dimensional models and experimental data is conducted to assess the quality of parameterization and improve the parameterization of submarine melting.

  13. On the frontal dynamics and morphology of submarine debris flows

    E-print Network

    On the frontal dynamics and morphology of submarine debris flows Trygve Ilstada,*, Fabio V. De, MN 55414, USA Accepted 30 September 2004 Abstract Several submarine debris flows show an apparently Norway) are classified from the outer distal part of the debris flow to the outermost outrunner block

  14. Numerical simulation of tsunami waves generated by deformable submarine landslides

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical simulation of tsunami waves generated by deformable submarine landslides Gangfeng Ma a wave model Tsunami wave Numerical modeling a b s t r a c t This paper presents a new submarine of landslide motion and associated tsunami wave generation on parameters including sediment settling velocity

  15. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; Gordon, David W., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  16. Redoubt Volcano Summit Crater During Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Redoubt Volcano summit crater during eruption. This was taken just after explosive activity at redoubt ceased. There were still significant gas and steam emissions occurring. Iliamna Volcano to the south of Redoubt is visible in the background....

  17. Dynamic and instability of submarine avalanches

    E-print Network

    F. Malloggi; J. Lanuza; B. Andreotti; E. Clément

    2005-04-21

    We perform a laboratory-scale experiment of submarine avalanches on a rough inclined plane. A sediment layer is prepared and thereafter tilted up to an angle lower than the spontaneous avalanche angle. The sediment is scrapped until an avalanche is triggered. Based on the stability diagram of the sediment layer, we investigate different structures for the avalanche front dynamics. First we see a straight front descending the slope, and then a transverse instability occurs. Eventually, a fingering instability shows up similar to rivulets appearing for a viscous fluid flowing down an incline. The mechanisms leading to this new instability and the wavelength selection are discussed.

  18. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  19. Miniature Robotic Submarine for Exploring Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Bruhn, Fredrik; Carsey, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The miniature autonomous submersible explorer (MASE) has been proposed as a means of scientific exploration -- especially, looking for signs of life -- in harsh, relatively inaccessible underwater environments. Basically, the MASE would be a small instrumented robotic submarine (see figure) that could launch itself or could be launched from another vehicle. Examples of environments that might be explored by use of the MASE include subglacial lakes, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, acidic or alkaline lakes, brine lenses in permafrost, and ocean regions under Antarctic ice shelves.

  20. Submarine Analogs to Venusian Pancake Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology and dimensions of the large diameter, steep-sided, flat-topped "pancake domes" on Venus make them unlike any type of terrestrial subaerial volcano. Comparisons between images of Hawaiian seamounts and pancake domes show similarities in shapes and secondary features. The morphometry of pancake domes is closer to that of Pacific seamounts than subaerial lava domes. Considering both morphology and morphometry, seamounts seem a better analog to the pancake domes. The control of volatile exsolution by pressure on Venus and the seafloor can cause lavas to have similar viscosities and densities, although the latter will be counteracted by high buoyancy underwater. However, analogous effects of the Venusian and seafloor alone are probably not sufficient to produce similar volcanoes. Rather, Venusian lavas of various compositions may behave like basalt on the seafloor if appropriate rates and modes of extrusion and planetary thermal structure are also considered.

  1. Volcano plumbing system geometry: The result of multi-parametric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Magma is transported from magma chambers towards the surface through networks of planar structures (intrusive sheets) spanning from vertical dikes to inclined sheets and horizontal sills. This study presents an overview of intrusive sheets at several volcanoes located in different settings in order to contribute to assess the factors controlling the geometry of magma plumbing systems. Data have been mainly acquired in the field and secondarily through a collection and analysis of geophysical publications; data include local lithology and tectonics of the substratum surrounding the volcano with special reference to local fault kinematics and related stress tensor, regional tectonics (general kinematics and far-field stress tensors), crustal thickness, geology and shape of the volcano, topographic setting, and characteristics of the plumbing system. Data from active volcanoes and eroded extinct volcanoes are discussed; the shallow plumbing system of active volcanoes has been reconstructed by combining available geophysical data with field information derived from outcropping sheets, morphometric analyses of pyroclastic cones, and the orientation and location of eruptive fissures. The study of eroded volcanoes enabled to assess the plumbing system geometry at lower levels in the core of the edifice or under the volcano-substratum interface. Key sites are presented in extensional, transcurrent and contractional tectonic settings, and different geodynamic areas have been investigated in North and South-America, Iceland, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea and Africa. The types of sheet arrangements that are illustrated include swarms of parallel dikes, diverging rift patterns, centrally-inclined sheets, radial dikes, bi-modal dike strikes, circum-lateral collapse sheets, and mixed members. This review shows that intrusive sheet emplacement at a volcano depends upon the combination of several local and regional factors, some of which are difficult to be constrained. While much progress has been made, it is still very challenging to forecast the likely paths and geometry of sheet propagation and emplacement during volcanic unrest events.

