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Sample records for subthalamic pgo-like waves

  1. The Subthalamic Nucleus, oscillations and conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is currently the most common target for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease, has received increased attention over the past few years for the roles it may play in functions beyond simple motor control. In this article we will highlight several of the theoretical, interventional, and electrophysiological studies that have implicated the STN in response inhibition. Most influential amongst this evidence has been the reported effect of STN deep brain stimulation in increasing impulsive responses in the laboratory setting. Yet, how this relates to pathological impulsivity in patient’s everyday lives remains uncertain. PMID:25688872

  2. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. PMID

  3. The subthalamic nucleus. Part I: development, cytology, topography and connections.

    PubMed

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    This monograph (Part I of two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. Part II of the two volumes (volume 199) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models--single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727483

  4. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  5. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  6. Recording of the Neural Activity Induced by the Electrical Subthalamic Stimulation Using Ca2+ Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Atsushi; Yagi, Tetsuya; Osanai, Makoto

    The basal ganglia (BG) have important roles in some kind of motor control and learning. Parkinson's disease is one of the motor impairment disease. Recently, to recover a motor severity in patients of Parkinsonism, the stimulus electrode is implanted to the subthalamic nucleus, which is a part of the basal ganglia, and the deep brain stimulation (DBS) is often conducted. However, the effects of the DBS on the subthalamic neurons have not been elucidated. Thus, to analyze the effects of the electrical stimulation on the subthalamic neurons, we conducted the calcium imaging at the mouse subthalamic nucleus. When the single stimulus was applied to the subthalamic nucleus, the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients were observed. In the case of application of the single electrical stimulation, the [Ca2+]i arose near the stimulus position. When 100 Hz 10-100 times tetanic stimulations were applied, the responded area and the amplitudes of [Ca2+]i transients were increased. The [Ca2+]i transients were disappeared almost completely on the action potential blockade, but blockade of the excitatory and the inhibitory synaptic transmission had little effects on the responded area and the amplitudes of the [Ca2+]i transients. These results suggested that the electrical stimulation to the subthalamic neurons led to activate the subthalamic neurons directly but not via synaptic transmissions. Thus, DBS may change the activity of the subthalamic neurons, hence, may alter the input-output relationship of the subthalamic neurons

  7. Electrophysiological registration of phonological perception in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    De Letter, M; Aerts, A; Van Borsel, J; Vanhoutte, S; De Taeye, L; Raedt, R; van Mierlo, P; Boon, P; Van Roost, D; Santens, P

    2014-11-01

    Phonological processing is usually associated with the activation of cortical areas, especially in the left cerebral hemisphere. This study examined if phonologically elicited evoked potentials can be recorded directly from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seven PD patients who had undergone implantation of deep brain electrodes for the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus were included. Local field potentials were recorded in a pre-attentive auditory phonological task, an attentive auditory phonological discrimination task, and a word recognition task. Auditory evoked potentials related to phonological, but not lexical processing, could be demonstrated in the subthalamic nucleus for all three tasks. Only minor changes were found after levodopa administration. This study demonstrates that the subthalamic nucleus is involved in early phonological perception, which puts the subthalamic nucleus in a position to modify phonological perception in a larger cortico-subcortical network. PMID:25265552

  8. MRI localization of the subthalamic nucleus in normal adults and its relation with age.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huandi; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Lixin; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-11

    The subthalamic nucleus regulates motor and neurocognitive functions. Because of its small size and close proximity to other small subcortical structures, it has been a challenge to localize and visualize it using MRI. Here, we sought to define the optimal MRI scan method and visualization plane for locating the subthalamic nucleus on MRI images and to further delineate the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus and their correlation with age, laterality, and sex. Healthy volunteers received axial, sagittal, and coronal T2_3D_DRIVE CLEAR, coronal T1-WI, coronal T2FLAIR, coronal T2, and coronal SWI sequence. The coronal T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR images were compared with the Schaltenbrand-Wahren Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain for localizing the subthalamic nucleus. The best visualization plane with the largest sectional area and the most distinct outline was obtained and region of interest was delineated manually on the basis of the contours of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei in T2-WI images. T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view showed optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and indicated that the subthalamic nucleus showed three morphological types: the double convex lens type (172, 64%), the ram's horn type (62, 23%), and the willow leaf type (34, 13%). There were no statistically significant differences because of laterality, sex, and age in the sectional area, and maximal long and short diameter of the subthalamic nucleus. On the basis of our results, the current study has shown that T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view provides optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus, which shows three distinct morphological types on MRI images, and there is no statistically significant difference in the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus because of laterality, sex, and age in normal individuals. PMID:26379058

  9. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  10. Improvement of sleep architecture in PD with subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Bejjani, B P; Garma, L; Bonnet, A M; Houeto, J L; Damier, P; Derenne, J P; Agid, Y

    2000-12-12

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was used to investigate the relationship of sleep disorders with motor handicap in PD. In 10 insomniac patients with PD, stimulation reduced nighttime akinesia by 60% and completely suppressed axial and early morning dystonia, but did not alleviate periodic leg movements (n = 3) or REM sleep behavior disorders (n = 5). Total sleep time increased by 47%; wakefulness after sleep onset decreased by 51 minutes. Insomnia in patients with PD may predominantly result from nighttime motor disability. PMID:11113233

  11. Arachnophobia alleviated by subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Allert, Niels; Gippert, Sabrina M; Sajonz, Bastian E A; Nelles, Christoph; Bewernick, Bettina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Coenen, Volker A

    2016-06-01

    We report on a Parkinson patient with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in whom deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) not only improved motor symptoms but also pre-existing arachnophobia. Arachnophobia had been unchanged by the course of Parkinson's disease but rapidly improved with STN-DBS. Both, motor effects and the improvement of arachnophobia were stable during 2 years follow-up. To our knowledge this is the first report on STN stimulation effects on a specific phobia. PMID:27198699

  12. Effects of dopaminergic and subthalamic stimulation on musical performance.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Floris T; Schüpbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Hälbig, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    Although subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an efficient treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on fine motor functions are not clear. We present the case of a professional violinist with PD treated with STN-DBS. DBS improved musical articulation, intonation and emotional expression and worsened timing relative to a timekeeper (metronome). The same effects were found for dopaminergic treatment. These results suggest that STN-DBS, mimicking the effects of dopaminergic stimulation, improves fine-tuned motor behaviour whilst impairing timing precision. PMID:23232663

  13. The subthalamic nucleus exerts opposite control on cocaine and 'natural' rewards.

    PubMed

    Baunez, Christelle; Dias, Carine; Cador, Martine; Amalric, Marianne

    2005-04-01

    A challenge in treating drug addicts is preventing their pathological motivation for the drug without impairing their general affective state toward natural reinforcers. Here we have shown that discrete lesions of the subthalamic nucleus greatly decreased the motivation of rats for cocaine while increasing it for food reward. The subthalamic nucleus, a key structure controlling basal ganglia outputs, is therefore able to oppositely modulate the effect of 'natural' rewards and drugs of abuse on behavior. Modulating the activity of the subthalamic nucleus might prove to be a new target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:15793577

  14. Suppression of beta oscillations in the subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Doyle Gaynor, L M F; Kühn, A A; Dileone, M; Litvak, V; Eusebio, A; Pogosyan, A; Androulidakis, A G; Tisch, S; Limousin, P; Insola, A; Mazzone, P; Di Lazzaro, V; Brown, P

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear how subthalamic nucleus activity is modulated by the cerebral cortex. Here we investigate the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the cortex on oscillatory subthalamic local field potential activity in the 8–35 Hz (alpha/beta) band, as exaggerated synchronization in this band is implicated in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. We studied nine patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to test whether cortical stimulation can modulate synchronized oscillations in the human subthalamic nucleus. With patients at rest, single-pulse TMS was delivered every 5 s over each primary motor area and supplementary motor area at intensities of 85–115% resting motor threshold. Subthalamic local field potentials were recorded from deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted into this nucleus for the treatment of PD. Motor cortical stimulation suppressed beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus from ∼0.2 to 0.6 s after TMS (repeated measures anova; main effect of time, P<0.01; main effect of side, P=0.03), regardless of intensity. TMS over the supplementary motor area also reduced subthalamic beta activity at 95% (P=0.05) and 115% resting motor threshold (P=0.01). The oscillatory activity decreased to 80 ± 26% of baseline (averaged across sites and stimulation intensities). Suppression with subthreshold stimuli confirmed that these changes were centrally driven and not due to peripheral afference. The results may have implications for mechanisms underlying the reported therapeutic benefits of cortical stimulation. PMID:18657185

  15. The Subthalamic Nucleus During Decision-Making With Multiple Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Schäfer, Andreas; Neumann, Jane; Turner, Robert; Forstmann, Birte U.

    2016-01-01

    Several prominent neurocomputational models predict that an increase of choice alternatives is modulated by increased activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In turn, increased STN activity allows prolonged accumulation of information. At the same time, areas in the medial frontal cortex such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the pre-SMA are hypothesized to influence the information processing in the STN. This study set out to test concrete predictions of STN activity in multiple-alternative decision-making using a multimodal combination of 7 Tesla structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and ancestral graph (AG) modeling. The results are in line with the predictions in that increased STN activity was found with an increasing amount of choice alternatives. In addition, our study shows that activity in the ACC is correlated with activity in the STN without directly modulating it. This result sheds new light on the information processing streams between medial frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. PMID:26178078

  16. Neuropsychological functioning following bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C E; Borod, J C; Perrine, K; Beric, A; Brin, M F; Rezai, A; Kelly, P; Sterio, D; Germano, I; Weisz, D; Olanow, C W

    2004-03-01

    The cognitive effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been examined. However, there are no reported studies that evaluate, by incorporating a disease control group, whether neuropsychological performance in surgical patients changes beyond the variability of the assessment measures. To examine this issue, 17 PD patients were tested before and after bilateral STN stimulator implantation, both on and off stimulation. Eleven matched PD controls were administered the same repeatable neuropsychological test battery twice. Relative to changes seen in the controls, the surgery for electrode placement mildly adversely affected attention and language functions. STN stimulation, per se, had little effect on cognition. The STN DBS procedure as a whole resulted in a mild decline in delayed verbal recall and language functions. There were no surgery, stimulation, or procedure effects on depression scale scores. In contrast to these group findings, one DBS patient demonstrated significant cognitive decline following surgery. PMID:15010083

  17. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Wiecki, Thomas V; Cohen, Michael X; Figueroa, Christina M; Samanta, Johan; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying time until the right decision can be made. Using the drift diffusion model of decision making, we found that trial-to-trial increases in mPFC activity (EEG theta power, 4-8 Hz) were related to an increased threshold for evidence accumulation (decision threshold) as a function of conflict. Deep brain stimulation of the STN in individuals with Parkinson's disease reversed this relationship, resulting in impulsive choice. In addition, intracranial recordings of the STN area revealed increased activity (2.5-5 Hz) during these same high-conflict decisions. Activity in these slow frequency bands may reflect a neural substrate for cortico-basal ganglia communication regulating decision processes. PMID:21946325

  18. The subthalamic nucleus during decision-making with multiple alternatives.

    PubMed

    Keuken, Max C; Van Maanen, Leendert; Bogacz, Rafal; Schäfer, Andreas; Neumann, Jane; Turner, Robert; Forstmann, Birte U

    2015-10-01

    Several prominent neurocomputational models predict that an increase of choice alternatives is modulated by increased activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In turn, increased STN activity allows prolonged accumulation of information. At the same time, areas in the medial frontal cortex such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the pre-SMA are hypothesized to influence the information processing in the STN. This study set out to test concrete predictions of STN activity in multiple-alternative decision-making using a multimodal combination of 7 Tesla structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and ancestral graph (AG) modeling. The results are in line with the predictions in that increased STN activity was found with an increasing amount of choice alternatives. In addition, our study shows that activity in the ACC is correlated with activity in the STN without directly modulating it. This result sheds new light on the information processing streams between medial frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. PMID:26178078

  19. Reduced cortical innervation of the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Abraham; Ma, Yuxian; Paré, Jean-Francois; Villalba, Rosa M.; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus are the main entry points for cortical information to the basal ganglia. Parkinson’s disease affects not only the function, but also the morphological integrity of some of these inputs and their synaptic targets in the basal ganglia. Significant morphological changes in the cortico-striatal system have already been recognized in patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of the disease. To find out whether the primate cortico-subthalamic system is also subject to functionally relevant morphological alterations in parkinsonism, we used a combination of light and electron microscopy anatomical approaches and in vivo electrophysiological methods in monkeys rendered parkinsonian following chronic exposure to low doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). At the light microscopic level, the density of vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive (i.e. cortico-subthalamic) profiles in the dorsolateral part of the subthalamic nucleus (i.e. its sensorimotor territory) was 26.1% lower in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys than in controls. These results were confirmed by electron microscopy studies showing that the number of vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive terminals and of axon terminals forming asymmetric synapses in the dorsolateral subthalamic nucleus was reduced by 55.1% and 27.9%, respectively, compared with controls. These anatomical findings were in line with in vivo electrophysiology data showing a 60% reduction in the proportion of pallidal neurons that responded to electrical stimulation of the cortico-subthalamic system in parkinsonian monkeys. These findings provide strong evidence for a partial loss of the hyperdirect cortico-subthalamic projection in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys.

  20. Reduced cortical innervation of the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Abraham; Ma, Yuxian; Paré, Jean-Francois; Villalba, Rosa M.; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus are the main entry points for cortical information to the basal ganglia. Parkinson’s disease affects not only the function, but also the morphological integrity of some of these inputs and their synaptic targets in the basal ganglia. Significant morphological changes in the cortico-striatal system have already been recognized in patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of the disease. To find out whether the primate cortico-subthalamic system is also subject to functionally relevant morphological alterations in parkinsonism, we used a combination of light and electron microscopy anatomical approaches and in vivo electrophysiological methods in monkeys rendered parkinsonian following chronic exposure to low doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). At the light microscopic level, the density of vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive (i.e. cortico-subthalamic) profiles in the dorsolateral part of the subthalamic nucleus (i.e. its sensorimotor territory) was 26.1% lower in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys than in controls. These results were confirmed by electron microscopy studies showing that the number of vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive terminals and of axon terminals forming asymmetric synapses in the dorsolateral subthalamic nucleus was reduced by 55.1% and 27.9%, respectively, compared with controls. These anatomical findings were in line with in vivo electrophysiology data showing a 60% reduction in the proportion of pallidal neurons that responded to electrical stimulation of the cortico-subthalamic system in parkinsonian monkeys. These findings provide strong evidence for a partial loss of the hyperdirect cortico-subthalamic projection in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. PMID:25681412

  1. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain. PMID:21780183

  2. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves balance control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common basal ganglia degenerative disease, affects balance control, especially when patients change balance strategy during postural tasks. Bilateral chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is therapeutically useful in advanced PD, and reduces the motor signs of patients. Nevertheless, the effects of STN stimulation on postural control are still debatable. Aims: To assess the impact of bilateral STN stimulation on balance control in PD and to determine how basal ganglia related sensorimotor modifications act on neurosensorial organisation of balance and motor postural programming. Methods: Twelve subjects aged 45–70 years underwent unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor (part III) clinical tests, static and dynamic posturography, including sensory organisation and adaptation tests, shortly before and six months after bilateral implantation of electrodes into the STN. Results: The postoperative static test showed an improvement in postural control precision both in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. The dynamic test highlighted the decreased number of falls and the ability of the patients to develop more appropriate sensorimotor strategies when stimulated. The sensory organisation test showed an improvement of equilibrium score and, thus, a better resolution of sensorial conflicts. Conclusions: STN stimulation allowed a reduction in rigidity and therefore an improvement in the ability to use muscular proprioception as reliable information, resulting in vestibulo-proprioceptive conflict suppression. STN stimulation has a synergistic effect with levodopa for postural control. Accordingly, non-dopaminergic pathways could be involved in postural regulation and STN stimulation may influence the functioning of these pathways. PMID:15897498

  3. The subthalamic nucleus contributes to post-error slowing.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Sanguinetti, Joseph L; Allen, John J B; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    pFC is proposed to implement cognitive control via directed "top-down" influence over behavior. But how is this feat achieved? The virtue of such a descriptive model is contingent on a mechanistic understanding of how motor execution is altered in specific circumstances. In this report, we provide evidence that the well-known phenomenon of slowed RTs following mistakes (post-error slowing) is directly influenced by the degree of subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity. The STN is proposed to act as a brake on motor execution following conflict or errors, buying time so a more cautious response can be made on the next trial. STN local field potentials from nine Parkinson disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery were recorded while they performed a response conflict task. In a 2.5- to 5-Hz frequency range previously associated with conflict and error processing, the degree phase consistency preceding the response was associated with increasingly slower RTs specifically following errors. These findings provide compelling evidence that post-error slowing is in part mediated by a corticosubthalamic "hyperdirect" pathway for increased response caution. PMID:24800632

  4. Neuronal Complexity in Subthalamic Nucleus is Reduced in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Saurabh; Huang, He; Gale, John T; Sarma, Sridevi V; Montgomery, Erwin B

    2016-01-01

    Several theories posit increased Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) activity is causal to Parkinsonism, yet in our previous study we showed that activity from 113 STN neurons from two epilepsy patients and 103 neurons from nine Parkinson's disease (PD) patients demonstrated no significant differences in frequencies or in the coefficients of variation of mean discharge frequencies per 1-s epochs. We continued our analysis using point process modeling to capture higher order temporal dynamics; in particular, bursting, beta-band oscillations, excitatory and inhibitory ensemble interactions, and neuronal complexity. We used this analysis as input to a logistic regression classifier and were able to differentiate between PD and epilepsy neurons with an accuracy of 92%. We also found neuronal complexity, i.e., the number of states in a neuron's point process model, and inhibitory ensemble dynamics, which can be interpreted as a reduction in complexity, to be the most important features with respect to classification accuracy. Even in a dataset with no significant differences in firing rate, we observed differences between PD and epilepsy for other single-neuron measures. Our results suggest PD comes with a reduction in neuronal "complexity," which translates to a neuron's ability to encode information; the more complexity, the more information the neuron can encode. This is also consistent with studies correlating disease to loss of variability in neuronal activity, as the lower the complexity, the less variability. PMID:26168436

  5. Inhibitory control and error monitoring by human subthalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, J; Polosan, M; Benis, D; Goetz, L; Bhattacharjee, M; Piallat, B; Krainik, A; Bougerol, T; Chabardès, S; David, O

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during tasks involving conflicting choice alternatives or rapid response suppression. However, the precise role of the STN during nonmotor functions remains controversial. First, we tested whether functionally distinct neuronal populations support different executive control functions (such as inhibitory control or error monitoring) even within a single subterritory of the STN. We used microelectrode recordings during deep brain stimulation surgery to study extracellular activity of the putative associative-limbic part of the STN while patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder performed a stop-signal task. Second, 2–4 days after the surgery, local field potential recordings of STN were used to test the hypothesis that STN oscillations may also reflect executive control signals. Extracellular recordings revealed three functionally distinct neuronal populations: the first one fired selectively before and during motor responses, the second one selectively increased their firing rate during successful inhibitory control, and the last one fired selectively during error monitoring. Furthermore, we found that beta band activity (15–35 Hz) rapidly increased during correct and incorrect behavioral stopping. Taken together, our results provide critical electrophysiological support for the hypothesized role of the STN in the integration of motor and cognitive-executive control functions. PMID:25203170

  6. The Subthalamic Nucleus, Limbic Function, and Impulse Control.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    It has been well documented that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) to address some of the disabling motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can evoke unintended effects, especially on non-motor behavior. This observation has catalyzed more than a decade of research concentrated on establishing trends and identifying potential mechanisms for these non-motor effects. While many issues remain unresolved, the collective result of many research studies and clinical observations has been a general recognition of the role of the STN in mediating limbic function. In particular, the STN has been implicated in impulse control and the related construct of valence processing. A better understanding of STN involvement in these phenomena could have important implications for treating impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs affect up to 40% of PD patients on dopamine agonist therapy and approximately 15% of PD patients overall. ICDs have been reported to be associated with STN DBS. In this paper we will focus on impulse control and review pre-clinical, clinical, behavioral, imaging, and electrophysiological studies pertaining to the limbic function of the STN. PMID:26577509

  7. Suppression of Subthalamic Nucleus Activity by Micromagnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation delivered via 0.5-mm diameter coils was recently shown to activate retinal neurons; the small coil size raises the possibility that micromagnetic stimulation (μMS) could underlie a new generation of implanted neural prosthetics. Such an approach has several inherent advantages over conventional electric stimulation, including the potential for selective activation of neuronal targets as well as less susceptibility to inflamma-tory responses. The viability of μMS for some applications, e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), may require suppression (rather than creation) of neuronal activity, however, and therefore we explore here whether (μMS) could, in fact, suppress activity. While single pulses elicited weak and inconsistent spiking in neurons of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (in vitro), repetitive stimulation effectively suppressed activity in ~70% of targeted neurons. This is the same percentage suppressed by conventional electric stimulation; with both modalities, suppression occurred only after an initial increase in spiking. The latency to the onset of suppression was inversely correlated to the energy of the stimulus waveform: larger amplitudes and lower frequencies had the fastest onset of suppression. These findings continue to support the viability of μMS as a next-generation implantable neural prosthetic. PMID:25163063

  8. Motor task event detection using Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Niketeghad, Soroush; Hebb, Adam O; Nedrud, Joshua; Hanrahan, Sara J; Mahoor, Mohammad H

    2015-08-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) provides significant therapeutic benefit for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Current DBS devices lack real-time feedback (thus are open loop) and stimulation parameters are adjusted during scheduled visits with a clinician. A closed-loop DBS system may reduce power consumption and DBS side effects. In such systems, DBS parameters are adjusted based on patient's behavior, which means that behavior detection is a major step in designing such systems. Various physiological signals can be used to recognize the behaviors. Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) Local Field Potential (LFP) is a great candidate signal for the neural feedback, because it can be recorded from the stimulation lead and does not require additional sensors. A practical behavior detection method should be able to detect behaviors asynchronously meaning that it should not use any prior knowledge of behavior onsets. In this paper, we introduce a behavior detection method that is able to asynchronously detect the finger movements of Parkinson patients. As a result of this study, we learned that there is a motor-modulated inter-hemispheric connectivity between LFP signals recorded bilaterally from STN. We used non-linear regression method to measure this connectivity and use it to detect the finger movements. Performance of this method is evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC). PMID:26737550

  9. Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome and Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De la Casa-Fages, Beatriz; Grandas, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome is a complication of the dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease that may be very disabling due to the negative impact that compulsive medication use may have on patients' social, psychological, and physical functioning. The relationship between subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and dopamine dysregulation syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease remains unclear. Deep brain stimulation may improve, worsen, or have no effect on preoperative dopamine dysregulation syndrome. Moreover, dopamine dysregulation syndrome may appear for the first time after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. The outcome of postoperative dopamine dysregulation syndrome is poor despite stimulation and medication adjustments. Here we review the phenomenology and neurobiology of this disorder, discuss possible mechanisms that may underlie the diverse outcomes of dopamine dysregulation syndrome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, and propose management strategies. PMID:22135744

  10. Effects of aging on nitrergic neurons in human striatum and subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Santos-Lobato, Bruno Lopes dos; Del-Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Pittella, José Eymard Homem; Tumas, Vitor

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major neurotransmitter associated with motor control in basal ganglia. Movement disorders, as essential tremor and Parkinson's disease, are more prevalent on aged individuals. We investigated the effects of aging on neuronal density and diameter/area of nitrergic neurons in samples of striatum (caudate and putamen) and subthalamic nucleus of 20 human brains from normal subjects, stained by histochemistry for NADPH-diaphorase and immunohistochemistry for neuronal NO synthase. Our data showed aging does not modify the neuronal density and size of nitrergic neurons in striatum and subthalamic nucleus. These findings suggest a lack of association between aging and morphologic changes on nitrergic neurons. PMID:26352497

  11. Metabolic correlates of subthalamic nucleus activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tanya P; Carbon, Maren; Tang, Chengke; Mogilner, Alon Y; Sterio, Djordje; Beric, Aleksandar; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2008-05-01

    Overactivity of subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons is a consistent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is a target of therapy for this disorder. However, the relationship of STN firing rate to regional brain function is not known. We scanned 17 PD patients with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET to measure resting glucose metabolism before the implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. Spontaneous STN firing rates were recorded during surgery and correlated with preoperative regional glucose metabolism on a voxel-by-voxel basis. We also examined the relationship between firing rate and the activity of metabolic brain networks associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. Mean firing rates were 47.2 +/- 6.1 and 48.7 +/- 8.5 Hz for the left and right hemispheres, respectively. These measures correlated (P < 0.007) with glucose metabolism in the putamen and globus pallidus, which receive projections from this structure. Significant correlations (P < 0.0005) were also evident in the primary motor (BA4) and dorsolateral prefrontal (BA46/10) cortical areas. The activity of both the motor (P < 0.0001) and the cognitive (P < 0.006) PD-related metabolic networks was elevated in these patients. STN firing rates correlated with the activity of the former (P < 0.007) but not the latter network (P = 0.39). The findings suggest that the functional pathways associated with motor disability in PD are linked to the STN firing rate. These pathways are likely to mediate the clinical benefit that is seen following targeted STN interventions for this disease. PMID:18400841

  12. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Herz, Damian M; Zavala, Baltazar A; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-04-01

    If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1-9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects' level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects' ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions. PMID:26996501

  13. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Zavala, Baltazar A.; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects’ level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects’ ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions. PMID:26996501

  14. Modulation of Human Time Processing by Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Timmermann, Lars; Reck, Christiane; Maarouf, Mohammad; Jörgens, Silke; Ploner, Markus; Südmeyer, Martin; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Sturm, Volker; Niedeggen, Michael; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2011-01-01

    Timing in the range of seconds referred to as interval timing is crucial for cognitive operations and conscious time processing. According to recent models of interval timing basal ganglia (BG) oscillatory loops are involved in time interval recognition. Parkinsońs disease (PD) is a typical disease of the basal ganglia that shows distortions in interval timing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a powerful treatment of PD which modulates motor and cognitive functions depending on stimulation frequency by affecting subcortical-cortical oscillatory loops. Thus, for the understanding of BG-involvement in interval timing it is of interest whether STN-DBS can modulate timing in a frequency dependent manner by interference with oscillatory time recognition processes. We examined production and reproduction of 5 and 15 second intervals and millisecond timing in a double blind, randomised, within-subject repeated-measures design of 12 PD-patients applying no, 10-Hz- and ≥130-Hz-STN-DBS compared to healthy controls. We found under(re-)production of the 15-second interval and a significant enhancement of this under(re-)production by 10-Hz-stimulation compared to no stimulation, ≥130-Hz-STN-DBS and controls. Milliseconds timing was not affected. We provide first evidence for a frequency-specific modulatory effect of STN-DBS on interval timing. Our results corroborate the involvement of BG in general and of the STN in particular in the cognitive representation of time intervals in the range of multiple seconds. PMID:21931767

  15. Task specific inter-hemispheric coupling in human subthalamic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Darvas, Felix; Hebb, Adam O.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical networks and quantitative measures of connectivity are integral to the study of brain function. Despite lack of direct connections between left and right subthalamic nuclei (STN), there are apparent physiological connections. During clinical examination of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), this connectivity is exploited to enhance signs of PD, yet our understanding of this connectivity is limited. We hypothesized that movement leads to synchronization of neural oscillations in bilateral STN, and we implemented phase coherence, a measure of phase-locking between cortical sites in a narrow frequency band, to demonstrate this synchronization. We analyzed task specific phase synchronization and causality between left and right STN local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from both hemispheres simultaneously during a cued movement task in four subjects with PD who underwent Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) surgery. We used a data driven approach to determine inter-hemispheric channel pairs and frequencies with a task specific increase in phase locking.We found significant phase locking between hemispheres in alpha frequency (8–12 Hz) in all subjects concurrent with movement of either hand. In all subjects, phase synchronization increased over baseline upon or prior to hand movement onset and lasted until the motion ceased. Left and right hand movement showed similar patterns. Granger causality (GC) at the phase-locking frequencies between synchronized electrodes revealed a unidirectional causality from right to left STN regardless of which side was moved.Phase synchronization across hemispheres between basal ganglia supports existence of a bilateral network having lateralized regions of specialization for motor processing. Our results suggest this bilateral network is activated by a unilateral motor program. Understanding phase synchronization in natural brain functions is critical to development of future DBS systems that augment goal directed behavioral

  16. Subthalamic nucleus phase–amplitude coupling correlates with motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Bernadette C.M.; Beudel, Martijn; Jha, Ashwani; Oswal, Ashwini; Foltynie, Tom; Hariz, Marwan I.; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Green, Alexander L.; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Objective High-amplitude beta band oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus are frequently associated with Parkinson’s disease but it is unclear how they might lead to motor impairments. Here we investigate a likely pathological coupling between the phase of beta band oscillations and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations around 300 Hz. Methods We analysed an extensive data set comprising resting-state recordings obtained from deep brain stimulation electrodes in 33 patients before and/or after taking dopaminergic medication. We correlated mean values of spectral power and phase–amplitude coupling with severity of hemibody bradykinesia/rigidity. In addition, we used simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalography to look at functional interactions between the subthalamic nucleus and ipsilateral motor cortex. Results Beta band power and phase–amplitude coupling within the subthalamic nucleus correlated positively with severity of motor impairment. This effect was more pronounced within the low-beta range, whilst coherence between subthalamic nucleus and motor cortex was dominant in the high-beta range. Conclusions We speculate that the beta band might impede pro-kinetic high-frequency activity patterns when phase–amplitude coupling is prominent. Furthermore, results provide evidence for a functional subdivision of the beta band into low and high frequencies. Significance Our findings contribute to the interpretation of oscillatory activity within the cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:26971483

  17. Beyond nine years of continuous subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zibetti, Maurizio; Merola, Aristide; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Angrisano, Serena; Azzaro, Corrado; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; Arduino, Nichy; Marchisio, Alice; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease. The benefits of bilateral subthalamic stimulation are well documented, and some studies reported outcomes with a follow-up of 5 to 6 years; nevertheless, few data are available beyond 5 years. We report a long-term prospective evaluation of 14 consecutive parkinsonian patients, treated by bilateral subthalamic stimulation for at least 9 years. Motor symptoms, activity of daily living, and motor complications were evaluated by means of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, while cognition and mood were assessed with a specific neuropsychological test battery; medication intake, stimulation parameters, comorbidity, and adverse events were also recorded. Patients were evaluated before surgery and at 1, 5, and ≥ 9 years after surgery. At last follow-up, deep brain stimulation significantly improved the motor score by 42% compared to baseline, whereas activities of daily living were no longer improved; there was a 39% reduction in the dosage of dopaminergic drugs and a 59% improvement of L-dopa-related motor complications. The neuropsychological assessment showed that 4 patients (29%) developed a significant cognitive decline over the follow-up period. These results indicate a persistent effect of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on the cardinal motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease patients in the long-term; however, a worsening of patients' disability, mainly due to disease progression, was observed. PMID:22012750

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson's Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought. PMID:27624437

  19. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  20. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  1. [Influence of Medication on the Oscillatory and Dynamic Characteristics of Subthalamic Local Field Potentials in Patients with Parkinson's Disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanan; Geng, Xinyi; Huang, Yongzhi; Wang, Shouyan

    2016-02-01

    The dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus is the main cause of Parkinson's disease. Local field potentials in human subthalamic nucleus contain rich physiological information. The present study aimed to quantify the oscillatory and dynamic characteristics of local field potentials of subthalamic nucleus, and their modulation by the medication therapy for Parkinson's disease. The subthalamic nucleus local field potentials were recorded from patients with Parkinson's disease at the states of on and off medication. The oscillatory features were characterised with the power spectral analysis. Furthermore, the dynamic features were characterised with time-frequency analysis and the coefficient of variation measure of the time-variant power at each frequency. There was a dominant peak at low beta-band with medication off. The medication significantly suppressed the low beta component and increased the theta component. The amplitude fluctuation of neural oscillations was measured by the coefficient of variation. The coefficient of variation in 4-7 Hz and 60-66 Hz was increased by medication. These effects proved that medication had significant modulation to subthalamic nucleus neural oscillatory synchronization and dynamic features. The subthalamic nucleus neural activities tend towards stable state under medication. The findings would provide quantitative biomarkers for studying the mechanisms of Parkinson's disease and clinical treatments of medication or deep brain stimulation. PMID:27382739

