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Sample records for subsurface horizontal flow

  1. The effect of the scale of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands on flow and transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Suliman, F; French, H; Haugen, L E; Kløve, B; Jenssen, P

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands have proven their efficiency in treating wastewater and removing the pollutants of concern. Treatment efficiency depends on the wastewater residence time, which is a function of the hydraulic loading and the physical conditions of the constructed filter system, which can be described with effective parameters such as: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, dispersivity etc. Because spatial variability is often scale dependent, these effective parameters may be affected by the scale of the system being studied. In this paper the results of tracer experiments in constructed filters using saturated horizontal flow at three scales (small and medium lab scales and full-scale system) using the same filter media is reported. Light-weight aggregate (filter media termed Filtralite-P) was used at all scales. Increasing the scale was associated with increasing dispersivity, meanwhile hydraulic conductivity experienced dramatic reduction and variation by increasing the examined scale. Observed changes in the hydraulic parameters indicate that heterogeneity at different scales should be taken into account when the performance of LWA filters are evaluated from small-scale experiments. PMID:16042266

  2. Statistical Analysis of Nitrogen in the Soil of Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaszek, Anita; Wojciech, Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    The removal of nitrogen compounds in constructed wetlands depends on various physical, chemical and biomechanical factors as well as on conditions of the environment. The paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the depositing of nitrogen at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) construcred wetland. The results of the substrate showed that the highest contents of nitrogen existed in the surface soil layer up to 20 cm of the depth. Nitrogen accumulation decreased in the deposit with depth, and in the direction of the wastewater flow.

  3. Reconstruction of a constructed wetland with horizontal subsurface flow after 18 years of operation.

    PubMed

    Hudcová, Tereza; Vymazal, Jan; Dunajský, Michal Kriška

    2013-01-01

    The constructed wetland (CW) for 326 PE with horizontal subsurface flow at Kotenčice, Central Bohemia, Czech Republic, was built in 1994. Despite the relatively high efficiency of the CW, the filtration beds suffered from clogging, and therefore it was decided in 2011 to rebuild the whole system. The new treatment system was built as an experimental system consisting of four different combinations of horizontal and vertical beds. The major aim of the design was to determine the best hybrid combination which then could be used in the future for refurbishment of older horizontal flow CWs or for the new systems. The mechanical pretreatment consists of mechanical bar screens, a new Imhoff tank, and the original settling tank which has been converted into the accumulation tank from where the wastewater is pumped into the wetlands. The filters are planted with Phragmites australis, Phalaris arundinacea, Iris pseudacorus, Iris sibirica, Glyceria maxima and Lythrum salicaria in order to evaluate and compare various plant species' effect on the treatment process. The new technology includes a tertiary treatment which consists of a greenhouse with a photo-reactor for the cultivation of algae and hydroponic systems (residual nutrients removal), sludge reed-beds and a composting field. PMID:24037174

  4. Design and monitoring of horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands for treating nursery leachates.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Lola; Cunill, Conrad; Cáceres, Rafaela; Marfà, Oriol

    2011-06-01

    Nursery leachates usually contain high concentrations of nitrates, phosphorus and potassium, so discharging them into the environment often causes pollution. Single-stage or two-stage horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSCW) filled with different substrates were designed to evaluate the effect and evolution over time of the removal of nitrogen and other nutrients contained in nursery leachates. The addition of sodium acetate to achieve a C:NO(3)(-)-N ratio of 3:1 was sufficient to reach complete denitrification in all HSSCW. The removal rate of nitrate was high throughout the operation period (over 98%). Nevertheless, the removal rate of ammonium decreased about halfway through the operation. Removal of the COD was enhanced by the use of two-stage HSSCW. In general, the substrates and the number of stages of the wetlands did not affect the removal of nitrogen, total phosphorus and potassium. PMID:21489781

  5. Nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands I: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, A. W.; Bigambo, T.

    In this paper a mathematical model for prediction of nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands was developed. Two horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands were designed to receive organic loading rate below 50 kg/ha/d and hydraulic loading rate of 480 m 3/ha/d from a primary facultative pond. Two rectangular shaped units each 11.0 m long, 3.7 m wide and 1.0 m deep and bottom slope of 1% were constructed and filled with 6-25 mm diameter gravel pack to a depth of 0.75 m. Each unit was planted with Phragmites mauritianus with an initial plant density of 29,000 plants/ha. The plants were allowed to grow for about four months before sampling for water quality parameters commenced. Samples were collected daily for about three months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and temperature were measured in situ and ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, nitrite and Chemical Oxygen Demand were measured in the laboratory in accordance with Standard Methods. The mathematical model took into account activities of biomass suspended in the water body and biofilm on aggregates and plant roots. The state variables modelled include organic, ammonia, and nitrate-nitrogen, which were sectored in water, plant and aggregates. The major nitrogen transformation processes considered in this study were mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, plant uptake, plant decaying, and sedimentation. The forcing functions, which were considered in the model, are temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen. Stella II software was used to simulate the nitrogen processes influencing the removal of nitrogen in the constructed wetland. One of the two-wetland units was used for model calibration and the second unit for model validation. The model results indicated that 0.872 gN/m 2 d was settled at the bottom of the wetland and on gravel bed and roots of the plants. However, 0.752 gN/m 2 d (86.2%) of the settled nitrogen was regenerated back to the water body, which means that

  6. Nitrogen transforming community in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Coban, Oksana; Kuschk, Peter; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Spott, Oliver; Martienssen, Marion; Jetten, Mike S M; Knoeller, Kay

    2015-05-01

    Constructed wetlands are important ecosystems with respect to nitrogen cycling. Here we studied the activity and abundance of nitrogen transforming bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and denitrification processes in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland. The functional genes of the nitrogen cycle were evenly distributed in a linear way along the flow path with prevalence at the superficial points. The same trend was observed for the nitrification and denitrification turnover rates using isotope labeling techniques. It was also shown that only short-term incubations should be used to measure denitrification turnover rates. Significant nitrate consumption under aerobic conditions diminishes nitrification rates and should therefore be taken into account when estimating nitrification turnover rates. This nitrate consumption was due to aerobic denitrification, the rate of which was comparable to that for anaerobic denitrification. Consequently, denitrification should not be considered as an exclusively anaerobic process. Phylogenetic analysis of hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene clones indicated the presence of Brocadia and Kuenenia anammox species in the constructed wetland. Although anammox bacteria were detected by molecular methods, anammox activity could not be measured and hence this process appears to be of low importance in nitrogen transformations in these freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25744184

  7. Vertical Subsurface Flow Mixing and Horizontal Anisotropy in Coarse Fluvial Aquifers: Structural Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, P.; Huber, E.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed descriptions of the subsurface heterogeneities in coarse fluvial aquifer gravel often lack in concepts to distinguish between the essence and the noise of a permeability structure and the ability to extrapolate site specific hydraulic information at the tens to several hundred meters scale. At this scale the heterogeneity strongly influences the anisotropies of the flow field and the mixing processes in groundwater. However, in many hydrogeological models the complexity of natural systems is oversimplified. Understanding the link between the dynamics of the surface processes of braided-river systems and the resulting subsurface sedimentary structures is the key to characterizing the complexity of horizontal and vertical mixing processes in groundwater. From the different depositional elements of coarse braided-river systems, the largest permeability contrasts can be observed in the scour-fills. Other elements (e.g. different types of gravel sheets) show much smaller variabilities and could be considered as a kind of matrix. Field experiments on the river Tagliamento (Northeast Italy) based on morphological observation and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys, as well as outcrop analyses of gravel pit exposures (Switzerland) allowed us to define the shape, sizes, spatial distribution and preservation potential of scour-fills. In vertical sections (e.g. 2D GPR data, vertical outcrop), the spatial density of remnant erosional bounding surfaces of scours is an indicator for the dynamics of the braided-river system (lateral mobility of the active floodplain, rate of sediment net deposition and spatial distribution of the confluence scours). In case of combined low aggradation rate and low lateral mobility the deposits may be dominated by a complex overprinting of scour-fills. The delineation of the erosional bounding surfaces, that are coherent over the survey area, is based on the identification of angular discontinuities of the reflectors. Fence diagrams

  8. Nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands II: Effect of biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigambo, T.; Mayo, A. W.

    In this paper the significance of the biofilm biomass present in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland in removal of nitrogen was demonstrated. The model was developed and optimised using data obtained in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland planted with Phragmites mauritianus and filled with 6-25 mm diameter gravel pack. The effects of biofilm biomass activities were studied by removing the effects of plant and gravel bed biofilm in an already calibrated model and re-run the same. Research results indicate that total nitrogen removal was largely influenced by growth of biofilm on plants than on aggregates. When plant biofilm and suspended biomasses were considered total nitrogen removal of 38.1% was observed compared with 25.1% when aggregate-biofilm and suspended biomasses were considered because plants have more surface areas, which are active sites for the effective biofilm activities than aggregates. However, in a natural wetland where the soil grain size is smaller, the effect of biofilm on plants may be smaller than biofilm on soil particles. There was no significant difference in organic-nitrogen effluent concentrations when biofilm biomass was considered or rejected. The averages in organic-nitrogen effluent concentrations were 0.39, 0.41 and 0.53 gN/m 2 for suspended alone, aggregate-biofilm and suspended; and suspended and plant-biofilm, respectively. This indicates that the removal of organic-nitrogen in wastewater is not significantly influenced by biofilm activities. Sedimentation and mineralization processes are the major factors influencing the concentration of organic-nitrogen in the effluent. On the other hand, biofilm activities had significant influence on ammonia-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen transformation. The developed model output indicates that the effluent ammonia concentration was 2 gN/m 2, but in absence of biofilm the effluent ammonia concentration increases to 3.5 gN/m 2. Statistical analysis indicates that the

  9. Influence of chlorothalonil on the removal of organic matter in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Casas-Zapata, Juan C; Ríos, Karina; Florville-Alejandre, Tomás R; Morató, Jordi; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of chlorothalonil (CLT) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites australis. Physicochemical parameters of influent and effluent water samples, microbial population counting methods and statistical analysis were used to evaluate the influence of CLT on organic matter removal efficiency. The experiments were conducted on four planted replicate wetlands (HSSFCW-Pa) and one unplanted control wetland (HSSFCW-NPa). The wetlands exhibited high average organic matter removal efficiencies (HSSFCW-Pa: 80.6% DOC, 98.0% COD; HSSFCW-NPa: 93.2% DOC, 98.4% COD). The addition of CLT did not influence organic removal parameters. In all cases CLT concentrations in the effluent occurred in concentrations lower than the detection limit of the analytical method. Microbial population counts from HSSFCW-Pa showed significant correlations among different microbial groups and with different physicochemical variables. The apparent independence of organic matter removal and CLT inputs, along with the CLT depletion observed in effluent samples demonstrated that HSSFCW are a viable technology for the treatment of agricultural effluents contaminated with organo-chloride pesticides like CLT. PMID:23305280

  10. Alternative filter media for phosphorous removal in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Vohla, Christina; Põldvere, Elar; Noorvee, Alar; Kuusemets, Valdo; Mander, Ulo

    2005-01-01

    During the study period from 1997 to 2002 the purification efficiency of phosphorus in the horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) in Kodijärve, has been quite high (63-95%). However, slowly increasing trend in outlet P concentrations and decreasing annual P removal rate are obviously the indicators that show possible saturation processes in filter media. To search for potential filter media with high phosphorus sorption capacity, sorption characteristics and particle size distribution of several local sands, gravels, glauconite-sandstone, LWA, and calcareous waste products from oil-shale industry were investigated. The average P sorption capacity for best materials (crashed ash block, oil, shale fly ash and the sediment from oil shale ash plateau) was higher than 96% and estimated design capacity was around 4-5 g P kg(-1). According to results, sediment from oil shale ash plateau was considered as perspective filter media for P retention. In Summer 2002 experimental sedimentation filter, filled with the sediment from oil shale ash plateau, was installed in the outlet from the Kodijärve HSSF CW. According to preliminary results the average P removal in the sedimentation filter was 52%. PMID:15921280

  11. Effects of intermittent loading on nitrogen removal in horizontal subsurface flow wetlands.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Margaret G; Yelderman, Joe C; Potterton, Tina; Doyle, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Removal of CBOD(5) and nitrogen from septic tank effluent was evaluated in four horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) wetlands. An intermittently loaded cell was compared to a continuously loaded control cell, with both treatments receiving the same weekly volume. The intermittent cell was rapidly drained and "rested" for 24-hr, then refilled in steps, twice weekly. Two media with different particle sizes but similar porosities were also compared. The two media, light weight expanded shale and gravel, were both continuously loaded. As hypothesized, the wetland cell that was intermittently loaded had higher dissolved oxygen, greater ammonia removal, and greater nitrate production than the continuously loaded cells. Areal NH(3)-N removal for the intermittently loaded cell was 0.90 g m(-2) d(-1) compared to 0.47 g m(-2) d(-1) for the control. Ammonia removal was also higher in continuously loaded gravel cells than in cells with expanded shale. Ammonia-N removal was an order of magnitude lower in a similar SSF wetland that had been in operation for 3 years. However, CBOD(5), total suspended solids, and total nitrogen did not vary substantially among the treatments. PMID:20962402

  12. Reactive transport simulation in a tropical horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mburu, N; Rousseau, D P L; van Bruggen, J J A; Thumbi, G; Llorens, E; García, J; Lens, P N L

    2013-04-01

    A promising approach to the simulation of flow and conversions in the complex environment of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF-CWs) is the use of reactive transport models, in which the transport equation is solved together with microbial growth and mass-balance equations for substrate transformation and degradation. In this study, a tropical pilot scale HSSF-CW is simulated in the recently developed CWM1-RETRASO mechanistic model. The model predicts organic matter, nitrogen and sulfur effluent concentrations and their reaction rates within the HSSF-CW. Simulations demonstrated that these reactions took place simultaneously in the same (fermentation, methanogenesis and sulfate reduction) or at different (aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic) locations. Anaerobic reactions occurred over large areas of the simulated HSSF-CW and contributed (on average) to the majority (68%) of the COD removal, compared to aerobic (38%) and anoxic (1%) reactions. To understand the effort and compare computing resources needed for the application of a mechanistic model, the CWM1-RETRASO simulation is compared to a process-based, semi-mechanistic model, run with the same data. CWM1-RETRASO demonstrated the interaction of components within the wetland in a better way, i.e. concentrations of microbial functional groups, their competition for substrates and the formation of intermediary products within the wetland. The CWM1-RETRASO model is thus suitable for simulations aimed at a better understanding of the CW system transformation and degradation processes. However, the model does not support biofilm-based modeling, and it is expensive in computing and time resources required to perform the simulations. PMID:23434579

  13. Biological mechanisms associated with triazophos (TAP) removal by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCW).

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Feng, Yuqin; Dai, Yanran; Cui, Naxin; Anderson, Bruce; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-05-15

    Triazophos (TAP) is a widely used pesticide that is easily accumulated in the environment due to its relatively high stability: this accumulation from agricultural runoff results in potential hazards to aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are generally considered to be an effective technology for treating TAP polluted surface water. However, knowledge about the biological mechanisms of TAP removal is still lacking. This study investigates the responses of a wetland plant (Canna indica), substrate enzymes and microbial communities in bench-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSCWs) loaded with different TAP concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 5 mg · L(-1)). The results indicate that TAP stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the roots of C. indica. The highest TAP concentrations significantly inhibited photosynthetic activities, as shown by a reduced effective quantum yield of PS II (ΦPS II) and lower electron transport rates (ETR). However, interestingly, the lower TAP loadings exhibited some favorable effects on these two variables, suggesting that C. indica is a suitable species for use in wetlands designed for treatment of low TAP concentrations. Urease and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the wetland substrate were activated by TAP. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated that urease activity was influenced by both the TAP concentrations and season, while acidphosphatase (ACP) only responded to seasonal variations. Analysis of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed seasonal variations in the microbial community structure of the wetland substrate at the phylum and family levels. In addition, urease activity had a greater correlation with the relative abundance of some functional microbial groups, such as the Bacillaceae family, and the ALP and ACP may be influenced by the plant more than substrate microbial communities. PMID:26897579

  14. Ibuprofen removal in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: treatment performance and fungal community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongqing; Luo, Jinxue; Lee, Zarraz May Ping; Gersberg, Richard M; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-06-01

    The treatment performance of ibuprofen (IBP)-enriched wastewater by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands planted with cattail (Typha angustifolia) and unplanted control mesocosms was investigated. Removal efficiencies of IBP were significantly (p < .05) enhanced in the planted mesocosms (78.5%) compared to those in the unplanted beds (57.9%). An 18S rRNA gene high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was used to investigate the effects of IBP on the structure of the fungal community in these wetland systems. The overall diversity of the fungal community was reduced under the IBP exposure. Taxonomic analysis revealed that 62.2% of the fungal sequences were affiliated with Basidiomycota, followed by Ascomycota (37.4%) at the phylum level. Uncultured fungus (48.2%), Chaetomium sp. (14.2%), Aspergillus sp. (12.4%), Trichoderma sp. (5.7%), Cladosporium sp. (5.4%), and Emericellopsis sp. (5.2%) were identified as dominant genera. At the genus level, a distinct profile of the fungal community in the IBP-enriched mesocosms was observed as compared to the control beds, and as well specific fungal genera were enhanced in the planted beds, regardless of IBP enrichment. However, despite these differences, the composition of the fungal community (as measured by Bray-Curtis similarity) was mostly unaffected by the significant IBP enrichment. On the other hand, a consistent similarity pattern of fungal community structure in the planted mesocosms suggests that the presence of higher macrophytes in the wetland systems may well help shape the fungal community structure. PMID:26581707

  15. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix. PMID:23286990

  16. Evapotranspiration from subsurface horizontal flow wetlands planted with Phragmites australis in sub-tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Headley, T R; Davison, L; Huett, D O; Müller, R

    2012-02-01

    The balance between evapotranspiration (ET) loss and rainfall ingress in treatment wetlands (TWs) can affect their suitability for certain applications. The aim of this paper was to investigate the water balance and seasonal dynamics in ET of subsurface horizontal flow (HF) TWs in a sub-tropical climate. Monthly water balances were compiled for four pilot-scale HF TWs receiving horticultural runoff over a two year period (Sep. 1999-Aug. 2001) on the sub-tropical east-coast of Australia. The mean annual wetland ET rate increased from 7.0 mm/day in the first year to 10.6 mm/day in the second, in response to the development of the reed (Phragmites australis) population. Consequently, the annual crop coefficients (ratio of wetland ET to pan evaporation) increased from 1.9 in the first year to 2.6 in the second. The mean monthly ET rates were generally greater and more variable than the Class-A pan evaporation rates, indicating that transpiration is an important contributor to ET in HF TWs. Evapotranspiration rates were generally highest in the summer and autumn months, and corresponded with the times of peak standing biomass of P. australis. It is likely that ET from the relatively small 1 m wide by 4 m long HF TWs was enhanced by advection through so-called "clothesline" and "oasis" effects, which contributed to the high crop coefficients. For the second year, when the reed population was well established, the annual net loss to the atmosphere (taking into account rainfall inputs) accounted for 6.1-9.6 % of the influent hydraulic load, which is considered negligible. However, the net loss is likely to be higher in arid regions with lower rainfall. The Water Use Efficiency (WUE) of the wetlands in the second year of operation was 1.3 g of above-ground biomass produced per kilogram of water consumed, which is low compared to agricultural crops. It is proposed that system level WUE provides a useful metric for selecting wetland plant species and TW design alternatives to

  17. Influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Lohay, W S; Lyimo, T J; Njau, K N

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms (FC) in constructed wetlands (CWs), removal rate constants of FC (k(FC)) were studied at various flow velocities (u). Membrane filtration technique was used during analysis. Values of k(FC) were determined using Reed's equation of pathogen removal; the results were compared with the plug flow equation. According to Reed's equation, k(FC) values ranged from 1.6 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 4 m/day to 34.5 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 42.9 m/day. The removal rates correlated positively with flow velocity (r = 0.84, p < 0.05). On assuming a plug flow equation, removal rates constants ranged from 0.77 to 11.69 day⁻¹; a more positive correlation (r = 0.93, p < 0.05) was observed. Optimum removal rate constants were observed for the velocity ranging 36 to 43 m/day. Generally, the increase of flow velocity improved FC removal rate constants: implying that pathogen removals are influenced by diffusion of the microorganisms into the biofilms on CW media. The velocity dependent approach together with the plug flow equation is therefore proposed for incorporation in the design of CW in a tropical climate where temperature variations are minor. PMID:23109602

  18. Removing heavy metals from Isfahan composting leachate by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Bakhshoodeh, Reza; Alavi, Nadali; Soltani Mohammadi, Amir; Ghanavati, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Composting facility leachate usually contains high concentrations of pollutants including heavy metals that are seriously harmful to the environment and public health. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate heavy metals removal from Isfahan composting facility (ICF) leachate by a horizontal flow constructed wetland (HFCWs) system. Two horizontal systems were constructed, one planted with vetiver and the other without plant as a control. They both operated at a flow rate of 24 L/day with a 5-day hydraulic retention time (HRT). The average removal efficiencies for Cr (53 %), Cd (40 %), Ni (35 %), Pb (30 %), Zn (35 %), and Cu (40 %) in vetiver constructed wetland were significantly higher than those of the control (P < 0.05). Accumulations of heavy metals in roots were higher than shoots. Cd and Zn showed the highest and the lowest bioconcentration factor (BCF), respectively. Vetiver tolerates the extreme condition in leachate including high total dissolved solids. PMID:26983810

  19. Effect of diffusional mass transfer on the performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in tropical climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Njau, K N; Gastory, L; Eshton, B; Katima, J H Y; Minja, R J A; Kimwaga, R; Shaaban, M

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mass transfer on the removal rate constants of BOD5, NH3, NO3 and TKN has been investigated in a Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites mauritianus. The plug flow model was assumed and the inlet and outlet concentrations were used to determine the observed removal rate constants. Mass transfer effects were studied by assessing the influence of interstitial velocity on pollutant removal rates in CW cells of different widths. The flow velocities varied between 3-46 m/d. Results indicate that the observed removal rate constants are highly influenced by the flow velocity. Correlation of dimensionless groups namely Reynolds Number (Re), Sherwood Number (Sh) and Schmidt Number (Sc) were applied and log-log plots of rate constants against velocity yielded straight lines with values beta = 0.87 for BOD5, 1.88 for NH3, 1.20 for NO3 and 0.94 for TKN. The correlation matched the expected for packed beds although the constant beta was higher than expected for low Reynolds numbers. These results indicate that the design values of rate constants used to size wetlands are influenced by flow velocity. This paper suggests the incorporation of mass transfer into CW design procedures in order to improve the performance of CW systems and reduce land requirements. PMID:22049736

  20. Enhancement of azo dye Acid Orange 7 removal in newly developed horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Tee, Heng-Chong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Mohd Nawi, Mohd Asri; Adnan, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface-flow (HSF) constructed wetland incorporating baffles was developed to facilitate upflow and downflow conditions so that the treatment of pollutants could be achieved under multiple aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions sequentially in the same wetland bed. The performances of the baffled and conventional HSF constructed wetlands, planted and unplanted, in the removal of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) were compared at the hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 5, 3 and 2 days when treating domestic wastewater spiked with AO7 concentration of 300 mg/L. The planted baffled unit was found to achieve 100%, 83% and 69% AO7 removal against 73%, 46% and 30% for the conventional unit at HRT of 5, 3 and 2 days, respectively. Longer flow path provided by baffled wetland units allowed more contact of the wastewater with the rhizomes, microbes and micro-aerobic zones resulting in relatively higher oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and enhanced performance as kinetic studies revealed faster AO7 biodegradation rate under aerobic condition. In addition, complete mineralization of AO7 was achieved in planted baffled wetland unit due to the availability of a combination of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:25284799

  1. Modeling total phosphorus removal in an aquatic environment restoring horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland based on artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Lijuan; Zhang, Manyin; Wang, Yifei

    2015-08-01

    A horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSF-CW) was designed to improve the water quality of an artificial lake in Beijing Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, China. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), including multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF), were used to model the removal of total phosphorus (TP). Four variables were selected as the input parameters based on the principal component analysis: the influent TP concentration, water temperature, flow rate, and porosity. In order to improve model accuracy, alternative ANNs were developed by incorporating meteorological variables, including precipitation, air humidity, evapotranspiration, solar heat flux, and barometric pressure. A genetic algorithm and cross-validation were used to find the optimal network architectures for the ANNs. Comparison of the observed data and the model predictions indicated that, with careful variable selection, ANNs appeared to be an efficient and robust tool for predicting TP removal in the HSSF-CW. Comparison of the accuracy and efficiency of MLP and RBF for predicting TP removal showed that the RBF with additional meteorological variables produced the most accurate results, indicating a high potentiality for modeling TP removal in the HSSF-CW. PMID:25903184

  2. Nitrogen removal performance in planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating different influent COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Ambrose, Richard F; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Zhao, Zhimiao

    2016-05-01

    Microcosm horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCWs) were used to examine the impacts of vegetation on nitrogen dynamics treating different influent COD/N ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 8:1). An increase in the COD/N ratio led to increased reductions in NO3 and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) in planted and unplanted wetlands, but diminished removal of NH4. The HSSFCW planted with Canna indica L. exhibited a significant reduction in NH4 compared to the unplanted system, particularly in the active root zone where NH4 removal performance increased by up to 26 % at the COD/N ratio of 8:1. There was no significant difference in NO3 removal between the planted and unplanted wetlands. TIN removal efficiency in the planted wetland increased with COD/N ratios, which was likely influenced by plant uptake. NH4 reductions were greater in planted wetland at the 20- and 40-cm depths while NO3 reductions were uniformly greater with depth in all cases, but no statistical difference was impacted by depth on TIN removal. These findings show that planting a HSSFCW can provide some benefit in reducing nitrogen loads in effluents, but only when a sufficient carbon source is present. PMID:26822218

  3. Pathways of nitrobenzene degradation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: Effect of intermittent aeration and glucose addition.

