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Sample records for substorm growth phase

  1. Pseudobreakup and substorm growth phase in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lopez, R. E.; Pellinen, R. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Bosinger, T.

    1993-01-01

    Observations made during the growth phase and the onset of a substorm on August 31, 1986 are presented. About 20 min after the epsilon parameter at the magnetopause had exceeded 10 exp 11 W, magnetic field dipolarization with an increase of energetic particle fluxes was observed by the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft at the geocentric distance of 8.7 R(E) close to magnetic midnight. The event exhibited local signatures of a substorm onset at AMPTE CCE and a weak wedgelike current system in the midnight sector ionosphere, but did not lead to a full-scale substorm expansion; neither did it produce large particle injections at GEO. Only after another 20 min of continued growth phase could the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system allow the onset of a regular substorm expansion. The initial activation is interpreted as a 'pseudobreakup'. We examine the physical conditions in the near-Earth plasma sheet and analyze the development in the ionosphere using ground-based magnetometers and electric field observations from the STARE radar.

  2. Pseudobreakup and substorm growth phase in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinin, H.E.J.; Pellinen, R.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I. ); Lopez, R.E. ); Baker, D.N. ); Boesinger, T. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors present space and ground based observations made during the growth phase and the onset of a substorm on August 31, 1986. Roughly 20 minutes after the [var epsilon] parameter at the magnetopause had exceeded 10[sup 11] W, the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft observed an increase in energetic particle fluxes consistent with magnetic field depolarization. The craft was close to magnetic midnight at a geocentric distance of 8.7R[sub E]. The event had the initial signature of a substorm onset, but it did not lead to a full-scale substorm expansion based on several ground based observations. There were no large particle injection events at geostationary orbit. After another 20 minutes the event did enter a normal substorm expansion phase. The authors interpret the initial activation as a [open quotes]pseudobreakup[close quotes]. They correlate observations made by spacecraft in the near-Earth plasma sheet, with ground based observations of the ionospheric development from magnetometer and electric field measurements from the STARE radar. The strength and the consequences are concluded to be the main differences of pseudobreakups and ordinary breakups.

  3. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  4. Magnetotail and Ionospheric Evolution during the Substorm Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M.; Otto, A.

    2013-12-01

    The growth phase of geomagnetic substorms is characterized by the equatorward motion of the growth phase arc close to or even into the region of diffuse aurora characteristic for a dipolar magnetic field. The presented results use a model of current sheet thinning based on midnight magnetic flux depletion (MMFD) in the near-Earth tail which is caused by sunward convection to replenish magnetic flux that is eroded on the dayside by magnetic reconnection during periods of southward IMF. The results use a three-dimensional mesocale MHD simulation of the near-Earth tail. This paper examines the changes of the near-Earth magnetotail region mapped into the ionopshere. Of specific interest are the changes in magnetic flux, flux tube entropy, field-aligned currents, convection, and the size and location of the respective ionospheric footprints of the magnetotail structure and properties. The mapping method is based on the Tsyganenko [1996] magnetic field model combined with magnetic flux conservation. It is found that the mapped magnetotail properties move equatorward by about 2 to 3 degrees during the growth phase. The removal of magnetic flux in the near-Earth tail causes a contraction of the ionospheric footprints of this tail region such that all of the mapped magnetotail structures move equatorward. The thin current is mapped into the region where magnetic flux is strongly depleted, and in close proximity with strong and narrow region 1 and 2 sense field-aligned currents. Our ionospheric maps also show a sharp transition between the dipole and stretched magnetic field and an evolution of thinning and convergent motion of field-aligned currents in the late growth phase.

  5. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-01-01

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼1015 J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase. PMID:26074645

  6. Particle scattering and current sheet stability in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Pellinen, R. J.; Buechner, J.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lopez, R. E.; Dyson, R. L.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    The particle scattering and current sheet stability features in the geomagnetic tail during the phase of substorm growth were investigated using Tsyganenko's (1989) magnetic field model. In a study of four substorm events which were observed both in the high-altitude nightside tail and in the auroral ionosphere, the model magnetic field was adjusted to each case so as to represent the global field development during the growth phase of the substorms. The model results suggest that the auroral brightenings are connected with processes taking place in the near-earth region inside about 15 earth radii. The results also suggest that there is a connection between the chaotization of the electrons and the auroral brightenings at substorm onset.

  7. Current carriers in the near-earth cross-tail current sheet during substorm growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Throughout most of the growth phase of a substorm, the cross-tail current at x about -10 Re can be supplied by the curvature drift of a bi-directional field aligned distribution of 1 keV electrons. Just prior to its local disruption after substorm onset, the cross-tail current in the now thin (about 400 km) current sheet is carried by the cross-tail serpentine motion of non-adiabatic ions (Speiser, 1965). The instability of this latter current leads to the local disruption of the near-earth current sheet.

  8. Existential variations of brightness auroral glow on a growth phase of a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. V.; Velichko, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    In work the advanced way of processing scanning photometer data (scanogramms) is stated. Data processing of a scanning photometer by the offered (suggested) way, and also the analysis of the data published in the literature, and geomagnetic field data (magnetogramms) Yakut meridional chains and stations of a world (global) network have allowed to reveal new properties diffuse aurora brightness on a growth phase of a substorm. It is shown, that the center magnetospheric substorms with a growth phase is formed long before the moment of explosive clearing energy. By results of the analysis of photometric supervision of a background brightness in Yakutia it is found out regular latitude and longitudinal variations of brightness of a luminescence during a growth phase. To the east and to the west of the center of a substorm at all breadthes auroral zones and on equatorial border diffuse spill on a longitude of the center brightness of a background monotonously grows during all growth phase. In longitudinal sector of the future (expected) center of a substorm in the field of discrete forms of polar lights intensity of a background luminescence raises in the beginning of a growth phase with the subsequent reduction prior to the beginning of an explosive phase. At polar edge (territory) of an oval the beginning of downturn of brightness of a background in the center for ten minutes outstrips the moment of fast movement of discrete forms to equator. Feding in a background luminescence it is simultaneously observed also in a vicinity of an equatorial strip of lights, but duration of reduction of his(its) intensity at these breadthes coincides in due course the moment of the beginning of drift of discrete forms to equator prior to the beginning of an explosive phase. It has led to to a conclusion that formation of the local center of a substorm occurs not during last moment before explosion, during all growth phase. The qualitative circuit explaining found out laws is

  9. Particle scattering and current sheet stability in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.; Koskinen, H.E.J. ); Baker, D.N. ); Buechner, J. ); Lopez, R.E. ); Dyson, R.L.; Frank, L.A. )

    1992-12-01

    The degree of pitch angle scattering and chaotization of various particle populations in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase is studied by utilizing the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model. A temporally evolving magnetic field model for the growth phase is constructed by enhancing the near-Earth currents and thinning the current sheet from the values given by the static Tsyganenko model. Changing the field geometry toward an increasingly taillike configuration leads to pitch angle scattering of particles whose Larmor radii become comparable to the field line radius of curvature. Several different cases representing substorms with varying levels of magnetic disturbance have been studied. In each case, the field development during the growth phase leads to considerable scattering of the thermal electrons relatively close to the Earth. The current sheet regions where the electron motion is chaotic are magnetically mapped to the ionosphere and compared with low-altitude measurements of electron precipitation. The chaotization of the thermal electron population occurs within a few minutes of the substorm onset, and the ionospheric mappings of the chaotic regions in the equatorial plane compare well with the region of brightening auroras. Even though the temporal evolution of the complex plasma system cannot be self-consistently described by the temporal evolution of the empirical field model, these models can provide the most accurate estimates of the field parameters for tail stability calculations.

  10. Ionospheric signature of the tail neutral line during the growth phase of a substorm

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Heelis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    An isolated substorm occurred on October 21, 1981 at the end of a large geomagnetic storm. Observations of particles and fields were made during the presumed growth phase of this substorm by the DE 2 satellite. The ionospheric convection velocitie averaging {approximately} 500 m/s in an eastward channel flow in the premidnight sector. Despite the convection signature, geomagnetic conditions were quiet with the AL index >{minus}50 nT and very weak field-aligned current. The authors will present an in-depth study of the nightside gap region within the channel of eastward flow. They will discuss the possible effects of a neutral wind flywheel on the convection. Also, they will present a detailed analysis of the electrodynamic structures within the nightside gap which indicates a magnetospheric source. Possible ionospheric signatures of the tail neutral line are discussed. 19 refs., 8 fig.

  11. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    sufficiently that the NSh reaches the outer radiation belt at about t=85 min, the ionospheric conductivity has grown sufficiently that the XTJ disrupted by the DZs changes its dawn-to-dusk closure by travelling through the ionosphere. This second stage of disruption is the Substorm Current Wedge (SCW). Onset follows at about t=88 min.

  12. Growth-phase thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the CDAW 6 substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanny, Jeff; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Baker, D. N.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Nishida, A.

    1994-01-01

    The thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the growth phase of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 magnetospheric substorm is studied. The expansion onset of the substorm occurred at 1054 UT, March 22, 1979. During the growth phase, two spacecraft, International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 and ISEE 2, were within the current sheet approximately 13 R(sub E) from the Earth and obtained simultaneous high-resolution magnetic data at two points in the current sheet. Plasma data were also provided by the ISEE spacecraft and solar wind data by IMP 8. To facilitate the analysis, the GSM magnetic field data are transformed to a 'neutral sheet coordinate system' in which the new x axis is parallel to the average magnetic field above and below the neutral sheet and the new y axis lies in the GSM equatorial plane. A model based on the assumption that the current sheet is a time-invariant structure fails to predict neutral sheet crossing times. Consequently, the Harris sheet model, which allows one to remove the restriction of time invariancy, is used instead. It is found that during the growth phase, a model parameter corresponding to the thickness of the current sheet decreased exponentially from about 5 R(sub E) to 1 R(sub E) with a time constant of about 14 min. In addition, the ISEE 1 and ISEE 2 neutral sheet crossings after expansion onset indicate that the neutral sheet was moving upward at 7 km/s relative to the spacecraft. Since both crossings occurred in approximately 80 s, the current sheet thickness is estimated to be about 500 km. These results demonstrate that the near-Earth current sheet undergoes dramatic thinning during the substorm growth phase and expansion onset.

  13. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng

    2003-04-30

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| {approx} 9 R{sub E}) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J{sub {phi}} {approx} 10 nA/m{sup 2}) and very high plasma {beta} ({beta} {approx} 40) between 7 and 10 R{sub E}. The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J{sub {parallel}max} {approx} 3 {micro}A/m{sup 2}) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents.

  14. CURRENT SHEET THINNING AND ENTROPY CONSTRAINTS DURING THE SUBSTORM GROWTH PHASE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Hall, F., IV

    2009-12-01

    A typical property during the growth phase of geomagnetic substorms is the thinning of the near-Earth current sheet, most pronounced in the region between 6 and 15 R_E. We propose that the cause for the current sheet thinning is convection from the midnight tail region to the dayside to replenish magnetospheric magnetic flux which is eroded at the dayside as a result of dayside reconnection. Adiabatic convection from the near-Earth tail region toward the dayside must conserve the entropy on magnetic field lines. This constraint prohibits a source of the magnetic flux from a region further out in the magnetotail. Thus the near-Earth tail region is increasingly depleted of magnetic flux (the Erickson and Wolf [1980] problem) with entropy matching that of flux tubes that are eroded on the dayside. It is proposed that the magnetic flux depletion in the near-Earth tail forces the formation of thin current layers. The process is documented by three-dimensional MHD simulations. It is shown that the simulations yield a time scale, location, and other general characteristics of the current sheet evolution during the substorm growth phase.

  15. Convection Constraints and Current Sheet Thinning During the Substorm Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Hsieh, M.

    2012-12-01

    A typical property during the growth phase of geomagnetic substorms is the thinning of the near-Earth current sheet, most pronounced in the region between 6 and 15 RE. We propose that the cause for this current sheet thinning is convection from the midnight tail region to the dayside to replenish magnetospheric magnetic flux that is eroded at the dayside as a result of dayside reconnection. Slow (adiabatic) convection from the near-Earth tail region toward the dayside must conserve the entropy on magnetic field lines. This constraint prohibits a source of magnetic flux from a region further out in the magnetotail. Thus the near-Earth tail region is increasingly depleted of magnetic flux (the Erickson and Wolf [1980] problem) with entropy matching that of flux tubes that are eroded on the dayside. It is proposed that the magnetic flux depletion in the near-Earth tail forces the formation of thin current layers. The process is illustrated and examined by three-dimensional meso-scale MHD simulations. It is shown that the simulations yield a time scale, location, and other general characteristics of the current sheet evolution consistent with observations during the substorm growth phase. The developing thin current sheet is easily destabilized and can undergo localized reconnection events. We present properties of the thinning current sheet, the associated entropy evolution, examples of localized reconnection onset and we discuss the dependence of this process on external parameters such the global reconnection rate.

  16. RCM-E simulation of substorm growth phase arc associated with large-scale adiabatic convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wolf, Richard A.; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Sazykin, Stanislav

    2013-12-01

    Substorm auroral breakup often occurs on a longitudinally elongated arc at the end of a growth phase. We present an idealized high-resolution simulation with the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) to investigate how large-scale adiabatic convection under equilibrium conditions can give rise to an auroral arc. We find that a thin arc that maps to the magnetic transition region at r ~ 8 RE emerges in the late growth phase. The simulation implies that the arc in the premidnight sector is associated with a sheet of additional region 1 sense field-aligned current (FAC) just poleward of the main region 2 FAC, while the arc in the postmidnight sector is associated with the poleward portion of the main upward region 2 FAC. Explanations for the location and the thickness of the arc are proposed, based on the simulation.

  17. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of Current Sheet Evolution During the Growth Phase of Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F.; Otto, A.

    2004-12-01

    Current sheet thinning in the near-Earth magnetotail is an important element of growth phase dynamics since it determines the conditions for substorm onset. The growth phase is initiated by the erosion of closed dayside magnetic flux. This flux is replenished by convection of closed magnetic flux from the near-Earth tail region to the dayside. However, this process of magnetic flux replenishment is subject to the entropy and mass conservation constraints imposed on the slow quasi-static convection of magnetic flux tubes from the mid- and far-tail regions, first identified by Erickson and Wolf (1980). We examine whether the depletion of flux from a finite reservoir in the near-Earth tail region leads to the observed current sheet thinning. This hypothesis is tested using a self-consistent three-dimensional MHD code which is coupled to a semi-empirical magnetic field model. The resulting system was relaxed to an equilibrium state using a modification of a `ballistic relaxation' method. We discuss the structure of the equilibrium near-Earth magnetotail. A plasma outflow is prescribed in the near-Earth magnetotail to model the depletion of the `flux reservoir' described above. The resulting evolution of the current sheet is discussed.

  18. Formation of a very thin current sheet in the near-earth magnetotail and the explosive growth phase of substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Zhang, L.; Choe, G. S.; Cai, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetofricional method is used to construct two-dimensional MHD equilibria of the Earth's magnetosphere for a given distribution of entropy functions(S = pV(exp gamma), where p is the plasma pressure and V is the tube volume per unit magnetic flux. It is found that a very thin current sheet with B (sub zeta) is less than 0.5 nu T and thickness less than 1000 km can be formed in the near-earth magnetotail (x is approximately -8 to -20R(sub e) during the growth phase of substorm. The tail current sheets are found to become thinner as the entropy or the entropy gradient increases. It is suggested that the new entropy anti-diffusion instability associated with plasma transport across field lines leads to magnetic field dipolarization and accelerates the formation of thin current sheet, which may explain the observed explosive growth phase of substorms.

  19. Global numerical simulation of the growth phase and the expansion onset for a substorm observed by Viking

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, J.A.; Slinker, S.P.; Lyon, J.G.

    1995-10-01

    The authors report the first global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of an actual magnetospheric substorm, which was recorded by the Viking spacecraft on October 19, 1986. The simulation is driven by IMP 8 solar wind parameters measured upstream of the Earth`s bow shock. The substorm, which had expansion onset at 1132 UT, was caused by a brief period of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and two weak solar wind shocks. The simulation model includes a self-consistent auroral ionospheric conductance depending directly on the MHD magnetospheric plasma parameters and magnetic field. Synthetic auroral emissions, derived from simulation results, are compared to the Viking images, which show considerable dayside activity preceding the substorm. The authors also compare model-derived synthetic AU and AL indices to geomagnetic measurements. The simulation results are seen to be in reasonable agreement with the observations throughout the growth phase and expansion onset. Moreover, the results allow the authors to form conclusions concerning which essential processes were responsible for the substorm occurrence. These results are a highly encouraging first step leading toward development of a space weather forecasting methodology based on the directly measured solar input. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Self-consistent quasi-static parallel electric field associated with substorm growth phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Pellat, R.; Roux, A.

    2000-06-01

    A new approach is proposed to calculate the self-consistent parallel electric field associated with the response of a plasma to quasi-static electromagnetic perturbations (ωsubstorm growth phase. LC00 used an expansion in the small parameter Te/Ti (Te/Ti is typically 0.1 to 0.2 in the plasma sheet) to solve the quasi-neutrality condition (QNC). To the lowest order in Te/Ti<1, they found that the QNC implies (1) the existence of a global electrostatic potential Φ0 which strongly modifies the perpendicular transport of the plasma and (2) the parallel electric field vanishes. In the present study, we solve the QNC to the next order in Te/Ti and show that a field-aligned potential drop proportional to Te/Ti does develop. We compute explicitly this potential drop in the case of the substorm growth phase modeled as in LC00. This potential drop has been calculated analytically for two regimes of parameters, ωd<ω and ωd>ω (ωd being the bounce averaged magnetic drift frequency equal to kyvd, where ky is the wave number in the y direction and vd the bounce averaged magnetic drift velocity). The first regime (ωd<ω) corresponds to small particle

  1. Self-consistent quasi-static radial transport during the substorm growth phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Pellat, R.; Roux, A.

    2000-06-01

    We develop a self-consistent description of the slowly changing magnetic configuration of the near-Earth plasma sheet (NEPS) during substorm growth phase. This new approach is valid for quasi-static fluctuations ωgrowth phase, the (total) azimuthal electric field is directed eastward, close to the equator, and westward, off-equator. Thus large equatorial pitch angle particles drift tailward, whereas small pitch angle particles drift

  2. Modeling the growth phase of a substorm using the Tsyganenko model and multi-spacecraft observations: CDAW-9

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, T.I. Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki ); Baker, D.N.; Fairfield, D.H. ); Pellinen, R.J. ); Murphree, J.S.; Elphinstone, R.D. ); McPherron, R.L. ); Fennell, J.F. ); Lopez, R.E. ); Nagai, T. )

    1991-11-01

    The CDAW-9 Event C focused upon the early part of 3 May 1986 when a large substorm onset occurred at 0111 UT. By modifying the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model, the authors construct a model in which the near-Earth current systems are enhanced with time to describe the observed development of the tail magnetic field during the growth phase. The cross-tail current intensity and the thickness of the current sheet are determined by comparison with three spacecraft in the near-Earth tail. The location of the auroral bulge as recorded by the Viking imager is mapped to the equatorial current sheet. The degree of chaotization of the thermal electrons is estimated, and the consequences to the tail stability towards ion tearing are discussed. The authors conclude that the mapping of the brightening region in the auroral oval corresponds to the regions in the tail where the current sheet may be unstable towards ion tearing.

  3. Modeling the growth phase of a substorm using the Tsyganenko model and multi-spacecraft observations - CDAW-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Fairfield, D. H.; Pellinen, R. J.; Murphree, J. S.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Lopez, R. E.; Nagai, T.

    1991-01-01

    The CDAW-9 Event C focused upon the early part of 3 May 1986 when a large substorm onset occurred at 0111 UT. By modifying the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model, a model is constructed in which the near-earth current systems are enhanced with time to describe the observed development of the tail magnetic field during the growth phase. The cross-tail current intensity and the thickness of the current sheet are determined by comparison with three spacecraft in the near-earth tail. The location of the auroral bulge as recorded by the Viking imager is mapped to the equatorial current sheet. The degree of chaotization of the thermal electrons is estimated, and the consequences to the tail stability towards on tearing are discussed. It is concluded that the mapping of the brightening region in the auroral oval corresponds to the regions in the tail where the current sheet may be unstable towards ion tearing.

  4. MHD instability with dawn-dusk symmetry in near-Earth plasma sheet during substorm growth phase*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Hegna, C.; Sovinec, C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent global MHD simulations of March 23, 2007 THEMIS substorm event using the OpenGGCM code have confirmed the presence of both high-ky ballooning modes and zero-ky instabilities in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the substorm growth phase [Raeder et al 2010]. These results are consistent with findings from earlier analyses [Siscoe et al 2009; Zhu et al 2009]. Here ky is the azimuthal wavenumber in the dawn-dusk direction. However, the nature and role of the ky=0 mode, as well as its interaction with the high ky ballooning modes, in the process leading to the expansion onset remain unclear. In this work, we focus on the stability properties of the ky=0 mode. A re-evaluation of the tail-tearing mode criterion by Sitnov and Schindler (2009) suggested that the dipolarization front (DF) structure identified in THEMIS observations [Runov et al 2009] could be tearing-unstable. Linear calculations using the NIMROD code have found a growing tearing mode in a generalized Harris sheet with a DF-like structure, which is also a unique feature closely correlated with the appearance of zero-ky mode in the OpenGGCM simulation. The ideal-MHD energy principle analysis is used to address the question whether the ky=0 mode is an ideal or resistive MHD instability. We further compare the linear and nonlinear tail-tearing mode in NIMROD simulations with the ky=0 mode from OpenGGCM simulations. *Supported by NSF Grants AGS-0902360 and PHY-0821899. References: Raeder, J., P. Zhu, Y.-S. Ge, and G. Siscoe (2010), Tail force imbalance and ballooning instability preceding substorm onset, submitted to J. Geophys. Res. Runov, A., et al. (2009), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L14106. Siscoe, G.L., M.M. Kuznetsova, and J. Raeder (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 3141. Sitnov, M.I. and K. Schindler (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08102. Zhu, P., J. Raeder, K. Germaschewski, and C.C. Hegna (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 1129.

  5. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0-5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2-5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.

  6. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    SciTech Connect

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.

  7. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arcmore » location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.« less

  8. Observations of the phases of the substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronkov, I. O.; Donovan, E. F.; Samson, J. C.

    2003-02-01

    Following the database of large-scale vortices during pseudo-breakup and breakup registered by the Gillam All-Sky Imager, we selected one event (19 February 1996) for a detailed consideration. This event is a sequence of pseudo-breakup and local substorm, and breakup followed by the large substorm, which is isolated from the previous pseudo-breakup by the second growth phase. Commencement of these elements of auroral activity was clearly seen above the Churchill line of the Canadian Auroral Network for the OPEN Program Unified Study (CANOPUS; pseudo-breakup was completely covered by the field of view of the Gillam All-Sky Imager). Geotail was located at ˜19 RE in the equatorial plane of midnight sector, which, along with supporting observations from two geostationary satellites (GOES 8 and 9), allowed for a comparison of ground-based, geostationary orbit and midtail signatures. The pseudo-breakup consisted of two distinct stages: a near-exponential arc intensity growth and a poleward vortex expansion that started simultaneously with dipolarization in the inner magnetosphere. The latter corresponded to explosive onset of short-period (tens of millihertz) pulsations observed at geostationary orbit and on the ground in the vicinity of the arc. No significant disturbances poleward of the vortex were observed. Pseudo-breakup was followed by the second growth phase, which involved a significant thinning of the plasma sheet. Breakup was of a similar two-stage character as the pseudo-breakup. Full onset of the expansive phase that followed breakup was seen simultaneously by all instruments including Geotail, which detected strong perturbations in the midtail. The expansive phase onset launched the second postbreakup package of Pi2 pulsations that were of larger amplitude. Finally, during the substorm recovery phase, the poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) were observed as long-period, on the order of 10 min, pulses of electron precipitation. PBI commencement

  9. Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This chapter deals with the essence of the magnetospheric substorm, the return of magnetic flux into the magnetosphere after disconnection from the solar wind magnetic field. There are three fundamental transport processes involved: (1) thinning of the tail plasma sheet and accompanying recession of the outer boundary of the dipolar magnetosphere during the growth phase, (2) flux transport along the tail toward that boundary after onset of tail reconnection, and (3) penetration of plasma and magnetic flux into the dipolar magnetosphere. The chapter then looks at corresponding processes in the Jupiter and Saturn magnetospheres and tails, which are strongly dominated by the fast planetary rotations. It elucidates some key aspects of the entry problem, albeit from a personal vantage point, and addresses the still open questions. Finally, the chapter addresses the correlation between solar wind ram pressure and auroral activity and brightness on Jupiter and Saturn.

  10. The average ionospheric electrodynamics for the different substorm phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Sun, W.; Akasofu, S.I.

    1996-01-01

    The average patterns of the electrostatic potential, current vectors, and Joule heating in the polar ionosphere, as well as the associated field-aligned currents, are determined for a quiet time, the growth phase, the expansion phase, the peak epoch, and the recovery phase of substorms. For this purpose, the Kamide-Richmond-Matsushita magnetogram-inversion algorithm is applied to a data set (for March 17, 18, and 19, 1978) from the six meridian magnetometer chains (the total number of magnetometer stations being 71) which were operated during the period of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). This is the first attempt at obtaining, on the basis of individual substorms, the average pattern of substorm quantitities in the polar ionosphere for the different epochs. The main results are as follows: (1) The substorm-time current patterns over the entire polar region consist of two components. The first one is related to the two-cell convection pattern, and the second one is the westward electrojet in the dark sector which is related to the wedge current. (2) Time variations of the two components for the four substorm epochs are shown to be considerably different. (3) The dependence of these differences on the ionospheric electric field and the conductivities (Hall and Pedersen) is identified. (4) It is shown that the large-scale two-cell pattern in the electric potential is dominant during the growth phase of substorms. (5) The expansion phase is characterized by the appearance of a strong westward electrojet, which is added to the two-cell pattern. (6) The large-scale potential pattern becomes complicated during the recovery phase of substorms, but the two-cell pattern appears to be relatively dominant again during their late recovery as the wedge current subsides. These and many other earlier results are consistent with the present ones, which are more quantitatively and comprehensively demonstrated in this global study. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Magnetic signatures of precursors to substorm expansive phase onset

    SciTech Connect

    de Groot-Hedlin, C.D.; Rostoker, G. )

    1987-06-01

    The expansive phase of magnetospheric substorms involves the development of auroral loops and surges with particular emphasis on the westward travelling surge which is identified with the western edge of the substorm current wedge. The authors use as a working hypothesis the contention that the wavelike auroral structures associated with the current wedge are a manifestation of the action of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the interface between the central plasma sheet (CPS) and the adjacent boundary layer plasmas in the deep magnetotail. Based on this concept, they used ground-based magnetometer data in an attempt to identify the growth of ionospheric current systems which might be associated with the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They have, in fact, found that the expansive phase is preceded by the growth of a weak substorm current wedge which strengthens explosively at the time of onset. They suggest that field-aligned current flows out of the ionosphere as part of a process damping a growing wave at the CPS/boundary layer interface. When the field-aligned current density exceeds {approximately} 1 {mu}A/m{sup 2}, an acceleration region at altitudes of {approximately} 1 R{sub E} is activated marking the onset of the substorm expansive phase.