  2. Mission design for an orbiting volcano observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.; Johnston, M. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The Mission to Planet Earth initiative will require global observation of land, sea, and atmosphere, and all associated phenomena over the coming years; perhaps for decades. A major phenomenon playing a major part in earth's environment is volcanic activity. Orbital observations, including IR, UV, and visible imaging, may be made to monitor many active sites, and eventually increase our understanding of volcanoes and lead to the predictability of eruptions. This paper presents the orbital design and maneuvering capability of a low cost, volcano observing satellite, flying in low earth orbit. Major science requirements include observing as many as 10 to 20 active sites daily, or every two or three days. Given specific geographic locations of these sites, it is necessary to search the trajectory space for those orbits which maximize overflight opportunities. Also, once the satellite is in orbit, it may be desirable to alter the orbit to fly over targets of opportunity. These are active areas which are not being monitored, but which give indications of erupting, or have in fact erupted. Multiple impulse orbital maneuvering methods have been developed to minimize propellant usage for these orbital changes.

  3. Preliminary seismic studies at Ceboruco Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Ochoa, J.; Robles, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano is located at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt at 21.125o north, 76 km from the pacific coast and 2,280 meters above sea level. It has an eruptive recurrence of 200 years and its last activity was at 1875. This natural hazard could affect more than eight communities and important highways. Scientific knowledge constitutes the only way to avoid or at least to mitigate the negative effects of an eventual eruptive event, accordingly the main objective of this project is monitor and analyze the potential destructive effects of the Ceboruco volcano. Seismic studies began at 2003 with the deployment of one MARSlite station equipped LE3d (1Hz) sensor. Station that works until 2009 and allow us to identify and characterize the seismic activity associated to the volcano;. Since March 2012 we installed four seismic stations, each includes a digital acquisition system TAURUS of Nanometrix and a Lennartz 3D lite seismometer. Batteries are change and data collected monthly. We use the data to establish the average seismic activity rate; we also aim to corroborate previous studies that showed four families of seismic events; and to localize and make preliminary evaluations of the events.

  4. Monitoring Santorini volcano (Greece) breathing from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foumelis, Michael; Trasatti, Elisa; Papageorgiou, Elena; Stramondo, Salvatore; Parcharidis, Issaak

    2013-04-01

    Since its last eruption in 1950, Santorini volcano (Greece) remained in a dormant state. This is also evidenced for the period 1992-2010 by the gradual deflation signal over Nea Kameni as measured by satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) with low rates of about 5-6 mm yr-1 as well as by the absence of seismic activity within the caldera. However, at the beginning of 2011 the volcano showed signs of unrest with increased microseismic activity and significant ground uplift, reaching 14 cm within a year (2011 March-2012 March), according to InSAR time-series. ALOS PALSAR data indicate the onset of the phenomenon in early 2010 where an aseismic pre-unrest phase of increased subsidence (1-3 cm) preceded the uplift. Joint inversions of SAR and GPS velocities using spherical and spheroidal magmatic source types indicate their location offshore at about 1 km north of Nea Kameni and between 3.5 and 3.8 km depth. The estimated volume variation rate is 6 × 106 m3 yr-1 to 9 × 106 m3 yr-1. A gradual slowing in the rate of inflation within the first quarter of 2012 is apparent by ENVISAT data, while subsequent observations from RADARSAT-2 confirm the observed trend.