    PubMed

    Kirui, Wesley K; Wu, Shubiao; Kizito, Simon; Carvalho, Pedro N; Dong, Renjie

    2016-01-15

    Intermittent aeration and addition of glucose were applied to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in order to investigate the effect on pathways of nitrobenzene (NB) degradation and interactions with microbial nitrogen and sulphur transformations. The experiment was carried out in three phases A, B and C consisting of different NB loading and glucose dosing. For each phase, the effect of aeration was assessed by intermittently aerating one wetland and leaving one unaerated. Regardless of whether or not the wetland was aerated, at an influent NB concentration of 140 mg/L, both wetlands significantly reduced NB to less than 2 mg/L, a reduction efficiency of 98%. However, once the influent NB concentration was increased to 280 mg/L, the aerated wetland had a higher removal performance 82% compared to that of the unaerated wetland 71%. Addition of glucose further intensified the NB removal to 95% in the aerated wetlands and 92% in the unaerated. Aeration of wetlands enhanced NB degradation, but also resulted in higher NB volatilization of 6 mg m(-2) d(-1). The detected high concentration of sulphide 20-60 mg/L in the unaerated wetland gave a strong indication that NB may act as an electron donor to sulphate-reducing bacteria, but this should be further investigated. Aeration positively improved NB removal in constructed wetlands, but resulted in higher NB volatilization. Glucose addition induced co-metabolism to enhance NB degradation. PMID:26468606

  4. Phytoextraction, phytotransformation and rhizodegradation of ibuprofen associated with Typha angustifolia in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifei; Zhang, Jiefeng; Zhu, Guibing; Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing; Ng, Wun Jern; Appan, Adhityan; Tan, Soon Keat

    2016-10-01

    Widespread occurrence of trace pharmaceutical residues in aquatic environments is of great concerns due to the potential chronic toxicity of certain pharmaceuticals including ibuprofen on aquatic organisms even at environmental levels. In this study, the phytoextraction, phytotransformation and rhizodegradation of ibuprofen associated with Typha angustifolia were investigated in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system. The experimental wetland system consisted of a planted bed with Typha angustifolia and an unplanted bed (control) to treat ibuprofen-loaded wastewater (∼107.2 μg L(-1)). Over a period of 342 days, ibuprofen was accumulated in leaf sheath and lamina tissues at a mean concentration of 160.7 ng g(-1), indicating the occurrence of the phytoextraction of ibuprofen. Root-uptake ibuprofen was partially transformed to ibuprofen carboxylic acid, 2-hydroxy ibuprofen and 1-hydroxy ibuprofen which were found to be 1374.9, 235.6 and 301.5 ng g(-1) in the sheath, respectively, while they were 1051.1, 693.6 and 178.7 ng g(-1) in the lamina. The findings from pyrosequencing analysis of the rhizosphere bacteria suggest that the Dechloromonas sp., the Clostridium sp. (e.g. Clostridium saccharobutylicum), the order Sphingobacteriales, and the Cytophaga sp. in the order Cytophagales were most probably responsible for the rhizodegradation of ibuprofen. PMID:27372652

  5. Influence of substrate heterogeneity on the hydraulic residence time and removal efficiency of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza-Diaz, O.; Brovelli, A.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Horizontal, subsurface flow constructed wetlands are wastewater treatment devices. The influent polluted water flows through a porous substrate where the contaminants are removed, for example by microbial oxidation, surface adsorption and mineral precipitation. These systems are widely used with varying degrees of success to treat municipal and agricultural contaminated waters and remove the organic carbon and nutrient load. Constructed wetlands are an appealing and promising technology, because they (i) are potentially very efficient in removing the pollutants, (ii) require only a small external energy input and (iii) require low maintenance. However, practical experience has shown that the observed purification rate is highly variable and is often much smaller than expected. One of the numerous reasons proposed to explain the variable efficiency of constructed wetlands is the existence of highly conductive zones within the porous substrate, which produce a dramatic reduction of the hydraulic residence time and therefore directly decreases the overall water purification rate. This work aims to understand quantitatively the relationship between the spatial variability in the hydraulic properties of the substrate and the effective residence time in constructed wetlands. We conducted two suites of stochastic numerical simulations, modelling the transport of a conservative tracer in a three-dimensional simulated constructed wetland in one case, and the microbial oxidation of a carbon source in the other. Within each group of simulations, different hydraulic conductivity fields were tested. These were based on a log-normal, spatially correlated random field (with exponential spatial correlation). The amount of heterogeneity was varied by changing the variance correlation length in the three directions. For each set of parameters, different realizations are considered to deduce both the expected residence time for a certain amount of heterogeneity, and its range of

  6. A comparative study of five horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands using different plant species for domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor Camacho, J; De Lucas Martínez, A; Gómez Gómez, R; Mena Sanz, J

    2007-12-01

    This project studied domestic wastewater treatment by horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetlands (CW) and compared the effect of four different plant species on the operating conditions, dissolved oxygen (DO), and redox potential (ORP), and their efficiency on pollutants removal. Five HSSF CWs were fed for 10 months with low loaded synthetic domestic wastewater, using theoretical hydraulic residence time of 7.6 days. The plant species under study were the following: Phragmites australis (CW1), Lythrum salicaria (CW3), Cladium mariscus (CW4) and Iris pseudacorus (CW5). CW2 was not planted and this was used as control. Qualitative measurements determined a greater growth of Lythrum salicaria and Iris pseudacorus than the others. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were very low in the entire bulk liquid of all the CWs. Also ORP values were very similar in all wetlands, dealing with facultative anaerobic environments. All planted wetlands improved pollutants removal compared with the unplanted control wetland. The performances in terms of COD, TN, TP and SO4(2-) removal obtained by the different CWs were in the ranges 80-90%, 35-55%, 15-40% and 45-60% respectively. Lythrum salicaria and Iris pseudacorus, which exhibited greater growth, were always the most efficient species that improved not only nutrients plant uptake but also other microbial removal processes probably due to a higher aeration potential, such as nitrification or aerobic respiration. Sulphate reduction was the most important mechanism for COD removal. Cladium mariscus, an autochthonous plant that grows in the south-central Iberian Peninsula, was less efficient than Lythrum salicaria and Iris pseudacorus, but improved the unplanted wetland wastewater efficiency. PMID:18341144

  7. Evaluation of the giant reed (Arundo donax) in horizontal subsurface flow wetlands for the treatment of dairy processing factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Idris, Shaharah Mohd; Jones, Paul L; Salzman, Scott A; Croatto, George; Allinson, Graeme

    2012-09-01

    Two emergent macrophytes, Arundo donax and Phragmites australis, were established in experimental horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF), gravel-based constructed wetlands (CWs) and challenged by treated dairy processing factory wastewater with a median electrical conductivity of 8.9 mS cm(-1). The hydraulic loading rate was tested at 3.75 cm day(-1). In general, the plants grew well during the 7-month study period, with no obvious signs of salt stress. The major water quality parameters monitored (biological oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solids (SS) and total nitrogen (TN) but not total phosphorus) were generally improved after the effluent had passed through the CWs. There was no significance different in removal efficiencies between the planted beds and unplanted gravel beds (p > 0.007), nor was there any significant difference in removal efficiencies between the A. donax and P. australis beds for most parameters. BOD, SS and TN removal in the A. donax and P. australis CWs was 69, 95 and 26 % and 62, 97 and 26 %, respectively. Bacterial removal was observed but only to levels that would allow reuse of the effluent for use on non-food crops under Victorian state regulations. As expected, the A. donax CWs produced considerably more biomass (37 ± 7.2 kg wet weight) than the P. australis CWs (11 ± 1.4 kg wet weight). This standing crop equates to approximately 179 and 68 tonnes ha(-1) year(-1) biomass (dry weight) for A. donax and P. australis, respectively (assuming a 250-day growing season and single-cut harvest). The performance similarity of the A. donax and P. australis planted CWs indicates that either may be used in HSSF wetlands treating dairy factory wastewater, although the planting of A. donax provides additional opportunities for secondary income streams through utilisation of the biomass produced. PMID:22573095

  8. Effect of the inlet outlet positions on the hydraulic performance of horizontal subsurface-flow wetlands constructed with heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, F.; Futsaether, C.; Oxaal, U.; Haugen, L. E.; Jenssen, P.

    2006-09-01

    Effects of the inlet and outlet position on flow patterns of saturated fluids in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland were investigated experimentally using a quasi two-dimensional flow cell representing a vertical cross-section in the longitudinal direction of the wetland. The filter medium consisted of glass beads that were either uniformly sized or a mixture of sizes with a distribution corresponding to wetland filter media. Flow through the filter bed was visualized by injecting dyed fluid into the water-saturated model. Next, breakthrough curves were obtained using chloride tracer. Flow through the homogeneous filter formed by uniformly sized beads displayed a clear density-driven component. Using mixed sizes, finer and coarser beads tended to separate into alternating and incomplete layers. Flow occurred preferentially along roughly horizontal high-conductivity paths of coarser filter material. Density-driven vertical flow was much slower than the horizontal flow. Nevertheless, appropriate positioning of the inlet and less importantly the outlet could to some extent mitigate the dominant effect of the medium stratification on the flow patterns. Using inlet-outlet configurations that forced the flow through larger portions of the filter bed by injecting into low-conductivity layers and opposing the gravity-driven flow increased the treatment efficiency.

  9. Key design factors affecting microbial community composition and pathogenic organism removal in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Morató, Jordi; Codony, Francesc; Sánchez, Olga; Pérez, Leonardo Martín; García, Joan; Mas, Jordi

    2014-05-15

    Constructed wetlands constitute an interesting option for wastewater reuse since high concentrations of contaminants and pathogenic microorganisms can be removed with these natural treatment systems. In this work, the role of key design factors which could affect microbial removal and wetland performance, such as granular media, water depth and season effect was evaluated in a pilot system consisting of eight parallel horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetlands treating urban wastewater from Les Franqueses del Vallès (Barcelona, Spain). Gravel biofilm as well as influent and effluent water samples of these systems were taken in order to detect the presence of bacterial indicators such as total coliforms (TC), Escherichia coli, fecal enterococci (FE), Clostridium perfringens, and other microbial groups such as Pseudomonas and Aeromonas. The overall microbial inactivation ratio ranged between 1.4 and 2.9 log-units for heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), from 1.2 to 2.2 log units for total coliforms (TC) and from 1.4 to 2.3 log units for E. coli. The presence of fine granulometry strongly influenced the removal of all the bacterial groups analyzed. This effect was significant for TC (p=0.009), E. coli (p=0.004), and FE (p=0.012). Shallow HSSF constructed wetlands were more effective for removing Clostridium spores (p=0.039), and were also more efficient for removing TC (p=0.011) and E. coli (p=0.013) when fine granulometry was used. On the other hand, changes in the total bacterial community from gravel biofilm were examined by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified fragments of the 16S rRNA gene recovered from DGGE bands. Cluster analysis of the DGGE banding pattern from the different wetlands showed that microbial assemblages separated according to water depth, and sequences of different phylogenetic groups, such as Alpha, Beta and Delta-Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Bacteroidetes

  10. Removal of trace elements in three horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kröpfelová, Lenka; Vymazal, Jan; Svehla, Jaroslav; Stíchová, Jana

    2009-04-01

    Between March 2006 and June 2008 removal of 34 trace elements was measured on a monthly basis at three horizontal-flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic designed to treat municipal wastewater. In general, the results indicated a very wide range of removal efficiencies among studied elements. The highest degree of removal (average of 90%) was found for aluminum. High average removal was also recorded for zinc (78%). Elements removed in the range of 50-75% were uranium, antimony, copper, lead, molybdenum, chromium, barium, iron and gallium. Removal of cadmium, tin, mercury, silver, selenium and nickel varied between 25 and 50%. Low retention (0-25%) was observed for vanadium, lithium, boron, cobalt and strontium. There were two elements (manganese and arsenic) for which average outflow concentrations were higher compared to inflow concentrations. Reduced manganese compounds are very soluble and therefore they are washed out under anaerobic conditions. PMID:19124182

  11. The effect of pre-aeration on the purification processes in the long-term performance of a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Noorvee, Alar; Põldvere, Elar; Mander, Ulo

    2007-07-15

    Different conditions (water level, oxygen supply) prevailing in both beds of the Kodijärve double-bed horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) (Southern Estonia; constructed in 1996, total area 312.5 m(2), 40 pe) provide the opportunity to compare how different operational methods have altered the efficiency of the purification processes inside the HSSF CW. In summer 2002 a vertical subsurface flow (VSSF) CW (total area 37.4 m(2)) was added as the first stage of the system. Data from 18 sampling wells installed in Kodijärve HSSF CW from two periods is compared: 1st period -- January 2000-April 2002 (before the VSSF CW was built); 2nd period --October 2002-December 2004 (after the construction of the VSSF filter). The VSSF CW has remarkably improved aerobic conditions in both beds of the HSSF. Apart from total phosphorus concentrations in the right bed and nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the outflow of both beds, all of the water quality indicators (dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids, biological oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen and total iron) improved after the construction of the VSSF filter. Typically, purification processes in the HSSF CW were dependent on oxygen supply, which was partly influenced by the water level inside the filter beds. PMID:17118430

  12. Removal of selected pharmaceuticals from domestic wastewater in an activated sludge system followed by a horizontal subsurface flow bed - analysis of their respective contributions.

    PubMed

    Verlicchi, P; Galletti, A; Petrovic, M; Barceló, D; Al Aukidy, M; Zambello, E

    2013-06-01

    Seventy-three commonly administered pharmaceuticals from twelve different therapeutic classes were investigated at a municipal wastewater treatment plant in northern Italy featuring a conventional activated sludge system (full-scale) and a polishing horizontal subsurface flow bed (pilot plant). Removal of these micro-pollutants by the two systems was assessed in order to evaluate their respective contributions. Mean concentrations and standard deviations were calculated and found to differ for the compounds detected, ranging from few ng/L to over 1,165 ng/L in the secondary effluent and from 11 to 533 in the polished effluent. Eighteen compounds were consistently below the detection limit and the remaining 55 compounds were found at a minimum of one sampling point. Average removal efficiencies of both treatment steps and in treatment train as a whole are evaluated and discussed, highlighting the difficulties in predicting the fate of pharmaceuticals in both an activated sludge system and a horizontal subsurface flow bed. Comparison between the observed average removal efficiencies and those reported in the literature was also carried out for the pharmaceuticals of interest, and the discrepancies that emerged are discussed. The investigated constructed wetland did show efficacy in removing some of these compounds, and it contributed to the overall removal efficiency of each therapeutic class. Indeed, evaluation of the specific mass loadings of each class of PhC detected in the raw wastewaters, secondary and polished effluent evidences that the investigated constructed wetland is able to further reduce the load of micropollutants, which could become a necessity, especially where the receiving water body is an effluent-dominant river and mitigation measures of the discharge impact are required to protect and safeguard the aquatic environment. PMID:23563255

  13. Role of vegetation (Typha latifolia) on nutrient removal in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland treating UASB reactor-trickling filter effluent.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jocilene Ferreira; Martins, Weber Luiz Pinto; Seidl, Martin; von Sperling, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the work is to characterize the role of plants in a constructed wetland in the removal of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The experiments were carried out in a full-scale system in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, with two parallel horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland units (one planted with Typha latifolia and one unplanted) treating the effluent from a system composed of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor and a trickling filter (TF). Each wetland unit received a mean flow of approximately 8.5 m³ d⁻¹ (population equivalent around 60 inhabitants each), with a surface hydraulic loading rate 0.12 m³m⁻²d⁻¹. The experiments were conducted from September 2011 to July 2013. Mean effluent concentrations from the wetlands were: (a) planted unit total nitrogen (TN) 22 mg L⁻¹, ammonia-N 19 mg L⁻¹, nitrite-N 0.10 mg L⁻¹, nitrate-N 0.25 mg L⁻¹, P-total 1.31 mg L⁻¹; and (b) unplanted unit TN 24 mg L⁻¹, ammonia-N 20 mg L⁻¹, nitrite-N 0.54 mg mL⁻¹, nitrate-N 0.15 mg L⁻¹, P-total 1.31 mg L⁻¹. The aerial part of the plant contained mean values of 24.1 gN (kg dry matter)⁻¹ and 4.4 gP (kg dry matter)⁻¹, and the plant root zone was composed of 16.5 gN (kg dry matter)⁻¹ and 4.1 gP (kg dry matter)⁻¹. The mean extraction of N by the plant biomass was 726 kgN ha⁻¹y⁻¹, corresponding to 17% of the N load removed. For P, the extraction by the plant biomass was 105 kgP ha⁻¹y⁻¹, corresponding to 9% of the P load removed. These results reinforce the reports that N and P removal due to plant uptake is a minor mechanism in horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands operating under similar loading rates, typical for polishing of sanitary effluent. PMID:25860702

  14. Temporal and spatial variations of contaminant removal, enzyme activities, and microbial community structure in a pilot horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland purifying industrial runoff.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiao-Hui; Jing, Dan-Dan; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2016-05-01

    A pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) was operated to purify industrial runoff containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Guangzhou, China. Synthetic industrial runoff was fed into the HSSFCW with continuous flow at an average loading rate of 0.128 m(3)/(m(2)/day) for about 2 years. Pollutants such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), total phosphorus (TP), and phenanthrene were mainly removed in the front quarter of the HSSFCW, and in the vertical direction, the average removal rates of COD, TP, total nitrogen (TN), ammonia, and phenanthrene of the upper layer were 64.23, 71.16, 50.81, 65.38, and 92.47 %, which were 1.23, 2.08, 1.48, 1.72, and 1.17 times higher than those of the bottom, respectively. Correlations among pollutant removal, soil environmental indexes, enzyme activities, and soil microbial community structure were evaluated. Enzyme assays (dehydrogenase, catalase, nitrate reductase, and polyphenol oxidase) showed significant associations between enzyme activities and pollutant removal (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). Soil microbial community structure was assessed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting method, and results demonstrated that bacterial communities remained relatively stable in different seasons. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant phyla of the bacteria communities, and three clones which might be related to the biodegradation of phenanthrene were also detected. Results of the present work would broaden the knowledge of the purification mechanism of contaminants in the constructed wetlands (CWs), and identification of the treatment performances and temporal and spatial variations of biological activities of subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSFCWs) would help to improve the operations of CWs for surface water protection. PMID:26797946

  15. Treatment of a sulfate-rich groundwater contaminated with perchloroethene in a hydroponic plant root mat filter and a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland at pilot-scale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Kuschk, Peter; Paschke, Heidrun; Kästner, Matthias; Müller, Jochen A; Köser, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    A hydroponic plant root mat filter (HPRMF) was compared over 7months with a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSF CW) regarding the removal of perchloroethene (PCE) (about 2 mg L(-1)) from a sulfate- (850 mg L(-1)) and ammonia-rich (50 mg L(-1)) groundwater with a low TOC content. At a mean area specific inflow PCE load of 56 mg m(-2)d(-1), after 4m from inlet, the mean PCE removal during summer time reached 97% in the HPRMF and almost 100% in the HSSF CW. Within the first 2m in the HSSF CW metabolites like dichloroethenes, vinyl chloride and ethene accumulated, their concentrations decreased further along the flow path. Moreover, the tidal operation (a 7-d cycle) in the HSSFCW decreased the accumulation of PCE metabolites within the first 1m of the bed. The carcinogenic degradation metabolite vinyl chloride was not detected in the HPRMF. The smaller accumulation of the degradation metabolites in the HPRMF correlated with its higher redox potential. It can be concluded from this study that HPRMF appears an interesting alternative for special water treatment tasks and that tidal operation will show some positive effects on the removal of the accumulated PCE metabolites in HSSF CW. PMID:25025478

  16. Performance comparison and economics analysis of waste stabilization ponds and horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater: a case study of the Juja sewage treatment works.

    PubMed

    Mburu, Njenga; Tebitendwa, Sylvie M; van Bruggen, Johan J A; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Lens, Piet N L

    2013-10-15

    The performance, effluent quality, land area requirement, investment and operation costs of a full-scale waste stabilization pond (WSP) and a pilot scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSF-CW) at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) were investigated between November 2010 to January 2011. Both systems gave comparable medium to high levels of organic matter and suspended solids removal. However, the WSP showed a better removal for Total Phosphorus (TP) and Ammonium (NH4(+)-N). Based on the population equivalent calculations, the land area requirement per person equivalent of the WSP system was 3 times the area that would be required for the HSSF-CW to treat the same amount of wastewater. The total annual cost estimates consisting of capital, operation and maintenance (O&M) costs were comparable for both systems. However, the evaluation of the capital cost of either system showed that it is largely influenced by the size of the population served, local cost of land and the construction materials involved. Hence, one can select either system in terms of treatment efficiency. When land is available other factor including the volume of wastewater or the investment, and O&M costs determine the technology selection. PMID:23747372

  17. Analysis of conservative tracer measurement results using the Frechet distribution at planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel and showing the effect of clogging processes.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical process, developed in Maple environment, has been successful in decreasing the error of measurement results and in the precise calculation of the moments of corrected tracer functions. It was proved that with this process, the measured tracer results of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C) can be fitted more accurately than with the conventionally used distribution functions (Gaussian, Lognormal, Fick (Inverse Gaussian) and Gamma). This statement is true only for the planted HSFCW-Cs. The analysis of unplanted HSFCW-Cs needs more research. The result of the analysis shows that the conventional solutions (completely stirred series tank reactor (CSTR) model and convection-dispersion transport (CDT) model) cannot describe these types of transport processes with sufficient accuracy. These outcomes can help in developing better process descriptions of very difficult transport processes in HSFCW-Cs. Furthermore, a new mathematical process can be developed for the calculation of real hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dispersion coefficient values. The presented method can be generalized to other kinds of hydraulic environments. PMID:26126688

  18. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour. PMID:26178828

  19. Total nitrogen and ammonia removal prediction in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: use of artificial neural networks and development of a design equation.

    PubMed

    Akratos, Christos S; Papaspyros, John N E; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine if artificial neural networks (ANNs) can predict nitrogen removal in horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) constructed wetlands (CWs). ANN development was based on experimental data from five pilot-scale CW units. The proper selection of the components entering the ANN was achieved using principal component analysis (PCA), which identified the main factors affecting TN removal, i.e., porous media porosity, wastewater temperature and hydraulic residence time. Two neural networks were examined: the first included only the three factors selected from the PCA, and the second included in addition meteorological parameters (i.e., barometric pressure, rainfall, wind speed, solar radiation and humidity). The first model could predict TN removal rather satisfactorily (R(2)=0.53), and the second resulted in even better predictions (R(2)=0.69). From the application of the ANNs, a design equation was derived for TN removal prediction, resulting in predictions comparable to those of the ANNs (R(2)=0.47). For the validation of the results of the ANNs and of the design equation, available data from the literature were used and showed a rather satisfactory performance. PMID:18786824

  20. High-throughput pyrosequencing analysis of bacteria relevant to cometabolic and metabolic degradation of ibuprofen in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifei; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Guibing; Liu, Yu; Ng, Wun Jern; Appan, Adhityan; Tan, Soon Keat

    2016-08-15

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceutical residues including ibuprofen on the aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates has attracted growing attention to the pharmaceutical pollution control using constructed wetlands, but there lacks of an insight into the relevant microbial degradation mechanisms. This study investigated the bacteria associated with the cometabolic and metabolic degradation of ibuprofen in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system by high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis. The ibuprofen degradation dynamics, bacterial diversity and evenness, and bacterial community structure in a planted bed with Typha angustifolia and an unplanted bed (control) were compared. The results showed that the plants promoted the microbial degradation of ibuprofen, especially at the downstream zones of wetland. However, at the upstream one-third zone of wetland, the presence of plants did not significantly enhance ibuprofen degradation, probably due to the much greater contribution of cometabolic behaviors of certain non-ibuprofen-degrading microorganisms than that of the plants. By analyzing bacterial characteristics, we found that: (1) The aerobic species of family Flavobacteriaceae, family Methylococcaceae and genus Methylocystis, and the anaerobic species of family Spirochaetaceae and genus Clostridium_sensu_stricto were the most possible bacteria relevant to the cometabolic degradation of ibuprofen; (2) The family Rhodocyclaceae and the genus Ignavibacterium closely related to the plants appeared to be associated with the metabolic degradation of ibuprofen. PMID:27110975

  1. Analysis of the metabolic utilization of carbon sources and potential functional diversity of the bacterial community in lab-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huanhuan; Ge, Liyun; Xu, Tan; Zhang, Minghua; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands. To improve the performance of constructed wetlands, it is very important to know the metabolic properties and functional diversity of the microbial communities. The purpose of this study is to analyze the metabolic properties and functional diversity of the microbial community in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland (CW) in a laboratory study through the sole-carbon-source utilization profiles using Biolog-ECO microplates. The technique has advantages over traditional cell culture techniques, such as molecular-level techniques-RNA amplification, which are time-consuming, expensive, and only applicable to the small number of species that may be cultured. This CW was designed to treat rural eutrophic water in China, using the plant L. This study showed that the metabolic activities of upper front substrate microorganisms (UF) were greater than those of the lower back substrate microorganisms (LB) in the CW. Integrated areas under average well color development (AWCD) curves of substrate microorganisms in the UF were 131.9, 4.8, and 99.3% higher than in the lower front part (LF), the upper back part (UB), and the LB part of the CW, respectively. Principal components analysis showed significant differences in both community structure and metabolic utilization of carbon sources between substrate microorganisms from different sampling sites. Carbon source utilization of polymers, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids was higher in UF than in LF, but that of amines and phenolic compounds was very similar in UF and LF. The richness, evenness, and diversity of upper substrate microbial communities were significantly higher than those of lower substrate. The LF substrate microbial communities had lower evenness than the other sampling plots, and the lowest richness of substrate microbial community was found in the LB part of the CW. PMID:22031555

  2. A study on the effects of different hydraulic loading rates (HLR) on pollutant removal efficiency of subsurface horizontal-flow constructed wetlands used for treatment of domestic wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Çakir, Recep; Gidirislioglu, Ali; Çebi, Ulviye

    2015-12-01

    The research into the treatment of domestic wastewaters originating from Büyükdöllük village in Edirne Province was carried out over a 3 year experimental period. The wastewaters of the settlement were treated using a constructed wetland with subsurface horizontal flow, and the effects of different hydraulic loading levels on removal efficiency were studied. In order to achieve this goal, three equal chambers (ponds) of 300 m(2) each were constructed and planted with Phragmites australis. Each of the chambers was loaded with domestic wastewater with average flow discharge creating hydraulic loading rates of 0. m(3) day(-1) m(-2); 0.075 m(3) day(-1) m(-2) and 0.125 m(3) day(-1) m(-2), respectively. According to the results of the study, the inlet levels of the pollutant parameters with carbon origin in the water samples taken from the system entrance are high and the average values for three years are respectively: Biological Oxygen Demand, BOD5 -324.5 mg L(-1); Chemical Oxygen Demand, COD -484,0 mg L(-1); suspended solids (TSS) -147.3 mg L(-1) and Oil and Grease -0.123 mg L(-1). It was also determined that the removal rates of the system were closely dependent on the applied hydraulic loading levels and the highest removal rates of 64.9%, 62.5%, 86.3% and 80.34% for BOD5, COD, TSS and Oil and Grease, respectively, were determined in the pond with a hydraulic loading rate of 0.050 m(3) day(-1) m(-2). Lower removal of 57.9%, 55.5%, 81.4% and 74.5% for BOD5, COD, TSS and Oil and Grease were recorded in the pond with a hydraulic loading rate of 0.075 m(3) day(-1) m(-2); and these values were 49.1%, 47.8%, 70.9% and 62.1% for the pond with a hydraulic loading rate of 0.125 m(3) day(-1) m(-2). High removal rates were also recorded for the other investigated pollution parameters. PMID:26363259

  3. The Effectiveness of Organic Pollutants Removal in Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow / Efektywność Usuwania Zanieczyszczeń Organicznych W Oczyszczalni Hydrofitowej

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaszek, Anita; Sadecka, Zofia

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the research work related to the removal efficiency from wastewater organic pollutants and suspended solids at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) constructed wetland. The average effectiveness defined as loss of value COD in wastewater has reached 77%, for BOD5 - 80% and TOC - 82%. The effect of seasonal temperature changes and the period of plant vegetation and rest on the effectiveness of wastewater treatment were also analyzed. The results of the presented research showed a decrease in the efficiency of removing organic pollutants from wastewater and suspended solids in the autumn and winter. During the vegetation the object in Małyszyn has been characterized by the effectiveness of wastewater treatment at the level of 78% for COD, 82% for BOD5, and in the non-vegetation period the effectiveness has decreased up to 75% for COD and 74% for BOD5. During the plants growth the total suspension was removed in 88%, whereas during the plants rest efficiency of removing lowered to 69%. W pracy przedstawiono wyniki badań dotyczące efektywności usuwania ze ścieków zanieczyszczeń organicznych w oczyszczalni hydrofitowej. Średnia skuteczność oczyszczania wyrażona jako obniżenie wartości ChZT w ściekach była na poziomie 77%, dla BZT5 80%, a dla OWO 82%. Analizowano również wpływ sezonowych zmian temperatury oraz okresu wegetacji i spoczynku roślin na skuteczność oczyszczania ścieków. Wyniki badań wykazały obniżenie efektywności usuwania zanieczyszczeń organicznych ze ścieków wyrażonych przez ChZT i BZT5 oraz zawiesiny ogólnej w okresie jesienno-zimowym. W okresie wegetacyjnym obiekt w Małyszynie charakteryzował się efektywnością oczyszczania ścieków na poziomie: 78% dla ChZT, 82% dla BZT5, a w sezonie pozawegetacyjnym skuteczność uległa obniżeniu do 75% w przypadku ChZT oraz 74% dla BZT5. Zawiesina ogólna w okresie wegetacji trzciny usuwana była w 88%, a w okresie powegetacyjnym w 69%.

  4. Comparison of simple, small, full-scale sewage treatment systems in Brazil: UASB-maturation ponds-coarse filter; UASB-horizontal subsurface-flow wetland; vertical-flow wetland (first stage of French system).

