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Sample records for substrate thermal resistance

  1. Impact of nucleation density on thermal resistance near diamond-substrate boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Touzelbaev, M.N.; Goodson, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    Existing theory cannot account for the experimentally-observed thermal boundary resistance between deposited layers and substrates at room temperature. This is due to microstructural disorder in the deposited film within tens of nanometers of the interface. This work develops a model for the resulting thermal resistance near diamond-substrate interfaces, where the best deposition processes continue to yield high concentrations of amorphous inclusions and nanocrystalline material. The model relies on phonon transport theory and a novel subdivision of the near-interfacial region, which shows that the resistance is governed by the number of diamond nucleation sites per unit substrate area, i.e. The nucleation density. The predictions are consistent with experimental data for diamond-silicon interfaces and indicate that the resistance reaches a minimum for a nucleation density near 10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2}. This work facilitates the development microstructures that benefit more strongly from the excellent thermal-conduction properties of diamond.

  2. Predominance of thermal contact resistance in a silicon nanowire on a planar substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalopin, Yann; Gillet, Jean-Numa; Volz, Sebastian

    2008-06-01

    At low temperatures, thermal transport in single crystalline nanowires with sub-10-nm diameters is defined in terms of the universal quantum of conductance. In the case of a nanowire connected to plane substrates, additional conductances appear due to the contacts. We calculate the contact conductances and prove that they are much smaller than the conductance of the nanowire. The reason is that the number of excited modes per unit volume in the substrates becomes smaller than the one in the wire at low temperatures. The substrate then generates the predominant thermal resistance because its specific heat becomes smaller than the one of the wire. From these considerations, the wire-membrane and membrane-plane substrate thermal conductances can also be predicted.

  3. High-resolution and high-conductive electrode fabrication on a low thermal resistance flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bongchul; Kno, Jinsung; Yang, Minyang

    2011-07-01

    Processes based on the liquid-state pattern transfer, like inkjet printing, have critical limitations including low resolution and low electrical conductivity when fabricating electrodes on low thermal resistance flexible substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Those are due to the nonlinear transfer mechanism and the limit of the sintering temperature. Although the laser direct curing (LDC) of metallic inks is an alternative process to improve the resolution, it is also associated with the disadvantages of causing thermal damage to the polymer substrate. This paper suggests the laser induced pattern adhesion transfer method to fabricate electrodes of both high electrical conductivity and high resolution on a PET substrate. First, solid patterns are cost-effectively created by the LDC of the organometallic silver ink on a glass that is optically and thermally stable. The solid patterns sintered on the glass are transferred to the PET substrate by the photo-thermally generated adhesion force of the substrate. Therefore, we achieved electrodes with a minimum line width of 10 µm and a specific resistance of 3.6 μΩcm on the PET substrate. The patterns also showed high mechanical reliability.

  4. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  5. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al.sub.x N.sub.y O.sub.z layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  6. Effect of acidification and oil on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated in food substrate.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, F; Rodrigo, C; Fernández, P S; Rodrigo, M; Martínez, A

    1999-11-15

    The effect of the addition of vinegar and/or oil to a food homogenate (tomato sauce, tuna and vegetables) on the thermal resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores was studied. The results indicated that the food substrate without the addition of vinegar and oil and a pH value of 5.28 reduced the thermal resistance of B. stearothermophilus spores compared with that obtained in double-distilled water, (D121 = 1.41 and 3.08 min respectively). The addition of vinegar reduced the pH of the substrate (4.81) and consequently the D values were reduced (D121 = 1.28 min). The addition of soya oil and vinegar to substrate until a pH of 4.81, further reduced the thermal resistance of the spores, giving a D121 value of 0.93 min. PMID:10733251

  7. Impact of substrate and thermal boundary resistance on the performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs analyzed by means of electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, S.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Pérez, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present results from the simulations of a submicrometer AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) by using an in-house electro-thermal Monte Carlo simulator. We study the temperature distribution and the influence of heating on the transfer characteristics and the transconductance when the device is grown on different substrates (sapphire, silicon, silicon carbide and diamond). The effect of the inclusion of a thermal boundary resistance (TBR) is also investigated. It is found that, as expected, HEMTs fabricated on substrates with high thermal conductivities (diamond) exhibit lower temperatures, but the difference between hot-spot and average temperatures is higher. In addition, devices fabricated on substrates with higher thermal conductivities are more sensitive to the value of the TBR because the temperature discontinuity is greater in the TBR layer.

  8. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Sung, Dahye; Lee, Junghoon; Kim, Yonghwan; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-12-01

    A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu2O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  9. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Anthony Mark; Gray, Dennis Michael; Jackson, Melvin Robert

    2003-05-13

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  10. Intensified magneto-resistance by rapid thermal annealing in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film on SiO2 glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Morii, K.; Yamasaki, A.; Sugimura, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Horie, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have observed large magneto-resistance (MR) intensified by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film (MTF) on SiO2 glass (a-SiO2) substrate. The MTF was produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method by using a magnetite target. The electrical resistivity (ER) of as-grown MTF (AG-MTF) showed the Mott's variable range hopping behavior, which implies that the AG-MTF is amorphous-like. Although the magneto-resistance (MR) ratio of bulk single crystal is very small except around the Verwey transition temperature (VTT), that of the AG-MTF showed moderately large below room temperature. Due to RTA of the AG-MTF by use of an IR image furnace, the MR ratio of MTFs was intensified, and especially by the annealing around the Curie temperature (585°C) of magnetite. Furthermore the ER of the rapid thermally annealed MTF (RTA-MTF) showed a slight kink at around the VTT, which indicates that the crystallinity of the RTA-MTF is higher than that of the AG-MTF The MTF produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method are composed of magnetite fine particles (MFPs). We consider that the directions of magnetic moments of MFPs in the MTF were spatially randomized by the RTA and the strong spin scattering of itinerant electrons transferring between adjacent MFPs caused the intensification of the MR ratio.

  11. The combined effect of thermal annealing of MgO substrate and Ca substitution on the surface resistance of YBa2Cu3Oz thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, M.; Obara, H.; Yamasaki, H.

    2005-07-01

    Single-layer Y1-xCaxBa2Cu3Oz (YCBCO) thin films (x =0.00, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.10) grown on annealed as well as unannealed MgO substrates have been systematically investigated for their carrier concentration, critical current density Jc, and microwave surface resistance Rs. For x ⩽0.05, the grain growth follows a three-dimensional-spiral growth mechanism, while for x =0.10 we observed a mainly two-dimensional-like growth of grains. The results of Hall data reveal that the x =0.05 film is overdoped while films with x =0.02 and 0.10 are underdoped with respect to the x =0.00 film. However, the Hall mobility μH is highly enhanced for the x =0.02 film. Thermal annealing of MgO substrates prior to film deposition results to an improvement in the overall superconducting properties of the film such as suppression of normal-state resistivity, enhancement of Jc, and minimization of Rs both for pure as well as Ca-substituted films. Annealing of MgO substrates enhances the Jc value to a magnitude (i) nearly doubled for x =0.00 films and (ii) more than an order for x =0.02 films. Also it leads to a minimization of the Rs value to (i) more than half and (ii) nearly an order of magnitude higher, respectively, for x =0.00 and x =0.02 films. Furthermore, for the x =0.02 film, below 60K, we realized an enhanced Jc value in self- as well as in large-applied fields. For other than the Ca-2% substituted films, a suppression of Jc with a strong field dependency has been noticed. Furthermore, the Rs value of the x =0.02 film (0.1mΩ at 20K, 21.9GHz) was three times lower compared to that of the x =0.00 film (0.35mΩ at 20K, 21.9GHz). At 20K and 21.9GHz, the Rs value for the x =0.05 film is comparable to that of the x =0.00 film, whereas for the x =0.10 film it is twice that of x =0.00. The low normal-state resistivity, enhanced mobility, high Jc, and the minimized Rs observed for x =0.02 films firmly support the possible improvement of superconducting order parameters near the grain

  12. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  13. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Fleming, Austin; Hamaoui, Georges; Ban, Heng

    2016-07-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  14. Low thermal resistance power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hassani, Vahab; Vlahinos, Andreas; Bharathan, Desikan

    2007-03-13

    A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

  15. Structural, compositional, thermal resistant and hydro-oleophobic properties of fluorine based block-co-polymer films on quartz substrates by wet chemical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, A. R.; Passacantando, M.; Santucci, S.

    2006-08-01

    Crack free and smooth surfaces of poly [4,5-difluoro 2,2-bis (trifluoromethyl)-(1,3 dioxole)-co-tetrafluoroethylene] (TFE-co-TFD) thin films have been deposited by wet chemical dip coating technique on polished quartz and glass slide substrates. The deposited films have been subjected to annealing at different temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 °C for 1 h in argon atmosphere. The elemental composition of the as-deposited (xerogel) thin film as well as film annealed at 400 °C was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and observed that there was no change in the composition of the film. X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the amorphous behaviour of both as-deposited and film annealed at 400 °C. Surface morphology and elemental composition of the films have been examined by employing scanning electron microscopy attached with energy dispersive X-ray analyser, respectively. It was found that as the annealing temperature increased from 100 to 400 °C, nano-hemisphere-like structures have been grown, which in turn has shown increase in the water contact angle from 122o to 148o and oil (peanut) contact angle from 85° to 96°. No change in the water contact angle (122°) has been observed when the films deposited at room temperature were heated in air from 30 to 80 °C as well as exposed to steam for 8 days for 8 h/day indicating thermal stability of the film.

  16. Method for making high resistance chromium-free semiconductor substrate body with low resistance active semiconductor layer by surface irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kniepkamp, H.

    1984-10-30

    A high resistance semiconductor substrate body with a thin low resistance active semiconductor layer thereon is generated by a method including the steps of subjecting the semiconductor substrate body to neutron bombardment to a degree which produces high resistance in the semiconductor body and whereby doping substances are generated in the substrate body by the thermal neutron bombardment. A thin low resistant active semiconductor layer is then generated on the substrate body by annealing, a surface of the semiconductor substrate body up to a selected depth by laser radiation or electron radiation such that the lattice deterioration which was caused by the neutron bombardment is eliminated but the doping which was generated by the transmutation of elements during neutron bombardment remains. The annealing can be undertaken only in selected regions on the surface of the semiconductor substrate body, thereby facilitating the construction of integrated circuit components thereon.

  17. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  18. Modeling Thermal Contact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One difficulty in using cryocoolers is making good thermal contact between the cooler and the instrument being cooled. The connection is often made through a bolted joint. The temperature drop associated with this joint has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. The low temperature behavior of dry joints have shown some anomalous dependence on the surface condition of the mating parts. There is also some doubts on how well one can extrapolate from the test samples to predicting the performance of a real system. Both finite element and analytic models of a simple contact system have been developed. The model assumes (a) the contact is dry (contact limited to a small portion of the total available area and the spaces in-between the actual contact patches are perfect insulators), (b) contacts are clean (conductivity of the actual contact is the same as the bulk), (c) small temperature gradients (the bulk conductance may be assumed to be temperature independent), (d) the absolute temperature is low (thermal radiation effects are ignored), and (e) the dimensions of the nominal contact area are small compared to the thickness of the bulk material (the contact effects are localized near the contact). The models show that in the limit of actual contact area much less than the nominal area (a much less than A), that the excess temperature drop due to a single point of contact scales as a(exp -1/2). This disturbance only extends a distance approx. A(exp 1/2) into the bulk material. A group of identical contacts will result in an excess temperature drop that scales as n(exp -1/2), where n is the number of contacts and n dot a is constant. This implies that flat rough surfaces will have a lower excess temperature drop than flat polished surfaces.

  19. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2013-04-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  20. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2014-03-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  1. Quantification of thermal and contact resistances of scanning thermal probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyeongtae E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu Jeong, Wonho; Lee, Woochul; Sadat, Seid; Thompson, Dakotah; Meyhofer, Edgar E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu; Reddy, Pramod E-mail: meyhofer@umich.edu

    2014-11-17

    Scanning thermal probes are widely used for imaging temperature fields with nanoscale resolution, for studying near-field radiative heat transport and for locally heating samples. In all these applications, it is critical to know the thermal resistance to heat flow within the probe and the thermal contact resistance between the probe and the sample. Here, we present an approach for quantifying the aforementioned thermal resistances using picowatt resolution heat flow calorimeters. The measured contact resistance is found to be in good agreement with classical predictions for thermal contact resistance. The techniques developed here are critical for quantitatively probing heat flows at the nanoscale.

  2. Thermal Contact Resistance: Experiment Versus Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, L.; Moyne, C.; Degiovanni, A.

    1998-11-01

    With a knowledge of the thermal resistance value associated with an asperity, a model for the thermal contact resistance of a given interface is obtained by considering that each asperity of surfaces in contact is a flux tube. Calculation of any of the thermal conductances depends on the contact radius of each asperity. This radius increases with load, as asperities are compressed. Contact area is calculated for a plastic load. Values of thermal contact conductance (or resistance) are compared with experimental results.

  3. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  4. Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Interface Resistance of Pentacene Thin Films with Varying Morphology.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jillian; Ong, Wee-Liat; Bettinger, Christopher J; Malen, Jonathan A

    2016-07-27

    Temperature dependent thermal conductivities and thermal interface resistances of pentacene (Pn) thin films deposited on silicon substrates and self-assembled monolayer-modified [octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)] silicon substrates were measured using frequency domain thermoreflectance. Atomic force microscopy images were used to derive an effective film thickness for thermal transport that accounts for surface roughness. Data taken over a temperature range of 77-300 K for various morphologies and film thicknesses show that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing Pn grain size. The sum of the substrate-Pn and Pn-gold thermal interface resistances was isolated from the intrinsic thermal resistance of the Pn films and found to be independent of surface chemistry. Corresponding Kapitza lengths of approximately 150 nm are larger than the physical thicknesses of typical Pn thin films and indicate that the interfaces play a dominant role in the total thermal resistance. This study has implications for increasing the performance and effective thermal management of small molecule electronic and energy conversion devices. PMID:27391107

  5. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  6. Hybrid organic/inorganic coatings for abrasion resistance on plastic and metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J.; Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    Novel abrasion resistant coatings have been successfully prepared by the sol-gel method. These materials are spin coated onto bisphenol-A polycarbonate, diallyl diglycol carbonate resin (CR-39) sheet, aluminum, and steel substrates and are thermally cured to obtain a transparent coating of a few microns in thickness. Following the curing, the abrasion resistance is measured and compared with an uncoated control. It was found that these hybrid organic/inorganic networks partially afford excellent abrasion resistance to the polycarbonate substrates investigated. In addition to having excellent abrasion resistance comparable to current commercial coatings, some newly developed systems are also UV resistant. Similar coating formulations applied to metals can greatly improve the abrasion resistance despite the fact that the coatings are lower in density than their substrates.

  7. Low thermal resistance power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hassani, Vahab; Vlahinos, Andreas; Bharathan, Desikan

    2010-12-28

    A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410) with passageways or openings (414) for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface (411) to an upper surface (412). A circuit substrate (420) is provided and positioned on the spreader plate (410) to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate (420) includes a bonding layer (422) configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer (422) may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface (412) of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening (414) in the plate. The assembly includes power modules (430) mounted on the circuit substrate (420) on a surface opposite the bonding layer (422). The power modules (430) are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

  8. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  9. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  10. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  11. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-09-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  12. Thermal sprayed zirconium coatings for corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bamola, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) is conducted in inert reduced pressures. This results in higher particle velocities than in atmospheric plasma spraying. Reverse arc sputter cleaning and pre-heating of the workpiece lead to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition, allowing sintering of the coating and, thus, enhanced densities and bond strengths. Inert Environment Electric Arc Spraying (IEAS) is performed in inert gas chambers, utilizing wire as the feedstock. This leads to lower gas content in the coating, since the initial gas content in wire is lower than that of the powder feedstock used in VPS. Controlled atmosphere sprayed zirconium coatings had inferior mechanical and corrosion properties when compared with bulk zirconium. The VPS coatings displayed higher bond strengths and better cavitation erosion resistance than did the IEAS coatings. The IEAS coatings had lower gas content and showed better electrochemical and corrosion behavior. The lower gas content for IEAS was due to a lower initial gas level in the wire feedstock used in this process. Also, scanning electron microscopy revealed that larger particles result in the IEAS process. Thus, a smaller surface-area-to-volume ratio is available for gas-metal reactions to occur. Improvements in mechanical and corrosion properties for the IEAS coatings were due to elevated substrate temperatures during deposition. Compressive surface stresses induced by post-spray shot-peening enhanced corrosion and cavitation resistance of IEAS coatings. Coating porosity caused failure during immersion testing. Therefore, it was concluded that controlled environment thermal spraying of zirconium is not suitable for forming corrosion resistant coatings on steel. ZrN coatings were formed by electric arc spraying using a nitrogen shroud and post-spray nitriding. Two phases; ZrN and zirconium solid solution, exist in the as-sprayed coating. Nitriding increases the proportion of ZrN.

  13. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    The issue of thermal contact resistance across metallic interfaces has been investigated for many situations over the past several decades. The application in the present case is contact cooling of high heat load optical substrates. High heat load x-ray mirrors and other optical components used at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are either internally cooled or contact cooled. In the internally cooled mirrors, a coolant flows through passages configured in the optical substrate. In the contact-cooled case, cooling is provided by placing cooling plates in contact with the mirror to extract the heat. Here, an experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial thermal transport between silicene and substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingchao; Hong, Yang; Tong, Zhen; Xiao, Zhihuai; Bao, Hua; Yue, Yanan

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the interfacial thermal transport across silicene and various substrates, i.e., crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), crystalline silica (c-SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) are explored by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A transient pulsed heating technique is applied in this work to characterize the interfacial thermal resistance in all hybrid systems. It is reported that the interfacial thermal resistances between silicene and all substrates decrease nearly 40% with temperature from 100 K to 400 K, which is due to the enhanced phonon couplings from the anharmonicity effect. Analysis of phonon power spectra of all systems is performed to interpret simulation results. Contradictory to the traditional thought that amorphous structures tend to have poor thermal transport capabilities due to the disordered atomic configurations, it is calculated that amorphous silicon and silica substrates facilitate the interfacial thermal transport compared with their crystalline structures. Besides, the coupling effect from substrates can improve the interface thermal transport up to 43.5% for coupling strengths χ from 1.0 to 2.0. Our results provide fundamental knowledge and rational guidelines for the design and development of the next-generation silicene-based nanoelectronics and thermal interface materials. PMID:26266456

  15. Apparatus for thermally evolving chemical analytes from a removable substrate

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.

    2003-06-03

    Method and apparatus suited to convenient field use for heating a porous metallic substrate swiped on the surface of an article possibly bearing residue of contraband or other target chemical substances. The preferred embodiment of the device includes means for holding the swiped substrate between electrodes bearing opposite electrical charges, thereby completing an electrical circuit in which current can flow through the porous metallic substrate. Resistance causes the substrate to heat, thus driving adherent target chemicals, if present, into a space from which they are carried via gas flow into a detector such as a portable IMS for analysis.

  16. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of Alumina Substrate for Microelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.; Ibrahim, A.; Alias, R.; Shapee, S. M.; Ambak, Z.; Zakaria, S. Z.; Yahya, M. R.; Mat, A. F. A.

    2010-03-11

    This paper reports the effect of sintering temperature on thermal and electrical properties of alumina material as substrate for microelectronic devices. Alumina materials in the form of green sheet with 1 mm thickness were sintered at 1100 deg. C, 1300 deg. C and 1500 deg. C for about 20 hours using heating and cooling rates of 2 deg. C/min. The densities were measured using densitometer and the microstructures of the samples were analyzed using SEM micrographs. Meanwhile thermal and electrical properties of the samples were measured using flash method and impedance analyzer respectively. It was found that thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the substrate increases as sintering temperature increases. It was found also that the dielectric constant of alumina substrate increases as the sintering temperature increases.