  2. Subthalamic stimulation modulates cortical motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel; Klotz, Rosa; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Scholten, Marlieke; Naros, Georgios; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Bunjes, Friedemann; Meisner, Christoph; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic modulations of large-scale network activity and synchronization are inherent to a broad spectrum of cognitive processes and are disturbed in neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson's disease. Here, we set out to address the motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease and its modulation with subthalamic stimulation. To this end, 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease with subthalamic nucleus stimulation were analysed on externally cued right hand finger movements with 1.5-s interstimulus interval. Simultaneous recordings were obtained from electromyography on antagonistic muscles (right flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) together with 64-channel electroencephalography. Time-frequency event-related spectral perturbations were assessed to determine cortical and muscular activity. Next, cross-spectra in the time-frequency domain were analysed to explore the cortico-cortical synchronization. The time-frequency modulations enabled us to select a time-frequency range relevant for motor processing. On these time-frequency windows, we developed an extension of the phase synchronization index to quantify the global cortico-cortical synchronization and to obtain topographic differentiations of distinct electrode sites with respect to their contributions to the global phase synchronization index. The spectral measures were used to predict clinical and reaction time outcome using regression analysis. We found that movement-related desynchronization of cortical activity in the upper alpha and beta range was significantly facilitated with 'stimulation on' compared to 'stimulation off' on electrodes over the bilateral parietal, sensorimotor, premotor, supplementary-motor, and prefrontal areas, including the bilateral inferior prefrontal areas. These spectral modulations enabled us to predict both clinical and reaction time improvement from subthalamic stimulation. With 'stimulation on', interhemispheric cortico

  3. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus–response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the ‘normalization term’ in Bayes’ theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson’s disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions—information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their

  4. Chronic stress-like syndrome as a consequence of medial site subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Filip; Jech, Robert; Nováková, Lucie; Urgošík, Dušan; Bezdíček, Ondřej; Vymazal, Josef; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-02-01

    Considering the functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), we hypothesized that subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease might have a differential impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in relation to the position of active stimulating contact within the STN. In addition, we searched for any STN-DBS-related morning plasma cortisol changes in association with postoperative anxiety and weight gain. A plasma cortisol measurement was performed on the day of initiation of bilateral STN-DBS and repeated after 1 and 17 months in twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The body weight change and anxiety scores following the implantation were assessed as well. The electrode positions in the STN were determined on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. After initiation of stimulation, cortisol levels significantly decreased and the cortisol changes after 1 and 17 months strongly correlated with the position of active contact in the subthalamic area. Patients with at least one contact located more medially in the STN experienced a significantly greater decrease of cortisol than those with one or both active contacts more laterally. Furthermore, the lower cortisol levels were strongly associated with higher trait anxiety and weight gain. These changes mimicked the effects of chronic stress and suggest the disturbing impact of STN-DBS on limbic and motivational systems. PMID:25554999

  5. Parkinson's disease progression at 30 years: a study of subthalamic deep brain-stimulated patients.

    PubMed

    Merola, Aristide; Zibetti, Maurizio; Angrisano, Serena; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Artusi, Carlo A; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario G; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    Clinical findings in Parkinson's disease suggest that most patients progressively develop disabling non-levodopa-responsive symptoms during the course of the disease. Nevertheless, several heterogeneous factors, such as clinical phenotype, age at onset and genetic aspects may influence the long-term clinical picture. In order to investigate the main features of long-term Parkinson's disease progression, we studied a cohort of 19 subjects treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation after >20 years of disease, reporting clinical and neuropsychological data up to a mean of 30 years from disease onset. This group of patients was characterized by an early onset of disease, with a mean age of 38.63 years at Parkinson's disease onset, which was significantly lower than in the other long-term subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation follow-up cohorts reported in the literature. All subjects were regularly evaluated by a complete Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, a battery of neuropsychological tests and a clinical interview, intended to assess the rate of non-levodopa-responsive symptom progression. Clinical data were available for all patients at presurgical baseline and at 1, 3 and 5 years from the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgical procedure, while follow-up data after >7 years were additionally reported in a subgroup of 14 patients. The clinical and neuropsychological performance progressively worsened during the course of follow-up; 64% of patients gradually developed falls, 86% dysphagia, 57% urinary incontinence and 43% dementia. A progressive worsening of motor symptoms was observed both in 'medication-ON' condition and in 'stimulation-ON' condition, with a parallel reduction in the synergistic effect of 'medication-ON/stimulation-ON' condition. Neuropsychological data also showed a gradual decline in the performances of all main cognitive domains, with an initial involvement of executive functions, followed by the impairment

  6. Encoding of sequence boundaries in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Rusconi, Marco; Brücke, Christof; Haynes, John-Dylan; Schönecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-10-01

    Sequential behaviour is widespread not only in humans but also in animals, ranging in different degrees of complexity from locomotion to birdsong or music performance. The capacity to learn new motor sequences relies on the integrity of basal ganglia-cortical loops. In Parkinson's disease the execution of habitual action sequences as well as the acquisition of novel sequences is impaired partly due to a deficiency in being able to generate internal cues to trigger movement sequences. In addition, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have difficulty initiating or terminating a self-paced sequence of actions. Direct recordings from the basal ganglia in these patients show an increased level of beta (14-30 Hz) band oscillatory activity associated with impairment in movement initiation. In this framework, the current study aims to evaluate in patients with Parkinson's disease the neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus related to the encoding of sequence boundaries during the explicit learning of sensorimotor sequences. We recorded local field potential activity from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients who underwent deep brain stimulation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease, while the patients in their usual medicated state practiced sequences of finger movements on a digital piano with corresponding auditory feedback. Our results demonstrate that variability in performance during an early phase of sequence acquisition correlates across patients with changes in the pattern of subthalamic beta-band oscillations; specifically, an anticipatory suppression of beta-band activity at sequence boundaries is linked to better performance. By contrast, a more compromised performance is related to attenuation of beta-band activity before within-sequence elements. Moreover, multivariate pattern classification analysis reveals that differential information about boundaries and within-sequence elements can be decoded at least 100 ms before the keystroke

  7. Equilibrium potential of GABA(A) current and implications for rebound burst firing in rat subthalamic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bevan, M D; Wilson, C J; Bolam, J P; Magill, P J

    2000-05-01

    Reciprocally connected glutamatergic subthalamic and GABAergic globus pallidus neurons have recently been proposed to act as a generator of low-frequency oscillatory activity in Parkinson's disease. To determine whether GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic potentials could theoretically generate rebound burst firing in subthalamic neurons, a feature that is central to the proposed oscillatory mechanism, we determined the equilibrium potential of GABA(A) current (E(GABA(A))) and the degree of hyperpolarization required for rebound firing using perforated-patch recording. In the majority of neurons that fired rebounds, E(GABA(A)) was equal to or more hyperpolarized than the hyperpolarization required for rebound burst firing. These data suggest that synchronous activity of pallidal inputs could underlie rhythmic bursting activity of subthalamic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:10805713

  8. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus transiently enhances loss-chasing behaviour in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert D; Wielenberg, Birgit; Wojtecki, Lars; Elben, Saskia; Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2011-09-01

    Dopaminergic treatments are associated with impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling in a subset of patients with Parkinson's Disease. While deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has been reported to reduce symptoms of impulse control disorders in some Parkinson's Disease patients, little is known about its specific effects on gambling behaviour. In this experiment, we investigated the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on one of the central features of pathological gambling: the tendency to chase losses. Loss-chasing is associated with impaired control over gambling behaviour and it is one of the most salient features of pathological gambling as it presents in the clinic. Twenty two patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's Disease and chronically implanted subthalamic nucleus electrodes for deep brain stimulation completed a simple laboratory model of loss-chasing behaviour twice: once with and once without stimulation. Exploratory analysis indicated that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increased the value of losses chased by patients with Parkinson's Disease when shifting from off- to on-stimulation. These effects were not attributable to changes in state affect or to the motor impairments produced by the withdrawal of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. The effects of the stimulation on the value of losses chased were more pronounced in female than in male patients and reduced in patients taking dopamine receptor agonists. Collectively, these results suggest that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can transiently alter the evaluation of accumulated losses during gambling episodes in idiopathic Parkinson's Disease. PMID:21726554

  9. Ultra-High Field MRI Post Mortem Structural Connectivity of the Human Subthalamic Nucleus, Substantia Nigra, and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G.; Uludağ, Kâmil; Melse, Maartje; Mai, Jürgen; Kuijf, Mark L.; Herrler, Andreas; Jahanshahi, Ali; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus, three nuclei of the human basal ganglia, play an important role in motor, associative, and limbic processing. The network of the basal ganglia is generally characterized by a direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathway. This study aims to investigate the mesoscopic nature of these connections between the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus and their surrounding structures. Methods: A human post mortem brain specimen including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus was scanned on a 7 T MRI scanner. High resolution diffusion weighted images were used to reconstruct the fibers intersecting the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. The course and density of these tracks was analyzed. Results: Most of the commonly established projections of the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus were successfully reconstructed. However, some of the reconstructed fiber tracks such as the connections of the substantia nigra pars compacta to the other included nuclei and the connections with the anterior commissure have not been shown previously. In addition, the quantitative tractography approach showed a typical degree of connectivity previously not documented. An example is the relatively larger projections of the subthalamic nucleus to the substantia nigra pars reticulata when compared to the projections to the globus pallidus internus. Discussion: This study shows that ultra-high field post mortem tractography allows for detailed 3D reconstruction of the projections of deep brain structures in humans. Although the results should be interpreted carefully, the newly identified connections contribute to our understanding of the basal ganglia. PMID:27378864

  10. Subthalamic stimulation modulates cortical motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Rosa; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Scholten, Marlieke; Naros, Georgios; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Bunjes, Friedemann; Meisner, Christoph; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic modulations of large-scale network activity and synchronization are inherent to a broad spectrum of cognitive processes and are disturbed in neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson’s disease. Here, we set out to address the motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson’s disease and its modulation with subthalamic stimulation. To this end, 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease with subthalamic nucleus stimulation were analysed on externally cued right hand finger movements with 1.5-s interstimulus interval. Simultaneous recordings were obtained from electromyography on antagonistic muscles (right flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) together with 64-channel electroencephalography. Time-frequency event-related spectral perturbations were assessed to determine cortical and muscular activity. Next, cross-spectra in the time-frequency domain were analysed to explore the cortico-cortical synchronization. The time-frequency modulations enabled us to select a time-frequency range relevant for motor processing. On these time-frequency windows, we developed an extension of the phase synchronization index to quantify the global cortico-cortical synchronization and to obtain topographic differentiations of distinct electrode sites with respect to their contributions to the global phase synchronization index. The spectral measures were used to predict clinical and reaction time outcome using regression analysis. We found that movement-related desynchronization of cortical activity in the upper alpha and beta range was significantly facilitated with ‘stimulation on’ compared to ‘stimulation off’ on electrodes over the bilateral parietal, sensorimotor, premotor, supplementary-motor, and prefrontal areas, including the bilateral inferior prefrontal areas. These spectral modulations enabled us to predict both clinical and reaction time improvement from subthalamic stimulation. With ‘stimulation on’, interhemispheric cortico

  11. Subthalamic local field potentials in Parkinson's disease and isolated dystonia: An evaluation of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Doris D; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman E; Miller, Andrew M; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; San Luciano, Marta; Starr, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate prominent oscillations in the beta (13-30Hz) frequency range, and reduction of beta band spectral power by levodopa and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is correlated with motor symptom improvement. Several features of beta activity have been theorized to be specific biomarkers of the parkinsonian state, though these have rarely been studied in non-parkinsonian conditions. To compare resting state LFP features in PD and isolated dystonia and evaluate disease-specific biomarkers, we recorded subthalamic LFPs from 28 akinetic-rigid PD and 12 isolated dystonia patients during awake DBS implantation. Spectral power and phase-amplitude coupling characteristics were analyzed. In 26/28 PD and 11/12 isolated dystonia patients, the LFP power spectrum had a peak in the beta frequency range, with similar amplitudes between groups. Resting state power did not differ between groups in the theta (5-8Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta (13-30Hz), broadband gamma (50-200Hz), or high frequency oscillation (HFO, 250-350Hz) bands. Analysis of phase-amplitude coupling between low frequency phase and HFO amplitude revealed significant interactions in 19/28 PD and 6/12 dystonia recordings without significant differences in maximal coupling or preferred phase. Two features of subthalamic LFPs that have been proposed as specific parkinsonian biomarkers, beta power and coupling of beta phase to HFO amplitude, were also present in isolated dystonia, including focal dystonias. This casts doubt on the utility of these metrics as disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26884091

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Arjun S; Bynevelt, Michael; Lind, Christopher R P

    2016-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is one of the most important stereotactic targets in neurosurgery, and its accurate imaging is crucial. With improving MRI sequences there is impetus for direct targeting of the STN. High-quality, distortion-free images are paramount. Image reconstruction techniques appear to show the greatest promise in balancing the issue of geometrical distortion and STN edge detection. Existing spin echo- and susceptibility-based MRI sequences are compared with new image reconstruction methods. Quantitative susceptibility mapping is the most promising technique for stereotactic imaging of the STN. PMID:26295914

  13. Mood Response to Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Meghan C.; Black, Kevin J.; Weaver, Patrick M.; Lugar, Heather M.; Videen, Tom O.; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) improves motor function but has variable effects on mood. Little is known about the relationship between electrode contact location and mood response. We identified the anatomical location of electrode contacts and measured mood response to stimulation with the Visual Analog Scale in 24 STN DBS PD patients. Participants reported greater positive mood, decreased anxiety and apathy with bilateral and unilateral stimulation. Left DBS improved mood more than right DBS. Right DBS-induced increase in positive mood was related to more medial and dorsal contact locations. These results highlight the functional heterogeneity of the STN. PMID:22450611

  14. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves health-related quality of life in Parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Erola, Tuomo; Karinen, Petri; Heikkinen, Esa; Tuominen, Juho; Haapaniemi, Tarja; Koivukangas, John; Myllylä, Vilho

    2005-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurological disorder. Recently, bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become an option in the treatment of severe PD. We measured the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of 27 parkinsonian patients, who underwent a bilateral STN-operation. The instruments used for the evaluation of the HRQoL were the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Finnish version of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). We found that the quality of life significantly improved when measured with both HRQoL scales. Clinical improvement and improvement in HRQoL were positively correlated. PMID:15734666

  15. Conflict-dependent dynamic of subthalamic nucleus oscillations during moral decisions.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Giannicola, Gaia; Rosa, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Lucchiari, Claudio; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Servello, Domenico; Pacchetti, Claudio; Porta, Mauro; Sassi, Marco; Zangaglia, Roberta; Franzini, Angelo; Albanese, Alberto; Romito, Luigi; Piacentini, Sylvie; Zago, Stefano; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Although lesional, neuroimaging, and brain stimulation studies have provided an insight into the neural mechanisms of judgement and decision-making, all these works focused on the cerebral cortex, without investigating the role of subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia. Besides being an effective therapeutic tool, deep brain stimulation (DBS) allows local field potential (LFP) recordings through the stimulation electrodes thus providing a physiological "window" on human subcortical structures. In this study we assessed whether subthalamic nucleus LFP oscillations are modulated by processing of moral conflictual, moral nonconflictual, and neutral statements. To do so, in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease (8 men) bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus (STN) electrodes for DBS, we recorded STN LFPs 4 days after surgery during a moral decision task. During the task, recordings from the STN showed changes in LFP oscillations. Whereas the 14--30 Hz band (beta) changed during the movement executed to perform the task, the 5--13 Hz band (low-frequency) changed when subjects evaluated the content of statements. Low-frequency band power increased significantly more during conflictual than during nonconflictual or neutral sentences. We conclude that STN responds specifically to conflictual moral stimuli, and could be involved in conflictual decisions of all kinds, not only those for moral judgment. LFP oscillations provide novel direct evidence that the neural processing of conflictual decision-making spreads beyond the cortex to the basal ganglia and encompasses a specific subcortical conflict-dependent component. PMID:21061226

  16. Sensory contribution to vocal emotion deficit in Parkinson's disease after subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Cekic, Sezen; Haegelen, Claire; Sauleau, Paul; Patel, Sona; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier

    2015-02-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease induces modifications in the recognition of emotion from voices (or emotional prosody). Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms are still only poorly understood, and the role of acoustic features in these deficits has yet to be elucidated. Our aim was to identify the influence of acoustic features on changes in emotional prosody recognition following STN stimulation in Parkinson's disease. To this end, we analysed the performances of patients on vocal emotion recognition in pre-versus post-operative groups, as well as of matched controls, entering the acoustic features of the stimuli into our statistical models. Analyses revealed that the post-operative biased ratings on the Fear scale when patients listened to happy stimuli were correlated with loudness, while the biased ratings on the Sadness scale when they listened to happiness were correlated with fundamental frequency (F0). Furthermore, disturbed ratings on the Happiness scale when the post-operative patients listened to sadness were found to be correlated with F0. These results suggest that inadequate use of acoustic features following subthalamic stimulation has a significant impact on emotional prosody recognition in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting the extraction and integration of acoustic cues during emotion perception. PMID:25282055

  17. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  18. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  19. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  20. The Relationship of Neuronal Activity within the Sensori-Motor Region of the Subthalamic Nucleus to Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter; Montgomery, Erwin B., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode recordings of human sensori-motor subthalamic neuronal activity during spoken sentence and syllable-repetition tasks provided an opportunity to evaluate the relationship between changes in neuronal activities and specific aspects of these vocal behaviors. Observed patterns of neuronal activity included a build up of activity in…

  1. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:23365104

  2. Enhanced visual responses in the superior colliculus and subthalamic nucleus in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rolland, M; Carcenac, C; Overton, P G; Savasta, M; Coizet, V

    2013-11-12

    Striatal dopaminergic denervation leads to a change in afferent activity within the basal ganglia. Coupled with the effect of local dopaminergic denervation in the subthalamic nucleus, this is likely to affect the responsiveness of subthalamic neurons to their hyperdirect inputs in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, in this report, we investigated subthalamic nucleus responses to visual stimuli relayed by one such input - the superior colliculus - in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. We used a protocol where the superior colliculus was selectively unlocked from the inhibitory effect of anesthesia with an injection of bicuculline, attenuating GABAergic inhibition in the colliculus, which arises predominantly from the substantia nigra pars reticulata. We found that visual responses in the superior colliculus were facilitated by partial or total lesions of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, once the colliculus was disinhibited by bicuculline. Responses were faster, larger in amplitude and lasted longer compared to those in control rats. In the subthalamic nucleus, visual responses were also increased in amplitude and magnitude in partial or total lesioned groups. A classic hypothesis in Parkinson's disease suggests that following dopaminergic denervation, the discharge of cells in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increases, thereby intensifying the inhibitory influence that this structure exerts on its targets in the thalamus and brainstem. Our results suggest that neuroadaptations may have taken place within the superior colliculus in order to maintain normal function in the face of increased inhibitory tone coming from the substantia nigra pars reticulata, which once reduced, gave rise to facilitated responding. This facilitated responding in the superior colliculus then appears to lead to facilitated responding in the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:23916713

  3. Modulation of local field potential power of the subthalamic nucleus during isometric force generation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Florin, E; Dafsari, H S; Reck, C; Barbe, M T; Pauls, K A M; Maarouf, M; Sturm, V; Fink, G R; Timmermann, L

    2013-06-14

    Investigations of local field potentials of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease have provided evidence for pathologically exaggerated oscillatory beta-band activity (13-30 Hz) which is amenable to physiological modulation by, e.g., voluntary movement. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in healthy controls have provided evidence for an increase of subthalamic nucleus blood-oxygenation-level-dependant signal in incremental force generation tasks. However, the modulation of neuronal activity by force generation and its relationship to peripheral feedback remain to be elucidated. We hypothesised that beta-band activity in the subthalamic nucleus is modulated by incremental force generation. Subthalamic nucleus local field potentials were recorded intraoperatively in 13 patients with Parkinson's disease (37 recording sites) during rest and five incremental isometric force generation conditions of the arm with applied loads of 0-400 g (in 100-g increments). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a modulation of local field potential (LFP) power in the upper beta-band (in 24-30 Hz; F(₃.₀₄₂)=4.693, p=0.036) and the gamma-band (in 70-76 Hz; F(₄)=4.116, p=0.036). Granger-causality was computed with the squared partial directed coherence and showed no significant modulation during incremental isometric force generation. Our findings indicate that the upper beta- and gamma-band power of subthalamic nucleus local field potentials are modulated by the physiological task of force generation in patients with Parkinson's disease. This modulation seems to be not an effect of a modulation of peripheral feedback. PMID:23454540

  4. Neurophysiological modulation of the subthalamic nucleus by pallidal stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sterio, D; Rezai, A; Mogilner, A; Zonenshayn, M; Gracies, J; Kathirithamby, K; Beric, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Current models of basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease suggest a pivotal role of subthalamic nucleus (STN) hyperactivity. There is a direct excitatory output to the globus pallidus internus (GPi), which in turn hyperinhibits the motor thalamus and leads to a lack of cortical facilitation. The model, however, does not address the reciprocal influence of GPi on STN activity. Methods: Measurement of immediate changes in STN single cell activity after GPi deep brain stimulation (DBS). Results: An opposite effect of GPi DBS in the dorsal versus ventral STN was found. There was an almost exclusive reduction of firing rate in the dorsal region of the STN, whereas the cells in the ventral region exhibited facilitation similar to the recordings from the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Conclusion: Although these findings require confirmation, they suggest that the current theories of GPi DBS action, which do not include a GPi-STN modulation, are most likely incomplete. PMID:11861688

  5. A fronto-striato-subthalamic-pallidal network for goal-directed and habitual inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Obeso, Ignacio; Rothwell, John C; Obeso, José A

    2015-12-01

    Classically, the basal ganglia have been considered to have a role in producing habitual and goal-directed behaviours. In this article, we review recent evidence that expands this role, indicating that the basal ganglia are also involved in neural and behavioural inhibition in the motor and non-motor domains. We then distinguish between goal-directed and habitual (also known as automatic) inhibition mediated by fronto-striato-subthalamic-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks. We also suggest that imbalance between goal-directed and habitual action and inhibition contributes to some manifestations of Parkinson's disease, Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Finally, we propose that basal ganglia surgery improves these disorders by restoring a functional balance between facilitation and inhibition. PMID:26530468

  6. Placebo effects induced by auditory cues decrease parkinsonian rigidity in patients with subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rätsep, Tõnu; Asser, Toomas

    2016-03-15

    Placebo effects are the consequence of an interaction between an organism and its surroundings and may be influenced by cues from the environment. Our study was designed to analyze if conditioned auditory cues could trigger placebo effects and affect parkinsonian rigidity as measured by viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles in patients treated with subthalamic stimulation. We found that after repeatedly associating with the effect of deep brain stimulation on rigidity, a common dial phone signal itself was able to reduce the mean values of viscoelastic stiffness in the placebo stage (368.8±50.4Nm(-1)) as compared to the stimulation-off conditions (383.7±61.2Nm(-1)) (q=4.18; p<0.05) in ten patients with Parkinson's disease. Thus, it appears that due to associative learning processes environmental cues can acquire the capacity to trigger placebo effects affecting the clinical status of the patients. PMID:26706890

  7. HETEROSYNAPTIC REGULATION OF EXTERNAL GLOBUS PALLIDUS INPUTS TO THE SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS BY MOTOR CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hong-Yuan; Atherton, Jeremy F.; Wokosin, David; Surmeier, D. James; Bevan, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The two principal movement-suppressing pathways of the basal ganglia, the so-called hyperdirect and indirect pathways interact within the subthalamic nucleus (STN). An appropriate level and pattern of hyperdirect pathway cortical excitation and indirect pathway external globus pallidus (GPe) inhibition of the STN are critical for normal movement and greatly perturbed in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we demonstrate that motor cortical inputs to the STN heterosynaptically regulate through activation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors the number of functional GABAA receptor-mediated GPe-STN inputs. Thus, a homeostatic mechanism, intrinsic to the STN, balances cortical excitation by adjusting the strength of GPe inhibition. However, following loss of dopamine, excessive cortical activation of STN NMDA receptors triggers GPe-STN inputs to strengthen abnormally, contributing to the emergence of pathological, correlated activity. PMID:25578364

  8. Does bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus aggravate apathy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Czernecki, V; Pillon, B; Houeto, J; Welter, M; Mesnage, V; Agid, Y; Dubois, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) dramatically decreases motor disability in patients with Parkinson"s disease (PD), but has been reported to aggravate apathy. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of STN stimulation on motivation and reward sensitivity in a consecutive series of PD patients. Methods: Apathy and reward sensitivity (Apathy Scale, Stimulus-Reward Learning, Reversal, Extinction, and Gambling tasks) were assessed in 18 PD patients treated by bilateral STN stimulation ("on" and "off" conditions) compared with 23 matched patients undergoing long term treatment with levodopa ("on" and "off" conditions). Results: Apathy decreased under both STN stimulation and levodopa treatment, whereas explicit and implicit stimulus reward learning was unchanged. Conclusions: Bilateral STN stimulation in PD patients does not necessarily have a negative effect on motivation and reward sensitivity and can even improve apathy provided patients have been appropriately selected for neurosurgery. PMID:15897497

  9. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Christina; Macoir, Joël; Langlois, Mélanie; Cantin, Léo; Prud'homme, Michel; Monetta, Laura

    2015-02-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) on different language abilities are still controversial and its impact on high-level language abilities such as metaphor comprehension has been overlooked. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of STN electrical stimulation on metaphor comprehension and language abilities such as lexical and semantic capacities. Eight PD individuals with bilateral STN-DBS were first evaluated OFF-DBS and, at least seven weeks later, ON-DBS. Performance on metaphor comprehension, lexical decision, word association and verbal fluency tasks were compared ON and OFF-DBS in addition to motor symptoms evaluation. STN stimulation had a significant beneficial effect on motor symptoms in PD. However, this stimulation did not have any effect on metaphor comprehension or any other cognitive ability evaluated in this study. These outcomes suggest that STN stimulation may have dissociable effects on motor and language functions. PMID:25577507

  10. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Vance, Katie M.; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)–P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a key component of the basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei that control movement and are dysregulated in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Subthalamic neurons receive direct excitatory input, but the pharmacology of excitatory

  11. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making.

    PubMed

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Adaptive behaviour entails the capacity to select actions as a function of their energy cost and expected value and the disruption of this faculty is now viewed as a possible cause of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Indirect evidence points to the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus-the most common target for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease-in cost-benefit computation. However, this putative function appears at odds with the current view that the subthalamic nucleus is important for adjusting behaviour to conflict. Here we tested these contrasting hypotheses by recording the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's disease during an effort-based decision task. Local field potentials were recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (mean age 63.8 years ± 6.8; mean disease duration 9.4 years ± 2.5) both OFF and ON levodopa while they had to decide whether to engage in an effort task based on the level of effort required and the value of the reward promised in return. The data were analysed using generalized linear mixed models and cluster-based permutation methods. Behaviourally, the probability of trial acceptance increased with the reward value and decreased with the required effort level. Dopamine replacement therapy increased the rate of acceptance for efforts associated with low rewards. When recording the subthalamic nucleus activity, we found a clear neural response to both reward and effort cues in the 1-10 Hz range. In addition these responses were informative of the subjective value of reward and level of effort rather than their actual quantities, such that they were predictive of the participant's decisions. OFF levodopa, this link with acceptance was weakened. Finally, we found that these responses did not index conflict, as they did not vary as a function of the distance from indifference in the acceptance decision. These findings show that low

  12. The human subthalamic nucleus encodes the subjective value of reward and the cost of effort during decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Zénon, Alexandre; Duclos, Yann; Carron, Romain; Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Régis, Jean; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Peter; Eusebio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour entails the capacity to select actions as a function of their energy cost and expected value and the disruption of this faculty is now viewed as a possible cause of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Indirect evidence points to the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus—the most common target for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease—in cost-benefit computation. However, this putative function appears at odds with the current view that the subthalamic nucleus is important for adjusting behaviour to conflict. Here we tested these contrasting hypotheses by recording the neuronal activity of the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson’s disease during an effort-based decision task. Local field potentials were recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of 12 patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (mean age 63.8 years ± 6.8; mean disease duration 9.4 years ± 2.5) both OFF and ON levodopa while they had to decide whether to engage in an effort task based on the level of effort required and the value of the reward promised in return. The data were analysed using generalized linear mixed models and cluster-based permutation methods. Behaviourally, the probability of trial acceptance increased with the reward value and decreased with the required effort level. Dopamine replacement therapy increased the rate of acceptance for efforts associated with low rewards. When recording the subthalamic nucleus activity, we found a clear neural response to both reward and effort cues in the 1–10 Hz range. In addition these responses were informative of the subjective value of reward and level of effort rather than their actual quantities, such that they were predictive of the participant’s decisions. OFF levodopa, this link with acceptance was weakened. Finally, we found that these responses did not index conflict, as they did not vary as a function of the distance from indifference in the acceptance decision. These findings show

  13. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  14. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus engages the cerebellum for motor function in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Alexander C; O'Connor, Katherine A; Pilitsis, Julie G; Shin, Damian S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in managing motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in well-selected individuals. Recently, research has shown that DBS in the basal ganglia (BG) can alter neural circuits beyond the traditional basal ganglia-thalamus-cortical (BG-TH-CX) loop. For instance, functional imaging showed alterations in cerebellar activity with DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, these imaging studies revealed very little about how cell-specific cerebellar activity responds to STN stimulation or if these changes contribute to its efficacy. In this study, we assess whether STN-DBS provides efficacy in managing motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease by recruiting cerebellar activity. We do this by applying STN-DBS in hemiparkinsonian rats and simultaneously recording neuronal activity from the STN, brainstem and cerebellum. We found that STN neurons decreased spiking activity by 55% during DBS (P = 0.038), which coincided with a decrease in most pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and Purkinje neurons by 29% (P < 0.001) and 28% (P = 0.003), respectively. In contrast, spike activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei increased 45% during DBS (P < 0.001), which was likely from reduced afferent activity of Purkinje cells. Then, we applied STN-DBS at sub-therapeutic current along with stimulation of the deep cerebellar nuclei and found similar improvement in forelimb akinesia as with therapeutic STN-DBS alone. This suggests that STN-DBS can engage cerebellar activity to improve parkinsonian motor symptoms. Our study is the first to describe how STN-DBS in Parkinson's disease alters cerebellar activity using electrophysiology in vivo and reveal a potential for stimulating the cerebellum to potentiate deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:25124274

  15. Mismatch negativity-like potential (MMN-like) in the subthalamic nuclei in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Minks, Eduard; Jurák, Pavel; Chládek, Jan; Chrastina, Jan; Halámek, Josef; Shaw, Daniel J; Bareš, Martin

    2014-12-01

    An infrequent change to an otherwise repetitive sequence of stimuli leads to the generation of mismatch negativity (MMN), even in the absence of attention. This evoked negative response occurs in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) over the temporal and frontal cortices, 100-250 ms after onset of the deviant stimulus. The MMN is used to detect sensory information processing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether MMN can be recorded in the subthalamic nuclei (STN) as evidence of auditory information processing on an unconscious level within this structure. To our knowledge, MMN has never been recorded in the human STN. We recorded intracerebral EEG using a MMN paradigm in five patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who were implanted with depth electrodes in the subthalamic nuclei (STN). We found far-field MMN when intracerebral contacts were connected to an extracranial reference electrode. In all five PD patients (and nine of ten intracerebral electrodes), we also found near-field MMN-like potentials when intracerebral contacts were referenced to one another, and in some electrodes, we observed phase reversals in these potentials. The mean time-to-peak latency of the intracerebral MMN-like potentials was 214 ± 38 ms (median 219 ms). We reveal MMN-like potentials in bilateral STN. This finding provides evidence that STN receives sensory (auditory) information from other structures. The question for further research is whether STN receives such signals through a previously described hyperdirect pathway between STN and frontal cortex (a known generator of the MMN potential) and if the STN contributes to sensorimotor integration. PMID:24809684