    PubMed

    von Sperling, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between three simple sewage treatment lines involving natural processes: (a) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor-three maturation ponds in series-coarse rock filter; (b) UASB reactor-horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland; and (c) vertical-flow constructed wetlands treating raw sewage (first stage of the French system). The evaluation was based on several years of practical experience with three small full-scale plants receiving the same influent wastewater (population equivalents of 220, 60 and 100 inhabitants) in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The comparison included interpretation of concentrations and removal efficiencies based on monitoring data (organic matter, solids, nitrogen, phosphorus, coliforms and helminth eggs), together with an evaluation of practical aspects, such as land and volume requirements, sludge production and handling, plant management, clogging and others. Based on an integrated evaluation of all aspects involved, it is worth emphasizing that each system has its own specificities, and no generalization can be made on the best option. The overall conclusion is that the three lines are suitable for sewage treatment in small communities in warm-climate regions. PMID:25714630

  5. Effects of interspecific competition on the growth of macrophytes and nutrient removal in constructed wetlands: A comparative assessment of free water surface and horizontal subsurface flow systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yucong; Wang, Xiaochang; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Zhao, Yaqian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Ge, Yuan; Xiong, Jiaqing

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of competition between adjoining interspecific colonies of Phragmites and Typha in two large field pilot-scale free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SSF) CWs is evaluated. According to findings, the effect of interspecific competition was notable for Phragmites australis, whereby it showed the highest growth performance in both FWS and SSF wetland. In a mixed-culture, P. australis demonstrates superiority in terms of competitive interactions for space between plants. Furthermore, the interspecific competition among planted species seemed to cause different ecological responses of plant species in the two CWs. For example, while relatively high density and shoot height determined the high aboveground dry weight of P. australis in the FWS wetland, this association was not evident in the SSF. Additionally, while plants nutrients uptake accounts for a higher proportion of the nitrogen removal in FWS, that in the SSF accounts for a higher proportion of the phosphorous removal. PMID:26874442

  6. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-09-19

    FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code for simulating isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably and/or fully saturated subsurface porous media. Both single and dual-domain transport formulations are available. Transport mechanisms considered include advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear adsorption, mobile/immobile mass transfer and first-order degradation. A wide range of acquifier conditions and remediation systems commonly encountered in the field can be simulated. Notable boundary condition (BC) options include, a combined rechargemore » and drain BC for simulating recirculation wells, and a head dependent well BC that computes flow based on specified drawdown. The code is designed to handle highly heterogenous, multi-layer, acquifer systems in a numerically efficient manner. Subsurface structure is represented with vertically distorted rectangular brick elements in a Cartesian system. The groundwater flow equation is approximated using the Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with an efficient symmetric Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) ICCG matrix solver. The solute transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual finite element method designed to alleviate numerical oscillation. An efficient asymmetric PCG (ORTHOMIN) matrix solver is employed for transport. For both the flow and transport equations, element matrices are computed from either influence coefficient formulas for speed, or two point Gauss-Legendre quadrature for accuracy. Non-linear flow problems can be solved using either Newton-Ralphson linearization or Picard iteration, with under-relaxation formulas to further enhance convergence. Dynamic memory allocation is implemented using Fortran 90 constructs. FACT coding is clean and modular.« less

  7. Distribution and mass balance of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in a subsurface, horizontal flow (SF-h) constructed wetland operating as post-treatment of textile wastewater for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Fibbi, Donatella; Doumett, Saer; Lepri, Luciano; Checchini, Leonardo; Gonnelli, Cristina; Coppini, Ester; Del Bubba, Massimo

    2012-01-15

    In this study, during a two-year period, we investigated the fate of hexavalent and trivalent chromium in a full-scale subsurface horizontal flow constructed wetland planted with Phragmites australis. The reed bed operated as post-treatment of the effluent wastewater from an activated sludge plant serving the textile industrial district and the city of Prato (Italy). Chromium speciation was performed in influent and effluent wastewater and in water-suspended solids, at different depths and distances from the inlet; plants were also analyzed for total chromium along the same longitudinal profile. Removals of hexavalent and trivalent chromium equal to 72% and 26%, respectively were achieved. The mean hexavalent chromium outlet concentration was 1.6 ± 0.9 μg l(-1) and complied with the Italian legal limits for water reuse. Chromium in water-suspended solids was in the trivalent form, thus indicating that its removal from wastewater was obtained by the reduction of hexavalent chromium to the trivalent form, followed by accumulation of the latter inside the reed bed. Chromium in water-suspended solids was significantly affected by the distance from the inlet. Chromium concentrations in the different plant organs followed the same trend of suspended solids along the longitudinal profile and were much lower than those found in the solid material, evidencing a low metal accumulation in P. australis. PMID:22104764

  8. Paracetamol removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Verlicchi, Paola; Young, Thomas M.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryIn this study two pilot scale Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands (HSFCWs) near Lecce, Italy, planted with different macrophytes ( Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia) and an unplanted control were assessed for their effectiveness in removing paracetamol. Residence time distributions (RTDs) for the two beds indicated that the Typha bed was characterized by a void volume fraction (porosity) of 0.16 and exhibited more ideal plug flow behavior (Pe = 29.7) than the Phragmites bed (Pe = 26.7), which had similar porosity. The measured hydraulic residence times in the planted beds were 35.8 and 36.7 h when the flow was equal to 1 m 3/d. The Phragmites bed exhibited a range of paracetamol removals from 51.7% for a Hydraulic Loading Rate (HLR) of 240 mm/d to 87% with 120 mm/d HLR and 99.9% with 30 mm/d. The Typha bed showed a similar behavior with percentages of removal slightly lower, ranging from 46.7% (HLR of 240 mm/d) to >99.9% (hydraulic loading rate of 30 mm/d). At the same HLR values the unplanted bed removed between 51.3% and 97.6% of the paracetamol. In all three treatments the paracetamol removal was higher with flow of 1 m 3/d and an area of approx. 7.5 m 2 (half bed) than in the case of flow equal to 0.5 m 3/d with a surface treatment of approx. 3.75 m 2. A first order model for paracetamol removal was evaluated and half lives of 5.16 to 10.2 h were obtained.

  9. Solar Subsurface Flows derived with Ring-Diagram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, R.; Howe, R.; Gonzalez Hernandez, I.; Hill, F.; Haber, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Local helioseismology makes it possible to map the horizontal flows in the outer convection zone of the Sun. For the ring-diagram analysis, we start from full-disk Doppler velocity images of the Sun and track a region at about the surface rotation rate for a period of a day. Each tracked data cube of velocity is then Fourier transformed. The resulting 3-D power spectrum shows structures that correspond to the acoustic waves. These structures appear as rings in a 2-D plane at a given temporal frequency. Since acoustic waves are advected by subsurface flows, the velocity of these horizontal flows can be determined from the offset of the ring centers. Using ring-diagram analysis of Doppler images of the Sun obtained with the ground-based Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft (SOHO), we are studying, for example, the large-scale subsurface flows (E-W rotation and N-S meridional flow) and their variation with the solar cycle of magnetic activity. We are also studying subsurface flows associated with active regions on the Sun focusing on their evolution (emergence and decay). In addition, we have started to analyze data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. We will present some recent results.

  10. Flow stabilization by subsurface phonons

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, M. I.; Biringen, S.; Bilal, O. R.; Kucala, A.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a fluid and a solid surface in relative motion represents a dynamical process that is central to the problem of laminar-to-turbulent transition (and consequent drag increase) for air, sea and land vehicles, as well as long-range pipelines. This problem may in principle be alleviated via a control stimulus designed to impede the generation and growth of instabilities inherent in the flow. Here, we show that phonon motion underneath a surface may be tuned to passively generate a spatio-temporal elastic deformation profile at the surface that counters these instabilities. We theoretically demonstrate this phenomenon and the underlying mechanism of frequency-dependent destructive interference of the unstable flow waves. The converse process of flow destabilization is illustrated as well. This approach provides a condensed-matter physics treatment to fluid–structure interaction and a new paradigm for flow control. PMID:27547095

  11. Plants as ecosystem engineers in subsurface-flow treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tanner, C C

    2001-01-01

    Mass balance performance data from side by side studies of planted and unplanted gravel-bed treatment wetlands with horizontal subsurface-flow are compared. Planted systems showed enhanced nitrogen and initial phosphorus removal, but only small improvements in disinfection, BOD, COD and suspended solids removal. Direct nutrient uptake by plants was insufficient to account for more than a fraction of the improved removal shown by planted systems. Roles of plants as ecosystem engineers are summarised, with organic matter production and root-zone oxygen release identified as key factors influencing nutrient transformation and sequestration. PMID:11804163

  12. Magnetic Polarity Streams and Subsurface Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, R.; Baker, D.; Harra, L.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.; González Hernández, I.

    2013-12-01

    An important feature of the solar cycle is the transport of unbalanced magnetic flux from active regions towards the poles, which eventually results in polarity reversal. This transport takes the form of distinct “polarity streams” that are visible in the magnetic butterfly diagram. We compare the poleward migration rate estimated from such streams to that derived from the subsurface meridional flows measured in helioseismic data from the GONG network since 2001, and find that the results are in reasonable agreement.

  13. Inlet Jet Interaction in Horizontal Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph

    2012-11-01

    Laminar incompressible flow (Re < 1000) inside a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. First, two cross-flow inlets were used to observe the flow interference phenomenon between the inlets. This concept was extended to axisymmetric pipe flow with five cross-flow inlets. Three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The effects of inlet pressure and different inlet sizes on the flow regimes under steady state condition were studied. A hydrostatic model of fluid reservoirs draining into the channel was constructed using a linear function for pressure at the inlet boundaries to study the dynamic behavior of the inlets. Three different time scales related to the depletion of the reservoirs were identified. The dynamic behavior of two cross-flow inlets was observed with the initial conditions corresponding to the three flow regimes. Similar study was carried out for a five-inlet case and the dynamic behavior of individual reservoirs was observed. The change of flow regimes in the system over time with reservoir draining was evident and the different time-scales involved were identified. Supported in Part by Apache Corporation.

  14. Phononic subsurface: Flow stabilization by crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahmoud I.; Biringen, Sedat; Bilal, Osama R.; Kucala, Alec

    2015-11-01

    Flow control is a century-old problem where the goal is to alter a flow's natural state to achieve improved performance, such as delay of laminar-to-turbulent transition or reduction of drag in a fully developed turbulent flow. Meeting this goal promises to significantly reduce the dependence on fossil fuels for global transport. In this work, we show that phonon motion underneath a surface interacting with a flow may be tuned to cause the flow to stabilize, or destabilize, as desired. This concept is demonstrated by simulating a fully developed plane Poiseuille (channel) flow whereby a small portion of an otherwise rigid wall is replaced with a one-dimensional phononic crystal. A Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is introduced to the flow as an evolving disturbance. Upon tuning the frequency-dependent phase and amplitude relations of the surface of the phononic crystal that interfaces with the flow, the TS wave is shown to stabilize, or destabilize, as needed. A theory of subsurface phonons is presented that provides an accurate prediction of this behavior without the need for a flow simulation. This represents an unprecedented capability to passively synchronize wave propagation across a fluid-structure interface and achieve favorable, and predictable, alterations to the flow properties. National Science Foundation, Grant No. 1131802.

  15. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  16. Review of Constructed Subsurface Flow vs. Surface Flow Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    HALVERSON, NANCY

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to use existing documentation to review the effectiveness of subsurface flow and surface flow constructed wetlands in treating wastewater and to demonstrate the viability of treating effluent from Savannah River Site outfalls H-02 and H-04 with a subsurface flow constructed wetland to lower copper, lead and zinc concentrations to within National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit limits. Constructed treatment wetlands are engineered systems that have been designed and constructed to use the natural functions of wetlands for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetlands have significantly lower total lifetime costs and often lower capital costs than conventional treatment systems. The two main types of constructed wetlands are surface flow and subsurface flow. In surface flow constructed wetlands, water flows above ground. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands are designed to keep the water level below the top of the rock or gravel media, thus minimizing human and ecological exposure. Subsurface flow wetlands demonstrate higher rates of contaminant removal per unit of land than surface flow (free water surface) wetlands, therefore subsurface flow wetlands can be smaller while achieving the same level of contaminant removal. Wetlands remove metals using a variety of processes including filtration of solids, sorption onto organic matter, oxidation and hydrolysis, formation of carbonates, formation of insoluble sulfides, binding to iron and manganese oxides, reduction to immobile forms by bacterial activity, and uptake by plants and bacteria. Metal removal rates in both subsurface flow and surface flow wetlands can be high, but can vary greatly depending upon the influent concentrations and the mass loading rate. Removal rates of greater than 90 per cent for copper, lead and zinc have been demonstrated in operating surface flow and subsurface flow wetlands. The constituents that exceed NPDES limits at outfalls H-02 a nd H

  17. The Lakshmi Plateau structure as an indicator of asthenosphere horizontal flows on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pronin, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of Lakshmi Planum in the western part of Ishtar Terra in a fold-fault setting which conforms to the basic massif of the plateau with eruptive centers is constructed concentrically and is interpreted from the point of view of the subsurface flow of materials in the form of horizontally diverging asthenospheric flows and gravitational creep. The surrounding structures are formed by the deformation of the more rigid lithosphere as it breaks away from the asthenospheric flow.

  18. Subsurface flow and vegetation patterns in tidal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, Nadia; Silvestri, Sonia; Marani, Marco

    2004-05-01

    Tidal environments are characterized by a complex interplay of hydrological, geomorphic, and biological processes, and their understanding and modeling thus require the explicit description of both their biotic and abiotic components. In particular, the presence and spatial distribution of salt marsh vegetation (a key factor in the stabilization of the surface soil) have been suggested to be related to topographic factors and to soil moisture patterns, but a general, process-based comprehension of this relationship has not yet been achieved. The present paper describes a finite element model of saturated-unsaturated subsurface flow in a schematic salt marsh, driven by tidal fluctuations and evapotranspiration. The conditions leading to the establishment of preferentially aerated subsurface zones are studied, and inferences regarding the development and spatial distribution of salt marsh vegetation are drawn, with important implications for the overall ecogeomorphological dynamics of tidal environments. Our results show that subsurface water flow in the marsh induces complex water table dynamics, even when the tidal forcing has a simple sinusoidal form. The definition of a space-dependent aeration time is then proposed to characterize root aeration. The model shows that salt marsh subsurface flow depends on the distance from the nearest creek or channel and that the subsurface water movement near tidal creeks is both vertical and horizontal, while farther from creeks, it is primarily vertical. Moreover, the study shows that if the soil saturated conductivity is relatively low (10-6 m s-1, values quite common in salt marsh areas), a persistently unsaturated zone is present below the soil surface even after the tide has flooded the marsh; this provides evidence of the presence of an aerated layer allowing a prolonged presence of oxygen for aerobic root respiration. The results further show that plant transpiration increases the extent and persistence of the aerated

  19. Axisymmetric, Ventilated Supercavitation in Unsteady, Horizontal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Ellison; Lee, Seung-Jae; Arndt, Roger

    2012-11-01

    Drag reduction and/or speed augmentation of marine vehicles by means of supercavitation is a topic of great interest. During the initial launch of a supercavitating vehicle, an artificial supercavity is required until the vehicle can reach conditions at which a natural supercavity can be sustained. Previous studies at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) focused on the behavior of ventilated supercavities in steady horizontal flows. In open waters, vehicles can encounter unsteady flows, especially when traveling under waves. A study has been carried out at SAFL to investigate the effects of unsteady flow on axisymmetric supercavities. An attempt is made to duplicate sea states seen in open waters. In an effort to track cavity dimensions throughout a wave cycle, an automated cavity tracking script has been developed. Using a high speed camera and the proper software, it is possible to synchronize cavity dimensions with pressure measurements taken inside the cavity. Results regarding supercavity shape, ventilation demand, cavitation parameters and closure methods are presented. It was found that flow unsteadiness caused a decrease in the overall length of the supercavity while having only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter. The supercavity volume varied with cavitation number and a possible relationship between the two is being explored. (Supported by ONR)

  20. Analysis of riverbed temperatures to determine the geometry of subsurface water flow around in-stream geomorphological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Matthias; Oswald, Sascha E.; Schmidt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    The analytical evaluation of diurnal temperature variation in riverbed sediments provides detailed information on exchange fluxes between rivers and groundwater. The underlying assumption of the stationary, one-dimensional vertical flow field is frequently violated in natural systems where subsurface water flow often has a significant horizontal component. In this paper, we present a new methodology for identifying the geometry of the subsurface flow field using vertical temperature profiles. The statistical analyses are based on model optimisation and selection and are used to evaluate the shape of vertical amplitude ratio profiles. The method was applied to multiple profiles measured around in-stream geomorphological structures in a losing reach of a gravel bed river. The predominant subsurface flow field was systematically categorised in purely vertical and horizontal (hyporheic, parafluvial) components. The results highlight that river groundwater exchange flux at the head, crest and tail of geomorphological structures significantly deviated from the one-dimensional vertical flow, due to a significant horizontal component. The geometry of the subsurface water flow depended on the position around the geomorphological structures and on the river level. The methodology presented in this paper features great potential for characterising the spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of complex subsurface flow geometries by using measured temperature time series in vertical profiles.

  1. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Field, Erin K.; Lau, Maggie; Chivian, Dylan; Van Heerden, Esta; Wommack, K. Eric; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a 3 km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32% of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment. PMID:25954269

  2. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Field, Erin K; Lau, Maggie; Chivian, Dylan; Van Heerden, Esta; Wommack, K Eric; Kieft, Thomas L; Onstott, Tullis C; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a 3 km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32% of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment. PMID:25954269

  3. BPA and NP removal from municipal wastewater by tropical horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Toro-Vélez, A F; Madera-Parra, C A; Peña-Varón, M R; Lee, W Y; Bezares-Cruz, J C; Walker, W S; Cárdenas-Henao, H; Quesada-Calderón, S; García-Hernández, H; Lens, P N L

    2016-01-15

    It has been recognized that numerous synthetic compounds like Bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenols (NP) are present in effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) at levels of parts per billion (μg L(-1)) or even parts per trillion (ng L(-1)) with a high potential to cause endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment. Constructed wetlands (CW) are a cost-effective wastewater treatment alternative with promising performance to treat these afore mentioned compounds. This research was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CW treatment of WWTP effluent for mitigating the effects endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). This research goal was accomplished by (1) quantifying the removal of BPA and NP in CWs; (2) isolating CW fungal strains and testing for laccase production; and (3) performing endocrine disruption (reproduction) bioassays using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Three pilot scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF-CW) were operated for eight weeks: one planted with Phragmites australis; one planted with Heliconia psitacorum; and one unplanted. The Heliconia CW showed a removal efficiency of 73.3(± 19%) and 62.8(± 20.1%) for BPA and NP, respectively; while the Phragmites CW demonstrated a similar removal for BPA (70.2 ± 27%) and lower removal efficiency for NP 52.1(± 37.1%).The unplanted CW achieved 62.2 (± 33%) removal for BPA and 25.3(± 37%) removal for NP. Four of the eleven fungal strains isolated from the Heliconia-CW showed the capacity to produce laccase. Even though complete removal of EDCs was not achieved by the CWs, the bioassay confirmed a significant improvement (p < 0.05) in fly viability for all CWs, with Heliconia sp. being the most effective at mitigating adverse effects on first and second generational reproduction. This study showed that a CW planted with a native Heliconia sp. CW demonstrated a higher removal of endocrine disrupting compounds and better mitigation of reproductive disruption in the

  4. A Helioseismic Survey to Investigate Relationships between Subsurface Flows beneath Large Active Regions and Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Leka, K D.; Barnes, Graham

    2014-06-01

    A survey of the subsurface flow properties of about 120 of the largest active regions, determined from the application of helioseismic holography to Dopplergrams obtained with the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, is being carried out. The overriding goal is to characterize differences in the subsurface flows between active regions associated with eruptive flares and the flows observed in relatively quiescent regions. Applications to flare forecasting comprise only one part of this investigation, since the potential response of the subsurface environment to eruptive events during and after their occurrence is also of scientific interest. Other priorities include understanding the limitations of the helioseismic methods, identifying and correcting systematic effects, and validating the reliability of the measurements using artificial data. While inversions to determine the variation with depth of subsurface flows are planned, preliminary results will be discussed which make use of proxies for near-surface depth-integrated properties, including the horizontal component of the flow divergence and the vertical component of the flow vorticity.This work is supported by the Solar Terrestrial Program of the National Science Foundation, through grant AGS-1127327, and by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration SBIR program.

  5. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Winkler, G.; Birk, S.

    2016-05-01

    Preferential flow patterns in the subsurface are of great importance for the availability and the quality of water resources. However, knowledge of their spatial structure is still behind their importance, so that understanding the nature of preferential flow patterns is a major issue in subsurface hydrology. Comparing the statistics of river catchment sizes and spring discharges, we found that the morphology of preferential subsurface flow patterns is probably scale invariant and similar to that of dendritic river networks. This result is not limited to karstic aquifers where the occurrence of dendritic structures has been known at least qualitatively for a long time. The scale invariance even seems to be independent of the lithology of the aquifer. However, scale invariance of river patterns seems to be only limited by the continental scale, while scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns breaks down at much smaller scales. The upper limit of scale invariance in subsurface flow patterns is highly variable. We found a range from thousands of square kilometers for limestone aquifers down to less than 1 km2 in the weathered zone and debris accumulations of crystalline rocks.

  6. Imaging lateral groundwater flow in the shallow subsurface using stochastic temperature fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, Jerry P.; Nicholson, Kirsten N.

    2006-04-01

    Although temperature has often been used as an indication of vertical groundwater movement, its usefulness for identifying horizontal fluid flow has been limited by the difficulty of obtaining sufficient data to draw defensible conclusions. Here we use stochastic simulation to develop a high-resolution image of fluid temperatures in the shallow subsurface at Borax Lake, Oregon. The temperature field inferred from the geostatistical simulations clearly shows geothermal fluids discharging from a group of fault-controlled hydrothermal springs, moving laterally through the subsurface, and mixing with shallow subsurface flow originating from nearby Borax Lake. This interpretation of the data is supported by independent geochemical and isotopic evidence, which show a simple mixing trend between Borax Lake water and discharge from the thermal springs. It is generally agreed that stochastic simulation can be a useful tool for extracting information from complex and/or noisy data and, although not appropriate in all situations, geostatistical analysis may provide good definition of flow paths in the shallow subsurface. Although stochastic imaging techniques are well known in problems involving transport of species, e.g. delineation of contaminant plumes from soil gas survey data, we are unaware of previous applications to the transport of thermal energy for the purpose of inferring shallow groundwater flow.

  7. Formation damage effects on horizontal-well flow efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, G.; Dupuy, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Wellbore damage commonly is accounted for by an apparent skin factor. A better relative index for determining the efficiency with which a well has been drilled and completed is the flow efficiency, the ration of a well's actual PI to ideal PI. The flow efficiency of horizontal wells is derived assuming steady-state flow of an incompressible fluid in a homogeneous, anisotropic medium. A comparison between the flow efficiencies of vertical and horizontal wells indicates that permeability reduction around the wellbore is less detrimental to horizontal wells. This paper shows that the effect of damage around a horizontal wellbore is reduced slightly by increasing the well length. Conversely, if the vertical permeability is less than the horizontal permeability, the anisotropy ratio, {radical} k{sub H}/k{sub V}, magnifies the influence of formation damage near the horizontal wellbore. Examples of flow efficiency calculations assuming a formation damage or a formation collapse around a liner in poorly consolidated formations are provided for horizontal and vertical wells.

  8. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  9. Analysis of nitrogen removal processes in a subsurface flow carbonate sand filter treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kløve, Bjørn; Søvik, Anne-Kristine; Holtan-Hartwig, Liv

    2005-01-01

    Controlled experiments were carried out in a mesoscale subsurface flow sand filter treating municipal wastewater from a single household. The system consisted of a 50 cm high vertical flow column (pre-filter) with unsaturated flow and a 3 m long horizontal subsurface flow unit (main filter) with saturated flow. Fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were analyzed in 4 different operating conditions (low and high loading, with and without the prefilter unit). Water samples were taken from the inlet, the outlet and within the sand filter at different depths and locations and analysed for water quality (Tot N, NO3-N, NH4-N, TOC, DOC, CODcr, BOD5, SS, pH, and EC) and dissolved gas content (N2O, CH4, and CO2). Emissions of N2O, CH4, and CO2 were measured with the closed-chamber technique adjacent to water quality sampling points. The results show that prefiltering in a vertical, unsaturated flow column changed the incoming ammonium to nitrate during low loading. During high loading part of the ammonium nitrified in the pre-filter was lost by denitrification. Within the horizontal main filter there were two pathways for the incoming nitrate: denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). PMID:15921289

  10. Horizontal Flows in the Photosphere and Subphotosphere of Two Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    We compare horizontal flow fields in the photosphere and in the subphotosphere (a layer 0.5 megameters below the photosphere) in two solar active regions: AR11084 and AR11158. AR11084 is a mature, simple active region without significant flaring activity, and AR11158 is a multipolar, complex active region with magnetic flux emerging during the period studied. Flows in the photosphere are derived by applying the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms (DAVE4VM) on HMI-observed vector magnetic fields, and the subphotospheric flows are inferred by time-distance helioseismology using HMI-observed Dopplergrams. Similar flow patterns are found for both layers for AR11084: inward flows in the sunspot umbra and outward flows surrounding the sunspot. The boundary between the inward and outward flows, which is slightly different in the photosphere and the subphotosphere, is within the sunspot penumbra. The area having inward flows in the subphotosphere is larger than that in the photosphere. For AR11158, flows in these two layers show great similarities in some areas and significant differences in other areas. Both layers exhibit consistent outward flows in the areas surrounding sunspots. On the other hand, most well-documented flux-emergence-related flow features seen in the photosphere do not have counterparts in the subphotosphere. This implies that the horizontal flows caused by flux emergence do not extend deeply into the subsurface.

  11. Influence of lateral subsurface flow and connectivity on soil water storage in land surface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jonggun; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral surface/subsurface flow and their connectivity play a significant role in redistributing soil water, which has a direct effect on biological, chemical, and geomorphological processes in the root zone (~1 m). However, most of the land surface models neglect the horizontal exchanges of water at the grid or subgrid scales, focusing only on the vertical exchanges of water as one-dimensional process. To develop better hydrologic understanding and modeling capability in complex landscapes, in this study we added connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow algorithms in the Community Land Model. To demonstrate the impact of lateral flow and connectivity on soil water storage we designed three cases including the following: (1) with complex surface topography only, (2) with complex surface topography in upper soil layers and soil hydraulic properties with uniform anisotropy. and (3) with complex surface topography and soil hydraulic properties with spatially varying anisotropy. The connectivity was considered as an indicator for the variation of anisotropy in the case 3, which was created by wetness conditions or geophysical controls (e.g., soil type, normalized difference vegetation index, and topographic index). These cases were tested in two study sites (ER 5 field and ER-sub watershed in Oklahoma) comparing to the field (gravimetric and remote sensing) soil moisture observations. Through the analysis of spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of soil moisture predictions from the study cases, surface topography was found to be a crucial control in demonstrating the variation of near surface soil moisture, but not significantly affected the subsurface flow in deeper soil layers. In addition, we observed the best performance in case 3 representing that the lateral connectivity can contribute effectively to quantify the anisotropy and redistributing soil water in the root zone. Hence, the approach with connectivity-based lateral subsurface flow was able to better

  12. Time-distance helioseismology of subsurface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Thompson, Michael J.

    2003-02-01

    We revisit the work of Giles (1999) in an attempt to extend the work on large scale flows using the technique of time-distance helioseismology. The basic process and techniques are discussed and some initial results are shown. The behaviour of the meridional and zonal flows is found to be similar to that found by Giles and separately by ring diagram methods (Haber et al. 2002).

  13. Effects of hillslope geometry on surface and subsurface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzevari, T.; Noroozpour, S.

    2014-07-01

    Dividing a catchment to subcatchment or hillslope scales allows for better scrutiny of the changes in spatial distribution of rainfall, soil attributes and plant cover across the catchment. An instantaneous unit hydrograph model is suggested for simulating runoff hydrographs for complex hillslopes. This model is able to estimate surface and subsurface flows of the catchment based on the Dunne-Black mechanism. For this purpose, a saturation model is used to separate the saturated and unsaturated zones in complex hillslopes. The profile curvatures (concave, straight and convex) and plan shapes (convergent, parallel and divergent) of complex hillslopes are considered, in order to compute the travel time of surface and subsurface flows. The model was used for prediction of the direct runoff hydrograph and subsurface flow hydrograph of Walnut Gulch No. 125 catchment in Arizona (USA). Based on results, the geometry of hillslopes can change the peak of the direct runoff hydrograph up to two-fold, either higher or lower. The divergent hillslopes show higher peaks in comparison with the parallel and convergent hillslopes. The highest and lowest peak flows correspond to divergent-concave and convergent-straight hillslopes, respectively.

  14. Horizontal Transfer of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in the Subsurface of a Poultry Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Ward, M.; Hilpert, M.

    2008-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are considered to be important man-made reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. At a poultry farm, we, together with Mr.~James Doolittle from USDA, measured the apparent subsurface electrical conductivity (ECa) using a EM38 meter. The resulting ECaR) associated with the poultry farm due to the fact that tetracycline (Tc) is one of the most frequently used antibiotics in food animal production and therefore is probably used at this farm. Soil and aquifer samples were taken from the farm. TcR bacteria were detected, with higher concentrations in the top layer of soil than in the aquifer. TcR bacteria were then enriched from a soil sample, and two classes of TcR genes were detected: tet(M) genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins and tet(L) genes encoding tet efflux pumps. Sequences of the PCR products were compared to known tet(M) and tet(L) genes in GenBank using BLASTN. Phylogenetic trees were also built based on the sequence information. The tet(M) genes found in our soil sample were highly similar to those located on transposons. In a soil microcosm experiment, we used the aforementioned soil sample as incubation medium as well as genetic donor (TcR soil bacteria), and a green fluorescent strain of E. coli as a model genetic recipient to study horizontal transfer of TcR genes from soil bacteria to naïve bacteria. Concentrations of inoculated E. coli were continuously monitored for 15 days, TcR E. coli isolated, and colony PCR performed. The tet(M) genes were found to be transferred to naïve E. coli. The highest horizontal transfer ratio, 0.62 transconjugant per recipient, was observed when Tc was supplemented to a soil microcosm at a concentration of 140 μg/kg soil. Modeling is also ongoing to obtain a better understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  15. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  16. Connecting Surface Planting with Subsurface Erosion Due to Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, M.; Curran, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Bank erosion and failure is a major contributor of fine sediment to streams and rivers, and can be driven by subsurface flow. In restoration projects, vegetation is often planted on banks to reduce erosion and stabilize the banks. However, the relationship between subsurface flow, erosion and vegetation remains somewhat speculative. A comparative study quantified the effect of surface planting on subsurface erosion and soil strength. Six 32-gallon containers were layered with a sandy loam overlying a highly conductive sand layer and a confining clay. Three treatments were applied in pairs: switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), sod (turf-type tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass mix), and no vegetation. After a vegetation establishment period, the 2, 10, and 100 year rainfalls were simulated. Samples collected from ports in the containers were analyzed for subsurface drainage volume and suspended sediment concentration. After all rainfall simulations, a sediment core was taken from each container to measure shear strength and root density. Results indicate the relative benefits of vegetative planting to reduce subsurface erosion during storms and enhance soil strength. Switchgrass reduced the total amount of sediment removed from containers during all three storms when compared to the sod and during the 10 and 100 year storms when compared to the bare ground. Results from the volume analysis were more variable. Switchgrass retained the greatest volume of water from the 100 year storm event, but also released the largest fraction of water in the 2 and 10 year storms. Both sod and switchgrass planting considerably increased the time required for the soil samples to fail despite reducing the shear stress at failure. Where switchgrass grew long, woody roots, the sod developed a dense mat of interconnected thin roots. We suspect the different root patterns between sod and switchgrass to be a dominant factor in the response of the different containers.