  17. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Assoufid, L.; Worek, W.M.

    1997-10-27

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include iridium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance, Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the iridium foil, and then the silver foil.

  18. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali M.; Chojnowski, David; Assoufid, Lahsen; Worek, William M.

    1997-12-01

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  19. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  20. Smoother Turbine Blades Resist Thermal Shock Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerniak, Paul; Longenecker, Kent; Paulus, Don; Ullman, Zane

    1991-01-01

    Surface treatment increases resistance of turbine blades to low-cycle fatigue. Smoothing removes small flaws where cracks start. Intended for blades in turbines subject to thermal shock of rapid starting. No recrystallization occurs at rocket-turbine operating temperatures.

  1. Evaluation of thermal barrier coating systems on novel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Wright, I. G.; Brindley, W. J.

    2000-06-01

    Testing was conducted on both plasma-sprayed (PS) and electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied directly to oxidation-resistant substrates such as β-NiAl, oxide-dispersed FeCrAl, and NiCr. On an alloy that forms a very adherent alumina scale, β-NiAl+Zr, the coating lifetime of YSZ in furnace cyclic tests was 6 or more times longer than on state-of-the-art, YSZ coatings on single-crystal Ni-base superalloys with MCrAlY or Pt aluminide bond coats. Coatings on FeCrAl alloys appear to be a viable option for applications such as the external skin of the X-33, single stage to orbit, reusable launch vehicle. Model chromia-forming bond coat compositions also show promise for power generation applications at temperatures where hot corrosion may be a major problem. In general, while this work examined unique materials systems, many of the same fundamental failure mechanisms observed in conventional TBCs were observed.

  2. Analysis on partial thermal resistances of packaged SiC schottky barrier diodes at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehwa; Funaki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of partial thermal resistances of a packaged SiC schottky barrier diode (SBD) for high temperature applications. Transient thermal resistances of the packaged SiC SBD were measured and characterized in temperature range from 27 to 275 °C. The partial thermal resistances were extracted and analyzed using the cumulative and differential thermal structure functions. The extracted partial thermal resistances were compared to the results from the finite difference thermal model, and both results were in good agreement. The temperature dependence of the partial thermal resistance of the SiC device and the Si3N4 substrate contributes to the overall thermal characteristics variation of the packaged SiC SBD.

  3. Resistive substrate heater for film processing by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, B.; De Barros, D.; La Manna, J.; Weiss, F.; Duneau, G.; Odier, P.; De Sousa Meneses, D.; Auger, Y.; Melin, P.; Echegut, P.

    2004-09-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive resistive heater usable in the spray pyrolysis process. It is based on a resistively heated ceramic plate. By using such a heater substrate temperatures exceeding 900 °C are easily achieved on the substrate. The heater consists of a ceramic plate enclosed in a stainless steel box. A refractory wire woven in a regular frame inside the ceramic provides an excellent heating uniformity over the entire surface. Performances and parameters of the system are given. We apply this device to the preparation of thick films of HTc oxides such as (Hg,Re)Ba2Ca2Cu3O8+δ.

  4. Developing a dissimilar metal foil-to-substrate resistance welding process.

    SciTech Connect

    Knorovsky, Gerald Albert

    2010-10-01

    Materials changes occurring upon redesign caused redevelopment of the multiple spot resistance weld procedure employed to join a 23 micrometer thick foil of 15-7PH to a thick substrate and (at a separate location) a second, smaller thermal mass substrate. Both substrates were 304L. To avoid foil wrinkling, minimal heat input was used. The foil/thick substrate weld was solid-state, though the foil/small substrate weld was not. Metallographic evidence indicated occasional separation of the solid-state weld, hence a fusion weld was desired at both locations. In the redesign, a Co-Cr-Fe-Ni alloy was substituted for the foil, and a Ni-Cr-Mo alloy was evaluated for the small substrate. Both materials are substantially more resistive than their predecessors. This study reports development of weld schedules to accommodate the changes, yet achieve the fusion weld goal. Thermal analysis was employed to understand the effects caused by the various weld schedule parameters, and guide their optimization.

  5. Development of a platinum resistance thermometer on the silicon substrate for phase change studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qingjun; Chen, Ya-Chi; Tsai, Chialun; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    2012-08-01

    Resistance temperature detectors are commonly used measurement sensors in heat transfer studies. In many resistance temperature detectors, the platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) is chemically stable, has a wide temperature measurement range and possesses high measurement accuracy. In phase change studies of carbon nanotubes, bi-porous structures for microelectronic thermal management, 100 nm thick PRTs are developed on silicon substrates with 10 nm titanium adhesive to achieve precise and interface-free temperature measurements. After an annealing at 375 °C, the PRT samples are calibrated at a temperature range from 20 to 180 °C. Measurement hysteresis of temperature appears in thermal cycles. Electrical resistance tends to become low during all heating periods, which establishes the maximum measurement deviation of 10 °C. Experimental results from two different thin-film PRTs indicate that accurate and repeatable temperature measurements can be achieved by either reducing heating speed or using data in the cooling period.

  6. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A. . Metalurgia Fisica-Ciencia de Materials)

    1994-10-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken.

  7. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy of graphene devices on flexible polyimide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Mir Mohammad; Park, Saungeun; Huang, Yu; Akinwande, Deji; Yao, Zhen; Murthy, Jayathi; Shi, Li

    2016-06-01

    A triple-scan scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) method and a zero-heat flux laser-heated SThM technique are investigated for quantitative thermal imaging of flexible graphene devices. A similar local tip-sample thermal resistance is observed on both the graphene and metal areas of the sample, and is attributed to the presence of a polymer residue layer on the sample surface and a liquid meniscus at the tip-sample junction. In addition, it is found that the tip-sample thermal resistance is insensitive to the temperature until it begins to increase as the temperature increases to 80 °C and exhibits an abrupt increase at 110 °C because of evaporation of the liquid meniscus at the tip-sample junction. Moreover, the variation in the tip-sample thermal resistance due to surface roughness is within the experimental tolerance except at areas with roughness height exceeding tens of nanometers. Because of the low thermal conductivity of the flexible polyimide substrate, the SThM measurements have found that the temperature rise in flexible graphene devices is more than one order of magnitude higher than those reported for graphene devices fabricated on a silicon substrate with comparable dimensions and power density. Unlike a graphene device on a silicon substrate where the majority of the electrical heating in the graphene device is conducted vertically through the thin silicon dioxide dielectric layer to the high-thermal conductivity silicon substrate, lateral heat spreading is important in the flexible graphene devices, as shown by the observed decrease in the average temperature rise normalized by the power density with decreasing graphene channel length from about 30 μm to 10 μm. However, it is shown by numerical heat transfer analysis that this trend is mainly caused by the size scaling of the thermal spreading resistance of the polymer substrate instead of lateral heat spreading by the graphene. In addition, thermoelectric effects are found to be negligible

  8. Corrosion-resistant ceramic thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two-layer thermal barrier coating, consisting of metal-CrA1Y bond coating and calcium silicate ceramic outer layer, greatly improves resistance of turbine parts to hot corrosion from fuel and air impurities. Both layers can be plasma sprayed, and ceramic layer may be polished to reduce frictional losses. Ceramic provides thermal barrier, so parts operate cooler metal temperatures, coolant flow can be reduced, or gas temperatures increased. Lower grade fuels also can be used.

  9. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, D. M.; Nied, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental and analytical investigation of the thermal shock phenomena in ceramic matrix composites is detailed. The composite systems examined were oxide-based, consisting of an aluminosilicate matrix with either polycrystalline aluminosilicate or single crystal alumina fiber reinforcement. The program was divided into three technical tasks; baseline mechanical properties, thermal shock modeling, and thermal shock testing. The analytical investigation focused on the development of simple expressions for transient thermal stresses induced during thermal shock. The effect of various material parameters, including thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and thermal expansion, were examined analytically for their effect on thermal shock performance. Using a simple maximum stress criteria for each constituent, it was observed that fiber fracture would occur only at the most extreme thermal shock conditions and that matrix fracture, splitting parallel to the reinforcing fiber, was to be expected for most practical cases. Thermal shock resistance for the two material systems was determined experimentally by subjecting plates to sudden changes in temperature on one surface while maintaining the opposite surface at a constant temperature. This temperature change was varied in severity (magnitude) and in number of shocks applied to a given sample. The results showed that for the most severe conditions examined that only surface matrix fracture was present with no observable fiber fracture. The impact of this damage on material performance was limited to the matrix dominated properties only. Specifically, compression strength was observed to decrease by as much as 50 percent from the measured baseline.

  10. Heat resistant substrates and battery separators made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, Alois (Inventor); Scala, Luciano C. (Inventor); Ruffing, Charles R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A flexible substrate having a caustic resistant support and at least one membrane comprising a solid polymeric matrix containing a network of interconnected pores and interdispersed inorganic filler particles with a ratio of filler: polymer in the polymeric matrix of between about 1:1 to 5:1, is made by coating at least one side of the support with a filler:coating formulation mixture of inorganic filler particles and a caustic resistant, water insoluble polymer dissolved in an organic solvent, and removing the solvent from the mixture to provide a porous network within the polymeric matrix.

  11. Thermal shock resistance of silicon oxynitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandus, J. C.; Boch, P.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of Si2N2O refractory material was studied. The thermal expansion coeff. is 3.55x10 to the -6th power at 20 to 800 C and 2.86x10 to the -6th power m/m/deg at 20 to 200 C. The breaking loads are high at high stress. Young's modulus E and the shear modulus G decrease linearly with increasing porosity. For dense material E sub o approx. = 216,500 N/mm2 and G approx = 90,600 N/mm2. The Vickers hardness of the dense material is comparable to that of sapphire. The results on thermal shock show that R, the breaking load, stays constant for T T sub c, the first cracks appear and R decreases sharply for T=T sub c. As the severity of the thermal shock is increased at T T sub c, a small no. of new, large-size cracks appears. The shock's cumulative effect is negligible, and repeated shocks do not change the cracks. The low values of the thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus and the high tension breaking load are considered. Sintered Si2N2O with 5% MgO shows excellent cracking resistance under thermal shock.

  12. Method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates, such as a baking enamel paint surface, is described wherein the uncured enamel paint surface is coated with a non-curing lacquer which is, in turn, coated with a partially cured lacquer. The non-curing lacquer adheres to the enamel and a photo resist material satisfactorily adheres to the partially cured lacquer. Once normal photo etching techniques are employed the lacquer coats can be easily removed from the enamel leaving the photo etched image. In the case of edge lighted instrument panels, a coat of uncured enamel is placed over the cured enamel followed by the lacquer coats and the photo resists which is exposed and developed. Once the etched uncured enamel is cured, the lacquer coats are removed leaving an etched panel.

  13. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage. PMID:22097561

  14. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  15. Substrate Recognition and Modification by the Nosiheptide Resistance Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The proliferation of antibiotic resistant pathogens is an increasing threat to the general public. Resistance may be conferred by a number of mechanisms including covalent or mutational modification of the antibiotic binding site, covalent modification of the drug, or the over-expression of efflux pumps. The nosiheptide resistance methyltransferase (NHR) confers resistance to the thiazole antibiotic nosiheptide in the nosiheptide producer organism Streptomyces actuosus through 2ʹO-methylation of 23S rRNA at the nucleotide A1067. Although the crystal structures of NHR and the closely related thiostrepton-resistance methyltransferase (TSR) in complex with the cofactor S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) are available, the principles behind NHR substrate recognition and catalysis remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analyzed the binding interactions between NHR and model 58 and 29 nucleotide substrate RNAs by gel electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy. We show that the enzyme binds to RNA as a dimer. By constructing a hetero-dimer complex composed of one wild-type subunit and one inactive mutant NHR-R135A subunit, we show that only one functional subunit of the NHR homodimer is required for its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis suggests that the interactions between neighbouring bases (G1068 and U1066) and A1067 have an important role in methyltransfer activity, such that the substitution of a deoxy sugar spacer (5ʹ) to the target nucleotide achieved near wild-type levels of methylation. A series of atomic substitutions at specific positions on the substrate adenine show that local base-base interactions between neighbouring bases are important for methylation. Conclusion/Significance Taken together these data suggest that local base-base interactions play an important role in aligning the substrate 2’ hydroxyl group of A1067 for methyl group transfer. Methylation of nucleic acids is playing an

  16. Thermal engineering of non-local resistance in lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, S. Takahashi, Y. K.; Hirayama, S.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Adachi, H.; Ieda, J.; Maekawa, S.

    2014-04-21

    We study the non-local spin transport in Permalloy/Cu lateral spin valves (LSVs) fabricated on thermally oxidized Si and MgO substrates. While these LSVs show the same magnitude of spin signals, significant substrate dependence of the baseline resistance was observed. The baseline resistance shows much weaker dependence on the inter-electrode distance than that of the spin transport observed in the Cu wires. A simple analysis of voltage-current characteristics in the baseline resistance indicates the observed result can be explained by a combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects at the injector and detector junctions, suggesting the usage of high thermal conductivity substrate (or under-layer) is effective to reduce the baseline resistance.

  17. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  18. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Imide-linked perfluoroalkylene ether polymers, that were developed for the high temperature fuel tank sealant application, are discussed. Modifications of polymer structure and properties were realized through use of a new aromatic dianhydride intermediate containing an ether-linked perfluoroalkylene segment. Tests of thermal, oxidative and hydrolytic stability, fuel resistance, and adhesion are discussed along with tensile strength and elongation results. Efforts to effect a low temperature condensation of amic acid prepolymer to form imide links inside are described.

  19. Low-thermal expansion material for telescope mirror substrate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kousuke; Kawasaki, Nobuo; Nakajima, Toshihide

    2004-09-01

    The material property and processability of the low thermal expansion glass-ceramics product by Ohara Inc. called CLEARCERAM-Z were studied for telescope mirror substrate application. For material property, numbers of the key properties for the application, such as Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) characteristic in wide temperature range, Stress Birefringence and Mechanical strengths were intensively investigated focusing on the blank uniformity. The mean CTE of +0.15x10-7/degree C in wide temperature range (-50 to +150degree C) with the standard deviation (Std.) of 0.03x10-7/degree C and Young"s Modulus & Poisson Ratio data with the coefficient of variation less than 1% were obtained for the blanks with the size up to Dia.670mm. The maximum Stress Birefringence was 3nm/cm within a 400mm square blank. For processability, the surface finish data of AFM Rms 0.15nm, the Power Spectral Density profile in the same level of low expansion amorphous glass and three dimensional structured samples were demonstrated. The comparison of the obtained data with known blanks specification for past and future telescope projects revealed that CLEARCERAM-Z has capability to meet material property requirements for telescope mirror substrate application in the size up to Dia.670mm. Also for the precision metrology to support the material technology, CTE measurement system developed at OHARA was described.

  20. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulinkin, Alexandr; Shugurov, Artur; Panin, Alexey; Sergeev, Viktor; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  1. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinkin, Alexandr Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-27

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  2. Thermal singularity and droplet motion in one-component fluids on solid substrates with thermal gradients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2012-06-01

    Using a continuum model capable of describing the one-component liquid-gas hydrodynamics down to the contact line scale, we carry out numerical simulation and physical analysis for the droplet motion driven by thermal singularity. For liquid droplets in one-component fluids on heated or cooled substrates, the liquid-gas interface is nearly isothermal. Consequently, a thermal singularity occurs at the contact line and the Marangoni effect due to temperature gradient is suppressed. Through evaporation or condensation in the vicinity of the contact line, the thermal singularity makes the contact angle increase with the increasing substrate temperature. This effect on the contact angle can be used to move the droplets on substrates with thermal gradients. Our numerical results for this kind of droplet motion are explained by a simple fluid dynamical model at the droplet length scale. Since the mechanism for droplet motion is based on the change of contact angle, a separation of length scales is exhibited through a comparison between the droplet motion induced by a wettability gradient and that by a thermal gradient. It is shown that the flow field at the droplet length scale is independent of the statics or dynamics at the contact line scale. PMID:23005105

  3. Substrate-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride thin-films processed at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Belkerk, B. E.; Bensalem, S.; Soussou, A.; Carette, M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Scudeller, Y.; Al Brithen, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on investigation concerning the substrate-dependent thermal conductivity (k) of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin-films processed at low temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity of AlN films grown at low temperature (<200 °C) on single-crystal silicon (Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (SiN) with thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 4000 nm was measured with the transient hot-strip technique. The k values for AlN films on SiN were found significantly lower than those on Silicon consistently with their microstructures revealed by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The change in k was due to the thermal boundary resistance found to be equal to 10 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on SiN against 3.5 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on Si. However, the intrinsic thermal conductivity was determined with a value as high as 200 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} whatever the substrate.

  4. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  5. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  6. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  7. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  8. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  9. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  10. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  11. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  12. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  13. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress...

  14. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  15. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  16. Characterization and thermal shock behavior of Y2O3 films deposited on freestanding CVD diamond substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Chenyi; Guo, Jianchao; Liu, Jinglong; Yan, Xiongbo; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Liangxian; Wei, Junjun; Hei, Lifu; Li, Chengming

    2016-07-01

    Y2O3 anti-reflection films were deposited on freestanding CVD diamond substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal shock resistance and oxidation resistance of Y2O3/diamond/Y2O3 samples at 727 °C and 800 °C in atmospheric air were investigated. No delamination of the Y2O3 films occurred after thermal shock, thereby demonstrating extreme adhesion to freestanding diamond substrates. After thermal shock, Y atoms in the films were almost fully oxidized. Moreover, the majority of monoclinic phase in the Y2O3 films transformed into cubic phase, crystallinity was enhanced, and the average grain size significantly increased. The maximum transmittance in the 8-12 μm long-wave IR range of the Y2O3/diamond/Y2O3 samples increased from 81.3% ± 0.3% to 84.7% ± 0.2% and 83.6% ± 0.4%. These findings indicated that the Y2O3 anti-reflection films displayed good resistance to thermal shock and provided sufficient protection for diamond substrates against elevated temperature oxidation.

  17. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  18. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Helen F.; Cooper, Sarah M.; Meyyappan, M.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials.

  19. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  20. Development of a protective decorative fire resistant low smoke emitting, thermally stable coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of suitable electrocoatings and subsequent application to nonconductive substrates are discussed. Substrates investigated were plastics or resin-treated materials such as FX-resin (phenolic-type resin) impregnated fiberglass mat, polyphenylene sulfide, polyether sulfone and polyimide-impregnated unidirectional fiberglass. Efforts were aimed at formulating a fire-resistant, low smoke emitting, thermally stable, easily cleaned coating material. The coating is to be used for covering substrate panels, such as aluminum, silicate foam, polymeric structural entities, etc., all of which are applied in the aircraft cabin interior and thus subject to the spillages, scuffing, spotting and the general contaminants which prevail in aircraft passenger compartments.