  5. Quantifying the current unrest of the Santorini volcano: Evidence from a multiparametric dataset, involving seismological, geodetic, geochemical and other geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazachos, C. B.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Newman, A. V.; Stiros, S.; Vougioukalakis, G.; Fytikas, M.; Laopoulos, T.; Albanakis, K.; Vamvakaris, D.; Karagianni, E.; Feng, L.; Psimoulis, P.; Moschas, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Santorini volcanic center is the most active volcano system in the Southern Aegean Volcanic Arc, characterized by very rare Plinian eruptions (minimum time interval of 20Kyrs) and more frequent Vulcanian-type eruptions in historic times (e.g. 3 eruptions in the 20th century). Though the Coloumbo submarine volcano, located roughly 8km to the NE of the main Santorini island caldera, is the most active volcanic center, with continuous seismicity and hydrothermal activity, since the beginning of 2011 the main Santorini volcano has gone through a period of unrest. The most detectable symptoms of this unrest, as they are recognized by the local people, are small earthquakes (M2.8-3.0) being quite strongly felt along the caldera rim villages. We examine the main characteristics of this unrest by using seismicity information from a local seismological network, in operation before the unrest initiation. This dataset is complemented by other important information such as geodetic measurements (using a network of permanent and temporary stations, also in operation before the unrest start), geochemical information concerning CO2 and H2 emissions, and a local network of tide gauges providing sea temperature changes and sea level changes. The results show that a previously identified but inactive near-vertical NE-SW tectonic line, known as the Kameni line, has been activated at a length of ~5-6km and a depth extent of 4km. This activation is a response to a magma uplift that occurs to the north of this line (that crosses the intra-caldera Palea and Nea Kameni islands), which has resulted in significant relative displacements, both horizontal and vertical, locally of the order of 15-20cm until know, as confirmed by GPS and sea level data. Significant sea temperature changes are also observed along the fault zone, probably due to hydrothermal fluids originating from the main fault crack network. The observed quantities show an excellent spatial and time correlation, with deformation accelerations signaling an increase of the earthquake activity, temperature fluctuations, etc., verifying the magmatic origin of the observed unrest. Finally, a preliminary assessment of the associated earthquake hazard is presented, considering different rupture scenarios of the activated fault zone.

  6. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2004

    E-print Network

    , Geochemical constraints on possible subduction components in lavas of Mayon and Taal volcanoes, southern LuzonPublications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2004 2006 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part

  7. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  8. The Volcano Optimizer Jan. 29 2003

    E-print Network

    Ives, Zachary G.

    The Volcano Optimizer Generator Jan. 29 2003 Presented by Peng Wang in CIS650 Cite: Zhang Da Generator System General "toolkits" for creating customized DBs Exodus (Graefe&DeWitt,87) Volcano (Graefe;4 The Motivation of Volcano High Performance Optimization time Memory consumption for search More Extensibility

  9. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2005

    E-print Network

    Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2005 2007 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part are included based on date of publication with no attempt to assign them to Fiscal Year. #12;3 Volcano Hazards

  10. Monitoring Volcanoes by Use of Air-Dropped Sensor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Rivellini, Tommaso; Webb, Frank; Blaes, Brent; Bracho, Caroline; Lockhart, Andrew; McGee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Sensor packages that would be dropped from airplanes have been proposed for pre-eruption monitoring of physical conditions on the flanks of awakening volcanoes. The purpose of such monitoring is to gather data that could contribute to understanding and prediction of the evolution of volcanic systems. Each sensor package, denoted a volcano monitoring system (VMS), would include a housing with a parachute attached at its upper end and a crushable foam impact absorber at its lower end (see figure). The housing would contain survivable low-power instrumentation that would include a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an inclinometer, a seismometer, a barometer, a thermometer, and CO2 and SO2 analyzers. The housing would also contain battery power, control, data-logging, and telecommunication subsystems. The proposal for the development of the VMS calls for the use of commercially available sensor, power, and telecommunication equipment, so that efforts could be focused on integrating all of the equipment into a system that could survive impact and operate thereafter for 30 days, transmitting data on the pre-eruptive state of a target volcano to a monitoring center. In a typical scenario, VMSs would be dropped at strategically chosen locations on the flanks of a volcano once the volcano had been identified as posing a hazard from any of a variety of observations that could include eyewitness reports, scientific observations from positions on the ground, synthetic-aperture-radar scans from aircraft, and/or remote sensing from aboard spacecraft. Once dropped, the VMSs would be operated as a network of in situ sensors that would transmit data to a local monitoring center. This network would provide observations as part of an integrated volcano-hazard assessment strategy that would involve both remote sensing and timely observations from the in situ sensors. A similar strategy that involves the use of portable sensors (but not dropping of sensors from aircraft) is already in use in the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP), which was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance to respond to volcanic crises around the world. The VMSs would add a greatly needed capability that would enable VDAP response teams to deploy their volcano-monitoring equipment in a more timely manner with less risk to personnel in the field.