  16. Subthalamic nucleus long-range synchronization—an independent hallmark of human Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Moshel, Shay; Shamir, Reuben R.; Raz, Aeyal; de Noriega, Fernando R.; Eitan, Renana; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Beta-band synchronous oscillations in the dorsolateral region of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of human patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been frequently reported. However, the correlation between STN oscillations and synchronization has not been thoroughly explored. The simultaneous recordings of 2390 multi-unit pairs recorded by two parallel microelectrodes (separated by fixed distance of 2 mm, n = 72 trajectories with two electrode tracks >4 mm STN span) in 57 PD patients undergoing STN deep brain stimulation surgery were analyzed. Automatic procedures were utilized to divide the STN into dorsolateral oscillatory and ventromedial non-oscillatory regions, and to quantify the intensity of STN oscillations and synchronicity. Finally, the synchronicity of simultaneously vs. non-simultaneously recorded pairs were compared using a shuffling procedure. Synchronization was observed predominately in the beta range and only between multi-unit pairs in the dorsolateral oscillatory region (n = 615). In paired recordings between sites in the dorsolateral and ventromedial (n = 548) and ventromedial-ventromedial region pairs (n = 1227), no synchronization was observed. Oscillation and synchronicity intensity decline along the STN dorsolateral-ventromedial axis suggesting a fuzzy border between the STN regions. Synchronization strength was significantly correlated to the oscillation power, but synchronization was no longer observed following shuffling. We conclude that STN long-range beta oscillatory synchronization is due to increased neuronal coupling in the Parkinsonian brain and does not merely reflect the outcome of oscillations at similar frequency. The neural synchronization in the dorsolateral (probably the motor domain) STN probably augments the pathological changes in firing rate and patterns of subthalamic neurons in PD patients. PMID:24312018

  17. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on mechanical and thermal thresholds in 6OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lucy E; Chen, Nita; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Shin, Damian S; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain is a major complaint for up to 85% of Parkinson's disease patients; however, it often not identified as a symptom of Parkinson's disease. Adequate treatment of motor symptoms often provides analgesic effects in Parkinson's patients but how this occurs remains unclear. Studies have shown both Parkinson's patients and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats exhibit decreased sensory thresholds. In humans, some show improvements in these deficits after subthalamic deep brain stimulation, while others report no change. Differing methods of testing and response criteria may explain these varying results. We examined this effect in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally implanted with subthalamic stimulating electrodes in the lesioned right hemisphere and sensory thresholds were tested using von Frey, tail-flick and hot-plate tests. Tests were done during and off subthalamic stimulation at 50 and 150 Hz to assess its effects on sensory thresholds. The 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals exhibited lower mechanical (left paw, P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds than shams (hot plate, P < 0.05). Both 50 and 150 Hz increased mechanical (left paw; P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (hot-plate test: 150 Hz, P < 0.05, 50 Hz, P < 0.01). Interestingly, during von Frey testing, low-frequency stimulation provided a more robust improvement in some 6OHDA lesioned rats, while in others, the magnitude of improvement on high-frequency stimulation was greater. This study shows that subthalamic deep brain stimulation improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals at both high and low frequencies. Furthermore, we suggest considering using low-frequency stimulation when treating Parkinson's patients where pain remains the predominant complaint. PMID:26082992

  18. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease: clinical evaluation of 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Thobois, S; Mertens, P; Guenot, M; Hermier, M; Mollion, H; Bouvard, M; Chazot, G; Broussolle, E; Sindou, M

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of chronic subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). 18 consecutive severely affected PD patients were included (mean age, SD: 56.9+/-6 years; mean disease duration: 13.5+/-4.4 years). All the patients were evaluated clinically before and 6 months after the surgical procedure using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Additionally, a 12 months follow-up was available in 14 patients. The target coordinates were determined by ventriculography under stereotactic conditions, followed by electrophysiology and intraoperative stimulation. After surgery, continuous monopolar stimulation was applied bilaterally in 17 patients at 2.9+/-0.4 V through 1 (n = 31) or 2 contacts (n = 3). One patient had bilateral bipolar stimulation. The mean frequency of stimulation was 140+/-16 Hz and pulse width 68+/-13 micros. Off medication, the UPDRS part III score (max = 108) was reduced by 55 % during on stimulation (score before surgery: 44.9+/-13.4 vs at 6 months: 20.2+/-10; p < 0.001). In the on medication state, no difference was noted between the preoperative and the postoperative off stimulation conditions (scores were respectively: 17.9+/-9.2 and 23+/-12.6). The severity of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias assessed by UPDRS IV was reduced by 76 % at 6 months (scores were respectively: 10.3+/-3 and 2.5+/-3; p < 0.001). Off medication, the UPDRS II or ADL score was reduced by 52.8 % during on stimulation (26.9+/-6.5 preop versus 12.7+/-7 at 6 months). The daily dose of antiparkinsonian treatment was diminished by 65.5 % (levodopa equivalent dose -- mg/D -- was 1045 +/- 435 before surgery and 360 +/- 377 at 6 months; p < 0.01). These results remained stable at 12 months for the 14 patients studied. Side effects comprised lower limb phlebitis (n = 2), pulmonary embolism (n = 1), depression (n = 6), dysarthria and freezing (n = 1), sialorrhea and

  19. Spatiotemporal visualization of deep brain stimulation-induced effects in the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Nada; Borisyuk, Roman; Pavese, Nicola; Nandi, Dipankar; Bain, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a successful surgical therapy used to treat the disabling symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. It involves the chronic stimulation of disorder-specific nuclei. However, the mechanisms that lead to clinical improvements remain unclear. Consequently, this slows the optimization of present-day DBS therapy and hinders its future development and application. We used a computational model to calculate the distribution of electric potential induced by DBS and study the effect of stimulation on the spiking activity of a subthalamic nucleus (STN) projection neuron. We previously showed that such a model can reveal detailed spatial effects of stimulation in the vicinity of the electrode. However, this multi-compartmental STN neuron model can fire in either a burst or tonic mode and, in this study, we hypothesized that the firing mode of the cell will have a major impact on the DBS-induced effects. Our simulations showed that the bursting model exhibits behaviour observed in studies of high-frequency stimulation of STN neurons, such as the presence of a silent period at stimulation offset and frequency-dependent stimulation effects. We validated the model by simulating the clinical parameter settings used for a Parkinsonian patient and showed, in a patient-specific anatomical model, that the region of affected tissue is consistent with clinical observations of the optimal DBS site. Our results demonstrated a method of quantitatively assessing neuronal changes induced by DBS, to maximize therapeutic benefit and minimize unwanted side effects. PMID:22805069

  20. Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S.; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients. PMID:26090080

  1. Rapid assessment of gait and speech after subthalamic deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Sierra M.; Giroux, Monique L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Describe a rapid assessment for patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reporting worsening speech and/or gait problems. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 29 patients that had improvement in gait and/or speech within 30 min after turning stimulation off. Clinical data analyzed include unified PD rating scale motor scores and stimulation parameters before and after adjusting stimulation. All patients received electrode efficacy and side effect threshold testing. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to maximize efficacy, avoid side effects, and maximize battery longevity. Results: Turning stimulation off revealed reversible speech and/or gait stimulation side effects within 30 min. Focusing on six factors revealed stimulation modifications that improved motor symptoms, eliminated stimulation side effects, and reduced battery drain. Primary stimulation parameters modified were cathode selection and pulse width reduction. Conclusions: Stimulation-induced side effects impacting gait and speech can be identified within 30 min. A systematic evaluation can distinguish disease progression from reversible stimulation side effects and improve motor outcomes over the long term. PMID:27583181

  2. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects orbitofrontal cortex in facial emotion recognition: a pet study

    PubMed Central

    Le Jeune, F.; Péron, J.; Biseul, I.; Fournier, S.; Sauleau, P.; Drapier, S.; Haegelen, C.; Drapier, D.; Millet, B.; Garin, E.; Herry, J.-Y.; Malbert, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease is thought to produce adverse events such as emotional disorders, and in a recent study, we found fear recognition to be impaired as a result. These changes have been attributed to disturbance of the STN's limbic territory and would appear to confirm that the negative emotion recognition network passes through the STN. In addition, it is now widely acknowledged that damage to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), especially the right side, can result in impaired recognition of facial emotions (RFE). In this context, we hypothesized that this reduced recognition of fear is correlated with modifications in the cerebral glucose metabolism of the right OFC. The objective of the present study was first, to reinforce our previous results by demonstrating reduced fear recognition in our Parkinson's disease patient group following STN DBS and, second, to correlate these emotional performances with glucose metabolism using 18FDG-PET. The 18FDG-PET and RFE tasks were both performed by a cohort of 13 Parkinson's disease patients 3 months before and 3 months after surgery for STN DBS. As predicted, we observed a significant reduction in fear recognition following surgery and obtained a positive correlation between these neuropsychological results and changes in glucose metabolism, especially in the right OFC. These results confirm the role of the STN as a key basal ganglia structure in limbic circuits. PMID:18490359

  3. Neuronal Activity in the Subthalamic Cerebrovasodilator Area under Partial-Gravity Conditions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeredo, Jorge L.; Toda, Kazuo; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The reduced-gravity environment in space is known to cause an upward shift in body fluids and thus require cardiovascular adaptations in astronauts. In this study, we recorded in rats the neuronal activity in the subthalamic cerebrovasodilator area (SVA), a key area that controls cerebral blood flow (CBF), in response to partial gravity. “Partial gravity” is the term that defines the reduced-gravity levels between 1 g (the unit gravity acceleration on Earth) and 0 g (complete weightlessness in space). Neuronal activity was recorded telemetrically through chronically implanted microelectrodes in freely moving rats. Graded levels of partial gravity from 0.4 g to 0.01 g were generated by customized parabolic-flight maneuvers. Electrophysiological signals in each partial-gravity phase were compared to those of the preceding 1 g level-flight. As a result, SVA neuronal activity was significantly inhibited by the partial-gravity levels of 0.15 g and lower, but not by 0.2 g and higher. Gravity levels between 0.2–0.15 g could represent a critical threshold for the inhibition of neurons in the rat SVA. The lunar gravity (0.16 g) might thus trigger neurogenic mechanisms of CBF control. This is the first study to examine brain electrophysiology with partial gravity as an experimental parameter. PMID:25370031

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates reward processing and action selection in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Wagenbreth, Caroline; Zaehle, Tino; Galazky, Imke; Voges, Jürgen; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Düzel, Emrah

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for motor impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effect on the motivational regulation of action control is still not fully understood. We investigated whether DBS of the STN influences the ability of PD patients to act for anticipated reward or loss, or whether DBS improves action execution independent of motivational valence. 16 PD patients (12 male, mean age = 58.5 ± 10.17 years) treated with bilateral STN-DBS and an age- and gender-matched group of healthy controls (HC) performed a go/no-go task whose contingencies explicitly decouple valence and action. Patients were tested with (ON) and without (OFF) active STN stimulation. For HC, there was a benefit in performing rewarded actions when compared to actions that avoided punishment. PD patients showed such a benefit reliably only when STN stimulation was ON. In fact, the relative behavioral benefit for go for reward over go to avoid losing was stronger in the PD patients under DBS ON than in HC. In PD patients, rather than generally improving motor functions independent of motivational valence, modulation of the STN by DBS improves action execution specifically when rewards are anticipated. Thus, STN-DBS establishes a reliable congruency between action and reward ("Pavlovian congruency") and remarkably enhances it over the level observed in HC. PMID:25929662

  5. Optimal target localization for subthalamic stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Michael; Czernecki, Virginie; Karachi, Carine; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Serra, Giulia; Navarro, Soledad; Welaratne, Arlette; Hartmann, Andréas; Mesnage, Valérie; Pineau, Fanny; Cornu, Philippe; Pidoux, Bernard; Worbe, Yulia; Zikos, Panayiotis; Grabli, David; Galanaud, Damien; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Belaid, Hayat; Dormont, Didier; Vidailhet, Marie; Mallet, Luc; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jerome; Agid, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To further determine the causes of variable outcome from deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Data were obtained from our cohort of 309 patients with PD who underwent DBS-STN between 1996 and 2009. We examined the relationship between the 1-year motor, cognitive, and psychiatric outcomes and (1) preoperative PD clinical features, (2) MRI measures, (3) surgical procedure, and (4) locations of therapeutic contacts. Results: Pre- and postoperative results were obtained in 262 patients with PD. The best motor outcome was obtained when stimulating contacts were located within the STN as compared with the zona incerta (64% vs 49% improvement). Eighteen percent of the patients presented a postoperative cognitive decline, which was found to be principally related to the surgical procedure. Other factors predictive of poor cognitive outcome were perioperative confusion and psychosis. Nineteen patients showed a stimulation-induced hypomania, which was related to both the form of the disease (younger age, shorter disease duration, higher levodopa responsiveness) and the ventral contact location. Postoperative depression was more frequent in patients already showing preoperative depressive and/or residual axial motor symptoms. Conclusion: In this homogeneous cohort of patients with PD, we showed that (1) the STN is the best target to improve motor symptoms, (2) postoperative cognitive deficit is mainly related to the surgery itself, and (3) stimulation-induced hypomania is related to a combination of both the disease characteristics and a more ventral STN location. PMID:24647024

  6. Stimulation of the Rat Subthalamic Nucleus is Neuroprotective Following Significant Nigral Dopamine Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, A. L.; Behbehani, M. M.; Collier, T. J.; Wohlgenant, S. L.; Steece-Collier, K.; Paumier, K.; Daley, B. F.; Gombash, S.; Madhavan, L.; Mandybur, G. T.; Lipton, J.W.; Terpstra, B.T.; Sortwell, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is efficacious in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the impact of STN-DBS on the progression of PD is unknown. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that STN-DBS can attenuate the degeneration of a relatively intact nigrostriatal system from dopamine (DA)-depleting neurotoxins. The present study examined whether STN-DBS can provide neuroprotection in the face of prior significant nigral DA neuron loss similar to PD patients at the time of diagnosis. STN-DBS between two and four weeks after intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) provided significant sparing of DA neurons in the SN of rats. This effect was not due to inadvertent lesioning of the STN and was dependent upon proper electrode placement. Since STN-DBS appears to have significant neuroprotective properties, initiation of STN-DBS earlier in the course of PD may provide added neuroprotective benefits in addition to its ability to provide symptomatic relief. PMID:20307668

  7. Thyroid-induced worsening of parkinsonian tremor resistant to drugs and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Minár, Michal; Valkovič, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis can be easily overlooked in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We report on a patient whose parkinsonian tremor worsened and proved refractory not only to common treatment, but also to deep brain stimulation (DBS). Case Presentation. A 61-year-old woman with advanced PD underwent bilateral subthalamic DBS, with an excellent outcome. Twenty-one months after the surgery, however, patient's resting/postural tremor markedly worsened. There was a slight improvement for 1 month after repeated adjustments of DBS parameters, but then the tremor worsened again. Since even a minimal increase of the dose of dopaminergic drugs caused extremely severe dyskinesias, an anticholinergic drug biperiden and benzodiazepine clonazepam were introduced, what helped for another month. With the onset of severe diarrhoea, a laboratory workup was performed. Thyrotoxicosis was detected. During treatment with the antithyroid agent carbimazole, the parkinsonian tremor clearly improved within two weeks. Conclusion. A hyperthyroid state can markedly exaggerate all forms of tremor, as well as other types of movement disorders. This condition can be overlooked or masked by other symptoms. Therefore, if the tremor in a patient with PD gradually worsens and proves resistant to the usual treatment, examine the thyroid gland. PMID:25628904

  8. The Striatum and Subthalamic Nucleus as Independent and Collaborative Structures in Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Alia; Jog, Rachna; Jog, Mandar S.

    2016-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are two separate input structures into the basal ganglia (BG). Accordingly, research to date has primarily focused on the distinct roles of these structures in motor control and cognition, often through investigation of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Both structures are divided into sensorimotor, associative, and limbic subdivisions based on cortical connectivity. The more recent discovery of the STN as an input structure into the BG drives comparison of these two structures and their respective roles in cognition and motor control. This review compares the role of the striatum and STN in motor response inhibition and execution, competing motor programs, feedback based learning, and response planning. Through comparison, it is found that the striatum and STN have highly independent roles in motor control but also collaborate in order to execute desired actions. There is also the possibility that inhibition or activation of one of these structures indirectly contributes to the function of other connected anatomical structures. Both structures contribute to selective motor response inhibition, which forms the basis of many tasks, but the STN additionally contributes to global inhibition through the hyperdirect pathway. Research is warranted on the functional connectivity of the network for inhibition involving the rIFG, preSMA, striatum, and STN. PMID:26973474

  9. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects fear and sadness recognition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Biseul, Isabelle; Leray, Emmanuelle; Vicente, Siobhan; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Vérin, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) can produce emotional disorders that have been linked to disturbance of the STN's limbic territory. The aim of this study was to confirm the impairment of the recognition of facial emotions (RFE) induced by STN DBS, not only ruling out the effect of the disease's natural progression in relation to the effect of DBS, but also assessing the influence of modifications in dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) following STN DBS. RFE was investigated in 24 PD patients who underwent STN DBS and 20 PD patients treated with apomorphine. They were assessed 3 months before and after treatment. The 2 patient groups were compared with a group of 30 healthy matched controls. The results showed that RFE for negative emotions (fear and sadness) was impaired in only the STN DBS group in the posttreatment condition and was unrelated to DRT. Results confirm the selective reduction of RFE induced by STN DBS, due neither to the disease's natural progression nor to modifications in DRT. PMID:20063943

  10. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus facilitates coordination of hand preshaping in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schettino, L F; Van Erp, E; Hening, W; Lessig, S; Song, D; Barba, D; Poizner, H

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found that Parkinson's disease (PD) disrupts the organization of complex motor sequences regardless of the influence of parkinsonian medications. A clear candidate for the neural bases of such deficits, which we term "coordinative," is the failure to integrate propioceptive and visual information by cortico-striatal circuits in a timed fashion. Recent reports, however, have indicated that deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) may result in an improvement in coordinative deficits beyond the amelioration of "intensive deficits" such as bradykinesia and scaling errors. The present study examined the spatio-temporal organization underlying the shaping of the hand during reaching to grasp objects differing in shape. Six PD patients ON and OFF their STN DBS when OFF their concomitant medications and six age-matched controls participated in this study. STN DBS improved the coordination involved in preshaping the hand while grasping. We discuss these results in light of our earlier work with PD patients on and off dopamine replacement therapy. PMID:19922392

  11. Neuronal Activity in the Subthalamic Cerebrovasodilator Area under Partial-Gravity Conditions in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zeredo, Zeredo L; Toda, Kazuo; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The reduced-gravity environment in space is known to cause an upward shift in body fluids and thus require cardiovascular adaptations in astronauts. In this study, we recorded in rats the neuronal activity in the subthalamic cerebrovasodilator area (SVA), a key area that controls cerebral blood flow (CBF), in response to partial gravity. "Partial gravity" is the term that defines the reduced-gravity levels between 1 g (the unit gravity acceleration on Earth) and 0 g (complete weightlessness in space). Neuronal activity was recorded telemetrically through chronically implanted microelectrodes in freely moving rats. Graded levels of partial gravity from 0.4 g to 0.01 g were generated by customized parabolic-flight maneuvers. Electrophysiological signals in each partial-gravity phase were compared to those of the preceding 1 g level-flight. As a result, SVA neuronal activity was significantly inhibited by the partial-gravity levels of 0.15 g and lower, but not by 0.2 g and higher. Gravity levels between 0.2-0.15 g could represent a critical threshold for the inhibition of neurons in the rat SVA. The lunar gravity (0.16 g) might thus trigger neurogenic mechanisms of CBF control. This is the first study to examine brain electrophysiology with partial gravity as an experimental parameter. PMID:25370031

  12. Successful subthalamic stimulation in genetic Parkinson's disease caused by duplication of the α-synuclein gene.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Angelo; Pilleri, Manuela; Padoan, Angelo; Landi, Andrea; Ferla, Salvatore; Biundo, Roberta; D'Avella, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The α-synuclein gene (SNCA) multiplication causes autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Particularly triplication, but also duplication, of the SNCA is associated with early-onset rapidly progressing parkinsonism with increased risk of cognitive impairment. There is no report about the effect and safety of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in carriers of this mutation and, in general, data in patients with genetic parkinsonism are scarce. We report a one-year prospective follow-up of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS in a 46-year old female carrier of SNCA duplication who developed PD at the age of 41 years, and rapidly showed disabling motor fluctuations and dyskinesias refractory to pharmacological strategies. One year after surgery there was a clinically relevant improvement in motor features with a reduction of 64% in UPDRS III in "off medication" and a complete abolition of peak dose dyskinesias. Patient did not report procedure-related adverse events following STN-DBS except for stimulation-induced right foot dystonia relieved by modulating stimulation parameters. Postoperative cognitive testing showed a decline in executive functions, mostly verbal fluency and attention shifting, compared with presurgical assessment. STN-DBS is safe and effective in patients with SNCA duplication showing a clinical pattern similar to idiopathic PD. Our case suggests that clinical phenotype rather genotype is the main predictor for DBS outcome. PMID:21761143

  13. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing‐induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during “ON” and “OFF” condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients. PMID:17371906

  14. The influence of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on pragmatic language production in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Lier, Sam; Batens, Katja; Santens, Patrick; Van Roost, Dirk; Van Herreweghe, Mieke; De Letter, Miet

    2016-06-01

    While the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on the comprehension of pragmatic language in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been the focus of studies, its impact on production, however, has yet to be elucidated. (1) Investigating the inf luence of DBS STN on pragmatic language production in spontaneous speech by comparing different stimulation conditions and (2) evaluating the effect of asymmetric dopaminergic denervation. This paper included 18 patients with advanced idiopathic PD with STN DBS. [Ten PD patients with predominantly left hemispheric dopamine denervation (PD-left) and eight PD patients with predominantly right-hemispheric dopamine denervation (PD-right).] The pragmatic components 'communicative functions' and 'conversational skills' were evaluated by analysing the spontaneous language production in four stimulation conditions. STN stimulation did not appear to influence the pragmatic production skills. Only when asymmetric dopamine depletion was taken into account the parameter 'giving an explanation' interaction was detectable. STN DBS appears to have some influence on the production of pragmatic language depending on asymmetric dopaminergic denervation. Suggestions are made for further research of pragmatic production in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26442686

  15. Influence of propofol and fentanyl on deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonki; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, In Keyoung; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Woong-Woo; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, In Young; Park, Hee Pyoung; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jeon, Beom Seok; Paek, Sun Ha

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effect of propofol and fentanyl on microelectrode recording (MER) and its clinical applicability during subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We analyzed 8 patients with Parkinson's disease, underwent bilateral STN DBS with MER. Their left sides were done under awake and then their right sides were done with a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl under local anesthesia. The electrode position was evaluated by preoperative MRI and postoperative CT. The clinical outcomes were assessed at six months after surgery. We isolated single unit activities from the left and the right side MERs. There was no significant difference in the mean firing rate between the left side MERs (38.7 ± 16.8 spikes/sec, n=78) and the right side MERs (35.5 ± 17.2 spikes/sec, n=66). The bursting pattern of spikes was more frequently observed in the right STN than in the left STN. All the electrode positions were within the STNs on both sides and the off-time Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III scores at six months after surgery decreased by 67% of the preoperative level. In this study, a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl did not significantly interfere with the MER signals from the STN. The results of this study suggest that propofol and fentanyl can be used for STN DBS in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease improving the overall experience of the patients. PMID:25246748

  16. A computational model for bipolar deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Maria I; Neufeld, Esra; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Akinnagbe, Esther; Jakab, Andras; Cohen, Ethan; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to reduce some of the symptoms of advanced, levodopa-responsive Parkinson's disease that are not adequately controlled with medication. However, the precise mechanism of the therapeutic action of DBS is still unclear. Stimulation-induced side effects are not uncommon and require electrical "dose" adjustments. Quantitative methods are needed to fully characterize the electric field in the deep brain region that surrounds the electrodes in order to help with adjustments and maximize the efficacy of the device. Herein we report a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based head model proposed for analysis of fields generated by deep brain stimulation (DBS). The model was derived from multimodal image data at 0.5mm isotropic spatial resolution and distinguishes 142 anatomical structures, including the basal ganglia and 38 nuclei of the thalamus. Six bipolar electrode configurations (1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4) were modeled in order to assess the effects of the inter-electrode distance of the electric field. Increasing the distance between the electrodes results in an attenuated stimulation, with up to 25% reduction in electric field amplitude delivered (2-3 vs. 1-4). The map of the deep brain structures provided a highly precise anatomical detail which is useful for the quantitative assessment of current spread around the electrode and a better evaluation of the stimulation setting for the treatment optimization. PMID:25571427

  17. Subthalamic nucleus activity dissociates proactive and reactive inhibition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Benis, Damien; David, Olivier; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Seigneuret, Eric; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valérie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Bastin, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Models of action selection postulate the critical involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), especially in reactive inhibition processes when inappropriate responses to a sudden stimulus must be overridden. The STN could also play a key role during proactive inhibition, when subjects prepare to potentially suppress their actions. Here, we hypothesized that STN responses to reactive and proactive inhibitory control might be driven by different underlying mechanisms with specific temporal profiles. Direct neural recordings in twelve Parkinson's disease patients during a modified stop signal task (SST) revealed a decrease of beta band activity (βA, 13-35Hz) in the STN during reactive inhibition of smaller amplitude and shorter duration than during motor execution. Crucially, the onset latency of this relative increase of βA took place before the stop signal reaction time. It could thus be thought of as a "stop" signal inhibiting thalamo-cortical activity that would have supported motor execution. Finally, results also revealed a higher level of βA in the STN during proactive inhibition, which correlated with patient's inhibitory performances. We propose that βA in the STN would here participate in the implementation of a "hold your horse" signal to delay motor responses, thus prioritizing accuracy as compared to speed. In brief, our results provide strong electrophysiological support for the hypothesized role of the STN during executive control underlying proactive and reactive response suppression. PMID:24368260

  18. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Lexical Switching in Parkinsons Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vonberg, Isabelle; Ehlen, Felicitas; Fromm, Ortwin; Kühn, Andrea A.; Klostermann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced verbal fluency (VF) has been reported in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), especially those treated by Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). To delineate the nature of this dysfunction we aimed at identifying the particular VF-related operations modified by STN DBS. Method Eleven PD patients performed VF tasks in their STN DBS ON and OFF condition. To differentiate VF-components modulated by the stimulation, a temporal cluster analysis was performed, separating production spurts (i.e., ‘clusters’ as correlates of automatic activation spread within lexical fields) from slower cluster transitions (i.e., ‘switches’ reflecting set-shifting towards new lexical fields). The results were compared to those of eleven healthy control subjects. Results PD patients produced significantly more switches accompanied by shorter switch times in the STN DBS ON compared to the STN DBS OFF condition. The number of clusters and time intervals between words within clusters were not affected by the treatment state. Although switch behavior in patients with DBS ON improved, their task performance was still lower compared to that of healthy controls. Discussion Beyond impacting on motor symptoms, STN DBS seems to influence the dynamics of cognitive procedures. Specifically, the results are in line with basal ganglia roles for cognitive switching, in the particular case of VF, from prevailing lexical concepts to new ones. PMID:27575379

  19. Cortical Potentials Evoked by Deep Brain Stimulation in the Subthalamic Area

    PubMed Central

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Wichmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been used since the mid-1990s as a treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease, and more recently also in other conditions, such as dystonia or obsessive compulsive disorder. Non-invasive studies of cortical evoked potentials (EPs) that follow individual STN–DBS stimuli has provided us with insights about the conduction of the DBS pulses to the cortex. Such EPs have multiple components of different latencies, making it possible to distinguish short-latency and long-latency responses (3–8 ms and 18–25 ms latency, respectively). The available evidence indicates that these short- and long-latency EPs correspond to conduction from the STN stimulation site to the cortical recording location via anti- and orthodromic pathways, respectively. In this review we survey the literature from recording studies in human patients treated with STN–DBS for Parkinson's disease and other conditions, as well as recent animal studies (including our own) that have begun to elucidate details of the pathways, frequency dependencies, and other features of EPs. In addition, we comment on the possible clinical utility of this knowledge. PMID:21625611

  20. Effect of unilateral versus bilateral electrostimulation in subthalamic nucleus on speech in Parkinsons disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan

    2001-05-01

    Previously, it was found that 16 right-handed patients with idiopathic Parkinsons disease who underwent unilateral implantation of deep brain stimulator in subthalamic nucleus (STN) showed significant improvement in their nonspeech motor functions. Eight of the 16 patients had stimulator in the left STN and eight in the right STN. In contrast, their speech function showed very mild improvement that was limited to the respiratory/phonotory subsystems. Further, there seemed a trend that the patients with right STN stimulation did better than those with left STN stimulation. It was speculated that the difference might be due to a micro lesion caused by the surgical procedure to the corticobulbar fibers run in the left internal capsule. This paper reports speech changes associated with bilateral DBS in STN in four of the 16 subjects who elected to have deep brain stimulator implanted in STN on the opposite side of the brain at a later time. Results show negative changes in speech after bilateral DBS in STN. The changes were not limited to the micro lesion effect due to the surgery itself, but also related to the active stimulation on the dominant hemisphere for speech processing. [Work supported by NIH.

  1. Operative techniques and morbidity with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 100 consecutive patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, R R; Kim, B; McClelland, S; Senatus, P B; Winfield, L M; Pullman, S L; Yu, Q; Ford, B; McKhann, G M

    2006-01-01

    Objective Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation for patients with medically refractory Parkinson disease (PD) is expanding. Reported experience has provided some indication of techniques, efficacy, and morbidity, but few centres have reported more than 50 patients. To expand this knowledge, we reviewed our experience with a large series of consecutive patients. Methods From March 1999 to September 2003, 191 subthalamic stimulator devices (19 unilateral) were implanted in 100 patients with PD at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center. Sixteen patients had undergone a prior surgery for PD (pallidotomy, thalamotomy, or fetal transplant). Microelectrode guided implantations were performed using techniques similar to those described previously. Electrode implantation occurred 1–2 weeks before outpatient pulse generator implantation. Results Reductions of dyskinesias and off severity/duration were similar to prior published reports. Morbidity included: 7 device infections (3.7%), 1 cerebral infarct, 1 intracerebral haematoma, 1 subdural haematoma, 1 air embolism, 2 wound haematomas requiring drainage (1.0%), 2 skin erosions over implanted hardware (1.0%), 3 periprocedural seizures (1.6%), 6 brain electrode revisions (3.1%), postoperative confusion in 13 patients (6.8%), and 16 battery failures (8.4%). Of the 100 patients, there were no surgical deaths or permanent new neurological deficits. The average hospital stay for all 100 patients was 3.1 days. Conclusion Subthalamic stimulator implantation in a large consecutive series of patients with PD produced significant clinical improvement without mortality or major neurological morbidity. Morbidity primarily involved device infections and hardware/wound revisions. PMID:16361585

  2. Basal ganglia dysfunction in OCD: subthalamic neuronal activity correlates with symptoms severity and predicts high-frequency stimulation efficacy.