  1. A method for testing the integrated thermal resistance of thermoelectric modules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Du, Qungui; Chen, Min

    2013-11-01

    The integrated thermal resistance (ITR) of thermoelectric modules (TEMs) is an important parameter that represents the thermal-conduction of ceramic substrates, copper conducting strips, and welding material used in the TEM as well as the thermal contact resistances between different materials. In this study, an accurate and practical test method is proposed for the ITR of TEMs according to thermoelectric heat transfer theory and the equivalent characteristics of heat flux through the cold and hot sides of TEMs in an open-circuit situation. By using such measurements and comparisons, it is verified that the measured ITR value in our mode is accurate and reliable. In particular this method accurately predicts the actual operating conditions of TEMs, in which TEMs are under certain mechanical pressure. It effectively solves the problem of thermal resistance extraction from operating TEMs and is of great significance in their analysis and optimization. PMID:24289427

  2. A Method for testing the integrated thermal resistance of thermoelectric modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junling; Du, Qungui; Chen, Min

    2013-11-01

    The integrated thermal resistance (ITR) of thermoelectric modules (TEMs) is an important parameter that represents the thermal-conduction of ceramic substrates, copper conducting strips, and welding material used in the TEM as well as the thermal contact resistances between different materials. In this study, an accurate and practical test method is proposed for the ITR of TEMs according to thermoelectric heat transfer theory and the equivalent characteristics of heat flux through the cold and hot sides of TEMs in an open-circuit situation. By using such measurements and comparisons, it is verified that the measured ITR value in our mode is accurate and reliable. In particular this method accurately predicts the actual operating conditions of TEMs, in which TEMs are under certain mechanical pressure. It effectively solves the problem of thermal resistance extraction from operating TEMs and is of great significance in their analysis and optimization.

  3. Phenothiazinium antimicrobial photosensitizers are substrates of bacterial multidrug resistance pumps.

    PubMed

    Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines a nontoxic photoactivatable dye, or photosensitizer (PS), with harmless visible light to generate singlet oxygen and free radicals that kill microbial cells. Although the light can be focused on the diseased area, the best selectivity is achieved by choosing a PS that binds and penetrates microbial cells. Cationic phenothiazinium dyes, such as methylene blue and toluidine blue O, have been studied for many years and are the only PSs used clinically for antimicrobial PDT. Multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs) are membrane-localized proteins that pump drugs out of cells and have been identified for a wide range of organisms. We asked whether phenothiazinium salts with structures that are amphipathic cations could potentially be substrates of MDRs. We used MDR-deficient mutants of Staphylococcus aureus (NorA), Escherichia coli (TolC), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MexAB) and found 2 to 4 logs more killing than seen with wild-type strains by use of three different phenothiazinium PSs and red light. Mutants that overexpress MDRs were protected from killing compared to the wild type. Effective antimicrobial PSs of different chemical structures showed no difference in light-mediated killing depending on MDR phenotype. Differences in uptake of phenothiazinium PS by the cells depending on level of MDR expression were found. We propose that specific MDR inhibitors could be used in combination with phenothiazinium salts to enhance their photodestructive efficiency. PMID:16377686

  4. Thermal resistance at a liquid-solid interface dependent on the ratio of thermal oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, BoHung

    2012-12-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of atomic-scale thermal resistance at a solid-liquid interface are theoretically investigated with a simple modal analysis of a one-dimensional lattice system. In the modal analysis, the solid-liquid intermolecular interaction strength between is taken into account as the stiffness constant between the solid and liquid molecular masses, and plays a key role in understanding the interfacial thermal resistance. The results show that the interfacial thermal resistance is proportional to the 4th power of the ratio of the thermal oscillation frequencies for the solid and liquid molecules, which provides a better physical description for the interfacial thermal resistance.

  5. Thermal resistances of solder-boss/potting compound combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, E. D.

    1968-01-01

    Formulas, which can be used as a design tool, are derived to calculate the thermal resistance of solder-boss/potting compound combinations, for different depths of a solder boss, in electronic cordwood modules. Since the solder boss is the heat source, its shape and position will affect the thermal resistance of the surrounding potting compound.

  6. The thermal resistance of flat powder-filled evacuated panels

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The need to develop high thermal resistance insulations that do not use chlorofluorocarbons has resulted in renewed interest in evacuated powder-filled panel insulations. Evacuated panels containing small diameter milled perlite or silica particles have been studied using a linear heat flow measurement technique. Thermal resistivities (R-value for one-inch of thickness) as high as 19.3 ft/sup 2//center dot/h/center dot//degree/F/Btu-in. have been observed for silica panels. Thermal measurements completed for a commercially produced evacuated panel containing perlite have shown thermal resistivities from 9.0 to 18.1 ft/sup 2//center dot/h/center dot//degree/F/Btu-in. Thermal resistance measurements have been repeated to determine changes in thermal performance with time (aging). 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  8. Measurement of clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance using a novel perspiring fabric thermal manikin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Chen, Y. S.

    2002-07-01

    Thermal manikins are necessary instruments for measuring the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of clothing systems, which are important parameters relevant to clothing thermal comfort. Although many thermal manikins have been developed since the first example in the 1940s, simulation of human perspiration in thermal manikins remains a challenge. This paper reports on a novel perspiring fabric thermal manikin, which simulates gaseous perspiration by moisture transfer through a `skin' made of a breathable fabric. The manikin has been used to measure the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistances of clothing ensembles, and demonstrated high accuracy and reproducibility.

  9. Thermal expansion compatibility of ceramic chip capacitors mounted on alumina substrates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. V.; Caruso, S. V.; Wilson, L. K.; Kinser, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of a representative sample of BaTiO3 and TiO2 ceramic chip capacitors and alumina substrates have been examined. These data have revealed large potential mechanical stresses under thermal cycling. A mathematical analysis of a composite model of the capacitor to predict the thermal expansion and modulus of elasticity and an analysis of the capacitor-substrate system to predict the magnitude of thermally induced stresses have been conducted. In all cases studied, thermally induced stresses great enough to cause capacitor body rupture or termination failure was predicted.

  10. Experimental and numerical study of the effective thermal conductivity of silica nanocomposites with thermal boundary resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, Rushabh M; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal interface resistance at the macro scale is mainly described by the physical gap between two interfaces and constriction resistance due to this gap. The small gaps between the two material faces makes up the majority of thermal interface resistance at the macro scale. So, most of the studies have been focused on characterizing effect of surface geometry and material properties to thermal interface resistance. This resistance is more widely known as thermal contact resistance, represented with Rc. There are various models to predict thermal contact resistance at macro scale. These models predict thermal resistance Rc for given two materials by utilizing their bulk thermomechanical properties. Although, Rc represents thermal resistance accurately for macro size contacts between two metals, it is not suitable to describe interface resistance of particles in modern TIMs, aka particulate composites. The particles inside recently available TIMs are micron size and with effort to further increase surface area this particle size is approaching nano scale. At this small scale, Rc does not accurately predict thermal interface, as it is very difficult to characterize the surface topography. The thermal discontinuity at perfectly bonded interface of two dissimilar materials is termed as thermal boundary resistance (Rb) or Kapitza resistance. The macroscopic assumptions that thermal discontinuity only exists due to gaps and surface geometry leads to substantial error in determining interface thermal properties at micron and nano scale. The phenomenon of thermal boundary resistance is an inherent material property and arises due to fundamental mechanism of thermal transport. For metal-matrix particulate composites, Rb plays more important role than Rc. The free flowing nature of the polymer would eliminate most of the gaps between the two materials at their interface. This means almost all of the thermal resistance at particle/matrix interface would occur due to Rb

  11. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates and Method Relating Thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Claire, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared, This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches. adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrates; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  12. Flexible and mechanical strain resistant large area SERS active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Chu, Hsiaoyun; Abell, Justin; Tripp, Ralph A.; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    We report a cost effective and facile way to synthesize flexible, uniform, and large area surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using an oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique. The flexible SERS substrates consist of 1 μm long, tilted silver nanocolumnar films deposited on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets using OAD. The SERS enhancement activity of these flexible substrates was determined using 10-5 M trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) Raman probe molecules. The in situ SERS measurements on these flexible substrates under mechanical (tensile/bending) strain conditions were performed. Our results show that flexible SERS substrates can withstand a tensile strain (ε) value as high as 30% without losing SERS performance, whereas the similar bending strain decreases the SERS performance by about 13%. A cyclic tensile loading test on flexible PDMS SERS substrates at a pre-specified tensile strain (ε) value of 10% shows that the SERS intensity remains almost constant for more than 100 cycles. These disposable and flexible SERS substrates can be integrated with biological substances and offer a novel and practical method to facilitate biosensing applications.

  13. Tensile adhesion testing of thermal spray coatings on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Berndt, C.C.; Wu, C.L.; Nakamura, T.

    1994-12-31

    The standard tensile adhesion test (TAT), ASTM C633, has been modified to perform multiple tests on flat and wide substrates. The TAT geometry which specifies a 25.4 mm (1 in.) diameter cylindrical substrate has been employed as the pull-off bar. Two renditions of this test were implemented and the Weibull moduli and characteristics tresses for both test methods obtained. The modified TAT, termed as the single bar (SB) method, yields a higher Weibull modulus and characteristic strength than the other method which is termed as the double bar (DB) method. It is expected that the different test results between the two methods arise from different stress distributions near the interface of the coating and substrate. Finite element analysis was used to obtain the stress distribution near the interface of the coating and substrate, and the relationship between the adhesion strength of the SB and DB methods were derived.

  14. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  15. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  16. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  17. Study of Substrate Preheating on Flattening Behavior of Thermal-Sprayed Copper Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Fukumoto, M.; Yasui, T.; Yamada, M.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, the effect of substrate preheating on flattening behavior of thermal-sprayed particles was systematically investigated. A part of mirror-polished AISI304 substrates were preheated to 573 and 773 K for 10 min, and then exposed to an air atmosphere for different durations of up to 48 h, respectively. Contact angle of water droplet was measured on the substrate under designated conditions. It was found that the contact angle increased gradually with the increase of substrate duration after preheating. Moreover, smaller contact angle was maintained on the substrate with higher preheating temperature. Commercially available Cu powders were thermally sprayed onto the substrates with the same thermal treatment history as contact angle measurement using atmospheric plasma-spray technique. The splat shape had a transitional changing tendency from a splash splat to a disk one on the substrate with a short duration after preheating, while reappearance of splash splat with the increase of duration was confirmed. In general, wetting of substrate surface by molten particles may dominate the flattening behavior of thermal-sprayed particles. The occurrence of desorption of adsorbed gas/condensation caused by substrate preheating likely provides good wetting. On the other hand, the poor wetting may be attributed to the re-adsorption of gas/condensation on the substrate surface with the increase of duration. In addition, the shear adhesion strength of coating fabricated on blasted AISI304 substrate was enhanced on the once-heated substrate, but weakened with the increase of duration. The changing tendency of the coating adhesion strength and the wetting of substrate by droplet corresponded quite well with each other.

  18. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ∼mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m(-1) K(-1), 359 W m(-1) K(-1), 273 W m(-1) K(-1) and 33.5 W m(-1) K(-1), respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp(2) domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the

  19. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ~mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m-1 K-1, 359 W m-1 K-1, 273 W m-1 K-1 and 33.5 W m-1 K-1, respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp2 domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the other three. This

  20. An efficient numerical technique for calculating thermal spreading resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gale, E. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a thermal spreading resistance data generation technique study are reported. The method developed is discussed in detail, illustrative examples given, and the resulting computer program is included.

  1. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Helen F; Cooper, Sarah M; Meyyappan, M; Cruden, Brett A

    2004-11-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials. PMID:15656186

  2. Thermal contact resistance in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillig, Marius; Biedermann, Thomas; Karl, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    For detailed thermal modelling of SOFC stacks, in particular research of improved thermal management, start-up and shut-down processes, thermal contact resistances (TCR) are required input parameters. These parameters are difficult to access analytically and strongly depend on temperature, geometry and material properties of the contact. Therefore, this work presents an experimental study of thermal contact resistance between different components of one SOFC stack repeating unit at varying temperatures up to typical operating temperatures (800 °C). Heat transfer rates are obtained for full repeating units, cell only, contact mesh only and sealing set-ups. Thermal interface resistances between interconnector and Ni-mesh, Ni-mesh and anode, cathode and interconnector as well as between interconnector and sealing are computed based on the measured data and provide information for numerical SOFC stack modelling.

  3. Thermal resistance of ultra-small-diameter disk microlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E. Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Savelyev, A. V.; Shostak, I. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kudashova, Yu. V.; Kulagina, M. M.; Troshkov, S. I.

    2015-05-15

    The thermal resistance of AlGaAs/GaAs microlasers of the suspended-disk type with a diameter of 1.7–4 μm and InAs/InGaAs quantum dots in the active region is inversely proportional to the squared diameter of the microdisk. The proportionality factor is 3.2 × 10{sup −3} (K cm{sup 2})/W, and the thermal resistance is 120–20°C/mW.

  4. Thermal contact resistance in a non-ideal joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roca, R. T.; Mikic, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis has been conducted to determine thermal contact resistance at interface of two heat conductors and effect of roughness of mating surfaces on pressure distribution. Investigation reveals how heat transfer resistance may be decreased or increased by changing surface properties of particular interface being considered.

  5. Bilateral substrate effect on the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Bao, Hua; Hu, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Silicene, the silicon-based counterpart of graphene, has received exceptional attention from a wide community of scientists and engineers in addition to graphene, due to its unique and fascinating physical and chemical properties. Recently, the thermal transport of the atomic thin Si layer, critical to various applications in nanoelectronics, has been studied; however, to date, the substrate effect has not been investigated. In this paper, we present our nonequilibrium molecular dynamics studies on the phonon transport of silicene supported on different substrates. A counter-intuitive phenomenon, in which the thermal conductivity of silicene can be either enhanced or suppressed by changing the surface crystal plane of the substrate, has been observed. This phenomenon is fundamentally different from the general understanding of supported graphene, a representative two-dimensional material, in which the substrate always has a negative effect on the phonon transport of graphene. By performing phonon polarization and spectral energy density analysis, we explain the underlying physics of the new phenomenon in terms of the different impacts on the dominant phonons in the thermal transport of silicene induced by the substrate: the dramatic increase in the thermal conductivity of silicene supported on the 6H-SiC substrate is due to the augmented lifetime of the majority of the acoustic phonons, while the significant decrease in the thermal conductivity of silicene supported on the 3C-SiC substrate results from the reduction in the lifetime of almost the entire phonon spectrum. Our results suggest that, by choosing different substrates, the thermal conductivity of silicene can be largely tuned, which paves the way for manipulating the thermal transport properties of silicene for future emerging applications.

  6. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Conversion of fluorocarbon dicarboxylic acid to intermediates whose terminal functional groups permit polymerization is discussed. Resulting polymers are used as fuel tank sealers for jet fuels at elevated temperatures. Stability and fuel resistance of the prototype polymers is explained.

  7. Solution-processed indium-tin-oxide nanoparticle transparent conductors on flexible glass substrate with high optical transmittance and high thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Sun-Woo; In Han, Jeong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, solution-processed transparent conductors on flexible glass substrate were investigated using indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanoparticle (NP) ink. The ITO-NP conductors were well fabricated on the flexible glass substrate with neither distortion nor deformation. Optical transmittances of the ITO-NP conductors on flexible glass substrate were enhanced to more than 91% that is higher than those on rigid glass substrate owing to decreased thickness. As well, the ITO-NP conductors on flexible glass substrate heat-treated at 500 and 600 °C showed good thermal stabilities of electrical and optical properties. In case of bending characteristics of samples heat-treated at 500 and 600 °C, the change in resistance was slight within 14%, which is smaller than those of conventional TCOs on flexible films. Based on the results, we propose that the solution-processed ITO-NP conductors are suitable for TCOs on flexible glass substrates.

  8. Significance of thermal contact resistance in two-layer thermal-barrier-coated turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of thermal contact resistance between layers in heat transfer through two layer, plasma sprayed, thermal barrier coatings applied to turbine vanes was investigated. Results obtained with a system of NiCrAlY bond and yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic show that thermal contact resistance between layers is negligible. These results also verified other studies which showed that thermal contact resistance is negligible for a different coating system of NiCr bond calcia stabilized zirconia ceramic. The zirconia stabilized ceramic thermal conductivity data scatter presented in the literature is ?20 to -10 percent about a curve fit of the data. More accurate predictions of heat transfer and metal wall temperatures are obtained when the thermal conductivity values are used at the ?20 percent level.

  9. Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

    2010-11-03

    Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

  10. Modeling the electrical resistance of gold film conductors on uniaxially stretched elastomeric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenzhe; Görrn, Patrick; Wagner, Sigurd

    2011-05-01

    The electrical resistance of gold film conductors on polydimethyl siloxane substrates at stages of uniaxial stretching is measured and modeled. The surface area of a gold conductor is assumed constant during stretching so that the exposed substrate takes up all strain. Sheet resistances are calculated from frames of scanning electron micrographs by numerically solving for the electrical potentials of all pixels in a frame. These sheet resistances agree sufficiently well with values measured on the same conductors to give credence to the model of a stretchable network of gold links defined by microcracks.

  11. Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Mattson, Brad S.; Savas, Stephen E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

  12. Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Mattson, Brad S.; Savas, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

  13. Reduced thermal resistance in AlGaN/GaN multi-mesa-channel high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Asubar, Joel T. Yatabe, Zenji; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2014-08-04

    Dramatic reduction of thermal resistance was achieved in AlGaN/GaN Multi-Mesa-Channel (MMC) high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on sapphire substrates. Compared with the conventional planar device, the MMC HEMT exhibits much less negative slope of the I{sub D}-V{sub DS} curves at high V{sub DS} regime, indicating less self-heating. Using a method proposed by Menozzi and co-workers, we obtained a thermal resistance of 4.8 K-mm/W at ambient temperature of ∼350 K and power dissipation of ∼9 W/mm. This value compares well to 4.1 K-mm/W, which is the thermal resistance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on expensive single crystal diamond substrates and the lowest reported value in literature.

  14. Pattern transfer from the e-beam resist, over the nanoimprint resist and to the final silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Howitz, S.; Richter, K.; Bartha, J. W.; Moench, J. I.

    2012-03-01

    We developed Fluor-based RIE processes to fabricate nanoimprint template in silicon and to transfer patterns from the imprint resist to the silicon substrate. The etched silicon patterns have slightly tapered and smooth sidewalls. The sidewall angle can be controlled between 85° and 90° by varying the ratio of the used gas. The dimension of the etched structures is identical with the patterns in the resist. We demonstrated line structures in silicon substrate down to 50 nm. The etching rate is over 100 nm per minute and the maximal achieved aspect ratio is more than 10.

  15. Plasmonic Heating in Au Nanowires at Low Temperatures: The Role of Thermal Boundary Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zolotavin, Pavlo; Alabastri, Alessandro; Nordlander, Peter; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-07-26

    Inelastic electron tunneling and surface-enhanced optical spectroscopies at the molecular scale require cryogenic local temperatures even under illumination-conditions that are challenging to achieve with plasmonically resonant metallic nanostructures. We report a detailed study of the laser heating of plasmonically active nanowires at substrate temperatures from 5 to 60 K. The increase of the local temperature of the nanowire is quantified by a bolometric approach and could be as large as 100 K for a substrate temperature of 5 K and typical values of laser intensity. We also demonstrate that a ∼3-fold reduction of the local temperature increase is possible by switching to a sapphire or quartz substrate. Finite element modeling of the heat dissipation reveals that the local temperature increase of the nanowire at temperatures below ∼50 K is determined largely by the thermal boundary resistance of the metal-substrate interface. The model reproduces the striking experimental trend that in this regime the temperature of the nanowire varies nonlinearly with the incident optical power. The thermal boundary resistance is demonstrated to be a major constraint on reaching low temperatures necessary to perform simultaneous inelastic electron tunneling and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies. PMID:27355238

  16. Research of surface activating influence on formation of adhesion between gas-thermal coating and steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Z.; Klimenov, V.; Zaitsev, K.

    2015-09-01

    Estimation of influence of physical and thermal activating on adhesion between steel substrates and thermal coatings has been performed. The substrates with surfaces obtained by and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation were used. To evaluate physical activating, preheating of the substrates to 600°C was performed. To evaluate the effect of thermal activating, the substrate surfaces after interfacial detachment were examined. Bonded areas on the substrate surfaces were measured by means of optical profilometry. The experiments have shown that surface physical activating is the main factor in formation of the adhesive bond between the coating and the substrate processed with the proposed methods.