  12. Particle acceleration during substorm growth and onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    ISEE-1 observations of ion and electron energization made at 11 RE during a substorm event on April 2, 1978 are presented. An analysis of the dominant cross-tail current systems in this event (Mitchell et al., 1990) has made it possible to uniquely associate particle energization processes with the development and/or disruption of the cross-tail currents. It is found that significant ion acceleration occurs as the ions participate in serpentine cross-tail motion (Speiser, 1965), establishing the dominant plasma sheet current system just prior to onset. As this current disrupts, the magnetic field configuration dipolarizes and further ion energization and the bulk of the electron energization occurs. During dipolarization energization is due primarily to the inductive electric field, including betatron and Fermi acceleration processes.

  13. Phase transition-like behavior of the magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Vassiliadis, D.; Valdivia, J. A.; Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.

    2000-06-01

    The behavior of substorms as sudden transitions of the magnetosphere is studied using the Bargatze et al. [1985] data set of the solar wind induced electric field vBs and the auroral electrojet index AL. The data set is divided into three subsets representing different levels of activity, and they are studied using the singular spectrum analysis. The points representing the evolution of the magnetosphere in the subspace of the eigenvectors corresponding to the three largest eigenvalues can be approximated by two-dimensional manifolds with a relative deviation of 10-20%. For the first two subsets corresponding to small and medium activity levels the manifolds have a pleated structure typical of the cusp catastrophe. The dynamics of the magnetosphere near these pleated structures resembles the hysteresis phenomenon typical of first-order phase transitions. The reconstructed manifold is similar to the ``temperature-pressure-density'' diagrams of equilibrium phase transitions. The singular spectra of vBs, AL, and combined data have the power law dependence typical of second-order phase transitions and self-organized criticality. The magnetosphere thus exhibits the signatures of both self-organization and self-organized criticality. It is concluded that the magnetospheric substorm is neither a pure catastrophe of the low-dimensional system nor a random set of avalanches of different scales described by the simple sandpile models. The substorms behave like nonequilibrium phase transitions, with features of both first- and second-order phase transitions.

  14. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  15. Recovery phase of magnetospheric substorms and its association with morning-sector aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Opgenoorth, H.J.; Persson, M.A.L.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    The authors report on conclusions drawn from an extensive study of ground based measurements of the recovery phase of magnetospheric substorms. Much previous work has considered this phase to simply consist of decay processes of growth phase phenomena as the magnetosphere relaxes to its quiescent state. From their studies of observational data the authors conclude that there is evidence of distinct processes within the recovery phase which are related to it alone. These include intense electrojet activity, high-energy particle precipitation, distinct large scale auroral phenomena, and possibly even expanded auroral activity.

  16. Poleward leaping auroras, the substorm expansive and recovery phases and the recovery of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W.

    1992-05-01

    The auroral motions and geomagnetic changes the characterize the substorm`s expansive phase, maximum epoch, and recovery phase are discussed in the context of their possible associations with the dropout and, especially, the recovery of the magnetotail plasma sheet. The evidence that there may be an inordinately sudden large poleward excursion or displacement (a poleward leap) of the electrojet and the auroras at the expansive phase-recovery phase transition is described. The close temporal association of these signatures with the recovery of the plasma sheet, observed on many occasions, suggests a causal relationship between substorm maximum epoch and recovery phase on the one hand and plasma sheet recovery on the other.

  17. Traveling compression region observed in the mid-tail lobes near substorm expansion phase onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Nose, M.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of traveling compression regions (TCRs) in the midtail lobes are examined. Through the use of the AL index, isolated substorm events with well developed expansion phases are selected. The TCR events which feature a field compression coincident with modified Bz variations are categorized into different types, and the magnetic variations are interpreted in terms of the relative location of the point of observation to the plasmoid at the time of release and the effects of tail flaring. In order to understand the relationship between the plasmoid release time and the substorm onset time, the time difference between the different types of TCR and the substorm onset determined by Pi 2 pulsations at mid-latitude ground stations, is examined. The results suggest that the downtail release of most of the plasmoids created earthwards of -38 earth radii occurs at almost the same distance as the substorm onset.

  18. Substorm evolution of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Juusola, L.; Whiter, D.; Kauristie, K.

    2015-07-01

    Auroral arcs are often associated with magnetically quiet time and substorm growth phases. We have studied the evolution of auroral structures during global and local magnetic activity to investigate the occurrence rate of auroral arcs during different levels of magnetic activity. The ground-magnetic and auroral conditions are described by the magnetometer and auroral camera data from five Magnetometers — Ionospheric radars — All-sky cameras Large Experiment stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland. We identified substorm growth, expansion, and recovery phases from the local electrojet index (IL) in 1996-2007 and analyzed the auroral structures during the different phases. Auroral structures were also analyzed during different global magnetic activity levels, as described by the planetary Kp index. The distribution of auroral structures for all substorm phases and Kp levels is of similar shape. About one third of all detected structures are auroral arcs. This suggests that auroral arcs occur in all conditions as the main element of the aurora. The most arc-dominated substorm phases occur in the premidnight sector, while the least arc-dominated substorm phases take place in the dawn sector. Arc event lifetimes and expectation times calculated for different substorm phases show that the longest arc-dominated periods are found during growth phases, while the longest arc waiting times occur during expansion phases. Most of the arc events end when arcs evolve to more complex structures. This is true for all substorm phases. Based on the number of images of auroral arcs and the durations of substorm phases, we conclude that a randomly selected auroral arc most likely belongs to a substorm expansion phase. A small time delay, of the order of a minute, is observed between the magnetic signature of the substorm onset (i.e., the beginning of the negative bay) and the auroral breakup (i.e., the growth phase arc changing into a dynamic display). The magnetic onset was

  19. Poleward leaping auroras, the substorm expansive and recovery phases and the recovery of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    The auroral motions and geomagnetic changes the characterize the substorm's expansive phase, maximum epoch, and recovery phase are discussed in the context of their possible associations with the dropout and, especially, the recovery of the magnetotail plasma sheet. The evidence that there may be an inordinately sudden large poleward excursion or displacement (a poleward leap) of the electrojet and the auroras at the expansive phase-recovery phase transition is described. The close temporal association of these signatures with the recovery of the plasma sheet, observed on many occasions, suggests a causal relationship between substorm maximum epoch and recovery phase on the one hand and plasma sheet recovery on the other.

  20. Firehose instability near substorm expansion-phase onset?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Wolf, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of plasma ejected earthward from a patch of reconnection at about 25 RE is studied using a double-adiabatic-MHD simulation of a thin filament. Firehose instability occurs in the simulation after a compressional shock reflects from the near-Earth region. The tailward-propagating compressional wave, which brakes the earthward flow in the filament, is thus characterized by strong magnetic fluctuations. Within the context of the Near-Earth-Neutral-Line model of substorms, we suggest that firehose instability might cause the intense magnetic-field fluctuations that are observed in the inner plasma sheet at substorm onset. To assess the accuracy of double-adiabatic MHD, we tested it for a situation that resembles the substorm-generated filament but is simple enough to allow an exact kinetic theory solution. The test confirms that double-adiabatic MHD does a reasonable job of predicting when the firehose criterion is satisfied.

  1. Near-earth substorm onset: A coordinated study

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, M.A.L.; Opgenoorth, H.J.; Eriksson, A.I.; Dovner, P.O.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Andre, M.; Blomberg, L.G.; Erlandson, R.E.

    1994-08-15

    The authors present simultaneous satellite and ground-based measurements of a substorm. Throughout the initial substorm expansion, southward drifting arcs are observed poleward of the expanding substorm aurora, indicating two independent systems of particle precipitation. Freja passes the brightening onset arc in the topside ionosphere near the moment of the substorm onset, observing an Alfven wave, field aligned current and oxygen ion outflow. The substorm onset occurs at low magnetospheric L-shells, near the poleward edge of the region of trapped particles. The location and time for the substorm injection are confirmed by geostationary spacecraft together with magnetometers, all-sky cameras and radar on the ground. The authors believe that the substorm onset may be triggered by modification of the oxygen content of the inner magnetosphere during the growth-phase caused by ionospheric ion outflow. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Phase transition-like behavior of magnetospheric substorms: Global MHD simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, S. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we statistically investigate whether the simulated substorms from global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have a combination of global and multiscale features, revealed in substorm dynamics by [2000] and featured the phase transition-like behavior. We simulate seven intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the data set used in the above works [, 1985]. We analyze the input-output (vBs-pseudo AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those inferred from the original set (vBs-observed AL index). The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs-observed AL index system. Although the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system also shows multiscale behavior (scale-invariant power law dependence) in SSA power spectrum. Besides, we find the critical exponent of the nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multiscale behavior when compared to the real system.

  3. Phase Transition-like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global MHD Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Guzdar, P. N.; Goodrich, C. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their relevance to massive global energy loading and unloading, lots of observations and studies have been made for magnetic substorm events. Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we investigate whether the simulated substorms from global MHD models have the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features revealed by \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000]}. We simulated 6 intervals of total duration of 240 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. We analyzed the input-output (vBs--pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compared the results to those in \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]}. The analysis of the coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs--observed-AL index system from Sitnov et al. [2000]. The explanation lies in the cusp catastrophe model proposed by Lewis [1991]. Although, the comparison between observation and individual global MHD simulations may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is consistent between simulations and observations. This is an important validation of the global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. The coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invarianet power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We found critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere and distinguish the second order phase transition model from the self-organized criticality model. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multi-scale behavior when compared to the real system.

  4. Phase Transition like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global and Multiscale Features from MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    Studies of the magnetosphere during substorms based on the observational data of the solar wind and the geomagnetic indices have shown clear features of phase transition-like behavior [Sitnov et al., 2000]. The global MHD simulations of the events in the Bargatze et al. [1985] database are used to study the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features of substorms. We simulated 7 intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. From the simulations the AL index is computed from the maximum of the westward Hall current and is referred to as the pseudo-AL index. We analyzed the input-output (vBs-pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those in Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]. The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition characterizing global beahavior, similar to the case of vBs-observed-AL index [Sitnov et al., 2000]. Although, the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum snalysis is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invariant power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We find critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere.

  5. A cross-field current instability for substorm expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. ); Chang, C.L.; Mankofsky, A. ); Wong, H.K. ); Winske, D. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors investigate a cross-field current instability (CFCI) as a candidate for current disruption during substorm expansions. The numerical solution of the linear dispersion equation indicates that (1) the proposed instability can occur at the inner edge or the midsection of the neutral sheet just prior to the substorm expansion onset although the former environment is found more favorable at the same drift speed scaled to the ion thermal speed, (2) the computed growth time is comparable to the substorm onset time, and (3) the excited waves have a mixed polarization with frequencies near the ion gyrofrequency at the inner edge and near the lower hybrid frequency in the midtail region. On the basis of this analysis, they propose a substorm development scenario in which plasma sheet thinning during the substorm growth phase leads to an enhancement in the relative drift between ions and electrons. This results in the neutral sheet being susceptible to the CHCI and initiates the diversion of the cross-tail current through the ionosphere. Whether or not a substorm current wedge is ultimately formed is regulated by the ionospheric condition. A large number of substorm features can be readily understood with the proposed scheme. These include (1) precursory activities (pseudobreakups) prior to substorm onset, (2) substorm initiation region to be spatially localized, (3) three different solar wind conditions for substorm occurence, (4) skew towards evening local times for substorm onset locations, (5) different acceleration characteristics between ions and electrons, (6) tailward spreading of current disruption region after substorm onset, and (7) local time expansion of substorm current wedge with possible discrete westward jump for the evening expansion.

  6. Auroral substorms as an electrical discharge phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    During the last 50 years, we have made much progress in studying auroral substorms (consisting of the growth phase, the expansion phase, and the recovery phase). In particular, we have quantitatively learned about auroral substorms in terms of the global energy input-output relationship. (i) What powers auroral substorms? (ii) Why is there a long delay (1 h) of auroral activities after the magnetosphere is powered (growth phase)? (iii) How much energy is accumulated and unloaded during substorms? (iv) Why is the lifetime of the expansion phase so short (1h)? (v) How is the total energy input-output relationship? (vi) Where is the magnetic energy accumulated during the growth phase? On the basis of the results obtained in (i)-(vi), we have reached the following crucial question: (vii) how can the unloaded energy produce a secondary dynamo, which powers the expansion phase? Or more specifically, how can the accumulated magnetic energy get unloaded such that it generates the earthward electric fields needed to produce the expansion phase of auroral substorms? It is this dynamo and the resulting current circuit that drive a variety of explosive auroral displays as electrical discharge phenomena during the expansion phase, including the poleward advance of auroral arcs and the electrojet. This chain of processes is summarized in Section 4.2. This is the full version of work published by Akasofu (2015).

  7. The ground signatures of the expansion phase during multiple onset substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pytte, T.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kokubun, S.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the signatures of multiple-expansion-phase substorm onsets in night-time magnetograms as well as in recordings of auroral activity and energetic electron precipitation. Individual onsets of Pi2 magnetic pulsations observed at three widely spaced stations are used to define and time each onset accurately in order to distinguish between local variations in bay activity and fully developed substorm onsets; this method is equivalent to defining each new onset in terms of the brightening of an auroral arc and the formation of a westward-travelling surge. It is found that the formation of multiple auroral surges appears to be a fundamental feature of multiple-onset substorms, that each surge seems to be associated with a localized field-aligned current system which moves westward with the surge and perturbs the preexisting current wedge, and that this gives rise to the multiple-onset signatures observed on subauroral and low-latitude magnetograms. Since certain findings contradict existing models of multiple-onset events, an alternative model is proposed which is based on the fundamental role of surge activity and localized current wedges.

  8. Magnetospheric Substorm Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1998-01-01

    It was proposed that the expansion phase of substorms results from a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind, following a greater than or equal to 30 min growth phase due to an enhancement in this electric field. The reduction in the electric field is assumed to propagate anti-sunward within the magnetosphere. Triggering by a reduction in the electric field is suggested by the observation that substorms are often triggered by northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, under the theory presented here, substorms may be triggered by anything that causes an electric field reduction such as a reduction in the magnitude of the y-component of the IMF. A reduction in the large-scale electric field disrupts both the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occurs during the growth phase. It is suggested here that this can lead to formation of the expansion-phase current wedge and active aurora. The current wedge results from the magnetic drift of ions, which has a speed proportional to particle energy, and a large azimuthal gradient in mean particle energy that is expected to develop in the vicinity of magnetic midnight during the growth phase. Current wedge formation will most likely be initiated near the radial distance (approx. 6- 10 R(sub E)) of the peak in the growth-phase plasma pressure distribution, and then propagate tailward from that region. Order-of-magnitude calculations show that the above proposal can account for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to the growth phase, the magnitude of the reduction in the cross-tail current within the current wedge, the speeds of tailward and westward expansion of the current reduction region, the speeds of poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere, and the magnitude of wedge field-aligned currents that connect the ionospheric region of active auroral to the divergent cross

  9. Lower thermospheric wind variations in auroral patches during the substorm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Brenton J.; Kurihara, Junichi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Fallen, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the lower thermospheric wind with a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsø, Norway, found the largest wind variations in a night during the appearance of auroral patches at the substorm recovery phase. Taking into account magnetospheric substorm evolution of plasma energy accumulation and release, the largest wind amplitude at the recovery phase is a fascinating result. The results are the first detailed investigation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system at the substorm recovery phase using comprehensive data sets of solar wind, geomagnetic field, auroral pattern, and FPI-derived wind. This study used three events in November 2010 and January 2012, particularly focusing on the wind signatures associated with the auroral morphology, and found three specific features: (1) wind fluctuations that were isolated at the edge and/or in the darker area of an auroral patch with the largest vertical amplitude up to about 20 m/s and with the longest oscillation period about 10 min, (2) when the convection electric field was smaller than 15 mV/m, and (3) wind fluctuations that were accompanied by pulsating aurora. This approach suggests that the energy dissipation to produce the wind fluctuations is localized in the auroral pattern. Effects of the altitudinal variation in the volume emission rate were investigated to evaluate the instrumental artifact due to vertical wind shear. The small electric field values suggest weak contributions of the Joule heating and Lorentz force processes in wind fluctuations. Other unknown mechanisms may play a principal role at the recovery phase.

  10. Satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms on August 15, 1968. I - State of the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state of the magnetosphere on August 15, 1968, as defined by magnetic indices and ground magnetograms, is described. Onset times of various phases of two magnetospheric substorms are determined. These substorms occurred while the OGO 5 satellite was inbound on the midnight meridian through the cusp region of the geomagnetic tail. It is concluded that at least two worldwide substorm expansions were preceded by growth phases.

  11. Statistical characterization of the growth and spatial scales of the substorm onset arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Rae, I. J.; Watt, C. E. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Forsyth, C.; Owen, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first multievent study of the spatial and temporal structuring of the aurora to provide statistical evidence of the near-Earth plasma instability which causes the substorm onset arc. Using data from ground-based auroral imagers, we study repeatable signatures of along-arc auroral beads, which are thought to represent the ionospheric projection of magnetospheric instability in the near-Earth plasma sheet. We show that the growth and spatial scales of these wave-like fluctuations are similar across multiple events, indicating that each sudden auroral brightening has a common explanation. We find statistically that growth rates for auroral beads peak at low wave number with the most unstable spatial scales mapping to an azimuthal wavelength λ≈ 1700-2500 km in the equatorial magnetosphere at around 9-12 RE. We compare growth rates and spatial scales with a range of theoretical predictions of magnetotail instabilities, including the Cross-Field Current Instability and the Shear Flow Ballooning Instability. We conclude that, although the Cross-Field Current instability can generate similar magnitude of growth rates, the range of unstable wave numbers indicates that the Shear Flow Ballooning Instability is the most likely explanation for our observations.

  12. Occurrency frequency of substorm field and plasma signatures observed near-earth by ISEE-1/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, T. S.; McPherron, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    The onset of the majority of substorms occurs when the tail field stops growing more tail-like and begins to become more dipolar. This corresponds to the onset signatures on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit. The AE indices and the IGS Pi 2 data were used to determine the major substorm onsets of 1978 and 1979. The time delay between successive substorms, the distribution of the substorm growth phase duration and the probability of tailward flows were determined as a function of spacecraft location. About a half of the substorms exhibit a plasma signature including earthward or tailward flows or plasma sheet drop out and recovery. Earthward flows are often seen at substorm onset, and almost always during substorm recovery. Tailward flows are occasionally seen at onset as the spacecraft is close enough to the neutral sheet. The experimental results are compared to predictions based on the neutral line and current sheet disruption models.

  13. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  14. Spontaneous and trigger-associated substorms compared: Electrodynamic parameters in the polar ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Kamide, Y.; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Hu, Ze-Jun; Yang, Hui-Gen

    2011-01-01

    An attempt is made to study the difference, if any, between the response of the polar ionosphere to spontaneous substorms and that to trigger-associated substorms in terms of electrodynamic parameters including ionospheric current vectors, the electric potential, and the current function. The results show that, in the first approximation, the ionospheric parameters for the two types of substorms are quite similar. It is therefore conceived that spontaneous substorms are not very different from trigger-associated substorms in the development of substorm processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We demonstrate, however, that spontaneous substorms seem to have a more clearly identifiable growth phase, whereas trigger-associated substorms have a more powerful unloading process. Changes in the current intensity and the electric potential drop across the polar cap in the recovery phase are also quite different from each other. Both the current intensity and the cross-polar cap potential drop show a larger decrease in the recovery phase of trigger-associated substorms, but the potential drop decreases only slightly and the currents in the late morning sector are still strong for spontaneous substorms. We interpret these findings as an indication of the relative importance of the unloading process and the directly driven process in conjunction with the north-south polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field. There still exists a strong directly driven process in the recovery phase of spontaneous substorms. For trigger-associated substorms, however, both the directly driven process and the unloading process become weak after the peak time.

  15. Generation of BBFs and DFs, Formation of Substorm Auroras and Triggers of Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Lysak, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Substorm onset is a dynamical response of the MI coupling system to external solar wind driving conditions and to internal dynamical processes. During the growth phase, the solar wind energy and momentum are transferred into the magnetosphere via MHD mesoscale Alfvenic interactions throughout the magnetopause current sheet. A decrease in momentum transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere starts a preconditioning stage, and produces a strong earthward body force acting on the whole magnetotail within a short time period. The strong earthward force will cause localized transients in the tail, such as multiple BBFs, DFs, plasma bubbles, and excited MHD waves. On auroral flux tubes, FACs carried by Alfven waves are generated by Alfvenic interactions between tail earthward flows associated with BBFs/DFs/Bubbles and the ionospheric drag. Nonlinear Alfvenic interaction between the incident and reflected Alfven wave packets in the auroral acceleration region can produce localized parallel electric fields and substorm auroral arcs. During the preconditioning stage prior to substorm onset, the generation of parallel electric fields and auroral arcs can redistribute perpendicular mechanical and magnetic stresses, "decoupling" the magnetosphere from the ionosphere drag. This will enhance the tail earthward flows and rapidly build up stronger parallel electric fields in the auroral acceleration region, leading to a sudden and violent tail energy release and substorm auroral poleward expansion. We suggest that in preconditioning stage, the decrease in the solar wind momentum transfer is a necessary condition of the substorm onset. Additionally, "decoupling" the magnetosphere from ionosphere drag can trigger substorm expansion onset.

  16. Evidence of kinetic Alfvén eigenmode in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorm expansion phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S. P.; Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Liang, J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Chen, L. J.; He, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-05-01

    Unipolar pulses of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAW) are first observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet (NEPS) associated with dipolarizations during substorm expansion phases. Two similar events are studied with Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations during substorms on 3 February 2008 and 7 February 2008. The unipolar pulses were located at a trough-like Alfvén speed profile in the northern plasma sheet at a distance of 10-11 RE from Earth. The dominant wave components consist of a southward δEz toward the neutral plane and a +δBy toward the dusk. The |δEz|/|δBy| ratio was in the range of a few times the local Alfvén speed, a strong indication of KAW nature. The wave Poynting flux was earthward and nearly parallel to the background magnetic field. The pulse was associated with an earthward field-aligned current carried by electrons. These observational facts strongly indicate a KAW eigenmode that is confined by the plasma sheet but propagates earthward along the field line. The KAW eigenmode was accompanied by short timescale (1 min) dipolarizations likely generated by transient magnetotail reconnection. The observed polarity of the KAW field/current is consistent with that of the Hall field/current in magnetic reconnection, supporting the scenario that the Hall fields/current propagate out from reconnection site as KAW eigenmodes. Aurora images on the footprint of THEMIS spacecraft suggest that KAW eigenmode may power aurora brightening during substorm expansion phase.

  17. Strong induction effects during the substorm on 27 August 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V. V.; Mishin, V. M.; Lunyushkin, S. B.; Pu, Z.; Wang, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on strong induction effects notably contributing to the cross polar cap potential drop and the energy balance during the growth and active phases of the substorm on 27 August 2001. The inductance of the magnetosphere is found to be crucial for the energy balance and electrical features of the magnetosphere in the course of the substorm. The inductive response to the switching on and off of the solar wind-magnetosphere generator exceeds the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variation. The induction effects are most apparent during the substorm expansion onset when the rapid growth of the ionospheric conductivity is accompanied by the fast release of the magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail during the growth phase. Using the magnetogram inversion technique, we estimated the magnetospheric inductance and effective ionospheric conductivity during the loading and unloading phases.

  18. Variations of the polar cap potential measured during magnetospheric substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, D.R.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I. )

    1992-04-01

    Measurements of the polar cap potential drop and size have been obtained during magnetospheric substorms. Using double-prove electric field measurements on the DE 2 satellite, 148 measurements have been obtained at random times preceding, during, and after 64 substorms. The polar cap potentials are graphed as a function of the difference between the time of the polar cap measurement and the time of the expansion onset of the corresponding substorm. The ratios of the auroral electrojet (AE) indices and the potential are also determined. The results show that on the average the polar cap potential starts to increase at 1.5 hours before onset. However, on a case-by-case basis there are substantial variations from the average, as polar cap potentials over 1,200 kV were measured as early as 1 hour before substorm onset and values as low as 40 kV were observed during the expansion phase. The size of the polar cap ranged from 23{degree} to 38{degree} invariant latitude at the time of onset, and had an average value of 31{degree}. The AE/{Phi}{sub PC} ratio is nearly constant before and after substorms, but decreases slightly during the substorm growth phase and increases greatly during the expansion phase. This increase is most likely due to a higher conductivity and westward electric field within the electrojet during expansion, which causes AE to increase without a corresponding change in the polar cap potential.

  19. Global and local current sheet thickness estimates during the late growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mcpherron, Robert L.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    The thinning and intensification of the cross tail current sheet during the substorm growth phase are analyzed during the CDAW 6 substorm (22 Mar. 1979) using two complementary methods. The magnetic field and current sheet development are determined using data from two spacecraft and a global magnetic field model with several free parameters. These results are compared with the local calculation of the current sheet location and structure previously done by McPherron et al. Both methods lead to the conclusion that an extremely thin current sheet existed prior to the substorm onset, and the thicknesses estimated by the two methods at substorm onset agree relatively well. The plasma data from the ISEE 1 spacecraft at 13 R(sub E) show an anisotropy in the low energy electrons during the growth phase which disappears just before the substorm onset. The global magnetic model results suggest that the field is sufficiently stretched to scatter such low energy electrons. The strong stretching may improve the conditions for the growth of the ion tearing instability in the near Earth tail at substorm onset.

  20. AMPERE observations of the Birkeland currents associated with substorms and comparison with simple electrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2014-04-01

    We present observations of the global terrestrial Birkeland field-aligned current (FAC) pattern observed by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) during a sequence of substorms. The observations show that the region 1 and 2 current systems move to lower latitudes during the substorm growth phase and retreat to higher latitudes following substorm expansion phase onset. We interpret these observations within the framework of the expanding/contracting polar cap paradigm. This links expansion of the polar cap and equatorward motion of the auroras and FAC systems to the action of magnetopause reconnection increasing the open magnetic flux content of the magnetosphere.

  1. Coupling between pre-onset flows and substorm onset waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable pre-onset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well-instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multi-spectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields-of-view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These pre-onset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where pre-existing stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from further downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  2. A new theory for magnetospheric substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, L.R.