    PubMed

    Welter, M-L; Burbaud, P; Fernandez-Vidal, S; Bardinet, E; Coste, J; Piallat, B; Borg, M; Besnard, S; Sauleau, P; Devaux, B; Pidoux, B; Chaynes, P; Tézenas du Montcel, S; Bastian, A; Langbour, N; Teillant, A; Haynes, W; Yelnik, J; Karachi, C; Mallet, L

    2011-01-01

    Functional and connectivity changes in corticostriatal systems have been reported in the brains of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, the relationship between basal ganglia activity and OCD severity has never been adequately established. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a central basal ganglia nucleus, improves OCD. Here, single-unit subthalamic neuronal activity was analysed in 12 OCD patients, in relation to the severity of obsessions and compulsions and response to STN stimulation, and compared with that obtained in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). STN neurons in OCD patients had lower discharge frequency than those in PD patients, with a similar proportion of burst-type activity (69 vs 67%). Oscillatory activity was present in 46 and 68% of neurons in OCD and PD patients, respectively, predominantly in the low-frequency band (1-8 Hz). In OCD patients, the bursty and oscillatory subthalamic neuronal activity was mainly located in the associative-limbic part. Both OCD severity and clinical improvement following STN stimulation were related to the STN neuronal activity. In patients with the most severe OCD, STN neurons exhibited bursts with shorter duration and interburst interval, but higher intraburst frequency, and more oscillations in the low-frequency bands. In patients with best clinical outcome with STN stimulation, STN neurons displayed higher mean discharge, burst and intraburst frequencies, and lower interburst interval. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of a dysfunction in the associative-limbic subdivision of the basal ganglia circuitry in OCD's pathophysiology. PMID:22832400

  3. Control of the subthalamic innervation of substantia nigra pars reticulata by D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Hernández, Adán; Florán, Benjamin; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Valdiosera, Rene; Erlij, David; Aceves, Jorge; Bargas, José

    2006-03-01

    The effects of activating dopaminergic D1 and D2 class receptors of the subthalamic projections that innervate the pars reticulata of the subtantia nigra (SNr) were explored in slices of the rat brain using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) that could be blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxalene-2,3-dione and D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid were evoked onto reticulata GABAergic projection neurons by local field stimulation inside the subthalamic nucleus in the presence of bicuculline. Bath application of (RS)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SKF-38393), a dopaminergic D1-class receptor agonist, increased evoked EPSCs by approximately 30% whereas the D2-class receptor agonist, trans-(-)-4aR-4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a,9-octahydro-5-propyl-1H-pyrazolo(3,4-g)quinoline (quinpirole), reduced EPSCs by approximately 25%. These apparently opposing actions were blocked by the specific D1- and D2-class receptor antagonists: R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetra-hydro-1H-3-benzazepinehydrochloride (SCH 23390) and S-(-)-5-amino-sulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-methyl]-2-methoxybenzamide (sulpiride), respectively. Both effects were accompanied by changes in the paired-pulse ratio, indicative of a presynaptic site of action. The presynaptic location of dopamine receptors at the subthalamonigral projections was confirmed by mean-variance analysis. The effects of both SKF-38393 and quinpirole could be observed on terminals contacting the same postsynaptic neuron. Sulpiride and SCH 23390 enhanced and reduced the evoked EPSC, respectively, suggesting a constitutive receptor activation probably arising from endogenous dopamine. These data suggest that dopamine presynaptically modulates the subthalamic projection that targets GABAergic neurons of the SNr. Implications of this modulation for basal ganglia function are discussed. PMID:16306171

  4. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  5. Recognition of emotional prosody is altered after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Grandjean, Didier; Le Jeune, Florence; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Drapier, Sophie; Vérin, Marc

    2010-03-01

    The recognition of facial emotions is impaired following subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). These changes have been linked to a disturbance in the STN's limbic territory, which is thought to be involved in emotional processing. This was confirmed by a recent PET study where these emotional modifications were correlated with changes in glucose metabolism in different brain regions, including the amygdala and the orbitofrontal regions that are well known for their involvement in emotional processing. Nevertheless, the question as to whether these emotional changes induced by STN DBS in PD are modality-specific has yet to be answered. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the effects of STN DBS in PD on the recognition of emotional prosody. An original emotional prosody paradigm was administered to twenty-one post-operative PD patients, twenty-one pre-operative PD patients and twenty-one matched controls. Results showed that both the pre- and post-operative groups differed from the healthy controls. There was also a significant difference between the pre and post groups. More specifically, an analysis of their continuous judgments revealed that the performance of the post-operative group compared with that of the other two groups was characterized by a systematic emotional bias whereby they perceived emotions more strongly. These results suggest that the impaired recognition of emotions may not be specific to the visual modality but may also be present when emotions are expressed through the human voice, implying the involvement of the STN in the brain network underlying the recognition of emotional prosody. PMID:20005239

  6. Parkinsonian beta oscillations in the external globus pallidus and their relationship with subthalamic nucleus activity.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Nicolas; Pogosyan, Alek; Márton, László F; Bolam, J Paul; Brown, Peter; Magill, Peter J

    2008-12-24

    Inappropriately synchronized beta (beta) oscillations (15-30 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) accompany movement difficulties in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The cellular and network substrates underlying these exaggerated beta oscillations are unknown but activity in the external globus pallidus (GP), which forms a candidate pacemaker network with STN, might be of particular importance. Using a clinically relevant rat model of PD, we demonstrate that oscillatory activity in GP neuronal networks becomes excessively and selectively synchronized at beta frequencies in a spatially widespread and brain state-dependent manner after lesion of dopamine neurons. Although synchronization of GP unit activity increased by almost 100-fold during beta oscillations, the mean firing rate of GP neurons decreased compared with controls. Importantly, in parkinsonian animals, two main types of GP neuron were identified according to their distinct and inversely related firing rates and patterns. Moreover, neurons of the same type tended to fire together, with small phase differences, whereas different types of neuron tended not to do so. This functional dichotomy in temporal coupling persisted across extreme brain states, suggesting that maladaptive interactions are dominated by hardwiring. Finally, the precisely timed discharges of GP and STN neurons indicated that rhythmic sequences of recurrent excitation and inhibition in the STN-GP network, and lateral inhibition between GP neurons, could actively support abnormal beta oscillations. We propose that GP neurons, by virtue of their spatiotemporal synchronization, widespread axon collaterals and feed-back/feed-forward mechanisms, are well placed to orchestrate and propagate exaggerated beta oscillations throughout the entire basal ganglia in PD. PMID:19109506

  7. No Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Intertemporal Decision-Making in Parkinson Patients123

    PubMed Central

    Wojtecki, Lars; Storzer, Lena; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). DBS or pharmacological treatment is believed to modulate the tendency to, or reverse, impulse control disorders. Several brain areas involved in impulsivity and reward valuation, such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum, are linked to the STN, and activity in these areas might be affected by STN-DBS. To investigate the effect of STN-DBS on one type of impulsive decision-making—delay discounting (i.e., the devaluation of reward with increasing delay until its receipt)—we tested 40 human PD patients receiving STN-DBS treatment and medication for at least 3 months. Patients were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four groups to test the effects of DBS on/off states as well as medication on/off states on delay discounting. The delay-discounting task consisted of a series of choices among a smaller. sooner or a larger, later monetary reward. Despite considerable effects of DBS on motor performance, patients receiving STN-DBS did not choose more or less impulsively compared with those in the off-DBS group, as well as when controlling for risk attitude. Although null results have to be interpreted with caution, our findings are of significance to other researchers studying the effects of PD treatment on impulsive decision-making, and they are of clinical relevance for determining the therapeutic benefits of using STN-DBS. PMID:27257622

  8. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging-guided subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Hooman; Gupta, Fiona; Vukic, Mario; Kreitner, Jason; Kera, Elizabeth; Nicola, Gregory; Pierce, Sean; Panush, David; Cohen, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been shown to be effective. The costs of a dedicated intraoperative MRI may be prohibitive. The procedure can also be performed in a diagnostic scanner, however this presents challenges for utilization of time when the scanner is used both as a diagnostic and an interventional unit. This report outlines our novel methodology for patient selection for implantation in a diagnostic MR scanner, as an attempt to streamline the use of resources. A retrospective review of our outcomes is also presented. Methods: DBS candidacy evaluation included a PD questionnaire-39. Anxiety, age, difficulties in communication and body habitus were factors that were assessed in selecting patients for this technique. Eleven patients underwent iMRI-guided DBS implantation in the subthalamic nucleus. All patients were implanted bilaterally. Unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) part III and L-dopa dose were compared pre- and post-stimulation. A cohort of 11 DBS patients not selected for iMRI-guided DBS were also reported for comparison. Results: For the iMRI-guided patients, mean “Off” UPDRS III score was 47.6 (standard deviation [SD] 8.26). Postoperative “On” medication, “On” stimulation UPDRS III was 13.6 (SD 5.23). Mean preoperative L-dopa dose was 1060 mg (SD 474.3) and mean postoperative L-dopa dose was 320 (SD 298.3). Conclusion: iMRI-guided DBS is a newly emerging technique for surgical treatment of patients with PD. We present a novel scoring system for patient selection assessing anxiety, age, ability to communicate, and body habitus to identify patients who will be benefited most from this technique.

  9. Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Has a Measurable Ipsilateral Effect on Rigidity And Bradykinesia in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tabbal, Samer D.; Ushe, Mwiza; Mink, Jonathan W.; Revilla, Fredy J.; Wernle, Angie R.; Hong, Minna; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves motor function in Parkinson disease (PD). However, little is known about the quantitative effects on motor behavior of unilateral STN DBS. Methods In 52 PD subjects with STN DBS, we quantified in a double-blinded manner rigidity (n= 42), bradykinesia (n= 38), and gait speed (n= 45). Subjects were tested in four DBS conditions: both on, left on, right on and both off. A force transducer was used to measure rigidity across the elbow, and gyroscopes were used to measure angular velocity of hand rotations for bradykinesia. About half of the subjects were rated using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (part III) motor scores for arm rigidity and repetitive hand rotation simultaneously during the kinematic measurements. Subjects were timed walking 25 feet. Results All subjects had significant improvement with bilateral STN DBS. Contralateral, ipsilateral and bilateral stimulation significantly reduced rigidity and bradykinesia. Bilateral stimulation improved rigidity more than unilateral stimulation of either side, but there was no significant difference between ipsilateral and contralateral stimulation. Although bilateral stimulation also increased hand rotation velocity more than unilateral stimulation of either side, contralateral stimulation increased hand rotation significantly more than ipsilateral stimulation. All stimulation conditions improved walking time but bilateral stimulation provided the greatest improvement. Conclusions Unilateral STN DBS decreased rigidity and bradykinesia contralaterally as well ipsilaterally. As expected, bilateral DBS improved gait more than unilateral DBS. These findings suggest that unilateral STN DBS alters pathways that affect rigidity and bradykinesia bilaterally but do not support the clinical use of unilateral STN DBS since bilateral DBS clearly provides greater benefit. PMID:18329019

  10. Dopamine-dependent non-linear correlation between subthalamic rhythms in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Marceglia, S; Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Tamma, F; Egidi, M; Priori, A

    2006-01-01

    The basic information architecture in the basal ganglia circuit is under debate. Whereas anatomical studies quantify extensive convergence/divergence patterns in the circuit, suggesting an information sharing scheme, neurophysiological studies report an absence of linear correlation between single neurones in normal animals, suggesting a segregated parallel processing scheme. In 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys and in parkinsonian patients single neurones become linearly correlated, thus leading to a loss of segregation between neurones. Here we propose a possible integrative solution to this debate, by extending the concept of functional segregation from the cellular level to the network level. To this end, we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of parkinsonian patients. By applying bispectral analysis, we found that in the absence of dopamine stimulation STN LFP rhythms became non-linearly correlated, thus leading to a loss of segregation between rhythms. Non-linear correlation was particularly consistent between the low-beta rhythm (13–20 Hz) and the high-beta rhythm (20–35 Hz). Levodopa administration significantly decreased these non-linear correlations, therefore increasing segregation between rhythms. These results suggest that the extensive convergence/divergence in the basal ganglia circuit is physiologically necessary to sustain LFP rhythms distributed in large ensembles of neurones, but is not sufficient to induce correlated firing between neurone pairs. Conversely, loss of dopamine generates pathological linear correlation between neurone pairs, alters the patterns within LFP rhythms, and induces non-linear correlation between LFP rhythms operating at different frequencies. The pathophysiology of information processing in the human basal ganglia therefore involves not only activities of individual rhythms, but also

  11. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation on Emotional Prosody Comprehension in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background Although impaired decoding of emotional prosody has frequently been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), to date only few reports have sought to explore the effect of Parkinson's treatment on disturbances of prosody decoding. In particular, little is known about how surgical treatment approaches such as high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affect emotional speech perception in patients with PD. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on prosody processing. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end the performance of 13 PD patients on three tasks requiring the decoding of emotional speech was assessed and subsequently compared to the performance of healthy control individuals. To delineate the effect of STN-DBS, all patients were tested with stimulators turned on as well as with stimulators turned off. Results revealed that irrespective of whether assessments were made “on” or “off” stimulation, patients' performance was less accurate as compared to healthy control participants on all tasks employed in this study. However, while accuracy appeared to be unaffected by stimulator status, a facilitation of reactions specific to highly conflicting emotional stimulus material (i.e. stimulus material presenting contradicting emotional messages on a verbal and non-verbal prosodic level) was observed during “on” stimulation assessments. Conclusion In sum, presented results suggest that the processing of emotional speech is indeed modulated by STN-DBS. Observed alterations might, on the one hand, reflect a more efficient processing of highly conflicting stimulus material following DBS. However, on the other hand, given the lack of an improvement in accuracy, increased impulsivity associated with STN stimulation needs to be taken into consideration. PMID:21552518

  12. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in elderly patients – analysis of outcome and complications

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Jan; Haak, Susanne; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion about age limits for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Current indications for DBS are tremor-dominant disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Electrode implantation for DBS with analgesia and sedation makes surgery more comfortable, especially for elderly patients. However, the value of DBS in terms of benefit-risk ratio in this patient population is still uncertain. Methods Bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was performed in a total of 73 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Patients were analyzed retrospectively. For this study they were divided into two age groups: group I (age <65 years, n = 37) and group II (age ≥ 65 years, n = 36). Examinations were performed preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up intervals for 24 months postoperatively. Age, UPDRS motor score (part III) on/off, Hoehn & Yahr score, Activity of Daily Living (ADL), L-dopa medication, and complications were determined. Results Significant differences were found in overall performance determined as ADL scores (group I: 48/71 points, group II: 41/62 points [preoperatively/6-month postoperatively]) and in the rate of complications (group I: 4 transient psychosis, 4 infections in a total of 8 patients, group II: 2 deaths [unrelated to surgery], 1 intracerebral hemorrhage, 7 transient psychosis, 3 infections, 2 pneumonia in a total of 13 patients), (p < 0.05). Interestingly, changes in UPDRS scores, Hoehn & Yahr scores, and L-dopa medication were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion DBS of the STN is clinically as effective in elderly patients as it is in younger ones. However, a more careful selection and follow-up of the elderly patients are required because elderly patients have a higher risk of surgery-related complications and a higher morbidity rate. PMID:17367531

  13. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases premature responding in a rat gambling task.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Creed, Meaghan C; Fletcher, Paul J; Lobo, Daniela S S; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2013-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, several recent studies have found an association between STN-DBS and increased impulsivity. Currently, it is not clear whether the observed increase in impulsivity results from STN-DBS per se, or whether it involves an interaction with the underlying PD neuropathology and/or intake of dopaminergic drugs. We investigated the effects of STN-DBS on performance of intact rats on two tasks measuring impulsive responding: a novel rat gambling task (rGT) and a differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL20s) schedule. Following initial behavioural training, animals received electrode implantation into the STN (n=24) or sham surgery (n=24), and were re-tested on their assigned behavioural task, with or without STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS administered for two hours immediately prior to testing, had no effects on rGT choice behaviour or on DRL response inhibition (p>0.05). However, STN-DBS significantly increased premature responding in the rGT task (p=0.0004), an effect that took several sessions to develop and persisted in subsequent trials when no stimulation was given. Consistent with the notion of distinct facets of impulsivity with unique neurochemical underpinnings, we observed differential effects of STN-DBS in the two tasks employed. These results suggest that STN-DBS in the absence of parkinsonism may not lead to a general loss of inhibitory control, but may instead affect impulsivity under specific conditions. PMID:23434606

  14. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation modulates neuronal reactivity to cocaine within the reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Hachem-Delaunay, Sabira; Fournier, Marie-Line; Cohen, Candie; Bonneau, Nicolas; Cador, Martine; Baunez, Christelle; Le Moine, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a critical component of a complex network controlling motor, associative and limbic functions. High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the STN is an effective therapy for motor symptoms in Parkinsonian patients and can also reduce their treatment-induced addictive behaviors. Preclinical studies have shown that STN HFS decreases motivation for cocaine while increasing that for food, highlighting its influence on rewarding and motivational circuits. However, the cellular substrates of these effects remain unknown. Our objectives were to characterize the cellular consequences of STN HFS with a special focus on limbic structures and to elucidate how STN HFS may interfere with acute cocaine effects in these brain areas. Male Long-Evans rats were subjected to STN HFS (130 Hz, 60 μs, 50-150 μA) for 30 min before an acute cocaine injection (15 mg/kg) and sacrificed 10 min following the injection. Neuronal reactivity was analyzed through the expression of two immediate early genes (Arc and c-Fos) to decipher cellular responses to STN HFS and cocaine. STN HFS only activated c-Fos in the globus pallidus and the basolateral amygdala, highlighting a possible role on emotional processes via the amygdala, with a limited effect by itself in other structures. Interestingly, and despite some differential effects on Arc and c-Fos expression, STN HFS diminished the c-Fos response induced by acute cocaine in the striatum. By preventing the cellular effect of cocaine in the striatum, STN HFS might thus decrease the reinforcing properties of the drug, which is in line with the inhibitory effect of STN HFS on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cocaine. PMID:25982833

  15. GABAA-receptor activation in the subthalamic nucleus compensates behavioral asymmetries in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Petri, David; Pum, Martin; Vesper, Jan; Huston, Joseph P; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-09-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Modulation of STN activity (by lesions, pharmacological or electrical stimulation) has been shown to improve motor parameters in PD patients and in animal models of PD. In an attempt to characterize the neurochemical bases for such antiparkinsonian action, we address specific neurotransmitter systems via local pharmacological manipulation of the STN in hemiparkinsonian rats. Here, we have focused on the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors in the STN. In animals with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigro-striatal tract, we administered either the selective GABAA-agonist muscimol (0.5 μg and 1.0 μg), the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine; 2.5 μg), or vehicle (0.25 μl) into the STN. The effects of GABAergic and glutamatergic modulation of the STN on motor parameters were assessed by gauging rotational behavior and locomotion. Application of muscimol ipsilateral to the side of dopamine-depletion influenced turning behavior in a dose-dependent fashion, with the low dose re-adjusting turning behavior to a non-biased distribution, and the high dose evoking contraversive turning. The administration of MK-801 did not have such effects. These findings give evidence for the involvement of GABAergic activation in the STN in the compensation of motor asymmetries in the hemiparkinsonian rat, whereas N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonism was ineffective in this model of PD. PMID:23727148

  16. The Good and Bad Differentially Encoded within the Subthalamic Nucleus in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Breysse, Emmanuel; Pelloux, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has only recently been added into the reward circuit. It has been shown to encode information regarding rewards (4% sucrose, 32% cocaine). To investigate the encoding of negative value, STN neurons were recorded in rats performing a task using discriminative stimuli predicting various rewards and especially during the replacement of a positive reinforcer (4% sucrose) by an aversive reinforcer (quinine). The results show that STN neurons encode information relative to both positive and aversive reinforcers via specialized subpopulations. The specialization is reset when the context is modified (change from a favorable context (4% vs 32% sucrose) to an unfavorable context (quinine vs 32% sucrose). An excitatory response to the cue light predicting the reward seems to be associated with the preferred situation, suggesting that STN plays a role in encoding the relative value of rewards. STN also seems to play a critical role in the encoding of execution error. Indeed, various subpopulations of neurons responding exclusively at early (i.e., “oops neurons”) or at correct lever release were identified. The oops neurons respond mostly when the preferred reward (32% sucrose) is missed. Furthermore, STN neurons respond to reward omission, suggesting a role in reward prediction error. These properties of STN neurons strengthen its position in the reward circuit as a key cerebral structure through which reward-related processes are mediated. It is particularly important given the fact that STN is the target of surgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive compulsive disorders, and has been suggested for the treatment of addiction as well. PMID:26478913

  17. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Increases Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Nigrostriatal System and Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Behbehani, Michael M.; Collier, Timothy J.; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Levine, Nathan D.; Gombash, Sara E.; Thompson, Valerie B.; Lipton, Jack W.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) as a therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood. The present study examined whether functionally effective, long-term STN DBS modulates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in both unlesioned and unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Lesioned rats that received two weeks of continuous unilateral STN DBS exhibited significant improvements in parkinsonian motor behaviors in tests of forelimb akinesia and rearing activity. Unilateral STN DBS did not increase GDNF in the nigrostriatal system, primary motor cortex (M1), or hippocampus of unlesioned rats. In contrast, unilateral STN DBS increased BDNF protein 2–3 fold bilaterally in the nigrostriatal system with the location (substantia nigra vs. striatum) dependent upon lesion status. Further, BDNF protein was bilaterally increased in M1 cortex by as much as 2 fold regardless of lesion status. STN DBS did not impact cortical regions that receive less input from the STN. STN DBS also was associated with bilateral increases in BDNF mRNA in the substantia nigra (SN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi). The increase observed in GPi was completely blocked by pretreatment with 5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), suggesting that the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors was involved in this phenomenon. The upregulation of BDNF associated with long term STN DBS suggest that this therapy may exert pronounced and underappreciated effects on plasticity in the basal ganglia circuitry that may play a role in the symptomatic effects of this therapy as well as support the neuroprotective effect of stimulation documented in this rat model. PMID:22328911

  18. Improved Sequence Learning with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Treatment-Specific Network Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C.; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H2 15Opositron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA–STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation. PMID:22357863

  19. No Effect of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on Intertemporal Decision-Making in Parkinson Patients.

    PubMed

    Seinstra, Maayke; Wojtecki, Lars; Storzer, Lena; Schnitzler, Alfons; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). DBS or pharmacological treatment is believed to modulate the tendency to, or reverse, impulse control disorders. Several brain areas involved in impulsivity and reward valuation, such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum, are linked to the STN, and activity in these areas might be affected by STN-DBS. To investigate the effect of STN-DBS on one type of impulsive decision-making-delay discounting (i.e., the devaluation of reward with increasing delay until its receipt)-we tested 40 human PD patients receiving STN-DBS treatment and medication for at least 3 months. Patients were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four groups to test the effects of DBS on/off states as well as medication on/off states on delay discounting. The delay-discounting task consisted of a series of choices among a smaller. sooner or a larger, later monetary reward. Despite considerable effects of DBS on motor performance, patients receiving STN-DBS did not choose more or less impulsively compared with those in the off-DBS group, as well as when controlling for risk attitude. Although null results have to be interpreted with caution, our findings are of significance to other researchers studying the effects of PD treatment on impulsive decision-making, and they are of clinical relevance for determining the therapeutic benefits of using STN-DBS. PMID:27257622

  20. Functional Connectivity Differences of the Subthalamic Nucleus Related to Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Christian; Caspers, Julian; Langner, Robert; Südmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Reetz, Kathrin; Moldovan, Alexia-Sabine; Michely, Jochen; Heller, Julia; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Turowski, Bernd; Schnitzler, Alfons; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-03-01

    A typical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is pathological activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Here, we tested whether in patients with PD under dopaminergic treatment functional connectivity of the STN differs from healthy controls (HC) and whether some brain regions show (anti-) correlations between functional connectivity with STN and motor symptoms. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity with STN in 54 patients with PD and 55 HC matched for age, gender, and within-scanner motion. Compared to HC, we found attenuated negative STN-coupling with Crus I of the right cerebellum and with right ventromedial prefrontal regions in patients with PD. Furthermore, we observed enhanced negative STN-coupling with bilateral intraparietal sulcus/superior parietal cortex, right sensorimotor, right premotor, and left visual cortex compared to HC. Finally, we found a decline in positive STN-coupling with the left insula related to severity of motor symptoms and a decline of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between left and right STN with progression of PD-related motor symptoms. Motor symptom related uncoupling of the insula, a key region in the saliency network and for executive function, from the STN might be associated with well-known executive dysfunction in PD. Moreover, uncoupling between insula and STN might also induce an insufficient setting of thresholds for the discrimination between relevant and irrelevant salient environmental stimuli, explaining observations of disturbed response control in PD. In sum, motor symptoms in PD are associated with a reduced coupling between STN and a key region for executive function. PMID:26700444

  1. Subthalamic nucleus activity in the awake hemiparkinsonian rat: relationships with motor and cognitive networks.

    PubMed

    Delaville, Claire; McCoy, Alex J; Gerber, Colin M; Cruz, Ana V; Walters, Judith R

    2015-04-29

    Oscillatory activity in both beta and gamma ranges has been recorded in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and linked to motor function, with beta activity considered antikinetic, and gamma activity, prokinetic. However, the extent to which nonmotor networks contribute to this activity is unclear. This study uses hemiparkinsonian rats performing a treadmill walking task to compare synchronized STN local field potential (LFP) activity with activity in motor cortex (MCx) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), areas involved in motor and cognitive processes, respectively. Data show increases in STN and MCx 29-36 Hz LFP spectral power and coherence after dopamine depletion, which are reduced by apomorphine and levodopa treatments. In contrast, recordings from mPFC 3 weeks after dopamine depletion failed to show peaks in 29-36 Hz LFP power. However, mPFC and STN both showed peaks in the 45-55 Hz frequency range in LFP power and coherence during walking before and 21 days after dopamine depletion. Interestingly, power in this low gamma range was transiently reduced in both mPFC and STN after dopamine depletion but recovered by day 21. In contrast to the 45-55 Hz activity, the amplitude of the exaggerated 29-36 Hz rhythm in the STN was modulated by paw movement. Furthermore, as in PD patients, after dopamine treatment a third band (high gamma) emerged in the lesioned hemisphere. The results suggest that STN integrates activity from both motor and cognitive networks in a manner that varies with frequency, behavioral state, and the integrity of the dopamine system. PMID:25926466

  2. The Subthalamic Nucleus in Primary Dystonia: Single-Unit Discharge Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Lauren E.; Ostrem, Jill L.; Turner, Robert S.; Shimamoto, Shoichi A.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of dystonia pathophysiology predict alterations of activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical motor circuit. The globus pallidus interna (GPi) shows bursting and oscillatory neuronal discharge in both human dystonia and in animal models, but it is not clear which intrinsic basal ganglia pathways are implicated in this abnormal output. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives prominent excitatory input directly from cortical areas implicated in dystonia pathogenesis and inhibitory input from the external globus pallidus. The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of the STN in dystonia by analyzing STN neuronal discharge in patients with idiopathic dystonia. Data were collected in awake patients undergoing microelectrode recording for implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. We recorded 62 STN neurons in 9 patients with primary dystonia. As a comparison group, we recorded 143 STN neurons in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Single-unit activity was discriminated off-line by principal component analysis and evaluated with respect to discharge rate, bursting, and oscillatory activity. The mean STN discharge rate in dystonia patients was 26.3 Hz (SD 13.6), which was lower than that in the PD patients (35.6 Hz, SD 15.2), but higher than published values for subjects without basal ganglia dysfunction. Oscillatory activity was found in both disorders, with a higher proportion of units oscillating in the beta range in PD. Bursting discharge was a prominent feature of both dystonia and PD, whereas sensory receptive fields were expanded in PD compared with dystonia. The STN firing characteristics, in conjunction with those previously published for GPi, suggest that bursting and oscillatory discharge in basal ganglia output may be transmitted via pathways involving the STN and provide a pathophysiologic rationale for STN as a surgical target in dystonia. PMID:19846625

  3. Subthalamic Nucleus Discharge Patterns during Movement in the Normal Monkey and Parkinsonian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gale, John T.; Shields, Donald C.; Jain, Felipe A.; Amirnovin, Ramin; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by derangements in the discharge rates, bursting patterns, and oscillatory activity of basal ganglia (BG) neurons. In this study, subthalamic nucleus (STN) neuronal activity patterns in humans with PD was compared with that in the normal monkey during performance of similar volitional movements. Single-unit STN recordings were collected while PD patients and animals moved a joystick in the direction of targets presented on a monitor. When discharge rates in all PD human and normal monkey neurons were compared, no significant differences were observed. However, when neurons were classified by peri-movement response type (i.e., excited, inhibited, or unresponsive to movement) statistical differences were demonstrated – most significantly among PD excited neurons. Analysis of burst activity demonstrated inter- and intra-burst activities were greater in the PD human compared to the monkey irrespective of neuronal response type. Moreover, simultaneously recorded neurons in the human demonstrated consistent oscillatory synchronization at restricted frequency bands, whereas synchronized oscillatory neurons in the monkey were not restricted to distinct frequencies. During movement, discharge and burst rates were positively correlated, independent of subject or neuronal response type; however, rates and oscillatory activity were more strongly correlated in the PD human than the normal monkey. Interestingly, across all domains of analysis, STN neurons in PD demonstrated reduced response variability when compared to STN neurons in the normal monkey brain. Thus, the net effect of PD may be a reduction in the physiological degrees of freedom of BG neurons with diminished information carrying capacity. PMID:19167367

  4. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia. PMID:26231574

  5. Subthalamic Nucleus Activity in the Awake Hemiparkinsonian Rat: Relationships with Motor and Cognitive Networks

    PubMed Central

    Delaville, Claire; McCoy, Alex J.; Gerber, Colin M.; Cruz, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory activity in both beta and gamma ranges has been recorded in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and linked to motor function, with beta activity considered antikinetic, and gamma activity, prokinetic. However, the extent to which nonmotor networks contribute to this activity is unclear. This study uses hemiparkinsonian rats performing a treadmill walking task to compare synchronized STN local field potential (LFP) activity with activity in motor cortex (MCx) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), areas involved in motor and cognitive processes, respectively. Data show increases in STN and MCx 29–36 Hz LFP spectral power and coherence after dopamine depletion, which are reduced by apomorphine and levodopa treatments. In contrast, recordings from mPFC 3 weeks after dopamine depletion failed to show peaks in 29–36 Hz LFP power. However, mPFC and STN both showed peaks in the 45–55 Hz frequency range in LFP power and coherence during walking before and 21 days after dopamine depletion. Interestingly, power in this low gamma range was transiently reduced in both mPFC and STN after dopamine depletion but recovered by day 21. In contrast to the 45–55 Hz activity, the amplitude of the exaggerated 29–36 Hz rhythm in the STN was modulated by paw movement. Furthermore, as in PD patients, after dopamine treatment a third band (high gamma) emerged in the lesioned hemisphere. The results suggest that STN integrates activity from both motor and cognitive networks in a manner that varies with frequency, behavioral state, and the integrity of the dopamine system. PMID:25926466

  6. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Mallory L.; Currie, Amanda D.; Molinari, Anna L.; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M.; Heusinkveld, Lauren E.; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E.; Davis, Thomas L.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W.; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson’s disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Methods: Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Results: Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04–0.97). Conclusions: STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD. PMID:26967937

  7. The subthalamic nucleus keeps you high on emotion: behavioral consequences of its inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pelloux, Yann; Meffre, Julie; Giorla, Elodie; Baunez, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) belongs to the basal ganglia and is the current target for the surgical treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD), but also a proposed site for the treatment of addiction. It is therefore very important to understand its functions in order to anticipate and prevent possible side-effects in the patients. Although the involvement of the STN is well documented in motor, cognitive and motivational processes, less is known regarding emotional processes. Here we have investigated the direct consequences of STN inactivation by excitotoxic lesions on emotional processing and reinforcement in the rat. We have used various behavioral procedures to assess affect for neutral, positive and negative reinforcers in STN lesioned rats. STN lesions reduced affective responses for positive (sweet solutions) and negative (electric foot shock, Lithium Chloride-induced sickness) reinforcers while they had no effect on responses for a more neutral reinforcer (novelty induced place preference (NIPP)). Furthermore, when given the choice between saccharine, a sweet but non caloric solution, and glucose, a more bland but caloric solution, in contrast to sham animals that preferred saccharine, STN lesioned animals preferred glucose over saccharine. Taken altogether these results reveal that STN plays a critical role in emotional processing. These results, in line with some clinical observations in PD patients subjected to STN surgery, suggest possible emotional side-effects of treatments targeting the STN. They also suggest that the increased motivation for sucrose previously reported cannot be due to increased pleasure, but could be responsible for the decreased motivation for cocaine reported after STN inactivation. PMID:25538581

  8. Cognitive predictors of cognitive change following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yágüez, Lidia; Costello, Angela; Moriarty, John; Hulse, Natasha; Selway, Richard; Clough, Chris; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2014-03-01

    The beneficial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for the motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are well established. Early in PD, mild cognitive impairment is present in a proportion of patients. Hence, it can also be present in PD patients considered for DBS. The potential impact of even a modest decline post-surgically is a concern because it could result in impaired cognitive function. Therefore, attempts to determine which pre-operative cognitive measures predict post-operative cognitive change warrant further attention. We report our findings in a cohort of 30 routinely operated non-demented patients who underwent detailed neuropsychological assessments on average 7.1 months before and 9.4 months after STN DBS. We report the individual and group differences pre- and post-DBS. Stepwise regression analysis was used to analyse the best cognitive predictors of post-operative cognitive changes. We describe our data in relation to published normative data. Post-STN DBS, the immediate story recall component of verbal memory was the most affected cognitive function showing a significant decline in its group mean with a large effect size. The best predictors for this change were pre-surgical list learning and Full Scale Intelligence Quotient. These results suggest that non-demented patients, with even mild impairments in both general intellectual functions and list learning, may be at greater risk of decline in other aspects of verbal memory after STN DBS. Pre-existing mild executive dysfunction was not influenced post-operatively. These findings may help selection and consent for STN DBS. PMID:24231557

  9. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  10. Parkinson subtype-specific Granger-causal coupling and coherence frequency in the subthalamic area.