  17. Vendor Capability for Low Thermal Expansion Mask Substrates for EUV Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Taylor, J S; Hector, S D; Yan, P Y; Ramamoorthy, A; Brooker, P D

    2002-04-12

    Development of manufacturing infrastructure is required to ensure a commercial source of mask substrates for the timely introduction of EUVL. Improvements to the low thermal expansion materials that compose the substrate have been made, but need to be scaled to production quantities. We have been evaluating three challenging substrate characteristics to determine the state of the infrastructure for the finishing of substrates. First, surface roughness is on track and little risk is associated with achieving the roughness requirement as an independent specification. Second, with new flatness-measuring equipment just coming on line, the vendors are poised for improvement toward the SEMI P37 flatness specification. Third, significant acceleration is needed in the reduction of defect levels on substrates. The lack of high-sensitivity defect metrology at the vendors' sites is limiting progress in developing substrates for EWL.

  18. Thermal resistance of Saccharomyces yeast ascospores in beers.

    PubMed

    Milani, Elham A; Gardner, Richard C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2015-08-01

    The industrial production of beer ends with a process of thermal pasteurization. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus are yeasts used to produce top and bottom fermenting beers, respectively. In this research, first the sporulation rate of 12 Saccharomyces strains was studied. Then, the thermal resistance of ascospores of three S. cerevisiae strains (DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, Ethanol Red(®)) and one strain of S. pastorianus (ATCC 9080) was determined in 4% (v/v) ethanol lager beer. D60 °C-values of 11.2, 7.5, 4.6, and 6.0 min and z-values of 11.7, 14.3, 12.4, and 12.7 °C were determined for DSMZ 1848, DSMZ 70487, ATCC 9080, and Ethanol Red(®), respectively. Lastly, experiments with 0 and 7% (v/v) beers were carried out to investigate the effect of ethanol content on the thermal resistance of S. cerevisiae (DSMZ 1848). D55 °C-values of 34.2 and 15.3 min were obtained for 0 and 7% beers, respectively, indicating lower thermal resistance in the more alcoholic beer. These results demonstrate similar spore thermal resistance for different Saccharomyces strains and will assist in the design of appropriate thermal pasteurization conditions for preserving beers with different alcohol contents. PMID:25996521

  19. Arrayed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators with inherent real-time feedback for actively modifying MEMS’ substrate warpage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Xiao, Dingbang; Chen, Zhihua; Wu, Xuezhong

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a batch-fabricated micro-thermal actuators array with inherent real-time self-feedback, which can be used to actively modify micro-electro-mechanical systems’ (MEMS’) substrate warpage. Arrayed polymer thermal actuators utilize SU-8 polymer (a thick negative photoresist) as a functional material with integrated Ti/Al film-heaters as a microscale heat source. The electro-thermo-mechanical response of a micro-fabricated actuator was measured. The resistance of the Al/Ti film resistor varies obviously with ambient temperature, which can be used as inherent feedback for observing real-time displacement of activated SU-8 bumps (0.43 μm Ω‑1). Due to the high thermal expansion coefficient, SU-8 bumps tend to have relatively large deflection at low driving voltage and are very easily integrated with MEMS devices. Experimental results indicated that the proposed SU-8 polymer thermal actuators (array) are able to achieve accurate rectification of MEMS’ substrate warpage, which might find potential applications for solving stress-induced problems in MEMS.

  20. Thermal stress analyses of multilayered films on substrates and cantilever beams for micro sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Luttrell, Claire Roberta; Cui, Tianhong

    2006-01-01

    Thermal stress-induced damage in multilayered films formed on substrates and cantilever beams is a major reliability issue for the fabrication and applications of micro sensors and actuators. Using closed-form predictive solutions for thermal stresses in multilayered systems, specific results are calculated for the thermal stresses in PZT/Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 film layers on Si substrates and PZT/Pt/Ti/SiO2 film layers on Si3N4 cantilever beams. When the thickness of the film layer is negligible compared to the substrate, thermal stresses in each film layer are controlled by the thermomechanical mismatch between the individual film layer and the substrate, and the modification of thermal stresses in each film layer by the presence of other film layers is insignificant. On the other hand, when the thickness of the film layer is not negligible compared to the cantilever beam, thermal stresses in each film layer can be controlled by adjusting the properties and thickness of each layer. The closed-form solutions provide guidelines for designing multilayered systems with improved reliability.

  1. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring. PMID:27263656

  2. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring.

  3. Thermal conductivities of sub-micron Bi2Te3 films sputtered on anisotropic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Shiping; Pei, Yili; Yang, Fan; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 450 nm thick Bi2Te3 films were deposited on flat Al2O3 substrate and nanochannel alumina (NCA) templates with different pore diameters through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The structure and morphology of Bi2Te3 films were investigated by x-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the thermal conductivities of the films deposited on anisotropic substrates were evaluated by micro-Raman method combined with numerical simulation and optimization conducted by COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates with discontinuous Φ20 and Φ100 nm pores and flat Al2O3 substrate were 0.80, 0.99 and 1.54 Wm‑1 K‑1, respectively. The lower thermal conductivities of Bi2Te3 films deposited on NCA templates are attributed to much smaller grain size, bottom porous layers, and rougher surfaces through analysis.

  4. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  5. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, Santosh Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4 P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.2X O.sub.24, .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-2X Y.sub.2X P.sub.6 O.sub.24 and .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-X Y.sub.X P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.X O.sub.24 wherein .phi. is either Strontium or Barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures.

  6. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-01-30

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub 2X}O{sub 24}, {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}2X}Y{sub 2X}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} and {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}X}Y{sub X}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub X}O{sub 24} wherein {phi} is either strontium or barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures. 7 figs.

  7. Thermal and radiation resistance of stabilized LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Jipa, S.; Henderson, D.; Kappel, W.; Mariş, D. A.; Mariş, M.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of capsaicin on the radiation stability of low density polyethylene was accomplished by applying the chemiluminescence procedure. The neat and modified polymer with 0.25% and 0.50% (w/w) capsaicin were exposed to γ-irradiation in air receiving 10, 20 and 30 kGy. The synergistic effect due to the presence of metallic selenium was demonstrated. The significant improvement in oxidation induction time was obtained demonstrating the efficient antioxidant activity of capsaicin in LDPE. The simultaneous protection action of metallic selenium in LDPE/capsaicin systems brought about a supplementary enhancement in the oxidation resistance of irradiated samples.

  8. Effects of substrate properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, V. P.; Suarez, F. I.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Green roofs are a sustainable urban development solution that incorporates a growing media (also known as substrate) and vegetation into infrastructures to reach additional benefits such as the reduction of: rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy utilized for cooling/heating buildings, and the heat island effect. The substrate is a key component of the green roof that allows achieving these benefits. It is an artificial soil that has an improved behavior compared to natural soils, facilitating vegetation growth, water storage and typically with smaller densities to reduce the loads over the structures. Therefore, it is important to study the effects of substrate properties on green roof performance. The objective of this study is to investigate the physical properties of four substrates designed to improve the behavior of a green roof, and to study their impact on the efficiency of a green roof. The substrates that were investigated are: organic soil; crushed bricks; a mixture of mineral soil with perlite; and a mixture of crushed bricks and organic soil. The thermal properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) were measured using a dual needle probe (Decagon Devices, Inc.) at different saturation levels, and the hydraulic properties were measured with a constant head permeameter (hydraulic conductivity) and a pressure plate extractor (water retention curve). This characterization, combined with numerical models, allows understanding the effect of these properties on the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof. Results show that substrates composed by crushed bricks improve the thermal insulation of infrastructures and at the same time, retain more water in their pores. Simulation results also show that the hydraulic and thermal behavior of a green roof strongly depends on the moisture content prior to a rainstorm.

  9. Casimir-Polder force for a polarizable molecule near a dielectric substrate out of thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the Casimir-Polder force for a molecule near the surface of a real dielectric substrate out of thermal equilibrium displays distinctive behaviors as compared to that at thermal equilibrium. In particular, when the molecule-substrate separation is much less than the molecular transition wavelength, the CP force in the high-temperature limit can be dramatically manipulated by varying the relative magnitude of the temperatures of the substrate and the environment so that the attractive-to-repulsive transition can occur beyond a certain threshold temperature of either the substrate or the environment depending on which one is higher for molecules both in the ground and excited states. More remarkably, when the separation is comparable to the wavelength, such transitions which are impossible at thermal equilibrium may happen for longitudinally polarizable molecules with a small permittivity, while for isotropically polarizable ones the transitions can even occur at room temperature for some dielectric substrates such as sapphire and graphite which is much lower than the temperature for the transition to take place in the thermal equilibrium case, thus making the experimental demonstration of such force transitions easier.

  10. Fabrication of Ohmic contact on semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate by laser thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yue; Lu, Wu-yue; Wang, Tao; Chen, Zhi-zhan

    2016-06-01

    The Ni contact layer was deposited on semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate by magnetron sputtering. The as-deposited samples were treated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and KrF excimer laser thermal annealing (LTA), respectively. The RTA annealed sample is rectifying while the LTA sample is Ohmic. The specific contact resistance (ρc) is 1.97 × 10-3 Ω.cm2, which was determined by the circular transmission line model. High resolution transmission electron microscopy morphologies and selected area electron diffraction patterns demonstrate that the 3C-SiC transition zone is formed in the near-interface region of the SiC after the as-deposited sample is treated by LTA, which is responsible for the Ohmic contact formation in the semi-insulating 4H-SiC.

  11. Targeting substrate-site in Jak2 kinase prevents emergence of genetic resistance.

    PubMed

    Kesarwani, Meenu; Huber, Erika; Kincaid, Zachary; Evelyn, Chris R; Biesiada, Jacek; Rance, Mark; Thapa, Mahendra B; Shah, Neil P; Meller, Jarek; Zheng, Yi; Azam, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of genetic resistance against kinase inhibitors poses a great challenge for durable therapeutic response. Here, we report a novel mechanism of JAK2 kinase inhibition by fedratinib (TG101348) that prevents emergence of genetic resistance. Using in vitro drug screening, we identified 211 amino-acid substitutions conferring resistance to ruxolitinib (INCB018424) and cross-resistance to the JAK2 inhibitors AZD1480, CYT-387 and lestaurtinib. In contrast, these resistant variants were fully sensitive to fedratinib. Structural modeling, coupled with mutagenesis and biochemical studies, revealed dual binding sites for fedratinib. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins showed strong affinity for the substrate-binding site (Kd = 20 nM) while affinity for the ATP site was poor (Kd = ~8 μM). Our studies demonstrate that mutations affecting the substrate-binding pocket encode a catalytically incompetent kinase, thereby preventing emergence of resistant variants. Most importantly, our data suggest that in order to develop resistance-free kinase inhibitors, the next-generation drug design should target the substrate-binding site. PMID:26419724

  12. Targeting substrate-site in Jak2 kinase prevents emergence of genetic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Meenu; Huber, Erika; Kincaid, Zachary; Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Rance, Mark; Thapa, Mahendra B.; Shah, Neil P.; Meller, Jarek; Zheng, Yi; Azam, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of genetic resistance against kinase inhibitors poses a great challenge for durable therapeutic response. Here, we report a novel mechanism of JAK2 kinase inhibition by fedratinib (TG101348) that prevents emergence of genetic resistance. Using in vitro drug screening, we identified 211 amino-acid substitutions conferring resistance to ruxolitinib (INCB018424) and cross-resistance to the JAK2 inhibitors AZD1480, CYT-387 and lestaurtinib. In contrast, these resistant variants were fully sensitive to fedratinib. Structural modeling, coupled with mutagenesis and biochemical studies, revealed dual binding sites for fedratinib. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins showed strong affinity for the substrate-binding site (Kd = 20 nM) while affinity for the ATP site was poor (Kd = ~8 μM). Our studies demonstrate that mutations affecting the substrate-binding pocket encode a catalytically incompetent kinase, thereby preventing emergence of resistant variants. Most importantly, our data suggest that in order to develop resistance-free kinase inhibitors, the next-generation drug design should target the substrate-binding site. PMID:26419724

  13. Influence of a hot and humid environment on thermal transport across the interface between a Ag thin-film line and a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Noguchi, Kyohei; Saka, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the reliability of Ag thin-film lines for a wide range of applications in electronic devices, knowledge of the thermal transport across the interface between the line and the underlying substrate is of great importance. This is because such thermal transport significantly affects the temperature distribution in the line, the electrical performance of the line and the service life of the device the line is installed on. In this work, we examine the influence of a hot and humid environment on the thermal transport across the interface between a Ag thin-film line and a substrate. By performing a series of current-stressing experiments using the four-point probe method at atmospheric conditions (296 K and 30 RH%) on a Ag thin-film line for different durations of exposure to a hot and humid environment (323 K and 90 RH%), the electrical resistivity was found to increase with the exposure duration. Such an increase is believed to be the result of a decrease in the interfacial thermal conductance, which indicates less thermal transport from the line to the substrate. Moreover, by observing the surface morphology changes in the line and conducting a one-dimensional electro-thermal analysis, such variations can be attributed to the generation and growth of voids within the line, which hinder heat transfer from the line to the substrate through the interface.

  14. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  15. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  16. Thermophysical properties of thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel substrates by photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.A.; Mandelis, A.; Farahbakhsh, B.; Lebowitz, C.; Harris, I.

    1999-09-01

    Laser infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) was used to measure the thermophysical properties (thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of various thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel. A one-dimensional photothermal model of a three-layered system in the backscattered mode was introduced and compared with experimental measurements. The uppermost layer was used to represent a roughness-equivalent layer, a second layer represented the substrate. The thermophysical parameters of thermal sprayed coatings examined in this work were obtained when a multiparameter-fit optimization algorithm was used with the backscattered PTR experimental results. The results also suggested a good method to determine the thickness of tungsten carbide and stainless-steel thermal spray coatings once the thermal physical properties are known. The ability of PTR to measure the thermophysical properties and the coating thickness has a strong potential as a method for in situ characterization of thermal spray coatings.

  17. Thermal resistance of ridge-waveguide lasers mounted upside down

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-01-05

    The heat dissipation in upside down mounted ridge-waveguide lasers equipped with a double-channel structure is analyzed by a simplified device model. Assuming an isothermal active region, the thermal resistance is obtained by means of conformal mapping. A comparison to published experimental results shows good agreement.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 178 - Thermal Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... thermal resistance capabilities of a compressed oxygen generator and the outer packaging for a cylinder of compressed oxygen or other oxidizing gas and an oxygen generator. When exposed to a temperature of 205 °C... temperature of 93 °C (199 °F) and the oxygen generator must not actuate. 2. Apparatus. 2.1Test Oven. The...

  19. Modeling of nonlinear thermal resistance in FinFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Kompala, Bala; Kushwaha, Pragya; Agarwal, Harshit; Khandelwal, Sourabh; Duarte, Juan-Pablo; Hu, Chenming; Singh Chauhan, Yogesh

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, self-consistent three-dimensional (3D) device simulations for exact analysis of thermal transport in FinFETs are performed. We analyze the temperature rise in FinFET devices with the variation in the number of fins (N fin), shape of fins and fin pitch (F pitch). We investigate that the thermal resistance R th has nonlinear dependency on N fin and F pitch. We formulate a model for thermal resistance behavior correctly with N fin and F pitch variation. The proposed formulation is implemented in industry standard Berkeley short-channel independent gate FET model for common multi-gate transistors (BSIM-CMG) and validated with both experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  20. Thermal resistance of superinsulation/foam composite panels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, normalizing for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  1. Thermal resistance of composite panels containing superinsulation and urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, adjusting for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  2. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings with improved corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, J.T.; Courtright, E.L.

    1987-02-01

    A method for limiting the ingress of corrosive species into physical vapor deposited zirconia thermal barrier coatings by inserting dense ceramic sealing layers into the usual columnar (segmented) ceramic microstructure has been examined. The concept was evaluated by sputtering a series of ZrO/sub 2/-2OY/sub 2/O/sub 3/ deposits onto In792 substrates coated with a CoCrAlY bondlayer.

  3. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy based on determination of thermal probe dynamic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bodzenta, J; Juszczyk, J; Chirtoc, M

    2013-09-01

    Resistive thermal probes used in scanning thermal microscopy provide high spatial resolution of measurement accompanied with high sensitivity to temperature changes. At the same time their sensitivity to variations of thermal conductivity of a sample is relatively low. In typical dc operation mode the static resistance of the thermal probe is measured. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the sensitivity of measurement can be improved by a factor of three by measuring the dynamic resistance of a dc biased probe superimposed with small ac current. The dynamic resistance can be treated as a complex value. Its amplitude represents the slope of the static voltage-current U-I characteristic for a given I while its phase describes the delay between the measured ac voltage and applied ac current component in the probe. The phase signal also reveals dependence on the sample thermal conductivity. Signal changes are relatively small but very repeatable. In contrast, the difference between dynamic and static resistance has higher sensitivity (the same maximum value as that of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics), and also much higher amplitude than higher harmonics. The proposed dc + ac excitation scheme combines the benefits of dc excitation (mechanical stability of probe-sample contact, average temperature control) with those of ac excitation (base-line stability, rejection of ambient temperature influence, high sensitivity, lock-in signal processing), when the experimental conditions prohibit large ac excitation. PMID:24089831

  4. Analysis of the Microstructure and Thermal Shock Resistance of Laser Glazed Nanostructured Zirconia TBCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hao, Yunfei; Wang, Hongying; Tang, Weijie

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying using the reconstituted nanosized yttria partially stabilized zirconia powder. Field emission scanning electron microscope was applied to examine the microstructure of the resulting TBCs. The results showed that the TBCs exhibited a unique, complex structure including nonmelted or partially melted nanosized particles and columnar grains. A CO2 continuous wave laser beam has been applied to laser glaze the nanostructured zirconia TBCs. The effect of laser energy density on the microstructure and thermal shock resistance of the as-glazed coatings has been systematically investigated. SEM observation indicated that the microstructure of the as-glazed coatings was very different from the microstructure of the as-sprayed nanostructured TBCs. It changed from single columnar grain to a combination of columnar grains in the fracture surface and equiaxed grains on the surface with increasing laser energy density. Thermal shock resistance tests have showed that laser glazing can double the lifetime of TBCs. The failure of the as-glazed coatings was mainly due to the thermal stress caused by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the ceramic coat and metallic substrate.

  5. SOFI/Substrate integrity testing for cryogenic propellant tanks at extreme thermal gradient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Fabian, P.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid propellant tank insulation for space flight requires low weight as well as high insulation factors. Use of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) is an accepted, cost effective technique for insulating a single wall cryogenic propellant tank and has been used extensively throughout the aerospace industry. Determining the bond integrity of the SOFI to the metallic substrate as well as its ability to withstand the in-service strains, both mechanical and thermal, is critical to the longevity of the insulation. This determination has previously been performed using highly volatile, explosive cryogens, which increases the test costs enormously, as well as greatly increasing the risk to both equipment and personnel. CTD has developed a new test system, based on a previous NASA test that simulates the mechanical and thermal strains associated with filling a large fuel tank with a cryogen. The test enables a relatively small SOFI/substrate sample to be monitored for any deformations, delaminations, or disjunctures during the cooling and mechanical straining process of the substrate, and enables the concurrent application of thermal and physical strains to two specimens at the same time. The thermal strains are applied by cooling the substrate to the desired cryogen temperature (from 4 K to 250 K) while maintaining the outside surface of the SOFI foam at ambient conditions. Multiple temperature monitoring points are exercised to ensure even cooling across the substrate, while at the same time, surface temperatures of the SOFI can be monitored to determine the heat flow. The system also allows for direct measurement of the strains in the substrate during the test. The test system as well as test data from testing at 20 K, for liquid Hydrogen simulation, will be discussed.