    1995-10-01

    It is proposed here that the expansion phase of substorms results from a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind, following a {ge} 30-min growth phase due to an enhancement in this electric field. The reduction in the electric field is assumed to propagate antisunward within the magnetosphere. Triggering by a reduction in the electric field is suggested by the observation that substorms are often triggered by northward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, under the theory presented here, substorms may be triggered by anything that causes an electric field reduction such as a reduction in the magnitude of the y component of the IMF. A reduction in the large-scale electric field disrupts both the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occurs during the growth phase. It is suggested here that this can lead to formation of the expansion phase current wedge and active aurora. The current wedge results from the magnetic drift of ions, which has a speed proportional to particle energy, and a large azimuthal gradient in mean particle energy that is expected to develop in the vicinity of magnetic midnight during the growth phase. Current wedge formation will most likely be initiated near the radial distance ({approximately}6-10 R{sub E}) of the peak in the growth phase plasma pressure distribution, and then propagate tailward from that region. Order-of-magnitude calculations show that the above proposal can account for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to the growth phase, the magnitude of the reduction in the cross-tail current with the current wedge, the speeds of poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere, and the magnitude of wedge field-aligned currents that connect the ionospheric region of active auroral to the divergent cross-tail current within the magnetosphere. 77 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  4. Comparison of Two Substorms Observed on August 1, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkova, Natalia; Parkhomov, Vladimir; Zastenker, Georgy

    Magnetospheric response to the onset and development of two successive substorms, caused by different reasons is investigated. The choice of these events was due to the successful location of satellites in different areas of near-Earth space and the presence of numerous satellite and ground based observations. First substorm initiated at 17.20 UT on August 1, 1998 was caused by spontaneous release of exceeded energy stored in the tail. The second substorm occurred at the same day at 18.30 UT, was triggered by large and sharp solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement, accompanied by fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field. This pres-sure enhancement, consisted of a sequence of several fast fluctuations in solar wind dynamic pressure, led to the corresponding variations of magnetic field and energetic particle fluxes at geosynchronous orbit and ground stations and auroral disturbances. It was found that corre-lation coefficients calculated between the solar wind pressure fluctuations and magnetospheric responding parameters are significantly high. It was shown that first substorm was localized in the midnight sector of the aurora, westward auroral bulge was formed during the growth phase and typical recovery phase was observed. In contrast to that the second substorm, caused by an external trigger, was characterized by dayside auroral intensification propagating to down and dusk and nightside auroral activity localized in the premidnight sector.The global modulation of magnetospheric currents by the solar wind dynamic pressure was shown for the second event.

  5. The February 24, 2010 substorm: a refined view involving a pseudobreakup/expansive phase/poleward boundary intensification sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Martin; Russell, Christopher T.; Chu, Xiangning; McPherron, Robert L.

    2015-12-01

    A substorm on February 24, 2010 was chosen for study by Connors et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett. 41:4449-4455, 2014) due to simple symmetric subauroral magnetic perturbations observed in North America. It was shown that a substorm current wedge (SCW) three-dimensional current model could represent these perturbations well, gave a reasonable representation of auroral zone perturbations, and matched field-aligned currents determined in space from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) project. The conclusion was that substorm onset was at approximately 4:30 UT and that the substorm current wedge (SCW) formed in the region 1 (more poleward) current system.

  6. The magnetotail and substorms. [magnetic flux transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The tail plays a very active and important role in substorms. Magmetic flux eroded from the dayside magnetosphere is stored here. As more and more flux is transported to the magnetotail and stored, the boundary flares more, the field strength in the tail increases, and the currents strengthen and move closer to the earth. Further, the plasma sheet thins and the magnetic flux crossing the neutral sheet lessens. The experimental evidence for these processes is discussed and a phenomenological or qualitative model of the substorm sequence is presented. In this model, the flux transport is driven by the merging of the magnetospheric and interplanetary magnetic fields. During the growth phase of substorms the merging rate on the dayside magnetosphere exceeds the reconnection rate in the neutral sheet.

  7. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: IMF BY dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.; Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Wild, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    We present superposed epoch analyses of the average ionospheric convection response in the northern and southern hemispheres to magnetospheric substorms occurring under different orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Observations of the ionospheric convection were provided by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) and substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We find that during the substorm growth phase the expected IMF BY-dependent dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed over the entire convection pattern, but that during the expansion phase this asymmetry is retained only in the polar cap and dayside auroral zone. In the nightside auroral zone the convection is reordered according to the local substorm electrodynamics with any remaining dusk-dawn asymmetry being more closely related to the magnetic local time of substorm onset, itself only weakly governed by IMF BY. Owing to the preponderance of substorms occurring just prior to magnetic midnight, the substorm-asymmetry tends to be an azimuthal extension of the dusk convection cell across the midnight sector, a manifestation of the so-called “Harang discontinuity.” This results in the northern (southern) hemisphere nightside auroral convection during substorms generally resembling the expected pattern for negative (positive) IMF BY. When the preexisting convection pattern in the northern (southern) hemisphere is driven by positive (negative) IMF BY, the nightside auroral convection changes markedly over the course of the substorm to establish this same “Harang” configuration.

  8. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: Development of magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Podorozhkina, N. A.; Sormakov, D. A.; Janzhura, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index has been approved by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA XXII Assembly, Merida, Mexico, 2013) as a new index of magnetic activity. The PC index can be considered to be a proxy of the solar wind energy that enters the magnetosphere. This distinguishes PC from AL and Dst indices that are more related to the dissipation of energy through auroral currents or storage of energy in the ring current during magnetic substorms or storms. The association of the PC index with the direct coupling of the solar wind energy into the magnetosphere is based upon analysis of the relationship of PC with parameters in the solar wind, on the one hand, and correlation between the time series of PC and the AL index (substorm development), on the other hand. This paper (the first of a series) provides the results of statistical investigations that demonstrate a strong correlation between the behavior of PC and the development of magnetic substorms. Substorms are classified as isolated and expanded. We found that (1) substorms are preceded by growth in the RS index, (2) sudden substorm expansion onsets are related to "leap" or "reverse" signatures in the PC index which are indicative of a sharp increase in the PC growth rate, (3) substorms start to develop when PC exceeds a threshold level 1.5 ± 0.5 mV/m irrespective of the length of the substorm growth phase, and (4) there is a linear relation between the intensity of substorms and PC for all substorm events.

  9. The response of ionospheric convection in the polar cap to substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, M.; Lockwood, M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Luehr, H.; Bunting, R.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    We report multi-instrument observations during an isolated substorm on 17 October 1989. The European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar operated in the SP-UK-POLI mode measuring ionospheric convection at latitudes 71 deg Lambda - 78 deg Lambda. Sub-Auroral Magnetometer Network (SAMNET) and the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross provide information on the timing of substorm expansion phase onset and subsequent intensifications, as well as the location of the field aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the substorm current wedge. Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP-8) magnetic field data are also included. Evidence of a substorm growth phase is provided by the equatorward motion of a flow reversal boundary across the EISCAT radar field of view at 2130 MLT, following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We infer that the polar cap expanded as a result of the addition of open magnetic flux in the tail lobes during this interval. The flow reversal boundary, which is a lower limit to the polar cap boundary, reached an invariant latitude equatorward of 71 deg Lambda by the time of the expansion phase onset. We conclude that the substorm onset region in the ionosphere, defined by the westward electrojet, mapped to a part of the tail radially earthward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux, the distant neutral line. Thus the substorm was not initiated at the distant neutral line, although there is evidence that it remained active during the expansion phase.

  10. Substorm electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1990-01-01

    The present one-dimensional model analysis of substorm electrodynamics proceeds from the standard scenario in which the plasma sheet collapses into a neutral sheet, and magnetic merging occurs between the two tail lobes; plasma flows into the neutral sheet from the lobes and the sides, undergoing acceleration in the dawn-dusk direction. The process is modified by the tendency of the accelerated plasma to unbalance charge neutrality, leading to an exchange of electrons with the ionosphere in order to maintain neutrality. The cross-tail current is weakened by the diversion: this reduces the adjacent lobe-field intensity, but without notable effects apart from a slight expansion of the tail boundary.

  11. MESSENGER observations of substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Slavin, James; Fu, Suiyan; Raines, Jim; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Yao, Zhonghua; Pu, Zuyin; Shi, Quanqi; Poh, Gangkai; Boardsen, Scott; Imber, Suzanne; Sundberg, Torbjörn; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been examined for evidence of substorm activity. A total of 32 events were found during which an Earth-like growth phase was followed by clear near-tail expansion phase signatures. During the growth phase, the lobe of the tail loads with magnetic flux while the plasma sheet thins due to the increased lobe magnetic pressure. MESSENGER is often initially in the plasma sheet and then moves into the lobe during the growth phases. The averaged time scale of the loading is around 1 min, consistent with previous observations of Mercury's Dungey cycle. The dipolarization front that marks the initiation of the substorm expansion phase is only a few seconds in duration. The spacecraft then abruptly enters the plasma sheet due to the plasma sheet expansion as reconnection-driven flow from the near-Mercury neutral line encounters the stronger magnetic fields closer to the planet. Substorm activity in the near tail of Mercury is quantitatively very similar to the Earth despite the very compressed time scale.

  12. Modulation of the substorm current wedge by bursty bulk flows: 8 September 2002—Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, L.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Ågren, K.; Zivkovic, T.; Sergeev, V. A.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Nikolaev, A.; Kauristie, K.; Kamp, M.; Amm, O.; Milan, S. E.; Imber, S. M.; Facskó, G.; Palmroth, M.; Nakamura, R.

    2016-05-01

    The ultimate formation mechanism of the substorm current wedge (SCW) remains to date unclear. In this study, we investigate its relationship to plasma flows at substorm onset and throughout the following expansion phase. We revisit the case of 8 September 2002, which has been defined as "one of the best textbook examples of a substorm" because of its excellent coverage by both spacecraft in the magnetotail and ground-based observatories. We found that a dense sequence of arrival of nightside flux transfer events (NFTEs; which can be understood as the lobe magnetic signature due to a bursty bulk flow travelling earthward in the central plasma sheet) in the near-Earth tail leads to a modulation (and further step-like builtup) of the SCW intensity during the substorm expansion phase. In addition, we found that small SCWs are created also during the growth phase of the event in association with another less intense sequence of NFTEs. The differences between the sequence of NFTEs in the growth and expansion phase are discussed. We conclude that the envelope of the magnetic disturbances which we typically refer to as an intense magnetic substorm is the result of a group or sequence of more intense and more frequent NFTEs.

  13. Substorm theories: United they stand, divided they fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    1995-01-01

    Consensus on the timing and mapping of substorm features has permitted a synthesis of substorm models. Within the synthesis model the mechanism for onset of substorm expansion is still unknown. Possible mechanisms are: growth of an ion tearing mode, current disruption by a cross-field current instability, and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. While the synthesis model is consistent with overall substorm morphology, including near-Earth onset, none of the onset theories, taken individually, appear to account for substorm expansion onset. A grand synthesis with unification of the underlying onset theories appears necessary.

  14. Fine scale structures of pulsating auroras in the early recovery phase of substorm using ground-based EMCCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Hampton, Donald; Katoh, Yuto; Asamura, Kazushi; Okano, Shoichi

    2012-10-01

    We have carried out ground-based observations, optimized to temporal and spatial characteristics of pulsating auroras (PAs) in the micro/meso scale, using an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera with a wide field of view corresponding to 100 × 100 km at an altitude of 110 km and a high sampling rate up to 100 frames per second. We focus on transient PAs propagating southward around 1100 UT, in the early recovery phase of the substorm, on 4th March 2011. Three independent patches (PA1-3) each with different periods between 4 and 7 s were observed, which means that the periodicity was not explained by the electron bounce motion and strongly depended on local plasma conditions in the magnetosphere or in the ionosphere. One more insight is that only PA1 had also a sharp peak of modulations around 1.5 Hz, with a narrow frequency width of 0.30 Hz, and the strong modulations existed as a small spot in the center of PA1. We have also conducted cross spectrum analysis and have obtained coherence and phase distributions for auroral variations between 0.1 and 3.0 Hz. The results indicated that low frequency variations from 0.2 to 0.5 Hz inside PA1-3 propagated as a collective motion in well-defined directions. The estimated horizontal propagation velocities ranged from 50 to 120 km/s at the auroral altitude. The velocities are almost consistent with the Alfven speed at the magnetic equator, which suggests that compressional waves have an effect on PA via modulations of the ambient plasma environment.

  15. Role of heavy ionospheric ions in the localization of substorm disturbances on March 22, 1979: CDAW 6

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Fritz, T.A.; Lennartsson, W.; Wilken, B.; Kroehl, H.W.; Birn, J.

    1985-02-01

    Extensive ground-based arrays of magnetometers and numerous satellite platforms in the outer magnetosphere have established that two separate substorm expansion onsets occurred on March 22, 1979. The first of these occurred at 1055 UT and is demonstrated to be localized in the 0200--0300 LT sector. Concurrent plasma sheet ion composition measurements are used to show that the growth and expansion phase of this substorm occurred while the outer magnetosphere was composed dominantly of solar wind (H/sup +/ and He/sup + +/) plasmas. The 1055 UT substorm greatly perturbed and altered the ion composition of the plasma in the outer magnetosphere such that the second substorm expansion onset (1436 UT) occurred while the outer magnetospheric plasmas were dominantly of ionospheric (O/sup +/) origin. The 1436 UT substorm is shown to have a component of the westward electrojet localized further westward in local time relative to the first substorm. These results are a consistent, well-documented example of the possible important role of heavy ions in the localization and initiation of plasma sheet instabilities during substorms.

  16. Midday auroras and magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Auroral activity in the midday sector is examined in some detail on the basis of all-sky photographs taken from Pyramida, Spitzbergen. The equatorward motion of the midday auroras observed during substorms and the subsequent poleward shift during the recovery phase are discussed.

  17. Changes in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and FACs Associated with Substorm Onset (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, I. J.; Waters, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Milling, D. K.; Singer, H. J.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    Field aligned currents (FACs) are crucial for the communication of information between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Utilising in-situ observations from the Iridium constellation and Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) we provide detailed observations of the FAC topology through the substorm growth and expansion phases. In particular, for an isolated substorm on 16 February 2010 we demonstrate a clear and localized reduction in the FACs at least 6 minutes prior to auroral onset. A new auroral arc forms in the region of reduced FAC on closed field lines and initially expands azimuthally in wave like fashion. This newly formed arc continues to brighten and expands poleward signifying the start of the substorm expansion phase. We argue that the change in FACs observed prior to onset is the result of a change in the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling in a region local to the subsequent auroral onset. Such a change implies an important role for M-I coupling in destabilising the near-Earth tail during magnetospheric substorms and perhaps more importantly in selecting the location in the ionosphere where auroral onset begins. Further, we provide, a comprehensive in-situ two-dimensional view of the FAC topology associated with the substorm current wedge and westward traveling surge during the substorm expansion phase. We demonstrate that these current structures, when integrated with latitude to produce a net FAC as a function of MLT, have the same structure as the equivalent line current system comprising the SCW. Moreover, regions of upward FAC are associated with discrete auroral forms during the substorm expansion phase.

  18. A missing variable in the data-based substorm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Viktor; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Sormakov, Dmitry

    Nowadays the quantitative characterization of the magnetospheric activity is predominantly based on the amplitude of auroral zone magnetic perturbations (e.g., AL index value). This approach ignores the long-established fact that ground magnetic perturbations are basically formed by the Hall currents (Fukushima theorem), which depend critically on the Hall conductivity and, therefore, are sensitive to the plasma sheet electron parameters (Te and Ne, which also control the production of energetic electrons by their field-aligned acceleration). Observational confirmation of such influence is difficult because of many complicating factors, main of which are the inhomogeneity of Te, Ne parameters in the magnetotail and, especially, the reconnection-induced production of low-density and high-temperature electrons during substorms in the magnetotail. In this study, based on long-term monitoring of plasma sheet electrons by THEMIS spacecraft, we (a) demonstrate a strong variation of auroral zone currents (by an order of magnitude depending on the plasma sheet Te/Ne value) under the conditions of the substorm growth phase (when substorm-related acceleration is weak), (b) compare the average behaviors of Te, Ne during substorms under very large (very small) Te/Ne conditions and (c) briefly discuss a number of ’phantom problems’ which arise due to the ignorance of this dependence (incl. the problem of pseudobreakups, etc).

  19. Source Distributions of Substorm Ions Observed in the Near-Earth Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study employs Geotail plasma observations and numerical modeling to determine sources of the ions observed in the near-Earth magnetotail near midnight during a substorm. The growth phase has the low-latitude boundary layer as its most important source of ions at Geotail, but during the expansion phase the plasma mantle is dominant. The mantle distribution shows evidence of two distinct entry mechanisms: entry through a high latitude reconnection region resulting in an accelerated component, and entry through open field lines traditionally identified with the mantle source. The two entry mechanisms are separated in time, with the high-latitude reconnection region disappearing prior to substorm onset.

  20. Relationship between the growth of the ring current and the interplanetary quantity. [solar wind energy-magnetospheric coupling parameter correlation with substorm AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    Akasofu (1979) has reported that the interplanetary parameter epsilon correlates reasonably well with the magnetospheric substorm index AE; in the first approximation, epsilon represents the solar wind coupled to the magnetosphere. The correlation between the interplanetary parameter, the auroral electrojet index and the ring current index is examined for three magnetic storms. It is shown that when the interplanetary parameter exceeds the amount that can be dissipated by the ionosphere in terms of the Joule heat production, the excess energy is absorbed by the ring current belt, producing an abnormal growth of the ring current index.

  1. Substorm onset: A switch on the sequence of transport from decreasing entropy to increasing entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we propose a scenario about the trigger for substorm onset. In a stable magnetosphere, entropy is an increasing function tailward. However, in the growth phase of a substorm, a later born bubble has lower entropy than earlier born bubbles. When a bubble arrives at its final destination in the near-Earth region, it will spread azimuthally because of its relatively uniform entropy. The magnetic flux tubes of a dying bubble, which cause the most equatorward aurora thin arc, would block the later coming bubble tailward of them, forming an unstable domain. Therefore, an interchange instability develops, which leads to the collapse of the unstable domain, followed by the collapse of the stretched plasma sheet. We regard the substorm onset as a switch on the sequence of transport, i.e., from a decreasing entropy process to an increasing entropy process. We calculated the most unstable growth rates and the wavelengths of instability, and both are in agreement with observations.

  2. Observational evidence for an inside-out substorm onset scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    We present observations which provide strong support for a substorm onset scenario in which a localized inner magnetospheric instability developed first and was later followed by the development of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL) farther down-tail. Specifically, we find that the onset began as a localized brightening of an intensified growth phase arc which developed as a periodic series of arc-aligned (i.e. azimuthally arrayed) bright spots. As the disturbance grew, it evolved into vortical structures that propagated poleward and eventually morphed into an east-west aligned arc system at the poleward edge of the auroral substorm bulge. The auroral intensification shows an exponential growth with an estimated e-folding time of around 188 seconds (linear growth rate, {gamma} of 5.33 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}). During the initial breakup, no obvious distortions of auroral forms to the north were observed. However, during the expansion phase, intensifications of the poleward boundary of the expanding bulge were observed together with the equatorward ejection of auroral streamers into the bulge. A strong particle injection was observed at geosynchronous orbit, but was delayed by several minutes relative to onsel. Ground magnetometer data also shows a two phase development of mid-latitude positive H-bays, with a quasi-linear increase in H between the onset and the injection. We conclude that this event provides strong evidence in favor of the so-called 'inside-out' substorm onset scenario in which the near Earth region activates first followed at a later time by the formation of a near-to-mid tail substorm X-line. The ballooning instability is discussed as a likely mechanism for the initial onset.

  3. Electron precipitation patterns and substorm morphology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from the auroral particles experiment aboard OGO 4, performed in a statistical framework interpretable in terms of magnetospheric substorm morphology, both spatial and temporal. Patterns of low-energy electron precipitation observed by polar satellites are examined as functions of substorm phase. The implications of the precipitation boundaries identifiable at the low-latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector are discussed.

  4. Observations in the vicinity of substorm onset: Implications for the substrom process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphinstone, R. D.; Hearn, D. J.; Cogger, L. L.; Murphree, J. S.; Singer, H.; Sergeev, V.; Mursula, K.; Klumpar, D. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Johnson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-instrument data sets from the ground and satellites at both low and high altitude have provided new results concerning substorm onset and its source region in the magnetosphere. Twenty-six out of 37 substorm onset events showed evidence of azimuthally spaced auroral forms (AAFs) prior to the explosive poleward motion associated with optical substorm onset. AAFs can span 8 hours of local time prior to onset and generally propagate eastward in the morning sector. Onset itself is, however, more localized spanning only about 1 hour local time. AAF onset occur during time periods when the solar wind pressure is relatively high. AAFs brighten in conjunction with substorm onset leading to the conclusion that they are a growth phase activity casually related to substorm onset. Precursor activity associated with these AAFs is also seen near geosynchronous orbit altitude and examples show the relationship between the various instrumental definitions of substorm onset. The implied mode number (30 to 135) derived from this work is inconsistent with cavity mode resonances but is consistent with a modified flute/ballooning instability which requires azimuthal pressure gradients. The extended source region and the distance to the open-closed field line region constrain reconnection theory and local mechanisms for substorm onset. It is demonstrated that multiple onset substorms can exist for which localized dipolarizations and the Pi 2 occur simultaneously with tail stretching existing elsewhere. These pseudobreakups can be initiated by auroral streamers which originate at the most poleward set of arc systems and drift to the more equatorward main UV oval. Observations are presented of these AAFs in conjunction with low- and high-altitutde particle and magnetic field data. These place the activations at the interface between dipolar and taillike field lines probably near the peak in the cross-tail current. These onsets are put in the context of a new scenario for substorm

  5. Substorm currents in the equatorial magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have determined characteristics of magnetospheric equatorial currents during substorms from the vector magnetic field data acquired with the GOES 5 and GOES 6 satellites, separated about 1.9 hours in MLT in geosynchronous orbit. These data have been used to determine the local time (azimuthal) and radial variation of the equatorial current. The divergence of the equatorial current was computed from these variations, and systems of field-aligned currents were deduced. During the growth phase to the maximum phase of the taillike reconfiguration of the near-Earth magnetic field, a positive divergence (away from the equatorial plane) of the westward equatorial current occurs in the late evening to premidnight MLT sector, and a negative divergence (away from the equatorial plane) occurs in the late evening to premidnight MLT sector, and a negative divergence (away from the equatorial plane) occurs in the premidnight to early morning MLT sector. This flow direction pattern is the same as that of the region 2 field-aligned current system. The authors have also determined the presence of a radial current that flows toward the earth in the late evening to premidnight sector and flows away from the Earth in the midnight to morning sector. The intensity of the radial currents increases before the expansion phase. Consequently, the patterns of field-aligned currents associated with various substorm phases are the superposition of currents driven by multiple sources with different temporal variations. They have identified at least three different but related sources of field-aligned currents during the growth and expansion phases. These sources are related to the divergence of the westward flowing equatorial current and to distributions of pressure and magnetic field gradients that evolve in the magnetotail. When combined, these complicated systems support the basic region 1 to region 2 field-aligned current flow pattern. 22 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Sources and Transport of Plasma Sheet Ions During Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Raeder, J.; Walker, R. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the sources and transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that took place on November 24, 1996. The sources and acceleration mechanisms of ions observed at Geotail were determined by calculating the trajectories of thousands of ions backward in time. We found that during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and were already in the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase more plasma mantle ions reached the Geotail location. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the energy gained was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration during the ions' crossing of the equatorial current sheet just prior to the detection of the ions.

  7. From space weather toward space climate time scales: Substorm analysis from 1993 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Viljanen, A.; Mursula, K.; Partamies, N.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in the Northern Hemisphere auroral region was examined during solar cycles 22 and 23 (1993-2008). Substorms were identified from ground-based magnetic field measurements by an automated search engine. On average, 550 substorms were observed per year, which gives in total about 9000 substorms. The interannual, seasonal and solar cycle-to-cycle variations of the substorm number (Rss), substorm duration (Tss), and peak amplitude (Ass) were examined. The declining phases of both solar cycles 22 and 23 were more active than the other solar cycle phases due to the enhanced solar wind speed. The spring substorms during the declining solar cycle phase (∣Ass,decl∣ = 500 nT) were 25% larger than the spring substorms during the ascending solar cycle years (∣Ass,acs∣ = 400 nT). The following seasonal variation was found: the most intense substorms occurred during spring and fall, the largest substorm frequency in the Northern Hemisphere winter, and the longest-duration substorms in summer. Furthermore, we found a winter-summer asymmetry in the substorm number and duration, which is speculated to be due to the variations in the ionospheric conductivity. The solar cycle-to-cycle variation was found in the yearly substorm number and peak amplitude. The decline from the peak substorm activity in 1994 and 2003 to the following minima took 3 years during solar cycle 22, while it took 6 years during solar cycle 23.

  8. Dynamics of the inner magnetosphere near times of substorm onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Basinska, E. M.; Erickson, G. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Singer, H. J.; Yahnin, A. G.; Hardy, D. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1996-04-01

    in both directions is weak (negative feedback?). ``Explosive-growth-phase'' signatures occur after onset, early in the substorm expansion phase. Heated electrons arrive at the spacecraft while convection is earthward, during or at the end of electromagnetic energy flow away from the ionosphere.

  9. A mechanism for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. M.; Heinemann, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy-principle analysis performed on two-dimensional, self-consistent solutions for magnetospheric convection indicates that the magnetosphere is unstable to isobaric (yet still frozen-in) fluctuations of plasma-sheet flux tubes. Normally, pdV work associated with compression maintains stability of the inward/outward oscillating normal mode. However, if Earth's ionosphere can provide sufficient mass flux, isobaric expansion of flux tubes can occur. The growth of a field-aligned potential drop in the near-Earth, midnight portion of the plasma sheet, associated with upward field-aligned currents responsible for the Harang discontinuity, redistributes plasma along field lines in a manner that destabilizes the normal mode. The growth of this unstable mode results in an out-of-equilibrium situation near the inner edge. When this occurs over a downtail extent comparable to the half-thickness of the plasma sheet, collapse ensues and forces thinning of the plasma sheet whereby conditions favorable to reconnection occur. This scenario for substorm onset is consistent with observed upward fluxes of ions, parallel potential drops, and observations of substorm onset. These observations include near Earth onset, pseudobreakups, the substorm current wedge, and local variations of plasma-sheet thickness.

  10. A proposed production model of rapid subauroral ion drifts and their relationship to substorm evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.C.; Baker, D.N. ); Hanson, W.B.; Heelis, R.A. ); Frank, L.A.; Craven, J.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors conduct a study of subauroral ion drifts (SAID), to examine their correlation with magnetic storms. By a SAID one means a latitudinally narrow band of westward drifting ions located on the equatorial side of the auroral oval in the evening ionosphere. They look at the relationship of SAID to various stages in the development of a substorm. Data comes from DE 1, which provided auroral images, DE 2 which measured ionospheric parameters by means of magnetometers, an ion drift meter, a low altitude plasma instrument, and a retarding potential analyzer, and measurements of particle injection made by instruments at geosynchronous orbit. Analysis of the data showed very low ion drifts or field aligned currents in regions equatorward of the auroral oval before or after substorms. After substorm onset ion drifts and field aligned currents were observed extending well equatorward of the oval. There was no clear drift spike in these observations suggesting a SAID. They never saw a SAID occuring within 30 minutes of substorm onset. In almost all observations of a SAID which could be correlated with the recovery phase of the substorm, the SAID was initiated in the recovery phase. The authors then propose a model to explain the SAID which draws upon a decrease in the conductivity in the E and F regions between the band of electron precipitation in the oval and the equatorward band of ion precipitation. Several factors play into this decrease, but its occurance allows the growth of large electric fields which can drive the plasma drift as the equatorward extent of the substorm expansion shrinks in the recovery phase.

  11. New perspectives on substorm injections

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    There has been significant progress in understanding substorm injections since the Third International Conference on Substorms in 1996. Progress has come from a combination of new theories, quantitative modeling, and observations--particularly multi-satellite observations. There is now mounting evidence that fast convective flows are the mechanism that directly couples substorm processes in the mid tail, where reconnection occurs, with substorm processes the inner magnetosphere where Pi2 pulsations, auroral breakups, and substorm injections occur. This paper presents evidence that those flows combined with an earthward-propagating compressional wave are responsible for substorm injections and discusses how that model can account for various substorm injection signatures.