    PubMed

    Florin, Esther; Pfeifer, Johannes; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Schnitzler, Alfons; Timmermann, Lars

    2016-09-22

    Previous work on Parkinson's disease (PD) has indicated a predominantly afferent coupling between affected arm muscle activity and electrophysiological activity within the subthalamic nucleus (STN). So far, no information is available indicating which frequency components drive the afferent information flow in PD patients. Non-directional coupling e.g. by measuring coherence is primarily established in the beta band as well as at tremor frequency. Based on previous evidence it is likely that different subtypes of the disease are associated with different connectivity patterns. Therefore, we determined coherence and causality between local field potentials (LFPs) in the STN and surface electromyograms (EMGs) from the contralateral arm in 18 akinetic-rigid (AR) PD patients and 8 tremor-dominant (TD) PD patients. During the intraoperative recording, patients were asked to lift their forearm contralateral to the recording side. Significantly more afferent connections were detected for the TD patients for tremor-periods and non-tremor-periods combined as well as for only tremor periods. Within the STN 74% and 63% of the afferent connections are associated with coherence from 4-8Hz and 8-12Hz, respectively. However, when considering only tremor-periods significantly more afferent than efferent connections were associated with coherence from 12 to 20Hz across all recording heights. No difference between efferent and afferent connections is seen in the frequency range from 4 to 12Hz for all recording heights. For the AR patients, no significant difference in afferent and efferent connections within the STN was found for the different frequency bands. Still, for the AR patients dorsal of the STN significantly more afferent than efferent connections were associated with coherence in the frequency range from 12 to 16Hz. These results provide further evidence for the differential pathological oscillations and pathways present in AR and TD Parkinson patients. PMID:27393252

  11. The combined depletion of monoamines alters the effectiveness of subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, Emilie; Delaville, Claire; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-01

    Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are under-studied and therefore not well treated. Here, we investigated the role of combined depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and/or serotonin in the manifestation of motor and non-motor deficits in the rat. Then, we studied the impact of these depletions on the efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). We performed selective depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, and the behavioral effects of different combined depletions were investigated using the open field, the elevated plus maze and the forced swim test. Bilateral dopamine depletion alone induced locomotor deficits associated with anxiety and mild "depressive-like" behaviors. Although additional depletions of norepinephrine and/or serotonin did not potentiate locomotor and anxiety disorders, combined depletions of the three monoamines dramatically exacerbated "depressive-like" behavior. STN-DBS markedly reversed locomotor deficits and anxiety behavior in animals with bilateral dopamine depletion alone. However, these improvements were reduced or lost by the additional depletion of norepinephrine and/or serotonin, indicating that the depletion of these monoamines may interfere with the antiparkinsonian efficacy of STN-DBS. Furthermore, our results showed that acute STN-DBS improved "depressive-like" disorder in animals with bilateral depletion of dopamine and also in animals with combined depletions of the three monoamines, which induced severe immobility in the forced swim test. Our data highlight the key role of monoamine depletions in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive-like disorders and provide the first evidence of their negative consequences on the efficacy of STN-DBS upon the motor and anxiety disorders in the context of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26206409

  12. Long-term impact on quality of life of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Elena; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Tijero, Beatriz; Bilbao, Gaizka; Lambarri, Imanol; Rodriguez, Olivia; Villoria, Rafael; Dolado, Ainara; Berganzo, Koldo; Molano, Ana; de Gopegui, Edurne Ruiz; Pomposo, Iñigo; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Zarranz, Juan José

    2016-05-01

    Long-term impact of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and associated factors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not clear. In this prospective study, we included 69 PD patients (64 % men, mean age 61.3 ± 7.4 and disease duration 13.2 ± 5.7 years) undergoing STN-DBS. They were evaluated preoperatively (baseline), 1 and 5 years postoperatively assessing 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (SEADL), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) off- and on-medication, patient diaries, dopaminergic treatment, mortality and surgical complications. Five years postoperatively, off-medication, there were improvements from baseline in UPDRS-II and III total (27.2 and 26.7 %, respectively) and SEADL (18.6 % more completely independent patients) (p < 0.05) scores, while on-medication, there was a deterioration in UPDRS-III (37.8 %, mainly axial signs) (p < 0.05) and minor improvements in SEADL (3.7 %). While at 1 year PDQ-39, the summary index improved substantially (36.5 %) (p < 0.05), at 5 years patients regressed (only 8.8 %) (p < 0.05), though changes in PDQ-39 subscores remained significant, with improvements in ADL (18.8 %), emotional well-being (19.0 %), stigma (36.4 %) and discomfort (20.6 %), despite worsening in communication (47.8 %) (p < 0.05). Lower preoperative PDQ-39 summary index and greater 1-year UPDRS-III-off total score gain predicted better long-term HRQOL. STN-DBS produces long-term improvements in HRQOL in PD. Preoperative HRQOL and short-term postoperative changes in off-medication motor status may predict long-term HRQOL in PD following STN-DBS. PMID:26964542

  13. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lauren L.; Podurgiel, Samantha J.; Haque, Aileen F.; Errante, Emily L.; Chrobak, James J.; Salamone, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3–7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders. PMID:27378874

  14. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Impacts Language in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A.; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated. PMID:22880117

  15. Delayed synchronization of activity in cortex and subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew; Bolam, J Paul; Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oscillations may play a role in the functional organization of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, and it is important to understand their underlying mechanisms. The cortex often drives basal ganglia (BG) activity, and particularly, oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, the STN may also indirectly influence cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize the delayed (>200 ms) responses of STN neurons to synchronized cortical inputs, focusing on their relationship with oscillatory cortical activity. We recorded the short-latency and delayed responses of STN units and frontal electrocorticogram (ECoG) to cortical stimulation in anaesthetized rats. Similar to previous studies, stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex, but not temporal cortex, evoked a short-latency triphasic response, followed by a sustained reduction or pause in firing, in rostral STN units. Caudal STN units did not show the short-latency triphasic response but often displayed a prolonged firing reduction. Oscillations in STN unit activity and ECoG were common after this sustained firing reduction, particularly between 200 and 600 ms after frontal cortical stimulation. These delayed oscillations were significantly coherent in a broad frequency band of 5–30 Hz. Coherence with ECoG at 5–15 Hz was observed throughout STN, though coherence at 15–30 Hz was largely restricted to rostral STN. Furthermore, oscillatory responses at 5–30 Hz in rostral STN predominantly led those in cortex (mean latency of 29 ms) after frontal cortical stimulation. These findings suggest that STN neurons responding to corticosubthalamic inputs may provide a delayed input to cortex, via BG output nuclei, and thence, thalamocortical pathways. PMID:16709634

  16. Spatial distance between anatomically- and physiologically-identified targets in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh-Rizi, Mansour; Tabibkhoei, Alireza; Shahidi, Gholamali; Vaidyanathan, Janardan; Tabibkhoei, Amirreza; Rohani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is the treatment of choice for carefully chosen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and refractory motor fluctuations. We evaluated the value of intraoperative electrophysiology during STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures in refining the anatomically-defined target. Methods: We determined the spatial distance between the anatomical and physiological targets along x, y and z axes in 50 patients with PD who underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS surgery. Results: The mean spatial distance between anatomical and functional targets was 1.84 ± 0.88 mm and the least distances in different methods were 0.66 mm [standard error (SE): 0.07], 1.07 mm (SE: 0.08) and 1.01 mm (SE: 0.08) on x, y and z axes, respectively, for the combined method. Conclusion: The most physiologically-accurate anatomical targeting was achieved via a combination of multiple independent methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and functional targets in all methods (even the combined) on the y coordinate, emphasizing the need for intra-operative electrophysiological monitoring to refine the anatomico-radiologically-defined target. PMID:27141275

  17. Functional localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus from microelectrode recordings acquired during DBS surgery with unsupervised machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Baltuch, G. H.; Jaggi, J. L.; Danish, S. F.

    2009-04-01

    Microelectrode recordings are a useful adjunctive method for subthalamic nucleus localization during deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease. Attempts to quantitate and standardize this process, using single computational measures of neural activity, have been limited by variability in patient neurophysiology and recording conditions. Investigators have suggested that a multi-feature approach may be necessary for automated approaches to perform within acceptable clinical standards. We present a novel data visualization algorithm and several unique features that address these shortcomings. The algorithm extracts multiple computational features from the microelectrode neurophysiology and integrates them with tools from unsupervised machine learning. The resulting colour-coded map of neural activity reveals activity transitions that correspond to the anatomic boundaries of subcortical structures. Using these maps, a non-neurophysiologist is able to achieve sensitivities of 90% and 95% for STN entry and exit, respectively, to within 0.5 mm accuracy of the current gold standard. The accuracy of this technique is attributed to the multi-feature approach. This activity map can simplify and standardize the process of localizing the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for neurostimulation. Because this method does not require a stationary electrode for careful recording of unit activity for spike sorting, the length of the operation may be shortened.

  18. [Single and Network Neuron Activity of Subthalamic Nucleus at Impulsive and Delayed (Self-Control) Reactions in Choice Behavior].

    PubMed

    Sidorina, V V; Gerasimova, Yu A; Kuleshova, E P; Merzhanova, G Kh

    2015-01-01

    During our experiments on cats was investigated the subthalamic neuron activity at different types of behavior in case of reinforcement choice depending on its value and availability. In chronic experiences the multiunit activity in subthalamic nucleus (STN) and orbitofrontal cortex (FC) has been recorded. Multiunit activity was analyzed over frequency and network properties of spikes. It was shown, that STN neurons reaction to different reinforcements and conditional stimulus at short- or long-delay reactions was represented by increasing or decreasing of frequency of single neurons. However the same STN neu- rons responded with increasing of frequency of single neuron during expectation of mix-bread-meat and decreasing--during the meat expectation. It has been revealed, that the number of STN interneuron interactions was authentic more at impulsive behavior than at self-control choice of behavior. The number of interactions between FC and STN neurons within intervals of 0-30 Ms was authentic more at display impulsive than during self-control behavior. These results suppose that FC and STN neurons participate in integration of reinforcement estimation; and distinctions in a choice of behavior are defined by the local and distributed interneuron interactions of STN and FC. PMID:26601504

  19. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  20. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  1. Bilateral subthalamic stimulation impairs cognitive–motor performance in Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Hallahan, Katie; Vitek, Megan; Bamzai, Rashi; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure that has been shown effective in improving the cardinal motor signs of advanced Parkinson's disease, however, declines in cognitive function have been associated with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. Despite the fact that most activities of daily living clearly have motor and cognitive components performed simultaneously, postoperative assessments of cognitive and motor function occur, in general, in isolation of one another. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effects of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on upper extremity motor function and cognitive performance under single- and dual-task conditions in advanced Parkinson's disease patients. Data were collected from eight advanced Parkinson's disease patients between the ages of 48 and 70 years (mean 56.5) who had bilaterally placed STN stimulators. Stimulation parameters for DBS devices were optimized clinically and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Data were collected while patients were Off anti-parkinsonian medications under three stimulation conditions: Off stimulation, unilateral DBS and bilateral DBS. In each stimulation condition patients performed a cognitive (n-back task) and motor (force tracking) task under single- and dual-task conditions. During dual-task conditions, patients performed the n-back and force-maintenance task simultaneously. Under relatively simple dual-task conditions there were no differences in cognitive or motor performance under unilateral and bilateral stimulation. As dual-task complexity increased, cognitive and motor performance was significantly worse with bilateral compared with unilateral stimulation. In the most complex dual-task condition (i.e. 2-back + force tracking), bilateral stimulation resulted in a level of motor performance that was similar to the Off stimulation condition. Significant declines in cognitive and motor function under modest dual-task conditions

  2. The Involvement of Oxytocin in the Subthalamic Nucleus on Relapse to Methamphetamine-Seeking Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Baracz, Sarah Jane; Everett, Nicholas Adams; Cornish, Jennifer Louise

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive drug of abuse. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to modulate METH-related reward and METH-seeking behaviour. Recent findings implicated the subthalamic nucleus (STh) as a key brain region in oxytocin modulation of METH-induced reward. However, it is unclear if oxytocin acts in this region to attenuate relapse to METH-seeking behaviour, and if this action is through the oxytocin receptor. We aimed to determine whether oxytocin pretreatment administered into the STh would reduce reinstatement to METH use in rats experienced at METH self-administration, and if this could be reversed by the co-administration of the oxytocin receptor antagonist desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent surgery to implant an intravenous jugular vein catheter and bilateral microinjection cannulae into the STh under isoflourane anaesthesia. Rats were then trained to self-administer intravenous METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) by lever press during 2-hour sessions under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 20 days. Following extinction of lever press activity, the effect of microinjecting saline, oxytocin (0.2 pmol, 0.6 pmol, 1.8 pmol, 3.6 pmol) or co-administration of oxytocin (3.6 pmol) and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT (3 nmol) into the STh (200 nl/side) was examined on METH-primed reinstatement (1 mg/kg; i.p.). We found that local administration of the highest oxytocin dose (3.6 pmol) into the STh decreased METH-induced reinstatement and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT had a non-specific effect on lever press activity. These findings highlight that oxytocin modulation of the STh is an important modulator of relapse to METH abuse. PMID:26284529

  3. Older Candidates for Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease Have a Higher Incidence of Psychiatric Serious Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Cozac, Vitalii V.; Ehrensperger, Michael M.; Gschwandtner, Ute; Hatz, Florian; Meyer, Antonia; Monsch, Andreas U.; Schuepbach, Michael; Taub, Ethan; Fuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of serious adverse events (SAE) of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We investigated a group of 26 patients with PD who underwent STN-DBS at mean age 63.2 ± 3.3 years. The operated patients from the EARLYSTIM study (mean age 52.9 ± 6.6) were used as a comparison group. Incidences of SAE were compared between these groups. Results: A higher incidence of psychosis and hallucinations was found in these elderly patients compared to the younger patients in the EARLYSTIM study (p < 0.01). Conclusions: The higher incidence of STN-DBS-related psychiatric complications underscores the need for comprehensive psychiatric pre- and postoperative assessment in older DBS candidates. However, these psychiatric SAE were transient, and the benefits of DBS clearly outweighed its adverse effects. PMID:27375478

  4. Determinants of neuronal firing pattern in the guinea-pig subthalamic nucleus: an in vivo and in vitro comparison.

    PubMed

    Overton, P G; Greenfield, S A

    1995-01-01

    To ascertain the extent to which neuronal firing pattern in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is determined by afferent inputs, a comparison was made between STN neurons recorded in vivo and in vitro (a largely denervated preparation). In vivo, the majority of cells exhibited an irregular firing pattern, although some showed evidence of burst firing. In contrast, all cells had a regular firing pattern in vitro. Electrical stimulation of the striatopallidal complex in vivo induced a short latency inhibition in STN neurons, followed by a burst of spikes. These effects could be reproduced in vitro; hyperpolarising pulses gave rist to a slow depolarising potential upon termination, which was accompanied by a burst of action potentials. Hence, the evidence suggests that afferents play an important role in determining the firing pattern of STN neurons. However, the cells also possess intrinsic membrane properties which allow inputs to trigger either single spikes or bursts. PMID:8619908

  5. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation induces impulsive action when patients with Parkinson's disease act under speed pressure.

    PubMed

    Pote, Inês; Torkamani, Mariam; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia-Maria; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin-Dowsey, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is proposed to modulate response thresholds and speed-accuracy trade-offs. In situations of conflict, the STN is considered to raise response thresholds, allowing time for the accumulation of information to occur before a response is selected. Conversely, speed pressure is thought to reduce the activity of the STN and lower response thresholds, resulting in fast, errorful responses. In Parkinson's disease (PD), subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) reduces the activity of the nucleus and improves motor symptoms. We predicted that the combined effects of STN stimulation and speed pressure would lower STN activity and lead to fast, errorful responses, hence resulting in impulsive action. We used the motion discrimination 'moving-dots' task to assess speed-accuracy trade-offs, under both speed and accuracy instructions. We assessed 12 patients with PD and bilateral STN-DBS and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed the task twice, and the patients completed it once with STN-DBS on and once with STN-DBS off, with order counterbalanced. We found that STN stimulation was associated with significantly faster reaction times but more errors under speed instructions. Application of the drift diffusion model showed that stimulation resulted in lower response thresholds when acting under speed pressure. These findings support the involvement of the STN in the modulation of speed-accuracy trade-offs and establish for the first time that speed pressure alone, even in the absence of conflict, can result in STN stimulation inducing impulsive action in PD. PMID:26892884

  6. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Vance, Katie M; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)-P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26631477

  7. Changes in handwriting resulting from bilateral high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siebner, H R; Ceballos-Baumann, A; Standhardt, H; Auer, C; Conrad, B; Alesch, F

    1999-11-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with severely disabling Parkinson's disease (PD). Whereas STN stimulation improves the cardinal signs of PD, little is known about the effects of STN stimulation on fine manual skills like handwriting. Therefore, the present study investigated the changes in handwriting during bilateral STN stimulation in 12 patients with advanced PD. Dopaminergic medication was discontinued at least 12 hours before the study. The patients were asked to write a standardized sentence repetitively. Five samples of the patient's script were recorded during effective bilateral STN stimulation and 1 hour after both stimulators had been switched off. The movements of the tip of the pencil were recorded using a digitizing tablet. Handwriting movements were segmented into subsequent up- and down-strokes, and a stroke-based kinematic analysis of handwriting was performed. During high-frequency STN stimulation, handwriting movements became faster and smoother indicating a partial restoration of an "open-loop" automatic performance. In addition, STN stimulation gave rise to a significant increase in the mean vertical stroke length demonstrating a stimulation-related reduction in micrographia. The present data underscores the importance of the STN in "open-loop" performance of highly skilled sequential hand movements. PMID:10584671

  8. Reduced levodopa-induced complications after 5 years of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a second honeymoon.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Clemence; Tir, M; Devos, D; Kreisler, A; Dujardin, K; Salleron, J; Delval, A; Blond, S; Defebvre, L; Destée, A; Krystkowiak, P

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the effect of 5 years of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) on levodopa-induced complications, both in everyday life and during an acute challenge with levodopa. Thirty three patients were evaluated during an acute levodopa challenge before surgery and then 1 and 5 years afterwards (both off stim and on stim), using the UPDRS III scale and the CAPSIT-PD scales for dystonia and peak-dose dyskinesia. The UPDRS IV scale was used to assess motor complications in everyday life. The levodopa daily dose and DBS parameters were also recorded. Levodopa-induced complications in everyday life (UPDRS IV) and during an acute levodopa challenge had improved markedly after 1 year (both on and off stim) and still further at 5 years. Peak-dose dyskinesia decreased between the 1- and 5-year measurements. STN DBS decreases levodopa-induced motor complications over the long term. This phenomenon may be explained by (a) overall stabilization of the basal ganglia network and (b) striatal synaptic changes. Our results suggest that DBS leads to both qualitative and quantitative modulations in the corticostriatal loops. PMID:19536584

  9. Self-Reported Executive Functioning in Everyday Life in Parkinson's Disease after Three Months of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Uyen Ha Gia; Andersson, Stein; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebolt; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Studies on the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on executive functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial. In this study we compared self-reported daily executive functioning in PD patients before and after three months of STN-DBS. We also examined whether executive functioning in everyday life was associated with motor symptoms, apathy, and psychiatric symptoms. Method. 40 PD patients were examined with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). Results. PD patients reported significant improvement in daily life executive functioning after 3 months of STN-DBS. Anxiety scores significantly declined, while other psychiatric symptoms remained unchanged. The improvement of self-reported executive functioning did not correlate with motor improvement after STN-DBS. Apathy scores remained unchanged after surgery. Only preoperative depressed mood had predictive value to the improvement of executive function and appears to prevent potentially favorable outcomes from STN-DBS on some aspects of executive function. Conclusion. PD patients being screened for STN-DBS surgery should be evaluated with regard to self-reported executive functioning. Depressive symptoms in presurgical PD patients should be treated. Complementary information about daily life executive functioning in PD patients might enhance further treatment planning of STN-DBS. PMID:26167329

  10. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson’s disease following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intensive voice therapy (LSVT®LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes for surgical subjects were comparable to non-surgical cohorts. Methods Eight subjects with PD (four with STN-DBS and four without) received LSVT LOUD four times a week for four weeks. Four additional subjects with PD remained untreated. Voice intensity (SPL), Vowel Articulation Index (VAI), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and a structured interview were evaluated before and after treatment and again six months later. Results Both treated groups showed significant increases in SPL from pre to post and six-month follow up. VAI was significantly higher for the treated groups compared to the untreated subjects at follow up. Several treated individuals had significant clinical improvement in VHI scores, particularly within the LSVT-DBS group. Treated individuals reported improvements in voice and speech in structured interviews; however, answers suggest more variable long-term maintenance within the LSVT-DBS group. The untreated group exhibited no significant changes in any measure throughout the study. Conclusions Results support LSVT LOUD for treating voice and speech in individuals with PD following STN-DBS surgery. However, modifications may be required to maintain functional improvements. PMID:21724193

  11. Impulsivities and Parkinson's disease: delay aversion is not worsened by Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Torta, Diana M E; Vizzari, Vincenzo; Castelli, Lorys; Zibetti, Maurizio; Lanotte, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) improves motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), but can exert detrimental effects on impulsivity. These effects are especially related to the inability to slow down when high-conflict choices have to be made. However, the influence that DBS has on delay aversion is still under-investigated. Here, we tested a group of 21 PD patients on and off stimulation (off medication) by using the Cambridge Gamble Task (CGT), a computerized task that allows the investigation of risk-related behaviours and delay aversion, and psychological questionnaires such as the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), the Sensitivity to Punishment and to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), and the Quick Delay Questionnaire (QDQ). We found that delay aversion scores on the CGT were no higher when patients were on stimulation as compared to when they were off stimulation. In contrast, PD patients reported feeling more impulsive in the off stimulation state, as revealed by significantly higher scores on the BIS. Higher scores on the sensitivity to punishment subscale of the SPSRQ highlighted that possible punishments influence patients' behaviours more than possible rewards. Significant correlations between delay aversion scores on the CGT and QDQ delay aversion subscale suggest that these two instruments can be used in synergy to reach a convergent validity. In conclusion, our results show that not all impulsivities are detrimentally affected by DBS of the STN and that the joint use of experimental paradigms and psychological questionnaires can provide useful insights in the study of impulsivity. PMID:22984415

  12. A point process approach to identifying and tracking transitions in neural spiking dynamics in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinyi; Eskandar, Emad N.; Eden, Uri T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the role of rhythmic dynamics in normal and diseased brain function is an important area of research in neural electrophysiology. Identifying and tracking changes in rhythms associated with spike trains present an additional challenge, because standard approaches for continuous-valued neural recordings—such as local field potential, magnetoencephalography, and electroencephalography data—require assumptions that do not typically hold for point process data. Additionally, subtle changes in the history dependent structure of a spike train have been shown to lead to robust changes in rhythmic firing patterns. Here, we propose a point process modeling framework to characterize the rhythmic spiking dynamics in spike trains, test for statistically significant changes to those dynamics, and track the temporal evolution of such changes. We first construct a two-state point process model incorporating spiking history and develop a likelihood ratio test to detect changes in the firing structure. We then apply adaptive state-space filters and smoothers to track these changes through time. We illustrate our approach with a simulation study as well as with experimental data recorded in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's patients performing an arm movement task. Our analyses show that during the arm movement task, neurons underwent a complex pattern of modulation of spiking intensity characterized initially by a release of inhibitory control at 20-40 ms after a spike, followed by a decrease in excitatory influence at 40-60 ms after a spike.

  13. Characteristic laryngoscopic findings in Parkinson's disease patients after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and its correlation with voice disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Speech and voice disorders are one of the most common adverse effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). However, the pathophysiology of voice and laryngeal dysfunction after STN-DBS remains unclear. We assessed 47 PD patients (22 treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 25 treated medically (PD-Med); all patients in both groups matched by age, sex, disease duration, and motor and cognitive function) using the objective and subjective voice assessment batteries (GRBAS scale and Voice Handicap Index), and laryngoscopy. Laryngoscopic examinations revealed that PD-DBS patients showed a significantly higher incidence of incomplete glottal closure (77 vs 48 %; p = 0.039), hyperadduction of the false vocal folds (73 vs 44 %; p = 0.047), anteroposterior hypercompression (50 vs 20 %; p = 0.030) and asymmetrical glottal movement (50 vs 16 %; p = 0.002) than PD-Med patients. On- and off-stimulation assessment revealed that STN-DBS could induce or aggravate incomplete glottal closure, hyperadduction of the false vocal folds, anteroposterior hypercompression, and asymmetrical glottal movement. Incomplete glottal closure and hyperadduction of the false vocal folds significantly correlated with breathiness and strained voice, respectively (r = 0.590 and 0.539). We should adjust patients' DBS settings in consideration of voice and laryngeal functions as well as motor function. PMID:26254905

  14. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin J.; Sheppard, Daylan T.; Huynh, Rachel; Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Polar, Christian A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian (hPD) onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. PMID:26217192

  15. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; van den Wildenberg, W. P. M.; Band, G. P. H.; Abisogun, A.; Elias, W. J.; Frysinger, R.; Wylie, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be critically involved in decision-making, action selection, and motor control. Here we investigate the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reward-based decision-learning in patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined computational measures of outcome evaluation and reward prediction from PD patients who performed a probabilistic reward-based decision-learning task. In previous work, these measures covaried with activation in the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning) and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning). We observed that stimulation of the STN motor regions in PD patients served to improve reward-based decision-learning, probably through its effect on activity in frontostriatal motor loops (prominently involving the putamen and, hence, reward prediction). In a subset of relatively younger patients with relatively shorter disease duration, the effects of DBS appeared to spread to more cognitive regions of the STN, benefiting loops that connect the caudate to various prefrontal areas importantfor outcome evaluation. These results highlight positive effects of STN stimulation on cognitive functions that may benefit PD patients in daily-life association-learning situations. PMID:21519377

  16. Anatomo-clinical atlases correlate clinical data and electrode contact coordinates: application to subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lalys, Florent; Haegelen, Claire; Mehri, Maroua; Drapier, Sophie; Vérin, Marc; Jannin, Pierre

    2013-01-30

    For patients suffering from Parkinson's disease with severe movement disorders, functional surgery may be required when medical therapy is not effective. In Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), electrodes are implanted within the brain to stimulate deep structures such as SubThalamic Nucleus (STN). The quality of patient surgical outcome is generally related to the accuracy of nucleus targeting during surgery. In this paper, we focused on identifying optimum sites for STN DBS by studying symptomatic motor improvement along with neuropsychological side effects. We described successive steps for constructing digital atlases gathering patient's location of electrode contacts automatically segmented from postoperative images, and clinical scores. Three motor and five neuropsychological scores were included in the study. Correlations with active contact locations were carried out using an adapted hierarchical ascendant classification. Such analysis enabled the extraction of representative clusters to determine the optimum site for therapeutic STN DBS. For each clinical score, we built an anatomo-clinical atlas representing its improvement or deterioration in relation with the anatomical location of electrodes and from a population of implanted patients. To the best of our knowledge, we reported for the first time a discrepancy between a very good motor improvement by targeting the postero-superior region of the STN and an inevitable deterioration of the categorical and phonemic fluency in the same region. Such atlases and associated analysis may help better understanding of functional mapping in deep structures and may help pre-operative decision-making process and especially targeting. PMID:23147008

  17. Limiting glutamate transmission in a Vglut2-expressing subpopulation of the subthalamic nucleus is sufficient to cause hyperlocomotion

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Nadine; Pupe, Stéfano; Arvidsson, Emma; Nordenankar, Karin; Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.; Mahmoudi, Souha; Andrén, Anna; Dumas, Sylvie; Rajagopalan, Aparna; Lévesque, Daniel; Leão, Richardson N.; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a key area of the basal ganglia circuitry regulating movement. We identified a subpopulation of neurons within this structure that coexpresses Vglut2 and Pitx2, and by conditional targeting of this subpopulation we reduced Vglut2 expression levels in the STN by 40%, leaving Pitx2 expression intact. This reduction diminished, yet did not eliminate, glutamatergic transmission in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus, two major targets of the STN. The knockout mice displayed hyperlocomotion and decreased latency in the initiation of movement while preserving normal gait and balance. Spatial cognition, social function, and level of impulsive choice also remained undisturbed. Furthermore, these mice showed reduced dopamine transporter binding and slower dopamine clearance in vivo, suggesting that Vglut2-expressing cells in the STN regulate dopaminergic transmission. Our results demonstrate that altering the contribution of a limited population within the STN is sufficient to achieve results similar to STN lesions and high-frequency stimulation, but with fewer side effects. PMID:24821804

  18. Beta-coupled high-frequency activity and beta-locked neuronal spiking in the subthalamic nucleus of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andrew I; Vanegas, Nora; Lungu, Codrin; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2014-09-17

    Beta frequency (13-30 Hz) oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been shown to influence the temporal dynamics of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs; 200-500 Hz) and single neurons, potentially compromising the functional flexibility of the motor circuit. We examined these interactions by simultaneously recording both local field potential and single-unit activity from the basal ganglia of 15 patients with PD during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the bilateral STN. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) in the STN was specific to beta phase and HFO amplitude, and this coupling was strongest at the dorsal STN border. We found higher beta-HFO PAC near DBS lead contacts that were clinically effective compared with the remaining non-effective contacts, indicating that PAC may be predictive of response to STN DBS. Neuronal spiking was locked to the phase of 8-30 Hz oscillations, and the spatial topography of spike-phase locking (SPL) was similar to that of PAC. Comparisons of PAC and SPL showed a lack of spatiotemporal correlations. Beta-coupled HFOs and field-locked neurons had different preferred phase angles and did not co-occur within the same cycle of the modulating oscillation. Our findings provide additional support that beta-HFO PAC may be central to the pathophysiology of PD and suggest that field-locked neurons alone are not sufficient for the emergence of beta-coupled HFOs. PMID:25232117

  19. Changes of oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus during obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bastin, Julien; Polosan, Mircea; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Bougerol, Thierry; Chabardès, Stéphan; David, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has positive and negative effects on mood and cognition, as shown in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and severe obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). Such behavioural and clinical effects suggest that the STN has an important function in limbic circuitry, which still needs to be clarified from electrophysiological recordings. Here we report two exceptional cases of OCD patients in whom local field potentials (LFP) of the anterior STN were directly recorded during acute obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We found significant symptom-related changes in different frequency bands, with no clear preferential oscillatory pattern. The overall modified STN activity during OCD symptoms suggests a mixture of both pathological and compensatory mechanisms that would reflect the maintenance of an over stable motor/cognitive/emotional set. Whether this activity propagates throughout the entire cognitive-limbic loops that are impaired in OCD is an interesting question for future research in larger series of patients. PMID:24552693