  17. Pore geometry, avalanching, and subsurface flow: A sand infiltration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardson, R.; Hunt, J. R.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    The deposition of sand into gravel riverbeds has been well-documented, along with its negative impacts on developing salmon eggs and riverbank extraction for water supplies. Dam releases may be used on regulated rivers to flush the bed of fine sediment, but it is not generally known how deep the sand deposit extends or how much sand is there. One-dimensional (plane-bed) experiments consistently show that the depth of infiltration is a function of the sand and gravel grain size distributions and that the saturation sand fraction is near 8-10%. However, precise empirical relationships developed in individual studies do poorly at predicting the results of other experiments. Furthermore, no infiltration model includes the effect of flow conditions in the water column, although flow conditions clearly impact the deposit characteristics. We propose a mechanistic model for the infiltration of fine sediment and compare its predictions to the results of two recent infiltration experiments. This model is based on geometric arguments about pore and particle shape and five mechanisms: particle settling, particle capture, subsurface avalanching, average subsurface flow, and subsurface pressure fluctuations. The model successfully predicts for both experiments the fraction of sand deposited and the shape of that deposit as a function of depth.

  18. The role of fragipan soils properties for hillslope subsurface flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, Helen; Easton, Zachary; Brown, Larry; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2010-05-01

    In watersheds characterized by fragipan, soils runoff generation is traditionally assumed to be dominated by shallow subsurface flow perched by a nearly impenetrable, low-conductive, subsurface soil horizon. However, several irrigation studies have indicated that fragipan soils can conduct subsurface flow vertically in considerable amounts resulting from differences in fragipan properties (e.g., prism diameter, interprism cracks, etc). These fragipan properties remain difficult to measure at the hillslope and watershed scales and consequently are inadequately accounted for in hydrological models. In the present study, a geophysical survey using ground penetrating radar of a 0.5 ha hillslope in central New York, USA has shown that spatial variability of the continuity and depth of fragipan soils is more influential on subsurface flow pathways than the physical characteristics of the fragipan itself. The geophysical survey revealed that the depth to fragipan varied between 0.3 and 0.8 m, resulting in water table and subsurface flow dynamics similar to the ‘fill and spill hypothesis'. The survey also indicated that the fragipan is interrupted by a higher conductive glacial sand lens that facilitates percolation of subsurface flow beneath the fragipan. The effect of the spatial variability of fragipan soils on subsurface flow pathways and flux was examined in further detail by installation of a 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m deep and 12.5 m long trench at the base of the 125 m long hillslope. The trench was installed in a variable source area (VSA) that forms at the base of the hillslope. The trench was instrumented with a surface flow collector measuring runoff from the upper 5 cm of the soil, and two collector drains installed at the soil-fragipan interface in 0.4 m depth and at the base of the trench (1.5 m depth). In addition, water levels were recorded at 5-min intervals in a 10 m x 10 m grid at the upslope contributing area of the trench. Soils in the study site are

  19. DETECTION OF SUPERSONIC HORIZONTAL FLOWS IN THE SOLAR GRANULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2009-07-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations of granular convection predict the existence of supersonic flows covering {approx}3%-4% of the solar surface at any time, but these flows have not been detected unambiguously as yet. Using data from the spectropolarimeter aboard the Hinode satellite, I present direct evidence of fast horizontal plasma motions in quiet-Sun granules. Their visibility increases toward the limb due to more favorable viewing conditions. At the resolution of Hinode, the horizontal flows give rise to asymmetric intensity profiles with very inclined blue wings and even line satellites located blueward of the main absorption feature. Doppler shifts of up to 9 km s{sup -1} are observed at the edges of bright granules, demonstrating that the flows reach supersonic speeds. The strongest velocities occur in patches of 0.''5 or less. They tend to be associated with enhanced continuum intensities, line widths, and equivalent widths, but large values of these parameters do not necessarily imply the existence of supersonic flows. Time series of spectropolarimetric measurements in regions away from the disk center show the transient nature of the strong horizontal motions, which last only for a fraction of the granule lifetime. Supersonic flows are expected to produce shocks at the boundaries between granules and intergranular lanes, and may also play a role in the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in quiet-Sun internetwork regions.

  20. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J; DePaolo, Donald J.; Pietraß, Tanja

    2015-05-22

    From beneath the surface of the earth, we currently obtain about 80-percent of the energy our nation consumes each year. In the future we have the potential to generate billions of watts of electrical power from clean, green, geothermal energy sources. Our planet’s subsurface can also serve as a reservoir for storing energy produced from intermittent sources such as wind and solar, and it could provide safe, long-term storage of excess carbon dioxide, energy waste products and other hazardous materials. However, it is impossible to underestimate the complexities of the subsurface world. These complexities challenge our ability to acquire the scientific knowledge needed for the efficient and safe exploitation of its resources. To more effectively harness subsurface resources while mitigating the impacts of developing and using these resources, the U.S. Department of Energy established SubTER – the Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut team. This DOE multi-office team engaged scientists and engineers from the national laboratories to assess and make recommendations for improving energy-related subsurface engineering. The SubTER team produced a plan with the overall objective of “adaptive control of subsurface fractures and fluid flow.”This plan revolved around four core technological pillars—Intelligent Wellbore Systems that sustain the integrity of the wellbore environment; Subsurface Stress and Induced Seismicity programs that guide and optimize sustainable energy strategies while reducing the risks associated with subsurface injections; Permeability Manipulation studies that improve methods of enhancing, impeding and eliminating fluid flow; and New Subsurface Signals that transform our ability to see into and characterize subsurface systems. The SubTER team developed an extensive R&D plan for advancing technologies within these four core pillars and also identified several areas where new technologies would require additional basic research

  1. Treatment of laboratory wastewater in a tropical constructed wetland comparing surface and subsurface flow.

    PubMed

    Meutia, A A

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater treatment by constructed wetland is an appropriate technology for tropical developing countries like Indonesia because it is inexpensive, easily maintained, and has environmentally friendly and sustainable characteristics. The aim of the research is to examine the capability of constructed wetlands for treating laboratory wastewater at our Center, to investigate the suitable flow for treatment, namely vertical subsurface or horizontal surface flow, and to study the effect of the seasons. The constructed wetland is composed of three chambered unplanted sedimentation tanks followed by the first and second beds, containing gravel and sand, planted with Typha sp.; the third bed planted with floating plant Lemna sp.; and a clarifier with two chambers. The results showed that the subsurface flow in the dry season removed 95% organic carbon (COD) and total phosphorus (T-P) respectively, and 82% total nitrogen (T-N). In the transition period from the dry season to the rainy season, COD removal efficiency decreased to 73%, T-N increased to 89%, and T-P was almost the same as that in the dry season. In the rainy season COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to 95% respectively, while T-P remained unchanged. In the dry season, COD and T-P concentrations in the surface flow showed that the removal efficiencies were a bit lower than those in the subsurface flow. Moreover, T-N removal efficiency was only half as much as that in the subsurface flow. However, in the transition period, COD removal efficiency decreased to 29%, while T-N increased to 74% and T-P was still constant, around 93%. In the rainy season, COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to almost 95%. On the other hand, T-P decreased to 76%. The results show that the constructed wetland is capable of treating the laboratory wastewater. The subsurface flow is more suitable for treatment than the surface flow, and the seasonal changes have effects on the removal efficiency. PMID:11804141

  2. Bacterial community dissimilarity between the surface and subsurface soils equals horizontal differences over several kilometers in the western Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haiyan; Sun, Huaibo; Tripathi, Binu M; Adams, Jonathan M; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Yangjian; Shi, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have investigated patterns in the near-surface soil microbial community over large spatial scales. However, less is known about variation in subsurface (15-30 cm of depth) microbial communities. Here we studied depth profiles of microbial communities in high-elevation soils from Tibet. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Alphaproteobacteria was higher in near-surface layers, while the relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Betaproteobacteria was higher in the subsurface samples. The microbial community structure was distinct between the surface and subsurface soil layers, strongly correlating with variation in total carbon (TC) and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N). The differences in the microbial community between the layers were about the same as the horizontal differences between sites separated by many kilometers. Overall, we found that TC and C/N were the best predictors for both surface and subsurface microbial community distribution. Exploration of the relative contribution of distance and environmental variables to community composition suggests that the contemporary environment is the primary driver of microbial distribution in this region. Reflecting niche conservatism in evolution, the microbial communities in each soil site and layer tended to be more phylogenetically clustered than expected by chance, and surface soil layer samples were more likely to be clustered than subsurface samples. PMID:26914676

  3. Subsurface flow mixing in coarse, braided river deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Emanuel; Huggenberger, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Coarse, braided river deposits show a large hydraulic heterogeneity on the metre scale. One of the main depositional elements found in such deposits is a trough structure filled with layers of bimodal gravel and open-framework gravel, the latter being highly permeable. However, the impact of such trough fills on subsurface flow and advective mixing has not drawn much attention. A geologically realistic model of trough fills is proposed and fitted to a limited number of ground-penetrating radar records surveyed on the river bed of the Tagliamento River (northeast Italy). A steady-state, saturated subsurface flow simulation is performed on the small-scale, high-resolution, synthetic model (size: 75 m × 80 m × 9 m). Advective mixing (i.e. streamline intertwining) is visualised and quantified based on particle tracking. The results indicate strong advective mixing as well as a large flow deviation induced by the asymmetry of the trough fills with regard to the main flow direction. The flow deviation induces a partial, large-scale rotational effect. These findings depict possible advective mixing found in natural environments and can guide the interpretation of ecological processes such as in the hyporheic zone.

  4. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  5. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis ["Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface," Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A2), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A2) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A2) and thus particle dispersion on O(A4). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  6. Phase-locked measurements of gas-liquid horizontal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2014-11-01

    A flow of gas and liquid in a horizontal pipe can be described in terms of various flow regimes, e.g. wavy stratified, annular or slug flow. These flow regimes appear at characteristic gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and feature unique wave phenomena. Wavy stratified flow is populated by low amplitude waves whereas annular flow contains high amplitude and long lived waves, so called disturbance waves, that play a key role in a liquid entrainment into the gas phase (droplets). In a slug flow regime, liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow. We use a refractive index matched dynamic shadowgraphy technique using a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation and development of features characteristic for the aforementioned flow regimes. We show that the wave dynamics become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the shadowgraphy measurements we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation, and (ii) statistical data on the downstream velocity distribution of different classes of waves. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  7. Solar-Cycle Evolution of Subsurface Flows and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Local helioseismology and magnetic field measurements from the HMI instrument on SDO provide unique high-resolution data that allow us to investigate detailed dynamics of the upper convection zone and its relation to the magnetic field evolution during the first five years of the current solar cycle. This study is focused on the understanding the role of the near-surface shear layer (NSSL) in the dynamo process, generation, emergence and transport of the solar magnetic flux. The helioseismology data represent 3D flow maps in the depth range of 0-20 Mm, obtained uninterruptedly every 8 hours for almost the whole solar disk with the spatial sampling of two arcsec. We calculate the flow characteristics (such as divergence, vorticity and kinetic helicity) on different spatio-temporal scales from supergranulation to global-scale zonal and meridional flows. We investigate the multi-scale organization of the subsurface flows, including the inflows into active regions, the hemispheric `flip-flop’ asymmetry of variations of the meridional flows, the structure and dynamics of torsional oscillations, and compare the flow behavior with the evolution of the observed magnetic activity of the current cycle.

  8. Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Swen O

    2002-08-01

    Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

  9. Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, S.O.

    2002-05-10

    Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

  10. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected. PMID:23005535

  11. Modelling bioclogging in variably saturated porous media and the interactions between surface/subsurface flows: Application to Constructed Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Samsó, Roger; García, Joan; Molle, Pascal; Forquet, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands (HF CWs) are biofilters planted with aquatic macrophytes within which wastewater is treated mostly through contact with bacterial biofilms. The high concentrations of organic carbon and nutrients being transported leads to high bacterial biomass production, which decreases the flow capacity of the porous material (bioclogging). In severe bioclogging scenarios, overland flow may take place, reducing overall treatment performance. In this work we developed a mathematical model using COMSOL Multiphysics™ and MATLAB(®) to simulate bioclogging effects in HF CWs. Variably saturated subsurface flow and overland flow were described using the Richards equation. To simplify the inherent complexity of the processes involved in bioclogging development, only one bacterial group was considered, and its growth was described using a Monod equation. Bioclogging effects on the hydrodynamics were taken into account by using a conceptual model that affects the value of Mualem's unsaturated relative permeability. Simulation results with and without bioclogging were compared to showcase the impact of this process on the overall functioning of CWs. The two scenarios rendered visually different bacteria distributions, flow and transport patterns, showing the necessity of including bioclogging effects on CWs models. This work represents one of the few studies available on bioclogging in variably saturated conditions, and the presented model allows simulating the interaction between overland and subsurface flow occurring in most HF CWs. Hence, this work gets us a step closer to being able to describe CWs functioning in an integrated way using mathematical models. PMID:26454071

  12. Pollutant removal from municipal wastewater employing baffled subsurface flow and integrated surface flow-floating treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Tanveer; Al-Muyeed, Abdullah; Afrin, Rumana; Rahman, Habibur; Sun, Guangzhi

    2014-04-01

    This article reports pollutant removal performances of baffled subsurface flow, and integrated surface flow-floating treatment wetland units, when arranged in series for the treatment of municipal wastewater in Bangladesh. The wetland units (of the hybrid system) included organic, inorganic media, and were planted with nineteen types of macrophytes. The wetland train was operated under hydraulic loading fluctuation and seasonal variation. The performance analyses (across the wetland units) illustrated simultaneous denitrification and organics removal rates in the first stage vertical flow wetland, due to organic carbon leaching from the employed organic media. Higher mean organics removal rates (656.0 g COD/(m(2)·day)) did not completely inhibit nitrification in the first stage vertical flow system; such pattern could be linked to effective utilization of the trapped oxygen, as the flow was directed throughout the media by the baffle walls. Second stage horizontal flow wetland showed enhanced biodegradable organics removal, which depleted organic carbon availability for denitrification. The final stage integrated wetland system allowed further nitrogen removal from wastewater, via nutrient uptake by plant roots (along with nitrification), and generation of organic carbon (by the dead macrophytes) to support denitrification. The system achieved higher E. coli mortality through protozoa predation, E. coli oxidation, and destruction by UV radiation. In general, enhanced pollutant removal efficiencies as demonstrated by the structurally modified hybrid wetland system signify the necessity of such modification, when operated under adverse conditions such as: substantial input organics loading, hydraulic loading fluctuation, and seasonal variation. PMID:25079402

  13. Physical-Based Inversion for Subsurface Flow and Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jiao, J.; Wang, D.; Irsa, J.

    2014-12-01

    A new and computationally efficient fluid flow and transport inverse theory has been developed for characterizing, calibrating, and modeling aquifers. The theory is capable of simultaneous estimation of model boundary conditions (for simple transient problems, also the initial conditions) and fluid flow and transport parameters, i.e., spatially distributed permeabilities, source/sink rates, storativity, and dispersivity. The theory is robust to measurement errors and strong parameter variability. Effective parameters can be estimated to represent unresolved heterogeneity, e.g., sub-grid features and spatially variable recharge. The theory has been extended to new problems including parameter structure identification, unsaturated and variably saturated flows (e.g., directly estimating the soil retention functions), joint flow and transport inversion (e.g., containment source identification), uncertainty analysis (e.g., integrating subsurface static and dynamic data via geostatistical inversion), and high performance computing (e.g., solving large inversion systems with parallel computing). This presentation will summarize the body of the inversion research and discuss new directions for future work.

  14. Simulating subsurface flow and transport on ultrascale computers using PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Mills, Richard; Lu, Chuan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2007-07-01

    We describe PFLOTRAN, a recently developed code for modeling multi-phase, multi-component subsurface flow and reactive transport using massively parallel computers. PFLOTRAN is built on top of PETSc, the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation. Leveraging PETSc has allowed us to develop—with a relatively modest investment in development effort—a code that exhibits excellent performance on the largest-scale supercomputers. Very significant enhancements to the code are planned during our SciDAC-2 project. Here we describe the current state of the code, present an example of its use on Jaguar, the Cray XT3/4 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consisting of 11706 dual-core Opteron processor nodes, and briefly outline our future plans for the code.

  15. Simulating Subsurface Flow and Transport on Ultrascale Computers using PFLOTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Richard T; Lu, Chuan; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We describe PFLOTRAN, a recently developed code for modeling multi-phase, multicomponent subsurface flow and reactive transport using massively parallel computers. PFLOTRAN is built on top of PETSc, the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation. Leveraging PETSc has allowed us to develop--with a relatively modest investment in development effort--a code that exhibits excellent performance on the largest-scale supercomputers. Very significant enhancements to the code are planned during our SciDAC-2 project. Here we describe the current state of the code, present an example of its use on Jaguar, the Cray XT3/4 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consisting of 11706 dual-core Opteron processor nodes, and briefly outline our future plans for the code.

  16. A vertical subsurface-flow constructed wetland in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. M.; Chen, B.; Zhou, J. B.; Li, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Xi, X. R.; Lin, C.; Chen, G. Q.

    2008-11-01

    Presented in this paper is an integrated cost and efficiency analysis of a pilot vertical subsurface-flow constructed wetland (CW) built up in 2004 near the Longdao River in Beijing, China. The CW has been monitored over one year and proved to be a good solution to treat the polluted water and restored the ecosystem health of the Longdao River. The modified CW system in accordance with local conditions costs less in construction, operation and maintenance than traditional wastewater treatment system and occupies less land than conventional CW. Also, derived from the efficiency analysis, the Longdao River CW provides better elimination effects for nutrient substances in the polluted river water and has stable performances in cold seasons.

  17. Evaluating the Effects of Horizontal Spatial Discretization on Interflow in the Soil Zone Using the Richards and Groundwater Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In many mountainous regions, a large proportion of streamflow originates as shallow subsurface storm flow (interflow) within the shallow soils of hillslopes. Infiltration can accumulate to form perched groundwater within the upper few meters of the soil horizon that drains to streams through both macropores and soil-matrix. Richards Equation has become a commonly used governing equation for simulating interflow in regional-scale models. Recent research has shown that optimal vertical discretization for Richards Equation near land surface and the water table is much smaller than the discretization typically used in basin-scale hydrologic models, yet little is known about optimal horizontal discretization or potential effects of horizontal discretization on interflow solutions. Most of the work related to the effects of discretization on the solution of Richards Equation has focused on the vertical infiltration problem. This study evaluates horizontal spatial discretization effects on interflow predictions using 1) a modified version of GSFLOW and 2) VS2DT. The modified GSFLOW couples Smith-Parlange 1-D infiltration equations with 3-D unconfined groundwater flow equation, whereas VS2DT uses Richards Equation to represent infiltration and variably saturated flow. Interflow solutions and breakthrough at the stream were compared using a model domain similar to Vauclin and others (1979) with horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 0.05-5m and vertical resolutions ranging between 0.05-1m, with horizontal flow path lengths of 25m to the stream. Variable horizontal spatial resolutions affected VS2DT interflow solutions (RMSE up to 0.12) and interflow breakthrough at the stream, whereas GSFLOW solutions were well correlated (RMSE <0.052). Interflow breakthrough was delayed by up to 10 days with increasing resolution in VS2DT, whereas GSFLOW breakthrough was consistently the same day. Results indicate that the solution of Richards Equation for soil-zone interflow is much

  18. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio {approximately}7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S. A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio ˜7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit.

  20. Analysis of horizontal flows in the solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Suematsu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Solar limb observations sometimes reveal the presence of a satellite lobe in the blue wing of the Stokes I profile from pixels belonging to granules. The presence of this satellite lobe has been associated in the past to strong line-of-sight gradients and, as the line-of-sight component is almost parallel to the solar surface, to horizontal granular flows. We aim to increase the knowledge about these horizontal flows studying a spectropolarimetric observation of the north solar pole. We will make use of two state of the art techniques, the spatial deconvolution procedure that increases the quality of the data removing the stray light contamination, and spectropolarimetric inversions that will provide the vertical stratification of the atmospheric physical parameters where the observed spectral lines form. We inverted the Stokes profiles using a two component configuration, obtaining that one component is strongly blueshifted and displays a temperature enhancement at upper photospheric layers while the second component has low redshifted velocities and it is cool at upper layers. In addition, we examined a large number of cases located at different heliocentric angles, finding smaller velocities as we move from the centre to the edge of the granule. Moreover, the height location of the enhancement on the temperature stratification of the blueshifted component also evolves with the spatial location on the granule being positioned on lower heights as we move to the periphery of the granular structure.

  1. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  2. Low volume fraction rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Te; Liu, Ta-Jo; Wu, Ping-Yao

    2007-12-01

    An experimental study was carried out to examine how uniform rimming flow is established for a very small volume fraction of aqueous Newtonian solutions in a partially filled rotating horizontal cylinder. There exists a certain critical volume fraction (Vc) for each solution, where the rotational speed required to achieve uniform rimming flow takes a minimum value. Counterintuitively, it takes greater rotation speeds for both larger and smaller volume fractions than this. Axial instabilities are observed for liquid volume fractions above or below this critical value. For V >Vc the defects are mainly of shark-teeth and turbulent types, while for V Vc, but has very little effect for V flow found in the present study is 0.25%. The dimensionless minimum rotational speed Ω to achieve rimming flow is presented as a function of the dimensionless liquid volume fraction ϕ. The competing effects of fluid inertia and viscous force on rimming flow are demonstrated from a dimensionless plot of Ω versus ϕ.

  3. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  4. Proper horizontal photospheric flows in a filament channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Roudier, T.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Malherbe, J. M.; Chandra, R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. An extended filament in the central part of the active region NOAA 11106 crossed the central meridian on Sept. 17, 2010 in the southern hemisphere. It has been observed in Hα with the THEMIS telescope in the Canary Islands and in 304 Å with the EUV imager (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Counterstreaming along the Hα threads and bright moving blobs (jets) along the 304 Å filament channel were observed during 10 h before the filament erupted at 17:03 UT. Aims: The aim of the paper is to understand the coupling between magnetic field and convection in filament channels and relate the horizontal photospheric motions to the activity of the filament. Methods: An analysis of the proper photospheric motions using SDO/HMI continuum images with the new version of the coherent structure tracking (CST) algorithm developed to track granules, as well as the large scale photospheric flows, was performed for three hours. Using corks, we derived the passive scalar points and produced a map of the cork distribution in the filament channel. Averaging the velocity vectors in the southern hemisphere in each latitude in steps of 3.5 arcsec, we defined a profile of the differential rotation. Results: Supergranules are clearly identified in the filament channel. Diverging flows inside the supergranules are similar in and out of the filament channel. Converging flows corresponding to the accumulation of corks are identified well around the Hα filament feet and at the edges of the EUV filament channel. At these convergence points, the horizontal photospheric velocity may reach 1 km s-1, but with a mean velocity of 0.35 km s-1. In some locations, horizontal flows crossing the channel are detected, indicating eventually large scale vorticity. Conclusions: The coupling between convection and magnetic field in the photosphere is relatively strong. The filament experienced the convection motions through its anchorage points with the photosphere, which are

  5. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  6. Fragipan controls on nitrogen loss by surface and subsurface flow pathways in an upland agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved understanding of nutrient transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways is critical to protecting water quality in agricultural watersheds. We sought to compare nitrogen loss in overland and subsurface flow on two opposing hillslopes (north versus south facing), each with contrasting so...

  7. Phosphorus transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways in an upland agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved understanding of phosphorus transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways is critical to protecting water quality in agricultural watersheds. While considerable attention has been devoted to understanding phosphorus losses in overland flow, comparatively limited research has examined ph...

  8. A coupled stream flow and depth-integrated subsurface flow model for catchment hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Weill, Sylvain; Ackerer, Philippe; Delay, Frederick

    2015-11-01

    Few hydrological models that couple stream flow and subsurface flow in shallow aquifers are based on a compromise between simple and complex depiction of the system, although this compromise could result in tractable tools for various applications. We present a depth-integrated approach in which flows in the vadose and saturated zones are assumed to be parallel to the bottom of the aquifer and thus are integrated in the direction normal to the bottom of the aquifer. The hydrodynamic parameters are also integrated in this direction, and gravity effects are preserved. Stream flow is handled by a diffusive-wave equation that is calculated over a network of one-dimensional bonds. The first-order coupling between the stream and subsurface flows exchanges water fluxes between the stream network and the subsurface compartment according to the hydraulic head differences between the systems. Three synthetic test cases, one including a comparison with a three-dimensional code, are used to evaluate the general behavior of the coupled model. It is shown that the approach reproduces the main hydrological features at the catchment scale, including the generation of runoff, infiltration-exfiltration into (from) the vadose zone, and smooth transient head variations in the aquifer.

  9. Flow interaction between multiple cross-flow inlets in a horizontal pipe or channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab N.; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph W.

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible flow in horizontal channels and pipes with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. Flow interference among the inlets was studied using an axisymmetric pipe flow model with five cross-flow inlets. Three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The effects of inlet pressure and inlet size on the flow regimes under steady state conditions were studied. The presence of these regimes was supported by field data obtained from a horizontal natural gas well at two different times in the production cycle. Using a hydrostatic pressure model of reservoirs as the inlet boundary condition that drained fluid into the channel, the dynamic interaction of the inlets was studied. The transient behavior of the flow regimes was simulated and the key time-scales involved were identified. This is supported by field data where a similar behavior can be observed over time. Initially, the upstream inlets were in a blocked state, but opened up at a later time, leading to a trickle flow regime. Supported in Part by Apache Corporation.

  10. Particle seeding flow system for horizontal shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Stephen; Garcia, Nicolas J.; Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2012-08-01

    The Extreme Fluids Team in P-23, Physics Division, studies fluid dynamics at high speeds using high resolution diagnostics. The unsteady forces on a particle driven by a shock wave are not well understood, and they are difficult to model. A horizontal shock tube (HST) is being modified to collect data about the behavior of particles accelerated by shocks. The HST has been used previously for studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), diagnostics that measure density and velocity. The purpose of our project is to design a flow system that will introduce particles into the HST. The requirements for this particle flow system (PFS) are that it be non-intrusive, be able to introduce either solid or liquid particles, have an exhaust capability, not interfere with existing diagnostics, and couple with the existing HST components. In addition, the particles must flow through the tube in a uniform way. We met these design criteria by first drawing the existing shock tube and diagnostics and doing an initial design of the ducts for the PFS. We then estimated the losses through the particle flow system from friction and researched possible fans that could be used to drive the particles. Finally, the most challenging component of the design was the coupling to the HST. If we used large inlets, the shock would lose strength as it passed by the inlet, so we designed a novel coupling inlet and outlet that minimize the losses to the shock wave. Our design was reviewed by the Extreme Fluids Team, and it is now being manufactured and built based upon our technical drawings.

  11. Simulating Subsurface Reactive Flows on Ultrascale Computers with PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Lu, C.; Smith, B. F.; Philip, B.

    2009-12-01

    To provide true predictive utility, subsurface simulations often must accurately resolve--in three dimensions--complicated, multi-phase flow fields in highly heterogeneous geology with numerous chemical species and complex chemistry. This task is especially daunting because of the wide range of spatial scales involved--from the pore scale to the field scale--ranging over six orders of magnitude, and the wide range of time scales ranging from seconds or less to millions of years. This represents a true "Grand Challenge" computational problem, requiring not only the largest-scale ("ultrascale") supercomputers, but accompanying advances in algorithms for the efficient numerical solution of systems of PDEs using these machines, and in mathematical modeling techniques that can adequately capture the truly multi-scale nature of these problems. We describe some of the specific challenges involved and present the software and algorithmic approaches that are being using in the computer code PFLOTRAN to provide scalable performance for such simulations on tens of thousands of processors. We focus particularly on scalable techniques for solving the large (up to billions of total degrees of freedom), sparse algebraic systems that arise. We also describe ongoing work to address disparate time and spatial scales by both the development of adaptive mesh refinement methods and the use of multiple continuum formulations. Finally, we present some examples from recent simulations conducted on Jaguar, the 150152 processor core Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is currently one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.

  12. Bacterial carbon utilization in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Alexandra; Langergraber, Günter; Watzinger, Andrea; Haberl, Raimund; Kirschner, Alexander K T

    2008-03-01

    Subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands with intermittent loading are considered as state of the art and can comply with stringent effluent requirements. It is usually assumed that microbial activity in the filter body of constructed wetlands, responsible for the removal of carbon and nitrogen, relies mainly on bacterially mediated transformations. However, little quantitative information is available on the distribution of bacterial biomass and production in the "black-box" constructed wetland. The spatial distribution of bacterial carbon utilization, based on bacterial (14)C-leucine incorporation measurements, was investigated for the filter body of planted and unplanted indoor pilot-scale constructed wetlands, as well as for a planted outdoor constructed wetland. A simple mass-balance approach was applied to explain the bacterially catalysed organic matter degradation in this system by comparing estimated bacterial carbon utilization rates with simultaneously measured carbon reduction values. The pilot-scale constructed wetlands proved to be a suitable model system for investigating microbial carbon utilization in constructed wetlands. Under an ideal operating mode, the bulk of bacterial productivity occurred within the first 10cm of the filter body. Plants seemed to have no significant influence on productivity and biomass of bacteria, as well as on wastewater total organic carbon removal. PMID:17991505

  13. Erosive dynamics of channels incised by subsurface water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkovsky, Alexander E.; Smith, Braunen E.; Kudrolli, Arshad; Mohrig, David C.; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2007-09-01

    We propose a dynamical model for channels incised into an erodible bed by subsurface water flow. The model is validated by the time-resolved topographic measurements of channel growth in a laboratory-scale experiment. Surface heights in the experiment are measured via a novel laser-aided imaging technique. The erosion rate in the model is composed of diffusive and advective components as well as a simple driving term due to the seeping water. Steady driving conditions may exist whenever channels are incised into a flat and level erodible bed by a water table replenished via steady (on average) rainfall. Under such steady driving conditions, the model predicts an asymptotically self-similar growing shape for the channel transects. Conversely, given a transect shape that evolved under steady driving conditions and an estimate of the erosion rate at the bottom of the channel, granular transport coefficients can be inferred from the static channel shape. We report an estimate of these transport coefficients for a system of ravines incised into unconsolidated sand in the Apalachicola River basin, Florida.