  12. The response of the near earth magnetotail to substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; McPherron, R. L.; Thompson, S.; Khurana, K. K.; Weygand, J. M.; Balogh, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The large scale structure of the current sheet in the terrestrial magnetotail is often represented as the superposition of a constant northward-oriented magnetic field component (B(sub z)) and a component along the Earth-Sun direction (B(sub x)) that varies with distance from the center of the sheet (z(sub o) in GSM) as in a Hams neutral sheet. The latter implies that B(sub x) = B(sub Lx) tanh((z - z(sub o))/h) where B(sub Lx) is the magnitude of the B(sub x) component in the northern lobe. Correspondingly, the cross-tail current should be approximated by J(sub y) = (B(sub Lx)/h) sech(sup 2)((z - z(sub o))/h). Using data from the fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) on the Cluster I1 spacecraft tetrad, we have used measured fields and currents to ask if this model represents the large-scale properties of the system. During very quiet crossings of the plasmasheet, we find that the model gives a reasonable estimate of the trend of the average current and field distributions, but during disturbed intervals, the best fit fails to represent the data. If, however, the parameters z(sub o) and h of the model are taken as variable functions of time, the fits can be reasonably good. The temporal variation of the fit parameter h that characterizes the thickness of the current sheet can be interpreted in terms of thinning during the growth phase of a substorm and thickening following the expansion phase. Ground signatures that give insight into the local time of substorm onset can be used to interpret the response of the plasmasheet to substorm related changes of the global system. During a substorm, the field magnitude in the central plasmasheet fluctuates at the period of Pi2 pulsations.

  13. Temporal and spatial dynamics of the regions 1 and 2 Birkeland currents during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Wing, S.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.

    2013-06-01

    We use current density data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) to identify the location of maximum region 1 current at all magnetic local times (MLTs). We term this location the R1 oval. Comparing the R1 oval location with particle precipitation boundaries identified in DMSP data, we find that the R1 oval is located on average within 1° of particle signatures associated with the open/closed field line boundary (OCB) across dayside and nightside MLTs. We hence conclude that the R1 oval can be used as a proxy for the location of the OCB. Studying the amount of magnetic flux enclosed by the R1 oval during the substorm cycle, we find that the R1 oval flux is well organized by it: during the growth phase the R1 oval location moves equatorward as the amount of magnetic flux increases whereas after substorm expansion phase onset significant flux closure occurs as the R1 current location retreats to higher latitudes. For about 15 min after expansion phase onset, the amount of open magnetic flux continues to increase indicating that dayside reconnection dominates over nightside reconnection. In the current density data, we find evidence of the substorm current wedge and also show that the dayside R1 currents are stronger than their nightside counterpart during the substorm growth phase, whereas after expansion phase onset, the nightside R1 currents dominate. Our observations of the current distribution and OCB movement during the substorm cycle are in excellent agreement with the expanding/contracting polar cap paradigm.

  14. Magnetic field fluctuations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Before a magnetospheric substorm and during its early phases the magnetic field magnitude in the geomagnetic tail increases and field lines in the nighttime hemisphere assume a more tail-like configuration. Before the substorm onset a minimum amount of magnetic flux is observed to cross the neutral sheet which means that the neutral sheet currents attain their most earthward locations and their greatest current densities. This configuration apparently results from an increased transport of magnetic flux to the tail caused by a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The field begins relaxing toward a more dipolar configuration at the time of a substorm onset with the recovery probably occurring first between 6 and 10 R sub E. This recovery must be associated with magnetospheric convection which restores magnetic flux to the dayside hemisphere. Field aligned currents appear to be required to connect magnetospheric currents to the auroral electrojets, implying that a net current flows in a limited range of longitudes. Space measurements supporting current systems are limited. More evidence exists for the occurrence of double current sheets which do not involve net current at a given longitude.

  15. Bursty reconnection modulating the substorm current wedge, a substorm case study re-analysed by ECLAT tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, Hermann; Palin, Laurianne; Ågren, Karin; Zivkovic, Tatjana; Facsko, Gabor; Sergeev, Victor; Kubyshkina, Marina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Milan, Steve; Imber, Suzanne; Kauristie, Kirsti; Palmroth, Minna; van de Kamp, Max; Nakamura, Rumi; Boakes, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Multi-instrumental data mining and interpretation can be tedious and complicated. In this context, the ECLAT (European Cluster Assimilation Technology) project was created to « provide a novel and unique data base and tools for space scientists, by providing an upgrade of the European Space Agency's Cluster Active Archive (CAA). » How can this new tool help the space plasma physics community? Here we demonstrate the power of coordinated global and meso-scale ground-based data to put satellite data into the proper context. We re-analyse a well-isolated substorm with a strong growth phase, which starts right overhead the Scandinavian network of instruments on 8 September 2002. This event was previously studied in detail by Sergeev et al (2005), based on a THEMIS-like configuration near-midnight using a unique radial constellation of LANL (~6.6Re), Geotail and Polar (~9Re), and Cluster (~16Re). In this new study we add detailed IMAGE spacecraft and ground-based network data. Magnetospheric models are specially adapted using solar wind conditions and in-situ observations. Simulation results are compared to the in-situ observations and discussed. We show how - both before and after substorm onset - bursty reconnection in the tail modulates the localised field aligned current flow associated with the substorm current wedge.

  16. Energy dissipation in substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Loretta A.; Reiff, P. H.; Moses, J. J.; Heelis, R. A.; Moore, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The energy dissipated by substorms manifested in several ways is discussed: the Joule dissipation in the ionosphere; the energization of the ring current by the injection of plasma sheet particles; auroral election and ion acceleration; plasmoid ejection; and plasma sheet ion heating during the recovery phase. For each of these energy dissipation mechanisms, a 'rule of thumb' formula is given, and a typical dissipation rate and total energy expenditure is estimated. The total energy dissipated as Joule heat (approximately) 2 x 10(exp 15) is found about twice the ring current injection term, and may be even larger if small scale effects are included. The energy expended in auroral electron precipitation, on the other hand, is smaller than the Joule heating by a factor of five. The energy expended in refilling and heating the plasma sheets is estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(exp 14)J, while the energy lost due to plasmoid ejection is between (approximately) (10 exp 13)(exp 14)J.

  17. Integrated Observations of ICME - Driven Substorm - Storm Evolution on 7 August 1998: Traditional and Non-Traditional Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Torbert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain an integrated view of substorm-storm evolution in relation to well-defined interplanetary (IP) conditions, and to identify traditional and non-traditional aspects of the DP1 and DP2 current systems during substorm activity. Specifically, we report a case study of substorm/storm evolution driven by an ICME from ground observations around the oval in relation to geoeffective IP parameters (Kan-Lee electric field, E-KL, and dynamic pressure, Pdyn), geomagnetic indices (AL, SYM-H and PCN) and satellite observations (from DMSP F13 and F14, Geotail, and GOES spacecraft). A sudden enhancement of E-KL at a southward turning of the IMF led to an initial transient phase (PCN-enhancement) followed by a persistent stage of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The persistent phase terminated abruptly at a steep E-KL reduction when the ICME magnetic field turned north after a 3-hour-long interval of enhanced E-KL. The persistent phase consisted of (i) a 45-min-long substorm growth phase (DP2 current) followed by (ii) a classical substorm onset (DP1 current) in the 0100 - 0300 MLT sector, (ii) a 30-min-long expansion phase, maximizing in the same sector, and (iii) a phase lasting for 1.5 hr of 10-15 min-long DP1 events in the 2100 - 2300 and 0400 - 0600 MLT sectors. In the morning sector the expansion phase was characterized by Ps6 pulsations and omega bands. The SYM-H evolution reached the level of a major storm after a 2.5-hour-long interval of E-KL ˜5 mV/m and elevated Pdyn in the substorm expansion phase. Magetosphere - Ionosphere (M - I) coupling during a localized electrojet event at 0500 MLT in the late stage of the substorm expansion is studied by ground - satellite conjunction data (Iceland - Geotail). The DP1 and DP2 components of geomagnetic activity are discussed in relation to M - I current systems and substorm current wedge morphology.

  18. On the relationship between the energetic particle flux morphology and the change in the magnetic field magnitude during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Sibeck, D. G.; Takahashi, K.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the morphology of energetic particle substorm injections and the change in the magnetic field magnitude over the course of the event is examined. Using the statistical relationships between the magnetic field during the growth phase and the change in the field magnitude during substorms calculated by Lopez et al. (1988), a limited number of dispersionless ion injections observed by AMPTE CCE are selected. It is argued that this limited set is representative of a large set of events and that the conclusions drawn from examining those events are valid for substorms in general in the inner magnetosphere. It is demonstrated that in an event when CCE directly observed the disruption of the current sheet, the particle and field data show that the region of particle acceleration was highly turbulent and was temporally, and perhaps spatially, limited and that the high fluxes of energetic particles are qualitatively associated with intense inductive electric fields.

  19. Energy Coupling Between the Ionosphere and Inner Magnetosphere Related to Substorm Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1999-01-01

    The investigation of substorm effects in the inner magnetosphere with CRRES data looked in detail at over 50 substorms relative to signatures of onset and early expansion phases. The accomplishments of the project are: Determined perpendicular Poynting flux at CRRES in the inner magnetosphere at substorm onset, including primary direction is azimuthal, not radial, indicating a local source, no obvious signal from the magnetotail to trigger onset, strongly supports substorm onset location near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and process is local and a strong function of Magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling. We also developed near geosynchronous onset (NGO) model for substorm onset and expansion.

  20. Electron precipitation pattern and substorm morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Patterns of the precipitation of low energy electrons observed by polar satellites were examined as functions of substorm phase. Precipitation boundaries are generally identifiable at the low latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector. Both of these boundaries move equatorward when the interplanetary magnetic field turns southward.

  1. Theory for substorms triggered by sudden reductions in convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    Many substorm expansions are triggered by interplanetary magnetic field changes that reduce magnetospheric convection. This suggests that expansion onsets are a result of a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind. Such a reduction disrupts the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occur during the growth phase. It is proposed that the resulting magnetic drift of particles and a large dawn to dusk gradient in the ion energies leads to a longitudinally localized reduction in the plasma pressure, and thus, to the current wedge formation. This theory accounts for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to growth phase, the magnitude of the wedge currents, the speeds of tailward and westward expansion of the current reduction region in the equatorial plane, and the speeds of the poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere.

  2. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 1. Particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Winglee, R.M. ); Steinolfson, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a simulation study of the particle dynamics in the magnetotail during the development of substorms. They look at how energy flows into the magnetotail under external magnetospheric conditions, and study the energy storage and dissipation in the magnetic field, and the role of particle dynamics in this process. They consider two primary external influences in their model. First is the pressure exerted by the magnetospheric boundary layer, on the nightside magnetopause. This pressure is expected to grow in response to solar wind penetration into the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field becomes southward in the initial phases of substorm growth. Second is the dawn to dusk electric field. This field is expected to grow as the current sheet thins and energy stored in the magnetic field rises. The authors argue that the simultaneous increase in both the magnetic pressure and electric field can better model magnetotail response. One sees strong earthward flows in conjunction with increased energy storage in the tail, and at substorm onset one sees the ejection of plasmoids in a tailward direction with increased particle heating. The clumping of particles in the current sheet due to the opposing effects of the magnetic pressure and electric field could be responsible for substorm onset, rather than instabilities such as the tearing mode.

  3. Multiradar observations of substorm-driven ULF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Mager, P. N.; Klimushkin, D. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    A recent statistical study of ULF waves driven by substorm-injected particles observed using Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) found that the phase characteristics of these waves varied depending on where the wave was observed relative to the substorm. Typically, positive azimuthal wave numbers, m, were observed in waves generated to the east of the substorms and negative m to the west. The magnitude of m typically increased with the azimuthal separation between the wave observation and the substorm location. The energies estimated for the driving particles for these 83 wave events were found to be highest when the waves were observed closer to the substorm and lowest farther away. Each of the 83 events studied by James et al. (2013) involved just a single wave observation per substorm. Here a study of three individual substorm events are presented, with associated observations of multiple ULF waves using various different SuperDARN radars. We demonstrate that a single substorm is capable of driving a number of wave events characterized by different azimuthal scale lengths and wave periods, associated with different energies, W, in the driving particle population. We find that similar trends in m and W exist for multiple wave events with a single substorm as was seen in the single wave events of James et al. (2013). The variety of wave periods present on similar L shells in this study may also be evidence for the detection of both poloidal Alfvén and drift compressional mode waves driven by substorm-injected particles.

  4. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  5. "Old" tail lobes provide significant additional substorm power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V.; Mishin, V. V.; Karavaev, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In each polar cap (PC) we mark out "old PC" observed during quiet time before the event under consideration, and "new PC" that emerges during rounding the old one and expanding the PC total area. Old and new PCs correspond in the magnetosphere to the old and new tail lobes, respectively. The new lobe variable magnetic flux Ψ1 is usually assumed to be active, i.e. it provides transport of the electromagnetic energy flux (Poynting flux) ɛ' from solar wind into the magnetosphere. The old lobe magnetic flux Ψ2 is usually supposed to be passive, i.e. it remains constant during the disturbance and does not participate in the transporting process which would mean the old PC electric field absolute screening from the convection electric field created by the magnetopause reconnection. In fact, screening is observed, but it is far from absolute. We suggest a model of screening and determine its quantitative characteristics in the selected superstorm. The coefficient of a screening is the β = Ψ2/Ψ02, where Ψ02 = const is open magnetic flux through the old PC measured prior to the substorm, and Ψ2 is variable magnetic flux during the substorm. We consider three various regimes of disturbance. In each, the coefficient β decreased during the loading phase and increased at the unloading phase, but the rates and amplitudes of variations exhibited a strong dependence on the regime. We interpreted decrease in β as a result of involving the old PC magnetic flux Ψ2, which was considered to be constant earlier, to the ' transport process of the Poynting flux from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A weakening of the transport process at the subsequent unloading phase creates increase in β. Estimates showed that coefficient β during each regime and the computed Poynting flux varied manifolds. In general, unlike the existing substorm conception, the new scenario describes an unknown earlier tail lobe activation process during a substorm growth phase that effectively

  6. Current sheet thinning, reconnection onset, and auroral morphology during geomagnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Hsieh, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic substorms represent a fundamental energy release mechanism for the terrestrial magnetosphere. Specifically, the evolution of thin currents sheets during the substorm growth phase plays a key role for substorms because such current sheets present a much lower threshold for the onset of tearing modes and magnetic reconnection than the usually thick magnetotail current sheet. Here we examine and compare two basic processes for current sheet thinning in the Earth's magnetotail: Current sheet thinning (1) through closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail caused by divergent flux transport to replace closed flux on the dayside and (2) through accumulation of open flux magnetic flux in the tail lobes also caused by dayside reconnection. Both processes are expected to operate during any period of enhanced dayside reconnection. It is demonstrated that closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail and the increase of open lobe magnetic flux can lead to the evolution of two separate thin current sheets in the near Earth and the mid tail regions of the magnetosphere. While the auroral morphology associated with MFD and near Earth current sheet formation is well consistent with typical substorm growth observation, midtail current sheet formation through lobe flux increase shows only a minor influence on the auroral ionosphere. We discuss the physics of the dual current sheet formation and local and auroral properties of magnetic reconnection in either current sheet. It is suggested that only reconnection onset in the near Earth current sheet may be consistent with substorm expansion because the flux tube entropy depletion of mid tail reconnection appears insufficient to cause geosynchronous particle injection and dipolarization. Therefore reconnection in the mid tail current sheet is more likely associated with bursty bulk flows or dipolarization fronts which stop short of geosynchronous distances.

  7. Response of northern winter polar cap to auroral substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The three-phase substorm sequence has been generally accepted and is often tied to the Dungey cycle. Although previous studies have mostly agreed on the increase and decrease in the polar cap area during an episode of substorm, there are disparate views on when the polar cap starts to contract relative to substorm onset. Here we address this conflict using high-resolution (~1-3 min) snapshot global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on board the Polar spacecraft. On the basis of 28 auroral substorm events, all observed in the Northern Hemispheric winter, it is found that the polar cap inflated prior to onset in all events and it attained the largest area ~6 min prior to the substorm expansion phase onset, while the dayside polar cap area remained steady around the onset. The onset of nightside polar cap deflation is found to be attributed to intensifications of aurora on the poleward edge of the nightside oval, mostly in the midnight sector. Although this result supports the loading-unloading and reconnection substorm models, it is not clear if the initial polar cap deflation and the substorm expansion are parts of the same process.

  8. A magnetospheric substorm observed at Sanae, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, J.A.; Dore, I.S.; Haggard, R. ); Goertz, C.K. ); Hughes, W.J. ); Scourfield, M.W.J.; Wakerley, P.A.; Walker, A.D.M. ); Smits, D.P.; Sutcliffe, P.R. ); Stoker, P.H. )

    1987-03-01

    A magnetospheric substorm that occurred at Sanae, Antarctica, on July 27, 1979, was observed by a variety of techniques. A synthesis of the observations is presented, and an attempt made to deduce details of the behavior of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system during the event. While there was some evidence of a growth phase, it was inconclusive. At the onset there was a rapid change in the tail field, which assumed a more dipolar form, accompanied by Pi 2 oscillations and the precipitation of 6-keV electrons, with brightening of the auroral arc, auroral-type sporadic E ionization, and riometer absorption. A positive spike was observed in the D magnetic component, instead of the expected negative one. There was no evidence of the usual westward traveling surge at the beginning of the expansion phase during which the precipitation region, auroral arc, and electrojet moved rapidly poleward, though it may have occurred outside the field of view from Sanae. The H{beta} emission increased by a factor of less than 2, whereas the oxygen and nitrogen emissions monitored increased by 3-4. During the recovery phase, phenomena were consistent with a return of the tail field to an elongated form; a very high ratio of 557.7-nm/630-nm emissions, exceeding 10, was observed; and the electrojet lagged noticeably behind the photon emission regions.

  9. Boundary layer dynamics in the description of magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Rostoker, G.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of eleven magnetospheric substorm events for which good-quality ground-based magnetometer data and ISEE satellite data were both available. It is shown that the magnetotail particle and field observations associated with a substorm expansive phase can be explained through the spatial movement of the boundary layers and central plasma sheet in the magnetotail. The sweeping of these regions past the satellite, even in the absence of temporal variations within the various regions, can lead to a set of plasma flow observations typical of what is observed in the magnetotail during substorm activity.

  10. Substorm statistics: Occurrences and amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.; Nemzek, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    The occurrences and amplitudes of substorms are statistically investigated with the use of three data sets: the AL index, the Los Alamos 3-satellite geosynchronous energetic-electron measurements, and the GOES-5 and -6 geosynchronous magnetic-field measurements. The investigation utilizes {approximately} 13,800 substorms in AL, {approximately} 1400 substorms in the energetic-electron flux, and {approximately} 100 substorms in the magnetic field. The rate of occurrence of substorms is determined as a function of the time of day, the time of year, the amount of magnetotail bending, the orientation of the geomagnetic dipole, the toward/away configuration of the IMF, and the parameters of the solar wind. The relative roles of dayside reconnection and viscous coupling in the production of substorms are assessed. Three amplitudes are defined for a substorms: the jump in the AL index, the peak of the >30-keV integral electron flux at geosynchronous orbit near midnight, and the angle of rotation of the geosynchronous magnetic field near midnight. The substorm amplitudes are statistically analyzed, the amplitude measurements are cross correlated with each other, and the substorm amplitudes are determined as functions of the solar-wind parameters. Periodically occurring and randomly occurring substorms are analyzed separately. The energetic-particle-flux amplitudes are consistent with unloading and the AL amplitudes are consistent with direct driving plus unloading.

  11. The Origin of the Near-Earth Plasma Population During a Substorm on November 24, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had already entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft. Distribution functions computed at the ion sources indicate that ionospheric ions reaching Geotail during the expansion phase were significantly heated. Plasma mantle source distributions indicated the presence of a high-latitude reconnection region that allowed ion entry into the magnetosphere when the IMF was northward. These ions reached Geotail during the expansion phase. Ions from the traditional plasma mantle had access to the spacecraft throughout the substorm.

  12. From Space Weather Toward Space Climate Time Scales: Substorm Analysis from 1993 to 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Viljanen, A.; Partamies, N.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic activity in the Northern Hemisphere auroral region was examined during solar cycles 22 and 23 (1993- 2008). Substorms were identified from ground-based magnetic field measurements by an automated search engine. On average, 550 substorms were observed per year, which gives in total about 9000 substorms. The interannual, seasonal and solar cycle-to-cycle variations of the substorm number (R(sub ss)), substorm duration (T(sub ss)), and peak amplitude (A(sub ss)) were examined. The declining phases of both solar cycles 22 and 23 were more active than the other solar cycle phases due to the enhanced solar wind speed. The spring substorms during the declining solar cycle phase (absolute value of A(sub ss,decl)) - 500 nT) were 25% larger than the spring substorms during the ascending solar cycle years ((absolute value of A(sub ss,asc) = 400 nT). The following seasonal variation was found: the most intense substorms occurred during spring and fall, the largest substorm frequency in the Northern Hemisphere winter, and the longest-duration substorms in summer. Furthermore, we found a winter-summer asymmetry in the substorm number and duration. which is speculated to be due to the variations in the ionospheric conductivity. The solar cycle-Io-cycle variation was found in the yearly substorm number and peak amplitude. The decline from the peak substorm activity in 1994 and 2003 to the following minima took 3 years during solar cycle 22, while it took 6 years during solar cycle 23.

  13. Are steady magnetospheric convection events prolonged substorms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walach, M.-T.; Milan, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetospheric modes, including substorms, sawtooth events, and steady magnetospheric convection events, have in the past been described as different responses of the magnetosphere to coupling with the solar wind. Using previously determined event lists for sawtooth events, steady magnetospheric convection events, and substorms, we produce a statistical study of these event types to examine their similarities and behavior in terms of solar wind parameters, auroral brightness, open magnetospheric flux, and geomagnetic indices. A superposed epoch analysis shows that individual sawteeth show the same signatures as substorms but occur during more extreme cases of solar wind driving as well as geomagnetic activity. We also explore the limitations of current methods of identifying steady magnetospheric convection events and explain why some of those events are flagged inappropriately. We show that 58% of the steady magnetospheric convection events considered, as identified by criteria defined in previous studies are part of a prolonged version of substorms due to continued dayside driving during expansion phase. The remaining 42% are episodes of enhanced magnetospheric convection, occurring after extended periods of dayside driving.

  14. Thermospheric density perturbations in response to substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.

    2014-06-01

    We use 5 years (2001-2005) of CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) satellite data to study average spatial and temporal mass density perturbations caused by magnetospheric substorms in the thermosphere. Using statistics from 2306 substorms to construct superposed epoch time series, we find that the largest average increase in mass density of about 6% occurs about 90 min after substorm expansion phase onset about 3 h of magnetic local time east of the onset region. Averaged over the entire polar auroral region, a mass density increase of about 4% is observed. Using a simple model to estimate the mass density increase at the satellite altitude, we find that an energy deposition rate of 30 GW applied for half an hour predominantly at an altitude of 110 km is able to produce mass density enhancements of the same magnitude. When taking into account previous work that has shown that 80% of the total energy input is due to Joule heating, i.e., enhanced electric fields, whereas 20% is due to precipitation of mainly electrons, our results suggest that the average substorm deposits about 6 GW in the polar thermosphere through particle precipitation. Our result is in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) Hemispheric Power Index; however, it is about 1 order of magnitude less than reported previously.

  15. Longitudinal structure of substorm injections at synchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Arnoldy, R.L.; Moore, T.E.

    1983-08-01

    From multiple-spacecraft measurements it is shown that the synchronous orbit manifestation of a substorm, i.e., plasma injection and magnetic field reconfiguration to dipolar, has an onset which expands both eastward and westward from a relatively narrow sector near midnight. For low-to-moderate geomagnetic activity the earliest onset sector at synchronous orbit is about 3 hours wide, skewed toward the evening side of midnight. Using the extensive International Magnetospheric Study ground magnetometer network beneath the satellites, it is found that simultaneous westward motion of electrojet intensification is seen in the ground data over a large longitudinal range than the magnetospheric signatures. This might be explained in terms of distortion of the nightside magnetic field at synchronous orbit. Plasma that might be explained in terms of distortion of the nightside magnetic field at synchronous orbit. Plasma that has already been injected near midnight at synchronous altitude undergoes no further change as a result of the westward and eastward motion of the borders of the plasma. This suggest that the expansion does not represent new substorm activation. One can intepret these results in terms of an injection front wedge which makes hot plasma accessible to the inner magnetosphere and which spatially expands or propagates with time. The origin of plasma behind the front is not addressed. Detailed pitch angle data do, however, show that strong precipitation would be expected from the front for about the first 10 min after the front passes over an observer. Finally, as a result of longitudinal expansion of plasma injections from midnight toward evening or morning and the continuation or even enhancement of field inflation in the evening or morning sectors, growth and expansive phase substorm signatures can occur simultaneously.

  16. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  17. Substorms on Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

  18. The signatures of kinetic ballooning instability during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Fang; Cheng, Chio-Zong

    2016-04-01

    We use the observations of THEMIS spacecraft, THEMIS Ground-Based Observatories and FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL satellite to investigate the behavior of wave-like brightness structure on the substorm auroral arcs associated with disturbances in the ionosphere and in the near-Earth plasma sheet. The results indicate that the exponential growth of the westward electrojet current is correlated with the exponential growth of the arc intensity which may support the theory of Cowling channel effect. We also find that the azimuthal mode number values of the wave-like substorm arcs are found to decrease with increasing geomagnetic latitude of the substorm auroral arc location. It is suggest that the azimuthal mode number is likely related to the ion gyroradius and azimuthal wave number. We also show that the azimuthal mode number of the substorm onset arc wave-like structure is similar to that of the disturbances in the plasma sheet. We discuss the role of the kinetic ballooning instability as a plausible candidate for substorm mechanism in understanding qualitatively the analysis results of these simultaneous observations of the ionospheric and magnetospheric substorm phenomena.

  19. Modeling of intermediate phase growth

    SciTech Connect

    Umantsev, A.

    2007-01-15

    We introduced a continuum method for modeling of intermediate phase growth and numerically simulated three common experimental situations relevant to the physical metallurgy of soldering: growth of intermetallic compound layer from an unlimited amount of liquid and solid solders and growth of the compound from limited amounts of liquid solder. We found qualitative agreements with the experimental regimes of growth in all cases. For instance, the layer expands in both directions with respect to the base line when it grows from solid solder, and grows into the copper phase when the solder is molten. The quantitative agreement with the sharp-interface approximation was also achieved in these cases. In the cases of limited amounts of liquid solder we found the point of turnaround when the compound/solder boundary changed the direction of its motion. Although such behavior had been previously observed experimentally, the simulations revealed important information: the turnaround occurs approximately at the time of complete saturation of solder with copper. This result allows us to conclude that coarsening of the intermetallic compound structure starts only after the solder is practically saturated with copper.

  20. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: onset latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Wild, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2008-12-01

    Using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) we investigate the ionospheric convection response to magnetospheric substorms. Substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, and were then grouped according to the magnetic latitude of their onset. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection patterns for each latitude group was then performed using radar data for the interval 60 minutes before onset to 90 minutes after. It is found that lower latitude onset substorms are associated with generally more enhanced convection than the higher latitude substorms, although they suffer from the most significant localised suppression of the flow in the midnight sector during the expansion phase. On the other hand, the higher-latitude events are associated with a significant and rapid increase in the nightside convection following substorm onset. These results suggest differences in the electrodynamics associated with substorms occurring at different latitudes.