  20. The influence of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on impulsivity and prepulse inhibition in Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Lucy; Smith, Heather; Cruz, Priscilla De La; Campbell, Joannalee; Fama, Chris; Haller, Jessica; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Durphy, Jennifer; Hanspal, Era; Molho, Eric; Barba, Anne; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background At least 14% of Parkinson disease (PD) patients develop impulse control disorders (ICDs). The pathophysiology behind these behaviors and the impact of deep brain stimulation in a real-life setting remains unclear. Objectives We prospectively examined the impact of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on ICDs in PD patients, as well as the relationship between impaired sensorimotor gaiting and impulsivity. Methods Patients undergoing bilateral STN-DBS were assessed for ICDs preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively using a validated questionnaire (QUIP-RS). A subset of patients completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) and auditory pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) testing. Results Analysis revealed 12 patients had an improvement in score assessing ICDs (“good responders” – GR; p = 0.006) while 4 had a worse or stable score (“poor responders” – PR; p > 0.05). GR further exemplified a significant decrease in hypersexual behavior (p = 0.005) and binge eating (p = 0.01). Impaired PPI responses also significantly correlated with impulsivity in BART (r = −0.72, p = 0.044). Discussion Following bilateral STN-DBS 75% of our cohort had a reduction in ICDs, thus suggesting deep brain stimulation effectively manages ICDs in PD. The role of impaired PPI in predisposition to ICDs in PD warrants further investigation. PMID:26066569

  1. Real-time refinement of subthalamic nucleus targeting using Bayesian decision-making on the root mean square measure.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anan; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2006-09-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a major target for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. Microelectrode recording (MER) is used in many cases to identify the target nucleus. A real-time procedure for identifying the entry and exit points of the STN would improve the outcome of this targeting procedure. We used the normalized root mean square (NRMS) of a short (5 seconds) MER sampled signal and the estimated anatomical distance to target (EDT) as the basis for this procedure. Electrode tip location was defined intraoperatively by an expert neurophysiologist to be before, within, or after the STN. Data from 46 trajectories of 27 patients were used to calculate the Bayesian posterior probability of being in each of these locations, given RMS-EDT pair values. We tested our predictions on each trajectory using a bootstrapping technique, with the rest of the trajectories serving as a training set and found the error in predicting the STN entry to be (mean +/- SD) 0.18 +/- 0.84, and 0.50 +/- 0.59 mm for STN exit point, which yields a 0.30 +/- 0.28 mm deviation from the expert's target center. The simplicity and computational ease of RMS calculation, its spike sorting-independent nature and tolerance to electrode parameters of this Bayesian predictor, can lead directly to the development of a fully automated intraoperative physiological procedure for the refinement of imaging estimates of STN borders. PMID:16763982

  2. Cognitive Changes following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangyu; Xiao, Jinsong; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, it has been largely acknowledged that deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) can alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but its effects on cognitive function remain unclear, which are not given enough attention by many clinical doctors and researchers. To date, 3 existing meta-analyses focusing on this issue included self-control studies and have not drawn consistent conclusions. The present study is the first to compare effect sizes of primary studies that include control groups, hoping to reveal the net cognitive outcomes after STN DBS and the clinical significance. Methods. A structured literature search was conducted using strict criteria. Only studies with control group could be included. Data on age, duration of disease, levodopa equivalent dosage (LED), and multiple cognitive scales were collected and pooled. Results. Of 172 articles identified, 10 studies (including 3 randomized controlled trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled studies) were eligible for inclusion. The results suggest that STN DBS results in decreased global cognition, memory, verbal fluency, and executive function compared with control group. No significant difference is found in other cognitive domains. Conclusions. STN DBS seems relatively safe with respect to cognitive function, and further studies should focus on the exact mechanisms of possible verbal deterioration after surgery in the future. PMID:27314016

  3. Confirmation of functional zones within the human subthalamic nucleus: Patterns of connectivity and sub-parcellation using diffusion weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Christian; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Nagy, Zoltan; Lutti, Antoine; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Thomas; Draganski, Bogdan; Ashburner, John; Frackowiak, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a small, glutamatergic nucleus situated in the diencephalon. A critical component of normal motor function, it has become a key target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Animal studies have demonstrated the existence of three functional sub-zones but these have never been shown conclusively in humans. In this work, a data driven method with diffusion weighted imaging demonstrated that three distinct clusters exist within the human STN based on brain connectivity profiles. The STN was successfully sub-parcellated into these regions, demonstrating good correspondence with that described in the animal literature. The local connectivity of each sub-region supported the hypothesis of bilateral limbic, associative and motor regions occupying the anterior, mid and posterior portions of the nucleus respectively. This study is the first to achieve in-vivo, non-invasive anatomical parcellation of the human STN into three anatomical zones within normal diagnostic scan times, which has important future implications for deep brain stimulation surgery. PMID:22173294

  4. A Kv3-like persistent, outwardly rectifying, Cs+-permeable, K+ current in rat subthalamic nucleus neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wigmore, Mark A; Lacey, Michael G

    2000-01-01

    A persistent outward K+ current (IPO), activated by depolarization from resting potential, has been identified and characterized in rat subthalamic nucleus (SThN) neurones using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in brain slices.IPO both rapidly activated (τ= 8 ms at +5 mV) and deactivated (τ= 2 ms at −68 mV), while showing little inactivation. Tail current reversal potentials varied with extracellular K+ concentration in a Nernstian manner.Intracellular Cs+ did not alter either IPO amplitude or the voltage dependence of activation, but blocked transient (A-like) outward currents activated by depolarization. When extracellular K+ was replaced with Cs+, IPO tail current reversal potentials were dependent upon the extracellular Cs+ concentration, indicating an ability to conduct Cs+, as well as K+.IPO was blocked by Ba2+ (1 mm), 4-aminopyridine (1 mm) and tetraethylammonium (TEA; 20 mm), with an IC50 for TEA of 0.39 mm.The IPO conductance appeared maximal (38 nS) at around +27 mV, half-maximal at −13 mV, with the threshold for activation at around −38 mV.TEA (1 mm) blocked the action potential after-hyperpolarization and permitted accommodation of action potential firing at frequencies greater than around 200 Hz.We conclude that IPO, which shares many characteristics of currents attributable to Kv3.1 K+ channels, enables high-frequency spike trains in SThN neurones. PMID:10990536

  5. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Camptocormia is known as “bent spine syndrome” and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). Case Description: We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. Conclusion: The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition. PMID:26958425

  6. Human subthalamic nucleus-medial frontal cortex theta phase coherence is involved in conflict and error related cortical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Baltazar; Tan, Huiling; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2016-08-15

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is thought to control the shift from automatic to controlled action selection when conflict is present or when mistakes have been recently committed. Growing evidence suggests that this process involves frequency specific communication in the theta (4-8Hz) band between the mPFC and the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is the main target of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease. Key in this hypothesis is the finding that DBS can lead to impulsivity by disrupting the correlation between higher mPFC oscillations and slower reaction times during conflict. In order to test whether theta band coherence between the mPFC and the STN underlies adjustments to conflict and to errors, we simultaneously recorded mPFC and STN electrophysiological activity while DBS patients performed an arrowed flanker task. These recordings revealed higher theta phase coherence between the two sites during the high conflict trials relative to the low conflict trials. These differences were observed soon after conflicting arrows were displayed, but before a response was executed. Furthermore, trials that occurred after an error was committed showed higher phase coherence relative to trials that followed a correct trial, suggesting that mPFC-STN connectivity may also play a role in error related adjustments in behavior. Interestingly, the phase coherence we observed occurred before increases in theta power, implying that the theta phase and power may influence behavior at separate times during cortical monitoring. Finally, we showed that pre-stimulus differences in STN theta power were related to the reaction time on a given trial, which may help adjust behavior based on the probability of observing conflict during a task. PMID:27181763

  7. Increased extracellular dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels contribute to enhanced subthalamic nucleus neural activity during exhausting exercise.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Liu, X; Qiao, D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the mechanism underlying the enhanced subthalamic nucleus (STN) neural activity during exhausting exercise from the perspective of monoamine neurotransmitters and changes of their corresponding receptors. Rats were randomly divided into microdialysis and immunohistochemistry study groups. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of the STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe before, during and 90 min after one bout of exhausting exercise. Dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were subsequently detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For immunohistochemistry study, the expression of DRD2 and HT2C receptors in the STN, before, immediately after and 90 min after exhaustion was detected through immunohistochemistry technique. Microdialysis study results showed that the extracellular DA and 5-HT neurotransmitters increased significantly throughout the procedure of exhausting exercise and the recovery period (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry study results showed that the expression levels of DRD2 and HT2C in the rat STN immediately after exhausting exercise and at the time point of 90 min after exhaustion were both higher than those of the rest condition, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Our results suggest that the increased extracellular DA and 5-HT in the STN might be one important factor leading to the enhanced STN neural activity and the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise. This study may essentially offer useful evidence for better understanding of the mechanism of the central type of exercise-induced fatigue. PMID:26424920

  8. A new biomarker for subthalamic deep brain stimulation for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease—a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmel, Gerrit E.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Obradovic, Milan; Gorman, Robert B.; Single, Peter S.; Chenery, Helen J.; Coyne, Terry; Silburn, Peter A.; Parker, John L.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard treatment for advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other motor disorders. Although the surgical procedure has improved in accuracy over the years thanks to imaging and microelectrode recordings, the underlying principles that render DBS effective are still debated today. The aim of this paper is to present initial findings around a new biomarker that is capable of assessing the efficacy of DBS treatment for PD which could be used both as a research tool, as well as in the context of a closed-loop stimulator. Approach. We have used a novel multi-channel stimulator and recording device capable of measuring the response of nervous tissue to stimulation very close to the stimulus site with minimal latency, rejecting most of the stimulus artefact usually found with commercial devices. We have recorded and analyzed the responses obtained intraoperatively in two patients undergoing DBS surgery in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced PD. Main results. We have identified a biomarker in the responses of the STN to DBS. The responses can be analyzed in two parts, an initial evoked compound action potential arising directly after the stimulus onset, and late responses (LRs), taking the form of positive peaks, that follow the initial response. We have observed a morphological change in the LRs coinciding with a decrease in the rigidity of the patients. Significance. These initial results could lead to a better characterization of the DBS therapy, and the design of adaptive DBS algorithms that could significantly improve existing therapies and help us gain insights into the functioning of the basal ganglia and DBS.

  9. Buspirone requires the intact nigrostriatal pathway to reduce the activity of the subthalamic nucleus via 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagarduy, A; Llorente, J; Miguelez, C; Morera-Herreras, T; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Ugedo, L

    2016-03-01

    The most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), l-DOPA, induces dyskinesia after prolonged use. We have previously shown that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by prolonged l-DOPA administration, lesion of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) reduces not only dyskinesias but also buspirone antidyskinetic effect. This study examined the effect of buspirone on STN neuron activity. Cell-attached recordings in parasagittal slices from naïve rats showed that whilst serotonin excited the majority of STN neurons, buspirone showed an inhibitory main effect but only in 27% of the studied cells which was prevented by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist WAY-100635. Conversely, single-unit extracellular recordings were performed in vivo on STN neurons from four different groups, i.e., control, chronically treated with l-DOPA, 6-OHDA lesioned and lesioned treated with l-DOPA (dyskinetic) rats. In control animals, systemic-buspirone administration decreased the firing rate in a dose-dependent manner in every cell studied. This effect, prevented by WAY-100635, was absent in 6-OHDA lesioned rats and was not modified by prolonged l-DOPA administration. Altogether, buspirone in vivo reduces consistently the firing rate of the STN neurons through 5-HT1A receptors whereas ex vivo buspirone seems to affect only a small population of STN neurons. Furthermore, the lack of effect of buspirone in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, suggests the requirement of not only the activation of 5-HT1A receptors but also an intact nigrostriatal pathway for buspirone to inhibit the STN activity. PMID:26687972

  10. Dopamine Release in the Nonhuman Primate Caudate and Putamen Depends upon Site of Stimulation in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hoon-Ki; Ross, Erika K.; Jo, Hang Joon; Cho, Shinho; Settell, Megan L.; Jeong, Ju Ho; Duffy, Penelope S.; Chang, Su-Youne; Bennet, Kevin E.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease. Although DBS has recognized clinical utility, its biologic mechanisms are not fully understood, and whether dopamine release is a potential factor in those mechanisms is in dispute. We tested the hypothesis that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release depends on the precise location of the stimulation site in the STN and the site of recording in the caudate and putamen. We conducted DBS with miniature, scaled-to-animal size, multicontact electrodes and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the best dopamine recording site in the brains of nonhuman primates (rhesus macaques), which are highly representative of human brain anatomy and circuitry. Real-time stimulation-evoked dopamine release was monitored using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. This study demonstrates that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by redirecting STN stimulation to a slightly different site. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Electrical stimulation of deep structures of the brain, or deep brain stimulation (DBS), is used to modulate pathological brain activity. However, technological limitations and incomplete understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS prevent personalization of this therapy and may contribute to less-than-optimal outcomes. We have demonstrated that DBS coincides with changes in dopamine neurotransmitter release in the basal ganglia. Here we mapped relationships between DBS and changes in neurochemical activity. Importantly, this study shows that DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by refocusing the DBS on a slightly different stimulation site. PMID:27251623

  11. D2 dopamine receptors modulate neuronal resonance in subthalamic nucleus and cortical high-voltage spindles through HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Julei; Gao, Guodong; Zhu, Junling; Wang, Wenting

    2016-06-01

    The high-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the characteristic oscillations that include theta frequencies in the basal ganglia (BG)-cortical system, are involved in immobile behavior and show increasing power in Parkinson's disease (PD). Our previous results suggested that the D2 dopamine receptor might be involved in HVSs modulations in a rat model of PD. Membrane resonance is one of the cellular mechanisms of network oscillation; therefore, we investigated how dopamine modulates the theta frequency membrane resonance of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a central pacemaker of BG, and whether such changes in STN neurons subsequently alter HVSs in the BG-cortical system. In particular, we tested whether dopamine modulates HVSs through hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels-dependent membrane resonance in STN neurons. We found that an antagonist of D2 receptors, but not of D1 receptors, inhibited membrane resonance and HCN currents of STN neurons through a G-protein activity in acute brain slices. Our further in vivo experiments using local injection of a D2 receptor antagonist or an HCN blocker in STNs of free-moving rats showed an increase in HVSs power and correlation in the BG-cortical system. Local injection of lamotrigine, an HCN agonist, counteracted the effect induced by the D2 antagonist. Taken together, our results revealed a potential cellular mechanism underlying HVSs activity modulation in the BG-cortical system, i.e. tuning HCN activities in STN neurons through dopamine D2 receptors. Our findings might lead to a new direction in PD treatment by providing promising new drug targets for HVSs activity modulation. PMID:26808313

  12. Transient and state modulation of beta power in human subthalamic nucleus during speech production and finger movement.

    PubMed

    Hebb, A O; Darvas, F; Miller, K J

    2012-01-27

    Signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) are augmented by speech and repetitive motor tasks. The neurophysiological basis for this phenomenon is unknown, but may involve augmentation of β (13-30 Hz) oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus (STN). We hypothesized that speech and motor tasks increase β power in STN and propose a mechanism for clinical observations of worsening motor state during such behaviors. Subjects undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery performed tasks while STN local field potential (LFP) data were collected. Power in the β frequency range was analyzed across the entire recording to observe slow shifts related to block design and during time epochs synchronized to behavior to evaluate immediate fluctuations related to task execution. Bilaterally symmetric β event related desynchronization was observed in analysis time-locked to subject motor and speech tasks. We also observed slow shifts of β power associated with blocks of tasks. Repetitive combined speech and motor, and isolated motor blocks were associated with the highest bilateral β power state. Overt speech alone and imagined speech were associated with a low bilateral β power state. Thus, changing behavioral tasks is associated with bilateral switching of β power states. This offers a potential neurophysiologic correlate of worsened PD motor signs experienced during clinical examination with provocative tasks: switching into a high β power state may be responsible for worsening motor states in PD patients when performing unilateral repetitive motor tasks and combined speech and motor tasks. Beta state changes could be chronically measured and potentially used to control closed loop neuromodulatory devices in the future. PMID:22173017

  13. High-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus excites target structures in a model using c-fos immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Shehab, S; D'souza, C; Ljubisavljevic, M; Redgrave, P

    2014-06-13

    Deep-brain stimulation at high frequencies (HFS) directed to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used increasingly to treat patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanism of action by which HFS of the STN achieves its therapeutic effects remains unresolved. Insofar as lesions of the STN have similar therapeutic benefit, a favored hypothesis is that HFS acts by suppressing neural activity in the STN. The purpose of the present study was to exploit prior observations that exposure to ether anesthesia in a rodent model evokes c-fos expression (a marker of neural activation) in the STN and its efferent structures, the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra. We showed first that exposure to ether induced a profound oscillatory pattern of neural activity in the STN and SNr, which could explain the marked induction of c-fos immunoreactivity in these structures. Secondly, inhibition of the STN by local injections of the GABA agonist, muscimol, suppressed ether-evoked c-fos expression in all target structures. This showed that excitation of target structures in the ether model originated, at least in part, from the STN. Thirdly, and contrary to expectation, HFS of the STN increased further the expression of c-fos in the STN target structures of animals treated with ether. Finally, we demonstrated, in the absence of ether treatment, that HFS and chemical stimulation of the STN with local injections of kainic acid both induced c-fos expression in the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra. Together these results suggest that the principal action of STN stimulation at high frequencies is to excite rather than inhibit its efferent targets. Given that Parkinsonism has been associated with increased levels of inhibitory output activity from the basal ganglia, it is unlikely that excitation of output structures revealed in this study provides a basis for deep-brain stimulation's therapeutic action. PMID:24755486

  14. High-Frequency Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus Suppresses Excessive Self-Grooming in Autism-Like Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andrew D; Berges, Victoria A; Chung, Sunho J; Fridman, Gene Y; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately one quarter of individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display self-injurious behavior (SIB) ranging from head banging to self-directed biting and punching. Sometimes, these behaviors are extreme and unresponsive to pharmacological and behavioral therapies. We have found electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can produce life-changing results, with more than 90% suppression of SIB frequency. However, these patients typically require frequent maintenance ECT (mECT), as often as every 5 days, to sustain the improvement gained during the acute course. Long-term consequences of such frequent mECT started as early as childhood in some cases are unknown. Accordingly, there is a need for alternative forms of chronic stimulation for these patients. To explore the feasibility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for intractable SIB seen in some patients with an ASD, we utilized two genetically distinct mouse models demonstrating excessive self-grooming, namely the Viaat-Mecp2(-/y) and Shank3B(-/-) lines, and administered high-frequency stimulation (HFS) via implanted electrodes at the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS). We found that STN-HFS significantly suppressed excessive self-grooming in both genetic lines. Suppression occurs both acutely when stimulation is switched on, and persists for several days after HFS is stopped. This effect was not explained by a change in locomotor activity, which was unaffected by STN-HFS. Likewise, social interaction deficits were not corrected by STN-HFS. Our data show STN-HFS suppresses excessive self-grooming in two autism-like mouse models, raising the possibility DBS might be used to treat intractable SIB associated with ASDs. Further studies are required to explore the circuitry engaged by STN-HFS, as well as other potential stimulation sites. Such studies might also yield clues about pathways, which could be modulated by non-invasive stimulatory techniques. PMID:26606849

  15. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation generates a concomitant synaptic excitation–inhibition in substantia nigra pars reticulata

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Clémentine; Degos, Bertrand; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Venance, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation is an efficient treatment for various neurological pathologies and a promising tool for neuropsychiatric disorders. This is particularly exemplified by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS), which has emerged as an efficient symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease. How STN-HFS works is still not fully elucidated. With dual patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices, we analysed the cellular responses of STN stimulation on SNr neurons by simultaneously recording synaptic currents and firing activity. We showed that STN-HFS caused an increase of the spontaneous spiking activity in half of SNr neurons while the remaining ones displayed a decrease. At the synaptic level, STN stimulation triggered inward current in 58% of whole-cell recorded neurons and outward current in the remaining ones. Using a pharmacological approach, we showed that STN-HFS-evoked responses were mediated in all neurons by a balance between AMPA/NMDA receptors and GABAA receptors, whose ratio promotes either a net excitation or a net inhibition. Interestingly, we observed a higher excitation occurrence in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats. In vivo injections of phaseolus revealed that GABAergic pallido-nigral fibres travel through the STN whereas striato-nigral fibres travel below it. Therefore, electrical stimulation of the STN does not only recruit glutamatergic axons from the STN, but also GABAergic passing fibres probably from the globus pallidus. For the first time, we showed that STN-HFS induces concomitant excitatory–inhibitory synaptic currents in SNr neurons by recruitment of efferences and passing fibres allowing a tight control on basal ganglia outflow. PMID:21690190

  16. Continuous bilateral infusion of vigabatrin into the subthalamic nucleus: Effects on seizure threshold and GABA metabolism in two rat models.

    PubMed

    Gey, Laura; Gernert, Manuela; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role as a regulator of basal ganglia outflow but also influences the activity of cortical and limbic structures, so that it is widely used as a therapeutic target in different brain diseases, including epilepsy. In addition to electrical stimulation of the STN, targeted delivery of anti-seizure drugs to the STN may constitute an alternative treatment approach in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. In the present experimental study, we investigated the anti-seizure and adverse effects of chronic infusion of vigabatrin into the STN of rats. Vigabatrin is a clinically approved anti-seizure drug, which acts by increasing brain GABA levels by irreversibly inhibiting GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T). Based on functional and neurochemical effects of acute STN microinjection, doses for continuous infusion were calculated and administered, using an innovative drug infusion technology. Bilateral infusion of only 10μg/day vigabatrin over 3weeks into the STN resulted in an almost complete inhibition of GABA-T and 4-fold increase in GABA in the target region, which was associated with a significant increase in seizure threshold, determined once weekly by i.v. infusion of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Lower doses or unilateral infusion were less effective, both on PTZ seizures and on kindled seizures. Bilateral infusion into substantia nigra pars reticulata was less effective and more toxic than STN infusion. In part of the rats, tolerance to the anti-seizure effect developed. The data demonstrate that chronic administration of very low, nontoxic doses of vigabatrin into STN is an effective means of increasing local GABA concentrations and seizure threshold. PMID:26976738

  17. Movement-Related Discharge in the Macaque Globus Pallidus during High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zimnik, Andrew J.; Nora, Gerald J.; Desmurget, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has largely replaced ablative therapies for Parkinson's disease. Because of the similar efficacies of the two treatments, it has been proposed that DBS acts by creating an “informational lesion,” whereby pathologic neuronal firing patterns are replaced by low-entropy, stimulus-entrained firing patterns. The informational lesion hypothesis, in its current form, states that DBS blocks the transmission of all information from the basal ganglia, including both pathologic firing patterns and normal, task-related modulations in activity. We tested this prediction in two healthy rhesus macaques by recording single-unit spiking activity from the globus pallidus (232 neurons) while the animals completed choice reaction time reaching movements with and without STN-DBS. Despite strong effects of DBS on the activity of most pallidal cells, reach-related modulations in firing rate were equally prevalent in the DBS-on and DBS-off states. This remained true even when the analysis was restricted to cells affected significantly by DBS. In addition, the overall form and timing of perimovement modulations in firing rate were preserved between DBS-on and DBS-off states in the majority of neurons (66%). Active movement and DBS had largely additive effects on the firing rate of most neurons, indicating an orthogonal relationship in which both inputs contribute independently to the overall firing rate of pallidal neurons. These findings suggest that STN-DBS does not act as an indiscriminate informational lesion but rather as a filter that permits task-related modulations in activity while, presumably, eliminating the pathological firing associated with parkinsonism. PMID:25740526

  18. Intraoperative MRI for optimizing electrode placement for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Pan, Longsheng; Song, Huifang; Xu, Xin; Xu, Bainan; Yu, Xinguang; Ling, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The degree of clinical improvement achieved by deep brain stimulation (DBS) is largely dependent on the accuracy of lead placement. This study reports on the evaluation of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for adjusting deviated electrodes to the accurate anatomical position during DBS surgery and acute intracranial changes. METHODS Two hundred and six DBS electrodes were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 110 patients with Parkinson disease. All patients underwent iMRI after implantation to define the accuracy of lead placement. Fifty-six DBS electrode positions in 35 patients deviated from the center of the STN, according to the result of the initial postplacement iMRI scans. Thus, we adjusted the electrode positions for placement in the center of the STN and verified this by means of second or third iMRI scans. Recording was performed in adjusted parameters in the x-, y-, and z-axes. RESULTS Fifty-six (27%) of 206 DBS electrodes were adjusted as guided by iMRI. Electrode position was adjusted on the basis of iMRI 62 times. The sum of target coordinate adjustment was -0.5 mm in the x-axis, -4 mm in the y-axis, and 15.5 mm in the z-axis; the total of distance adjustment was 74.5 mm in the x-axis, 88 mm in the y-axis, and 42.5 mm in the z-axis. After adjustment with the help of iMRI, all electrodes were located in the center of the STN. Intraoperative MRI revealed 2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages in 2 patients, brain shift in all patients, and leads penetrating the lateral ventricle in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS The iMRI technique can guide surgeons as they adjust deviated electrodes to improve the accuracy of implanting the electrodes into the correct anatomical position. The iMRI technique can also immediately demonstrate acute changes such as hemorrhage and brain shift during DBS surgery. PMID:26274983

  19. Subthalamic 6-OHDA-induced lesion attenuates levodopa-induced dyskinesias in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J A

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives direct dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra pars compacta that degenerates in Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of dopaminergic denervation of STN in the origin of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats were distributed in four groups which were concomitantly lesioned with 6-OHDA or vehicle (sham) in the STN and in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as follows: a) MFB-sham plus STN-sham, b) MFB-sham plus STN-lesion, c) MFB-lesion plus STN-sham, and d) MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion. Four weeks after lesions, animals were treated with levodopa (6mg/kg with 15mg/kg benserazide i.p.) twice daily for 22 consecutive days. Abnormal involuntary movements were measured. In situ hybridization was performed measuring the expression of striatal preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, STN cytochrome oxidase (CO) and nigral GAD67 mRNAs. STN 6-OHDA denervation did not induce dyskinesias in levodopa-treated MFB-sham animals but attenuated axial (p<0.05), limb (p<0.05) and orolingual (p<0.01) dyskinesias in rats with a concomitant lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The attenuation of dyskinesias was associated with a decrease in the ipsilateral STN CO mRNA levels (p<0.05). No significant differences between MFB-lesion plus STN-sham and MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion groups in the extent of STN dopaminergic denervation were observed. Moreover, intrasubthalamic microinfusion of dopamine in the MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion group triggered orolingual (p<0.01), but not axial or limb, dyskinesias. These results suggest that dopaminergic STN innervation influences the expression of levodopa-induced dyskinesias but also the existence of non dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms. STN noradrenergic depletion induced by 6-OHDA in the STN needs to be taken in account as a possible mechanism explaining the attenuation of dyskinesias in the combined lesion group. PMID:24140562

  20. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation improves smooth pursuit and saccade performance in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) significantly reduces symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) such as bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity. It also reduces the need for anti-PD medication, and thereby potential side-effects of L-Dopa. Although DBS in the STN is a highly effective therapeutic intervention in PD, its mechanism and effects on oculomotor eye movement control and particularly smooth pursuit eye movements have to date rarely been investigated. Furthermore, previous reports provide conflicting information. The aim was to investigate how DBS in STN affected oculomotor performance in persons with PD using novel analysis techniques. Methods Twenty-five patients were eligible (22 males, 3 females) according to the clinical inclusion criteria: idiopathic PD responsive to L-Dopa and having had bilateral STN stimulation for at least one year to ensure stable DBS treatment. Fifteen patients were excluded due to the strict inclusion criteria applied to avoid interacting and confounding factors when determining the effects of DBS applied alone without PD medication. One patient declined participation. Nine PD patients (median age 63, range 59–69 years) were assessed after having their PD medications withdrawn overnight. They were examined with DBS ON and OFF, with the ON/OFF order individually randomized. Results DBS ON increased smooth pursuit velocity accuracy (p < 0.001) and smooth pursuit gain (p = 0.005), especially for faster smooth pursuits (p = 0.034). DBS ON generally increased saccade amplitude accuracy (p = 0.007) and tended to increase peak saccade velocity also (p = 0.087), specifically both saccade velocity and amplitude accuracy for the 20 and 40 degree saccades (p < 0.05). Smooth pursuit latency tended to be longer (p = 0.090) approaching normal with DBS ON. Saccade latency was unaffected. Conclusions STN stimulation from DBS alone significantly improved both smooth pursuit and

  1. The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria H; Fransson, Per-Anders; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Magnusson, Måns; Rehncrona, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa). A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years) with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized). In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes), clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002) increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ≤ 0.016) improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S) increased (p = 0.002) in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ≥ 0.109) in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic activities in

  2. High Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Leads to Presynaptic GABA(B)-Dependent Depression of Subthalamo-Nigral Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Gertler, Christoph; Harnack, Daniel; Grantyn, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with akinesia benefit from chronic high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Among the mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic success of HFS-STN might be a suppression of activity in the output region of the basal ganglia. Indeed, recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) of fully adult mice revealed that HFS-STN consistently produced a reduction of compound glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at a time when the tetrodotoxin-sensitive components of the local field potentials had already recovered after the high frequency activation. These observations suggest that HFS-STN not only alters action potential conduction on the way towards the SNr but also modifies synaptic transmission within the SNr. A classical conditioning-test paradigm was then designed to better separate the causes from the indicators of synaptic depression. A bipolar platinum-iridium macroelectrode delivered conditioning HFS trains to a larger group of fibers in the STN, while a separate high-ohmic glass micropipette in the rostral SNr provided test stimuli at minimal intensity to single fibers. The conditioning-test interval was set to 100 ms, i.e. the time required to recover the excitability of subthalamo-nigral axons after HFS-STN. The continuity of STN axons passing from the conditioning to the test sites was examined by an action potential occlusion test. About two thirds of the subthalamo-nigral afferents were occlusion-negative, i.e. they were not among the fibers directly activated by the conditioning STN stimulation. Nonetheless, occlusion-negative afferents exhibited signs of presynaptic depression that could be eliminated by blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 (1 µM). Further analysis of single fiber-activated responses supported the proposal that the heterosynaptic depression of synaptic glutamate release during and after HFS-STN is mainly caused by the tonic release of GABA from co-activated striato

  3. Validation of GDI, GPS and GVS for use in Parkinson's disease through evaluation of effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation and levodopa.