  14. Subsurface Water Flow and its Subsequent Impact on Chemical Behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of the subsurface stratigraphy on crop growth and agrichemical behavior has been studied for several years at the OPE3 research site located at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, in Beltsville Maryland. This site contains subsurface restricting layers that have been id...

  15. compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Uli; Oswald, Sascha; Thullner, Martin; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    A conceptual computer model has been constructed to simulate the compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. The model accounts for flow and transport in the variably saturated porous medium as well as biogeochemical change reactions. The most concentrated contaminants such as BTEX, MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons and dissolved as well as mineral phase electron acceptors are considered. Also of major interest are reduced species with high oxygen demand such as ammonium. The influence of marsh plants on microbial activity, gas transport, water balance and contaminant fate in general is matter of current investigation. The constructed wetlands consist of a coarse sand or fine gravel porous medium. Marsh plants were introduced after installation, however, a number of control basins are operated unplanted. Water levels and through flow rates are adjusted to optimize the remediation efficiency. The system is likely to be neither reaction nor mixing limited, thus both, values of dispersivity and degradation kinetics may be crucial for remediation efficiency. Biogeochemical modelling is able to delineate in detail (i) the zonation of processes, (ii) temporal variation (breakthrough curves) and (iii) mass balance information. The contributions of biodegradation and volatilisation and the influence of plants (compartment transfer) can generally best be evaluated by the component's mass balance. More efficient mixing is expected in the wetlands with open water body which leads to both, more biodegradation and volatilisation. An important task is to quantify the role of plants and root systems for contaminant attenuation in constructed wetlands. The long term goal of investigation is to allow for predictions for the design of large scale compartment transfer wetlands that may be applied to remediate the site as a whole.

  16. Statistical analysis of the horizontal divergent flow in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-10

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s{sup –1}. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s{sup –1}. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  17. Statistical Analysis of the Horizontal Divergent Flow in Emerging Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 1020 to 1022 Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s-1. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s-1. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  18. Shallow subsurface storm flow in a forested headwater catchment: Observations and modeling using a modified TOPMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Todd M.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hornberger, George M.; Clapp, Roger B.

    2000-09-01

    Transient, perched water tables in the shallow subsurface are observed at the South Fork Brokenback Run catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Crest piezometers installed along a hillslope transect show that the development of saturated conditions in the upper 1.5 m of the subsurface is controlled by total precipitation and antecedent conditions, not precipitation intensity, although soil heterogeneities strongly influence local response. The macroporous subsurface storm flow zone provides a hydrological pathway for rapid runoff generation apart from the underlying groundwater zone, a conceptualization supported by the two-storage system exhibited by hydrograph recession analysis. A modified version of TOPMODEL is used to simulate the observed catchment dynamics. In this model, generalized topographic index theory is applied to the subsurface storm flow zone to account for logarithmic storm flow recessions, indicative of linearly decreasing transmissivity with depth. Vertical drainage to the groundwater zone is required, and both subsurface reservoirs are considered to contribute to surface saturation.

  19. Shallow subsurface storm flow in a forested headwater catchment: Observations and modeling using a modified TOPMODEL

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, T.M.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Hornberger, G.M.; Clapp, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Transient, perched water tables in the shallow subsurface are observed at the South Fork Brokenback Run catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Crest piezometers installed along a hillslope transect show that the development of saturated conditions in the upper 1.5 m of the subsurface is controlled by total precipitation and antecedent conditions, not precipitation intensity, although soil heterogeneities strongly influence local response. The macroporous subsurface storm flow zone provides a hydrological pathway for rapid runoff generation apart from the underlying groundwater zone, a conceptualization supported by the two-storage system exhibited by hydrograph recession analysis. A modified version of TOPMODEL is used to simulate the observed catchment dynamics. In this model, generalized topographic index theory is applied to the subsurface storm flow zone to account for logarithmic storm flow recessions, indicative of linearly decreasing transmissivity with depth. Vertical drainage to the groundwater zone is required, and both subsurface reservoirs are considered to contribute to surface saturation.

  20. Polishing domestic wastewater on a subsurface flow constructed wetland: organic matter removal and microbial monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Pinto Mina, I; Costa, M; Matos, A; Sousa Coutinho Calheiros, C; Castro, P M L

    2011-01-01

    Microbial monitoring of constructed wetlands (CWs) treating domestic wastewater is generally scarce, despite the need of more knowledge about its biocenosis. The sanitation quality of a wastewater treated in a CW is a crucial aspect, mainly when the receiving water body is used as a swimming and/or recreation area. The present study was carried out in a horizontal subsurface flow CWplanted with Phragmites australis receiving pre-treated domestic wastewater (mean flow 50 m3 day(-1)), from a population of about 300 inhabitants. The monitoring programme undertaken during the first year operation, revealed removal efficiencies of 61% BOD5, 44% COD, and 65% TSS for inlet water with ca. 90 mg L(-1) BOD5, 157 mg L(-1) COD, and 17 mg L(-1) TSS. Total Coliform (TC) and Faecal Coliform (FC) bacteria were removed from wastewater (mean inlet values of 5 x 10(6) CFU 100 mL(-1) TC and of 9 x 10(5) CFU 100 mL(-1) FC), with efficiencies of 92 and 97%, respectively. The dynamics of microbial communities established in the system assessed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), had revealed a high bacterial diversity within the system, with no relevant differences in composition at the CW inlet and outlet but exhibiting temporal differences in bacterial communities. PMID:21972563

  1. Characterization of river flow fluctuations via horizontal visibility graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, A. C.; Alves, L. G. A.; Costa, L. S.; Ribeiro, A. A.; de Jesus, M. M. A.; Tateishi, A. A.; Ribeiro, H. V.

    2016-02-01

    We report on a large-scale characterization of river discharges by employing the network framework of the horizontal visibility graph. By mapping daily time series from 141 different stations of 53 Brazilian rivers into complex networks, we present a useful approach for investigating the dynamics of river flows. We verified that the degree distributions of these networks were well described by exponential functions, where the characteristic exponents are almost always larger than the value obtained for random time series. The faster-than-random decay of the degree distributions is an another evidence that the fluctuation dynamics underlying the river discharges has a long-range correlated nature. We further investigated the evolution of the river discharges by tracking the values of the characteristic exponents (of the degree distribution) and the global clustering coefficients of the networks over the years. We show that the river discharges in several stations have evolved to become more or less correlated (and displaying more or less complex internal network structures) over the years, a behavior that could be related to changes in the climate system and other man-made phenomena.

  2. Surface and subsurface hydrothermal flow pathways at Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham Wall, B. R.

    2005-12-01

    During summer 2003 at Yellowstone's Norris Geyser Basin notable changes were observed in the discharge of heat and steam, creating new thermal features, dying vegetation, and the consequent closure of trails to protect public safety. In order to interpret data collected from GPS, seismic, and temperature instruments deployed in response to the increased hydrothermal activity, a study has been undertaken to provide a more complete knowledge of the spatial distribution of subsurface fluid conduits. Geologic data, including mapped outcrops, aerial imagery, thermal infrared imagery, and subsurface core, indicate that fracture pathways in the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT) channel flow in the hydrothermal system. These data show clear evidence that NE-SW and NW-SE trending structures provide major flow pathways at Norris. By mapping fracture sets in outcrops of LCT with varied degrees of hydrothermal alteration, one can consistently identify fractures that localize hydrothermal fluid flow, alteration, and the geometry of surface thermal features. Alteration is characterized by acid leaching that quickly alters LCT mafic minerals and glassy groundmass, which in outcrop is recognized by corroded and disaggregated LCT with local secondary mineral deposition. Mapping the sequence from unaltered to altered LCT has identified vertical cooling joints as primary conduits for hydrothermal fluids. These vertical joints correlate with the NE-SW trending geomorphic expression of the LCT in this area, and parallel the adjacent caldera boundary. Horizontal fractures parallel depositional stratigraphy, and in core from drill holes Y-9 (248 m) and Y-12 (332 m) appear to initiate at collapsed vapor-phase cavities or regions of altered fiamme. Vertical fractures in the core show sequences of hydrothermal minerals locally derived from water-rock interaction that line fracture walls, characteristic of mineral deposition associated with repeat reactivation. Although the hydrothermal system is

  3. A Generalized Subsurface Flow Parameterization Considering Subgrid Spatial Variability of Recharge and Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Liang, Xu; Leung, Lai R.

    2008-12-05

    Subsurface flow is an important hydrologic process and a key component of the water budget, especially in humid regions. In this study, a new subsurface flow formulation is developed that incorporates spatial variability of both topography and recharge. It is shown through theoretical derivation and case studies that the power law and exponential subsurface flow parameterizations and the parameterization proposed by Woods et al.[1997] are all special cases of the new formulation. The subsurface flows calculated using the new formulation compare well with values derived from observations at the Tulpehocken Creek and Walnut Creek watersheds. Sensitivity studies show that when the spatial variability of topography or recharge, or both is increased, the subsurface flows increase at the two aforementioned sites and the Maimai hillslope. This is likely due to enhancement of interactions between the groundwater table and the land surface that reduce the flow path. An important conclusion of this study is that the spatial variability of recharge alone, and/or in combination with the spatial variability of topography can substantially alter the behaviors of subsurface flows. This suggests that in macroscale hydrologic models or land surface models, subgrid variations of recharge and topography can make significant contributions to the grid mean subsurface flow and must be accounted for in regions with large surface heterogeneity. This is particularly true for regions with humid climate and relatively shallow groundwater table where the combined impacts of spatial variability of recharge and topography are shown to be more important. For regions with arid climate and relatively deep groundwater table, simpler formulations, especially the power law, for subsurface flow can work well, and the impacts of subgrid variations of recharge and topography may be ignored.

  4. Advances in Fluid Dynamics of Subsurface Flow of Groundwater, Hydrocarbons, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, the chemical methods of contaminant hydrogeology have dominated much of hydrogeological thinking. In their wake, understanding the physics of subsurface fluid flow and its application to practice and science seemingly has played a secondary role and it often has been replaced by numerical modelling only. Building an understanding of the actual physics of subsurface flow beyond numerical modelling, however, is a confusing experience exposing one to conflicting statements from the sides of engineers, hydrogeologists, and, for a decade or more, by the followers of free convection and density-driven flow. Within the physics of subsurface flow a number of questions arise, such as: Is water really incompressible as assumed in engineering hydraulics? How does buoyancy work? Are underground buoyancy forces generally directed vertically upwards or downwards? What is the consequential difference between hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions? What are the force fields causing subsurface flow for water, hydrocarbons and CO2? Is fluid flow really driven by pressure gradients as assumed in reservoir engineering? What is the effect of geothermal gradients on subsurface flow? Do convection cells and free convection exist on-shore? How does variable density flow work? Can today's numerical codes adequately determine variable density flow? Does saltwater really sink to the bottom of geologic systems due to its higher density? Aquitards create confining conditions and thereby confine fluid movements to aquifers? Does more water flow in aquifers than aquitards? The presentation will shed light on the maze of conflicting statements issued within engineering hydraulics and groundwater dynamics. It will also present a field case and its numerical modelling of variable density flow at a major industrial landfill site. The presentation will thereby foster the understanding of the correct physics involved and how this physics can be beneficially applied to practical cases

  5. Textural evidence for jamming and dewatering of a sub-surface, fluid-saturated granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, T. J.; Rowe, C. D.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Sand injectites are spectacular examples of large-scale granular flows involving migration of hundreds of cubic meters of sand slurry over hundreds of meters to kilometers in the sub-surface. By studying the macro- and microstructural textures of a kilometer-scale sand injectite, we interpret the fluid flow regimes during emplacement and define the timing of formation of specific textures in the injected material. Fluidized sand sourced from the Santa Margarita Fm., was injected upward into the Santa Cruz Mudstone, Santa Cruz County, California. The sand injectite exposed at Yellow Bank Beach records emplacement of both hydrocarbon and aqueous sand slurries. Elongate, angular mudstone clasts were ripped from the wall rock during sand migration, providing evidence for high velocity, turbid flow. However, clast long axis orientations are consistently sub-horizontal suggesting the slurry transitioned to a laminar flow as the flow velocity decreased in the sill-like intrusion. Millimeter to centimeter scale laminations are ubiquitous throughout the sand body and are locally parallel to the mudstone clast long axes. The laminations are distinct in exposure because alternating layers are preferentially cemented with limonite sourced from later groundwater infiltration. Quantitative microstructural analyses show that the laminations are defined by subtle oscillations in grain alignment between limonite and non-limonite stained layers. Grain packing, size and shape distributions do not vary. The presence of limonite in alternating layers results from differential infiltration of groundwater, indicating permeability changes between the layers despite minimal grain scale differences. Convolute dewatering structures deform the laminations. Dolomite-cemented sand, a signature of hydrocarbon saturation, forms irregular bodies that cross-cut the laminations and dewatering structures. Laminations are not formed in the dolomite-cemented sand. The relative viscosity difference

  6. CO2 exsolution - challenges and opportunities in subsurface flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    for storage security. Falta et al. [2013] show that if carbonated brine migrates upwards and exsolution occurs, brine migration would be greatly reduced and limited by the presence of exsolved CO2 and the consequent low relatively permeability to brine. Similarly, if an exsolved CO2 phase were to evolve in seals, for example, after CO2 injection stops, the effect would be to reduce the permeability to brine and the CO2 would have very low mobility. This flow blocking effect is also studied with water/oil/CO2 [Zuo et al., 2013]. Experiments show that exsolved CO2 performs as a secondary residual phase in porous media that effectively blocks established water flow paths and deviates water to residual oil zones, thereby increasing recovery. Overall, our studies suggest that CO2 exsolution provides an opportunity for mobility control in subsurface processes. However, the lack of simulation capability that accounts for differences between gas injection and gas exsolution creates challenges for modeling and hence, designing studies to exploit the mobility reduction capabilities of CO2 exsolution. Using traditional drainage multiphase flow parameterization in simulations involving exsolution will lead to large errors in transport rates. Development of process dependent parameterizations of multiphase flow properties will be a key next step and will help to unlock the benefits from gas exsolution. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work is funded by the Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) at Stanford University. This work was also supported by U.S. EPA, Science To Achieve Results (STAR) Program, Grant #: 834383, 2010-2012. REFERENCES Falta, R., L. Zuo and S.M. Benson (2013). Migration of exsolved CO2 following depressurization of saturated brines. Journal of Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology, 3(6), 503-515. Zuo, L., S.C.M. Krevor, R.W. Falta, and S.M. Benson (2012). An experimental study of CO2 exsolution and relative permeability measurements during CO2 saturated water

  7. Subsurface conditions in hydrothermal vents inferred from diffuse flow composition, and models of reaction and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, B. I.; Houghton, J. L.; Lowell, R. P.; Farough, A.; Meile, C. D.

    2015-08-01

    Chemical gradients in the subsurface of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems create an environment where minerals precipitate and dissolve and where chemosynthetic organisms thrive. However, owing to the lack of easy access to the subsurface, robust knowledge of the nature and extent of chemical transformations remains elusive. Here, we combine measurements of vent fluid chemistry with geochemical and transport modeling to give new insights into the under-sampled subsurface. Temperature-composition relationships from a geochemical mixing model are superimposed on the subsurface temperature distribution determined using a heat flow model to estimate the spatial distribution of fluid composition. We then estimate the distribution of Gibb's free energies of reaction beneath mid oceanic ridges and by combining flow simulations with speciation calculations estimate anhydrite deposition rates. Applied to vent endmembers observed at the fast spreading ridge at the East Pacific Rise, our results suggest that sealing times due to anhydrite formation are longer than the typical time between tectonic and magmatic events. The chemical composition of the neighboring low temperature flow indicates relatively uniform energetically favorable conditions for commonly inferred microbial processes such as methanogenesis, sulfate reduction and numerous oxidation reactions, suggesting that factors other than energy availability may control subsurface microbial biomass distribution. Thus, these model simulations complement fluid-sample datasets from surface venting and help infer the chemical distribution and transformations in subsurface flow.

  8. Subsurface temperatures and surface heat flow in the Michigan Basin and their relationships to regional subsurface fluid movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1989-01-01

    Linear regression of 405 bottomhole temperature (BHT) measurements vs. associated depths from Michigan's Lower Peninsula results in the following equation relating BHT and depth: BHT(??C) = 14.5 + 0.0192 ?? depth(m) Temperature residuals, defined as (BHT measured)-(BHT calculated), were determined for each of the 405 BHT's. Areas of positive temperature residuals correspond to areas of regional groundwater discharge (determined from maps of equipotential surface) while areas of negative temperature residuals correspond to areas of regional groundwater recharge. These relationships are observed in the principal aquifers in rocks of Devonian and Ordovician age and in a portion of the principal aquifer in rocks of Silurian age. There is a similar correspondence between high surface heat flow (determined using the silica geothermometer) and regional groundwater discharge areas and low surface heat flow and regional groundwater recharge areas. Post-Jurassic depositional and tectonic histories suggest that the observed coupling of subsurface temperature and groundwater flow systems may have persisted since Jurassic time. Thus the higher subsurface palaeotemperatures (and palaeogeothermal gradients) indicated by recent studies most likely pre-date the Jurassic. ?? 1989.

  9. Subsurface flow in a soil-mantled subtropical dolomite karst slope: A field rainfall simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Z. Y.; Chen, H. S.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Q. X.; Wang, S.; Wang, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil and epikarst co-evolve resulting in complex structures, but their coupled structural effects on hydrological processes are poorly understood in karst regions. This study examined the plot-scale subsurface flow characteristics from an integrated soil-epikarst system perspective in a humid subtropical cockpit karst region of Southwest China. A trench was excavated to the epikarst lower boundary for collecting individual subsurface flows in five sections with different soil thicknesses. Four field rainfall simulation experiments were carried out under different initial moisture conditions (dry and wet) and rainfall intensities (114 mm h- 1 (high) and 46 mm h- 1 (low) on average). The soil-epikarst system was characterized by shallow soil overlaying a highly irregular epikarst surface with a near-steady infiltration rate of about 35 mm h- 1. The subsurface flows occurred mainly along the soil-epikarst interface and were dominated by preferential flow. The subsurface flow hydrographs showed strong spatial variability and had high steady-state coefficients (0.52 and 0.36 for high and low rainfall intensity events). Irregular epikarst surface combining with high vertical drainage capacity resulted in high threshold rainfall depths for subsurface flows: 67 mm and 263 mm for initial wet and dry conditions, respectively. The above results evidenced that the irregular and permeable soil-epikarst interface was a crucial component of soil-epikarst architecture and consequently should be taken into account in the hydrological modeling for karst regions.

  10. Large-scale horizontal flows from SOUP observations of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    November, L. J.; Simon, G. W.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Ferguson, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Using high resolution time sequence photographs of solar granulation from the SOUP experiment on Spacelab 2, large scale horizontal flows were observed in the solar surface. The measurement method is based upon a local spatial cross correlation analysis. The horizontal motions have amplitudes in the range 300 to 1000 m/s. Radial outflow of granulation from a sunspot penumbra into surrounding photosphere is a striking new discovery. Both the supergranulation pattern and cellular structures having the scale of mesogranulation are seen. The vertical flows that are inferred by continuity of mass from these observed horizontal flows have larger upflow amplitudes in cell centers than downflow amplitudes at cell boundaries.

  11. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  12. MODELING THREE-DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FLOW, FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MICROBES AND CHEMICALS (3DFATMIC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional model simulating the subsurface flow, microbial growth and degradation, microbial-chemical reaction, and transport of microbes and chemicals has been developed. he model is designed to solve the coupled flow and transport equations. asically, the saturated-uns...

  13. The Influence of Plant Root Systems on Subsurface Flow: Implications for Slope Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although research has explained how plant roots mechanically stabilize soils, in this article we explore how root systems create networks of preferential flow and thus influence water pressures in soils to trigger landslides. Root systems may alter subsurface flow: Hydrological m...

  14. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  15. Dual permeability flow behavior for modeling horizontal well production in fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Nie, Ren-Shi; Jia, Yong-Lu

    2012-09-01

    SummaryFractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs are composed of by matrix, fracture, and vug systems. This paper is the first investigation into the dual permeability flow issue for horizontal well production in a fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoir. Considering dispersed vugs in carbonate reservoirs and treating media directly connected with horizontal wellbore as the matrix and fracture systems, a test analysis model of a horizontal well was created, and triple porosity and dual permeability flow behavior were modeled. Standard log-log type curves were drawn up by numerical simulation and flow behavior characteristics were thoroughly analyzed. Numerical simulations showed that type curves are dominated by external boundary conditions as well as the permeability ratio of the fracture system to the sum of fracture and matrix systems. The parameter κ is only relevant to the dual permeability model, and if κ is one, then the dual permeability model is equivalent to the single permeability model. There are seven main flow regimes with constant rate of horizontal well production and five flow regimes with constant wellbore pressure of horizontal well production; different flow regimes have different flow behavior characteristics. Early radial flow and linear flow regimes are typical characteristics of horizontal well production; duration of early radial flow regime is usually short because formation thickness is generally less than 100 m. Derivative curves are W-shaped, which is a reflection of inter-porosity flows between matrix, fracture, and vug systems. A distorted W-shape, which could be produced in certain situations, such as one involving an erroneously low time of inter-porosity flows, would handicap the recognition of a linear flow regime. A real case application was successfully implemented, and some useful reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability and inter-porosity flow factor) were obtained from well testing interpretation.

  16. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Describing interactions between surface and subsurface flow processes is important to adequately define water flow in natural systems. Since overland flow generation is highly influenced by rainfall and infiltration, both highly spatially heterogeneous processes, overland flow is unsteady and varies spatially. The prediction of overland flow needs to include an appropriate description of the interactions between the surface and subsurface flow. Coupling surface and subsurface water flow is a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed during the last few years, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. A new approach by Weill et al. (2009) to couple overland flow and subsurface flow based on a generalized Richards equation was implemented into the well-known subsurface flow model HYDRUS-2D (Šimůnek et al., 2011). This approach utilizes the one-dimensional diffusion wave equation to model overland flow. The diffusion wave model is integrated in HYDRUS-2D by replacing the terms of the Richards equation in a pre-defined runoff layer by terms defining the diffusion wave equation. Using this approach, pressure and flux continuity along the interface between both flow domains is provided. This direct coupling approach provides a strong coupling of both systems based on the definition of a single global system matrix to numerically solve the coupled flow problem. The advantage of the direct coupling approach, compared to the loosely coupled approach, is supposed to be a higher robustness, when many convergence problems can be avoided (Takizawa et al., 2014). The HYDRUS-2D implementation was verified using a) different test cases, including a direct comparison with the results of Weill et al. (2009), b) an analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation, and c) the results of a benchmark test of Maxwell et al. (2014), that included several known coupled surface subsurface flow models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects

  17. Three-Dimensional Compartmentalization of Subsurface Ground Water Flow in Eastern North American Mesozoic Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. P.; Sutphin, D. M.; Daniels, D. L.; Pierce, H. A.; Smoot, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    An extensive network of diabase intrusions occurs in several of the largest Mesozoic basins of Eastern North America, including the Culpeper, Gettysburg, Newark, and Hartford basins. Within each, great dikes, inclined sheets, and lopoliths cut through the surrounding sandstones, siltstones, and conglomerates in ways that subdivide the regional subsurface flow field, and thus compartmentalize the basin. In the Culpeper basin, for example, the scale- and direction-dependent permeability of diabase spans the range 10-17 to 10-21 m2, whereas the permeability of the heavily fractured sediments is in the range 10-12 to 10-14 m2. Thus there is at least three, and upwards of nine, orders of magnitude difference in permeability between the diabase and the surrounding sediments. This great permeability contrast is at the heart of basin compartmentalization and the related subsurface hydrologic phenomena. In the Culpeper basin, our understanding of compartmentalization is guided by the following geological, geophysical, and hydrologic measurements and observations: (1) Short wavelength aeromagnetic anomalies constrain the geometry of the up-turned margins of diabase lopoliths. These lopoliths bound compartments horizontally and vertically; (2) Deep compartment structure has been resolved to 800 meters by in-situ AudioMagnetotelluric experiments; (3) Alignments of hornfels-hosted springs parallel to the diabase-hornfels contact along a compartment wall. We posit that eastward-migrating ground water is forced up and out to the surface when it comes into contact with the low permeability diabase at depth; (4) Direct observations of high fluid flow from bedding plane fractures within hornfels in the diabase-hornfels contact ``no-flow boundary condition'' region of a compartment's walls; (5) Direct drilling into and through a compartment's margins. Pumping yields within diabase are ~2 gal./min., whereas penetration of the compartment margins (drilling from diabase into the

  18. Fractal topography and subsurface water flows from fluvial bedforms to the continental shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worman, A.; Packman, A.I.; Marklund, L.; Harvey, J.W.; Stone, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-subsurface flow interactions are critical to a wide range of geochemical and ecological processes and to the fate of contaminants in freshwater environments. Fractal scaling relationships have been found in distributions of both land surface topography and solute efflux from watersheds, but the linkage between those observations has not been realized. We show that the fractal nature of the land surface in fluvial and glacial systems produces fractal distributions of recharge, discharge, and associated subsurface flow patterns. Interfacial flux tends to be dominated by small-scale features while the flux through deeper subsurface flow paths tends to be controlled by larger-scale features. This scaling behavior holds at all scales, from small fluvial bedforms (tens of centimeters) to the continental landscape (hundreds of kilometers). The fractal nature of surface-subsurface water fluxes yields a single scale-independent distribution of subsurface water residence times for both near-surface fluvial systems and deeper hydrogeological flows. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Base cation concentrations in subsurface flow from a forested hillslope: The role of flushing frequency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Hooper, R.P.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Freer, J.E.; Kendall, C.; Beven, K.

    1998-01-01

    A 20-m-wide trench was excavated to bedrock on a hillslope at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed in the Piedmont region of Georgia to determine the effect of upslope drainage area from the soil and bedrock surfaces on the geochemical evolution of base cation concentrations in subsurface flow. Samples were collected from ten 2-m sections and five natural soil pipes during three winter rainstorms in 1996. Base cation concentrations in hillslope subsurface flow were generally highest early and late in the storm response when flow rates were low, but during peak flow, concentrations varied little. Base cation concentrations in matrix flow from the 10 trench sections were unrelated to the soil surface drainage area and weakly inversely related to the bedrock surface drainage area. Base cation concentrations in pipe flow were lower than those in matrix flow and were also consistent with the inverse relation to bedrock surface drainage area found in matrix flow. The left side of the trench, which has the highest bedrock surface drainage area, had consistently lower mean base cation concentrations than the right side of the trench, which has the lowest bedrock surface drainage area. During moderate size rain events of about 20-40 mm, subsurface flow occurred only on the left side of the trench. The greater volume of water that has flowed through the left side of the trench appears to have resulted in greater leaching of base cations from soils and therefore lower base cation concentrations in subsurface flow than in flow from the right side of the trench. Alternatively, a greater proportion of flow that bypasses the soil matrix may have occurred through the hillslope on the left side of the trench than on the right side. Flushing frequency links spatial hillslope water flux with the evolution of groundwater and soil chemistry.

  20. Flow Visualization Study of a 1/48-Scale AFTI/F111 Model to Investigate Horizontal Tail Flow Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    During flight testing of the AFTI/F111 aircraft, horizontal tail buffet was observed. Flutter analysis ruled out any aeroelastic instability, so a water-tunnel flow visualization study was conducted to investigate possible flow disturbances on the horizontal tail which might cause buffet. For this study, a 1/48-scale model was used. Four different wing cambers and one horizontal tail setting were tested between 0 and 20 deg angle of attack. These wing cambers corresponded to the following leading training edge deflections: 0/2, 10/10, 10/2, and 0/10. Flow visualization results in the form of still photographs are presented for each of the four wing cambers between 8 and 12 deg angle of attack. In general, the horizontal tail experiences flow disturbances which become more pronounced with angle of attack or wing trailing-edge deflection.