  1. Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; McFadden, James P; Larson, Davin; Carlson, Charles W; Mende, Stephen B; Frey, Harald; Phan, Tai; Sibeck, David G; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Auster, Uli; Donovan, Eric; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Russell, Christopher T; Runov, Andrei; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Kepko, Larry

    2008-08-15

    Magnetospheric substorms explosively release solar wind energy previously stored in Earth's magnetotail, encompassing the entire magnetosphere and producing spectacular auroral displays. It has been unclear whether a substorm is triggered by a disruption of the electrical current flowing across the near-Earth magnetotail, at approximately 10 R(E) (R(E): Earth radius, or 6374 kilometers), or by the process of magnetic reconnection typically seen farther out in the magnetotail, at approximately 20 to 30 R(E). We report on simultaneous measurements in the magnetotail at multiple distances, at the time of substorm onset. Reconnection was observed at 20 R(E), at least 1.5 minutes before auroral intensification, at least 2 minutes before substorm expansion, and about 3 minutes before near-Earth current disruption. These results demonstrate that substorms are likely initiated by tail reconnection. PMID:18653845

  2. A New Paradigm for Multi-Scale Geospace Dynamics Inspired by Recent Observations of the Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based observations of the spatio-temporal evolution of the aurora and related processes have played a critical role in the dramatic advances in substorm research that have unfolded over the THEMIS era. For example, with its unique combination of extent of coverage, and time and space resolution, THEMIS-ASI has shown dynamics unfolding rapidly across surprisingly large distances. Its image sequences show the substorm as part of a system-level dynamic that connects the inner magnetosphere to the distant tail, and perhaps even the dayside. Together with simultaneous observations by the THEMIS spacecraft, the auroral images have also transformed our understanding of magnetic mapping during the growth phase. In this talk I will review some true science highlights that have been enabled by ground-based observations since the launch of THEMIS. I will also highlight how these ground-based observations fall short of capturing key aspects of the dynamics around expansion phase onset. This creates difficulties, for example, in understanding why, how and where dispersionless injections begin. I finish with a discussion of how ground-based observations targeting the substorm have impacted geospace research in general.

  3. Localized activation of the distant tail neutral line just prior to substorm onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masakazu; Pinnock, Michael; Rodger, Alan S.; Sato, Natsuo; Yamagishi, Hisao; Sessai Yukimatu, A.; Greenwald, Raymond A.; Villain, Jean-Paul; Hairston, Marc R.

    1998-08-01

    We have found flow burst features in the nightside ionosphere that are thought to be the ionospheric signature of distant tail reconnection. These are observed to form just prior to substorm onsets. Simultaneous observations by the Goose Bay-Stokkseyri dual HF radars and DMSP satellites provide the data. Our conclusions are based on equatorward flow bursts on the nightside during two isolated substorms that followed a long period of magnetospheric inactivity associated with a northward interplanetary magnetic field. Both flow bursts start ~60 min after the growth phase onset and last ~10-20 min until the expansion phase onset, migrating equatorward with time. Simultaneous DMSP observations of precipitating particles show that the flow burst occurs at the polar cap boundary, suggesting that the equatorward migration corresponds to the expansion of the polar cap during the growth phase. For one event, the reconnection electric field at 400 km altitude was 14 mV/m and its longitudinal scale was 290 km, which is equivalent to a reconnection voltage of 4.1 kV. For the other event, these values were 11 mV/m (reconnection electric field), 380 km (longitudinal scale), and 4.0 kV (reconnection voltage). In addition to the reconnection signatures, we discuss implications for substorm dynamics during the final stage of the substorm growth phase. The morphology indicates that the distant tail neutral line is activated ~1 hour after the growth phase onset and at the same time the nightside separatrix starts to move equatorward much faster than during the preceding early and middle growth phases. The 1-hour time lag would correspond to the timescale on which slow rarefaction waves from both northern and southern tail lobes converge in the equatorial magnetotail. The fast-moving separatrix on the nightside implies a rapid change of magnetotail configuration resulting from nonlinear enhancement and/or earthward movement of the cross-tail current for the last 10-20 min prior to the

  4. Storm/substorm signatures in the outer belt

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Mouikis, C.; Fennell, J.F.

    1998-12-01

    The response of the ring current region is compared for periods of storm and substorm activity, with an attempt to isolate the contributions of both processes. The authors investigate CRRES particle data in an overview format that allows the display of long-term variations of the outer radiation belt. They compare the evolution of the ring current population to indicators of storm (Dst) and substorm (AE) activity and examine compositional changes. Substorm activity leads to the intensification of the ring current at higher L (L {approximately} 6) and lower ring current energies compared to storms (L {approximately} 4). The O{sup +}/H{sup +} ratio during substorms remains low, near 10%, but is much enhanced during storms (can exceed 100%). They conclude that repeated substorms with an AE {approximately} 900 nT lead to a {Delta}Dst of {approximately} 30 nT, but do not contribute to Dst during storm main phase as substorm injections do not form a symmetric ring current during such disturbed times.

  5. A proposed production model of rapid subauroral ion drifts and their relationship to substorm evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. C.; Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.; Craven, J. D.; Baker, D. N.; Frank, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    The temporal relationship between subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs) and the phases of an auroral substorm is examined on the basis of multisatellite data. The time of expansive phase onset is identified and the time at which recovery begins is estimated. SAIDs are found to typically occur well after substorm onset (more than 30 min), during the substorm recovery phase. Substantial westward ion drifts and field-aligned currents are observed well equatorward of the auroral oval during the expansion phase of a substorm, but the drifts lack the narrow spike signature associated with SAIDs. A phenomenological model of SAID production that qualitatively agrees with the observed ionospheric signatures and substorm temporal relationship is proposed.

  6. Onset of magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B.; Bogott, F.

    1972-01-01

    An examination of the onset of magnetospheric substorms is made by using ATS 5 energetic particles, conjugate balloon X rays and electric fields, all-sky camera photographs, and auroral-zone magnetograms. It is shown that plasma injection to ATS distances, conjugate 1- to 10-keV auroral particle precipitation, energetic electron precipitation, and enhancements of westward magnetospheric electric-field component all occur with the star of slowly developing negative magnetic bays. No trapped or precipitating energetic-particle features are seen at ATS 5 when later sharp negative magnetic-bay onsets occur at Churchill or Great Whale River.

  7. Magnetic flux transfer in the 5 April 2010 Galaxy 15 substorm: an unprecedented observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-03-01

    At approximately 08:25 UT on 5 April 2010, a CME-driven shock compressed Earth's magnetosphere and applied about 15 nT of southward IMF for nearly an hour. A substorm growth phase and localized dipolarization at 08:47 UT were followed by large dipolarizations at 09:03 UT and 09:08 UT, observed by GOES West (11) in the midnight sector, and by three THEMIS spacecraft near X=-11, Y=-2 RE. A large electric field at the THEMIS spacecraft indicates so much flux transfer to the inner magnetosphere that "overdipolarization" took place at GOES 11. This transfer is consistent with the ground and space magnetic signature of the substorm current wedge. Significant particle injections were also observed. The ensemble of extreme geophysical conditions, never previously observed, is consistent with the Near-Earth Neutral Line interpretation of substorms, and subjected the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite to space weather conditions which appear to have induced a major operational anomaly.

  8. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  9. A Perfect Substorm: ICME-driven Magnetic Activity Catches Galaxy 15 in the Wrong Place at the Wrong Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Singer, H. J.; Glassmeier, K.

    2010-12-01

    At approximately 0825 UT on April 5, 2010, an ICME-driven shock encountered Earth's magnetosphere. The IMF, slightly southward since 0805 UT, turned more so, to an average value close to -15 nT, which was maintained for nearly an hour under high dynamic pressure conditions. Following a substorm growth phase, dipolarizations were observed at 0847 and 0903 UT by GOES West (11) in the midnight sector, at 0903 UT by three THEMIS spacecraft near X=-11, Y=-2 RE, and at about 0900 by GOES 14 near 2 MLT. Electron injections began at 0903 UT at the THEMIS spacecraft, while GOES 11 detected an increase in flux of energetic protons. A major dipolarization event at 0909 UT was observed at all of these spacecraft, and transferred magnetic flux from the vicinity of THEMIS to the inner magnetosphere, resulting in "overdipolarization" in the midnight sector. Extreme currents, more than 3 MA crossing the midnight sector, are inferred from ground magnetic perturbations of over 2000 nT, indicating this was an unusually strong substorm. Flux transfer associated with large electric fields observed at THEMIS (EY of 80 mV/m) is consistent with this increase in inner magnetospheric magnetic field. A second increase in ca. 1 MeV proton flux at this time led to a factor of over 10000 overall increase of this flux in the event. When the effects of this substorm reached synchronous orbit, the Galaxy 15 satellite was in eclipse when photoemission is not available to counter charging by the potentially high fluxes of energetic magnetospheric electrons that can occur during substorms. Galaxy 15 experienced a severe operational anomaly shortly after leaving eclipse and appears to have simply been at the wrong place at the wrong time when the “perfect” substorm occurred.

  10. Propagating substorm injection fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Feynman, J.; Hardy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a series of two-satellite observations leads to a clarification of substorm plasma injection, in which boundary motion plays a major role. Emphasis is put on a type of event characterized by abrupt, dispersionless changes in electron intensity and a coincident perturbation that consists of both a field magnitude increase and a small rotation toward more dipolar orientation. Comparing plasma observations at two points, it is found that in active, preinjection conditions the two most important features of the plasma sheet are: (1) the low-energy convection boundary for near-zero energy particles, determined by the magnitude of the large-scale convection electric field; and (2) the precipitation-flow boundary layer between the hot plasma sheet and the atmospherically contaminated inner plasma sheet.

  11. Relationship between auroral substorms and the occurrence of terrestrial kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Alexander, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The correlation between magnetospheric substorms as inferred from the AE(11) index and the occurrence of terrestrial kilometric radiation (TKR) is examined. It is found that AE and TKR are well correlated when observations are made from above the 15-03 hr local time zone and are rather poorly correlated over the 03-15 hr zone. High-resolution dynamic spectra obtained during periods of isolated substorms indicate that low-intensity, high-frequency TKR commences at about the same time as the substorm phase. The substorm expansion phase corresponds to a rapid intensification and bandwidth increase of TKR. When combined with previous results, these new observations imply that many TKR events begin at low altitudes and high frequencies (about 400-500 kHz) and spread to higher altitudes and lower frequencies as the substorm expands.

  12. Magnetospheric substorms in the distant magnetotail observed by Imp 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C. I.; Akasofu, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Study of variations of the magnetic field and plasma sheet in the distant magnetotail (20 to 40 earth radii) during magnetospheric substorms on the basis of the Imp 3 magnetic-field and particle data. Depending on the locations of the satellite with respect to the boundary of the plasma sheet, the variations differ greatly. However, the present results and the results of other workers give a clear indication of an increase of the magnitude of the field outside the plasma sheet and of the simultaneous ?thinning' of the plasma sheet during an early phase of substorms. At about the maximum epoch or during the recovery phase of substorms, the plasma sheet expands and appears to be inflated to at least the presubstorm level. Furthermore, a large excessive flux of the magnetic (approximately equal to Z component) field, as compared with the flux of the original dipole field, appears across the neutral sheet.

  13. Energy density of ionospheric and solar wind origin ions in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daglis, Loannis A.; Livi, Stefano; Sarris, Emmanuel T.; Wilken, Berend

    1994-01-01

    Comprehensive energy density studies provide an important measure of the participation of various sources in energization processes and have been relatively rare in the literature. We present a statistical study of the energy density of the near-Earth magnetotail major ions (H(+), O(+), He(++), He(+)) during substorm expansion phase and discuss its implications for the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling. Our aim is to examine the relation between auroral activity and the particle energization during substorms through the correlation between the AE indices and the energy density of the major magnetospheric ions. The data we used here were collected by the charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Trace Explorer (AMPTE)/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) satellite in the near-equatorial nightside magnetosphere, at geocentric distances approximately 7 to 9 R(sub E). CHEM provided the opportunity to conduct the first statistical study of energy density in the near-Earth magnetotail with multispecies particle data extending into the higher energy range (greater than or equal to 20 keV/E). the use of 1-min AE indices in this study should be emphasized, as the use (in previous statistical studies) of the (3-hour) Kp index or of long-time averages of AE indices essentially smoothed out all the information on substorms. Most distinct feature of our study is the excellent correlation of O(+) energy density with the AE index, in contrast with the remarkably poor He(++) energy density - AE index correlation. Furthermore, we examined the relation of the ion energy density to the electrojet activity during substorm growth phase. The O(+) energy density is strongly correlated with the pre-onset AU index, that is the eastward electrojet intensity, which represents the growth phase current system. Our investigation shows that the near-Earth magnetotail is increasingly fed with energetic ionospheric ions during periods of enhanced

  14. Kinetic Ballooning Instability as a Substorm Onset Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z.Cheng

    1999-10-01

    A new scenario of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes are presented based on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observation and a kinetic ballooning instability theory. During the growth phase of substorms the plasma beta is larger than unity (20 greater than or equal to beta greater than or equal to 1). Toward the end of the late growth phase the plasma beta increases from 20 to greater than or equal to 50 in approximately 3 minutes and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50 - 75 sec is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the current disruption onset. At the onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place to modify the ambient pressure profile so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a dipole-like geometry. A kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) theory is proposed to explain the low-frequency instability (frequency and growth rate) and its observed high beta threshold (beta subscript c is greater than or equal to 50). Based on the ideal-MHD theory beta subscript c, superscript MHD approximately equals 1 and the ballooning modes are predicted to be unstable during the growth phase, which is inconsistent with observation that no appreciable magnetic field fluctuation is observed. The enhancement beta subscript c over beta subscript c, superscript MHD is due to the kinetic effects of trapped electrons and finite ion-Larmor radii which provide a large stabilizing effect by producing a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension. As a result, beta subscript c is greatly increased over beta subscript c, superscript MHD by a factor proportional to the ratio of the total electron density to the untrapped electron density (n subscript e divided by n subscript eu) which is greater than or equal to

  15. The effect of magnetic substorms on near-ground atmospheric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.; Tammet, H.

    2000-12-01

    Ionosphere-magnetosphere disturbances at high latitudes, e.g. magnetic substorms, are accompanied by energetic particle precipitation and strong variations of the ionospheric electric fields and currents. These might reasonably be expected to modify the local atmospheric electric circuit. We have analysed air-earth vertical currents (AECs) measured by a long wire antenna at Esrange, northern Sweden during 35 geomagnetic substorms. Using superposed epoch analysis we compare the air-earth current variations during the 3 h before and after the time of the magnetic X-component minimum with those for corresponding local times on 35 days without substorms. After elimination of the average daily variation we can conclude that the effect of substorms on AEC is small but distinguishable. It is speculated that the AEC increases observed during about 2 h prior to the geomagnetic X-component minimum, are due to enhancement of the ionospheric electric field. During the subsequent 2 h of the substorm recovery phase, the difference between substorm and quiet atmospheric currents decreases. The amplitude of this substorm variation of AEC is estimated to be less than 50% of the amplitude of the diurnal variation in AEC during the same time interval. The statistical significance of this result was confirmed using the Van der Waerden X-test. This method was further used to show that the average air-earth current and its fluctuations increase during late expansion and early recovery phases of substorms.

  16. Thin current sheets in the magnetotail during substorms: CDAW 6 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    The global magnetic field configuration during the growth phase of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 substorm (March 22, 1979, 1054 UT) is modeled using data from two suitably located spacecraft and temporally evolving variations of the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. These results are compared with a local calculation of the current sheet location and thickness carried out by McPherron et al. (1987) and Sanny et al. (this issue). Both models suggest that during the growth phase the current sheet rotated away from its nominal location, and simultaneously thinned strongly. The locations and thickness obtained from the two models are in good agreement. The global model suggests that the peak current density is approximately 120 nA/sq m and that the cross-tail current almost doubled its intensity during this very strong growth phase. The global model predicts a field configuration that is sufficiently stretched to scatter thermal electrons, which may be conducive to the onset of ion tearing in the tail. The electron plasma data further support this scenario, as the anisotropy present in the low-energy electrons disappears close to the substorm onset. The electron contribution to the intensifying current in this case is of the order of 10% before the isotropization of the distribution.

  17. Thin current sheets in the magnetotail during substorms: CDAW 6 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Baker, D.N.; Mitchell, D.G.

    1994-04-01

    The global magnetic field configuration during the growth phase of the CDAW 6 substorm is modeled using data from two suitably located spacecraft and temporally evolving variations of the Ysyganenko magnetic field model. These results are compared with a local calculation of the current sheet location and thickness carried out by McPherron et al. and Sanney et al. Both models suggest that during the growth phase the current sheet rotated away from its nominal location, and simultaneously thinned strongly. The locations and thicknesses obtained from the two models are in good agreement. The global model suggests that the peak current density is {approximately}120 nA/m{sup 2}, and that the cross-tail current almost doubled its intensity during this very strong growth phase. The global model predicts a field configuration that is sufficiently stretched to scatter thermal electrons, which may be conducive to the onset of ion tearing in the tail. The electron plasma data further support this scenario, as the anisotropy present in the low-energy electrons disappears close to the substorm onset. The electron contribution to the intensifying current in this case is of the order of 10% before the isotropization of the distribution. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Rapid control of phase growth by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yi; Xu, Jia-Quan; Choi, Hongseok; Konishi, Hiromi; Jin, Song; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Effective control of phase growth under harsh conditions (such as high temperature, highly conductive liquids or high growth rate), where surfactants are unstable or ineffective, is still a long-standing challenge. Here we show a general approach for rapid control of diffusional growth through nanoparticle self-assembly on the fast-growing phase during cooling. After phase nucleation, the nanoparticles spontaneously assemble, within a few milliseconds, as a thin coating on the growing phase to block/limit diffusion, resulting in a uniformly dispersed phase orders of magnitude smaller than samples without nanoparticles. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in both inorganic (immiscible alloy and eutectic alloy) and organic materials. Our approach overcomes the microstructure refinement limit set by the fast phase growth during cooling and breaks the inherent limitations of surfactants for growth control. Considering the growing availability of numerous types and sizes of nanoparticles, the nanoparticle-enabled growth control will find broad applications. PMID:24809454

  19. OpenGGCM Simulation of Ballooning and Axial MHD Mode at Substorm Onset (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, J.; Zhu, P.; Ge, Y.; Siscoe, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally accepted that magnetic reconnection is the main mechanism that dissipates power during a substorm. It is less clear, however, whether the beginning of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail also signifies the onset of the substorm expansion phase itself, i.e., whether the "outside-in" scenario applies, or if a different process happens first closer to Earth that triggers the reconnection onset in the magnetotail, i.e., the "inside-out" scenario. Global MHD simulations have generally supported the "outside-in" scenario. However, ideal MHD instabilities that could possibly trigger tail reconnection may have been missed due to coarse numerical resolution or due to other numerical effects. Here, we present results from an OpenGGCM simulation of the March 23, 2007 substorm that clearly shows growth of the ballooning mode as suggested by our earlier analysis (Zhu et al., 2009), as well as growth of an ideal-like instability that is purely axial and was previously reported by Siscoe et al. (2009). Both instabilities occur simultaneously and are immediately followed by reconnection onset. The simulations results are in accordance with recent Geotail observations of ballooning with a wavelength of approximately 0.5 RE, and the time scales agree with that of the explosive growth phase. The exact relation between the three instabilities, i.e., ballooning, the axial mode, and tearing, is not entirely clear yet; however, having demonstrated that the OpenGGCM reproduces all of them, they can now be analyzed in more detail. Furthermore, we present the expected auroral signature of these processes, which will allow for a more detailed comparison of the simulation results with ground based imagers.

  20. Phase-Field Simulations of Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis

    2010-07-01

    This course gives an elementary introduction to the phase-field method and to its applications for the modeling of crystal growth. Two different interpretations of the phase-field variable are given and discussed. It can be seen as a physical order parameter that characterizes a phase transition, or as a smoothed indicator function that tracks domain boundaries. Elementary phase-field models for solidification and epitaxial growth are presented and are applied to the dendritic growth of a pure substance and the step-flow growth on a vicinal surface.

  1. Relationship between wave-like auroral arcs and Pi2 pulsations in plasma sheet during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. F.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-12-01

    The observations of substorm onset phenomena in the magnetosphere and ionosphere are examined to investigate their correlation and to understand the substorm onset mechanism. In particular, we examine the Pi2 wave structure, propagation, frequency in the magnetosphere observed by the THEMIS satellites in the near-Earth plasma sheet and the structure and propagation of the substorm auroral onset arcs. The azimuthal mode number values of the wave-like substorm arcs are found to be in the range of ~ 100 - 260 and decrease with increasing geomagnetic latitude of the substorm auroral arc location. The wave-like arc brightness structures on the substorm auroral arcs tend to move azimuthally westward, but with a few exceptions of eastward movement, during tens of seconds prior to the substorm onset. The movement of the wave-like arc brightness structure is linearly correlated with the phase velocity of the Pi2 δBy pulsations in the near-Earth plasma sheet region. The result suggests that the Pi2 transverse δBy disturbances are related to the intensifying wave-like substorm onset arcs. One plausible explanation of the observations is the kinetic ballooning instability, which has high azimuthal mode number due to the ion gyro-radius effect and finite parallel electric field that accelerates electrons into the ionosphere to produce the wave-like arc structure.

  2. Solar cycle dependence of substorm occurrence and duration: Implications for onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning; McPherron, Robert L.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-04-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent a major energy release process in Earth's magnetosphere. Their duration and intensity are coupled to solar wind input, but the precise way the solar wind energy is stored and then released is a matter of considerable debate. Part of the observational difficulty has been the gaps in the auroral electrojet index traditionally used to study substorm properties. In this study, we created a midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index to measure the strength of the substorm current wedge. Because this index is based on midlatitude magnetometer data that are available continuously over several decades, we can assemble a database of substorm onsets lasting 31 years (1982-2012). We confirmed that the MPB onsets have a good agreement (±2 min) with auroral onsets as determined by optical means on board the IMAGE mission and that the MPB signature of substorms is robust and independent of the stations' position relative to ionospheric currents. Using the MPB onset, expansion, and recovery as a proxy of the respective substorm quantities, we found that the solar cycle variation of substorm occurrence depends on solar wind conditions and has a most probable value of 80 min. In contrast, the durations of substorm expansion and recovery phases do not change with the solar cycle. This suggests that the frequency of energy unloading in the magnetosphere is controlled by solar wind conditions through dayside reconnection, but the unloading process related to flux pileup in the near-Earth region is controlled by the magnetosphere and independent of external driving.

  3. Substorm Evolution in the Near-Earth Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    This grant represented one-year, phase-out funding for the project of the same name (NAG5-9110 to Boston University) to determine precursors and signatures of local substorm onset and how they evolve in the plasma sheet using the Geotail near-Earth database. We report here on two accomplishments: (1) Completion of an examination of plasma velocity signature at times of local onsets in the current disruption (CD) region. (2) Initial investigation into quantification of near-Earth flux-tube contents of injected plasma at times of substorm injections.

  4. Substorms - Future of magnetospheric substorm-storm research

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I. )

    1989-04-01

    Seven approaches and/or areas of magnetospheric substorm and storm science which should be emphasized in future research are briefly discussed. They are: the combining of groups of researchers who study magnetic storms and substorms in terms of magnetic reconnection with those that do not, the possible use of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model to merge the groups, the development of improved input-output relationships, the complementing of satellite and ground-based observations, the need for global imaging of the magnetosphere, the complementing of observations with computer simulations, and the need to study the causes of changes in the north-south component of the IMF. 36 refs.

  5. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: onset latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Wild, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-02-01

    Using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) we investigate the ionospheric convection response to magnetospheric substorms. Substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, and were then binned according to the magnetic latitude of their onset. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection patterns for each onset-latitude bin was then performed using radar data for the interval 60 min before onset to 90 min after. It is found that lower onset-latitude substorms are associated with generally more enhanced convection than the higher latitude substorms, although they suffer from a significant localised reduction of the flow in the midnight sector during the expansion phase. Higher-latitude substorms are associated with a significant and rapid increase in the nightside convection following substorm onset, with all onset-latitude bins showing an enhancement over onset values by ~60 min into the expansion phase. A rudimentary inspection of the concurrent auroral evolution suggests that the duration of the flow reduction following substorm onset is dependent on the strength and duration of the expansion phase aurora and its associated conductivity enhancement.

  6. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  7. Organization of the magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, T.; Rypdal, K.

    2012-05-01

    The change in degree of organization of the magnetosphere during substorms is investigated by analyzing various geomagnetic indices, as well as interplanetary magnetic field z-component and solar wind velocity x-component. We conclude that the magnetosphere self-organizes globally during substorms, but neither the magnetosphere nor the solar wind become more predictable in the course of a substorm. This conclusion is based on analysis of substorms in the period from 2000 to 2002. A minimal dynamic-stochastic model of the driven magnetosphere that reproduces many statistical features of substorm indices is discussed.

  8. Magnetospheric Substorms and Tail Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded several studies of magnetospheric substorms and their effect on the dynamics of the earth's geomagnetic tail. We completed an extensive study of plasmoids, plasma/magnetic field structures that travel rapidly down the tail, using data from the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. This study formed the PhD thesis of Mark Moldwin. We found that magnetically plasmoids are better described as flux-ropes (twisted magnetic flux tubes) rather than plasma bubbles, as had been generally regarded up to that point (Moldwin and Hughes, 1990; 1991). We published several examples of plasmoids observed first in the near tail by IMP 8 and later in the distant tail by ISEE 3, confirming their velocities down tail. We showed how the passage of plasmoids distorts the plasma sheet. We completed the first extensive statistical survey of plasmoids that showed how plasmoids evolve as they move down tail from their formation around 30 RE to ISEE 3 apogee at 240 RE. We established a one-to-one correspondence between the observation of plasmoids in the distant tail and substorm onsets at earth or in the near tail. And we showed that there is a class of plasmoid-like structures that move slowly earthward, especially following weak substorms during northward IMF. Collectively this work constituted the most extensive study of plasmoids prior to the work that has now been done with the GEOTAIL spacecraft. Following our work on plasmoids, we turned our attention to signatures of substorm onset observed in the inner magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit, especially signatures observed by the CRRES satellite. Using data from the magnetometer, electric field probe, plasma wave instrument, and low energy plasma instrument on CRRES we were able to better document substorm onsets in the inner magnetosphere than had been possible previously. Detailed calculation of the Poynting flux showed energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and a short burst of tailward convective

  9. Phase growth in bistable systems with impurities.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, C; Tucci, K; Cosenza, M G

    2008-01-01

    A system of coupled chaotic bistable maps on a lattice with randomly distributed impurities is investigated as a model for studying the phenomenon of phase growth in nonuniform media. The statistical properties of the system are characterized by means of the average size of spatial domains of equivalent spin variables that define the phases. It is found that the rate at which phase domains grow becomes smaller when impurities are present and that the average size of the resulting domains in the inhomogeneous state of the system decreases when the density of impurities is increased. The phase diagram showing regions where homogeneous, heterogeneous, and chessboard patterns occur on the space of parameters of the system is obtained. A critical boundary that separates the regime of slow growth of domains from the regime of fast growth in the heterogeneous region of the phase diagram is calculated. The transition between these two growth regimes is explained in terms of the stability properties of the local phase configurations. Our results show that the inclusion of spatial inhomogeneities can be used as a control mechanism for the size and growth velocity of phase domains forming in spatiotemporal systems. PMID:18351923

  10. Computer simulation of a geomagnetic substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, J. G.; Brecht, S. H.; Huba, J. D.; Fedder, J. A.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A global two-dimensional simulation of a substormlike process occurring in earth's magnetosphere is presented. The results are consistent with an empirical substorm model - the neutral-line model. Specifically, the introduction of a southward interplanetary magnetic field forms an open magnetosphere. Subsequently, a substorm neutral line forms at about 15 earth radii or closer in the magnetotail, and plasma sheet thinning and plasma acceleration occur. Eventually the substorm neutral line moves tailward toward its presubstorm position.