    PubMed

    Speciali, Danielli Souza; Corrêa, João Carlos Ferrari; Luna, Natália Mariana; Brant, Rachael; Greve, Julia Maria D'Andrea; de Godoy, Wagner; Baker, Richard; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-04-01

    The Gait Deviation Index (GDI), Gait Profile Score (GPS) and Gait Variable Scores (GVSs) have been proposed as measures of gait quality and validated for use with children with cerebral palsy. The aim of this study was to extend this validation to people with Parkinson's disease by evaluating the effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation and levodopa on gait. 16 participants had their gait evaluated with stimulation, medication or a combination of both. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) showed statistically significant differences in agreement with previous studies. The GPS and GDI showed similar treatment effects as did GVS for hip and knee flexion/extension, as assessed with Cohen's d where medium or large. Overall the results suggest that these gait indices are sensitive to treatment in this group of patients and that their use in groups other than children with cerebral palsy is valid. PMID:24548797

  4. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic microlesion and stimulation effects in Parkinson's disease: Indications of a principal role of the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Holiga, Štefan; Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During implantation of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in the target structure, neurosurgeons and neurologists commonly observe a “microlesion effect” (MLE), which occurs well before initiating subthalamic DBS. This phenomenon typically leads to a transitory improvement of motor symptoms of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). Mechanisms behind MLE remain poorly understood. In this work, we exploited the notion of ranking to assess spontaneous brain activity in PD patients examined by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in response to penetration of DBS electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus. In particular, we employed a hypothesis-free method, eigenvector centrality (EC), to reveal motor-communication-hubs of the highest rank and their reorganization following the surgery; providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the direct impact of disrupting the PD motor circuitry in vivo without prior assumptions. Penetration of electrodes was associated with increased EC of functional connectivity in the brainstem. Changes in connectivity were quantitatively related to motor improvement, which further emphasizes the clinical importance of the functional integrity of the brainstem. Surprisingly, MLE and DBS were associated with anatomically different EC maps despite their similar clinical benefit on motor functions. The DBS solely caused an increase in connectivity of the left premotor region suggesting separate pathophysiological mechanisms of both interventions. While the DBS acts at the cortical level suggesting compensatory activation of less affected motor regions, the MLE affects more fundamental circuitry as the dysfunctional brainstem predominates in the beginning of PD. These findings invigorate the overlooked brainstem perspective in the understanding of PD and support the current trend towards its early diagnosis. PMID:26509113

  5. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Asahina, Masato; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation. Methods In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients. Results Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with

  6. Dominant efficiency of nonregular patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a data-driven computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Deligiannis, Nick G.; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Almost 30 years after the start of the modern era of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) still constitutes a standard stimulation target for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the use of STN-DBS is also now supported by level I clinical evidence for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Disruption of neural synchronization in the STN has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms of action of standard and alternative patterns of STN-DBS at a local level. Meanwhile, recent experimental and computational modeling evidence has signified the efficiency of alternative patterns of stimulation; however, no indications exist for treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we comparatively simulate the desynchronizing effect of standard (regular at 130 Hz) versus temporally alternative (in terms of frequency, temporal variability and the existence of bursts or pauses) patterns of STN-DBS for PD and OCD, by means of a stochastic dynamical model and two microelectrode recording (MER) datasets. Approach. The stochastic model is fitted to subthalamic MERs acquired during eight surgical interventions for PD and eight surgical interventions for OCD. For each dynamical system simulated, we comparatively assess the invariant density (steady-state phase distribution) as a measure inversely related to the desynchronizing effect yielded by the applied patterns of stimulation. Main results. We demonstrate that high (130 Hz)—and low (80 Hz)—frequency irregular patterns of stimulation, and low-frequency periodic stimulation interrupted by bursts of pulses, yield in both pathologic conditions a significantly stronger desynchronizing effect compared with standard STN-DBS, and distinct alternative patterns of stimulation. In PD, values of the invariant density measure are proven to be optimal at the dorsolateral oscillatory region of the STN including sites with the optimal therapeutic window. Significance. In addition to providing

  7. Transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons into the striatum, subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra, and behavioral recovery in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Kim, Do-hoon; Qi, Meirigeng; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Tsuchiya, Daiju; Takata, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Kousuke; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Shimohama, Shun; Sumi, Shoichiro; Inoue, Kazutomo

    2005-10-28

    Usefulness of the in vitro and in vivo generation of neural precursors from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been widely discussed, but functional recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a transplantation strategy for PD by assessing whether double-transplants in the striatum (ST) and substantia nigra (SN), or ST and subthalamic nucleus (STN) induce functional recovery in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Methamphetamine-induced rotation was significantly reduced by transplantation of mouse ES cell-derived neurons into the ST, but not the STN or SN alone. Double-transplantation was also effective at recovering rotational behavior. Although immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was almost completely lost in the ipsilateral striatum in hemiparkinsonian rats, TH immunoreactivity was detected in transplanted cells and sprouting fibers in the ST, STN and SN. These results suggest that both the involvement of ST as a place of transplantation and the number of ES cell-derived neurons are essential factors for efficacy on hemiparkinsonian behaviors. PMID:16023291

  8. Continuous High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Cell Survival and Functional Recovery Following Dopaminergic Cell Transplantation in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Furlanetti, Luciano L; Cordeiro, Joacir Graciolli; Cordeiro, Karina Kohn; García, Joanna A; Winkler, Christian; Lepski, Guilherme A; Coenen, Volker A; Nikkhah, Guido; Döbrössy, Máté D

    2015-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) high-frequency stimulation (HFS) is a routine treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD), with confirmed long-term benefits. An alternative, but still experimental, treatment is cell replacement and restorative therapy based on transplanted dopaminergic neurons. The current experiment evaluated the potential synergy between neuromodulation and grafting by studying the effect of continuous STN-HFS on the survival, integration, and functional efficacy of ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic precursors transplanted into a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesioned rodent PD model. One group received continuous HFS of the ipsilateral STN starting a week prior to intrastriatal dopaminergic neuron transplantation, whereas the sham-stimulated group did not receive STN-HFS but only dopaminergic grafts. A control group was neither lesioned nor transplanted. Over the following 7 weeks, the animals were probed on a series of behavioral tasks to evaluate possible graft and/or stimulation-induced functional effects. Behavioral and histological data suggest that STN-HFS significantly increased graft cell survival, graft-host integration, and functional recovery. These findings might open an unexplored road toward combining neuromodulative and neuroregenerative strategies to treat severe neurologic conditions. PMID:25857428

  9. Blockade of mGluR glutamate receptors in the subthalamic nucleus ameliorates motor asymmetry in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janice M; Lam, Hoa A; Ackerson, Larry C; Maidment, Nigel T

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists could have potential therapeutic value in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. There is evidence that when given systemically, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) antagonist, produces anti-parkinsonian effects in animal models, but the site of action has not been directly established. In the present study, we examined whether the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and its output structures may mediate such an effect using a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease. A battery of simple behavioral tests, reliably sensitive to dopamine depletion, was applied consecutively: (i) prior to surgery; (ii) 3 weeks following a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the substantia nigra pars compacta; (iii) at 1 h, 24 h and 4 days following a microinjection of MPEP, via an indwelling cannula, into the STN, entopeduncular nucleus (EP) or substantia nigra zona reticulata. Unilaterally dopamine-depleted animals typically had severe motor and sensorimotor asymmetries 3 weeks following surgery. Microinjection of 25 nmol MPEP into the STN of these animals significantly attenuated these asymmetries relative to vehicle. Further microinjections of lower doses (5 and 10 nmol) revealed a dose-response effect. Microinjection of MPEP into either the EP or substantia nigra zona reticulata was without effect. These data suggest that MPEP may act at the level of the STN to reduce glutamatergic overactivity and thereby induce anti-parkinsonian effects. PMID:16420425

  10. Stimulation through electrodes implanted near the subthalamic nucleus activates projections to motor areas of cerebral cortex in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Colum D; Webb, Ruth M; Silberstein, Paul; Tisch, Steven; Asselman, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2005-03-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation through electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to reduce significantly the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite the success of this treatment, the mechanisms of action of stimulation are poorly understood. To elucidate further the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation and its effects on cortical activity, we recorded electroencephalographic potentials from 61 scalp-surface electrodes during low-frequency (5-10 Hz) bipolar stimulation in 11 patients with advanced PD (14 implanted electrodes were tested). In all electrodes tested, stimulation through at least one of the four contacts produced a medium-latency waveform with an average onset of 14 +/- 3 ms and peak at 23 +/- 4 ms. This potential typically increased in magnitude across contacts from ventral to dorsal. Within-subject comparisons of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials demonstrated that the generator of the medium-latency potential was within the primary sensorimotor cortex or lateral premotor cortex ipsilateral to stimulation. The timing and topography of this potential were consistent with indirect activation of the cortex by excitation of pallido-thalamic axons that traverse the dorsal aspect of the STN. The potential evoked by stimulation through the contact used for optimal clinical effect was highly variable across electrodes and frequently different from the medium-latency potential described above, suggesting that the neuronal elements mediating the medium-latency potential were different from those that mediate the clinical effects. PMID:15813949

  11. Maximal subthalamic beta hypersynchrony of the local field potential in Parkinson's disease is located in the central region of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    de Solages, Camille; Hill, Bruce C; Yu, Hong; Henderson, Jaimie M; Bronte-Stewart, Helen

    2011-12-01

    A pathological marker of Parkinson's disease is the existence of abnormal synchrony of neuronal activity within the beta frequency range (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Recent studies examining the topography of this rhythm have located beta hypersynchrony in the most dorsal part of the STN. In contrast, this study of the topography of the local field potential beta oscillations in 18 STNs with a 1 mm spatial resolution revealed that the point of maximal beta hypersynchrony was located at 53 ± 24% of the trajectory span from the dorsal to the ventral borders of the STN (corresponding to a 3.0 ± 1.6 mm depth for a 5.9 ± 0.75 mm STN span). This suggests that maximal beta hypersynchrony is located in the central region of the nucleus and that further investigation should be done before using STN spectral profiles as an indicator for guiding placement of deep brain stimulation leads. PMID:21205981

  12. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Counteracts Cortical Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats. PMID:24621597

  13. Underlying neurobiology and clinical correlates of mania status after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Amit; Tye, Susannah J; Lee, Kendall H; Sampson, Shirlene; Matsumoto, Joseph; Adams, Andrea; Klassen, Bryan; Stead, Matt; Fields, Julie A; Frye, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a novel and effective surgical intervention for refractory Parkinson's disease (PD). The authors review the current literature to identify the clinical correlates associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS-induced hypomania/mania in PD patients. Ventromedial electrode placement has been most consistently implicated in the induction of STN DBS-induced mania. There is some evidence of symptom amelioration when electrode placement is switched to a more dorsolateral contact. Additional clinical correlates may include unipolar stimulation, higher voltage (>3 V), male sex, and/or early-onset PD. STN DBS-induced psychiatric adverse events emphasize the need for comprehensive psychiatric presurgical evaluation and follow-up in PD patients. Animal studies and prospective clinical research, combined with advanced neuroimaging techniques, are needed to identify clinical correlates and underlying neurobiological mechanisms of STN DBS-induced mania. Such working models would serve to further our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of mania and contribute valuable new insight toward development of future DBS mood-stabilization therapies. PMID:22450620

  14. Subthalamic nucleus local field potential activity during the Eriksen flanker task reveals a novel role for theta phase during conflict monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Baltazar; Brittain, John-Stuart; Jenkinson, Ned; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2013-09-11

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is thought to play a central role in modulating responses during conflict. Computational models have suggested that the location of the STN in the basal ganglia, as well as its numerous connections to conflict-related cortical structures, allows it to be ideally situated to act as a global inhibitor during conflict. Additionally, recent behavioral experiments have shown that deep brain stimulation to the STN results in impulsivity during high-conflict situations. However, the precise mechanisms that mediate the "hold-your-horses" function of the STN remain unclear. We recorded from deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted bilaterally in the STN of 13 human subjects with Parkinson's disease while they performed a flanker task. The incongruent trials with the shortest reaction times showed no behavioral or electrophysiological differences from congruent trials, suggesting that the distracter stimuli were successfully ignored. In these trials, cue-locked STN theta band activity demonstrated phase alignment across trials and was followed by a periresponse increase in theta power. In contrast, incongruent trials with longer reaction times demonstrated a relative reduction in theta phase alignment followed by higher theta power. Theta phase alignment negatively correlated with subject reaction time, and theta power positively correlated with trial reaction time. Thus, when conflicting stimuli are not properly ignored, disruption of STN theta phase alignment may help operationalize the hold-your-horses role of the nucleus, whereas later increases in the amplitude of theta oscillations may help overcome this function. PMID:24027276

  15. Frequency-Specific Synchronization in the Bilateral Subthalamic Nuclei Depending on Voluntary Muscle Contraction and Relaxation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kenji; Yokochi, Fusako; Iwamuro, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hamada, Kohichi; Isoo, Ayako; Kimura, Katsuo; Okiyama, Ryoichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Ushiba, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    The volitional control of muscle contraction and relaxation is a fundamental component of human motor activity, but how the processing of the subcortical networks, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), is involved in voluntary muscle contraction (VMC) and voluntary muscle relaxation (VMR) remains unclear. In this study, local field potentials (LFPs) of bilateral STNs were recorded in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) while performing externally paced VMC and VMR tasks of the unilateral wrist extensor muscle. The VMC- or VMR-related oscillatory activities and their functional couplings were investigated over the theta (4–7 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (14–35 Hz), and gamma (40–100 Hz) frequency bands. Alpha and beta desynchronizations were observed in bilateral STNs at the onset of both VMC and VMR tasks. On the other hand, theta and gamma synchronizations were prominent in bilateral STNs specifically at the onset of the VMC task. In particular, just after VMC, theta functional coupling between the bilateral STNs increased, and the theta phase became coupled to the gamma amplitude within the contralateral STN in a phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupled manner. On the other hand, the prominent beta-gamma cross-frequency couplings observed in the bilateral STNs at rest were reduced by the VMC and VMR tasks. These results suggest that STNs are bilaterally involved in the different performances of muscle contraction and relaxation through the theta-gamma and beta-gamma networks between bilateral STNs in patients with PD. PMID:27064969

  16. Subthalamic Stimulation Reduces Vowel Space at the Initiation of Sustained Production: Implications for Articulatory Motor Control in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, John J.; Alken, Amy G.; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stimulation of the subthalamic nuclei (STN) is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but complaints of speech difficulties after surgery have been difficult to quantify. Speech measures do not convincingly account for such reports. Objective: This study examined STN stimulation effects on vowel production, in order to probe whether DBS affects articulatory posturing. The objective was to compare positioning during the initiation phase with the steady prolongation phase by measuring vowel spaces for three “corner” vowels at these two time frames. Methods: Vowel space was measured over the initial 0.25 sec of sustained productions of high front (/i/), high back (/u/) and low vowels (/a/), and again during a 2 sec segment at the midpoint. Eight right-handed male subjects with bilateral STN stimulation and seven age-matched male controls were studied based on their participation in a larger study that included functional imaging. Mean values: age = 57±4.6 yrs; PD duration = 12.3±2.7 yrs; duration of DBS = 25.6±21.2 mos, and UPDRS III speech score = 1.6±0.7. STN subjects were studied off medication at their therapeutic DBS settings and again with their stimulators off, counter-balanced order. Results: Vowel space was larger in the initiation phase compared to the midpoint for both the control and the STN subjects off stimulation. With stimulation on, however, the initial vowel space was significantly reduced to the area measured at the mid-point. For the three vowels, the acoustics were differentially affected, in accordance with expected effects of front versus back position in the vocal tract. Conclusions: STN stimulation appears to constrain initial articulatory gestures for vowel production, raising the possibility that articulatory positions normally used in speech are similarly constrained. PMID:27003219

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus preferentially alters the translational profile of striatopallidal neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Visanji, Naomi P.; Kamali Sarvestani, Iman; Creed, Meaghan C.; Shams Shoaei, Zahra; Nobrega, José N.; Hamani, Clement; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the precise neuronal mechanisms of which both at molecular and network levels remain a topic of debate. Here we employ two transgenic mouse lines, combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with bacterial artificial chromosome expression (Bac), to selectively identify changes in translational gene expression in either Drd1a-expressing striatonigral or Drd2-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum following STN-DBS. 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice received either 5 days stimulation via a DBS electrode implanted in the ipsilateral STN or 5 days sham treatment (no stimulation). Striatal polyribosomal RNA was selectively purified from either Drd2 or Drd1a MSNs using the TRAP method and gene expression profiling performed. We identified eight significantly altered genes in Drd2 MSNs (Vps33b, Ppp1r3c, Mapk4, Sorcs2, Neto1, Abca1, Penk1, and Gapdh) and two overlapping genes in Drd1a MSNs (Penk1 and Ppp1r3c) implicated in the molecular mechanisms of STN-DBS. A detailed functional analysis, using a further 728 probes implicated in STN-DBS, suggested an increased ability to receive excitation (mediated by increased dendritic spines, increased calcium influx and enhanced excitatory post synaptic potentials) accompanied by processes that would hamper the initiation of action potentials, transport of neurotransmitters from soma to axon terminals and vesicular release in Drd2-expressing MSNs. Finally, changes in expression of several genes involved in apoptosis as well as cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were also identified. This increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms induced by STN-DBS may reveal novel targets for future non-surgical therapies for PD. PMID:26106299

  18. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated. PMID:26459361

  19. The network of causal interactions for beta oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus, primary motor cortex, and subthalamic nucleus of walking parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Ming; Wen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Yong; Xiao, Hu; Xie, Zhengyuan; Li, Xing; Wang, Ning; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei; Chang, Jingyu; Zhang, Wangming

    2016-08-01

    Oscillatory activity has been well-studied in many structures within cortico-basal ganglia circuits, but it is not well understood within the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which was recently introduced as a potential target for the treatment of gait and postural impairments in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate oscillatory activity in the PPN and its relationship with oscillatory activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the PPN, primary motor cortex (M1), and subthalamic nucleus (STN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rats during resting and walking. After analysis of power spectral density, coherence, and partial Granger causality, three major findings emerged: 1) after 6-OHDA lesions, beta band oscillations were enhanced in all three regions during walking; 2) the direction of information flow for beta oscillations among the three structures was STN→M1, STN→PPN, and PPN→M1; 3) after the treatment of levodopa, beta activity in the three regions was reduced significantly and the flow of beta band was also abrogated. Our results suggest that beta activity in the PPN is transmitted from the basal ganglia and probably comes from the STN, and the STN plays a dominant role in the network of causal interactions for beta activity. Thus, the STN may be a potential source of aberrant beta band oscillations in PD. Levodopa can inhibit beta activity in the PPN of parkinsonian rats but cannot relieve parkinsonian patients' axial symptoms clinically. Therefore, beta oscillations may not be the major cause of axial symptoms. PMID:27163550

  20. Raclopride or high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus stops cocaine-induced motor stereotypy and restores related alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits.

    PubMed

    Aliane, Verena; Pérez, Sylvie; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Kemel, Marie-Louise

    2012-11-01

    Motor stereotypy is a key symptom of various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroleptics or the promising treatment using deep brain stimulation stops stereotypies but the mechanisms underlying their actions are unclear. In rat, motor stereotypies are linked to an imbalance between prefrontal and sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Indeed, cortico-nigral transmission was reduced in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor basal ganglia circuits and dopamine and acetylcholine release was altered in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor territory of the dorsal striatum. Furthermore, cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in the arrest of motor stereotypy. Here we found that, as previously observed for raclopride, high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (HFS STN) rapidly stopped cocaine-induced motor stereotypies in rat. Importantly, raclopride and HFS STN exerted a strong effect on cocaine-induced alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. Raclopride restored the cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum and the cortico-nigral information transmissions in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. HFS STN also restored the N-methyl-d-aspartic-acid-evoked release of acetylcholine and dopamine in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum. However, in contrast to raclopride, HFS STN did not restore the cortico-substantia nigra pars reticulata transmissions but exerted strong inhibitory and excitatory effects on neuronal activity in the prefrontal subdivision of the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Thus, both raclopride and HFS STN stop cocaine-induced motor stereotypy, but exert different effects on the related alterations in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. PMID:22845853

  1. Motor and non-motor circuitry activation induced by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson’s disease patients: Intraoperative fMRI for DBS

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Emily J.; Testini, Paola; Min, Hoon-Ki; Gibson, William S.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Favazza, Christopher P.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Kim, Inyong; Welker, Kirk M.; Clayton, Daniel A.; Klassen, Bryan T.; Chang, Su-youne; Lee, Kendall H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis suggested by previous studies that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with PD would affect the activity of both motor and non-motor networks, we applied intraoperative fMRI to patients receiving DBS. Patients and Methods Ten patients receiving STN DBS for PD underwent intraoperative 1.5T fMRI during high frequency stimulation delivered via an external pulse generator. The study was conducted between the dates of January 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014. Results We observed blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes (FDR<.001) in the motor circuitry, including primary motor, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices, thalamus, pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), and cerebellum, as well as in the limbic circuitry, including cingulate and insular cortices. Activation of the motor network was observed also after applying a Bonferroni correction (p<.001) to our dataset, suggesting that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. Conclusions These findings support the modulatory role of STN DBS on the activity of motor and non-motor networks, and suggest complex mechanisms at the basis of the efficacy of this treatment modality. Furthermore, these results suggest that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. With further studies combining the use of real time intraoperative fMRI with clinical outcomes in patients treated with DBS, functional imaging techniques have the potential not only to elucidate the mechanisms of DBS functioning, but also to guide and assist in the surgical treatment of patients affected by movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26046412

  2. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus preferentially alters the translational profile of striatopallidal neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visanji, Naomi P; Kamali Sarvestani, Iman; Creed, Meaghan C; Shams Shoaei, Zahra; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the precise neuronal mechanisms of which both at molecular and network levels remain a topic of debate. Here we employ two transgenic mouse lines, combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with bacterial artificial chromosome expression (Bac), to selectively identify changes in translational gene expression in either Drd1a-expressing striatonigral or Drd2-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum following STN-DBS. 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice received either 5 days stimulation via a DBS electrode implanted in the ipsilateral STN or 5 days sham treatment (no stimulation). Striatal polyribosomal RNA was selectively purified from either Drd2 or Drd1a MSNs using the TRAP method and gene expression profiling performed. We identified eight significantly altered genes in Drd2 MSNs (Vps33b, Ppp1r3c, Mapk4, Sorcs2, Neto1, Abca1, Penk1, and Gapdh) and two overlapping genes in Drd1a MSNs (Penk1 and Ppp1r3c) implicated in the molecular mechanisms of STN-DBS. A detailed functional analysis, using a further 728 probes implicated in STN-DBS, suggested an increased ability to receive excitation (mediated by increased dendritic spines, increased calcium influx and enhanced excitatory post synaptic potentials) accompanied by processes that would hamper the initiation of action potentials, transport of neurotransmitters from soma to axon terminals and vesicular release in Drd2-expressing MSNs. Finally, changes in expression of several genes involved in apoptosis as well as cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were also identified. This increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms induced by STN-DBS may reveal novel targets for future non-surgical therapies for PD. PMID:26106299

  3. The antidepressant effects of ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation is associated with neural activation in the medial part of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Janssen, Marcus L F; Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin

    2015-02-15

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and cingulate gyrus (Cg) are key regions in the control of mood-related behaviors. Electrical stimulation of these areas induces antidepressant-like effects in both patients and animal models. Another structure whose limbic connections are receiving more interest in the context of mood-related behaviors is the medial part of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the mood-related effects of NAc, vmPFC, and Cg are accompanied by changes in the neural activity of the STN. We performed high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the NAc, vmPFC, and Cg. Animals were behaviorally tested for hedonia and forced swim immobility; and the cellular activities in the different parts of the STN were assessed by means of c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-ir). Our results showed that HFS of the NAc and vmPFC, but not Cg reduced anhedonic-like and forced swim immobility behaviors. Interestingly, there was a significant increase of c-Fos-ir in the medial STN with HFS of the vmPFC, but not the NAc and Cg as compared to the sham. Correlation analysis showed that the medial STN is associated with the antidepressant-like behaviors in vmPFC HFS animals. No behavioral correlation was found with respect to behavioral outcome and activity in the lateral STN. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC induced profound antidepressant-like effects with enhanced neural activity in the medial part of the STN. PMID:25446757

  4. Long-term Efficacy of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease: A 5-year Follow-up Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lu-Lu; Liu, Jin-Long; Fu, Xiao-Li; Xian, Wen-Biao; Gu, Jing; Liu, Yan-Mei; Ye, Jing; Chen, Jie; Qian, Hao; Xu, Shao-Hua; Pei, Zhong; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is effective against advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), allowing dramatic improvement of Parkinsonism, in addition to a significant reduction in medication. Here we aimed to investigate the long-term effect of STN DBS in Chinese PD patients, which has not been thoroughly studied in China. Methods: Ten PD patients were assessed before DBS and followed up 1, 3, and 5 years later using Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS III), Parkinson's Disease Questionnatire-39, Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale-Chinese Version, Mini-mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression Scale. Stimulation parameters and drug dosages were recorded at each follow-up. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA for repeated measures. Results: In the “off” state (off medication), DBS improved UPDRS III scores by 35.87% in 5 years, compared with preoperative baseline (P < 0.001). In the “on” state (on medication), motor scores at 5 years were similar to the results of preoperative levodopa challenge test. The quality of life is improved by 58.18% (P < 0.001) from baseline to 3 years and gradually declined afterward. Sleep, cognition, and emotion were mostly unchanged. Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced from 660.4 ± 210.1 mg at baseline to 310.6 ± 158.4 mg at 5 years (by 52.96%, P < 0.001). The average pulse width, frequency and amplitude at 5 years were 75.0 ± 18.21 μs, 138.5 ± 19.34 Hz, and 2.68 ± 0.43 V, respectively. Conclusions: STN DBS is an effective intervention for PD, although associated with a slightly diminished efficacy after 5 years. Compared with other studies, patients in our study required lower voltage and medication for satisfactory symptom control. PMID:26365958

  5. Resiliency in adolescents at high-risk for substance abuse: flexible adaptation via subthalamic nucleus and linkage to drinking and drug use in early adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Barbara J.; Nigg, Joel T.; Welsh, Robert C.; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Zucker, Robert A.; Heitzeg, Mary M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The personality trait resiliency is the ability to flexibly adapt impulse control relative to contextual demand. Low resiliency has been linked to later alcohol/drug problems. The underlying psychological and neural mechanisms are unknown but neurocomputational models suggested relations between resiliency and working memory. Cortical-striatal connectivity has been proposed to underlie adaptive switches between cautious and risky behaviors. Methods Working memory was probed in sixty-seven 18–22 year olds from a larger community study of alcoholism, using the n-back task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity between task-related regions was investigated with psychophysiological interaction analysis. Resiliency was measured in early teen years and related to early adulthood measures of drinking/drug use, task activation and connectivity. Relationships with risk factors, including family history, age of drinking onset and number of alcohol problems were also investigated. Results Higher resiliency was related to lower levels of substance use, fewer alcohol problems and better working memory performance. Whole brain regression revealed resiliency negatively correlated with activation of subthalamic nucleus (STN) and pallidum during the n-back. High and Low resiliency quartile groups (n=17 each) differed in coupling strength between STN and median cingulate cortex, a region of reduced activation during working memory. The High resiliency group had later onset of drinking, fewer alcohol problems, had used fewer illicit drugs and were less likely to smoke cigarettes than their Low resiliency counterparts, Conclusions These findings suggest that resiliency in early adolescence may protect against alcohol problems and drug use, though the direction of this effect is currently unknown. This protective factor may relate to executive functioning as supported by the finding of a neural link shared between resiliency and working

  6. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, A.; Moll, C.K.E.; Hamel, W.; Buhmann, C.; Koeppen, J.A.; Boelmans, K.; Zittel, S.; Gerloff, C.; Westphal, M.; Schneider, T.R.; Engel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing. PMID:26594626

  7. Globus pallidus neurons dynamically regulate the activity pattern of subthalamic nucleus neurons through the frequency-dependent activation of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, Nicholas E; Bevan, Mark D

    2005-07-01

    Reciprocally connected GABAergic neurons of the globus pallidus (GP) and glutamatergic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are a putative generator of pathological rhythmic burst firing in Parkinson's disease (PD). Burst firing of STN neurons may be driven by rebound depolarization after barrages of GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated IPSPs arising from pallidal fibers. To determine the conditions under which pallidosubthalamic transmission activates these and other postsynaptic GABARs, a parasagittal mouse brain slice preparation was developed in which pallidosubthalamic connections were preserved. Intact connectivity was first confirmed through the injection of a neuronal tracer into the GP. Voltage-clamp and gramicidin-based perforated-patch current-clamp recordings were then used to study the relative influences of GABA(A)R- and GABA(B)R-mediated pallidosubthalamic transmission on STN neurons. Spontaneous phasic, but not tonic, activation of postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs reduced the frequency and disrupted the rhythmicity of autonomous firing in STN neurons. However, postsynaptic GABA(B)Rs were only sufficiently activated to impact STN firing when pallidosubthalamic transmission was elevated or pallidal fibers were synchronously activated by electrical stimulation. In a subset of neurons, rebound burst depolarizations followed high-frequency, synchronous stimulation of pallidosubthalamic fibers. Although GABA(B)R-mediated hyperpolarization was itself sufficient to generate rebound bursts, coincident activation of postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs produced longer and more intense burst firing. These findings elucidate a novel route through which burst activity can be generated in the STN, and suggest that GABARs on STN neurons could act in a synergistic manner to generate abnormal burst activity in PD. PMID:16000620

  8. An age-related shift of resting-state functional connectivity of the subthalamic nucleus: a potential mechanism for compensating motor performance decline in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mathys, Christian; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Caspers, Julian; Caspers, Svenja; Südmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Langner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Healthy aging is associated with decline in basic motor functioning and higher motor control. Here, we investigated age-related differences in the brain-wide functional connectivity (FC) pattern of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which plays an important role in motor response control. As earlier studies revealed functional coupling between STN and basal ganglia, which both are known to influence the conservativeness of motor responses on a superordinate level, we tested the hypothesis that STN FC with the striatum becomes dysbalanced with age. To this end, we performed a seed-based resting-state analysis of fMRI data from 361 healthy adults (mean age: 41.8, age range: 18–85) using bilateral STN as the seed region of interest. Age was included as a covariate to identify regions showing age-related changes of FC with the STN seed. The analysis revealed positive FC of the STN with several previously described subcortical and cortical regions like the anterior cingulate and sensorimotor cortex, as well as not-yet reported regions including central and posterior insula. With increasing age, we observed reduced positive FC with caudate nucleus, thalamus, and insula as well as increased positive FC with sensorimotor cortex and putamen. Furthermore, an age-related reduction of negative FC was found with precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex. We suggest that this reduced de-coupling of brain areas involved in self-relevant but motor-unrelated cognitive processing (i.e. precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex) from the STN motor network may represent a potential mechanism behind the age-dependent decline in motor performance. At the same time, older adults appear to compensate for this decline by releasing superordinate motor control areas, in particular caudate nucleus and insula, from STN interference while increasing STN-mediated response control over lower level motor areas like sensorimotor cortex and putamen. PMID:25100995

  9. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  10. Heat Waves

    MedlinePlus

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  11. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  12. Modulatory effect of subthalamic nucleus on the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise: an in vivo electrophysiological and microdialysis study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dalei; Liu, Xiaoli; Qiao, Decai

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the modulatory effect of changes of subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity on the development of central fatigue during exhausting exercise, and reveal the possible mechanism that might affect STN activity from the perspective of neurotransmitters. Rats were randomly divided into electrophysiology and microdialysis study groups. For electrophysiological study, electrical activity in sensorimotor cortex and STN were simultaneously recorded before, during and 90min after the exhausting exercise. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe and glutamate (Glu), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels were subsequently detected with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The behavioral studies showed that rats ran well initiatively with the treadmill exercise in the beginning, 45 ± 11.5min later, movement capacity reduced obviously (which was termed as 'early fatigue'). Correspondingly, STN activity increased significantly compared with rest condition (p < 0.05), while, cortex activity decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Subsequently, rats continued their exercise with minor external stimulation till exhaustion. Cortex activity reached the minimum value under exhaustion condition, while STN activity changed insignificantly (p > 0.05). For microdialysis study, the dynamic change of Glu/GABA ratio was consistent with the change of STN activity during the development of 'early fatigue' rather than the development of exhaustion. In conclusion, the present study shows that, the development of the cortex fatigue during exhausting exercise consists of two phases, 'early fatigue' and exhaustion. Our results suggest that, dynamic changes of STN activity are closely relevant to the development of 'early fatigue' rather than exhaustion, and the changes of STN activity during the development of 'early fatigue' might be partly related to the variance of Glu and GABA levels in

  13. Deep brain stimulation of pallidal versus subthalamic for patients with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fan; Ma, Wenbin; Huang, Yongmin; Qiu, Zhihai; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects many people every year. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective nonpharmacological method to treat PD motor symptoms. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS versus globus pallidus internus (GPi)-DBS in treating advanced PD. Methods Controlled clinical trials that compared STN-DBS to GPi-DBS for short-term treatment of PD in adults were researched up to November 2015. The primary outcomes were the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Section (UPDRS) III score and the levodopa-equivalent dosage (LED) after DBS. The secondary outcomes were the UPDRS II score and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Results Totally, 13 studies containing 1,148 PD patients were included in this meta-analysis to compare STN-DBS versus GPi-DBS. During the off-medication state, the pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) of UPDRS III and II scores were −2.18 (95% CI =−5.11 to 0.74) and −1.96 (95% CI =−3.84 to −0.08), respectively. During the on-medication state, the pooled WMD of UPDRS III and II scores were 0.15 (95% CI =−1.14 to 1.44) and 1.01 (95% CI =0.12 to 1.89), respectively. After DBS, the pooled WMD of LED and BDI were −254.48 (95% CI =−341.66) and 2.29 (95% CI =0.83 to 3.75), respectively. Conclusion These results indicate that during the off-medication state, the STN-DBS might be superior to GPi-DBS in improving the motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients; but during the on-medication state, the opposite result is observed. Meanwhile, the STN-DBS is superior at reducing the LED, whereas the GPi-DBS shows a significantly greater reduction in BDI score after DBS. PMID:27382286

  14. Chronic Methamphetamine Self-Administration Dysregulates Oxytocin Plasma Levels and Oxytocin Receptor Fibre Density in the Nucleus Accumbens Core and Subthalamic Nucleus of the Rat.