  11. Global systematics of arc volcano position.

    PubMed

    England, Philip C; Katz, Richard F

    2010-12-01

    Global systematics in the location of volcanic arcs above subduction zones are widely considered to be a clue to the melting processes that occur at depth, and the locations of the arcs have often been explained in terms of the release of hydrous fluids near the top of the subducting slab (see, for example, refs 3-6). Grove et al. conclude that arc volcano location is controlled by melting in the mantle at temperatures above the water-saturated upper-mantle solidus and below the upper limit of stability of the mineral chlorite and in particular, that the arc fronts lie directly above the shallowest point of such melt regions in the mantle. Here we show that this conclusion is incorrect because the calculated arc locations of Grove et al. are in error owing to the inadequate spatial resolution of their numerical models, and because the agreement that they find between predicted and observed systematics arises from a spurious correlation between calculated arc location and slab dip. A more informative conclusion to draw from their experiments is that the limits of chlorite stability (figure 1b of ref. 7) cannot explain the global systematics in the depth to the slab beneath the sharply localized arc fronts. PMID:21150944

  12. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001 ASTER captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 8028'. The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25 km ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and the Far East, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface heat balance.

  13. Deep intrusions, lateral magma transport and related uplift at ocean island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Andreas; Longpré, Marc-Antoine; García-Cañada, Laura; Stix, John

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic intraplate volcanoes grow by accumulation of erupted material as well as by coeval or discrete magmatic intrusions. Dykes and other intrusive bodies within volcanic edifices are comparatively well studied, but intrusive processes deep beneath the volcanoes remain elusive. Although there is geological evidence for deep magmatic intrusions contributing to volcano growth through uplift, this has rarely been demonstrated by real-time monitoring. Here we use geophysical and petrological data from El Hierro, Canary Islands, to show that intrusions from the mantle and subhorizontal transport of magma within the oceanic crust result in rapid endogenous island growth. Seismicity and ground deformation associated with a submarine eruption in 2011-2012 reveal deep subhorizontal intrusive sheets (sills), which have caused island-scale uplift of tens of centimetres. The pre-eruptive intrusions migrated 15-20 km laterally within the lower oceanic crust, opening pathways that were subsequently used by the erupted magmas to ascend from the mantle to the surface. During six post-eruptive episodes between 2012 and 2014, further sill intrusions into the lower crust and upper mantle have caused magma to migrate up to 20 km laterally, resulting in magma accumulation exceeding that of the pre-eruptive phase. A comparison of geobarometric data for the 2011-2012 El Hierro eruption with data for other Atlantic intraplate volcanoes shows similar bimodal pressure distributions, suggesting that eruptive phases are commonly accompanied by deep intrusions of sills and lateral magma transport. These processes add significant material to the oceanic crust, cause uplift, and are thus fundamentally important for the growth and evolution of volcanic islands. We suggest that the development of such a magma accumulation zone in the lower oceanic crust begins early during volcano evolution, and is a consequence of increasing size and complexity of the mantle reservoir system, and potentially the lithospheric stresses imposed by increasing edifice load.