  11. The spatio-temporal characteristics of ULF waves driven by substorm injected particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Mager, P. N.; Klimushkin, D. Yu.

    2013-04-01

    A previous case study observed a ULF wave with an eastward and equatorward phase propagation (an azimuthal wave number m, of ˜13) generated during the expansion phase of a substorm. The eastward phase propagation of the wave suggested that eastward drifting energetic electrons injected during the substorm were responsible for driving that particular wave. In this study, a population of 83 similar ULF wave events also associated with substorm-injected particles have been identified using multiple Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars in Europe and North America between June 2000 and September 2005. The wave events identified in this study exhibit azimuthal wave numbers ranging in magnitude from 2 to 92, where the direction of propagation depends on the relative positions of the substorm onsets and the wave observations. We suggest that azimuthally drifting energetic particles associated with the substorms are responsible for driving the waves. Both westward drifting ions and eastward drifting electrons are implicated with energies ranging from ˜1 to 70 keV. A clear dependence of the particle energy on the azimuthal separation of the wave observations and the substorm onset is seen, with higher energy particles (leading to lower m-number waves) being involved at smaller azimuthal separations.

  12. The Spatio-temporal Characteristics of ULF Waves Driven by Substorm Injected Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Klimushkin, D. Y.; Mager, P. N.

    2012-12-01

    A previous case study [Yeoman et al.,2010] observed a ULF wave with an eastward and equatorward phase propagation (an azimuthal wave number m, of ~13) generated during the expansion phase of a substorm. The eastward phase propagation of the wave suggested that eastward drifting energetic electrons injected during the substorm were responsible for driving that particular wave. In this study a population of 84 similar ULF wave events also associated with substorm-injected particles have been identified using multiple SuperDARN radars in Europe and North America between June 2000 and September 2005. The wave events identified in this study exhibit azimuthal wave numbers ranging in magnitude from 2 to 92, where the direction of propagation depends on the relative positions of the substorm onsets and the wave observations. We suggest that azimuthally drifting energetic particles associated with the substorms are responsible for driving the waves, as suggested in Yeoman et al. [2010]. Both westward drifting ions and eastward drifting electrons are implicated with energies ranging from ~1 to 70 keV. A clear dependence of the particle energy on the azimuthal separation of the wave observations and the substorm onset is seen, with higher energy particles (leading to lower m-number waves) being involved at smaller azimuthal separations.

  13. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  14. Vapor phase diamond growth technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Ion beam deposition chambers used for carbon film generation were designed and constructed. Features of the developed equipment include: (1) carbon ion energies down to approx. 50 eV; (2) in suit surface monitoring with HEED; (3) provision for flooding the surface with ultraviolet radiation; (4) infrared laser heating of substrate; (5) residual gas monitoring; (6) provision for several source gases, including diborane for doping studies; and (7) growth from either hydrocarbon source gases or from carbon/argon arc sources. Various analytical techniques for characterization of from carbon/argon arc sources. Various analytical techniques for characterization of the ion deposited carbon films used to establish the nature of the chemical bonding and crystallographic structure of the films are discussed. These include: H2204/HN03 etch; resistance measurements; hardness tests; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; scanning auger microscopy; electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis; electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis; electron energy loss spectroscopy; density measurements; secondary ion mass spectroscopy; high energy electron diffraction; and electron spin resonance. Results of the tests are summarized.

  15. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Wolf, R.A.; Harel, M.; Karty, J.L.

    1982-08-01

    Using substorm currents derived from the Rice computer simulation of the substorm event of September 19, 1976, we have computed theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations. A theoretical Dst has also been computed. Our computed magnetograms were obtained by integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of approximately 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring currents, the Birkeland currents, and the horizontal ionospheric currents. Ground currents and dynamo currents were neglected. Computed contributions to the magnetic field perturbation from eleven different kinds of currents are displayed (e.g., ring currents, northern hemisphere Birkeland currents). First, overall agreement of theory and data is generally satisfactory, especially for stations at high and mid-magnetic latitudes. Second, model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from very complicated combinations of different kinds of currents and that the magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents often cancel each other, despite the fact that complicated inhomogeneous conductivities in our model prevent rigorous application of Fukushima's theorem. Third, both the theoretical and observed Dst decrease during the expansion phase of the substorm, but data indicate that Dst relaxes back toward its initial value within about an hour after the peak of the substorm. Fourth, the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal component of magnetic field disturbance at low latitudes in a substorm is essentially due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, net upward current at midnight, and generally antisunward flowing electrojets; it is not due to a physical partial ring current injected into the duskside of the inner magnetosphere.

  16. Time development of high-altitude auroral acceleration region plasma, potentials, and field-aligned current systems observed by Cluster during a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Mozer, F.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral link in the chain of events that transpire during substorms, and the currents, plasma and electric fields undergo significant changes driven by complex dynamical processes deep in the magnetotail. These auroral acceleration processes in turn accelerate and heat the plasma that ultimately leads to some of the most intense global substorm auroral displays. The complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, and resultant changes in the plasma constituents that occur during substorms within or just above the auroral acceleration zone remain unclear. We present Cluster multi-point observations within the high-altitude acceleration region (> 3 Re altitude) at key instances during the development of a substorm. Of particular emphasis is on the time-development of the plasma, potentials and currents that occur therein with the aim of ascertaining high-altitude drivers of substorm active auroral acceleration processes and auroral emission consequences. Preliminary results show that the initial onset is dominated by Alfvenic activity as evidenced by the sudden occurrence of relatively intense, short-spatial scale Alfvenic currents and attendant energy dispersed, counterstreaming electrons poleward of the growth-phase arc. The Alfvenic currents are locally planar structures with characteristic thicknesses on the order of a few tens of kilometers. In subsequent passages by the other spacecraft, the plasma sheet region became hotter and thicker via the injection of new hot, dense plasma of magnetospheric origins poleward of the pre-existing growth phase arc. In association with the heating and/or thickening of the plasma sheet, the currents appeared to broaden to larger scales as Alfven dominated activity gave way to either inverted-V dominated or mixed inverted-V and Alfvenic behavior depending on location. The transition from Alfven dominated to inverted-V dominated

  17. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event - CDAW 6. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Manka, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW 6) has the primary objective to trace the flow of energy from the solar wind through the magnetosphere to its ultimate dissipation in the ionosphere. An essential role in this energy transfer is played by magnetospheric substorms, however, details are not yet completely understood. The International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) has provided an ideal data base for the study conducted by CDAW 6. The present investigation is concerned with the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event, which had been selected for detailed examination in connection with the studies performed by the CDAW 6. The observations of this substorm are discussed, taking into account solar wind conditions, ground magnetic activity on March 22, 1979, observations at synchronous orbit, observations in the near geomagnetic tail, and the onset of the 1054 UT expansion phase. Substorm development and magnetospheric dynamics are discussed on the basis of a synthesis of the observations.

  18. Substorms observations over Apatity during geomagnetic storms in the period 2012 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Werner, Rolf; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied substorms, generated during enhanced geomagnetic activity in the period 2012 - 2016. Observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity have been used. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were judged by the 1-min sampled OMNI data base. Substorm onset and further development were verified by the 10-s sampled data of IMAGE magnetometers and by data of the all-sky camera at Apatity. Subject of the study were substorms occurred during geomagnetic storms. The so-called "St. Patrick's day 2015 event" (17-21 March 2015), the events on 17-18 March 2013 and 7-17 March 2012 (a chain of events generated four consecutive storms) which were among the events of strongest geomagnetic activity during the current solar cycle 24, were part of the storms under consideration. The behavior of the substorms developed during different phases of the geomagnetic storms was discussed.

  19. Grain nucleation and growth during phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Offerman, S E; van Dijk, N H; Sietsma, J; Grigull, S; Lauridsen, E M; Margulies, L; Poulsen, H F; Rekveldt, M Th; van der Zwaag, S

    2002-11-01

    The mechanical properties of polycrystalline materials are largely determined by the kinetics of the phase transformations during the production process. Progress in x-ray diffraction instrumentation at synchrotron sources has created an opportunity to study the transformation kinetics at the level of individual grains. Our measurements show that the activation energy for grain nucleation is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by thermodynamic models. The observed growth curves of the newly formed grains confirm the parabolic growth model but also show three fundamentally different types of growth. Insight into the grain nucleation and growth mechanisms during phase transformations contributes to the development of materials with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:12411699

  20. Magnetotail Plasma Signatures of Pseudobreakups and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Chen, L. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Lin, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    Using Polar/UVI global images, we have identified a period of successive minor auroral activations during which WIND was making a perigee pass through the near-Earth magnetotail. On the basis of images, these auroral brightenings are interpreted to be pseudobreakups due to the lack of significant global expansion. Large magnetic by the WIND spacecraft show a nearly one-to-one correspondence auroral intensifications. During intervals of large field auroral brightenings, energized ions have an Earthward velocity energized electrons generally remain isotropic. Closer inspection ion distribution functions indicate that the high velocity moments are not due to convective flows. Rather, the plasma is composed of a component and a stagnate cold component. We also trace the observed by WIND backwards in time to determine the source regions for the particles. Based upon these observations, we find that to zeroth order there is no difference in the behavior of the plasma during as compared to substorm expansive phase events.

  1. Association of plasma sheet variations with auroral changes during substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A.; Parks, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Images of the southern auroral oval taken by the University of Iowa auroral imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite during an isolated substorm are correlated with plasma measurements made concurrently by the ISEE 1 satellite in the magnetotail. Qualitative magnetic field configuration changes necessary to relate the plasma sheet boundary location to the latitude of the auroras are discussed. Evidence is presented that the longitudinal advances of the auroras after expansive phase onset are mappings of a neutral line lengthening across the near-tail. We observe a rapid poleward auroral surge, occurring about 1 hour after expansive phase onset, to coincide with the peak of the AL index and argue that the total set of observations at that time is consistent with the picture of a /open quotes/poleward leap/close quotes/ of the electrojet marking the beginning of the substorm's recovery. 9 refs. 3 figs.

  2. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mursula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993-2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  4. Sambo-Geos: on three-dimensional substorm dynamics - a case study for 4 March 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Lazutin, L.L.; Khrushchinskii, A.A.; Glassmeier, K.; Gustafsson, G.; Kangas, J.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-based, balloon, and Geos-2 observations of the magnetospheric substorm of Mar. 4, 1979 are examined. It is shown that the substorm can be described by a four-phase scheme, with the active phase divided into two parts: an active-convective phase and a classical active phase. The breakup is shown to take place at closed rather than tailward stretched magnetic field lines. Radial particle movement is described in terms of the dynamic shell splitting effect; it corresponds to structural changes in the magnetosphere and may explain the northward expansion of the westward traveling surge. 7 references.

  5. The role of substorms in the formation of the ring current

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, G.

    1996-07-01

    It has long been recognized that the formation of the terrestrial ring current is accompanied by strong substorm expansive phase activity in the auroral oval. While large amplitude substorm activity seems to be a prerequisite for ring current formation to take place, it has long been puzzling as to why some large amplitude substorm activity in the auroral oval is not associated with significant ring current development. In this paper I shall outline the basis for the renovated boundary layer dynamics model of magnetospheric substorms showing how the onset of the substorm expansive phase can be associated with a sudden decrease in shielding space charge in the region of the near-Earth plasma sheet threaded by Region 2 field-aligned currents. I shall suggest that an episode of sufficiently large southward IMF lasting over a sufficiently lengthy period of time can lead to a sequence of substorm expansive phases, each one being initiated closer to the Earth than the previous one. Each expansive phase is attributed to a sudden decrease in radially localized cross-tail current (viz. a decrease in shielding space charge) and with each onset the inner edge of the plasma sheet moves inward. The inductive electric field associated with each crosstail current decrease is responsible for the acceleration of already energetic particles to energies of significance for ring current formation. Only when the inner edge of the crosstail current is sufficiently close to the Earth do the acceleration processes associated with substorm onset produce a long lived ring current. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Relationship between wave-like auroral arcs and Pi2 disturbances in plasma sheet prior to substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Fang; Cheng, Chio-Zong

    2015-10-01

    Wave-like substorm arc features in the aurora and Pi2 magnetic disturbances observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet are frequently, and sometimes simultaneously, observed around the substorm onset time. We perform statistical analyses of the THEMIS ASI auroral observations that show wave-like bright spot structure along the arc prior to substorm onset. The azimuthal mode number values of the wave-like substorm arcs are found to be in the range of ~100-240 and decrease with increasing geomagnetic latitude of the substorm auroral arc location. We suggest that the azimuthal mode number is likely related to the ion gyroradius and azimuthal wave number. We also perform correlation study of the pre-onset wave-like substorm arc features and Pi2 magnetic disturbances for substorm dipolarization events observed by THEMIS satellites during 2008-2009. The wave-like arc brightness structures on the substorm auroral arcs tend to move azimuthally westward, but with a few exceptions of eastward movement, during tens of seconds prior to the substorm onset. The movement of the wave-like arc brightness structure is linearly correlated with the phase velocity of the Pi2 δ B y disturbances in the near-Earth plasma sheet region. The result suggests that the Pi2 transverse δ B y disturbances are related to the intensifying wave-like substorm onset arcs. One plausible explanation of the observations is the kinetic ballooning instability, which has high azimuthal mode number due to the ion gyroradius effect and finite parallel electric field that accelerates electrons into the ionosphere to produce the wave-like arc structure.

  7. Effect of magnetic storms and substorms on GPS slips at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. I.; Yasyukevich, Yu. V.; Titova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of slips in navigation signal parameters of GPS from 2010 to 2014 is considered for the stations of the IGS and CHAIN networks located in the Arctic region. On the basis of almost continuous (more than 8 million hours) observations at around 200 receiving stations, we investigate the probability of "instrumental" loss of phase and pseudo-range as well as short-term variations in the high rate of change of the total electron content (TEC) in different geomagnetic conditions. Quantitative estimates for the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the slips of these parameters are given. The slip probabilities for TEC are significantly (100-200 times) higher than those of purely instrumental slips and grow during geomagnetic storms and substorms. The growth of instrumental slips may be caused by the increased absorption that occurs during geomagnetic storms, among other reasons, and is an indicator of auroral intrusions of highenergy particles.

  8. Magnetic islands in the near geomagnetic tail and its implications for the mechanism of 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, N.; Walker, R. J.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1054 UT CDAW 6 substorm event, two ISEE spacecraft observed dynamic changes in the magnetic field and in the flux of energetic particles in the near-earth plasma sheet. In the substorm growth phase, the magnetic field at both ISEE spacecraft became tail-like. Following expansion phase onset, two small scale magnetic islands were observed moving tailward at a velocity of about 580 km/s. The passage of these two magnetic islands was coincident with bursts of tailward streaming energetic particles. The length of the magnetic loops was estimated to have been about 2 to 3 earth radii while the height of the loops was less than 0.5 earth radii. The magnetic islands were produced by multipoint reconnection processes in the near tail plasma sheet which may have been associated with the formation of the near-earth neutral line and the subsequent formation of a large scale plasmoid. The near-earth neutral line retreated tailward later in the expansion phase, as suggested by the reversal of the streaming of energetic particles.

  9. Factors influencing the intensity of magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Baker, D. N.

    1993-01-01

    A definition of the substorm is presented, and it is shown that the typical isolated substorm is produced by the superposition of effects of processes directly driven by the solar wind through dayside reconnection and those driven by unloading through nighttime reconnection. The single factor that determines whether a substorm will occur or not is the clock angle of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) around the earth-sun line. Only when this field points south of the GSM equatorial plane do the auroral electrojet indices depart from their quiet values. For a given clock angle, the level of activity increases with the IMF strength and solar wind velocity.

  10. Extremely Intense Magnetospheric Substorms : External Triggering? Preconditioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    We study particularly intense substorms using a variety of near-Earth spacecraft data and ground observations. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, determine whether the supersubstorms are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  11. Does the ballooning instability trigger substorms in the near-Earth magnetotail?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, Shin-Ichi; Tamao, Tsutomu

    1993-01-01

    The stability of the near-Earth magnetotail against ballooning (or configurational) instability is examined in the framework of the MHD approximation. It is emphasized that a change in plasma pressure induced by a meriodional electric field drift delta u(sub n) is an important factor that determines the stability. We have to consider two ways in which plasma pressure changes, that is, a convective change -delta u(sub n) grad(P(sub 0)), where P(sub 0) is background plasma pressure, and plasma expansion/compression -P(sub 0) dive (delta u(sub n)). Since delta u(sub n) is perpendicular to the magnetic field and its magnitude is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength, delta u(sub n) diverges/converges in usual tail magnetic field configurations. For the instability, the convective change must overwhelm the effects of the plasma expansion/compression. However, near the equator in the near-Earth tail, the latter may overcompensate for the former. We describe the ballooning instability in terms of a coupling between the Alfven and slow magnetosonic waves in an inhomogeneous plasma and derive instability conditions. The result shows that the excessive curvature stabilizes, rather than destabilizes, perturbations. It is also found that the field-aligned flow stabilizes perturbations, as well as the field-aligned current. We infer that under quiet conditions, the plasma pressure gradient in the near-Earth tail is not sharp enough to trigger the instability. The plasma sheet is expected to become more stable during the substorm growth phase because of an increase in the field line curvature associated with the plasma sheet thinning. In the region closer to the Earth, including the ring current, the plasma pressure gradient may be localized in a limited range of the radial distance during the growth phase. However, recently reported plasma and magnetic field parameters before substorm onsets do not provide very convincing evidence that the ballooning instability

  12. A superposed epoch analysis of the regions 1 and 2 Birkeland currents observed by AMPERE during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, J. C.; Milan, S. E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2014-12-01

    We perform a superposed epoch analysis of the evolution of the Birkeland currents (field-aligned currents) observed by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) during substorms. The study is composed of 2900 substorms provided by the SuperMAG experiment. We find that the current ovals expand and contract over the course of a substorm cycle and that currents increase in magnitude approaching substorm onset and are further enhanced in the expansion phase. Subsequently, we categorize the substorms by their onset latitude, a proxy for the amount of open magnetic flux in the magnetosphere, and find that Birkeland currents are significantly higher throughout the epoch for low-latitude substorms. Our results agree with previous studies which indicate that substorms are more intense and close more open magnetic flux when the amount of open flux is larger at onset. We place these findings in the context of previous work linking dayside and nightside reconnection rate to Birkeland current strengths and locations.

  13. Substorms and magnetospheric energy transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests a direct process for the conversion of solar wind energy into the various manifestations of the auroral substorm. This is in contrast to the widely accepted premise that solar wind energy is accumulated in the magnetosphere and then released by an instability process occurring in the magnetotail. It is shown that much of the plasma sheet behavior associated with auroral substorms can be interpreted in terms of single-particle models and simple variations of the cross-tail electric field intensity which does not invoke release of stored magnetic energy. It is also pointed out that the major entry of substorm energy into the magnetosphere occurs through the boundaries of the lobes of the magnetotail. This paper is not intended to be a complete theory of the magnetospheric substorm - rather the intention of this paper is to point out directions of research deserving of more attention.

  14. Stepwise tailward retreat of magnetic reconnection: THEMIS observations of an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieda, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Nagai, T.; Frey, H. U.; Fairfield, D. H.; Slavin, J. A.; Vanhamäki, H.; Uchino, H.; Fujii, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Machida, S.

    2016-05-01

    Auroral stepwise poleward expansions were clarified by investigating a multiple-onset substorm that occurred on 27 February 2009. Five successive auroral brightenings were identified in all-sky images, occurring at approximately 10 min intervals. The first brightening was a faint precursor. The second brightening had a wide longitude; thus, it represented the Akasofu substorm onset. Other brightenings expanded poleward; thus, they were interpreted to be auroral breakups. These breakups occurred stepwise; that is, later breakups were initiated at higher latitudes. Corresponding reconnection signatures were studied using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite observations between 8 and 24 RE down the magnetotail. The Akasofu substorm onset was not accompanied by a clear reconnection signature in the tail. In contrast, the three subsequent auroral breakups occurred simultaneously (within a few minutes) with three successive fast flows at 24 RE; thus, these were interpreted to be associated with impulsive reconnection episodes. These three fast flows consisted of a tailward flow and two subsequent earthward flows. The flow reversal at the second breakup indicated that a tailward retreat of the near-Earth reconnection site occurred during the substorm expansion phase. In addition, the earthward flow at the third breakup was consistent with the classic tailward retreat near the end of the expansion phase; therefore, the tailward retreat is likely to have occurred in a stepwise manner. We interpreted the stepwise characteristics of the tailward retreat and poleward expansion to be potentially associated by a stepwise magnetic flux pileup.

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  16. Magnetospheric substorms - A newly emerging model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1981-10-01

    A surge of progress in magnetospheric substorm studies is expected by the following three recent developments: (1) the finding of the solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling function epsilon, (2) the determination of the Pedersen current distribution over the entire polar region, and (3) a new understanding of the auroral potential structure. In this paper, the significance of the three developments and the newly emerging model of magnetospheric substorms is described.

  17. Magnetospheric substorms - A newly emerging model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1981-01-01

    A surge of progress in magnetospheric substorm studies is expected by the following three recent developments: (1) the finding of the solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling function epsilon, (2) the determination of the Pedersen current distribution over the entire polar region, and (3) a new understanding of the auroral potential structure. In this paper, the significance of the three developments and the newly emerging model of magnetospheric substorms is described.

  18. Substorm classification with the WINDMI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Weigel, R. S.; Vassiliadis, D.; Doxas, I.

    The results of a genetic algorithm optimization of the WINDMI model using the Blanchard-McPherron substorm data set is presented. A key result from the large-scale computations used to search for convergence in the predictions over the database is the finding that there are three distinct types of vx Bs -AL waveforms characterizing substorms. Type I and III substorms are given by the internally-triggered WINDMI model. The analysis reveals an additional type of event, called a type II substorm, that requires an external trigger as in the northward turning of the IMF model of Lyons (1995). We show that incorporating an external trigger, initiated by a fast northward turning of the IMF, into WINDMI, a low-dimensional model of substorms, yields improved predictions of substorm evolution in terms of the AL index. Intrinsic database uncertainties in the timing between the ground-based AL electrojet signal and the arrival time at the magnetopause of the IMF data measured by spacecraft in the solar wind prevent a sharp division between type I and II events. However, within these timing limitations we find that the fraction of events is roughly 40% type I, 40% type II, and 20% type III.

  19. Satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms on August 15, 1968. IX - Phenomenological model for substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Aubry, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Observations made during three substorms on August 15, 1968, are shown to be consistent with current theoretical ideas about the cause of substorms. The phenomenological model described in several preceding papers is further expanded. This model follows closely the theoretical ideas presented more quantitatively in recent papers by Coronti and Kennel (1972 and 1973).

  20. Studies of the substorm on March 12, 1991: 1. Structure of substorm activity and auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, L. L.; Kozelova, T. V.; Meredith, N. P.; Danielides, M.; Kozelov, B. V.; Jussila, J.; Korth, A.

    2007-02-01

    The substorm on March 12, 1991 is studied using the data of ground-based network of magnetometers, all-sky cameras and TV recordings of aurora, and measurements of particle fluxes and magnetic field onboard a satellite in the equatorial plane. The structure of substorm activity and the dynamics of auroral ions of the central plasma sheet (CPS) and energetic quasi-trapped ions related to the substorm are considered in the first part. It is shown that several sharp changes in the fluxes and pitch-angle distribution of the ions which form the substorm ion injection precede a dipolarization of the magnetic field and increases of energetic electrons, and coincide with the activation of aurora registered 20° eastward from the satellite. A conclusion is drawn about different mechanisms of the substorm acceleration (injection) of electrons and ions.

  1. Ground-based studies of ionospheric convection associated with substorm expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamide, Y.; Richmond, A. D.; Emery, B. A.; Hutchins, C. F.; Ahn, B.-H.; De La Beaujardiere, O.; Foster, J. C.; Heelis, R. A.; Kroehl, H. W.; Rich, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The instantaneous patterns of electric fields and currents in the high-latitude ionosphere are deduced by combining satellite and radar measurements of the ionospheric drift velocity, along with ground-based magnetometer observations for October 25, 1981. The period under study was characterized by a relatively stable southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), so that the obtained electric field patterns do reflect, in general, the state of sustained and enhanced plasma convection in the magnetosphere. During one of the satellite passes, however, an intense westward electrojet caused by a substorm intruded into the satellite (DE2) and radar (Chatanika, Alaska) field of view in the premidnight sector, providing a unique opportunity to differentiate the enhanced convection and substorm expansion fields. The distributions of the calculated electric potential for the expansion and maximum phases of the substorm show the first clear evidence of the coexistence of two physically different systems in the global convection pattern. The changes in the convection pattern during the substorm indicate that the large-scale potential distributions are indeed of general two-cell patterns representing the southward IMF status, but the night-morning cell has two positive peaks, one in the midnight sector and the other in the late morning hours, corresponding to the substorm expansion and the convection enhancement, respectively.

  2. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang'e 3.

    PubMed

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-01-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang'e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth's plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20-22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region. PMID:27576944

  3. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    PubMed Central

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-01-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region. PMID:27576944

  4. Ground-based studies of ionospheric convection associated with substorm expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y. |; Richmond, A.D.; Emery, B.A.; Hutchins, C.F.; Ahn, B.H. |; Beaujardiere, O. de la; Foster, J.C.; Heelis, R.A.; Kroehl, H.W.; Rich, F.J.

    1994-10-01

    The instantaneous patterns of electric fields and currents in the high-latitude ionosphere are deduced by combining satellite and radar measurements of the ionospheric drift velocity, along with ground-based magnetometer observations for October 25, 1981. For this purpose, an updated version of the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics technique has been used. These global patterns are unobtainable from any single data set. The period under study was characterized by a relatively stable southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), so that the obtained electric field patterns do reflect, in general, the state of sustained and enhanced plasma convection in the magnetosphere. During one of the satellite passes, however, an intense westward electrojet caused by a substorm intruded into the satellite (DE 2) and radar (Chatanika, Alaska) field of view in the premidnight sector, providing a unique opportunity to differentiate the enhanced convection and substorm expansion fields. The distributions of the calculated electric potential for the expansion and maximum phases of the substorm show the first clear evidence of the coexistence of two physically different systems in the global convection pattern. The changes in the convection pattern during the substorm indicate that the large-scale potential distributions are indeed of general two-cell patterns representing the southward IMF status, but the night-morning cell has two positive peaks, one in the midnight sector and the other in the late morning hours, corresponding to the substorm expansion and the convection enhancement, respectively. 40 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Ground-based studies of ionospheric convection associated with substorm expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Richmond, A.D.; Emery, B.A.; Hutchins, C.F.; Ahn, B.H.