  1. Adaptive and Efficient Computing for Subsurface Simulation within ParFlow

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedeman, H; Woodward, C S

    2010-11-16

    This project is concerned with the PF.WRF model as a means to enable more accurate predictions of wind fluctuations and subsurface storage. As developed at LLNL, PF.WRF couples a groundwater (subsurface) and surface water flow model (ParFlow) to a mesoscale atmospheric model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting Model). It was developed as a unique tool to address coupled water balance and wind energy questions that occur across traditionally separated research regimes of the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. PF.WRF is capable of simulating fluid, mass, and energy transport processes in groundwater, vadose zone, root zone, and land surface systems, including overland flow, and allows for the WRF model to both directly drive and respond to surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and conditions. The current PF.WRF model is constrained to have uniform spatial gridding below the land surface and matching areal grids with the WRF model at the land surface. There are often cases where it is advantageous for land surface, overland flow and subsurface models to have finer gridding than their atmospheric counterparts. Finer vertical discretization is also advantageous near the land surface (to properly capture feedbacks) yet many applications have a large vertical extent. However, the surface flow is strongly dependent on topography leading to a need for greater lateral resolution in some regions and the subsurface flow is tightly coupled to the atmospheric model near the surface leading to a need for finer vertical resolution. In addition, the interactions (e.g. rain) will be highly variable in space and time across the problem domain so an adaptive scheme is preferred to a static strategy to efficiently use computing and memory resources. As a result, this project focussed on algorithmic research required for development of an adaptive simulation capability in the PF.WRF system and its subsequent use in an application problem in the Central Valley of

  2. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  3. Application of the gas tracer method for measuring oxygen transfer rates in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tyroller, Lina; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Santa, Santa; García, Joan

    2010-07-01

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) has a significant impact on the design, optimal operation and modelling of constructed wetlands treating wastewater. Oxygen consumption is very fast in wetlands and the OTR cannot be determined using an oxygen mass balance. This problem is circumvented in this study by applying the gas tracer method. Experiments were conducted in an unplanted gravel bed (dimensions L x W x d 125 x 50 x 35 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 10-11-mm gravel) and a planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) (L x W x d 110 x 70 x 38 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 3.5-mm gravel with Phragmites australis). Tap water saturated with propane as gas tracer (pure or commercial cooking gas, depending on the test) was used. The mass transfer ratio between oxygen and commercial propane gas was quite constant and averaged R = 1.03, which is slightly lower than the value of R = 1.39 that is usually reported for pure propane. The OTR ranged from 0.31 to 5.04 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted gravel bed and from 0.3 to 3.2 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the HSSFCW, depending on the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results of this study suggest that the OTR in HSSFCW is very low for the oxygen demand of standard wastewater and the OTR calculations based on mass balances and theoretical stoichiometric considerations overestimate OTR values by a factor that ranges from 10 to 100. The gas tracer method is a promising tool for determining OTR in constructed wetlands, with commercial gas proving to be a viable low-cost alternative for determining OTR. PMID:20542312

  4. Elimination of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Victor; Bayona, Josep M

    2006-09-15

    Removal efficiency and elimination rates of 11 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs)were measured in two subsurface horizontal flow constructed wetlands (SSFs) characterized by different water depths (i.e. 0.3 and 0.5 m) in a 2-year study. Dissolved and particulate phases of wastewater and gravel samples were collected and analyzed. The PPCP influent concentration ranged from 1 to 25 microg L(-1). The best removal efficiency was found in the shallower bed SSF due to its less negative redox potential. PPCPs were classified in four groups according to their removal behavior: (i) the efficiently removed (>80%) namely caffeine, salicylic acid, methyl dihydrojasmonate, and carboxy-ibuprofen, (ii) the moderately removed (50-80%) namely ibuprofren, hydroxy-ibuprofen, and naproxen, (iii) the recalcitrant to the elimination namely ketoprofen and diclofenac, and,finally, (iv) compounds that were eliminated by hydrophobic interactions namely polycyclic musks (i.e. galaxolide and tonalide). These compounds were removed more than 80% from the effluent but occurred at high concentrations (up to 824 microg kg(-1)) in the gravel bed. Accordingly, their elimination by sorption onto the organic matter retained is the predominant removal mechanism. Furthermore, the constructed wetland clogging appears to induce a negative effect in the PPCP degradation in the SSF evaluated. The PPCP elimination classified as efficiently and moderately removed through the shallow bed fitted to either zero- or a first-order areal kinetics. Finally, the apparent distribution coefficients between suspended solids (Kd'ss) or gravel bed (Kd'gb) and water were determined in the different sampling points of the wetland obtaining values comparable to the described previously for sewage sludge. PMID:17007145

  5. Predicted Variations in Flow Patterns in a Horizontal CVD Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    Expressions in terms of common reactor operating parameters were derived for the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, Gr/Re, the ratio of the Grashof to the square of 2 the Reynolds number, Gr/Re(exp 2), and the Rayleigh number, Ra. Values for these numbers were computed for an example horizontal CVD reactor and compared to numerical simulations to gauge their effectiveness as predictors of the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in the reactor. Comparisons were made for both argon and hydrogen carrier gases over the pressure range 2- 101 kPa. Reasonable agreement was achieved in most cases when using Gr/Re to predict the presence of transverse rolls and Ra to predict the presence of longitudinal rolls. The ratio Gr/Re(exp 2) did not yield useful predictions regarding the presence of transverse rolls. This comparison showed that the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, as well as the Rayleigh number, can be used to predict the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in a horizontal CVD reactor for a given set of reactor conditions. These predictions are approximate, and care must be exercised when making predictions near transition regions.

  6. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  7. Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Transport at the Pore and Continuum Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Fang, Yilin; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2010-07-15

    This paper will present recent results of simulations of subsurface and flow using both pore scale and grid-based continuum methods. Large scale simulations of pore scale flow and transport using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic method (SPH) using more than 14 million particles have been performed. These simulations are focused on tracking the behavior of contaminants and multiphase fluids in the subsurface. Simulations are also being performed at the field scale using the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases code (STOMP) using a novel, highly-resolved synthetic model of a braided channel belt deposit to analyze the large scale transport of material in a deposit with multiscale heterogeneity. Both sets of simulations are being performed with codes that have been developed using component-based software engineering principles that result in highly modular codes with few dependencies between components.

  8. Detectability of Large-Scale Solar Subsurface Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, M.

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of helioseismic measurement is limited by the stochastic nature of solar oscillations. In this article I use a Gaussian statistical model of the global seismic wave field of the Sun to investigate the noise limitations of direct-modeling analysis of convection-zone-scale flows. The theoretical analysis of noise is based on hypothetical data that cover the entire photosphere, including the portions invisible from the Earth. Noise estimates are derived for measurements of the flow-dependent couplings of global-oscillation modes and for combinations of coupling measurements that isolate vector-spherical-harmonic components of the flow velocity. For current helioseismic observations, which sample only a fraction of the photosphere, the inferred detection limits are best regarded as optimistic limits. The flow-velocity fields considered in this work are assumed to be decomposable into vector-spherical-harmonic functions of degree less than five. The problem of measuring the general velocity field is shown to be similar enough to the well-studied problem of measuring differential rotation to permit rough estimates of flow-detection thresholds to be gleaned from past helioseismic analysis. I estimate that, with existing and anticipated helioseismic datasets, large-scale flow-velocity amplitudes of a few tens of should be detectable near the base of the convection zone.

  9. [Optimization of aerobic/anaerobic subsurface flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Min; Shan, Shi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies showed that setting aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments in the subsurface constructed wetlands (SFCWs) can improve the COD, NH4(+)-N, and TN removal rate, whereas the oxygen enrichment environment which produced by the artificial aeration could restrain the NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N removal process, and to a certain extent, inhibit the denitrification in SFCWs Therefore, in this research the structure and technology of SFCW with aerobic and anaerobic paragraph segments were optimized, by using the multi-point water inflow and setting the corresponding section for the extra pollutant removal. Results showed that with the hydraulic load of 0.06 m3 x (m2 x d)(-1), the COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies in the optimized SFCW achieved 91.6%, 100% and 87.7% respectively. COD/N increased to 10 speedily after the inflow supplement. The multi-point water inflow could add carbon sources, and simultaneously maximum utilization of wetland to remove pollutants. The optimized SFCW could achieve the purposes of purification process optimization, and provide theoretical basis and application foundation for improving the total nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:22509578

  10. Algebraic instability in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    The regimes and mechanisms of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability have been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic shallow water model with horizontally nonuniform density. As analysis shows, the nonhydrostaticity has a crucial influence on the instability. It is for this reason that at the final stage a collapse tendency predicted on the base of the hydrostatic scenario slows down and turns into the regime of algebraic instability. The numerical testing has shown that in spite of its simplicity, the model is quite able to describe realistically a number of effects. For example, the model captures the shallowing effect, which manifests itself as profile concavities on either side of the jet coming out of the boundary layer.

  11. Phosphorus retention in lab and field-scale subsurface-flow wetlands treating plant nursery runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Constructed wetland systems built to handle nutrient contaminants are often efficient at removing nitrogen, but ineffective at reducing phosphorous (P) loads. Incorporating clay-based substrate can enhance P removal in subsurface-flow constructed wetland systems. We evaluated the potential of crus...

  12. A mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regime bound using void wave celerity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The two-phase flow regime boundaries in a horizontal channel has been investigated by using the behavior of the second order void wave celerities. The average two-fluid model has been constituted with closure relations for horizontally stratified and bubbly flows. A vapor phase turbulent stress model for a smooth interface geometry has been included. It is found that the second order waves (i.e., eigenvalues) propagate in opposite direction with almost the same speed when the liquid phase is stationary. Using the well-posedness limit of the two-phase system, the dispersed-stratified flow regime boundary has been modeled. Two-phase Froude number has been theoretically found to be a convenient parameter in quantifying the flow regime boundary as a function of the void fraction. It is found that interaction between void wave celerities become stronger as the two-phase Froude number is reduced. This result should be interpreted as that gravity and the relative velocity are key parameters in determining flow regime boundaries in a horizontal flow. The influence of the vapor phase turbulent stress found to stabilize the flow stratification. This study clearly shows that the average two-fluid model is very effective for a mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regimes if appropriate closure relations are developed.

  13. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  14. Slug-plug flow analyses of stratified flows in a horizontal duct by means of MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunugi, T.; Ose, Y.; Banat, M.

    1999-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to perform the slug-plug flow analyses of stratified flows in a horizontal duct by means of the MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) developed by the author which based on the piece-wise linear calculation as a volume tracking procedure and the continuum surface force model (CSF) for the surface tension, and to investigate the effect of the Bernoulli term for slug-plug flows, i.e., so-called the topological law, on the competition between inertial forces and gravitation forces. Some discussion on the primary jump condition at the interface in the MARS is described in the paper. The results of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) by the MARS are compared with the experimental one. The slugging positions obtained by the DNS are in good agreement with the experimental one. Since the mass conservation between before the plugging and after slugging can be shown by the DNS here, the authors may conclude that this physical/numerical model based on the MARS is reliable.

  15. Unbounded wall flow with free surface waves and horizontal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    2015-11-01

    Free surface waves in the presence of a non-uniform shear flow are treated. The shear flow of interest varies with both the transverse and vertical coordinates, U (y , z) . Initial results treat a mean flow varying only with the transverse, U (y) . The domain is bounded on one side by a flat rigid vertical wall and is unbounded on the other side. The mean flows considered here are nonzero near the vertical wall and approach zero far from the wall, e.g. U =e-γy . The flowfield is treated as inviscid but rotational. Linear solutions are obtained using a nonuniform coordinate transformation that converts the free surface boundary condition into a modified Bessel equation. Velocity components are expanded in modified Bessel functions of the first kind of purely imaginary order. The dispersion relation for steady waves are found with wavespeeds outside the range of U, matching previous results for a flow bounded on both sides. Corresponding eigenvectors show a sequence of wave profiles of increasing complexity near the wall. The wave amplitude approaches zero far from the wall.

  16. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  17. Subsurface Monitoring Results of Big Lost River Flow Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, G. L.; Baker, K. E.; Scott, C. L.; Schafer, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) established a research facility to investigate the movement of water and solutes through the vadose zone. An improved understanding of the INL vadose zone will support ground water monitoring, Wastewater Land Application Permits (WLAP), remediation of contamination sites, and constructing new facilities. The Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) is located at the new Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center percolation pond and includes a stretch of the Big Lost River. Data collected as part of an ongoing LDRD project being conducted at the VZRP captured water infiltration and redistribution from two flow events a 10-day flow event in June 2005 and two month event in summer of 2006. The data supports preferential-type flow behavior similar to percolation pond infiltration observations, rapid formation of perched water at various depths, non-sequential vertical and lateral water arrival, and a high degree of spatial variability in geohydrologic properties. Continued monitoring of hydraulic response to changes in the Big Lost River (BLR) flux, will aid INL and the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) operations in design and development of future waste disposal sites. The Big Lost River flow event and subsequent infiltration events will improve understanding of fluid transport and geochemical processes in complex heterogeneous vadose zones, and will provide a database of properties for development and validation of improved conceptual and predictive models.

  18. Sub-surface gas flow in porous bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teiser, Jens; Schywek, Mathias; de Beule, Caroline; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Gas flow within porous media is of importance for various bodies in the Solar System. It occurs within the Martian soil, might be significant in the porous interiors of comets and also within dusty planetesimals in the Solar Nebula. In regimes of low atmospheric pressure, thermal creep leads to an efficient gas flux if temperature gradients are present, e.g. by solar insolation. This flow can lead to erosion or supports the exchange of volatiles within a porous body. Experiments showed that this gas flux dominates over diffusive gas transport under Martian conditions with gas velocities on the order of cm/s. Results from the Rosetta spacecraft suggest that eolian processes occur on comets which might be related to thermal creep gas flow. Here, we present new results of microgravity experiments on a thermally induced gas flow. Gas velocities and their dependence on the atmospheric pressure for different gases (Helium and air) are studied as well as the influence of the geometry of the pores.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Ferrofluid Flow for Subsurface Environmental Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Moridis, George J.

    1997-05-05

    Ferrofluids are suspensions of magnetic particles of diameter approximately 10 nm stabilized by surfactants in carrier liquids. The large magnetic susceptibility of ferrofluids allows the mobilization of ferrofluid through permeable rock and soil by the application of strong external magnetic fields. We have developed simulation capabilities for both miscible and immiscible conceptualizations of ferrofluid flow through porous media in response to magnetic forces arising from the magnetic field of a rectangular permanent magnet. The flow of ferrofluid is caused by the magnetization of the particles and their attraction toward a magnet, regardless of the orientation of the magnet. The steps involved in calculating the flow of ferrofluid are (1) calculation of the external magnetic field, (2) calculation of the gradient of the external magnetic field, (3) calculation of the magnetization of the ferrofluid, and (4) assembly of the magnetic body force term and addition of this term to the standard pressure gradient and gravity force terms. We compare numerical simulations to laboratory measurements of the magnetic field, fluid pressures, and the two-dimensional flow of ferrofluid to demonstrate the applicability of the methods coded in the numerical simulators. We present an example of the use of the simulator for a field-scale application of ferrofluids for barrier verification.

  20. Multi-Physics Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods for Subsurface Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigelo, J.; Ginting, V.; Rahunanthan, A.; Pereira, F.

    2014-12-01

    For CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, contaminant transport in subsurface, and oil or gas recovery, we often need to forecast flow patterns. Subsurface characterization is a critical and challenging step in flow forecasting. To characterize subsurface properties we establish a statistical description of the subsurface properties that are conditioned to existing dynamic and static data. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is used in a Bayesian statistical description to reconstruct the spatial distribution of rock permeability and porosity. The MCMC algorithm requires repeatedly solving a set of nonlinear partial differential equations describing displacement of fluids in porous media for different values of permeability and porosity. The time needed for the generation of a reliable MCMC chain using the algorithm can be too long to be practical for flow forecasting. In this work we develop fast and effective computational methods for generating MCMC chains in the Bayesian framework for the subsurface characterization. Our strategy consists of constructing a family of computationally inexpensive preconditioners based on simpler physics as well as on surrogate models such that the number of fine-grid simulations is drastically reduced in the generated MCMC chains. In particular, we introduce a huff-puff technique as screening step in a three-stage multi-physics MCMC algorithm to reduce the number of expensive final stage simulations. The huff-puff technique in the algorithm enables a better characterization of subsurface near wells. We assess the quality of the proposed multi-physics MCMC methods by considering Monte Carlo simulations for forecasting oil production in an oil reservoir.

  1. Indicator to predict the movement of phosphorus from soil to subsurface flow.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Richard; Sharpley, Andrew; Withers, Paul

    2002-04-01

    The movement of phosphorus (P) in subsurface flow can contribute to losses from agricultural land. This study aims to identify a soil P threshold above which P loss is likely to accelerate as a function of soil and management type. Lysimeters (25 cm i.d. by 30 cm deep) were taken of four soils from agricultural watersheds in Pennsylvania and New York. The soils had a range of Mehlich-3 extractable P (7-517 mg of P kg(-1)) in surface soil (0-7.5 cm for grassland and 0-23 cm for cultivated/arable) and reactive P, filtered <0.45 microm (RP(<0.45 microm) in subsurface flow (0.007-1.53 mg of P L(-1)). The loss of P from lysimeters increased greatly when Mehlich-3 extractable P was in excess of a mean concentration of 280 mg kg(-1), the degree of saturation of P sorption sites exceeded 38%, and the corrected P sorption strength (corrected for desorption) derived from the monolayer Langmuir equation was less than 0.07 L of P mg(-1). Of these variables, P sorption strength was most consistently related to RP(<0.45 microm) in subsurface flow across a range of soil managements. Use of the corrected Langmuir sorption strength parameter to estimate subsurface flow RP(<0.45 microm) derived from four U.S. soils was tested on four soils of different physiochemical characteristics (one calcareous) from the U.K. The U.K. soils showed similar concentration trends to the U.S. soils, with elevated RP(<0.45 microm) below a sorption strength of 0.07 L of P mg(-1). We propose that the P sorption strength derived from the monolayer Langmuir equation may be used to estimate the potential for P loss in subsurface flow, when simpler environmental tests such as P saturation derived from acid ammonium oxalate extraction are unclear or unsuitable. PMID:11999058

  2. Spatio-temporal soil moisture distribution and subsurface water flow in the Shale Hills Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Lin, H.; Zhu, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Systematic and dynamic soil moisture monitoring is needed to characterize areal soil moisture distribution and model subsurface water flow at various scales. Further understanding of soil-water interactions is the key to explore subsurface water flow and its pathways. Hydropedologic approaches integrating soils information with hydrological processes were used to investigate subsurface water flow (vertical and lateral) and possible flow pathways in the 7.9-ha Shale Hills Catchment in central Pennsylvania. Automatic monitoring systems were installed at seven sites using an array of soil matric potential probes (Campbell Scientific 229 and Decagon matric potential probes) and water content probes (Decagon ECH2O-5). These sites are distributed at different landforms (hilltop, hillslope, and valley floor), representing five soil series (Berks, Blairton, Ernest, Rushtown, Weikert). Probes were inserted at different soil depths as well as their interfaces. The positions of probe installation were designed based on site-specific soil morphology and soil properties from laboratory analysis (e.g., soil texture, bulk density, hydraulic conductivity, water retention). A rain gauge was also installed at each monitoring site. The results showed that different soil types, even different soil layers of the same soil type, displayed different hydrological behaviors. There were evidences that lateral flow contributes to the water flow in the Shale Hills Catchment.

  3. Analytical Solution for Subsurface Gas Flow to a Well Induced by Surface Pressure Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    2001-06-20

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation.

  4. Analytical solution for subsurface gas flow to a well induced by surface pressure fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rossabi, Joseph; Falta, Ronald W

    2002-01-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting subsurface gas flow to a vadose-zone well in response to atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The effective radial permeability (kr) in the vicinity of the well is determined during model calibration using less than two weeks worth of data. By combining the flow solution with a solution for the vertical gas pressure, only atmospheric pressure data are required to predict the induced flow through a well. The ability to quantitatively predict naturally induced flow in vadose-zone wells by simple and inexpensive measurements is invaluable for systems using barometric pumping for remediation. PMID:11798048

  5. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the solar magnetic flux emergence. Parametric study on the horizontal divergent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Solar active regions are formed through the emergence of magnetic flux from the deeper convection zone. Recent satellite observations have shown that a horizontal divergent flow (HDF) stretches out over the solar surface just before the magnetic flux appearance. Aims: The aims of this study are to investigate the driver of the HDF and to see the dependency of the HDF on the parameters of the magnetic flux in the convection zone. Methods: We conducted three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) numerical simulations of the magnetic flux emergence and varied the parameters in the initial conditions. An analytical approach was also taken to explain the dependency. Results: The horizontal gas pressure gradient is found to be the main driver of the HDF. The maximum HDF speed shows positive correlations with the field strength and twist intensity. The HDF duration has a weak relation with the twist, while it shows negative dependency on the field strength only in the case of the stronger field regime. Conclusions: Parametric dependencies analyzed in this study may allow us to probe the structure of the subsurface magnetic flux by observing properties of the HDF.

  7. The effect of atmospheric variations on subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cardle, J.A.; Badran, L.

    1999-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located on the border of the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, is under consideration as a prospective commercial nuclear waste repository for spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive waste. This paper studies the effect that diurnal and seasonal temperature cycles and barometric pressure perturbations have on near-surface flow and transport conditions at Yucca Mountain, both without and with the repository in place. The potential near-surface temperature increase as a direct result of an emplaced repository is also examined.

  8. Coupling surface and subsurface flows with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pu; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A mortar multiscale method is developed for the coupled Stokes andDarcy flows with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in irregular domains. Conforming Stokes elements and multipoint flux mixed finite elements in Darcy are used to discretize the subdomains on the fine scale. A coarse scale mortar finite element space is used to approximate interface stresses and pressures and impose weakly continuity of velocities and fluxes. Matching conditions on curved interfaces are imposed by mapping the physical grids to reference grids with flat interfaces.

  9. Counter-current flow in a vertical to horizontal tube with obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, P.; Matuszkiewicz, A.; Teyssedou, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents experimental results on counter-current flow and flooding in an elbow between a vertical and a horizontal run. The experimental technique used allowed not only the flooding limit to be determined, but also the entire partial delivery region to be studied as well. The influence that various size orifices placed in the horizontal run have on both the delivered liquid flow rates and on the flooding limits is also examined. It is observed that both the flooding limits and the delivered liquid flow rates decrease with decreasing orifice size. Further, it is also observed that the mechanisms that govern the partial delivery of the liquid are significantly different when an orifice is present in the horizontal leg as compared to the case when no orifice is present.

  10. Sediment mobilization deposits from episodic subsurface fluid flow - A new tool to reveal long-term earthquake records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Anna; Moernaut, Jasper; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Strasser, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Subsurface fluid flow can be affected by earthquakes: increased spring activity, mud volcano eruptions, groundwater fluctuations, changes in geyser frequency and other forms of altered subsurface fluid flow have been documented during, after, or even prior to earthquakes. Recently discovered giant pockmarks on the bottom of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland, are the lake-floor expression of subsurface fluid flow. They discharge karstic groundwater from the Jura Mountains and experience episodically increased subsurface fluid flow documented by subsurface sediment mobilization deposits at the levees of the pockmarks. In this study, we present the spatio-temporal distribution of event deposits from phases of sediment expulsion and their time correlative multiple mass-transport deposits. We report striking evidence for five events of concurrent multiple subsurface sediment deposits and multiple mass-transport deposits since Late Glacial times, for which we propose past earthquakes as trigger. Comparison of this new event catalogue with historic earthquakes and other independent paleoseismic records suggests that initiation of sediment expulsion requires a minimum macroseismic intensity of VII. Thus, our study presents for the first time sedimentary deposits resulting from increased subsurface fluid flow as new paleoseismic proxy. Comparable processes must also be relevant for other mountain front ranges and coastal mountain ranges, where groundwater flow triggers subsurface sediment mobilization and discharges into lacustrine and marine settings.

  11. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  12. Modality transition-based network from multivariate time series for characterizing horizontal oil-water flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mei-Shuang; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-11-01

    The simultaneous flow of oil and water through a horizontal pipe is a common occurrence during petroleum industrial processes. Characterizing the flow behavior underlying horizontal oil-water flows is a challenging problem of significant importance. In order to solve this problem, we carry out experiment to measure multivariate signals from different flow patterns and then propose a novel modality transition-based network to analyze the multivariate signals. The results suggest that the local betweenness centrality and weighted shortest path of the constructed network can characterize the transitions of flow conditions and further allow quantitatively distinguishing and uncovering the dynamic flow behavior underlying different horizontal oil-water flow patterns.

  13. Drainflow: a fully distributed integrated surface/subsurface flow model for drainage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2015-04-01

    The scale of drainage studies may vary from high-resolution small scale investigations through to comprehensive catchment or regional-scale studies. This wide range of scales poses a significant challenge for the development of a suitable drainage model. To meet this demand, a fully distributed surface/subsurface interactive flow model named henceforth Drainflow has been developed. Drainflow includes both the Saint Venant equations for surface flow components and the Richards equation for saturated and unsaturated zones. To develop the model, surface and subsurface flow modules are formulated separately, then each component is connected to the other parts. All modules simultaneously interact to calculate water level and discharge in tile drains, channel networks, and overland flow. In the subsurface domain, the model also yields soil moisture and water table elevation. A smoothed Heaviside function is introduced to give a continuous transition of the model between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for tile drains and surface/subsurface flow interface boundaries. Compared to traditional drainage studies, Drainflow has the advantage of estimating the land surface recharge (LSR) directly from the partial differential Richards equation rather than via an analytical or empirical drainage method like the Green and Ampt equation. To test the model's accuracy, comparisons are made between Drainflow and a range of surface/subsurface flow models for five published integrated surface and subsurface problems. The comparison indicates Drainflow has a reasonably good agreement with the other integrated models. Furthermore, it is shown that the smoothed Heaviside functions technique is a very effective method to overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between dry and wet boundary conditions. In addition, Drainflow was run for some drainage study examples and was found to be fairly flexible in terms of changing all or part of the model dimensions as

  14. Are subsurface flows evidence of hidden magnetic flux during cycle minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Subsurface flows vary during the course of a solar cycle showing bands of faster- and slower-than-average rotation and bands of converging meridional flow. These flow patterns migrate with latitude; they first appear during the declining phase of a solar cycle and are present during cycle minimum. They appear several years before the magnetic pattern of a new cycle is apparent in synoptic maps and the values of magnetic flux at these locations are comparable to other quiet-Sun locations without such flow patterns. Do the precursory flow patterns thus indicate the presence of magnetic flux that is too small-scale or short-lived to be noticed in synoptic maps? How much flux would be required to generate these flow patterns?We quantify the relationship between subsurface flow patterns and magnetic activity during Cycles 23 and 24 and address these questions. We have analyzed GONG and SDO/HMI Dopplergrams using a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis and determined flows in the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone to a depth of about 16 Mm.

  15. Baseline hydraulic performance of the Heathrow constructed wetlands subsurface flow system.

    PubMed

    Richter, K M; Margetts, J R; Saul, A J; Guymer, I; Worrall, P

    2003-01-01

    A constructed wetland treatment system has been commissioned by BAA (formerly the British Airports Authority) in order to attenuate airfield runoff contaminated with de-icant and other potentially polluting materials from Heathrow Airport. Airfield runoff containing de-icants has the potential to impose significant oxygen demands on water bodies. The site consists of a number of integrated treatment systems, including a 1 ha rafted reed bed canal system and a 2 ha sub-surface flow gravel reed bed. This research project is concerned with the performance of the subsurface flow reed beds, though attention will be paid in this paper to the operation of the whole system. Prior to the planting of the subsurface flow reed beds, flow-tracing experiments were carried out on the three different types of subsurface flow beds, so that the baseline performance of the system could be quantified. In association, data regarding the soil organic matter content was also collected prior to the planting of the beds. As expected, soil organic matter content is observed to be negligible within the bed, though a small amount of build up was observed in localised areas on the surface of the beds. This was attributed to the growth of algae in depressions where standing water persisted during the construction phase. Few studies exist which provide detailed measurements into the cause and effect of variations in hydraulic conductivity within an operational reed bed system. The data presented here form the baseline results for an ongoing study into the investigation of the change in hydraulic conductivity of an operational reed bed system. PMID:12793678

  16. Tillage impact on herbicide loss by surface runoff and lateral subsurface flow.

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Bosch, David D; Strickland, Timothy C

    2015-10-15

    There is worldwide interest in conservation tillage practices because they can reduce surface runoff, and agrichemical and sediment losses from farm fields. Since these practices typically increase infiltration, their use may increase subsurface transport of water-soluble contaminants. Thus, to assess long-term environmental benefits of conservation tillage data may be needed that quantify both surface and subsurface contaminant fluxes. This study focused on the herbicide fluometuron (N,N-dimethyl-N'-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-urea) and its soil degradate DMF (N-methyl-N'-[3-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-urea). Both compounds are classed as "leachable". They were measured for 10 years in surface runoff and lateral subsurface flow from paired fields located on a hill slope in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region of the southeastern USA. One group of fields was conventionally tilled incorporating all crop residues into soil prior to planting. The second was strip tilled, a common conservation tillage practice. Seven fluometuron applications were made to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) produced in rotation with peanut (Arachis hypogea). Combined fluometuron and DMF surface and subsurface losses from the conventionally tilled fields were equivalent to 1.2% and 0.13% of fluometuron applied and 0.31% and 0.32% from the strip tilled fields. Annual surface runoff losses were significantly greater from the conventionally tilled fields while the strip tilled fields had significantly greater annual subsurface losses. Results demonstrated that shifting from conventional to conservation tillage management of farm fields in this landscape will reduce surface runoff losses of herbicides like fluometuron but subsurface losses will likely increase. The same trends can be expected in landscapes with similar soil and hydrologic properties. This should be considered when planning implementation of programs that promote conservation tillage use. PMID:26057540

  17. Clogging in subsurface-flow treatment wetlands: measurement, modeling and management.

    PubMed

    Nivala, Jaime; Knowles, Paul; Dotro, Gabriela; García, Joan; Wallace, Scott

    2012-04-15

    This paper reviews the state of the art in measuring, modeling, and managing clogging in subsurface-flow treatment wetlands. Methods for measuring in situ hydraulic conductivity in treatment wetlands are now available, which provide valuable insight into assessing and evaluating the extent of clogging. These results, paired with the information from more traditional approaches (e.g., tracer testing and composition of the clog matter) are being incorporated into the latest treatment wetland models. Recent finite element analysis models can now simulate clogging development in subsurface-flow treatment wetlands with reasonable accuracy. Various management strategies have been developed to extend the life of clogged treatment wetlands, including gravel excavation and/or washing, chemical treatment, and application of earthworms. These strategies are compared and available cost information is reported. PMID:22284912

  18. Wave / wave interaction production horizontal mean flows in stably stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galmiche, M.; Thual, O.; Bonneton, P.