  6. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: Further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K.; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A.; Fernandes, Miguel X.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for HIV protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (≥6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope Vout, is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the supplemental material. PMID:19703025

  7. Toward the design of mutation-resistant enzyme inhibitors: further evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K; Lather, Viney; Schiffer, Celia A; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the usefulness of the substrate envelope concept in the analysis and prediction of drug resistance profiles for human immunodeficiency virus protease mutants. This study tests its applicability to several other therapeutic targets: Abl kinase, chitinase, thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase, and neuraminidase. For the targets where many (> or =6) mutation data are available to compute the average mutation sensitivity of inhibitors, the total volume of an inhibitor molecule that projects outside the substrate envelope V(out), is found to correlate with average mutation sensitivity. Analysis of a locally computed volume suggests that the same correlation would hold for the other targets, if more extensive mutation data sets were available. It is concluded that the substrate envelope concept offers a promising and easily implemented computational tool for the design of drugs that will tend to resist mutations. Software implementing these calculations is provided with the 'Supporting Information'. PMID:19703025

  8. Design of mutation-resistant HIV protease inhibitors with the substrate envelope hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Sripriya; Kiran Kumar Reddy, G S; Ali, Akbar; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Anjum, Saima Ghafoor; Cao, Hong; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X; Altman, Michael D; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M; Schiffer, Celia A; Gilson, Michael K

    2007-05-01

    There is a clinical need for HIV protease inhibitors that can evade resistance mutations. One possible approach to designing such inhibitors relies upon the crystallographic observation that the substrates of HIV protease occupy a rather constant region within the binding site. In particular, it has been hypothesized that inhibitors which lie within this region will tend to resist clinically relevant mutations. The present study offers the first prospective evaluation of this hypothesis, via computational design of inhibitors predicted to conform to the substrate envelope, followed by synthesis and evaluation against wild-type and mutant proteases, as well as structural studies of complexes of the designed inhibitors with HIV protease. The results support the utility of the substrate envelope hypothesis as a guide to the design of robust protease inhibitors. PMID:17539822

  9. Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, Anthony N.; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (~2 mm thick, ~10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to <5°, which was close to a value for super hydrophilic surfaces. XPS analysis indicated that the percent of elements associated with mineral in dentin/enamel or fillers in the composites increased. In addition, the percent of carbon (%C) decreased while %O increased for all four substrates. As a result, the O/C ratio increased dramatically, suggesting that new oxygen-containing polar moieties were formed on the surfaces after plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested. PMID:23755823

  10. Surface thermal stability of free-standing GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shunsuke; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Miyagawa, Reina; Eryu, Osamu; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The thermal stability of GaN surfaces was investigated with respect to homo-epitaxy on free-standing GaN substrates. Morphologies and etching rates of the GaN surfaces for free-standing polar (0001), nonpolar (10\\bar{1}0), and semipolar (20\\bar{2}1) and (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) planes were studied before and after thermal cleaning. In the case of the polar (0001) plane, polishing scratches disappeared after thermal cleaning at temperatures above 1000 °C. The surface morphology depended on not only the cleaning temperature, but also the substrate off-angle. The surface after thermal cleaning became rough for the substrate with off-angle less than 0.05°. In the case of nonpolar and semipolar planes after thermal cleaning, surface morphologies and etching rates were strongly dependent on the planes. A flat surface was maintained at cleaning temperatures up to 1100 °C for the (10\\bar{1}0) plane, but the surface of the (20\\bar{2}1) plane became rough with increasing cleaning temperature.

  11. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester.

    PubMed

    Burg, Brian R; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm(2) K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings. PMID:26724058

  12. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm{sup 2} K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.

  13. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm2 K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.

  14. Thermal and Microstructure Characterization of Zn-Al-Si Alloys and Chemical Reaction with Cu Substrate During Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berent, Katarzyna; Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    The problems associated with the corrosion of aluminum connections, the low mechanical properties of Al/Cu connections, and the introduction of EU directives have forced the potential of new materials to be investigated. Alloys based on eutectic Zn-Al are proposed, because they have a higher melting temperature (381 °C), good corrosion resistance, and high mechanical strength. The Zn-Al-Si cast alloys were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, which were performed to determine the melting temperatures of the alloys. Thermal linear expansion and electrical resistivity measurements were performed at temperature ranges of -50 to 250 °C and 25 to 300 °C, respectively. The addition of Si to eutectic Zn-Al alloys not only limits the growth of phases at the interface of liquid solder and Cu substrate but also raises the mechanical properties of the solder. Spreading test on Cu substrate using eutectic Zn-Al alloys with 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 wt.% of Si was studied using the sessile drop method in the presence of QJ201 flux. Spreading tests were performed with contact times of 1, 8, 15, 30, and 60 min, and at temperatures of 475, 500, 525, and 550 °C. After cleaning the flux residue from solidified samples, the spreadability of Zn-Al-Si on Cu was determined. Selected, solidified solder/substrate couples were cross-sectioned, and the interfacial microstructures were studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The growth of the intermetallic phase layer was studied at the solder/substrate interface, and the activation energy of growth of Cu5Zn8, CuZn4, and CuZn phases were determined.

  15. Thermal Resistance Measurements for Flexible Straps at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, G. F.; Lachner, B. F.; Lokken, O. D.; Stahl, B. L.; Crawford, L. D.

    2004-06-01

    An experimental test facility is described that is capable of accurately measuring the total thermal resistance of a flexible strap and decomposing this total resistance into components that correspond to heat transfer through each bolted interface and heat transfer by conduction through the strap. The experimental procedure, data reduction technique, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measurements are described. The thermal resistance values of conductive straps fabricated by joining many, thin copper laminations were measured. A test matrix was used to investigate several potentially important factors, including: total strap thickness, individual foil thickness, metal foil alloy, interface clamping force, interface surface finish, and the presence of indium foil in the interface. Each test was run at nominal temperatures of 35 K, 60 K, 77 K, and 110 K. The results of the testing indicate that the two most important factors that determine the thermal resistance of the flexible strap are its thickness and the presence of indium in the interface. Clamping force and surface finish are also found to be important, although less so when indium is used in the interface.

  16. Numerical simulation for thermal shock resistance of thermal protection materials considering different operating environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguo; Li, Dingyu; Wang, Ruzhuan; Fang, Daining

    2013-01-01

    Based on the sensitivities of material properties to temperature and the complexity of service environment of thermal protection system on the spacecraft, ultrahigh-temperature ceramics (UHTCs), which are used as thermal protection materials, cannot simply consider thermal shock resistance (TSR) of the material its own but need to take the external constraint conditions and the thermal environment into full account. With the thermal shock numerical simulation on hafnium diboride (HfB2), a detailed study of the effects of the different external constraints and thermal environments on the TSR of UHTCs had been made. The influences of different initial temperatures, constraint strengths, and temperature change rates on the TSR of UHTCs are discussed. This study can provide a more intuitively visual understanding of the evolution of the TSR of UHTCs during actual operation conditions. PMID:23983628

  17. The influence of thermophysical properties of an anisotropic heat-element substrate on the value of thermal emf in the stationary thermal mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Popov, P. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Sakharov, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal and thermoelectric processes in anisotropic heat elements located on substrates made of different materials have been numerically simulated. It is shown that, when an invariable heat flux passes through a heat element, the thermophysical properties of the substrate and heat transfer coefficient at its rear surface affect significantly the temperature distribution and the value of generated thermal emf.

  18. Substrate effect on thermal stability of superconductor thin films in the peritectic melting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Y; Fang, T F; Yan, S B; Yao, X; Tao, B W

    2012-05-31

    Systematic experiments were performed by in situ observation of the YBa(2)Cu(3)O(z) (Y123 or YBCO) melting. Remarkably, the superheating phenomenon was identified to exist in all commonly used YBCO thin films, that is, films deposited on MgO, LaAlO(3) (LAO), and SrTiO(3) (STO) substrates, suggesting a universal superheating mode of the YBCO film. Distinctively, YBCO/LAO films were found to possess the highest level of superheating, over 100 K, mainly attributed to the lattice match effect of LAO substrate, that is, its superior lattice fit with Y123 delaying the Y123 dissolving and inferior lattice matching with Y(2)BaCuO(5) (Y211) delaying the Y211 nucleation. Moreover, strong dependence of the thermal stability on the substrate material for Y123 films was also found to be associated with the substrate wettability by the liquid and the potential element doping from the substrate. Most importantly, the understanding of the superheating behavior is widely valid for more film/substrate constructions that have the same nature as the YBCO film/substrate. PMID:22540312

  19. Thermal resistance of perlite-based evacuated insulations for refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.; McElroy, D.L.

    1986-09-01

    The thermal resistances of two side panels which were cut from imported refrigerators and of a single, newly manufactured evacuated packet were measured using a linear heat flow technique. The panels were composites of foamed-in-place urethane surrounding perlite-filled evacuated packets. One panel contained an apparently punctured packet and was found to have a thermal resistance at 300 K in the range 0.617 to 0.950 m/sup 2/ x K/W for 2.54 cm (3.5 to 5.4 ft/sup 2/ x h x /sup 0/F/Btu for 1.0 in.). A second apparently undamaged packet had thermal resistances in the range 1.66 to 2.45 m/sup 2/ x K/W for 2.54 cm (9.4 to 13.9 ft/sup 2/ x h x /sup 0/F/Btu for 1.0 in.). The internal pressure of the undamaged packet was calculated to be in the range 100 to 1000 Pa by comparing packet thermal properties with apparent thermal conductivities, k/sub a/, obtained as a function of pressure for the perlite removed from the damaged packet. The thermal resistance for the single evacuated packet was determined by framing the packet with polyisocyanurate of known k/sub a/ and measuring heat flow across the assembly. This yielded a thermal resistance of 18.1 ft/sup 2/ x h x /sup 0/F/Btu for 1.0 in. The k/sub a/ values of two domestic perlites and the perlite removed from the punctured refrigerator packet were measured at 300 K and pressures from atmospheric down to about 5 Pa using a radial heat flow technique. Near 1 atm the k/sub a/ of fine domestic perlite at a density of 246 kg/m/sup 3/ was 5% above that of the foreign perlite at 225 kg/m/sup 3/, but the domestic product had a k/sub a/ up to 45% greater than that of the foreign product under vacuum. The mean particle diameter of the imported perlite was near 13 ..mu..m, while the mean particle diameter of the domestic product was near 21 ..mu..m.

  20. Estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of graphene: the role of graphene-substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shaina, P R; George, Lijin; Yadav, Vani; Jaiswal, Manu

    2016-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of graphene is estimated for as-grown chemical vapor deposited graphene using temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. For as-grown graphene on copper, the extent of thermal expansion mismatch between substrate and the graphene layer is significant across the entire measured temperature interval, T  =  90-300 K. This mismatch induces lattice strain in graphene. However, graphene grown on copper substrates has a unique morphology in the form of quasi-periodic nanoripples. This crucially influences the profile of the strain in the graphene membrane, which is uniaxial. An estimate of the thermal expansion coefficient of grapheme α(T) is obtained after consideration of this strain profile and after incorporating temperature-dependent Grüneisen parameter corrections. The value of α(T), is found to be negative (average value, -3.75  ×  10(-6) K(-1)) for the entire temperature range and it approaches close to zero for T  <  150 K. For graphene wet-transferred to three kinds of substrates: copper, poly-dimethylsiloxane, and SiO2/Si, the Raman shifts can largely be modeled with lattice expansion and anharmonic contributions, and the data suggests limited interfacial interaction with the substrate. PMID:26823443

  1. Estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of graphene: the role of graphene-substrate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaina, P. R.; George, Lijin; Yadav, Vani; Jaiswal, Manu

    2016-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of graphene is estimated for as-grown chemical vapor deposited graphene using temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy. For as-grown graphene on copper, the extent of thermal expansion mismatch between substrate and the graphene layer is significant across the entire measured temperature interval, T  =  90-300 K. This mismatch induces lattice strain in graphene. However, graphene grown on copper substrates has a unique morphology in the form of quasi-periodic nanoripples. This crucially influences the profile of the strain in the graphene membrane, which is uniaxial. An estimate of the thermal expansion coefficient of graphene α (T) is obtained after consideration of this strain profile and after incorporating temperature-dependent Grüneisen parameter corrections. The value of α (T) , is found to be negative (average value, -3.75  ×  10-6 K-1) for the entire temperature range and it approaches close to zero for T  <  150 K. For graphene wet-transferred to three kinds of substrates: copper, poly-dimethylsiloxane, and SiO2/Si, the Raman shifts can largely be modeled with lattice expansion and anharmonic contributions, and the data suggests limited interfacial interaction with the substrate.

  2. Thermal resistance technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of thin microporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Payo, M. C.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.

    2004-11-01

    The thermal resistance technique for measurement of the thermal conductivity of microporous thin membranes is described. A modified and enhanced Lees' disc apparatus was used. Several samples of membranes were held between a hot copper plate and a cold copper base, and the temperature differences between them were measured using thermocouples under steady-state conditions. The accuracy and reliability of the results were checked by means of a comparative test on a standard bad conductor. A dependence of the thermal resistance on the thickness of the samples was observed. The thermal conductivity of the membrane was deduced from a linear fit of the thermal resistance versus the number of membranes. Better results were obtained when the air layer effect was considered in the linear fit. Several models found in the literature and based on empirical correlations or on theoretical structure models (such as Maxwell's, Fricke's or Misra's models) were tested in order to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the membrane. These values were compared with the experimental ones and they showed a better agreement than the parallel model commonly used in the literature for the membranes studied in this work.

  3. Development of conformation independent computational models for the early recognition of breast cancer resistance protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Talevi, Alan; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  4. Thermal Catalytic Oxidation of Airborne Contaminants by a Reactor Using Ultra-Short Channel Length, Monolithic Catalyst Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Tomes, K. M.; Tatara, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Contaminated air, whether in a crewed spacecraft cabin or terrestrial work and living spaces, is a pervasive problem affecting human health, performance, and well being. The need for highly effective, economical air quality processes spans a wide range of terrestrial and space flight applications. Typically, air quality control processes rely on absorption-based processes. Most industrial packed-bed adsorption processes use activated carbon. Once saturated, the carbon is either dumped or regenerated. In either case, the dumped carbon and concentrated waste streams constitute a hazardous waste that must be handled safely while minimizing environmental impact. Thermal catalytic oxidation processes designed to address waste handling issues are moving to the forefront of cleaner air quality control and process gas decontamination processes. Careful consideration in designing the catalyst substrate and reactor can lead to more complete contaminant destruction and poisoning resistance. Maintenance improvements leading to reduced waste handling and process downtime can also be realized. Performance of a prototype thermal catalytic reaction based on ultra-short waste channel, monolith catalyst substrate design, under a variety of process flow and contaminant loading conditions, is discussed.

  5. Thermal shock and erosion resistant tantalum carbide ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, L., III; Manning, C. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic tantalum carbide artifacts with high thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance are provided by incorporating tungsten-rhenium and carbon particles in a tantalum carbide matrix. The mix is sintered by hot pressing to form the ceramic article which has a high fracture strength relative to its elastic modulus and thus has an improved thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance. The tantalum carbide is preferable less than minus 100 mesh, the carbon particles are preferable less than minus 100 mesh, and the tungsten-rhenium particles are preferable elongate, having a length to thickness ratio of at least 2/1. Tungsten-rhenium wire pieces are suitable as well as graphite particles.

  6. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  7. Experimental determination of satellite bolted joints thermal resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Basto, Jose Edson

    1990-01-01

    The thermal resistance was experimentally determined of the bolted joints of the first Brazilian satellite (SCD 01). These joints, used to connect the satellite structural panels, are reproduced in an experimental apparatus, keeping, as much as possible, the actual dimensions and materials. A controlled amount of heat is forced to pass through the joint and the difference of temperature between the panels is measured. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cooled walls, that simulates the space environment. Experimental procedures are used to avoid much heat losses, which are carefully calculated. Important observations about the behavior of the joint thermal resistance with the variation of the mean temperature are made.

  8. Reduced electrical resistivity in TiO2:Nb/ZnO:Ga film by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuji; Funaki, Shuhei; Ichiyanagi, Seiji; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Inoue, Sota

    2014-01-01

    Layered films consisting of transparent conducting oxides, Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) and Nb-doped TiO2 (TNO), were fabricated on glass substrates and their electrical properties were investigated. As-deposited TNO/GZO films showed the mean resistivity of TNO and GZO films. Thermal annealing reduced the resistivity of these films; however, TNO/GZO films exhibited the lowest value among them. The carrier concentration and Hall mobility of TNO/GZO films increased with the reduction in electrical resistivity. The thickness dependence, annealing temperature dependence, and crystalline orientation of the TNO and GZO layers in TNO/GZO films indicated that the improvement of the electrical properties of the GZO underlayer contributed to the resistivity reduction behavior of TNO/GZO films induced by thermal annealing.

  9. Very high residual resistivity ratios of heteroepitaxial superconducting niobium films on MgO substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Valderrama, E.; Bures, B.; Wilson-Elliott, K.; Zhao, Xin; Phillips, H. Larry; Valente, Anne-Marie; Spradlin, Joshua K.; Reece, Charles E.; Seo, Kang

    2011-11-01

    We report residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values (up to RRR-541) measured in thin film Nb grown on MgO crystal substrates, using a vacuum arc discharge, whose 60?160 eV Nb ions drive heteroepitaxial crystal growth. The RRR depends strongly upon substrate annealing and deposition temperatures. X-ray diffraction spectra and pole figures reveal that, as the crystal structure of the Nb film becomes more ordered, RRR increases, consistent with fewer defects or impurities in the lattice and hence longer electron mean free path. A transition from Nb(110) to purely Nb(100) crystal orientation on the MgO(100) lattice occurs at higher temperature.

  10. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal resistance in a driven two segment classical Heisenberg chain.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Debarshee

    2013-12-11

    Using computer simulation we investigate thermal transport in a two segment classical Heisenberg spin chain with nearest neighbor interaction and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The system is thermally driven by heat baths attached at the two ends and transport properties are studied using energy conserving dynamics. We demonstrate that by properly tuning the parameters thermal rectification can be achieved-the system behaves as a good conductor of heat along one direction but becomes a bad conductor when the thermal gradient is reversed, and crucially depends on nonlinearity and spatial asymmetry. Moreover, suitable tuning of the system parameters gives rise to the counterintuitive and technologically important feature known as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). We find that the crucial factor responsible for the emergence of NDTR is a suitable mechanism for impeding the current in the bulk of the system. PMID:24195913

  11. Thermally-driven structural changes of graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazauskas, A.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Grigaliūnas, V.; Guobienė, A.; Prosyčevas, I.; Narmontas, P.; Abakevičienė, B.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2014-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been recognized as an important intermediate compound for a potential low-cost large-scale graphene-like film fabrication. In this work, graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate were reduced using different thermal reduction methods, including low-temperature annealing, flame-induced and laser reduction, and the corresponding surface morphology and structural properties were investigated. These graphene oxide thermal reduction methods strongly affected surface morphology and differently facilitated structural and chemical transformations of graphene oxide. As evidenced by Raman measurements, thermal annealing and laser reduction of graphene oxide produced more ordered graphene-like structure multilayer films. However, surface morphological differences were observed and attributed to the different de-oxidation mechanisms of GO. This Letter provides an important systematic comparison between the GO reduction methods and thermally-driven structural changes they provide to the reduced GO multilayer films obtained.