    1994-10-01

    The instantaneous patterns of electric fields and currents in the high-latitude ionosphere are deduced by combining satellite and radar measurements of the ionospheric drift velocity, along with ground-based magnetometer observations for October 25, 1981. For this purpose, an updated version of the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics technique has been used. These global patterns are unobtainable from any single data set. The period under study was characterized by a relatively stable southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), so that the obtained electric field patterns do reflect, in genernal, the state of sustained and enhanced plasma convection in the magnetosphere. During one of the satellite passes, however, an intense westward electrojet caused by a substorm intruded into the satellite (DE 2) and radar (Chatanika, Alaska) field of view in the premidnight sector, providing a unique opportunity to differentiate the enhanced convection and substorm expansion fields. The distributions of the calculated electric potential for the epansion and maximum phases of the substorm show the first clear evidence of the coezistence of two physically different systems in the global convection pattern. The changes in the convection pattern during the substorm indicate that the large-scale potential distributions are indeed of general two-cell patterns representing the southward LMF status, but the night-morning cell has two positive peaks, one in the midnight sector and the other in the late morning hours, corresponding to the substorm expansion and the convection enhancement respectively.

  6. The "Alfvénic surge" at substorm onset/expansion and the formation of "Inverted Vs": Cluster and IMAGE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Frey, H. U.; Fillingim, M. O.; Goldstein, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    From multipoint, in situ observations and imaging, we reveal the injection-powered, Alfvénic nature of auroral acceleration during onset and expansion of a substorm. It is shown how Alfvénic variations over time dissipate to form large-scale, inverted-V structures characteristic of quasistatic aurora. This characterization is made possible through the fortuitous occurrence of a substorm onset and expansion phase on field lines traversed by Cluster in the high-altitude acceleration region. Substorm onset was preceded by the occurrence of multiple poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) and subsequent development/progression of a streamer toward the growth phase arc indicating that this is of the PBI-/streamer-triggered class of substorms. Onset on Cluster is marked by the injection of hot, dense magnetospheric plasma in a region tied to one of the preexisting PBI current systems. This was accompanied by a surge of Alfvénic activity and enhanced inverted-V acceleration, as the PBI current system intensified and striated to dispersive scale Alfvén waves. The growth of Alfvén wave activity was significant (up to a factor of 300 increase in magnetic field power spectral density at frequencies 20 mHz ≲f≲ few hertz) and coincided with moderate growth (factor 3-5) in the background PBI current. This sequence is indicative of a cascade process whereby small-scale/dispersive Alfvén waves are generated from large-scale Alfvén waves or current destabilization. It also demonstrates that the initial PBIs and their subsequent evolution are an intrinsic part of the global auroral substorm response to injection and accompanying wave energy input from the magnetotail. Alfvénic activity persisted poleward of the PBI currents composing a broad Alfvén wave-dominated region extending to the polar cap edge. These waves have transverse scales ranging from a few tens of kilometers to below the ion gyroradius and are associated with large electric fields (up to 200 mV/m) and

  7. Description of substorms in the tail incorporating boundary layer and neutral line effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Nishida, A.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the substorm expansion phase that includes the formation of a neutral line in the relatively near-earth portion of the tail plasma sheet and phenomena observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is proposed. Specifically, it is proposed that substorm onset results from the formation of a neutral line within the preexisting source region for the PSBL. The source region is presumably the tail current sheet, which is suggested to extend well earthward of 80 earth radii. Both before and after the neutral line forms, auroral field-aligned currents and large ion flows remain confined to the PSBL earthward of the source region.

  8. Variation of The Magnetotail Electric Fields During Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M.; Zaitseva, S.; Nakamura, R.

    The behaviour of the midtail electric fields during two magnetospheric substorms on November, 22, 1995, is investigated. The magnetospheric electric field is supposed to consist of two components: a potential electric field penetrating into the magneto- sphere from the solar wind, and an inductive electric field associated with variation of the geomagnetic field. The first component is supposed to be proportional (with some time delay) to the Y -component of the solar wind electric field, and the second one is estimated from the time derivative of the tail lobe magnetic flux. The latter is obtained by converting total pressure to lobe magnetic field by assuming pressure balance be- tween lobe and plasma sheet (Nakamura et al., 1999). The Y -component of the total electric field is calculated from GEOTAIL spacecraft data as Ey = -[v × B]y. Analysis of experimental data shows that the inductive electric field (Ec) is "switched on" in the magnetotail practically simultaneously with the intensification of the IMF southern component. At the preliminary phase of the substorm, the Ec field within the plasmasheet is directed from dusk to dawn compensating the potential field Ep, so that the total field Ey is rather small there (Semenov and Sergeev, 1981). With the beginning of the active phase, the Ec changes its sign, and adding to the Ep, provides a rapid increase of the dawn­dusk Ey field. As the intensity of Ep during the active phase of the substorm is less than the intensity of the induced field, Ey is determined during this period by the latter mainly and does not correlate with the Esw field. However, the intensity of the potential electric field at this time may be obtained from the data on the velocity of the auroral arc motion (Pudovkin et al., 1992). So, judging by the dynamics of aurorae at the Poker Flat (Alaska) station, Ep field in the inner magnetosphere (X -10 RE) amounts the value of 0.7 mV/m, and it varies in proportion to Esw with the time delay of

  9. Substorm associated micropulsations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art of observations of substorm associated waves in GEO is reviewed and research directions are indicated. Data were taken from fluxgate magnetometers on board the ATS 1 and 6 spacecraft in GEO. Mixed mode Pc 4 and 5 waves, with the largest amplitude of magnetic pulsations observed at GEO, have been found to display a quasi-sinusoidal waveform with amplitudes from 10-30 gamma and a period of 50-200 sec. The wave spectra confined the excited frequencies to a narrow band, and possible generating mechanisms for the Pc 4 and 5 waves are discussed. Pc 1 and 2 magnetic pulsations are the most common in GEO, with Pc 1 occurring every third day, particularly in the afternoon to dusk sector and during major substorm expansion onset. Pi 2 outbursts are observed in the majority of substorms passing through the midnight sector and have been correlated with changes in field aligned currents.

  10. Postmidnight chorus - A substorm phenomenon. [outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The ELF emissions were detected in the midnight sector of the magnetosphere in conjunction with magnetospheric substorms. The emissions were observed at local midnight and early morning hours and are accordingly called 'post-midnight chorus.' The characteristics of these emissions such as their frequency time structure, emission frequency with respect to the local equatorial electron gyrofrequency, intensity-time variation, and the average intensity were investigated. The occurrence of the chorus in the nightside magnetosphere was investigated as a function of local time, L shell, magnetic latitude, and substorm activity, and the results of this analysis are presented. Specific features of postmidnight chorus are discussed in the context of possible wave-particle interactions occurring during magnetospheric substorms.

  11. Composite imaging of convective flows and auroral forms during a substorm cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Butler, T.; Zettergren, M. D.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements obtained with the electronically steerable Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) and a collocated all-sky camera have been used to construct composite images of ionospheric convective flows and auroral forms associated with an isolated substorm on 26 March 2008. The radar was configured to cycle through a 5x5 grid of beam positions. A statistical inversion of line-of-sight velocities was used to construct images of the overlying flow field at 30-km spatial resolution and 1-min time resolution over a 100x100-km field. The flow fields were co-registered with all-sky images recorded at 20-s cadence. Analysis of the composite images has revealed several interesting contrasts between growth-, expansion-, and recover-phase morphology. These include, (1) anti-correlation between ion velocity (electric field) and luminosity (plasma density, hence, conductance) in space and time during growth- and expansion-phases; identical velocities inside and outside the aurora during recovery phase, (2) large tangential velocity directed along auroral boundaries during all phases (consistent with electric field directed into the aurora), irrespective of the orientation of the arc boundary, and (3) large relative drift (~2 km/s) between aurora forms and convective flows during the recovery phase; little or no proper motion during growth phase. The results are interpreted with respect to electrodynamic models of auroral M-I coupling. Composite image showing convective flows (arrows), ion temperature at 200 km (contours), and auroral forms at onset of a pseudo-breakup event.

  12. Pi2 pulsations and substorm onsets: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John V.

    1999-08-01

    Pi2 pulsations have been the subject of continuous study since they were recognized to be an integral part of the magnetospheric substorm. With the advent of arrays of ground instruments the nature of the Pi2 has begun to be understood. As adopted by the 13th General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics in 1963, Pi2 is a designation that includes impulsive pulsations in the period range from 40 to 150 s. The Pi2 signal encompasses a class of pulsations that represents two fundamental processes. The first process is the sudden generation of field-aligned currents in association with the disruption of cross-tail currents in the plasma sheet and their subsequent effects on the ionosphere. The ionosphere appears to be something more than a passive load for this electrodynamic impulse. It responds, sending currents back into a magnetosphere whose topology is changing and, perhaps producing the feedback necessary to cause the explosive growth of the substorm current system. Oscillations of these currents are detected across the nightside of the Earth at onset as the midlatitude and high-latitude portions of Pi2. The second process is the impulse response of the inner magnetosphere to the compressional waves that are generated at substorm onset. Traveling inward, they stimulate field line resonances and surface waves at the plasmapause and excite global oscillations in the inner magnetosphere. The two processes produce wave modes that couple and cross-couple threading energy into the inner magnetosphere and ultimately to the ground. The purpose of this review is to construct a phenomenological overview of the Pi2.

  13. Substorm effects in auroral spectra. [electron spectrum hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eather, R. H.; Mende, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    A substorm time parameter is defined and used to order a large body of photometric data obtained on aircraft expeditions at high latitudes. The statistical analysis demonstrates hardening of the electron spectrum at the time of substorm, and it is consistent with the accepted picture of poleward expansion of aurora at the time of substorm and curvature drift of substorm-injected electrons. These features are not evident from a similar analysis in terms of magnetic time. We conclude that the substorm time concept is a useful ordering parameter for auroral data.

  14. Ionospheric irregularities during a substorm event: Observations of ULF pulsations and GPS scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Clauer, C. R.; Deshpande, K.; Lessard, M. R.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2014-07-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbances and distortions of the amplitude and phase of the radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produces very dynamic and short-lived Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. It is observed that scintillations in the high-latitude ionosphere occur frequently during geomagnetic storms and substorms. In addition, it is well known that Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) pulsations (Pi2 and Pi1B) are closely associated with substorm activity. This study reports simultaneous observations of Pi2 and Pi1B pulsations and GPS phase scintillations during a substorm using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. The magnetic field and GPS data from the instruments appear to be associated in terms of their temporal and spectral features. Moreover, the scintillation events were observed near the auroral latitudes where Pi1B pulsations are commonly detected. The temporal, spectral and spatial association between the scintillation and geomagnetic pulsation events suggests that the magnetic field perturbations and enhanced electric fields caused by substorm currents could contribute to the creation of plasma instability in the high-latitude ionosphere, leading to GPS scintillations.

  15. Fast ionospheric feedback instability and substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.; Grieger, John; Song, Yan

    1992-01-01

    A study suggesting that the Alfven resonator can play an important role in modifying the ionosphere on the time and space scales required to play a significant role in substorm formation is presented. Although the effect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on the onset of substorms has been studied, the effects due to gradients of the Alfven speed along auroral field line were neglected. The large increase of the Alfven speed with altitude above the ionosphere creates an effective resonant cavity, which can lead to fluctuations in the electric and magnetic fields as well as in particle fluxes in the range 0.1 to 1 Hz. Such fluctuations can be observed from the ground as PiB pulsations associated with substorm onset. These fluctuations can be excited by a fast feedback instability, which can grow on time scales much less than the Alfven travel time between the ionosphere and the plasma sheet. The instability enhances the value of both the Pedersen and Hall conductivity, and may play a role in preparing the ionosphere for substorm onset.

  16. Substorm current wedge composition by wedgelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Angelopoulos, V.; Chu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Yue, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how a substorm current wedge (SCW) is formed is crucial to comprehending the substorm phenomenon. One SCW formation scenario suggests that the substorm time magnetosphere is coupled to the ionosphere via "wedgelets," small building blocks of an SCW. Wedgelets are field-aligned currents (FACs) carried by elemental flux transport units known as dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs). A DFB is a magnetotail flux tube with magnetic field stronger than that of the ambient plasma. Its leading edge, known as a "dipolarization front" or "reconnection front," is a product of near-Earth reconnection. Dipolarizing flux bundles, and thus wedgelets, are localized—each is only <3 RE wide. How these localized wedgelets combine to become large-scale (several hours of magnetic local time) region-1-sense SCW FACs is unclear. To determine how this occurs, we investigated wedgelets statistically using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) data. The results show wedgelet asymmetries: in the dawn (dusk) sector of the magnetotail, a wedgelet has more FAC toward (away from) the Earth than away from (toward) the Earth, so the net FAC is toward (away from) the Earth. The combined effect of many wedgelets is therefore the same as that of large-scale region-1-sense SCW, supporting the idea that they comprise the SCW.

  17. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  18. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Lester, M.; Parkinson, M. L.; Yeoman, T. K.; Dyson, P. L.; Devlin, J. C.; Frey, H. U.

    2006-12-01

    At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV) instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER) moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003). At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a way which has

  19. Formation of the stable auroral arc that intensifies at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Samson, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    In a companion paper, we present observational evidence that the stable, growth-phase auroral arc that intensifies at substorm expansion phase onset often forms on magnetic field lines that map to within approximately 1 to 2 R(sub e) of synchronous. The equatorial plasma pressure is 1 to 10 nPa in this region, which can give a cross-tail current greater than 0.1 A/m. In this paper, we propose that the arc is formed by a perpendicular magnetospheric-current divergence that results from a strong dawn-to-dusk directed pressure gradient in the vicinity of magnetic midnight. We estimate that the current divergence is sufficiently strong that a is greater than 1 kV field-aligned potential drop is required to maintain ionospheric-current continuity. We suggest that the azimuthal pressure gradient results from proton drifts in the vicinity of synchronous orbit that are directed nearly parallel to the cross-tail electric field.

  20. Suprathermal O(+) and H(+) ion behavior during the March 22, 1979 (CDAW 6), substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to report on the behavior of energetic (approximately 130 keV) O(+) ions in the earth's plasma sheet, taking into account observations by the ISEE 1 spacecraft during a magnetically active time interval encompassing two major substorms on March 22, 1979. Attention is also given to suprathermal H(+) and He(++) ions. ISEE 1 plasma sheet observations of the proton and alpha particle phase space densities as a function of energy per charge during the time interval 0933-1000 UT on March 22, 1979 are considered along with the proton phase space density versus energy in the energy interval approximately 10 to 70 keV for the selected time periods 0933-1000 UT (presubstorm) and 1230-1243 UT (recovery phase) during the 1055 substorm on March 22, 1979. A table listing the proton energy density for presubstorm and recovery periods is also provided.

  1. Kinematics of Phase Boundary Growth. Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radev, Krassimir B.

    2010-01-01

    This report aims to give consideration to the time-space evolution of the phase boundary by making use of the kinematic condition on the interface, representing the balance of the mass fluxes through the movable growing boundary, as well as the Gibbs-Thompson condition of the local phase equilibrium. The analysis has shown the determinative role of a dimensionles parameter—combination of only physical properties of the system—on the evolution of surface fluctuations.

  2. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  3. Low energy particle signature of substorm dipolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Perez, J.D. ); Moore, T.E.; Chappell, C.R. )

    1994-02-01

    The low energy particle signature of substorm dipolarization is exhibited through a case study of RIMS data on DE-1 at [approximately]2100 MLT, ILAT = 59[degrees][approximately]65[degrees], L = 3.8 [approximately] 5.4 R[sub E], and geocentric distances 2.6[approximately]2.9 R[sub E]. A strong cross-field-line, poleward outflow that lasts for a few minutes with a velocity that reaches at least 50 km/s is correlated with substorm activity evidenced in the AE index and the MAG-1 data. All the major species (H[sup +], He[sup +], O[sup +]) are observed to have the same bulk velocity. The parallel velocities are strongly correlated with the perpendicular velocities. The parallel acceleration is shown to result from the centrifugal force of the ExB drift induced by the dipolarizing perturbation of the magnetic field. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Newell, P. T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Luehr, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred at about 0110 UT on April 25, 1985, carried out by AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7, as well as by ground auroral stations and midlatitude stations. These data yield information on the latitudinal extent of the polar cap and provide visual identification of substorm aurorae, magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath aurorae, and the situ magnetic field. In addition, they provide magnetic-particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region. Evidence is presented that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa.

  5. IMF effect on the polar cap contraction and expansion during a period of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A. T.; Pitkänen, T.; Honkonen, I.; Palmroth, M.; Amm, O.

    2013-06-01

    The polar cap boundary (PCB) location and motion in the nightside ionosphere has been studied by using measurements from the EISCAT radars and the MIRACLE magnetometers during a period of four substorms on 18 February 2004. The OMNI database has been used for observations of the solar wind and the Geotail satellite for magnetospheric measurements. In addition, the event was modelled by the GUMICS-4 MHD simulation. The simulation of the PCB location was in a rather good agreement with the experimental estimates at the EISCAT longitude. During the first three substorm expansion phases, neither the local observations nor the global simulation showed any poleward motions of the PCB, even though the electrojets intensified. Rapid poleward motions of the PCB took place only in the early recovery phases of the substorms. Hence, in these cases the nightside reconnection rate was locally higher in the recovery phase than in the expansion phase. In addition, we suggest that the IMF Bz component correlated with the nightside tail inclination angle and the PCB location with about a 17-min delay from the bow shock. By taking the delay into account, the IMF northward turnings were associated with dipolarizations of the magnetotail and poleward motions of the PCB in the recovery phase. The mechanism behind this effect should be studied further.

  6. A boundary layer model for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, Gordon; Eastman, Tim

    1987-01-01

    An alternative framework for understanding magnetospheric substorm activity is presented. It is argued that observations of magnetic field and plasma flow variations in the magnetotail can be explained in terms of the passage of the plasma sheet boundary layer over the satellite detecting the tail signatures. It is shown that field-aligned currents and particle acceleration processes on magnetic field lines threading the ionospheric Harang discontinuity lead to the distinctive particle and field signatures observed in the magnetotail during substorms. It is demonstrated that edge effects of field-aligned currents associated with the westward traveling surge can lead to the negative B(z) perturbations observed in the tail that are presently attributed to observations made on the anti-earthward side of a near-earth neutral line. Finally, it is shown that the model can provide a physical explanation of both the driven system and the loading-unloading system whose combined effects provide the observed substorm perturbation pattern in the magnetosphere and ionosphere.

  7. Growth and Morphology of Phase Separating Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegseth, John; Beysens, Daniel; Perrot, Francoise; Nikolayev, Vadim; Garrabos, Yves

    1996-01-01

    The scientific objective is to study the relation between the morphology and the growth kinetics of domains during phase separation. We know from previous experiments performed near the critical point of pure fluids and binary liquids that there are two simple growth laws at late times. The 'fast' growth appears when the volumes of the phases are nearly equal and the droplet pattern is interconnected. In this case the size of the droplets grows linearly in time. The 'slow' growth appears when the pattern of droplets embedded in the majority phase is disconnected. In this case the size of the droplets increases in proportion to time to the power 1/3. The volume fraction of the minority phase is a good candidate to determine this change of behavior. All previous attempts to vary the volume fraction in a single experimental cell have failed because of the extreme experimental difficulties.

  8. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  9. High temperature growth of Ag phases on Ge(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, Cory H.; Chiang, Shirley

    2013-03-15

    The growth of the (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) and ({radical}3 Multiplication-Sign {radical}3)R30 Degree-Sign phases of Ag on Ge(111) on substrates at temperatures from 540 to 660 Degree-Sign C is characterized with low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). From 540 Degree-Sign C to the Ag desorption temperature of 575 Degree-Sign C, LEEM images show that growth of the (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) phase begins at step edges. Upon completion of the (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) phase, the ({radical}3 Multiplication-Sign {radical}3)R30 Degree-Sign phase is observed with a dendritic growth morphology that is not much affected by steps. For sufficiently high deposition rates, Ag accumulates on the sample above the desorption temperature. From 575 to 640 Degree-Sign C, the growth proceeded in a manner similar to that at lower temperatures, with growth of the (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) phase to completion, followed by growth of the ({radical}3 Multiplication-Sign {radical}3)R30 Degree-Sign phase. Increasing the substrate temperature to 660 Degree-Sign C resulted in only (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) growth. In addition, for samples with Ag coverage less than 0.375ML, LEEM and LEED images were used to follow a reversible phase transformation near 575 Degree-Sign C, between a mixed high coverage phase of [(4 Multiplication-Sign 4) + (3 Multiplication-Sign 1)] and the high temperature, lower coverage (3 Multiplication-Sign 1) phase.

  10. The equatorial electrojet during geomagnetic storms and substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yosuke; Kosch, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The climatology of the equatorial electrojet during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity is examined using long-term records of ground-based magnetometers in the Indian and Peruvian regions. Equatorial electrojet perturbations due to geomagnetic storms and substorms are evaluated using the disturbance storm time (Dst) index and auroral electrojet (AE) index, respectively. The response of the equatorial electrojet to rapid changes in the AE index indicates effects of both prompt penetration electric field and disturbance dynamo electric field, consistent with previous studies based on F region equatorial vertical plasma drift measurements at Jicamarca. The average response of the equatorial electrojet to geomagnetic storms (Dst<-50 nT) reveals persistent disturbances during the recovery phase, which can last for approximately 24 h after the Dst index reaches its minimum value. This "after-storm" effect is found to depend on the magnitude of the storm, solar EUV activity, season, and longitude.

  11. Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Phase transformations during the growth of paracetamol crystals from the vapor phase are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the vapor-crystal phase transition is actually a superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with variable density and a second-order phase transition with variable ordering. The latter, being a diffuse phase transition, results in the formation of a new, "pretransition," phase irreversibly spent in the course of the transition, which ends in the appearance of orthorhombic crystals. X-ray diffraction data and micrograph are presented.

  12. Substorm-associated radar auroral surges

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.P.; Southwood, D.J. ); Lester, M.; Yeoman, T.K. ); Reeves, G.D. )

    1992-08-01

    The authors report a recurrent convection signature observed in the E region ionosphere within {approximately}2 hours of the dusk meridian by the SABRE radar facility. In a typical event, the irregularity drift speed in the SABRE field of view is seen to increase from about 300 m s{sup {minus}1} to of the order of 1 km s{sup {minus}1} in the space of about 10 min. The speed subsequently remains at the enhanced level for 10 min or longer before declining as rapidly as its onset. The total event duration ranges between 30 min and 1 hour. As the irregularity drift speed increases the direction of the drift velocity changes, rotating poleward. At the same time, the radar backscatter power decreases. The onset of the drift speed enhancement crosses the SABRE field of view as a front moving from east to west. Detailed study of individual events indicates that the events are associated with increases in the {vert bar}AL{vert bar} index and with the injection of energetic particles into geosynchronous orbit. The authors thus suggest that the events are a part of the magnetospheric response to the onset of a geomagnetic substorm. However, while each event appears to be associated with a substorm onset, not every substorm onset is associated with an event, at least not at SABRE. They estimate the speed at which the substorm-initiated ionospheric flow enhancement moves from the nightside to be 1-4 km s{sup {minus}1}, a figure that is consistent with the rate at which the drift velocity front crosses the SABRE field of view. Although the front is associated with a rotation in the drift velocity, they see little evidence of strong vertical vorticity as the front passes. However, shears in the flow do develop subsequently which seem likely to correspond to field-aligned current. Although associated with substorm onset, they argue that these events are distinct from westward traveling surges and appear to differ from the midlatitude phenomenon known as subauroral ion drifts.

  13. Magnetic effects of the substorm current wedge in a “spread-out wire” model and their comparison with ground, geosynchronous, and tail lobe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Smirnov, M. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Singer, H. J.; Baumjohann, W.

    2011-07-01

    Although the substorm current wedge (SCW) is recognized as a basic 3-D current system of the substorm expansion phase, its existing models still do not extend beyond a cartoon-like sketch, and very little is known of how well they reproduce magnetic variations observed in the magnetosphere during substorms. A lack of a realistic quantitative SCW model hampers testing model predictions against large sets of spacecraft data. This paper (1) presents a computationally efficient and flexible model with a realistic geometry of field-aligned currents, conveniently parameterized by the SCW strength, longitudinal width, and position, all derived from ground-based midlatitude magnetic variations; and (2) tests the model against INTERMAGNET network observations during substorms and compares its predictions with space magnetometer data. The testing demonstrated significant and systematic discrepancies between the observed and predicted magnetic variations, depending on spacecraft location, concurrent magnetotail configuration, and substorm phase. In particular, we found that the net SCW current derived from the midlatitude field variations corresponds to only a relatively small and variable fraction of the distant 3-D substorm current, inferred from spacecraft data in the lobe and at geosynchronous distance. The discrepancy can be partly attributed to additional region 2 polarity field-aligned currents in the same longitudinal sector, associated with azimuthal diversion of the earthward plasma flow when it encounters the region of strong quasi-dipolar field in the inner magnetosphere.

  14. A Phase-Field Model for Grain Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.Q.; Fan, D.N.; Tikare, V.

    1998-12-23

    A phase-field model for grain growth is briefly described. In this model, a poly-crystalline microstructure is represented by multiple structural order parameter fields whose temporal and spatial evolutions follow the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. Results from phase-field simulations of two-dimensional (2D) grain growth will be summarized and preliminary results on three-dimensional (3D) grain growth will be presented. The physical interpretation of the structural order parameter fields and the efficient and accurate semi-implicit Fourier spectral method for solving the TDGL equations will be briefly discussed.

  15. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event: CDAW 6

    SciTech Connect

    McPherron, R.L.; Manka, R.H.

    1985-02-01

    The physical processes involved in the transfer of energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and release associated with substorms, have been examined in a sequence of Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW 6). Magnetic storms of March 22 and 31, 1979, were chosen to study the problem, using a data base from 13 spacecraft and about 130 ground-based magnetometers. This paper describes the March 22 storm, in particular the large, isolated substorm at 1054 UT which followed an interval of magnetic calm. We summarize the observations in the solar wind, in various regions of the magnetosphre, and at the ground, synthesizing these observations into a description of the substorn development. We then give our interpretation of these observations and test their consistency with the reconnection model. The substorm appears to have been generated by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field associated with a current sheet crossing. Models of ionospheric currents derived from ground data show the substorm had three phases of development. During the first phase, a two-celled convection current system developed in the polar cap as synchronous spacecraft on the nightside recorded an increasingly tailike field and the ISEE measurements show that the near-earth plasma sheet thinned. In the second phase, possibly triggered by sudden changes in the solar wind, a one-celled current system was added to the first, enhancing the westward electrojet. During this phase the synchronous orbit field became more dipolar, and the plasma sheet magnetic field turned strongly southward as rapid tailward flow developed soon after expansion onset, suggesting that a neutral line formed in the near-earth plasma sheet with subsequent plasmoid ejection.

  16. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S. ); Winglee, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models.