  14. Cape Wanbrow: A stack of Surtseyan-style volcanoes built over millions of years in the Waiareka-Deborah volcanic field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, B. L.; White, J. D. L.; Scott, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Volcanic fields typically include many small, monogenetic, volcanoes formed by single eruptions fed by short-lived magma plumbing systems that solidify after eruption. The Cape Wanbrow coastline of the northeast Otago region in the South Island of New Zealand exposes an Eocene-Oligocene intraplate basaltic field that erupted in Surtseyan style onto a submerged continental shelf, and the stratigraphy of Cape Wanbrow suggests that eruptions produced multiple volcanoes whose edifices overlapped within a small area, but separated by millions of years. The small Cape Wanbrow highland is shown to include the remains of 6 volcanoes that are distinguished by discordant to locally concordant inter-volcano contacts marked by biogenic accumulations or other slow-formed features. The 6 volcanoes contain several lithofacies associations: (a) the dominantly pyroclastic E1 comprising well-bedded tuff and lapilli-tuff, emplaced by traction-dominated unsteady, turbulent high-density currents; (b) E2, massive to diffusely laminated block-rich tuff deposited by grain-dominant cohesionless debris flows; (c) E3, broadly cross-stratified tuff with local lenses of low- to high-angle cross-stratification which was deposited by either subaerial pyroclastic currents or subaqueously by unstable antidune- and chute-and-pool-forming supercritical flows; (d) E4, very-fine- to medium-grained tuff deposited by turbidity currents; (e) E5, bedded bioclast-rich tuff with increasing glaucony content upward, emplaced by debris flows; (f) E6, pillow lava and inter-pillow bioclastic sediment; and (g) E7, hyaloclastite breccia. These lithofacies associations aid interpretation of the eruptive evolution of each separate volcano, which in turn grew and degraded during build-up of the overall volcanic pile. Sedimentary processes played a prominent role in the evolution of the volcanic pile with both syn- and post-eruptive re-mobilization of debris from the growing pile of primary pyroclastic deposits of multiple volcanoes separated by time. An increase in bioclastic detritus upsequence suggests that the stack of deposits from overlapping volcanoes built up into shallow enough waters for colonization to occur. This material was periodically shed from the top of the edifice to form bioclast-rich debris flow deposits of volcanoes 4, 5 and 6. Since the eruption of Surtsey (1963-1965) many studies have been made of the resulting island, but the pre-emergent base remains submarine, unincised and little studied. Eruption-fed density currents that formed deposits of the volcanoes of Cape Wanbrow are inferred to be typical products of submarine processes such as those that built Surtsey to the sea surface.

  15. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a space radar image of the area around the Unzen volcano, on the west coast of Kyushu Island in southwestern Japan. Unzen, which appears in this image as a large triangular peak with a white flank near the center of the peninsula, has been continuously active since a series of powerful eruptions began in 1991. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 93rd orbit on April 15, 1994. The image shows an area 41.5 kilometers by 32.8 kilometers (25.7 miles by 20.3 miles) that is centered at 32.75 degrees north latitude and 130.15 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received); green represents the average of L-band and C-band (vertically transmitted and received); blue represents the C-band (vertically transmitted and received). Unzen is one of 15 'Decade' volcanoes identified by the scientific community as posing significant potential threats to large local populations. The city of Shimabara sits along the coast at the foot of Unzen on its east and northeast sides. At the summit of Unzen a dome of thick lava has been growing continuously since 1991. Collapses of the sides of this dome have generated deadly avalanches of hot gas and rock known as pyroclastic flows. Volcanologists can use radar image data to monitor the growth of lava domes, to better understand and predict potentially hazardous collapses.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

  16. Attack submarines: The case for negotiated reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, J.L.

    1990-12-01

    In East-West naval arms control, the realistic and genuinely useful options are fairly limited. The United States is likely to resist constraints on the numbers and operations of naval assets that serve national interests beyond East-West security. It is not altogether clear, in a post-Cold War environment, that such constraints on U.S. forces would be in the Soviet interest either. The attack submarine, however, is different - an artifact of the Cold War, with very limited utility in non-Cold War contingencies. Controlling its operations and movements has always been difficult, and is bound to remain so. But operations can be controlled indirectly, and costs can be reduced, by cutting inventories. To bring a substantial benefit, such cuts would need to be large, mutual, and to a more-or-less common ceiling. If something along the lines suggested above were agreed upon and implemented, the United States and the Soviet Union would eliminate from the world's oceans between 200 and 300 attack submarines. That would seem to be quite a respectable start toward building confidence, security, and stability at sea, and toward a more sensible force structure for both navies. 1 tab.

  17. Deep-Sea Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The deep-sea submarine 'Ben Franklin' is being docked in the harbor. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life. It also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effect of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  18. Deep-Sea Research Submarine 'Ben Franklin'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is an aerial view of the deep-sea research submarine 'Ben Franklin' at dock. Named for American patriot and inventor Ben Franklin, who discovered the Gulf Steam, the 50-foot Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 in Switzerland for deep-ocean explorer Jacques Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. The submersible made a famous 30-day drift dive off the East Coast of the United States and Canada in 1969 mapping the Gulf Stream's currents and sea life, and also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. On July 14, 1969, the Ben Franklin was towed to the high-velocity center of the Stream off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida. With a NASA observer on board, the sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks, reemerging near Maine. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future marned space-flight missions.

  19. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  20. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946