  12. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  13. Method for thermally spraying crack-free mullite coatings on ceramic-based substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Heidorn, Raymond W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for depositing a mullite coating on a silicon-based material, such as those used to form articles exposed to high temperatures and including the hostile thermal environment of a gas turbine engine. The process is generally to thermally spray a mullite powder to form a mullite layer on a substrate, in which the thermal spraying process is performed so that the mullite powder absorbs a sufficient low level of energy from the thermal source to prevent evaporation of silica from the mullite powder. Processing includes deposition parameter adjustments or annealing to maintain or reestablish phase equilibrium in the mullite layer, so that through-thickness cracks in the mullite layer are avoided.

  14. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  15. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition comprising a base oxide, a primary stabilizer oxide, and at least one dopant oxide is disclosed. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. The base oxide is selected from the group consisting of zirconia and hafnia and combinations thereof. The primary stabilizing oxide is selected from the group consisting of yttria, dysprosia, erbia and combinations thereof. The dopant or group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants are selected from the group consisting of rare earth metal oxides, transitional metal oxides, alkaline earth metal oxides and combinations thereof. The dopant or dopants preferably have ionic radii different from those of the primary stabilizer and/or the base oxides.

  16. Low conductivity and sintering-resistant thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating composition is provided. The composition has a base oxide, a primary stabilizer, and at least two additional cationic oxide dopants. Preferably, a pair of group A and group B defect cluster-promoting oxides is used in conjunction with the base and primary stabilizer oxides. The new thermal barrier coating is found to have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better sintering resistance. In preferred embodiments, the base oxide is selected from zirconia and hafnia. The group A and group B cluster-promoting oxide dopants preferably are selected such that the group A dopant has a smaller cationic radius than the primary stabilizer oxide, and so that the primary stabilizer oxide has a small cationic radius than that of the group B dopant.

  17. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a "segmented" thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed "segmented" model shows more precise than the "non-segmented" model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the "segmented" model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  18. Roll-to-roll printed resistive WORM memory on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Jaakko; Mattila, Tomi; Kololuoma, Terho; Suhonen, Mika; Alastalo, Ari

    2012-08-01

    The fabrication process and the operation characteristics of a fully roll-to-roll printed resistive write-once-read-many memory on a flexible substrate are presented. The low-voltage (<10 V) write operation of the memories from a high resistivity '0' state to a low resistivity '1' state is based on the rapid electrical sintering of bits containing silver nanoparticles. The bit ink is formulated by mixing two commercially available silver nanoparticle inks in order to tune the initial square resistance of the bits and to create a self-organized network of percolating paths. The electrical performance of the memories, including read and write characteristics, is described and the long-term stability of the less stable '0' state is studied in different environmental conditions. The memories can find use in low-cost mass printing applications. PMID:22782128

  19. Effect of Residual Stress on the Wear Resistance of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.; Tillmann, W.

    2016-01-01

    The wear resistance of thermal spray coatings mainly depends on coating properties such as the microstructure, hardness, and porosity, as well as on the residual stress in the coating. The residual stress is induced by a variety of influences e.g., temperature gradients, difference of the thermal expansion coefficient of the coating/substrate materials, and the geometry of the components. To investigate the residual stress, the impulse excitation technique was employed to measure the Young's and shear moduli. The residual stress was determined by the hole-drilling method and x-ray diffraction. Pin-on-Disk and Pin-on-Tube tests were used to investigate the wear behavior. After the wear tests, the wear volume was measured by means of a 3D-profilometer. The results show that the value of the residual stress can be modified by varying the coating thickness and the substrate geometry. The compressive stress in the HVOF-sprayed WC-Co coatings has a significant positive influence on the wear resistance whereas the tensile stress has a negative effect.

  20. Magneto-transport properties of oriented Mn{sub 2}CoAl films sputtered on thermally oxidized Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. Z.; Du, Y.; Zhang, X. M.; Liu, E. K.; Wang, W. H. Wu, G. H.; Zhang, H. G.

    2014-06-16

    Spin gapless semiconductors are interesting family of materials by embracing both magnetism and semiconducting due to their unique band structure. Its potential application in future spintronics requires realization in thin film form. In this Letter, we report fabrication and transport properties of spin gapless Mn{sub 2}CoAl films prepared on thermally oxidized Si substrates by magnetron sputtering deposition. The films deposited at 673 K are well oriented to (001) direction and display a uniform-crystalline surface. Magnetotransport measurements on the oriented films reveal a semiconducting-like resistivity, small anomalous Hall conductivity, and linear magnetoresistance representative of the transport signatures of spin gapless semiconductors. The magnetic properties of the films have also been investigated and compared to that of bulk Mn{sub 2}CoAl, showing small discrepancy induced by the composition deviation.

  1. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  2. Erosion Resistance of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel WC-Co-Cr Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imeson, Chris

    Thermal spray coatings have been incorporated in oil and gas extraction efforts for many years. Recently, High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) has become increasingly incorporated where erosive environments are present. This study investigates the microstructural and mechanical properties of HVOF WC-Co-Cr coatings deposited at SharkSkin Coatings ltd. The deposited coatings exhibited a low porosity with high adhesion strength, hardness, and superior erosion resistance. In this study, a recirculating solid particle erosion testing machine was designed and fabricated to simulate an erosive environment on a laboratory scale. This study was also aimed at improving microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings by modifying the two coating deposition parameters e.g. standoff and pre-cycle heating. It was determined that pre-spray substrate heating negatively affected the coatings microstructures e.g. porosity, while reducing the stand-off distance positively influenced the coating microstructures and mechanical properties, e.g. erosion resistance.

  3. Nonvolatile resistive switching memory properties of thermally annealed titania precursor/polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanwoo; Kim, Inpyo; Shin, Hyunjung; Kim, Sanghyo; Cho, Jinhan

    2009-10-01

    We describe a novel and versatile approach for preparing resistive switching memory devices based on transition metal oxides. A titania precursor and poly(allyamine hydrochloride) (PAH) layers were deposited alternately onto platinum (Pt)-coated silicon substrates using electrostatic interactions. The multilayers were then converted to TiO2 nanocomposite (TiO2 NC) films after thermal annealing. A top electrode was coated on the TiO2 NC films to complete device fabrication. When an external bias was applied to the devices, a switching phenomenon independent of the voltage polarity (i.e., unipolar switching) was observed at low operating voltages (approximately 0.4 VRESET and 1.3 VSET), which is comparable to that observed in conventional devices fabricated by sputtering or metal organic chemical vapor deposition processes. The reported approach offers new opportunities for preparing inorganic material-based resistive switching memory devices with tailored electronic properties, allowing facile solution processing. PMID:19725555

  4. Fabrication of Al2O3/glass/Cf Composite Substrate with High Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. X.; Liu, G. S.; Ouyang, X. Q.; Wang, Y. D.; Zhang, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber with high thermal conductivity was introduced into the alumina-based composites. To avoid oriented alignment of carbon fibers (Cf) and carbothermal reactions during the sintering process, the Al2O3/glass/Cf substrate was hot-pressed under a segmental-pressure procedure at 1123 K. Experimental results show that carbon fibers randomly distribute and form a bridging structure in the matrix. The three-dimensional network of Cf in Al2O3/glass/Cf substrate brings excellent heat conducting performance due to the heat conduction by electrons. The thermal conductivity of Al2O3/30%glass/30%Cf is as high as 28.98 W mK-1, which is 4.56 times larger than that of Al2O3/30%glass.

  5. Rapid thermal processing of Czochralski silicon substrates: Defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozgonyi, G. S.; Yang, D. K.; Cao, Y. H.; Radzimski, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid thermal processing (RTP) of Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrates is discussed with its attendant effects on defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime. Preferential chemical etching and X-ray topography was used to delineate defects which were subsequently correlated with minority carrier lifetime; determined by a pulse metallo-organic decompositon (MOD) test device. The X-ray delineation of grown-in defects was enhanced by a lithium decoration procedure. Results, thus far, show excellent correlation between process-induced defects.

  6. Impact of thermal expansion of substrates on phase transition temperature of VO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Joe; Zaghrioui, Mustapha; Matsushima, Masaaki; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Okimura, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    Non-epitaxial, (010)M1-oriented VO2 thin films were grown on various substrates [amorphous SiO2, Si (001), Al2O3 (0001), and CaF2 (001)] with Pt (111)/SiO2 buffer layers. Phase transition from MoO2-type monoclinic to rutile-type tetragonal structures of these VO2 layers was investigated with temperature-controlled micro-Raman spectroscopy. It was confirmed that substrates with larger thermal expansion coefficient cause larger out-of-plane lattice spacings of both Pt and VO2, and thus lower transition temperatures of VO2 films, as a result of higher in-plane shrinkage during cooling from the deposition temperature. The transition temperatures and aM1/2 lengths, estimated from bM1 lengths, of present samples were compared with previous reports in a strain—temperature phase diagram. The present results fit with previous reports better by assuming that in-plane lattice aspect ratio of VO2 films is not clamped by the substrates but is flexible during the temperature change. Thermal expansion of substrates is an essential parameter to be taken into account when one considers device application of the phase transition properties of VO2 films, especially thick or non-epitaxial.

  7. Dehydrothyrsiferol does not modulate multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 resistance: a functional screening system for MRP1 substrates.

    PubMed

    Pec, Martina K; Aguirre, Amable; Fernández, Javier J; Souto, Maria L; Dorta, Javier F; Villar, Jesús

    2002-11-01

    We had shown previously that the novel, marine, anticancer compound dehydrothyrsiferol (DHT) does not modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) dependent drug efflux. Many chemotherapeutics with clinical impact are substrates for the structurally distant related membrane transport protein MRP1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1). Thus, we were interested in analysing the behaviour of DHT and control compounds in specific drug transport of MRP1 overexpressing cells. We established a fluorescence based drug efflux system for specific, functional detection of interference of a test compound in MRP1 mediated drug extrusion. Briefly, MRP1 overexpressing HL60/Adr cells were incubated to uptake and then efflux fluorescent 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA), rhodamine 123 (Rh123), or 3,3-diethylocarbocyanine iodide (DiOC2), respectively. Changes in cell fluorescence intensity after coincubation with the compound of interest were determined by flow cytometry. MRP1 mediated efflux of CFDA was analysed in the presence of DHT, the known substrates genistein, probenecid, and the specific inhibitor MK-571. To exclude unknown P-gp related interference in drug transport, efflux of the fluorescent P-gp substrate DiOC2 and specific inhibition by cyclosporin A (CsA) were analysed. Cytotoxicity of DHT in resistant HL60/Adr cells was found to be even superior to that in the parental HL60 leukaemia cell line. Consequently, DHT did not interfere in MRP1 mediated drug transport. In contrast to DiOC2, rhodamine 123 was not specifically effluxed by P-gp but also by MRP1. Therefore, we propose the MRP1 specific CFDA efflux model as a screening and/or excluding system for MRP1 substrates. Together with previous data our results suggest DHT to be an interesting candidate for further investigation directed towards a drug development regimen. PMID:12373300

  8. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  9. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kany, A. M. I.; El-Gohary, M. I.; Kamal, S. M.

    1994-07-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barries of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure.

  10. A Novel Substrate-Based HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor Drug Resistance Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nijhuis, Monique; van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Lastere, Stephane; Schipper, Pauline; Coakley, Eoin; Glass, Bärbel; Rovenska, Mirka; de Jong, Dorien; Chappey, Colombe; Goedegebuure, Irma W; Heilek-Snyder, Gabrielle; Dulude, Dominic; Cammack, Nick; Brakier-Gingras, Lea; Konvalinka, Jan; Parkin, Neil; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Boucher, Charles A. B

    2007-01-01

    Background HIV protease inhibitor (PI) therapy results in the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants harbouring one or two substitutions in the viral protease. To combat PI resistance development, two approaches have been developed. The first is to increase the level of PI in the plasma of the patient, and the second is to develop novel PI with high potency against the known PI-resistant HIV protease variants. Both approaches share the requirement for a considerable increase in the number of protease mutations to lead to clinical resistance, thereby increasing the genetic barrier. We investigated whether HIV could yet again find a way to become less susceptible to these novel inhibitors. Methods and Findings We have performed in vitro selection experiments using a novel PI with an increased genetic barrier (RO033-4649) and demonstrated selection of three viruses 4- to 8-fold resistant to all PI compared to wild type. These PI-resistant viruses did not have a single substitution in the viral protease. Full genomic sequencing revealed the presence of NC/p1 cleavage site substitutions in the viral Gag polyprotein (K436E and/or I437T/V) in all three resistant viruses. These changes, when introduced in a reference strain, conferred PI resistance. The mechanism leading to PI resistance is enhancement of the processing efficiency of the altered substrate by wild-type protease. Analysis of genotypic and phenotypic resistance profiles of 28,000 clinical isolates demonstrated the presence of these NC/p1 cleavage site mutations in some clinical samples (codon 431 substitutions in 13%, codon 436 substitutions in 8%, and codon 437 substitutions in 10%). Moreover, these cleavage site substitutions were highly significantly associated with reduced susceptibility to PI in clinical isolates lacking primary protease mutations. Furthermore, we used data from a clinical trial (NARVAL, ANRS 088) to demonstrate that these NC/p1 cleavage site changes are associated with

  11. Thermal resistance at a solid/superfluid helium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiere, Aymeric; Volz, Sebastian; Amrit, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Kapitza in 1941 discovered that heat flowing across a solid in contact with superfluid helium (<2 K) encounters a strong thermal resistance at the interface. Khalatnikov demonstrated theoretically that this constitutes a general phenomenon related to all interfaces at all temperatures, given the dependence of heat transmission on the acoustic impedance (sound velocity × density) of each medium. For the solid/superfluid interface, the measured transmission of heat is almost one hundred times stronger than the Khalatnikov prediction. This discrepancy could be intuitively attributed to diffuse scattering of phonons at the interface but, despite several attempts, a detailed quantitative comparison between theoretical and experimental findings to explain the occurrence of scattering and its contribution to heat transmission had been lacking. Here we show that when the thermal wavelength λ of phonons of the less dense medium (liquid 4He) becomes comparable to the r.m.s. surface roughness σ, the heat flux crossing the interface is amplified; in particular when σ ~ 0.33λ, a spatial resonant mechanism occurs, as proposed by Adamenko and Fuks. We used a silicon single crystal whose surface roughness was controlled and characterized. The thermal boundary resistance measurements were performed from 0.4 to 2 K at different superfluid pressures ranging from saturated vapour pressure (SVP) to above 4He solidification, to eliminate all hypothetical artefact mechanisms. Our results demonstrate the physical conditions necessary for resonant phonon scattering to occur at all interfaces, and therefore constitute a benchmark in the design of nanoscale devices for heat monitoring.

  12. Laser-resistance sensitivity to substrate pit size of multilayer coatings

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Wang, Hu; Xing, Huanbin; Cui, Yun; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond laser-resistance to dielectric multilayer coatings on substrate pits was examined with respect to the electric-field (E-field) enhancement and mechanical properties. The laser-induced damage sensitivity to the shape of the substrate pits has not been directly investigated through experiments, thus preventing clear understanding of the damage mechanism of substrate pits. We performed a systematic and comparative study to reveal the effects of the E-field distributions and localized stress concentration on the damage behaviour of coatings on substrates with pits. To obtain reliable results, substrate pits with different geometries were fabricated using a 520-nm femtosecond laser-processing platform. By using the finite element method, the E-field distribution and localized stress of the pitted region were well simulated. The 1064-nm damage morphologies of the coated pit were directly compared with simulated E-field intensity profiles and stress distributions. To enable further understanding, a simplified geometrical model was established, and the damage mechanism was introduced. PMID:27252016

  13. Laser-resistance sensitivity to substrate pit size of multilayer coatings.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Wang, Hu; Xing, Huanbin; Cui, Yun; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond laser-resistance to dielectric multilayer coatings on substrate pits was examined with respect to the electric-field (E-field) enhancement and mechanical properties. The laser-induced damage sensitivity to the shape of the substrate pits has not been directly investigated through experiments, thus preventing clear understanding of the damage mechanism of substrate pits. We performed a systematic and comparative study to reveal the effects of the E-field distributions and localized stress concentration on the damage behaviour of coatings on substrates with pits. To obtain reliable results, substrate pits with different geometries were fabricated using a 520-nm femtosecond laser-processing platform. By using the finite element method, the E-field distribution and localized stress of the pitted region were well simulated. The 1064-nm damage morphologies of the coated pit were directly compared with simulated E-field intensity profiles and stress distributions. To enable further understanding, a simplified geometrical model was established, and the damage mechanism was introduced. PMID:27252016

  14. Laser-resistance sensitivity to substrate pit size of multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yingjie; Zhu, Meiping; Wang, Hu; Xing, Huanbin; Cui, Yun; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond laser-resistance to dielectric multilayer coatings on substrate pits was examined with respect to the electric-field (E-field) enhancement and mechanical properties. The laser-induced damage sensitivity to the shape of the substrate pits has not been directly investigated through experiments, thus preventing clear understanding of the damage mechanism of substrate pits. We performed a systematic and comparative study to reveal the effects of the E-field distributions and localized stress concentration on the damage behaviour of coatings on substrates with pits. To obtain reliable results, substrate pits with different geometries were fabricated using a 520-nm femtosecond laser-processing platform. By using the finite element method, the E-field distribution and localized stress of the pitted region were well simulated. The 1064-nm damage morphologies of the coated pit were directly compared with simulated E-field intensity profiles and stress distributions. To enable further understanding, a simplified geometrical model was established, and the damage mechanism was introduced.

  15. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  16. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  17. Vacuum thermal switch made of phase transition materials considering thin film and substrate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Basu, Soumyadipta; Wang, Liping

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, we theoretically demonstrate a vacuum thermal switch based on near-field thermal radiation between phase transition materials, i.e., vanadium dioxide (VO2), whose phase changes from insulator to metal at 341 K. Strong coupling of surface phonon polaritons between two insulating VO2 plates significantly enhances the near-field heat flux, which on the other hand is greatly reduced when the VO2 emitter becomes metallic, resulting in strong thermal switching effect. Fluctuational electrodynamics incorporated with anisotropic wave propagation predicts more than 80% heat transfer reduction at sub-30-nm vacuum gaps and 50% at vacuum gap of 1 μm. Furthermore, the penetration depth inside the uniaxial VO2 insulator is studied at the vacuum gap of 50 nm, suggesting the possible impact of reduced VO2 thickness on the near-field thermal radiation with thin-film structures. By replacing the bulk VO2 receiver with a thin film of several tens of nanometers, the switching effect is further improved over a broad range of vacuum gaps from 10 nm to 1 μm. Finally, the effect of SiO2 substrate for the thin-film emitter or receiver is also considered to provide insights for future experimental demonstrations. By controlling heat flow with near-field radiative transport, the proposed vacuum thermal switch would find practical applications for energy dissipation in microelectronic devices and for the realization of thermal circuits.

  18. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  19. Influence of surface character change of substrate due to heating on flattening behavior of thermal sprayed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, M.; Nagai, H.; Yasui, T.

    2006-12-01

    The authors have confirmed that in the thermal spraying of practical powder materials, the splat shape changes with increasing substrate temperature to a circular disk shape from a fringe shape with splashing at a critical substrate temperature, T t. The increase of the substrate temperature may accompany a kind of essential change on the substrate surface, because the effect is maintained until the substrate is cooled down to room temperature. However, the nature of the substrate surface change due to the heating has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, AISI 304 stainless steel was used as a substrate material, and the substrate was heated in an air at mosphere or laser treated as a pretreatment. Substrate surface topography in nanometer scale was analyzed precisely by atomic force microscope (AFM). The relationship between surface topography in nanometer scale and splat morphology was discussed. Moreover, to evaluate the effect of chemical composition of the substrate surface, gold was coated onto the substrate surface by physical vapor deposition (PVD) after the heat treatment. The effect of adsorbate/condensate on the substrate surface on the flattening behavior of thermal sprayed particles was also verified.