    2000-01-01

    We show that internal wave/wave interactions in stratified fluids are able to produce strong horizontal mean currents. A simple analytical model allows us to estimate the amplitude of the time-periodic horizontal mean flow induced by the interaction of two monochromatic waves. This model shows that in some cases, the mean flow velocity can overgo a threshold beyond which critical layers and intense energy transfers from the waves to the mean flow are expected. This prediction is confirmed by direct pseudo-spectral simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. Such interactions may help to further understand the presence of strong vertical shear observed in the final stage of stratified flows in oceans and atmospheres.

  19. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  20. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  1. Numerical simulations of cataclysmic floods: A coupling model of surface and subsurface flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Komatsu, G.; Ito, K.; Tosaka, H.; Tokunaga, T.

    1999-09-01

    The Martian outflow channels are considered to have been formed by catastrophic water flood processes analogous to the Lake Missoula floods responsible for the formation of the Channeled Scabland in Washington State [e.g., Baker and Milton, 1974]. The estimations of peak discharge rates and total amounts of water play critical roles for the discussion of the Martian water cycle. Therefore, for a more realistic estimation we developed a three-dimensional numerical code of surface flows coupled with subsurface flows. Coupling both surface and subsurface flows in the model is very important because the origin of the outflows is thought to be strongly linked to subsurface aquifers [e.g., Baker, et al., 1991]. Our model can calculate air-water movements on the surface and in the subsurface under various hydrological and geological conditions. We concentrated on the water movement as the first step. We applied our model to the glacial Lake Missoula floods to test our code and to study parameter sensitivities. We followed the glacial lake failure scenario and gave a well-constrained high discharge rate at an area of the lake failure. After the breakout, the flood water flows down-slope and covers a wide area. We compared the calculated areal coverage of the floods and the peak water levels with field observations. We obtained a reasonable result of the water coverage within a DTM containing the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. And also the computed time sequential behaviors of the floods, such as the hydraulic ponding in the Pasco Basin, are consistent with the field data. However, there are significant discrepancies in terms of the water depths between the calculated values and some field observations. This may indicate that the history of the floodings is more complex than our assumption.

  2. Preferential pathways for subsurface and overland flow on a sloped farmland: field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang-Yu; Seuntjens, Piet; Cornelis, Wim M.; Boënne, Wesley; Verbist, Koen; van Hoey, Stijn

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown that contaminant transport to river systems is dominated by various types of fast flow and solute transport, which can be attributed to macropore flow in tile-drained fields and surface runoff in sloped areas, but also due to point sources including urban drainage, effluents of waste water treatment plants, and inappropriate agricultural practices. Our study focuses on quantitatively identifying fast flow processes through different preferential pathways in an agricultural soil towards a neighbouring river. In October 2009, field plots at three locations along a representative hillslope of an agriculture-dominated remote watershed at Nil-Saint-Martin in Belgium were setup to continuously monitor surface runoff, soil moisture and water potential, and solute concentrations. Runoff tipping bucket equipment, TDR probes, tensiometers, drop counting glassfibre wick samplers and a meteorological station were connected to a fully automated solar-powered datalogging system with wireless communication to a lab-based PC. Hydrus-3D was used to optimize the setup of wick samplers, which were designed specifically for collecting soil pore water in the shallow (0-45 cm) vadose zone for both flux quantification and chemical analysis. First results show that macropore flow may well play an important role in the topsoil, as indicated by the quick response of subsurface flow upon rain events. Lateral subsurface fast flow and transport occurred above the compacted layer (at depth of 30-35 cm) after several heavy rain events and ceased when the rain intensity and duration reduced. The role of subsurface and overland flow on the spatial distribution of soil moisture appeared to be dependent on the spatial variations in soil hydraulic properties across the slope.

  3. Horizontal Flow of Semantic and Phonological Information in Chinese Spoken Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jin-Chen; Yang, Yu-Fang

    2008-01-01

    A variant of the picture--word interference paradigm was used in three experiments to investigate the horizontal information flow of semantic and phonological information between nouns in spoken Mandarin Chinese sentences. Experiment 1 demonstrated that there is a semantic interference effect when the word in the second phrase (N3) and the first…

  4. Forced flow of a vapor-liquid stream in a horizontal pipe with film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, É. K.; Panevin, V. I.; Firsov, V. P.

    1986-05-01

    The stream structure and flow regime during film boiling of liquid nitrogen in a horizontal pipe are investigated. Data on heat transfer are obtained and a model is proposed for calculating the parameters of the two-phase stream along the channel length.

  5. STRATIFICATION OF PARTICULATE AND VOC POLLUTANTS IN HORIZONTAL FLOW PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U. S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in this...

  6. Influence of soil spatial variability on surface and subsurface flow at a vegetative buffer strip scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatel, Laura; Lauvernet, Claire; Carluer, Nadia; Paniconi, Claudio; Leblois, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of soil hydrodynamic characteristics variability on surface and subsurface flow at a vegetative buffer strip scale, using mecanistic modeling. Cathy (CATchment HYdrology, Camporese et al. 2010) is a research physically based model able to simulate coupled surface/subsurface flow. The evaluation of soil hydrodynamic characteristics variability is based essentially on saturated hydraulic conductivity because of its large spatial variability in the 3 dimensions and its important influence on flow pathways, as well as its high influence on the model output variables. After testing the model sensitivity to some input variables, to the boundary conditions and to the mesh definition, the work focuses on hydraulic conductivity parametrization. The study was first conducted with uniform (by horizons) conductivity domains based on field measurements. In a second step, heterogeneous fields were generated by a statistical tool which allows the user to choose the statistical law (in this case, lognormal or Gauss), the hydraulic conductivity auto-correlation length and the possibility to condition the fields with measured points. With all these different ways to represent spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, model simulated surface and subsurface fluxes consistent with datasets from artificial run-off experiments on an French wineyard hillslope (Morcille catchment, Beaujolais, France). Model simulations are evaluated and compared to observations on several criteria : consistency, stability, interaction with water table, etc...

  7. Invertebrates associated with a horizontal-flow, subsurface constructed wetland in a northern climate.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Rosanna; Weber, Everett; Darby, Brian J; Soto-Adames, Felipe N; Murray, Robert E; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Wetlands function as buffers between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, filtering pollutants generated by human activity. Constructed wetlands were developed to mimic the physical and biological filtering functions of natural systems for the treatment of human and animal waste under controlled conditions. Previous studies on the effect of constructed wetlands on native invertebrate populations have concentrated almost exclusively on mosquitoes. Here, we present the first study investigating the relationship between vegetation cover and aeration regime, and the diversity and abundance of nematodes and springtails (Collembola) in a constructed wetland designed to treat dairy farm wastewater in northwestern Vermont. We investigated four treatment cells differing in aeration regime and vegetation cover, but equally overlaid by a layer of compost to provide insulation. Analysis showed that nematodes were most abundant in the nonplanted and nonaerated cells, and that bacterivorous nematodes dominated the community in all cells. Springtails were found to be most numerous in the planted and nonaerated cells. We hypothesize that the vegetation provided differing environmental niches that supported a more diverse system of bacteria and fungi, as well as offering protection from predators and inclement weather. Nematodes were likely imported with the original compost material, while springtails migrated into the cells either via air, water, or direct locomotion. PMID:24534015

  8. Horizontal gene transfer as adaptive response to heavy metal stress in subsurface microbial communities. Final report for period October 15, 1997 - October 15, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, B. F.

    2001-12-21

    Horizontal gene transfer as adaptive response to heavy metal stress in the presence of heavy metal stress was evaluated in oligotrophic subsurface soil laboratory scale microcosms. Increasing levels of cadmium (10, 100 and 1000 mM) were applied and an E. coli donor was used to deliver the target plasmids, pMOL187 and pMOL222, which contained the czc and ncc operons, and the helper plasmid RP4. Plasmid transfer was evaluated through monitoring of the heavy metal resistance and presence of the genes. The interactive, clearly revealed, effect of biological and chemical external factors on the extent of plasmid-DNA propagation in microbial communities in contaminated soil environments was observed in this study. Additionally, P.putida LBJ 415 carrying a suicide construct was used to evaluate selective elimination of a plasmid donor.

  9. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  10. Venus' nighttime horizontal plasma flow, 'magnetic congestion', and ionospheric hole production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Mayr, H. G.; Curtis, S. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A simple rectilinear, two-dimensional MHD model is used to investigate the effects of field-aligned plasma loss and cooling on a dense plasma convecting across a weak magnetic field, in order to illumine the Venus nighttime phenomena of horizontal plasma flow, magnetic congestion and ionospheric hole production. By parameterizing field-aligned variations and explicitly solving for cross magnetic field variations, it is shown that the abrupt horizontal enhancements of the vertical magnetic field, as well as sudden decreases of the plasma density to very low values (which are characteristic of ionospheric holes), can be produced in the presence of field-aligned losses.

  11. 3DFATMIC: THREE DIMENSIONAL SUBSURFACE FLOW, FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MICROBES AND CHEMICALS MODEL - USER'S MANUAL VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the user's manual of 3DFATMIC, a 3-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals Model using a Lagrangian-Eulerian adapted zooming and peak capturing (LEZOOMPC) algorithm.

  12. Prediction of refrigerant void fraction in horizontal tubes using probabilistic flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect

    Jassim, E.W.; Newell, T.A.; Chato, J.C.

    2008-04-15

    A state of the art review of two-phase void fraction models in smooth horizontal tubes is provided and a probabilistic two-phase flow regime map void fraction model is developed for refrigerants under condensation, adiabatic, and evaporation conditions in smooth, horizontal tubes. Time fraction information from a generalized probabilistic two-phase flow map is used to provide a physically based weighting of void fraction models for different flow regimes. The present model and void fraction models in the literature are compared to data from multiple sources including R11, R12, R134a, R22, R410A refrigerants, 4.26-9.58 mm diameter tubes, mass fluxes from 70 to 900 kg/m{sup 2} s, and a full quality range. The present model has a mean absolute deviation of 3.5% when compared to the collected database. (author)

  13. On the prediction of the phase distribution of bubbly flow in a horizontal pipe.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, G H; Cheung, Sherman C P; Tu, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal bubbly flow is widely encountered in various industrial systems because of its ability to provide large interfacial areas for heat and mass transfer. Nonetheless, this particular flow orientation has received less attention when compared to vertical bubbly flow. Owing to the strong influence due to buoyancy, the migration of dispersed bubbles towards the top wall of the horizontal pipe generally causes a highly asymmetrical internal phase distributions, which are not experienced in vertical bubbly flow. In this study, the internal phase distribution of air-water bubbly flow in a long horizontal pipe with an inner diameter of 50.3 mm has been predicted using the population balance model based on direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) and multiple-size group (MUSIG) model. The predicted local radial distributions of gas void fraction, liquid velocity and interfacial area concentration have been validated against the experimental data of Kocamustafaogullari and Huang (1994). In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results were achieved. The numerical results indicated that the gas void fraction and interfacial area concentration have a unique internal structure with a prevailing maximum peak near the top wall of the pipe due to buoyancy effect. PMID:24415823

  14. On the prediction of the phase distribution of bubbly flow in a horizontal pipe

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, G.H.; Cheung, Sherman C.P.; Tu, J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal bubbly flow is widely encountered in various industrial systems because of its ability to provide large interfacial areas for heat and mass transfer. Nonetheless, this particular flow orientation has received less attention when compared to vertical bubbly flow. Owing to the strong influence due to buoyancy, the migration of dispersed bubbles towards the top wall of the horizontal pipe generally causes a highly asymmetrical internal phase distributions, which are not experienced in vertical bubbly flow. In this study, the internal phase distribution of air-water bubbly flow in a long horizontal pipe with an inner diameter of 50.3 mm has been predicted using the population balance model based on direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) and multiple-size group (MUSIG) model. The predicted local radial distributions of gas void fraction, liquid velocity and interfacial area concentration have been validated against the experimental data of Kocamustafaogullari and Huang (1994). In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results were achieved. The numerical results indicated that the gas void fraction and interfacial area concentration have a unique internal structure with a prevailing maximum peak near the top wall of the pipe due to buoyancy effect. PMID:24415823

  15. Evidence for debris flow gully formation initiated by shallow subsurface water on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanza, N.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Okubo, C.H.; Newsom, Horton E.; Wiens, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    The morphologies of some martian gullies appear similar to terrestrial features associated with debris flow initiation, erosion, and deposition. On Earth, debris flows are often triggered by shallow subsurface throughflow of liquid water in slope-mantling colluvium. This flow causes increased levels of pore pressure and thus decreased shear strength, which can lead to slide failure of slope materials and subsequent debris flow. The threshold for pore pressure-induced failure creates a distinct relationship between the contributing area supplying the subsurface flow and the slope gradient. To provide initial tests of a similar debris flow initiation hypothesis for martian gullies, measurements of the contributing areas and slope gradients were made at the channel heads of martian gullies seen in three HiRISE stereo pairs. These gullies exhibit morphologies suggestive of debris flows such as leveed channels and lobate debris fans, and have well-defined channel heads and limited evidence for multiple flows. Our results show an area-slope relationship for these martian gullies that is consistent with that observed for terrestrial gullies formed by debris flow, supporting the hypothesis that these gullies formed as the result of saturation of near-surface regolith by a liquid. This model favors a source of liquid that is broadly distributed within the source area and shallow; we suggest that such liquid could be generated by melting of broadly distributed icy materials such as snow or permafrost. This interpretation is strengthened by observations of polygonal and mantled terrain in the study areas, which are both suggestive of near-surface ice. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Group-sparsity regularization for ill-posed subsurface flow inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golmohammadi, Azarang; Khaninezhad, Mohammad-Reza M.; Jafarpour, Behnam

    2015-10-01

    Sparse representations provide a flexible and parsimonious description of high-dimensional model parameters for reconstructing subsurface flow property distributions from limited data. To further constrain ill-posed inverse problems, group-sparsity regularization can take advantage of possible relations among the entries of unknown sparse parameters when: (i) groups of sparse elements are either collectively active or inactive and (ii) only a small subset of the groups is needed to approximate the parameters of interest. Since subsurface properties exhibit strong spatial connectivity patterns they may lead to sparse descriptions that satisfy the above conditions. When these conditions are established, a group-sparsity regularization can be invoked to facilitate the solution of the resulting inverse problem by promoting sparsity across the groups. The proposed regularization penalizes the number of groups that are active without promoting sparsity within each group. Two implementations are presented in this paper: one based on the multiresolution tree structure of Wavelet decomposition, without a need for explicit prior models, and another learned from explicit prior model realizations using sparse principal component analysis (SPCA). In each case, the approach first classifies the parameters of the inverse problem into groups with specific connectivity features, and then takes advantage of the grouped structure to recover the relevant patterns in the solution from the flow data. Several numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate the advantages of additional constraining power of group-sparsity in solving ill-posed subsurface model calibration problems.

  17. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  18. Subsurface Supergranular Vertical Flows as Measured Using Large Distance Separations in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Hanasoge, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-distance rays (say, 10 - 24deg) approach the solar surface approximately vertically, travel times measured from surface pairs for these large separations are mostly sensitive to vertical flows, at least for shallow flows within a few Mm of the solar surface. All previous analyses of supergranulation have used smaller separations and have been hampered by the difficulty of separating the horizontal and vertical flow components. We find that the large-separation travel times associated with supergranulation cannot be studied using the standard phase-speed filters of time-distance helioseismology. These filters, whose use is based upon a refractive model of the perturbations, reduce the resultant travel time signal by at least an order of magnitude at some distances. More effective filters are derived. Modeling suggests that the center-annulus travel-time difference [outward-going time minus inward-going time] in the separation range delta= 10 - 24deg is insensitive to the horizontally diverging flow from the centers of the supergranules and should lead to a constant signal from the vertical flow. Our measurement of this quantity, 5.1+/-0.1 seconds, is constant over the distance range. This magnitude of the signal cannot be caused by the level of upflow at cell centers seen at the photosphere of 10 ms(exp-1) extended in depth. It requires the vertical flow to increase with depth. A simple Gaussian model of the increase with depth implies a peak upward flow of 240 ms(exp-1) at a depth of 2.3 Mm and a peak horizontal flow of 700 ms(exp-1) at a depth of 1.6 Mm.

  19. Subsurface Supergranular Vertical Flows as Measured Using Large Distance Separations in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Hanasoge, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-distance rays (say, 10-24 deg) approach the solar surface approximately vertically, travel times measured from surface pairs for these large separations are mostly sensitive to vertical flows, at least for shallow flows within a few Mm of the solar surface. All previous analyses of supergranulation have used smaller separations and have been hampered by the difficulty of separating the horizontal and vertical flow components. We find that the large separation travel times associated with upergranulation cannot be studied using the standard phase-speed filters of time-distance helioseismology. These filters, whose use is based upon a refractive model of the perturbations,reduce the resultant travel time signal by at least an order of magnitude at some distances. More effective filters are derived. Modeling suggests that the center-annulus travel time difference in the separation range 10-24 deg is insensitive to the horizontally diverging flow from the centers of the supergranules and should lead to a constant signal from the vertical flow. Our measurement of this quantity for the average supergranule, 5.1 s, is constant over the distance range. This magnitude of signal cannot be caused by the level of upflow at cell centers seen at the photosphere of 10 m/s extended in depth. It requires the vertical flow to increase with depth. A simple Gaussian model of the increase with depth implies a peak upward flow of 240 m/s at a depth of 2.3 Mm and a peak horizontal flow of 700 m/s at a depth of 1.6 Mm.

  20. Akuna - Integrated Toolsets Supporting Advanced Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulations for Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Deborah A.; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Gable, Carl W.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth H.; Lansing, Carina S.; Meyer, Joerg; Moeglein, William A.M.; Pau, George S.H.; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Shoshani, Arie; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika

    2012-04-24

    A next generation open source subsurface simulator and user environment for environmental management is being developed through a collaborative effort across Department of Energy National Laboratories. The flow and transport simulator, Amanzi, will be capable of modeling complex subsurface environments and processes using both unstructured and adaptive meshes at very fine spatial resolutions that require supercomputing-scale resources. The user environment, Akuna, provides users with a range of tools to manage environmental and simulator data sets, create models, manage and share simulation data, and visualize results. Underlying the user interface are core toolsets that provide algorithms for sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. Akuna is open-source, cross platform software that is initially being demonstrated on the Hanford BC Cribs remediation site. In this paper, we describe the emerging capabilities of Akuna and illustrate how these are being applied to the BC Cribs site.

  1. Heat flow and subsurface temperature as evidence for basin-scale ground-water flow, North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deming, D.; Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; De Rito, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Several high-resolution temperature logs were made in each of 21 drillholes and a total of 601 thermal conductivity measurements were made on drill cuttings and cores. Near-surface heat flow (??20%) is inversely correlated with elevation and ranges from a low of 27 mW/m2 in the foothills of the Brooks Range in the south, to a high of 90 mW/m2 near the north coast. Subsurface temperatures and thermal gradients estimated from corrected BHTs are similarly much higher on the coastal plain than in the foothills province to the south. Significant east-west variation in heat flow and subsurface temperature is also observed; higher heat flow and temperature coincide with higher basement topography. The observed thermal pattern is consistent with forced convection by a topographically driven ground-water flow system. Average ground-water (Darcy) velocity in the postulated flow system is estimated to be of the order of 0.1 m/yr; the effective basin-scale permeability is estimated to be of the order of 10-14 m2. -from Authors

  2. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Near-wake Flow Dynamics of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Tari, P.; Siddiqui, K.; Refan, M.; Hangan, H.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments conducted in a large wind tunnel set-up investigate the 3D flow dynamics within the near-wake region of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements quantify the mean and turbulent components of the flow field. Measurements are performed in multiple adjacent horizontal planes in order to cover the area behind the rotor in a large radial interval, at several locations downstream of the rotor. The measurements were phase-locked in order to facilitate the re-construction of the threedimensional flow field. The mean velocity and turbulence characteristics clearly correlate with the near-wake vortex dynamics and in particular with the helical structure of the flow, formed immediately behind the turbine rotor. Due to the tip and root vortices, the mean and turbulent characteristics of the flow are highly dependent on the azimuth angle in regions close to the rotor and close to the blade tip and root. Further from the rotor, the characteristics of the flow become phase independent. This can be attributed to the breakdown of the vortical structure of the flow, resulting from the turbulent diffusion. In general, the highest levels of turbulence are observed in shear layer around the tip of the blades, which decrease rapidly downstream. The shear zone grows in the radial direction as the wake moves axially, resulting in velocity recovery toward the centre of the rotor due to momentum transport.

  3. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  4. A simple iterative method for estimating evapotranspiration with integrated surface/subsurface flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H.-T.; Park, Y.-J.; Frey, S. K.; Berg, S. J.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents an iterative, water balance based approach to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ET) with integrated surface/subsurface flow models. Traditionally, groundwater level fluctuation methods have been widely accepted and used for estimating ET and net groundwater recharge; however, in watersheds where interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes are highly dynamic, the traditional method may be overly simplistic. Here, an innovative methodology is derived and demonstrated for using the water balance equation in conjunction with a fully-integrated surface and subsurface hydrologic model (HydroGeoSphere) in order to estimate ET at watershed and sub-watershed scales. The method invokes a simple and robust iterative numerical solution. For the proof of concept demonstrations, the method is used to estimate ET for a simple synthetic watershed and then for a real, highly-characterized 7000 km2 watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada (Grand River Watershed). The results for the Grand River Watershed show that with three to five iterations, the solution converges to a result where there is less than 1% relative error in stream flow calibration at 16 stream gauging stations. The spatially-averaged ET estimated using the iterative method shows a high level of agreement (R2 = 0.99) with that from a benchmark case simulated with an ET model embedded directly in HydroGeoSphere. The new approach presented here is applicable to any watershed that is suited for integrated surface water/groundwater flow modelling and where spatially-averaged ET estimates are useful for calibrating modelled stream discharge.

  5. Multilevel Monte Carlo for Two Phase Flow and Transport in a Subsurface Reservoir with Random Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Florian; Jenny, Patrick; Daniel, Meyer

    2014-05-01

    To a large extent, the flow and transport behaviour within a subsurface reservoir is governed by its permeability. Typically, permeability measurements of a subsurface reservoir are affordable at few spatial locations only. Due to this lack of information, permeability fields are preferably described by stochastic models rather than deterministically. A stochastic method is needed to asses the transition of the input uncertainty in permeability through the system of partial differential equations describing flow and transport to the output quantity of interest. Monte Carlo (MC) is an established method for quantifying uncertainty arising in subsurface flow and transport problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow statistical convergence. To reduce the computational cost of MC, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method was introduced. Instead of sampling a random output quantity of interest on the finest affordable grid as in case of MC, MLMC operates on a hierarchy of grids. If parts of the sampling process are successfully delegated to coarser grids where sampling is inexpensive, MLMC can dramatically outperform MC. MLMC has proven to accelerate MC for several applications including integration problems, stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance as well as stochastic elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations. In this study, MLMC is combined with a reservoir simulator to assess uncertain two phase (water/oil) flow and transport within a random permeability field. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two-dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. It is found that MLMC yields significant speed-ups with respect to MC while providing results of essentially equal accuracy. This finding holds true not only for one specific Gaussian logarithmic permeability model but for a range of correlation lengths and variances.

  6. Comparison of the transport of the aggregates of nanoscale zerovalent iron under vertical and horizontal flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2016-02-01

    Direct injection of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles is being considered for remediation of contaminated sites. However, the transport characteristics of NZVI under horizontal flow conditions are not fully understood. In this study, NZVI particles were stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and injected in vertical and horizontal columns to compare the effects of the flow direction on the transport. Columns were packed with sand of mean grain diameters of 180, 340 or 1140 µm (referred to as fine, intermediate and coarse sand, respectively), and were injected with CMC-NZVI suspensions of 0.3, 1 or 3 g Fe L(-1). Experimental breakthrough curves showed that with the coarse and intermediate sands, the steady-state effluent concentration in the horizontal column were up to 84% lower than those in the vertical column regardless of the initial NZVI concentration. However, in the fine sand the differences were insignificant, except at the highest NZVI particle concentration. Additionally, in the horizontally-oriented columns containing the coarse or intermediated sand, NZVI aggregates particles were non-uniformly distributed in the cross-section of the columns and there higher deposition in the bottom-half of the cross-section due to gravity effects. These deposition patterns can be accounted for, in part, by the gravitational settling of the large aggregates of NZVI, especially at high NZVI concentrations. A particle trajectory analysis in three dimensions demonstrated that under horizontal flow, gravity forces resulted in lower deposition of NZVI on the bottom-half of a single collector, as particles approaching the bottom-half of the collector were deflected by gravity to collectors below. PMID:26498094

  7. Subsurface multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport modeling using high-performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling is a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of remediation strategies for subsurface legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern is the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. There is clearly a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. increased spatial and temporal resolution) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes (i.e. increased chemical degrees of freedom). We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in furthering the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN to simulate uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  8. Effects of macro-pores on water flow in coastal subsurface drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Yu, Xiayang; Lu, Chunhui; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Leaching through subsurface drainage systems has been widely adopted to ameliorate saline soils. The application of this method to remove salt from reclaimed lands in the coastal zone, however, may be impacted by macro-pores such as crab burrows, which are commonly distributed in the soils. We developed a three-dimensional model to investigate water flow in subsurface drainage systems affected by macro-pores distributed deterministically and randomly through Monte Carlo simulations. The results showed that, for subsurface drainage systems under the condition of continuous surface ponding, macro-pores increased the hydraulic head in the deep soil, which in turn reduced the hydraulic gradient between the surface and deep soil. As a consequence, water infiltration across the soil surface was inhibited. Since salt transport in the soil is dominated by advection, the flow simulation results indicated that macro-pores decreased the efficiency of salt leaching by one order of magnitude, in terms of both the elapsed time and the amount of water required to remove salt over the designed soil leaching depth (0.6 m). The reduction of the leaching efficiency was even greater in drainage systems with a layered soil stratigraphy. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that with an increased penetration depth or density of macro-pores, the leaching efficiency decreased further. The revealed impact of macro-pores on water flow represents a significant shortcoming of the salt leaching technique when applied to coastal saline soils. Future designs of soil amelioration schemes in the coastal zone should consider and aim to minimize the bypassing effect caused by macro-pores.

  9. A generalized grid connectivity-based parameterization for subsurface flow model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhark, Eric W.; Jafarpour, Behnam; Datta-Gupta, Akhil

    2011-06-01

    We develop a novel method of parameterization for spatial hydraulic property characterization to mitigate the challenges associated with the nonlinear inverse problem of subsurface flow model calibration. The parameterization is performed by the projection of the estimable hydraulic property field onto an orthonormal basis derived from the grid connectivity structure. The basis functions represent the modal shapes or harmonics of the grid, are defined by a modal frequency, and converge to special cases of the discrete Fourier series under certain grid geometries and boundary assumptions; therefore, hydraulic property updates are performed in the spectral domain and merge with Fourier analysis in ideal cases. Dependence on the grid alone implies that the basis may characterize any grid geometry, including corner point and unstructured, is model independent, and is constructed off-line and only once prior to flow data assimilation. We apply the parameterization in an adaptive multiscale model calibration workflow for three subsurface flow models. Several different grid geometries are considered. In each case the prior hydraulic property model is updated using a parameterized multiplier field that is superimposed onto the grid and assigned an initial value of unity at each cell. The special case corresponding to a constant multiplier is always applied through the constant basis function. Higher modes are adaptively employed during minimization of data misfit to resolve multiscale heterogeneity in the geomodel. The parameterization demonstrates selective updating of heterogeneity at locations and spatial scales sensitive to the available data, otherwise leaving the prior model unchanged as desired.

  10. Effect of spray aeration on organics and nitrogen removal in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Wei; Song, Xin-Shan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu-Hui

    2014-12-01

    The objective of present study was to assess the simultaneous removal of organics and nitrogen by four lab-scale vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (V-SFCWs). The emergent plants employed were Canna indica. Five-month experiments showed that the planted and aerated system largely reduced the COD by 95%, NH4 by 88% and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) by 83%. It outperformed the unplanted or simple aerated system and was much better than non-aerated system. The study provided a strong evidence to support widespread research and application of spray aeration as a low-cost and energy-efficient aeration technology in V-SFCWs. PMID:25259785

  11. Velocity and temperature profiles in near-critical nitrogen flowing past a horizontal flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Boundary layer velocity and temperature profiles were measured for nitrogen near its thermodynamic critical point flowing past a horizontal flat plate. The results were compared measurements made for vertically upward flow. The boundary layer temperatures ranged from below to above the thermodynamic critical temperature. For wall temperatures below the thermodynamic critical temperature there was little variation between the velocity and temperature profiles in three orientations. In all three orientations the point of crossing into the critical temperature region is marked by a significant flattening of the velocity and temperature profiles and also a decrease in heat transfer coefficient.