  17. Dynamic Particle Growth Testing - Phase I Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z-C.

    2001-05-17

    There is clearly a great need to understand the processes of crystallization and solid scale formation that led to the shutdown of 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and could possibly cause similar problems in the future in other evaporators. Waste streams from SRS operations that enter the evaporators generally contain alkaline, sodium nitrate/nitrite-based solutions with various changing concentrations of silicates and aluminates. It has been determined. that the silicates and aluminates served as precursor reactants for forming unwanted minerals during solution evaporation, upon transport, or upon storage. Mineral forms of the Zeolite Linde A group--sodalites and cancrinite--along with gibbsite, have often been identified as contributing to deposit (scale) formation on surfaces of the 2H evaporator as well as to the formation of solid plugs in the gravity drain line and lift line. Meanwhile, solids (amorphous or crystalline minerals) are believed, without direct evidence, to form in the bulk solutions in the evaporator. In addition, the position of deposits in the 2H evaporator suggests that scale formation depends on the interplay of heat and mass transfer, hydrodynamics, and reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The origin of solid scale formation on walls could be due to heterogeneous nucleation and/or to homogeneous nucleation followed by cluster/particle deposition. Preliminary laboratory tests at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with standing metal coupons seem to support the latter mechanism for initial deposition; that is, the solid particles form in the bulk solution first and then deposit on the metal surfaces. Further buildup of deposits may involve both mechanisms: deposition and crystal growth. Therefore, there may be a direct linkage between the solid particle growth in bulk solution and the scale buildup on the wall surfaces. On the other hand, even if scale formation is due solely to a heterogeneous mechanism

  18. Phase-field model of island growth in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Mei; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2004-02-01

    Nucleation and growth of islands in epitaxy is simulated using a continuum phase-field model. In addition to local density of adatoms, a local phase-field variable, varying in the real space, is introduced to describe the epitaxial islands. Evolution of this phase field is determined by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau-like equation coupled to a diffusive transport equation of adatoms. When applied to nucleation and growth of islands in the submonolayer regime, this model reproduces both the scaling laws of island density and experimental size and spatial distributions of islands. For island growth in the multilayer regime, this phase-field model reproduces mound structures consistent with experimental images concerned. Accurate coarsening and roughening exponents of the mounds are obtained in this model. Compared with atomic models and mean-field models, this model can provide a fine visualized morphology of islands at large space and time scales of practical engineering interests.

  19. Phase-field model of island growth in epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan-Mei; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2004-02-01

    Nucleation and growth of islands in epitaxy is simulated using a continuum phase-field model. In addition to local density of adatoms, a local phase-field variable, varying in the real space, is introduced to describe the epitaxial islands. Evolution of this phase field is determined by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau-like equation coupled to a diffusive transport equation of adatoms. When applied to nucleation and growth of islands in the submonolayer regime, this model reproduces both the scaling laws of island density and experimental size and spatial distributions of islands. For island growth in the multilayer regime, this phase-field model reproduces mound structures consistent with experimental images concerned. Accurate coarsening and roughening exponents of the mounds are obtained in this model. Compared with atomic models and mean-field models, this model can provide a fine visualized morphology of islands at large space and time scales of practical engineering interests. PMID:14995452

  20. Does a "substorm precursor" exist in the polar cap?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosikova, Nataliya; Lorentzen, Dag; Yagova, Nadezda; Baddeley, Lisa; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Kozyreva, Olga

    2015-04-01

    An isolated auroral substorm, which occurs without external triggering, can develop as a result of inner instabilities in the geomagnetic tail. The comparative analysis of presubstorm variations of the geomagnetic field and particle flux in the geomagnetic tail along with geomagnetic and auroral disturbances in the polar caps is of key importance for the discrimination between direct triggering and intra-magnetospheric processes in a substorm onset. In the present study we compare the auroral disturbances and geomagnetic pulsations in the frequency range 1-5 mHz (Pc5/Pi3) at nighttime high latitudes during both quiet geomagnetic intervals preceding isolated substorms and non-substorm intervals. Superposed epoch analysis is applied to reveal pre-substorm variations ("substorm precursors"). The data from IMAGE magnetometer network, the Meridian Scanning photometer (Svalbard), and particle flux measured by GEOTAIL, has been used. The effect of presubstorm activation (Yagova, 2000) is reproduced during the solar minimum conditions. References Yagova N., V. Pilipenko, A. Rodger, V. Papitashvili, J. Watermann, Long period ULF activity at the polar cap preceding substorm, in: Proc. 5th International Conference on Substorms, St. Peterburg, Russia (ESA SP-443), 603-606, 2000.

  1. Substorm Bulge/Surge Controlled by Polar Cap Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Nishimura, T.; Zou, Y.; Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Donovan, E.; Shiokawa, K.; Nicolls, M. J.; Chen, S.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Nishitani, N.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence that localized channels of enhanced polar cap flow drive plasma sheet/auroral oval flow channels, auroral poleward boundary intensifications and streamers, and substorm onset. Evidence has also indicated that a persistence of such flow channels after substorm onset may enhance post-onset auroral poleward expansion and activity. Here, we combine auroral imager and radar observations to show evidence that polar-cap flow channels can directly feed the substorm bulge westward motion, i.e., the westward traveling surge, and its poleward expansion well into the pre-existing polar cap. By taking advantage of the capability of tracing polar cap arcs and patches over long distances with red line imaging, we are able to trace flow features that strongly affect the substorm bulge across the polar cap for up to ~1-1.5 hr prior to their impacting and affecting the substorm bulge.

  2. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age velocity dispersion relation of the Solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models the outward migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  3. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  4. Quantifying the spatio-temporal correlation during a substorm using dynamical networks formed from the SuperMAG database of ground based magnetometer stations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dods, J.; Chapman, S. C.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The overall morphology and dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is well established in terms of observed qualitative auroral features and signatures seen in ground based magnetometers. The detailed evolution of a given substorm is captured by typically ~100 ground based magnetometer observations and this work seeks to synthesise all these observations in a quantitative manner. We present the first analysis of the full available set of ground based magnetometer observations of substorms using dynamical networks. SuperMAG offers a database containing ground station magnetometer data at a cadence of 1min from 100s stations situated across the globe. We use this data to form dynamic networks which capture spatial dynamics on timescales from the fast reconfiguration seen in the aurora, to that of the substorm cycle. Windowed linear cross-correlation between pairs of magnetometer time series along with a threshold is used to determine which stations are correlated and hence connected in the network. Variations in ground conductivity and differences in the response functions of magnetometers at individual stations are overcome by normalizing to long term averages of the cross-correlation. These results are tested against surrogate data in which phases have been randomised. The network is then a collection of connected points (ground stations); the structure of the network and its variation as a function of time quantify the detailed dynamical processes of the substorm. The network properties can be captured quantitatively in time dependent dimensionless network parameters and we will discuss their behaviour for examples of 'typical' substorms and storms. The network parameters provide a detailed benchmark to compare data with models of substorm dynamics, and can provide new insights on the similarities and differences between substorms and how they correlate with external driving and the internal state of the magnetosphere.

  5. Growth phase-dependent composition of the Helicobacter pylori exoproteome.

    PubMed

    Snider, Christina A; Voss, Bradley J; McDonald, W Hayes; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Analysis of H. pylori protein secretion is complicated by the occurrence of bacterial autolysis. In this study, we analyzed the exoproteome of H. pylori at multiple phases of bacterial growth and identified 74 proteins that are selectively released into the extracellular space. These include proteins known to cause alterations in host cells, antigenic proteins, and additional proteins that have not yet been studied in any detail. The composition of the H. pylori exoproteome is dependent on the phase of bacterial growth. For example, the proportional abundance of the vacuolating toxin VacA in culture supernatant is higher during late growth phases than early growth phases, whereas the proportional abundance of many other proteins is higher during early growth phases. We detected marked variation in the subcellular localization of putative secreted proteins within soluble and membrane fractions derived from intact bacteria. By providing a comprehensive view of the H. pylori exoproteome, these results provide new insights into the array of secreted H. pylori proteins that may cause alterations in the gastric environment. PMID:26363098

  6. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  7. The Four-Part Field-Aligned Current System in the Ionosphere at Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    lines in the convection pattern have a strong vorticity near the convection reversal. By Faraday's Law of Induction there is a decrease in magnetic flux density on the poleward side of the convection reversal, and an increase on the equatorward side. We address this issue for two different time intervals, namely the late growth phase and then the substorm onset.

  8. Substorm probabilities are best predicted from solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Sotirelis, T.; Wing, S.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Most measures of magnetospheric activity - including auroral power (AP), magnetotail stretching, and ring current intensity - are best predicted by solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions which approximate the frontside magnetopause merging rate. However radiation belt fluxes are best predicted by a simpler function, namely the solar wind speed, v. Since most theories of how these high energy electrons arise are associated with repeated rapid dipolarizations such as associated with substorms, this apparent discrepancy could be reconciled under the hypothesis that the frequency of substorms tracks v rather than the merging rate - despite the necessity of magnetotail flux loading prior to substorms. Here we investigate this conjecture about v and substorm probability. Specifically, a continuous list of substorm onsets compiled from SuperMAG covering January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2007 are studied. The continuity of SuperMAG data and near continuity of solar wind measurements minimize selection bias. In fact v is a much better predictor of onset probability than is the overall merging rate, with substorm odds rising sharply with v. Some loading by merging is necessary, and frontside merging does increase substorm probability, but nearly as strongly as does v taken alone. Likewise, the effects of dynamic pressure, p, are smaller than simply v taken by itself. Changes in the solar wind matter, albeit modestly. For a given level of v (or Bz), a change in v (or Bz) will increase the odds of a substorm for at least 2 h following the change. A decrease in driving elevates substorm probabilities to a greater extent than does an increase, partially supporting external triggering. Yet current v is the best single predictor of subsequently observing a substorm. These results explain why geomagnetically quiet years and active years are better characterized by low or high v (respectively) than by the distribution of merging estimators. It appears that the flow of energy

  9. Diffusion mass transport in liquid phase epitaxial growth of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, S.; Qin, Z.; Kimura, M.

    1996-12-01

    A numerical simulation model for the mass transport occurring during the liquid phase epitaxial growth of AlGaAs is presented. The mass transport equations in the liquid and solid phases, and the relationships between concentrations and temperature obtained from the phase diagram constitute the governing equations. These equations together with appropriate interface and boundary conditions were solved numerically by the Finite Element Method. Numerical results show the importance of diffusion into the solid phase, affecting the composition of grown layers. Simulation results agree with experiments.

  10. Interball substorm observations: Christmas for space scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandahl, Ingrid; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Budnik, Elena Yu.; Dubinin, Edouard M.; Eklund, Ulrik; Hughes, Terence J.; Kokubun, Susumu; Koskinen, Hannu; Kudela, Karel; Lepping, Ronald P.; Lin, Robert P.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Lutsenko, Volt; Mostroem, Arne; Nozdrachev, Michail; Pissarenko, Novomir, F.; Prokhorenko, Victoria; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Yermolaev, Yuri I.; Zakharov, Alexander V.

    1996-01-01

    Observational results from the Interball Tail Probe spacecraft are presented. One of the main objectives of the Interball project is to study the dynamic processes in the magnetosphere. Three events observed by the spacecraft's instruments are investigated: a pseudobreakup during which earthward streaming ions were observed in the vicinity of a thin current sheet; a substorm in which the magnetic signatures in the lobe and on the ground were preceeded by northward re-orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component; and a magnetic storm at the beginning of which extreme deformation of the magnetotail was observed.

  11. Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific work performed by the Aerospace Corporation under NASA Grant NAG5-10278, 'Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere during Geomagnetic Storms and Subsisting.' The period of performance for the Grant was March 1, 2001 to February 28, 2002. The following is a summary of the Statement of Work for this Grant. Use data from the PIXIE instrument on the Polar spacecraft from September 1998 onward to derive the statistical relationship between particle precipitation patterns and various geomagnetic activity indices. We are particularly interested in the occurrence of substorms during storm main phase and the efficacy of storms and substorms in injecting ring-current particles. We will compare stormtime simulations of the diffuse aurora using the models of Chen and Schulz with stormtime PIXIE measurements.

  12. A current disruption mechanism in the neutral sheet for triggering substorm expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Mankofsky, A.; Chang, C.-L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wu, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two main areas were addressed in support of an effort to understand mechanism responsible for the broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) observed in the magnetotail. The first area concerns the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region of the magnetotail whereas the second area concerns the occassional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region. For the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region, a hybrid simulation code was developed to perform reliable longtime, quiet, highly resolved simulations of field aligned electron and ion beam flow. The result of the simulation shows that broadband emissions cannot be generated by beam-plasma instability if realistic values of the ion beam parameters are used. The waves generated from beam-plasma instability are highly discrete and are of high frequencies. For the plasma sheet boundary layer condition, the wave frequencies are in the kHz range, which is incompatible with the observation that the peak power in BEN occur in the 10's of Hz range. It was found that the BEN characteristics are more consistent with lower hybrid drift instability. For the occasional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region, a linear analysis of the kinetic cross-field streaming instability appropriate to the neutral sheet condition just prior to onset of substorm expansion was performed. By solving numerically the dispersion relation, it was found that the instability has a growth time comparable to the onset time scale of substorm onset. The excited waves have a mixed polarization in the lower hybrid frequency range. The imposed drift driving the instability corresponds to unmagnetized ions undergoing current sheet acceleration in the presence of a cross-tail electric field. The required electric field strength is in the 10 mV/m range which is well within the observed electric field values detected in the neutral sheet during substorms. This finding can potentially account for the disruption of cross-tail current and its diversion to

  13. A two-phase model for smoothly joining disparate growth phases in the macropodid Thylogale billardierii.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Clive R; Buscot, Marie-Jeanne; Wiggins, Natasha L; Collier, Neil; Maindonald, John H; McCallum, Hamish I; Bowman, David M J S

    2011-01-01

    Generally, sigmoid curves are used to describe the growth of animals over their lifetime. However, because growth rates often differ over an animal's lifetime a single curve may not accurately capture the growth. Broken-stick models constrained to pass through a common point have been proposed to describe the different growth phases, but these are often unsatisfactory because essentially there are still two functions that describe the lifetime growth. To provide a single, converged model to age animals with disparate growth phases we developed a smoothly joining two-phase nonlinear function (SJ2P), tailored to provide a more accurate description of lifetime growth of the macropod, the Tasmanian pademelon Thylogale billardierii. The model consists of the Verhulst logistic function, which describes pouch-phase growth--joining smoothly to the Brody function, which describes post-pouch growth. Results from the model demonstrate that male pademelons grew faster and bigger than females. Our approach provides a practical means of ageing wild pademelons for life history studies but given the high variability of the data used to parametrise the second growth phase of the model, the accuracy of ageing of post-weaned animals is low: accuracy might be improved with collection of longitudinal growth data. This study provides a unique, first robust method that can be used to characterise growth over the lifespan of pademelons. The development of this method is relevant to collecting age-specific vital rates from commonly used wildlife management practices to provide crucial insights into the demographic behaviour of animal populations. PMID:22022369

  14. Numerical modeling of the ionospheric effects of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    The investigations of the substorm are carried out already many years. In spite of that, the single-valued answers on many questions which arise at the researchers of the substorm till now are not given. To such questions it is possible to concern the questions about the mechanism of occurrence of the substorm and on the influence of the substorm on the Earth's ionosphere. At modeling of the ionospheric effects of substorms it is important to know the following. How does the potential drop through polar caps change at initial stages of the substorm development - stepwise or smoothly? What is the duration of these changes? What and how does occur with the potential drop in the further during development of the substorm down to its termination? How does the time course of intensity of the field aligned currents of the first zone change before the substorm beginning, during substorm and after its termination? Is there a time delay of changes of the field aligned currents of the second zone relative to changes of the field aligned currents of the first zone or potential drop through polar caps? If the delay exists, what is it? How does the high-energy particle precipitation in the auroral zones and polar caps change during the substorm? Is it necessary to set at the modeling of the substorm effects the Substorm Current Wedge? If it is necessary, how make it correctly? On these questions we do not have the single-valued answers. But we shall like very strongly for them to have. We have carried out the modeling researches of the substorm influence on the ionosphere in various statements of the problem. The investigations were spent on the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere, added by the new block of calculation of electric fields in the Earth's ionosphere. In our investigations we have given the particular attention: to electrodynamics of the ionosphere; to changes of the global distributions of foF2, TEC and ion composition of

  15. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  16. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  17. Various phase-field approximations for Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätz, Andreas; Voigt, Axel

    2004-05-01

    We present diffuse interface approximations for a step flow model in epitaxial growth. In this model, the motion of step edges of discrete atomic layers is determined by the time evolution of an introduced phase-field variable. In order to incorporate the attachment-detachment kinetics at step edges into the phase-field model a degenerate mobility-function is established. The model is used to simulate the evolution of a step train.

  18. Lag Phase Is a Distinct Growth Phase That Prepares Bacteria for Exponential Growth and Involves Transient Metal Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, Matthew D.; Rice, Christopher J.; Lucchini, Sacha; Pin, Carmen; Thompson, Arthur; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Alston, Mark; Stringer, Michael F.; Betts, Roy P.; Baranyi, József; Peck, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Lag phase represents the earliest and most poorly understood stage of the bacterial growth cycle. We developed a reproducible experimental system and conducted functional genomic and physiological analyses of a 2-h lag phase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Adaptation began within 4 min of inoculation into fresh LB medium with the transient expression of genes involved in phosphate uptake. The main lag-phase transcriptional program initiated at 20 min with the upregulation of 945 genes encoding processes such as transcription, translation, iron-sulfur protein assembly, nucleotide metabolism, LPS biosynthesis, and aerobic respiration. ChIP-chip revealed that RNA polymerase was not “poised” upstream of the bacterial genes that are rapidly induced at the beginning of lag phase, suggesting a mechanism that involves de novo partitioning of RNA polymerase to transcribe 522 bacterial genes within 4 min of leaving stationary phase. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to discover that iron, calcium, and manganese are accumulated by S. Typhimurium during lag phase, while levels of cobalt, nickel, and sodium showed distinct growth-phase-specific patterns. The high concentration of iron during lag phase was associated with transient sensitivity to oxidative stress. The study of lag phase promises to identify the physiological and regulatory processes responsible for adaptation to new environments. PMID:22139505

  19. Dynamics of the AMPERE Region 1 Birkeland current oval during storms, substorms and steady magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, J. B.; Clausen, L.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Milan, S. E.; Kissinger, J.; Anderson, B. J.; Wing, S.

    2012-12-01

    Using radial current densities provided by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) we employ a fitting scheme to identify the location of the maximum Region 1 field-aligned (Birkeland) current at all magnetic local times. We call this parameter the "R1 oval" and we investigate its behavior during various modes of magnetospheric activity such as storms, substorms and steady magnetospheric convection (SMCs). Results show the following: (1) during substorms the radius of the R1 oval undergoes a cyclic inflation and contraction which matches the standard paradigm for substorm growth (loading) and expansion (unloading); (2) during SMCs the R1 oval is relatively steady consistent with balanced dayside and nightside reconnection during these events; and (3) during magnetic storms the size of the R1 oval is strongly correlated with the strength of the ring current specified by the Sym-H index. We also examine the behavior of the R1 oval in the northern and southern hemispheres simultaneously as a function of season in an effort to understand the role that internal magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling influences may play in modulating the response of the magnetosphere during these various types of events.

  20. Growth Phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetellae are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is a human-restricted variant of Bordetella bronchiseptica, which infects a broad range of mammals causing chronic and often asymptomatic infections. Growth phase dependent gen...

  1. Diffusion-controlled grain growth in two-phase solids

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Chen, L.Q.

    1997-08-01

    Microstructural evolution and the kinetics of grain growth in volume-conserved two-phase solids were investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) computer simulations based on a diffuse-interface field model. In this model, a two-phase microstructure is described by non-conserved field variables which represent crystallographic orientations of grains in each phase and by a conserved composition field variable which distinguishes the compositional difference between the two phases. The temporal and spatial evolution of these field variables were obtained through a numerical solution to the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. The effect of the ratios of grain boundary energies to interfacial energy on the microstructure features was systematically studied. It was found that grain growth in a volume-conserved two-phase solid is controlled by long-range diffusion and follows the power growth law, R{sup m} {minus} R{sup m}{sub o} = kt with m = 3 in the scaling regime for all cases studied, including the microstructures containing only quadrijunctions. The effects of volume fractions and initial microstructures are discussed.

  2. SuperDARN Observations of Pi2 Electric Field Pulsations during THEMIS Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Frissell, N. A.; Greenwald, R. A.; Rae, I. J.; Kale, Z. C.; Kepko, L.; Lester, M.; Grocott, A.; Yeoman, T. K.; Milan, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA THEMIS mission is focused on resolving the time sequence of events that occur in the magnetotail during the onset of the expansion phase of magnetospheric substorms. In support of THEMIS mission goals, the SuperDARN community is using a special camping-beam mode during THEMIS conjunctions over North America to maximize the temporal resolution of measurements of ionospheric convection during THEMIS substorm events. The SuperDARN THEMIS mode provides 8-second resolution on a single camping beam while simultaneously marching through each beam of the normal 2-minute scan. In this paper, we present SuperDARN measurements of ULF waves identified on SuperDARN camping beams during the onsets of several THEMIS substorms. These events clearly demonstrate the gains in temporal resolution that can be achieved using the THEMIS camping-beam mode. The characteristics of the Pi2 oscillations measured by the SuperDARN radars are found to be very similar to those seen by nearby ground-based magnetometers.

  3. Thermal catastrophe in the plasma sheet boundary layer. [in substorm models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Goertz, Christoph K.; Grossmann, William

    1986-01-01

    This letter presents a first step towards a substorm model including particle heating and transport in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). The heating mechanism discussed is resonant absorption of Alfven waves. For some assumed MHD perturbation incident from the tail lobes onto the plasma sheet, the local heating rate in the PSBL has the form of a resonance function of the one-fluid plasma temperature. Balancing the local heating by convective transport of the heated plasma toward the central plasma sheet, an 'equation of state" is found for the steady-state PSBL whose solution has the form of a mathematical catastrophe: at a critical value of a parameter containing the incident power flux, the local density, and the convection velocity, the equilibrium temperature jumps discontinuously. Associating this temperature increase with the abrupt onset of the substorm expansion phase, the catastrophe model indicates at least three ways in which the onset may be triggered. Several other consequences related to substorm dynamics are suggested by the simple catastrophe model.

  4. A binary phase field crystal study for liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth on predefined crystalline substrate is studied with binary phase field crystal (PFC) model. The purpose of this paper focuses on changes of the morphology of epitaxial films, influences of substrate vicinal angles on epitaxial growth, characteristics of islands growth on both sides of the substrate as well. It is found that the morphology of epitaxial films undergoes the following transitions: layer-by-layer growth, islands formation, mismatch dislocations nucleation and climb towards the film-substrate interface. Meanwhile, the density of steps and islands has obviously direct ratio relations with the vicinal angles. Also, preferential regions are found when islands grow on both sides of the substrate. For thinner substrate, the arrangement of islands is more orderly and the appearance of preferential growth is more obvious than that of thicker substrate. Also, the existing of preferential regions is much more valid for small substrate vicinal angles in contrast for big substrate vicinal angles.

  5. Kinetic Ballooning Instability for Substorm Onset and Current Disruption Observed by AMPTE/CCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Lui, A.T.Y., PPPL

    1998-05-01

    A new scenario of AMPTE/CCE observation of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes is presented. Toward the end of late growth phase plasma beta increases to greater than or equal to 50 and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption. At the current disruption onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic magnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place to modify the ambient plasma pressure and velocity profiles so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a more dipole-like geometry. To understand the excitation of the low-frequency global instability, a new theory of kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) is proposed to explain the high critical beta threshold (the high critical beta threshold is greater than or equal to 50) of the low-frequency global instability observed by the AMPTE/CCE. The stabilization is mainly due to kinetic effects of trapped electrons and finite ion Larmor radii which give rise to a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension to the ballooning mode. As a result, the high critical beta threshold for excitation of KBI is greatly increased over the ideal-MHD ballooning instability threshold by greater than or equal to O(10 exp 2). The wave-ion magnetic drift resonance effect produces a perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution with a duskward velocity roughly equal to the average ion magnetic (gradient B and curvature) drift velocity. Higher-frequency instabilities such as cross-field current instability (CCI) can be excited by the additional velocity space free energy associated with the positive slope in the perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution in the current disruption phase.

  6. Comparison of substorms near two solar cycle maxima: (1999-2000 and 2012-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I.; Lubchich, A.; Kleimenova, N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the comparative analysis of the substorm behavior during two solar cycle maxima. The substorms, observed during the large solar cycle maximum (1999- 2000, with Wp> 100) and during the last maximum (2012-2013 with Wp~60), were studied. The considered substorms were divided into 3 types according to auroral oval dynamic. First type - substorms which are observed only at auroral latitudes ("usual" substorms); second type - substorms which propagate from auroral latitudes (<70?) to polar geomagnetic latitudes (>70°) ("expanded" substorms, according to expanded oval); third type - substorms which are observed only at latitudes above ~70° in the absence of simultaneous geomagnetic disturbances below 70° ("polar" substorms, according to contracted oval). Over 1700 substorm events have been analyzed. The following substorm characteristics have been studied: (i) the seasonal variations, (ii) the latitudinal range of the occurrence, (iii) solar wind and IMF parameters before substorm onset, (iiii) PC-index before substorm onset. Thus, the difference between two solar activity maxima could be seen in the difference of substorm behavior in these periods as well.

  7. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  8. A phase-field model of island growth in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bang-Gui

    2004-03-01

    A phase-field model was proposed to simulate nucleation and growth of islands in epitaxy. In addition to local density of adatoms, a local phase-field variable, varying in the real space, is introduced to describe the epitaxial islands. Evolution of this phase field is determined by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau-like equation coupled to a diffusive transport equation of adatoms. When applied to nucleation and growth of islands in the submonolayer regime, this model reproduces both the scaling laws of island density and experimental size and spatial distributions of islands. For island growth in the multilayer regime, this phase-field model reproduces mound structures consistent with experimental images concerned. Accurate coarsening and roughening exponents of the mounds are obtained in this model. Compared with atomic models and mean-field models, this model can provide a fine visualized morphology of islands at large space and time scales of practical engineering interests. Reference: Yan-Mei Yu and Bang-Gui Liu, Phys Rev E (accepted Dec 2003).

  9. Two substorm intensifications compared: Onset, expansion, and global consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Baker, D.N.; Opgenoorth, H.J.; Sigwarth, J.B. Opgenoorth, H.J. Greenwald, R. Friis-Christensen, E. Mukai, T. Nakamura, R. Singer, H. Reeves, G.D. Lester, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present observations of two sequential substorm onsets on May 15, 1996. The first event occurred during persistently negative IMF B{sub Z}, whereas the second expansion followed a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). While the first onset remained localized, the second event led to a major reconfiguration of the magnetotail. The two very different events are contrasted, and it is suggested that the IMF direction controls the evolution of the expansion phase after the initial onset. Magnetic field modeling and field-aligned mappings are used to find the high-altitude source region of the auroral features and currents giving rise to ground magnetic disturbances: It is shown that the auroral brightening is related to processes near the inner edge of the plasma sheet but that the initial field-aligned currents couple to the midtail region. Ground magnetograms show an abrupt, large-scale weakening of the electrojet during the recovery phase. This event is followed by eastward drifting omega bands in a double-oval configuration. During that period, the Geotail plasma data show oscillations at {lt}100km/s amplitude. We argue that both these features are connected with the global tail evolution as the neutral line ceases to be active and reforms in the distant tail. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  10. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. ); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. . School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. )

    1992-10-20

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.