  20. Submerged Arc Stainless Steel Strip Cladding—Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Thermal Fatigue Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, I. C.; Chou, C. P.; Tseng, C. F.; Lee, I. K.

    2009-03-01

    Two types of martensitic stainless steel strips, PFB-132 and PFB-131S, were deposited on SS41 carbon steel substrate by a three-pass submerged arc cladding process. The effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on thermal fatigue resistance and hardness were evaluated by thermal fatigue and hardness testing, respectively. The weld metal microstructure was investigated by utilizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that, by increasing the PWHT temperature, hardness decreased but there was a simultaneous improvement in weldment thermal fatigue resistance. During tempering, carbide, such as (Fe, Cr)23C6, precipitated in the weld metals and molybdenum appeared to promote (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 formation. The precipitates of (Fe, Cr, Mo)23C6 revealed a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure with fine grains distributed in the microstructure, thereby effectively increasing thermal fatigue resistance. However, by adding nickel, the AC1 temperature decreased, causing a negative effect on thermal fatigue resistance.

  1. Thermal fatigue resistance of cobalt-modified UDIMET 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of comparative thermal fatigue resistances of five cobalt composition modifications of UDIMET 700 from fluidized bed tests is described. Cobalt compositional levels of 0.1, 4.3, 8.6, 12.8, 17.0 percent were being investigated in both the bare and coated (NiCrAlY overlay) conditions. Triplicate tests of each variation including duplicate tests of three control alloys are under investigation. Fluidized beds were maintained at 550 and 1850 F for the first 5500 cycles at which time the hot bed was increased to 1922 F. Immersion time in each bed is always 3 minutes. Upon the completion of 10,000 cycles, it appears that the 8.6 percent cobalt level gives the best thermal fatigue life. Considerable deformation of the test bars was observed.

  2. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  3. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  4. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  5. Surface preparation and thermal spray in a single step: The PROTAL process—Example of application for an aluminum-base substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddet, C.; Montavon, G.; Ayrault-Costil, S.; Freneaux, O.; Rigolet, F.; Barbezat, G.; Folio, F.; Diard, A.; Wazen, P.

    1999-06-01

    Thermal spray techniques can fulfill numerous industrial applications. Coatings are thus applied to resist wear and corrosion or to modify the surface characteristics of the substrate (e.g., thermal conductivity/thermal insulation). However, many of these applications remain inhibited by some deposit characteristics, such as a limited coating adhesion or pores or by industrial costs because several nonsynchronized and sequential steps (that is, degreasing, sand blasting, and spraying) are needed to manufacture a deposit. The PROTAL process was designed to reduce the aforementioned difficulties by implementing simultaneously a Q-switched laser and a thermal spray torch. The laser irradiation is primarily aimed to eliminate the contamination films and oxide layers, to generate a surface state enhancing the deposit adhesion, and to limit the contamination of the deposited layers by condensed vapors. From PROTAL arises the possibility to reduce, indeed suppress, the preliminary steps of degreasing and grit blasting. In this study, the benefits of the PROTAL process were investigated, comparing adhesion of different atmospheric plasma spray coatings (e.g., metallic and ceramic coatings) on an aluminum-base substrate. Substrates were coated rough from the machine shop, for example, manipulated barehanded and without any prior surface preparation. Results obtained this way were compared with those obtained using a classical procedure; that is, degreasing and grit blasting prior to the coating deposition.

  6. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 1. Determination of soil thermal stability and other soil thermal properties. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is, in turn, a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year-to-year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: (1) development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; (2) recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and (3) development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. This volume discussed methods for determining the thermal properties of soils. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  7. The Mixed Processing Models Development Of Thermal Fracture And Laser Ablation On Glass Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Hong; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Hwang, Chi-Hung

    2011-01-01

    As the industries of cell phone and LCD TV were vigorously flourishing and the manufacturing requirements for LCD glass substrate were getting higher, the thermal fracture cutting technology (TFCT) has progressively become the main technology for LCD glass substrate cutting. Due to using laser as the heat source, the TFCT has many advantages, such as uniform heating, small heat effect zone, and high cutting speed, smooth cutting surface and low residual stress, etc. Moreover, a general laser ablation processing or traditional diamond wheel cutting does not have the last two advantages. The article presents a mixed processing of glass substrate, which consists of TFCT and laser ablation mechanisms, and how to enhance the cutting speed with little ablation laser energy. In this study, a 10W Nd:YAG laser and a 40W CO2 laser are used as the heat source of TFCT and laser ablation processing, respectively. The result indicates that the speed of the mixed processing is more than twice the speed of TFCT. Furthermore, after the mixed processing, the residual stresses in the glass substrates are also smaller.

  8. Fundamentals of planar-type inductively coupled thermal plasmas on a substrate for large-area material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tial, Mai Kai Suan; Irie, Hiromitsu; Maruyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of planar-type Ar inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTPs) with oxygen molecular gas on a substrate have been studied. Previously, aiming at large-area material processing, we developed a planar-type ICTP torch with a rectangular quartz vessel instead of a conventional cylindrical tube. For the adoption of such planar-type ICTP to material processing, it is necessary to sustain the ICTP with molecular gases on a substrate stably and uniformly. To determine the uniformity of the ICTP formed on the substrate, spectroscopic observation was carried out at 3 mm above the substrate. Results showed that the radiation intensities of specified O atomic lines were almost uniformly detected along the surface of the substrate. This means that excited O atoms, which are important radicals for thermal plasma oxidation, are present in the planar-type ICTP uniformly on the substrate.

  9. Process for producing a well-adhered durable optical coating on an optical plastic substrate. [abrasion resistant polymethyl methacrylate lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A low temperature plasma polymerization process is described for applying an optical plastic substrate, such as a polymethyl methacrylate lens, with a single layer abrasive resistant coating to improve the durability of the plastic.

  10. Mechanically robust, thermally stable, broadband antireflective, and superhydrophobic thin films on glass substrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ligang; Geng, Zhi; He, Junhui; Zhou, Gang

    2014-06-25

    In this study, we developed a simple and versatile strategy to fabricate hierarchically structured lotus-leaf-like superhydrophobic thin films. The thin films are broadband antireflective, and the average transmittance of coated glass substrates reached greater than 95% in the wavelength range of 530-1340 nm, in contrast to 92.0% for bare glass substrate. The thin film surface shows a static water contact angle of 162° and a sliding angle less than 4°. Moreover, the thin film is thermally stable up to 300 °C, and shows remarkable stability against strong acid, strong alkali, water drop impact, and sand impact abrasion, while retaining its superhydrophobicity. Further, the thin film can pass the 3H pencil hardness test. The current approach may open a new avenue to a variety of practical applications, including windshields, eyeglasses, windows of high rise buildings and solar cells, etc. PMID:24848810

  11. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  12. Preparation and modification of VO2 thin film on R-sapphire substrate by rapid thermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nai-Wei; Hu, Ming; Xia, Xiao-Xu; Wei, Xiao-Ying; Liang, Ji-Ran

    2014-04-01

    The VO2 thin film with high performance of metal-insulator transition (MIT) is prepared on R-sapphire substrate for the first time by magnetron sputtering with rapid thermal process (RTP). The electrical characteristic and THz transmittance of MIT in VO2 film are studied by four-point probe method and THz time domain spectrum (THz-TDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and search engine marketing (SEM) are employed to analyze the crystalline structure, valence state, surface morphology of the film. Results indicate that the properties of VO2 film which is oxidized from the metal vanadium film in oxygen atmosphere are improved with a follow-up RTP modification in nitrogen atmosphere. The crystallization and components of VO2 film are improved and the film becomes compact and uniform. A better phase transition performance is shown that the resistance changes nearly 3 orders of magnitude with a 2-°C hysteresis width and the THz transmittances are reduced by 64% and 60% in thermal and optical excitation respectively.

  13. Characterization of the mechanical and thermal interface of copper films on carbon substrates modified by boron based interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, D.; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C.; Chirtoc, Mihai; Kijamnajsuk, P.; Kornfeind, N.; Hutter, H.; Neubauer, E.; Kitzmantel, M.

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of mechanical and thermal interfaces is essential for the design of modern composites. Amongst these are copper carbon composites which can exhibit excellent heat conductivities if the Cu/C interface is affected by a suitable interlayer to minimize the Thermal Contact Resistance (TCR) and to maximize the adhesion strength between Cu and C. In this paper we report on the effect of boron based interlayers on wetting, mechanical adhesion and on the TCR of Cu coatings deposited on glassy carbon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The interlayers were 5 nm thick and consisted of pure B and B with additions of the carbide forming metals Mo, Ti and Cr in the range of 5 at.% relative to B. The interlayers were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering from either a pure B target or from a composite target. The interlayer composition was checked by Auger Electron Spectroscopy and found to be homogenous within the whole film. The system C-substrate/interlayer/Cu coating was characterized in as deposited samples and samples heat treated for 30 min at 800 °C under High Vacuum (HV), which mimics typical hot pressing parameters during composite formation. Material transport during heat treatment was investigated by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The de-wetting and hole formation in the Cu coating upon heat treatment were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The adhesion of the Cu coating was evaluated by mechanical pull-off testing. The TCR was assessed by infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR). A correlation between the adhesion strength and the value of the TCR which was measured by PTR was determined for as deposited as well as for heat treated samples. PMID:22241938

  14. Characterization of the mechanical and thermal interface of copper films on carbon substrates modified by boron based interlayers.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, D; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C; Chirtoc, Mihai; Kijamnajsuk, P; Kornfeind, N; Hutter, H; Neubauer, E; Kitzmantel, M

    2011-03-15

    The manipulation of mechanical and thermal interfaces is essential for the design of modern composites. Amongst these are copper carbon composites which can exhibit excellent heat conductivities if the Cu/C interface is affected by a suitable interlayer to minimize the Thermal Contact Resistance (TCR) and to maximize the adhesion strength between Cu and C.In this paper we report on the effect of boron based interlayers on wetting, mechanical adhesion and on the TCR of Cu coatings deposited on glassy carbon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The interlayers were 5 nm thick and consisted of pure B and B with additions of the carbide forming metals Mo, Ti and Cr in the range of 5 at.% relative to B. The interlayers were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering from either a pure B target or from a composite target. The interlayer composition was checked by Auger Electron Spectroscopy and found to be homogenous within the whole film.The system C-substrate/interlayer/Cu coating was characterized in as deposited samples and samples heat treated for 30 min at 800 °C under High Vacuum (HV), which mimics typical hot pressing parameters during composite formation. Material transport during heat treatment was investigated by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The de-wetting and hole formation in the Cu coating upon heat treatment were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The adhesion of the Cu coating was evaluated by mechanical pull-off testing. The TCR was assessed by infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR). A correlation between the adhesion strength and the value of the TCR which was measured by PTR was determined for as deposited as well as for heat treated samples. PMID:22241938

  15. Multiferroic YCrO3 thin films grown on glass substrate: Resistive switching characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Son, Jong Yeog

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline YCrO3 thin films were deposited on (111) Pt/Ta/glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The YCrO3 thin films exhibited good ferroelectric properties with remnant polarization of about 5 µC/cm2. Large leakage current was observed by I- V curve and ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The YCrO3 resistive random access memory (RRAM) capacitor showed unipolar switching behaviors with SET and RESET voltages higher than those of general NiO RRAM capacitors. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Anomalous thermally induced pinning of a liquid drop on a solid substrate.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Srinivas; Kanungo, Mandakini; Law, Kock-Yee

    2013-08-27

    The effect of substrate temperature on the wetting and spreading behavior of a UV ink monomer has been studied as a surrogate for the ink on four different substrates: DTC (digital top coat)-coated BOPP (biaxial oriented polypropylene), Flexo-coated BOPP, DTC-coated SGE (semigloss elite) paper, and Flexo-coated SGE paper. Results show that the dynamic contact angles of the monomer decrease exponentially over time after contacting the surface, and the rate of spreading is consistently higher at 95 °C than at 22 °C. This observation indicates that spreading is controlled by the viscosity of the monomer as it decreases with temperature. An anomalous temperature effect is observed for the static contact angle on the DTC-coated BOPP substrate. The static contact angle at 95 °C is significantly larger than that at 22 °C (52° versus 30°). This is counterintuitive, as the surface tension of the monomer is shown to decease with increasing temperature. Microscopy (SEM and AFM) studies suggest that there is little interaction between the DTC coating solution and the BOPP substrate during the fast-drying coating process. This results in a smooth coated surface and, more importantly, voids between the BOPP nanofibers underneath the DTC coating. As the DTC-BOPP substrate is heated to 95 °C, fiber expansions occur. Microscopy results show that nanosized protrusions are formed on the DTC surface. We attribute it to fiber expansions in the vertical direction. Fiber expansions in the lateral direction causes little surface morphology change as the expanded materials only fill the voids laterally between the nanofiber network. We suggest that the protrusions on the surface create strong resistance to the wetting process and pin the monomer drop into a metastable wetting state. This interpretation is supported by the sliding angle and sessile drop height experiments. PMID:23899384

  17. Thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-traditional/non-planar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsifer, Drew Patrick

    Conformal thin films have a wide variety of uses in the microelectronics, optics, and coatings industries. The ever-increasing capabilities of these conformal thin films have enabled tremendous technological advancement in the last half century. During this period, new thin-film deposition techniques have been developed and refined. While these techniques have remarkable performance for traditional applications which utilize planar substrates such as silicon wafers, they are not suitable for the conformal coating of non-traditional substrates such as biological material. The process of thermally evaporating a material under vacuum conditions is one of the oldest thin-film deposition techniques which is able to produce functional film morphologies. A drawback of thermally evaporated thin films is that they are not intrinsically conformal. To overcome this, while maintaining the advantages of thermal evaporation, a procedure for varying the substrates orientation with respect to the incident vapor flux during deposition was developed immediately prior to the research undertaken for this doctoral dissertation. This process was shown to greatly improve the conformality of thermally evaporated thin films. This development allows for several applications of thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-planar/non-traditional substrates. Three settings in which to evaluate the improved conformal deposition of thermally evaporated thin films were investigated for this dissertation. In these settings the thin-film morphologies are of different types. In the first setting, a bioreplication approach was used to fabricate artificial visual decoys for the invasive species Agrilus planipennis, commonly known as the emerald ash borer (EAB). The mating behavior of this species involves an overflying EAB male pouncing on an EAB female at rest on an ash leaflet before copulation. The male spots the female on the leaflet by visually detecting the iridescent green color of the

  18. Superhydrophobic surface fabricated on iron substrate by black chromium electrodeposition and its corrosion resistance property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Feng, Haitao; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on iron substrate is carried out through 20 min black chromium electrodeposition, followed by immersing in 0.05 M ethanolic stearic acid solution for 12 h. The resultant superhydrophobic complex film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), disperse Spectrometer (EDS), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle (CA), sliding angle (SA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and its corrosion resistance property is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the fabricated superhydrophobic film has excellent water repellency (CA, 158.8°; SA, 2.1°) and significantly high corrosion resistance (1.31 × 106 Ω cm-2) and excellent corrosion protection efficiency (99.94%).

  19. Analysis of Parameter Estimation Possibilities of the Thermal Contact Resistance Using the Laser Flash Method with Two-Layer Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czél, Balázs; Woodbury, Keith A.; Woolley, Jonathan; Gróf, Gyula

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents a curve-fitting-based calculation of the thermal contact resistance and other parameters (absorbed energy and material properties) from laser flash measurements considering a two-layer specimen (aluminum substrate and stainless-steel film). Sensitivity analysis of different cases was used to examine the sensitivities of the unknown parameters: thermal contact resistance, absorbed energy, specific heat of the film, and thermal conductivity of the film. A nonlinear curve-fitting method was applied to perform the estimation of the unknown parameters using simulated measurements generated by the solution of the direct problem. An extensive analysis was performed to examine which parameters might be estimated simultaneously with the contact resistance for different noise levels of the simulated measurement. It was concluded that in the noiseless case all four unknown parameters can be estimated simultaneously with high accuracy. The noise has a significant effect on the accuracy of the parameter estimation, but even when a reasonable noise level is present, it is still possible to accurately estimate one or two parameters together with the thermal contact resistance.

  20. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Borom, Marcus Preston

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  1. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    PubMed

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (<12h) had a positive effect on the AD process. The highest enhancement of the biomethane production with an increase by 44-46% was achieved with a thermophilic pretreatment at 50°C for 6-12h or a thermal pretreatment at 80°C for 1.5h. Thermophilic pretreatments at higher temperatures (>55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment. PMID:26272711

  2. Thermal transport across graphene/SiC interface: effects of atomic bond and crystallinity of substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Zhang, Jingchao; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interatomic interaction between graphene and 4H-SiC on their interfacial thermal transport is investigated by empirical molecular dynamics simulation. Two magnitudes of interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) improvement are observed for graphene/4H-SiC interface interacting through covalent bonds than through van der Waals interaction, which can be explained by the bond strength and the number of covalent bonds. Besides, it is found that the ITC of covalent graphene/C-terminated SiC is larger than that Si-terminated SiC, which is due to the stronger bond strength of C-C than that of C-Si. The effect of crystallinity of the substrate is studied, and the result shows that the ITC of graphene/a-SiC is higher than that of graphene/c-SiC. These results are crucial to the understanding of thermal transport across graphene interfaces, which are useful for thermal design in graphene-based transistors.

  3. Thermal fatigue resistance of H13 steel treated by selective laser surface melting and CrNi alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xin; Dai, Ming-jiang; Zhang, Zhi-hui

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the selective laser surface melting and laser surface alloying technologies were adopted to improve the thermal fatigue resistance of medium carbon hot-work die steel (H13) by a CO2 laser. Two kinds of mixed chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) powders were used as the laser alloying materials, and the effects of the mixing ratio on the thermal fatigue resistance were investigated thoroughly. Some important results such as cross-sectional morphology, phases, hardness and thermal fatigue behavior were analyzed and evaluated. It indicates that the laser surface alloying technique using mixed powder with ratio of 75%Cr-25%Ni can considerably enhance the thermal fatigue resistance of the H13 steel. The laser alloyed zone has excellent properties such as preventing crack initiation and oxidation corrosion compared with original H13. Thermal cracking and oxidation corrosion that occurred at substrate surface can be surrounded and intercepted by a gridded laser strengthened structure. Therefore, the naturally developed cracks could be effectively prevented. Theses results and analysis show that laser surface technique can be positively used to improve surface mechanical properties of H13 dies.

  4. Effect of headgroup-substrate interactions on the thermal behavior of long-chain amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Saranshu; Zhu, He; Dhinojwala, Ali

    The structure of amphiphilic molecules at liquid/solid and solid/solid interfaces is relevant in understanding lubrication, colloid stabilization, chromatography, and nucleation. Here, we characterize the interfacial structures of long chain amphiphilic molecules with different head groups (OH, COOH, NH2) using interface-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The behavior of these self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sapphire substrate is recorded in situ as a function of temperature (above and below bulk Tm) using SFG. Previous studies using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and SFG show that the melting point of an ordered hexadecanol monolayer is around 30°C above its bulk Tm. The thermal stability of the monolayer is explained due to strong hydrogen bonding interactions between the head-group and the sapphire substrate. The strength of these hydrogen-bonding interactions between substrate and different head groups is calculated using the Badger-Bauer equation. Below Tm, the ordered monolayer influenced the structure of the interfacial crystalline layer, and the transition from monolayer to the bulk crystalline phases. The results with different head groups will be presented.