  12. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Cavitating Flow of Liquid Helium inHorizontal Converging-Diverging Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    The basic characteristics of the two-dimensional cavitating flow of liquid helium through a horizontal converging-diverging channel near the lambda point are numerically investigated to realize the further development and high performance of new multiphase superfluid cooling systems. First, the governing equations of the cavitating flow of liquid helium based on the unsteady thermal nonequilibrium multifluid model with generalized curvilinear coordinates system are presented, and several flow characteristics are numerically calculated, taking into account the effect of superfluidity. Based on the numerical results, the two-dimensional structure of the cavitating flow of liquid helium though horizontal converging-diverging channel is shown in detail, and it is also found that the generation of superfluid counterflow against normal fluid flow based on the thermo mechanical effect is conspicuous in the large gas phase volume fraction region where the liquid- to gas-phase change actively occurs. Furthermore, it is clarified that the mechanism of the He I to He II phase transition caused by the temperature decrease is due to the deprivation of latent heat for vaporization from the liquid phase.

  14. A new Spool Piece for horizontal two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    This works presents the characterization of a Spool Piece (SP), made up of a Classical Venturi and a Wire Mesh Sensor (WMS), that are installed in a horizontal test section, in which an air-water mixture flows. The test section consists of a horizontal Plexiglas pipe of internal diameter 19.5 mm and total length of about 7 m. The flow quality ranges from 0 to 0.73 and the superficial velocity ranges from 0.14 to 32 m/s for air and from 0.019 to 2.62 m/s for water; the pressure ranges from atmospheric pressure to 4 bar depending on the experimental conditions. The observed flow patterns are stratified-bubbly-slug/plug-annular. The instruments response is analyzed and discussed. From the signal analysis the mass flow rate of each phase is obtained. The developed model allows the evaluation of the mass flow rate with an accuracy higher than 20% in the 84% of the cases and with an accuracy higher than 10% in the 73.3% of the cases. Finally the introduction of the estimated parameters in the SP model is considered and discussed.

  15. The effect of evaporator operating parameters on the flow patterns inside horizontal pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lige; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Li; Sun, Xinxing; Xie, Yunfei

    2011-08-01

    A general and simple model for simulating the steady state behaviors of air-to-refrigerant fin-and-tube evaporator is introduced with the focus on the detailed flow patterns inside the tubes. In order to simulate the heat transfer between air and the working fluid, the evaporator is divided into a number of control volumes. Empirical correlations from literature were also adopted to estimate the void fraction, the internal and external heat transfer coefficients, and the pressure drops. Simulations were performed to study the effects of varying inlet air temperature, refrigerant mass flow rate and evaporation pressure on the flow patterns inside the horizontal pipe of the evaporator. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can be used to predict flow patterns well. The predicted results of the model agree well with experimental results, the difference is within ±3% for the cooling capacity, and is within ±0.2% for refrigerant evaporation temperature.

  16. Effects of inclination and vorticity on interfacial flow dynamics in horizontal and inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiara, Areti; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    The transport of oil and gas in long horizontal pipelines can be significantly affected by the development of violent roll waves and slugs, but the mechanics causing such transitions have not been well understood. To enable the improvement of the prediction of flow transition criteria in long pipelines we perform theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulations of multiphase pipe flows to quantify the roles of inclination and vorticity in the flow dynamics. We find that backflow or flooding may occur even in the absence of disturbances due to inclination effects and obtain criteria on the maximum pipe length for steady flows. We identify and compare the effects of inclination and vorticity on the stability of interfacial wave disturbances. We discuss the mechanisms of non-linear energy transfer between stable and unstable wave disturbances and present results from direct numerical simulations for the predictions of spectrum evolutions for broad-banded interfacial disturbances in inclined pipes.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  18. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  19. Spatial Variation of Phosphorous Retention Capacity in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands: Effect of Wetland Type and Inflow Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guangwei; Tan, Meijuan; Chong, Yunxiao; Long, Xinxian

    2015-01-01

    For verification of spatial distribution of phosphorous retention capacity in constructed wetlands systems(CWs), two horizontal subsurface flow(HSSF) CWs and two vertical subsurface flow(VSSF) CWs, using sand as substrate and Typha latifolia as wetland plants, were constructed and put into use for synthetic wastewater treatment. Five months later, significant spatial variations of TP and inorganic phosphorus(Ca-P, Fe-P and Al-P) were observed, which were found to be greatly affected by CWs type and hydraulic loading. The results revealed that though spatial distribution of Fe-P and Al-P displayed a similar order of substrate content as "rhizosphere" > "near-rhizosphere" > "non-rhizosphere" and "inflow section" > "outflow section" regardless of types and loading, the distribution of Ca-P was positively correlated to that of Fe-P and Al-P in HSSF CWs, while negative correlation was shown in VSSF CWs. As a result, TP spatial distribution in HSSF CWs demonstrated a greater dissimilarity than that in VSSF CWs. For HSSF CWs with low hydraulic loading, the lowest TP content was found in non-rhizosphere substrate of outflow section, while the highest one was discovered in rhizonsphere substrate of inflow section. The values in 6 parts of areas ranged from 0.138 g·kg-1 to 2.710 g·kg-1, which also were from -33.5% to 1209% compared to the control value. On contrast, spatial difference of TP content in substrates of VSSF CWs was insignificant, with a variation ranging from 0.776 g·kg-1 to 1.080 g·kg-1, that was 275% to 421% higher than the control value. In addition, when hydraulic loading was increased, TP content in VSSF CWs sharply decreased, ranging from 0.210 g·kg-1 to 0.634 g·kg-1. Meanwhile, dissimilarity of TP spatial distribution in HSSF CWs was reduced, with TP content ranging from 0.258 g·kg-1 to 2.237 g·kg-1. The results suggested that P spatial distribution should be taken into account for CWs design and operation. PMID:26218872

  20. DETECTION OF THE HORIZONTAL DIVERGENT FLOW PRIOR TO THE SOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that solar active regions including sunspots are formed by the emerging magnetic flux from the deep convection zone. In previous numerical simulations, we found that the horizontal divergent flow (HDF) occurs before the flux emergence at the photospheric height. This paper reports the HDF detection prior to the flux emergence of NOAA AR 11081, which is located away from the disk center. We use SDO/HMI data to study the temporal changes of the Doppler and magnetic patterns from those of the reference quiet Sun. As a result, the HDF appearance is found to come before the flux emergence by about 100 minutes. Also, the horizontal speed of the HDF during this time gap is estimated to be 0.6-1.5 km s{sup -1}, up to 2.3 km s{sup -1}. The HDF is caused by the plasma escaping horizontally from the rising magnetic flux. And the interval between the HDF and the flux emergence may reflect the latency during which the magnetic flux beneath the solar surface is waiting for the instability onset to the further emergence. Moreover, SMART H{alpha} images show that the chromospheric plages appear about 14 minutes later, located cospatial with the photospheric pores. This indicates that the plages are caused by plasma flowing down along the magnetic fields that connect the pores at their footpoints. One important result of observing the HDF may be the possibility of predicting the sunspot appearances that occur in several hours.

  1. An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.; Wheeler, Mary F.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-06-01

    Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) as a general method for parameter estimation based on stochastic estimation of gradients using an ensemble of directional derivatives. ISEM eliminates the need for adjoint coding and deals with the numerical simulator as a blackbox. The proposed method employs directional derivatives within a Gauss–Newton iteration. The update equation in ISEM resembles the update step in ensemble Kalman filter, however the inverse of the output covariance matrix in ISEM is regularized using standard truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov regularization. We also investigate the performance of a set of shrinkage based covariance estimators within ISEM. The proposed method is successfully applied on several nonlinear parameter estimation problems for subsurface flow models. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by the small size of utilized ensembles and in terms of error convergence rates.

  2. A virtual experiment on the effect of canopy and forest floor interception on subsurface flow behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrits, A. M. J.; Hopp, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Pfister, L.

    2009-04-01

    From several field experiments we know that the soil moisture distribution is highly heterogeneous on a hillslope, and also lateral subsurface flow appears to develop irregular flow paths along its way downslope. However, knowledge is still lacking on which processes are causing this spatial distribution. One of the possible explanations could be interception. First of all, interception prevents a part of the rainfall to infiltrate in the unsaturated zone, which is immediately fed back to the atmosphere. This fast feedback is highly dependent on the vegetation density, and causes a spread in the distribution of the net rainfall. On the other hand, it appears that vegetation can also funnel rain water, causing hot spots of high infiltration. Finally, interception delays precipitation. Only after the interception storage has been filled, water can find its way down through several storages. To investigate the influence of interception on subsurface flow processes, detailed experimental data is required. Because this data is often not available and new or additional field campaigns are very labour intensive, a virtual experiment can be a helpful tool. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of separated processes in a complex system. We apply the concept of virtual modelling to investigate the effects of interception on subsurface flow processes. It will enable us to separate the effect of ‘no interception', ‘canopy interception only', and ‘both canopy and forest floor interception'. Furthermore, we shall explore if there occurs a change in flow paths patterns when we use lumped or distributed input data. We use the topography characteristics of the Panola hillslope (Georgia, USA). On this hillslope intensive trench and soil moisture measurements have been carried out. Since there are no detailed interception measurements at Panola, we use interception data from

  3. ON THE INCLUSION OF THE INTERFACIAL AREA BETWEEN PHASES IN THE PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF SUBSURFACE MULTIPHASE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distinguishing feature of multi-phase subsurface flow in comparison to single phase flow is the existence of fluid-fluid interfaces. These interfaces define phase boundaries at the pore scale and influence overall system behavior in many important ways. For example, fluid-fluid...

  4. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymers on Stratified and Stratified/Annular Flow in a Horizontal Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, Patricia; Fleck, Brian; Heidrick, Ted

    2006-11-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effects of a drag reducing additive (DRA) on two phase flow in horizontal stratified and stratified/annular flow patterns. Experiments were conducted in an air-water flow in a transparent rectangular channel of cross-section 25.4 mm x 50.8 mm and 2.5 m in length. Pressure drop measurements, wave characteristics and observations of entrainment with and without DRA are presented. A non-contact measurement technique using laser induced fluorescence and high speed videography was used to measure span-wise liquid wave heights and to characterize the air-water interface. Pressure drop was measured at the centerline of the duct over a one meter distance. The onset of entrainment was observed visually. Effects of DRA were observed even at a low concentration of 5ppm. This concentration yielded pressure drop reductions of 10-15% which correlate with previous experiments done in horizontal pipelines. Observations also show dampening of roll waves and the suppression of atomization. Al-Sarkhi, A., Hanratty, T.J., Int J. Multiphase Flow, 27, 1151 (2001)

  5. Modelling the effects of horizontal and vertical shear in stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, Lars

    2005-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and model results from a number of one-point turbulence models are compared for homogeneous, stably stratified flows. Because of their wide spread use in numerical ocean modelling, only explicit algebraic second-moment models are investigated. Considered are two types of shear flows with either purely vertical or purely horizontal shear. The dissipation rate is evaluated from the observation that the shear-number becomes independent of stratification for low to moderate Richardson numbers as soon as the flow approaches self-similarity. For the cases with vertical shear, it is found that all statistical models essentially reproduced the DNS results, though with different accuracy. In contrast, only the most recent model was able to predict the salient features of horizontally sheared flows, i.e. a steady-state Richardson number that is about an order of magnitude larger and a vertical mixing efficiency that is about twice as large compared to the case with vertical shear. This model also reproduced other key parameters like the turbulent Froude number and the turbulent Prandtl number with good accuracy, but it failed to predict quantitatively the reduction of the shear anisotropy with increasing stratification. For strong stratification, none of the models was able to describe the rapid decrease of the mixing efficiency associated with the collapse and fossilisation of turbulence.

  6. Characterization of horizontal flows around solar pores from high-resolution time series of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, S.; de Vicente, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Martínez Pillet, V.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Though there is increasing evidence linking the moat flow and the Evershed flow along the penumbral filaments, there is not a clear consensus regarding the existence of a moat flow around umbral cores and pores, and the debate is still open. Solar pores appear to be a suitable scenario to test the moat-penumbra relation as they correspond to a direct interaction between the umbra and the convective plasma in the surrounding photosphere without any intermediate structure in between. Aims: We study solar pores based on high-resolution ground-based and satellite observations. Methods: Local correlation tracking techniques were applied to different-duration time series to analyze the horizontal flows around several solar pores. Results: Our results establish that the flows calculated from different solar pore observations are coherent among each other and show the determining and overall influence of exploding events in the granulation around the pores. We do not find any sign of moat-like flows surrounding solar pores, but a clearly defined region of inflows surrounding them. Conclusions: The connection between moat flows and flows associated to penumbral filaments is hereby reinforced.

  7. Characterization of Horizontal Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Using Markov Model-Based Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Dan; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow widely exists in many physical systems and chemical engineering processes. Compared with vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow, investigations on dynamic behavior underlying horizontal gas-liquid flows are quite limited. Complex network provides a powerful framework for time series analysis of complex dynamical systems. We use a network generation method based on Markov transition probability to infer directed weighted complex networks from signals measured from horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow experiment and find that the networks corresponding to different flow patterns exhibit different network structure. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of horizontal gas-liquid flows, we construct a number of complex networks under different flow conditions, and explore the network indices for each constructed network. In addition, we investigate the sample entropy of different flow patterns. Our results suggest that the network statistic can well represent the complexity in the transition among different flow patterns and further allows characterizing the interface fluctuation behavior in horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  8. A parallel computational framework for integrated surface-subsurface flow and transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hwang, H.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    HydroGeoSphere is a 3D control-volume finite element hydrologic model describing fully-integrated surface and subsurface water flow and solute and thermal energy transport. Because the model solves tighly-coupled highly-nonlinear partial differential equations, often applied at regional and continental scales (for example, to analyze the impact of climate change on water resources), high performance computing (HPC) is essential. The target parallelization includes the composition of the Jacobian matrix for the iterative linearization method and the sparse-matrix solver, a preconditioned Bi-CGSTAB. The matrix assembly is parallelized by using a coarse-grained scheme in that the local matrix compositions can be performed independently. The preconditioned Bi-CGSTAB algorithm performs a number of LU substitutions, matrix-vector multiplications, and inner products, where the parallelization of the LU substitution is not trivial. The parallelization of the solver is achieved by partitioning the domain into equal-size subdomains, with an efficient reordering scheme. The computational flow of the Bi-CGSTAB solver is also modified to reduce the parallelization overhead and to be suitable for parallel architectures. The parallelized model is tested on several benchmark simulations which include linear and nonlinear flow problems involving various domain sizes and degrees of hydrologic complexities. The performance is evaluated in terms of computational robustness and efficiency, using standard scaling performance measures. The results of simulation profiling indicate that the efficiency becomes higher with an increasing number of nodes/elements in the mesh, for increasingly nonlinear transient simulations, and with domains of irregular geometry. These characteristics are promising for the large-scale analysis water resources problems involved integrated surface/subsurface flow regimes.

  9. Laboratory Validation of Passive Flow Focusing of Horizontal Wells for in Situ Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, A.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.; Kumarage, P.; Divine, C.; O'Fallon, T.

    2014-12-01

    A new concept for in situgroundwater remediation was recently developed where drilled horizontal wells filled with granular treatment media are installed in the direction of groundwater flow. Due to the differences in hydraulic conductivity (K) of the media in the well and the surrounding aquifer, groundwater is "focused" into the well and treated (Figure 1). Initial computer simulations demonstrate that the horizontal well will have a substantial capture zone making this a viable and appealing remediation strategy. In this work, a laboratory scale model was constructed to validate the computer simulations and determine the expected capture zone of a horizontal well under a range of hydraulic conductivity differentials. We have built a physical model to replicate a horizontal well in a confined aquifer. The model is constructed inside a 55-gallon drum packed with sand and water is pumped into the bottom of the drum and flows upward through the system. Within the aquifer, we installed a 1" screened well packed with lime-soda beads. To define the capture zone, we placed manometers in the aquifer. Finally, a constant head is applied to the system (Figure 2 and 3). Initial tests have shown that the 1" well with a hydraulic conductivity 65 times greater than the surrounding aquifer (kwell= 1.3 cm/sec vs. kaquifer= 0.02cm/sec) will capture a significant percentage (over 80% in some configurations) of the water applied to the system. A tracer test has shown that the water velocity in the well is substantially higher than the aquifer. Manometer readings confirm the flowfield effects of the well and these data are being used to calibrate numerical models. The presentation will focus on the observed behavior of the physical model under varying applied head and hydraulic conductivities and discuss the potential design implications for full-scale application.

  10. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  11. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computingmore » finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  12. dfnWorks: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in anmore » intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  13. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  14. Numerical study of boundary layer transition in flowing film evaporation on horizontal elliptical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbik, M.; Ansari, O.; Zeghmati, B.

    2005-03-01

    A numerical study of the onset of longitudinal transition between turbulent and laminar regimes during the evaporation of a water film is presented. These water film streams along a horizontal elliptical tube under the simultaneous effects of gravity, pressure gradients, caused by the vapor flow and curvature, and viscous forces. At the interface of water vapor, the shear stress is supposed to be negligible. Outside the boundary layer, the vapor phase velocity is obtained from potential flow. In the analysis Von Karman’s turbulence model is used and the inertia and convection terms are retained. Transfers equations are discretised by using the implicit Keller method. The effects of an initial liquid flow rate per unit of length, Froude number, temperature difference between the wall and the liquid vapor interface and ellipticity on the transition position have been evaluated. The transition criterion has been given in term of the critical film Reynolds number (ReΓ)C.

  15. Evidence for extensive gene flow and Thermotoga subpopulations in subsurface and marine environments

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, Camilla L; S Swithers, Kristen; Dahle, Håkon; Haverkamp, Thomas HA; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Sokolova, Tatiana; Kublanov, Ilya; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Oil reservoirs represent a nutrient-rich ecological niche of the deep biosphere. Although most oil reservoirs are occupied by microbial populations, when and how the microbes colonized these environments remains unanswered. To address this question, we compared 11 genomes of Thermotoga maritima-like hyperthermophilic bacteria from two environment types: subsurface oil reservoirs in the North Sea and Japan, and marine sites located in the Kuril Islands, Italy and the Azores. We complemented our genomes with Thermotoga DNA from publicly available subsurface metagenomes from North America and Australia. Our analysis revealed complex non-bifurcating evolutionary history of the isolates' genomes, suggesting high amounts of gene flow across all sampled locations, a conjecture supported by numerous recombination events. Genomes from the same type of environment tend to be more similar, and have exchanged more genes with each other than with geographically close isolates from different types of environments. Hence, Thermotoga populations of oil reservoirs do not appear isolated, a requirement of the ‘burial and isolation' hypothesis, under which reservoir bacteria are descendants of the isolated communities buried with sediments that over time became oil reservoirs. Instead, our analysis supports a more complex view, where bacteria from subsurface and marine populations have been continuously migrating into the oil reservoirs and influencing their genetic composition. The Thermotoga spp. in the oil reservoirs in the North Sea and Japan probably entered the reservoirs shortly after they were formed. An Australian oil reservoir, on the other hand, was likely colonized very recently, perhaps during human reservoir development. PMID:25500512

  16. A nonlinear flow-transition criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal channels and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce K.; Liu, Yuming

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the interfacial instability and transition of a two-fluid flow from a stratified state to large amplitude waves or slugs is considered. By combining an asymptotic approximation of the linear Orr-Sommerfeld analysis with nonlinear resonant wave interaction theory, a novel nonlinear slug-transition criterion is derived. This criterion corresponds to a bounding condition on the upper fluid's velocity in order to limit the amount of energy (provided by the linear instability) which is transferred to long waves through resonant wave interactions. It is proposed that such a condition can predict the formation of large-amplitude long waves and/or slugs. Quantitative comparisons of the onset of slugging are made between the prediction by the nonlinear transition criterion and the experimental measurements carried out in a horizontal square channel. Good agreement is observed. An additional heuristic model is developed which generalizes the transition criterion to flow through horizontal pipes. Comparisons are made for flows through different pipe diameters and over a wide range of fluid properties. Good agreement between the present theoretical predictions and the experimental measurements is also observed.

  17. Measuring groundwater flow at the Sanford Laboratory with coupled surface/subsurface time-lapse gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murdoch, L.; Long, A. J.; Koth, K.

    2011-12-01

    Limited options exist to measure groundwater processes, particularly at large depths. Coupled time-lapse gravity measurements at the surface and underground are one possibility, but despite recent advances in borehole instruments, no repeat underground gravity measurements of water-mass change have been reported. At the Sanford Laboratory-located at the Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, and site of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)-the U.S. Geological Survey has established a network of 19 surface and 5 underground gravity stations to monitor groundwater-storage change over the projected 20-year existence of the underground laboratory. Continuous pumping is planned to dewater the mine to a depth of 2,500 m; the current pumping regime began in 2007 and current water levels (2011) are at a depth of about 1,700 m. Measurements using a field-portable A-10 absolute gravimeter have been made approximately annually at surface stations since 2007. Underground stations forming a vertical profile along the Ross Shaft on the 300, 800, 2000, 4100, and 4850 levels (numbers indicate approximate depth in feet) were established in 2011, and it is expected all stations will be surveyed annually. To date, surface time-lapse measurements show gravity increases of 50 to 100 nm/s^2 (10 nm/s^2 = 1 microgal) at some stations and equivalent decreases at others, indicating little evidence of water-mass change from pumping. Preliminary modeling, in which the dewatered zone is represented by a series of horizontal prisms that undergo mass change equal to the porosity (assumed 0.005, an average of rock porosity and mined-out voids), indicates that this is the expected result. At pumping rates required to maintain drawdown to a depth of 2,500 m, however, the expected gravity change increases from about 50 nm/s^2 at the surface to 250 nm/s^2 at the 4850 level. Gravity stations in the subsurface are advantageous because they are both closer to the water

  18. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  19. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  20. Melting of ice stuck on cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2016-04-01

    Melting of ice stuck on seven in-lined cooling cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct is investigated by means of a numerical analysis on the PHOENICS Code. The numerical results are validated compared with the experiment of an ice sphere melting. Parameters for calculations are inlet temperature, inlet velocity and clearance between the cylinders. The most concern of the melting is a finding of a curious behavior that is the melting in small inlet velocity on the long clearance between the cylinders.

  1. Evaluation of a Heterogeneity Preserving Inversion Method for Subsurface Unsaturated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Schaap, M. G.; Neuman, S. P.; Guadagnini, A.; Riva, M.

    2013-12-01

    Natural recharge to groundwater in semi-arid regions is driven by unsaturated flow through an often deep vadose zone. Understanding and modeling such flow requires knowledge of the subsurface heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. It is expensive and labor intensive to measure such properties, making it necessary to rely on other sources of information. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) constitute cheap and viable tools to estimate hydraulic properties from soil or sediment texture. Due to the predominantly empirical nature of PTFs and the fact that PTFs are often based on data derived from small laboratory samples, biased estimates of hydraulic parameters may be produced that would likely bias modeled field scale deep vadose zone flow. In this work, an inversion framework that treats the subsurface as a composite medium formed by different zones, each associated with spatially heterogeneous hydraulic parameters, is developed to allow (a) preserving the details of the subsurface heterogeneous nature and (b) assuring consistency among hydraulic parameters associated with different regions of the domain. The approach is demonstrated through a field application, which considers the Maricopa site near Phoenix, Arizona. The study site is a 50x50 meter and 15 meter deep vadose zone at which a 28-day constant-rate infiltration experiment was conducted in 2001. Moisture content at the site was measured daily with neutron thermalization at 400 locations during the infiltration period, and at irregular intervals 100 and 200 days prior and after infiltration, respectively. A PTF based on the Rosetta model is applied on the basis of measured spatial distributions of textural and bulk density data to provide initial estimates of the three-dimensional structure of hydraulic properties. Simple linear functions are defined that transform the PTF estimates of soil hydraulic properties values into hydraulic parameters that minimize the objective functions for the domain, while zonation

  2. Modeling flow into horizontal wells in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Henk; Kuzin, Sergey; Kelson, Vic; Abrams, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal wells or radial collector wells are used in shallow aquifers to enhance water withdrawal rates. Groundwater flow patterns near these wells are three-dimensional (3D), but difficult to represent in a 3D numerical model because of the high degree of grid refinement needed. However, for the purpose of designing water withdrawal systems, it is sufficient to obtain the correct production rate of these wells for a given drawdown. We developed a Cauchy boundary condition along a horizontal well in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model. Such a steady-state 2D model is not only useful for predicting groundwater withdrawal rates but also for capture zone delineation in the context of source water protection. A comparison of our Dupuit-Forchheimer model for a radial collector well with a 3D model yields a nearly exact production rate. Particular attention is given to horizontal wells that extend underneath a river. A comparison of our approach with a 3D solution for this case yields satisfactory results, at least for moderate-to-large river bottom resistances. PMID:20331744

  3. DFNWORKS: A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-11-01

    DFNWORKS is a parallelized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using DFNGEN, which combines FRAM (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs with the LAGRIT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation. The representation produces a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in DFNFLOW, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code PFLOTRAN. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within DFNTRANS to determine pathlines and solute transport through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  4. Modelling and evaluation of nitrogen removal performance in subsurface flow and free water surface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tunçsiper, B; Ayaz, S C; Akça, L

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of protecting drinking water sources in rural regions, pilot-scale subsurface water flow (SSF) and free water surface flow (FWS) constructed wetland systems were evaluated for removal efficiencies of nitrogenous pollutants in tertiary stage treated wastewaters (effluent from the Pasaköy biological nutrient removal plant). Five different hydraulic application rates and emergent (Canna, Cyperus, Typhia sp., Phragmites sp., Juncus, Poaceae, Paspalum and Iris) and floating (Pistia, Salvina and Lemna) plant species were assayed. The average annual NH4-N, NO3-N and organic-N treatment efficiencies were 81, 40 and 74% in SSFs and 76, 59 and 75% in FWSs, respectively. Two types of the models (first-order plug flow and multiple regression) were tried to estimate the system performances. Nitrification, denitrification and ammonification rate constants (k20) values in SSF and FWS systems were 0.898 d-1 and 0.541 d(-1), 0.486 d(-1) and 0.502 d(-1), 0.986 d(-1) and 0.908, respectively. Results show that the first-order plug flow model clearly estimates slightly higher or lower values than observed when compared with the other model. PMID:16889247

  5. Deformation band clusters on Mars and implications for subsurface fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, C.H.; Schultz, R.A.; Chan, M.A.; Komatsu, G.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution imagery reveals unprecedented lines of evidence for the presence of deformation band clusters in layered sedimentary deposits in the equatorial region of Mars. Deformation bands are a class of geologic structural discontinuity that is a precursor to faults in clastic rocks and soils. Clusters of deformation bands, consisting of many hundreds of individual subparallel bands, can act as important structural controls on subsurface fluid flow in terrestrial reservoirs, and evidence of diagenetic processes is often preserved along them. Deformation band clusters are identified on Mars based on characteristic meter-scale architectures and geologic context as observed in data from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The identification of deformation band clusters on Mars is a key to investigating the migration of fluids between surface and subsurface reservoirs in the planet's vast sedimentary deposits. Similar to terrestrial examples, evidence of diagenesis in the form of light- and dark-toned discoloration and wall-rock induration is recorded along many of the deformation band clusters on Mars. Therefore, these structures are important sites for future exploration and investigations into the geologic history of water and water-related processes on Mars. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  6. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-16

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most “state of the art” groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  7. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  8. Effect of Horizontally Inhomogeneous Heating on Flow and Magnetic Field in the Chromosphere of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  9. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach. PMID:27176392

  10. Accuracy of flowmeters measuring horizontal groundwater flow in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Ursic, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Borehole flowmeters that measure horizontal flow velocity and direction of groundwater flow are being increasingly applied to a wide variety of environmental problems. This study was carried out to evaluate the measurement accuracy of several types of flowmeters in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator. Flowmeter response to hydraulic gradient, aquifer properties, and well-screen construction was measured during 2003 and 2005 at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The flowmeters tested included a commercially available heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler flowmeter, a scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter, and a fluid-conductivity logging system. Results of the study indicated that at least one flowmeter was capable of measuring borehole flow velocity and direction in most simulated conditions. The mean error in direction measurements ranged from 15.1 degrees to 23.5 degrees and the directional accuracy of all tested flowmeters improved with increasing hydraulic gradient. The range of Darcy velocities examined in this study ranged 4.3 to 155 ft/d. For many plots comparing the simulated and measured Darcy velocity, the squared correlation coefficient (r2) exceeded 0.92. The accuracy of velocity measurements varied with well construction and velocity magnitude. The use of horizontal flowmeters in environmental studies appears promising but applications may require more than one type of flowmeter to span the range of conditions encountered in the field. Interpreting flowmeter data from field settings may be complicated by geologic heterogeneity, preferential flow, vertical flow, constricted screen openings, and nonoptimal screen orientation.