  5. Response of wetland herbaceous communities to gradients of light and substrate following disturbance by thermal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunn, Christopher P.; Scott, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of thermal disturbance and site characteristics on distribution of herbs was studied in portions of a 3020 ha wetland in the southeastern USA. Presence-absence of 52 species in 130 0.25 m2 plots was determined from four sites with different disturbance histories and from an undisturbed site. Data from the four disturbed sites were ordinated by detrended correspondence analysis. Differences in species composition among sites (coarse scale) were associated with water depth, light, and substrate type. Within a site (at a fine scale), correlation of environmental variables with ordination scores at a chronically disturbed site was weakly correlated with light (r=0.50). At two sites with episodic disturbance, species composition correlated significantly and positively with substrate and water depth. At a recovering site, vegetation patterns were moderately correlated with water depth (r=−0.52). Species richness was correlated with substrate type along the disturbance gradient. Our results are consistent the intermediate disturbance hypothesis and the subsidy-stress gradient concept.

  6. Wear resistance of composite coatings produced by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Klinskaya, N.A.

    1995-12-31

    Injection of refractory additions (carbides, borides, oxides etc.) into self-fluxing alloys is a well-known technique for their hardening. Nevertheless the matter of influence of refractory components on the structure and characteristics of composite coatings is not studied well enough. This paper presents the results of investigations of gas thermal coatings (plasma and detonation ones) on the base of stellite with refractory components in the form of borides such as CrB{sub 2}, TiB{sub 2}, (TiCr)B{sub 2}. This study is concerned with the influence of refractory additions (carbides, borides, oxides) on the wear resistance sprayed coatings based on self-fluxing alloys NiCrBSi and CoCrBSi.

  7. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  8. The impact of substrate properties on the electromigration resistance of sputter-deposited Cu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, A.; Pagel, N.; Seidel, H.; Schmid, U.

    2011-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is commonly used as metallization for a wide range of microelectronic devices. Typically, organic circuit boards as well as ceramic and glass-ceramic substrates use galvanic deposited Cu films for this purpose. However, due to a thickness of several microns the lateral resolution in the μm-region being required e.g. for novel high frequency applications can not be guaranteed when applying this technology. Hence, sputter deposition is envisaged for the realization of Cu thin films on glass, LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramics) and alumina substrates. The reliability of 300 nm thick Cu thin films is investigated under accelerated aging conditions, utilizing a test structure which consists of 20 parallel lines stressed with current densities up to 1•10+6 A•cm-2 at temperatures between T= 100°C and 200°C. To detect the degradation via the temporal characteristics of the current signal a constant voltage is applied according to the overall resistance of the test structure. Knowing the mean time to failure (MTF) and the activation energy at elevated temperatures conclusions on the migration mechanism can be drawn. Whereas on LTCC substrates the activation energy of Ea~ 0.75 eV is similar to other face centered cubic metals such as silver, the higher activation energies of about Ea~ 1 eV on glass and alumina indicate a suppression of back diffusion especially at enhanced temperature levels. Therefore, the overall electromigration resistance is lower compared to Ag. This effect is predominantly caused by a stable oxide layer being formed at high temperatures acting as passivation layer.

  9. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics. PMID:20488615

  10. Selection and Evaluation of Thermal Interface Materials for Reduction of the Thermal Contact Resistance of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Iida, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Taguchi, Yutaka; Hirayama, Naomi; Nishio, Keishi; Takanashi, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-01

    A variety of thermal interface materials (TIMs) were investigated to find a suitable TIM for improving the performance of thermoelectric power generators (TEGs) operating in the medium-temperature range (600-900 K). The thermal resistance at the thermal interface between which the TIM was inserted was evaluated. The TIMs were chosen on the basis of their thermal stability when used with TEGs operating at medium temperatures, their electrical insulating properties, their thermal conductivity, and their thickness. The results suggest that the boron nitride (BN)-based ceramic coating, Whity Paint, and the polyurethane-based sheet, TSU700-H, are suitable TIMs for the heat source and heat sink sides, respectively, of the TEG. Use of these effectively enhances TEG performance because they reduce the thermal contact resistance at the thermal interface.

  11. The pathogenesis of insulin resistance: integrating signaling pathways and substrate flux.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance arises when the nutrient storage pathways evolved to maximize efficient energy utilization are exposed to chronic energy surplus. Ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle triggers pathways that impair insulin signaling, leading to reduced muscle glucose uptake and decreased hepatic glycogen synthesis. Muscle insulin resistance, due to ectopic lipid, precedes liver insulin resistance and diverts ingested glucose to the liver, resulting in increased hepatic de novo lipogenesis and hyperlipidemia. Subsequent macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue (WAT) leads to increased lipolysis, which further increases hepatic triglyceride synthesis and hyperlipidemia due to increased fatty acid esterification. Macrophage-induced WAT lipolysis also stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis, promoting fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia through increased fatty acid delivery to the liver, which results in increased hepatic acetyl-CoA content, a potent activator of pyruvate carboxylase, and increased glycerol conversion to glucose. These substrate-regulated processes are mostly independent of insulin signaling in the liver but are dependent on insulin signaling in WAT, which becomes defective with inflammation. Therapies that decrease ectopic lipid storage and diminish macrophage-induced WAT lipolysis will reverse the root causes of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26727229

  12. Entropic effects of thermal rippling on van der Waals interactions between monolayer graphene and a rigid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Wei; Huang, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Graphene monolayer, with extremely low flexural stiffness, displays spontaneous rippling due to thermal fluctuations at a finite temperature. When a graphene membrane is placed on a solid substrate, the adhesive interactions between graphene and the substrate could considerably suppress thermal rippling. On the other hand, the statistical nature of thermal rippling adds an entropic contribution to the graphene-substrate interactions. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanics analysis on thermal rippling of monolayer graphene supported on a rigid substrate, assuming a generic form of van der Waals interactions between graphene and substrate at T = 0 K. The rippling amplitude, the equilibrium average separation, and the average interaction energy are predicted simultaneously and compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. While the amplitude of thermal rippling is reduced by adhesive interactions, the entropic contribution leads to an effective repulsion. As a result, the equilibrium average separation increases and the effective adhesion energy decreases with increasing temperature. Moreover, the effect of a biaxial pre-strain in graphene is considered, and a buckling instability is predicted at a critical compressive strain that depends on both the temperature and the adhesive interactions. Limited by the harmonic approximations, the theoretical predictions agree with MD simulations only for relatively small rippling amplitudes but can be extended to account for the anharmonic effects.

  13. Advanced thermal barrier system bond coatings for use on Ni, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1985-01-01

    New and improved Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base bond coatings have been identified for the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings to be used on NI-, Co-, and Fe-base alloy substrates. These bond coatings were evaluated in a cyclic furnace between 1120 and 1175 C. It was found that MCrAlYb (where M = Ni, Co, or Fe) bond coating thermal barrier systems. The longest life was obtained with the FeCrAlYb thermal barrier system followed by NiCrAlYb and CoCrAlYb thermal barrier systems in that order.

  14. Risk analysis of the thermal sterilization process. Analysis of factors affecting the thermal resistance of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Akterian, S G; Fernandez, P S; Hendrickx, M E; Tobback, P P; Periago, P M; Martinez, A

    1999-03-01

    A risk analysis was applied to experimental heat resistance data. This analysis is an approach for processing experimental thermobacteriological data in order to study the variability of D and z values of target microorganisms depending on the deviations range of environmental factors, to determine the critical factors and to specify their critical tolerance. This analysis is based on sets of sensitivity functions applied to a specific case of experimental data related to the thermoresistance of Clostridium sporogenes and Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. The effect of the following factors was analyzed: the type of target microorganism; nature of the heating substrate; pH, temperature; type of acid employed and NaCl concentration. The type of target microorganism to be inactivated, the nature of the substrate (reference or real food) and the heating temperature were identified as critical factors, determining about 90% of the alteration of the microbiological risk. The effect of the type of acid used for the acidification of products and the concentration of NaCl can be assumed to be negligible factors for the purposes of engineering calculations. The critical non-uniformity in temperature during thermobacteriological studies was set as 0.5% and the critical tolerances of pH value and NaCl concentration were 5%. These results are related to a specific case study, for that reason their direct generalization is not correct. PMID:10357273

  15. Sphingobium Chlorophenolicum Dichlorohydroquinone Dioxygenase (PcpA) Is Alkaline Resistant and Thermally Stable

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wanpeng; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Chen, Lifeng; Maley, Jason; Schatte, Gabriele; Zhou, Yijiang; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Dichlorohydroquinone dioxygenase (PcpA) is the ring-cleavage enzyme in the PCP biodegradation pathway in Sphingobium chlorophenolicum strain ATCC 39723. PcpA dehalogenates and oxidizes 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone to form 2-chloromaleylacetate, which is subsequently converted to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A via 3-oxoadipate. Previous studies have shown that PcpA is highly substrate-specific and only uses 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone as its substrate. In the current study, we overexpressed and purified recombinant PcpA and showed that PcpA was highly alkaline resistant and thermally stable. PcpA exhibited two activity peaks at pH 7.0 and 10.0, respectively. The apparent kcat and Km were measured as 0.19 ± 0.01 s-1 and 0.24 ± 0.08 mM, respectively at pH 7.0, and 0.17 ± 0.01 s-1 and 0.77 ± 0.29 mM, respectively at pH 10.0. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed rapid oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in PcpA and the formation of a stable radical intermediate during the enzyme catalysis. The stable radical was predicted to be an epoxide type dichloro radical with the unpaired electron density localized on C3. PMID:22043174

  16. A Sliding-press-type Reel-to-reel Thermal Imprint System for Fiber Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtomo, Akihiro; Mekaru, Harutaka; Takagi, Hideki; Kokubo, Mitsunori; Goto, Hiroshi

    In the emerging fields related to healthcare, energy, and environment, realization of devices on flexible sheets is imminent. The materialization of such sheets would require fabrication of parts of devices on a fiber substrate where they can be assembled and interconnected by weaving. To broaden the area of a flexible sheet device, larger number of such devices will need to be formed directly on the fibers. Moreover, fabrication cost of a flexible sheet device, larger number of such devices will have to be addressed in order to make large size fabric manufacturable at affordable price. Therefore, a high-speed, low-cost, environmental friendly batch-manufacturing process of the devices on fiber is required. In this paper, we developed a reel-to-reel thermal imprint system combined with a sliding roller imprint mechanism. In this process, fiber substrate is sandwiched by a couple of flat molds, and these molds slide opposite direction each other under suitable press force and temperature. And then, we optimized conditions of this imprint process. Finally, we succeeded to imprint continuously more than 100 times and to fabricate 1.6 m long imprinted fiber. And we succeeded to imprint almost on entire cylindrical surface. A stable imprinted region was about 160° at each side.

  17. Thermal analysis of coatings and substrate materials during a disruption in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1993-06-01

    In a tokamak fusion reactor, the frequency of occurrence and the severity of a plasma disruption event will determine the lifetime of the plasma facing components. Disruptions are plasma instabilities which result in rapid loss of confinement and termination of plasma current Intense energy fluxes to components like the rust wall and the divertor plate are expected during the disruptions. This high energy deposition in short times may cause severe surface erosion of these components resulting from melting and vaporization. Coatings and tile materials are proposed to protect and maintain the integrity of the underneath, structural materials from both erosion losses as well as from high thermal stresses encountered during a disruption. The coating thickness should be large enough to withstand both erosion losses and to reduce the temperature rise in the substrate structural material. The coating thickness should be minimized to enhance the structural integrity, to reduce potential problems from radioactivity, and to minimize materials cost. Tile materials such as graphite and coating materials such as beryllium and tungsten on structural materials like copper, steel, and vanadium are analyzed and compared as potential diverter and first wall design options. The effect of the sprayed coating properties during the disruption is investigated. Porous sprayed material may be found to protect the structure better than condensed phase properties. The minimum coating thickness required to protect the structural material during disruption is discussed. The impact of self shielding effect by the eroded material oil the response of both the type/coating and the substrate is discussed.

  18. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1999-03-01

    1. The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. 2. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and beta-estradiol 17-(beta-D-glucuronide) (E217betaG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl- currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96+/-10 and 563+/-103 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453+/-44 and 3760+/-710 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. 3. Reducing the extracellular Cl- concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54+/-1 microM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl- permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. 4. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. 5. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. 6. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  19. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Hanrahan, John W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and β-estradiol 17-(β-D-glucuronide) (E217βG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl− currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96±10 and 563±103 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453±44 and 3760±710 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. Reducing the extracellular Cl− concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54±1 μM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl− permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  20. Effect of Substrates on the Resistivity and Adhesion of Copper Nanoparticle Ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, Pritam

    Printed electronics processes have the potential to make electronics manufacturing more flexible by providing a wider choice of materials and easier processing steps. In traditional electronics manufacturing techniques, corrosive etching steps limit the choice of materials and also require advanced infrastructure for process implementation. High speed low cost printing processes (e.g. inkjet) can be used, and the printed tracks can then be cured to conductive circuits that meet the needs of electronic devices like radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, sensors, etc. In this work, intense flashes of broad spectrum light from Xenon lamps are used to cure inkjet printed metal nanoparticle inks. This technique is known as photonic curing. Paper, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyimide have been used as substrates with the aim of determining how different substrates affect the behavior of the ink and the photonic curing parameters. A statistical approach was employed for the experiments, and significant control variables determining curing of the ink were identified. Experiments were also conducted to obtain prints conforming to dimensional tolerances. Using the results from the experiments, standard curing parameters for low resistance and good adhesion of the ink were obtained. The results have been statistically validated and used to study the interaction between the control variables and individual effects of each control variable on the response variable.

  1. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-15

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO{sub 2}). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer et al. [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kh{sub o}<<1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and h{sub o} is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute

  2. Residual Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings for a Cu-8Cr-4Nb Substrate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Raj, Sai V.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical calculations were conducted to determine the thermal stresses developed in a coated copper-based alloy, Cu-8%(at.%)Cr-4%Nb (designated as GRCop-84), after plasma spraying and during heat-up in a simulated rocket engine environment. Finite element analyses were conducted for two coating systems consisting of a metallic top coat, a pure copper bond coat and the GRCop-84. The through thickness temperature variations were determined as a function of coating thickness for two metallic coatings, a Ni-17%(wt%)Cr-6%Al-0.5%Y alloy and a Ni-50%(at.%)Al alloy. The residual stresses after low-pressure plasma spraying of the NiCrAlY and NiAl coatings on GRCop-84 substrate were also evaluated. These analyses took into consideration a 50.8 mm copper bond coat and the effects of an interface coating roughness. The through the thickness thermal stresses developed in coated liners were also calculated after 15 minutes of exposure in a rocket environment with and without an interfacial roughness.

  3. Some effects of metallic substrate composition on degradation of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.

    1997-12-31

    Comparisons have been made in laboratory isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests of the degradation of oxide scales grown on single crystal superalloy substrates and bond coating alloys intended for use in thermal barrier coatings systems. The influence of desulfurization of the superalloy and bond coating, of reactive element addition to the bond coating alloy, and of oxidation temperature on the spallation behavior of the alumina scales formed was assessed from oxidation kinetics and from SEM observations of the microstructure and composition of the oxide scales. Desulfurization of nickel-base superalloy (in the absence of a Y addition) resulted in an increase in the lifetime of a state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating applied to it compared to a Y-free, non-desulfurized version of the alloy. The lifetime of the same ceramic coating applied without a bond coating to a non-desulfurized model alloy that formed an ideal alumina scale was also found to be at least four times longer than on the Y-doped superalloy plus state-of-the-art bond coating combination. Some explanations are offered of the factors controlling the degradation of such coatings.

  4. Comparative thermal fatigue resistances of twenty-six nickel and cobalt base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Spera, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal fatigue resistances were determined from fluidized bed tests. Cycles to cracking differed by almost three orders of magnitude for these materials with directional solidification and surface protection of definite benefit. The alloy-coating combination with the highest thermal fatigue resistance was directionally solidified NASA TAZ-8A with an RT-XP coating. It oxidation resistance was excellent, showing almost no weight change after 15 000 fluidized bed cycles.

  5. Transparent, superhydrophobic, and wear-resistant surfaces using deep reactive ion etching on PDMS substrates.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Daniel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Surfaces that simultaneously exhibit superhydrophobicity, low contact angle hysteresis, and high transmission of visible light are of interest for many applications, such as optical devices, solar panels, and self-cleaning windows. Superhydrophobicity could also find use in medical devices where antifouling characteristics are desirable. These applications also typically require mechanical wear resistance. The fabrication of such surfaces is challenging due to the competing goals of superhydrophobicity and transmittance in terms of the required degree of surface roughness. In this study, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) was used to create rough surfaces on PDMS substrates using a O2/CF4 plasma. Surfaces then underwent an additional treatment with either octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma or vapor deposition of perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (PFOTCS) following surface activation with O2 plasma. The effects of surface roughness and the additional surface modifications were examined with respect to the contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and optical transmittance. To examine wear resistance, a sliding wear experiment was performed using an atomic force microscope (AFM). PMID:27454031

  6. Transparent resistive switching memory using aluminum oxide on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Seung-Won; Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tan-Young; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Yun-Hi; Shim, Jae Won; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-02-01

    Resistive switching memory (ReRAM) has attracted much attention in recent times owing to its fast switching, simple structure, and non-volatility. Flexible and transparent electronic devices have also attracted considerable attention. We therefore fabricated an Al2O3-based ReRAM with transparent indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electrodes on a flexible substrate. The device transmittance was found to be higher than 80% in the visible region (400-800 nm). Bended states (radius = 10 mm) of the device also did not affect the memory performance because of the flexibility of the two transparent IZO electrodes and the thin Al2O3 layer. The conduction mechanism of the resistive switching of our device was explained by ohmic conduction and a Poole-Frenkel emission model. The conduction mechanism was proved by oxygen vacancies in the Al2O3 layer, as analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. These results encourage the application of ReRAM in flexible and transparent electronic devices.

  7. Transparent resistive switching memory using aluminum oxide on a flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seung-Won; Shin, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tan-Young; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Yun-Hi; Shim, Jae Won; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-02-19

    Resistive switching memory (ReRAM) has attracted much attention in recent times owing to its fast switching, simple structure, and non-volatility. Flexible and transparent electronic devices have also attracted considerable attention. We therefore fabricated an Al2O3-based ReRAM with transparent indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electrodes on a flexible substrate. The device transmittance was found to be higher than 80% in the visible region (400-800 nm). Bended states (radius = 10 mm) of the device also did not affect the memory performance because of the flexibility of the two transparent IZO electrodes and the thin Al2O3 layer. The conduction mechanism of the resistive switching of our device was explained by ohmic conduction and a Poole-Frenkel emission model. The conduction mechanism was proved by oxygen vacancies in the Al2O3 layer, as analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. These results encourage the application of ReRAM in flexible and transparent electronic devices. PMID:26763473

  8. Light out-coupling enhancement of organic light emitting devices using nano-structured substrate produced by rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Grover, Rakhi; Mehta, D. S.; Saxena, K.

    2015-07-01

    We report significant enhancement in light out-coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) using a nano-structured substrate by rapid thermal processing (RTP). On the backside of the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate a thin film of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) was coated by thermal evaporation. Nano-structured films of MgF2 and ITO were then produced by RTP on both sides of the glass substrate. Bottom-emitting OLEDs were fabricated on the ITO-coated glass substrate with α-NPD as the hole transport layer, Alq3 as the emissive layer, and LiF and aluminum as the cathode. On the backside of the glass substrate nano-structured MgF2 were fabricated by RTP. Experimental results of enhancement of electroluminescent intensity (EL) with and without nano-structured films are presented. Results of EL intensity of OLED are also compared with the uniform MgF2 film coated on the backside of the substrate. It was found that the enhancement of EL intensity is much higher in the case of nano-porous MgF2 film than in the case of uniform MgF2 coated on the backside of the glass substrate.

  9. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  10. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.