    PubMed

    Baracz, S J; Parker, L M; Suraev, A S; Everett, N A; Goodchild, A K; McGregor, I S; Cornish, J L

    2016-04-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin attenuates reward and abuse for the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). Recent findings have implicated the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core and subthalamic nucleus (STh) in oxytocin modulation of acute METH reward and relapse to METH-seeking behaviour. Surprisingly, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) is only modestly involved in both regions in oxytocin attenuation of METH-primed reinstatement. Coupled with the limited investigation of the role of the OTR in psychostimulant-induced behaviours, we primarily investigated whether there are cellular changes to the OTR in the NAc core and STh, as well as changes to oxytocin plasma levels, after chronic METH i.v. self-administration (IVSA) and after extinction of drug-taking. An additional aim was to examine whether changes to central corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and plasma corticosterone levels were also apparent because of the interaction of oxytocin with stress-regulatory mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for i.v. METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule or received yoked saline infusions during 2-h sessions for 20 days. An additional cohort of rats underwent behavioural extinction for 15 days after METH IVSA. Subsequent to the last day of IVSA or extinction, blood plasma was collected for enzyme immunoassay, and immunofluorescence was conducted on NAc core and STh coronal sections. Rats that self-administered METH had higher oxytocin plasma levels, and decreased OTR-immunoreactive (-IR) fibres in the NAc core than yoked controls. In animals that self-administered METH and underwent extinction, oxytocin plasma levels remained elevated, OTR-IR fibre density increased in the STh, and a trend towards normalisation of OTR-IR fibre density was evident in the NAc core. CRF-IR fibre density in both brain regions and corticosterone plasma levels did not change across treatment groups. These findings demonstrate that oxytocin systems, both centrally

  15. Third Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Third Wave is a Christian charity based in Derby (England) that offers training in vocational skills, preindustrial crafts, horticultural and agricultural skills, environmental education, and woodland survival skills to disadvantaged people at city and farm locations. Third Wave employs a holistic approach to personal development in a community…

  16. Microfluidic waves.

    PubMed

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  17. Efficacies of globus pallidus stimulation and subthalamic nucleus stimulation for advanced Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. Globus pallidus internus (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the most targeted locations for the procedure. To investigate the variable efficiencies for the two different locations, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare both stimulation sites. Materials and methods A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacies of GPi and STN DBS were included. Clinical outcomes of motor function, nonmotor function, and quality of life (QOL) were collected for the meta-analysis. Results Ten eligible trials with 1,034 patients were included in the analysis. Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale III (UPDRS-III) scores were collected at 6, 12, and 24 months postsurgery separately to assess the motor function of the patients. A statistically significant effect in favor of the GPi DBS was obtained in the off-medication/on-stimulation phase of UPDRS-III at 12 months (mean difference [MD] =6.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 3.00–10.74, P=0.57, I2=0%). However, GPi DBS showed an opposite result at 24 months (MD =−2.46, 95% CI: −4.91 to −0.02, P=0.05, I2=0%). In the on-medication/on-stimulation phase, GPi DBS obtained a worse outcome compared with STN DBS (MD =−2.90, 95% CI: −5.71 to −0.09, P=0.05, I2=0%). Compared with STN DBS, increased dosage of levodopa equivalent doses was needed in GPi DBS (standardized MD =0.60, 95% CI: 0.46–0.74, P<0.00001, I2=24%). Meanwhile, Beck Depression Inventory II scores demonstrated that STN has a better performance (standardized MD =−0.31, 95% CI: −0.51 to −0.12, P=0.002, I2=0%). As for neurocognitive phase postsurgery, GPi DBS showed better performance in three of the nine tests, especially in verbal fluency. Use of GPi DBS was associated with a greater effect in eight of the nine subscales of QOL. Conclusion

  18. Comparative effects of unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on gait kinematics in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, blinded study.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Jagid, Jonathan R; Luca, Corneliu C

    2016-08-01

    Gait dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) does not always respond to bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Since right hemisphere motor networks may be dominant for gait control, identical stimulation of asymmetric circuits could account for gait dysfunction. We compared the effects of bilateral and unilateral STN-DBS on gait kinematics in PD patients who developed gait impairment after STN-DBS. Twenty-two PD patients with >50 % improvement in motor scores, but dopamine-resistant gait dysfunction 6-12 months after bilateral STN-DBS were blindly tested off dopaminergic effects in four randomly assigned DBS conditions: bilateral, right-sided, left-sided and off stimulation. Motor scores (MDS-UPDRS III), gait scores (MDS-UPRDS 2.11-2.13 + 3.9-3.13), turning time (seconds), stride length (meters) and velocity (meters/second) were measured 1 h after DBS changes. Motor and gait scores significantly improved with bilateral versus unilateral STN-DBS. Stride length and velocity (0.95 ± 0.06, 0.84 ± 0.07) significantly improved with bilateral (1.09 ± 0.04, 0.95 ± 0.05), right-sided (1.06 ± 0.04, 0.92 ± 0.05) and left-sided stimulation (1.01 ± 0.05, 0.90 ± 0.05) (p < 0.05). Stride length significantly improved with right-sided versus left-sided (0.05 ± 0.02) and bilateral versus left-sided stimulation (0.07 ± 0.02) (p < 0.05). Turning time (4.89 ± 0.6) tended to improve with bilateral (4.13 ± 0.5) (p = 0.15) and right-sided (4.27 ± 0.6) (p = 0.2) more than with left STN-DBS (4.69 ± 0.5) (p = 0.5). Bilateral STN-DBS yields greater improvement in motor and gait scores in PD patients. Yet, unilateral stimulation has similar effects on gait kinematics. Particularly, right-sided stimulation might produce slightly greater improvements. Although the clinical relevance of differential programming of right versus left-sided STN-DBS is unclear, this approach could be considered in the management of

  19. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  20. Quasitravelling waves

    SciTech Connect

    Beklaryan, Leva A

    2011-02-11

    A finite difference analogue of the wave equation with potential perturbation is investigated, which simulates the behaviour of an infinite rod under the action of an external longitudinal force field. For a homogeneous rod, describing solutions of travelling wave type is equivalent to describing the full space of classical solutions to an induced one-parameter family of functional differential equations of point type, with the characteristic of the travelling wave as parameter. For an inhomogeneous rod, the space of solutions of travelling wave type is trivial, and their 'proper' extension is defined as solutions of 'quasitravelling' wave type. By contrast to the case of a homogeneous rod, describing the solutions of quasitravelling wave type is equivalent to describing the quotient of the full space of impulsive solutions to an induced one-parameter family of point-type functional differential equations by an equivalence relation connected with the definition of solutions of quasitravelling wave type. Stability of stationary solutions is analyzed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  1. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  2. Ship waves and lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Wurtele, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamics analogous to those of surface ship waves on water of finite depth are noted for the three-dimensional trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid. This vertical trapping of wave energy is modeled by uniform upstream flow and stratification, bounded above by a rigid lid, and by a semiinfinite fluid of uniform stability whose wind velocity increases exponentially with height, representing the atmosphere. While formal asymptotic solutions are produced, limited quantitative usefulness is obtained through them because of the limitations of the approximations and the infinity of modes in the solution. Time-dependent numerical models are accordingly developed for both surface ship waves and internal and atmospheric ship waves, yielding a variety of results.

  3. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  4. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  5. ASTER Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The pattern on the right half of this image of the Bay of Bengal is the result of two opposing wave trains colliding. This ASTER sub-scene, acquired on March 29, 2000, covers an area 18 kilometers (13 miles) wide and 15 kilometers (9 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The visible and near-infrared bands highlight surface waves due to specular reflection of sunlight off of the wave faces.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels

  6. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  7. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  8. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown.

  9. Geometrical versus wave optics under gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2015-06-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely, null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics—rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches—we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  10. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  11. Financial Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen-Ya

    2010-11-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black—Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  12. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  13. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  14. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p < 0.05). Improvement in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III score (off medication, on stimulation) 12 months after the operation was higher for patients who underwent 3D-SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). The total electrical energy

  15. Shear wave logging using guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winbow, G.A.; Chen, S.T.; Rice, J.A.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a method for acoustically logging an earth formation surrounding a borehole which contains a liquid where the approximate shear wave velocity v of the formation is known. The method consists of: vibrating a dipole source in the liquid to generate in the liquid a guided wave the frequencies of which include a critical frequency f given by zeta = ..nu..12a where a is the borehole radius, so that the fastest component of the guided wave has velocity substantially equal to ..nu..; and detecting the arrival of the fastest component of the guided wave at least one location in the liquid spaced longitudinally along the borehole from the dipole source.

  16. Magneto-atmospheric waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of magneto-atmospheric waves is presented and applied to the modelling of waves in the solar atmosphere. The waves arise in compressible, stratified, electrically conductive atmospheres within gravitational fields when permeated by a magnetic field. Compression, buoyancy, and distortion of the magnetic field all contribute to the existence of the waves. Basic linearized equations are introduced to describe the waves and attention is given to plane-stratified atmospheres and their stability. A dispersion relation is defined for wave propagation in a plane-stratified atmosphere when there are no plane-wave solutions. Solutions are found for the full wave equation in the presence of either a vertical or a horizontal magnetic field. The theory is applied to describing waves in sunspots, in penumbrae, and flare-induced coronal disturbances.

  17. ULF Waves at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.-H.; Boardsen, S. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the observed characteristics of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves at Mercury. It shows how field-aligned propagating ULF waves at Mercury can be generated by externally driven fast compressional waves (FWs) via mode conversion at the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Then, the chapter reviews the interpretation that the strong magnetic compressional waves near and its harmonics observed with 20 of Mercury's magnetic equator could be the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) mode. A recent statistical study of ULF waves at Mercury based on MESSENGER data reported the occurrence and polarization of the detected waves. The chapter further introduces the field line resonance and the electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves to explain such waves, and shows that both theories can partially explain the observations.

  18. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  19. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  20. Wave Meteorology and Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some mountain wave turbulence and operational hazards while soaring. Maps, photographs, and satellite images of the meteorological phenomena are included. Additionally, photographs of aircraft that sustained mountain wave damage are provided.

  1. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  2. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  3. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  4. Waves of Hanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Guillermo

    2003-03-01

    A spatially extended model of the hantavirus infection in deer mice is analyzed. Traveling waves solutions of the infected and susceptible populations are studied in different regimes, controlled by an environmental parameter. The wave of infection is shown to lag behind the wave of susceptible population, and the delay between the two is analyzed numerically and through a piecewise linearization.

  5. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  6. Detectors of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, G.

    Gravitational waves Motion of test bodies in a g.w. field Energy carried by gravitational waves Gravitational-wave sources Spinning star Double-star systems Fall into a Schwarzschild black hole Radiation from gravitational collapse Gravitational-wave detectors The nonresonant detectors The resonant detectors Electromechnical transducers Piezoelectric ceramic The capacitor The inductor Data analysis The Brownian noise The back-action The wide-band noise, data analysis and optimization The resonant transducer The Wiener-Kolmogoroff filter The cross-section and the effective temperature The antenna bandwidth The gravitational-wave experiments in the world The laser interferometers The resonant detectors

  7. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  8. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  9. Martian atmospheric lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirraglia, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 9 television pictures of Mars extensive mountain lee wave phenomenon in the northern mid-latitudes during winter were evaluated. The characteristic wave length of the lee waves is readily observable, and in a few cases the boundaries of the wave patterns, as well as the wave length, are observed. The cloud patterns resulting from the waves generated by the flow across a mountain or crater are shown to be dependent upon the velocity profile of the air stream and the vertical stability of the atmosphere. Using the stability as inferred by the temperature structure obtained from the infrared spectrometer data, a two layer velocity model of the air stream is used in calculations based on the theory of mountain lee waves. Results yield magnitudes generally in agreement with various other circulation models.

  10. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  11. Patterns in the Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coco, G.; Guza, R. T.; Garnier, R.; Lomonaco, P.; Lopez De San Roman Blanco, B.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Xu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Edge waves, gravity waves trapped close to the shoreline by refraction, can in some cases form a standing wave pattern with alongshore periodic sequence of high and low runup. Nonlinear mechanisms for generation of edge waves by monochromatic waves incident on a planar beach from deep water have been elaborated theoretically and in the lab. Edge waves have been long considered a potential source for alongshore periodic morphological patterns in the swash (e.g., beach cusps), and edge-wave based predictions of cusp spacing compare qualitatively well with many field observations. We will discuss the extension of lab observations and numerical modeling to include incident waves with significant frequency and directional bandwidth. Laboratory experiments were performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin. The large rectangular basin (25 m cross-shore by 32 m alongshore) was heavily instrumented, had reflective sidewalls, and a steep concrete beach (slope 1:5) with a constant depth (1m) section between the wavemaker and beach. With monochromatic, normally incident waves we observed the expected, previously described subharmonic observations. Edge wave vertical heights at the shoreline reached 80cm, and edge wave uprushes exceeded the sloping beach freeboard. When frequency and frequency-directional spread are increased, the excited edge wave character changes substantially. In some cases, subharmonic excitation is suppressed completely. In other cases, edge waves are excited intermittently and unpredictably. The spatially and temporally steady forcing required for strong, persistent subharmonic instability is lacking with even modestly spread (direction and frequency) incident waves. An SPH numerical model is capable of reproducing aspects of the observations. It seems unlikely to us that subhamonic edge waves alone are responsible for most cusp formation on natural beaches. The steady incident wave forcing needed to initiate subharmonic growth, and to maintain

  12. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  13. Gravitational Wave Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2005-02-01

    There is only one experimental proof that gravitational waves exist. With such a limitation, it may seem premature to suggest the possibility that gravitational waves can became a preferred space propulsion technique. The present understanding of the problem indicates that this is not the case. The emission of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources has been confirmed by observation, the respective detection at large distance from the source is difficult and actually we have no confirmation of a successful detection. Therefore the required preliminary discovery has been already made. This opinion is enforced by many different proposals for building the required powerful gravitational wave generators that have recently appeared in the literature and discussed at conferences. It is no longer reasonable to wait for additional confirmation of the existence of gravitational waves to start a program for building generators and testing their possible application to space travel. A vast literature shows that gravitational waves can be employed for space propulsion. Gravitational wave rockets have been proposed, non-linearity of Einstein equations allows the conversion of gravitational waves to a static gravitational field and ``artificial gravity assist'' may become a new way of travelling in space-time. Different approaches to gravitational wave propulsion are reviewed and compared. Gravitational wave propulsion is also compared to traditional rocket propulsion and an undeniable advantage can be demonstrated in terms of efficiency and performance. Testing the predictions will require gravitational wave generators with high power and wavelength short enough for producing high energy densities. Detectors designed for the specific application must be developed, taking into account that non-linearity effects are expected. The study and development of Gravitational wave propulsion is a very challenging endeavor, involving the most complex theories, sophisticated

  14. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  15. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  16. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  17. Reverse Quantum Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    As preposterous as it might sound, if quantum waves travel in the reverse direction from subatomic particles, then most of quantum physics can be explained without quantum weirdness or Schr"odinger's cat. Quantum mathematics is unchanged. The diffraction pattern on the screen of the double slit experiment is the same. This proposal is not refuted by the Innsbruck experiments; this is NOT a hidden local variable theory. Research evidence will be presented that is consistent with the idea waves travel in the opposite direction as neutrons. If one's thinking shifts from forwards to backwards quantum waves, the world changes so drastically it is almost unimaginable. Quantum waves move from the mathematical to the real world, multiply in number, and reverse in direction. Wave-particle duality is undone. In the double slit experiment every part of the target screen is emitting such quantum waves in all directions. Some pass through the two slits. Interference occurs on the opposite side of the barrier than is usually imagined. They impinge on ``S'' and an electron is released at random. Because of the interference it is more likely to follow some waves than others. It follows one and only one wave backward; hitting the screen where it's wave originated. )

  18. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation. PMID:18075587

  19. Internal Solitary Wave Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Keating, Scott; Shrivistava, Ishita

    2013-11-01

    In a two-layer fluid, solitary waves of depression (elevation) propagate in a shallow upper (lower) layer. The transition from depressed to elevated is known to occur as a solitary wave of depression passes over a bottom slope. If impacting a coastline the shoaling waves deposit some energy and partially reflect. Here we consider what happens if a solitary wave passes over a sill or the shoulder of an island. Specifically, through lock-release laboratory experiments, we examine the evolution of a solitary wave of depression incident upon a submerged thin vertical barrier and triangular submarine topography. From the measured interface displacement, we determine the available potential energy associated with the wave. The method of Hilbert transforms is used to subdivide the displacement signal into rightward- and leftward-propagating disturbances, from which we measure the available potential energy of the transmitted and reflected waves. These are used to measure the relative transmission, reflection and deposition of energy in terms of the barrier height and slope, the relative depths of the ambient fluid and the amplitude of the incident wave. Implications for internal wave scattering around Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea are discussed. Research performed while visiting the University of Alberta under the UARE program.

  20. Modal Waves Solved in Complex Wave Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.-J.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for the resolution in complex domain of the ultrasonic modal waves from the characteristic equation of elastic structures. The method is applicable to any numerically available function given explicitly or implicitly. The complex root loci of the modal waves are constructed by varying other parameters. Different situations which can cause the roots searching and following failure are analysed and the corresponding solutions are proposed. The computation examples are given for a three layered adhesive joint and a composite plate.

  1. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  2. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  3. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  4. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  5. Power from Ocean Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the utilization of surface ocean waves as a potential source of power. Simple and large-scale wave power devices and conversion systems are described. Alternative utilizations, environmental impacts, and future prospects of this alternative energy source are detailed. (BT)

  6. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  7. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  8. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  9. Wave - current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugan, I.; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2012-04-01

    The problem of wave interaction with current is still a big challenge in physical oceanography. In spite of numerous numbers of papers devoting to the analysis of the phenomenon some very strong effects are still waiting for its clear description. One of the problems here is the Benjamin-Feir instability in the presence of variable current. Modulation instability is one of the most ubiquitous types of instabilities in nature. In modern nonlinear physics, it is considered as a basic process that classifies the qualitative behavior of modulated waves (``envelope waves'') and may initialize the formation of stable entities such as envelope solitons. We theoretically describe the explosion instability of waves on the adverse blocking current and corresponding frequency downshifting. Waves can be blocked only partly and overpass the opposite current barrier at the lower side band resonance frequency. Theoretical results are compared with available experiments.

  10. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  11. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  12. Spin-Wave Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jin; Yu, Weichao; Wu, Ruqian; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    A diode, a device allowing unidirectional signal transmission, is a fundamental element of logic structures, and it lies at the heart of modern information systems. The spin wave or magnon, representing a collective quasiparticle excitation of the magnetic order in magnetic materials, is a promising candidate for an information carrier for the next-generation energy-saving technologies. Here, we propose a scalable and reprogrammable pure spin-wave logic hardware architecture using domain walls and surface anisotropy stripes as waveguides on a single magnetic wafer. We demonstrate theoretically the design principle of the simplest logic component, a spin-wave diode, utilizing the chiral bound states in a magnetic domain wall with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, and confirm its performance through micromagnetic simulations. Our findings open a new vista for realizing different types of pure spin-wave logic components and finally achieving an energy-efficient and hardware-reprogrammable spin-wave computer.

  13. Project GlobWave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busswell, Geoff; Ash, Ellis; Piolle, Jean-Francois; Poulter, David J. S.; Snaith, Helen; Collard, Fabrice; Sheera, Harjit; Pinnock, Simon

    2010-12-01

    The ESA GlobWave project is a three year initiative, funded by ESA and CNES, to service the needs of satellite wave product users across the globe. Led by Logica UK, with support from CLS, IFREMER, SatOC and NOCS, the project will provide free access to satellite wave data and products in a common format, both historical and in near real time, from various European and American SAR and altimeter missions. Building on the successes of similar projects for Sea Surface Temperature and ocean colour, the project aims to stimulate increased use and analysis of satellite wave products. In addition to common-format satellite data the project will provide comparisons with in situ measurements, interactive data analysis tools and a pilot spatial wave forecast verification scheme for operational forecast production centres. The project will begin operations in January 2010, with direction from regular structured user consultation.

  14. Sculpting Waves (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    In electronics controlling and manipulating flow of charged carriers has led to design of numerous functional devices. In photonics, by analogy, this is done through controlling photons and optical waves. However, the challenges and opportunities are different in these two fields. Materials control waves, and as such they can tailor, manipulate, redirect, and scatter electromagnetic waves and photons at will. Recent development in condensed matter physics, nanoscience, and nanotechnology has made it possible to tailor materials with unusual parameters and extreme characteristics and with atomic precision and thickness. One can now construct structures much smaller than the wavelengths of visible light, thus ushering in unprecedented possibilities and novel opportunities for molding fields and waves at the nanoscale with desired functionalities. At such subwavelength scales, sculpting optical fields and waves provides a fertile ground for innovation and discovery. I will discuss some of the exciting opportunities in this area, and forecast some future directions and possibilities.

  15. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  16. Phase randomization of three-wave interactions in capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Punzmann, H; Shats, M G; Xia, H

    2009-08-01

    We present new experimental results on the transition from coherent-phase to random-phase three-wave interactions in capillary waves under parametric excitation. Above the excitation threshold, coherent wave harmonics spectrally broaden. An increase in the pumping amplitude increases spectral widths of wave harmonics and eventually causes a strong decrease in the degree of the three-wave phase coupling. The results point to the modulation instability of capillary waves, which leads to breaking of continuous waves into ensembles of short-lived wavelets or envelope solitons, as the reason for the phase randomization of three-wave interactions. PMID:19792572

  17. Standing Waves on a Shoestring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Describes the construction of a wave generator used to review the algebraic relationships of wave motion. Students calculate and measure the weight needed to create tension to generate standing waves at the first eight harmonics. (MDH)

  18. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 – 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along

  19. Wave action power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia, L.V.

    1982-03-16

    A wave action power plant powered by the action of water waves has a drive shaft rotated by a plurality of drive units, each having a lever pivotally mounted on and extending from said shaft and carrying a weight, in the form of a float, which floats on the waves and rocks the lever up and down on the shaft. A ratchet mechanism causes said shaft to be rotated in one direction by the weight of said float after it has been raised by wave and the wave has passed, leaving said float free to move downwardly by gravity and apply its full weight to pull down on the lever and rotate the drive shaft. There being a large number of said drive units so that there are always some of the weights pulling down on their respective levers while other weights are being lifted by waves and thereby causing continuous rotation of the drive shaft in one direction. The said levers are so mounted that they may be easily raised to bring the weights into a position wherein they are readily accessible for cleaning the bottoms thereof to remove any accumulation of barnacles, mollusks and the like. There is also provided means for preventing the weights from colliding with each other as they independently move up and down on the waves.

  20. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  1. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  2. Glutamatergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous activity patterns propagate through many parts of the developing nervous system and shape the wiring of emerging circuits. Prior to vision, waves of activity originating in the retina propagate through the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus to primary visual cortex (V1). Retinal waves have been shown to instruct the wiring of ganglion cell axons in LGN and of thalamocortical axons in V1 via correlation-based plasticity rules. Across species, retinal waves mature in three stereotypic stages (I–III), in which distinct circuit mechanisms give rise to unique activity patterns that serve specific functions in visual system refinement. Here, I review insights into the patterns, mechanisms, and functions of stage III retinal waves, which rely on glutamatergic signaling. As glutamatergic waves spread across the retina, neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON vs. OFF) are activated sequentially. Recent studies identified lateral excitatory networks in the inner retina that generate and propagate glutamatergic waves, and vertical inhibitory networks that desynchronize the activity of ON and OFF cells in the wavefront. Stage III wave activity patterns may help segregate axons of ON and OFF ganglion cells in the LGN, and could contribute to the emergence of orientation selectivity in V1. PMID:27242446

  3. Global Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    After the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named ``EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal loop. Such a two-wave paradigm was proposed more than 13 years ago, and now is being recognized by more and more colleagues. In this paper, we review how various controversies can be resolved in the two-wave framework and how important it is to have two different names for the two types of coronal waves.

  4. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  5. Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2008-11-01

    Although low-frequency radio waves of extra-terrestrial origin were known over a century ago, it wasn't until the beginning of the space era fifty years ago that the origin of these waves could be adequately investigated. Since then spacecraft-borne instruments have shown that space plasmas exhibit an almost bewildering variety of wave phenomena, sometimes referred to as the plasma wave zoo. In this talk I will focus on two types of waves that occur in the magnetospheres of the strongly magnetized planets. They are whistler mode emissions and cyclotron maser radiation. Whistler mode emissions are generated in the now famous plasma wave mode known as the whistler mode, and cyclotron maser radiation is emitted mainly in the right-hand polarized free space mode. Both involve a cyclotron resonant interaction and require a perpendicular anisotropy to achieve wave growth. However, the origin of the anisotropy is different in the two cases. Whistler mode emissions occur in planetary radiation belts and are driven by the loss-cone anisotropy imposed by the planet. The resulting waves play a major role in the scattering and loss of radiation belt electrons. In contrast, the cyclotron maser radiation is generated in the auroral regions where parallel electric fields accelerate down-going electrons to high energies. The wave growth is driven by the shell distribution that arises from a combination of the parallel electric field and the magnetic mirror force. The resulting radiation is extremely intense and can be detected at great distances as an escaping radio emission. Both the whistler mode emissions and the cyclotron maser radiation display an amazing amount of fine structure. This structure is thought to be due to nonlinear trapping of the resonant electrons. The exact nonlinear mechanisms involved are still a topic of current study.

  6. Atmospheric waves and the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, T.

    1972-01-01

    A review of evidence supporting the existence of atmospheric waves is presented, and a simple, theoretical approach for describing them is shown. Suggestions for gravity wave sources include equatorial and auroral electrojet, auroral and polar substorm heating, atmospheric jet streams, and large oceanic tides. There are reviewed previous studies dealing with the interaction between ionization and atmospheric waves believed to exist at ionospheric heights. These waves include acoustic waves, evanescent waves, and internal atmospheric gravity waves. It is explained that mode analysis, often employed when an increased number of layers is used for a more complete profile, is inapplicable for waves very close to a source.

  7. Progress in gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing-Quan; Yang, De-Hua

    2005-09-01

    General theory of Einstein's relativity predicts the existence of gravitational wave when mass is accelerated. However, no material has direct effect when the gravitational wave passes. Therefore, gravitational wave can only be detected indirectly. The effort in gravitational wave detection was started in the 60s of last century by using a huge cylinder of aluminum. This paper introduced all the relevant projects in the gravitational wave detection. These projects include Weber's bar, Laser interferometer Gravitational wave Detector (LGD), Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO), GEO600, VIRGO, TAMA300, Advanced LIGO, Large scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (LCGO), and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA).

  8. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  9. The pendulum wave machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetie, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    There are many examples on the internet of videos of ‘pendulum wave machines’ and how to make them (for example, www.instructables.com/id/Wave-Pendulum/). The machine is simply a set of pendula of different lengths which, when viewed end on, produce wave-like patterns from the positions of the bobs. These patterns change with time, with new patterns emerging as the bobs change phase. In this article, the physics of the machine is explored and explained, along with tips on how to build such a device.

  10. Acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas Samuel

    Theoretical models of EM and acoustic wave propagation are presented in an introductory text intended for intermediate-level science and engineering students. Chapters are devoted to the mathematical representation of acoustic and EM fields, the special theory of relativity, radiation, resonators, waveguide theory, refraction, surface waves, scattering by smooth objects, diffraction by edges, and transient waves. The mathematical tools required for the analysis (Bessel, Legendre, Mathieu, parabolic-cylinder, and spheroidal functions; tensor calculus; and the asymptotic evaluation of integrals) are covered in appendices.

  11. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  12. Resonance wave pumping with surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Gharib, Morteza; Violeau, Damien; Caltech-ENPC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The valveless impedance pump enables the production or amplification of a flow without the use of integrated mobile parts, thus delaying possible failures. It is usually composed of fluid-filled flexible tubing, closed by solid tubes. The flexible tube is pinched at an off-centered position relative to the tube ends. This generates a complex wave dynamic that results in a pumping phenomenon. It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies of the system results in a strong pulsating flow. A case of a free surface wave pump is investigated. The resonance wave pump is composed of a rectangular tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free surface and a recirculation rectangular section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle placed at an off-center position above the submerged plate is controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Similar to the case of valveless impedance pump, we observed that near resonance frequencies strong pulsating flow is generated with almost no oscillations. A linear theory is developed to pseudo-analytically evaluate these frequencies. In addition, larger scale applications were simulated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic codes.

  13. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves. PMID:24580164

  14. Inventing the Wave Catchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Arthur

    1983-01-01

    Physicists and engineers advance the state of several arts in the design of gravitational-wave detection equipment. Provides background information and discusses the equipment (including laser interferometer), its use, and results of several experimental studies. (JN)

  15. Heat Wave Safety Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a ... care for heat- related emergencies … ❏ Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes. ❏ ...

  16. Gravitational-wave joy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    seyithocuk; jjeherrera; eltodesukane; GrahamRounce; rloldershaw; Beaker, Dr; Sandhu, G. S.; Ophiuchi

    2016-03-01

    In reply to the news article on the LIGO collaboration's groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves, first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, from two black holes colliding (pp5, 6-7 and http://ow.ly/Ylsyt).

  17. Observation of Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    On September 14 2015, the two LIGO gravitational wave detectors in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana registered a nearly simultaneous signal with time-frequency properties consistent with gravitational-wave emission by the merger of two massive compact objects. Further analysis of the signals by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration revealed that the gravitational waves detected by LIGO came from the merger of a binary black hole (BBH) system approximately 420 Mpc distant (z=0.09) with constituent masses of 36 and 29 M_sun. I will describe the details of the observation, the status of ground-based interferometric detectors, and prospects for future observations in the new era of gravitational wave astronomy.

  18. WindWaveFloat

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Alla

    2011-11-01

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review includes in which principal investigator Alla Weinstein discusses project progress in development of a floating offshore wind structure - the WindFloat - and incorporation therin of a Spherical Wave Energy Device.

  19. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  20. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  1. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  2. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  3. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  4. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  5. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results. PMID:27415365

  6. Turbulence beneath waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, J.; Farmer, D.

    2003-04-01

    Breaking surface waves are believed to provide a major pathway for the energy input from the atmosphere to the ocean and are a source of enhanced turbulent kinetic energy levels in the near-surface layer. Increased turbulence levels relate to enhanced air-sea exchange processes. The ocean surface is a complex system with a wide range of relevant scales. We use direct measurement of the small-scale velocity field as a first step to evaluate near-surface turbulence. At wind speed up to 14 m/s, velocity profiles were obtained with pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profilers. Based on wavenumber spectra calculated with the empirical mode decomposition, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy at ~1m beneath the free surface and 1 Hz sampling rate is estimated. In addition, bubble size distributions were obtained from acoustic resonator measurements and whitecap occurrence was monitored with video cameras. High turbulence levels with dissipation rates more than four orders larger than the background dissipation are linked to wave breaking. The decay and depth-dependence of the wave-induced turbulence are examined and implications for turbulence models are discussed. In individual breaking waves, the onset of enhanced dissipation occurs up to a quarter wave period prior to the air entrainment. Magnitude and occurrence of the pre-breaking turbulence are consistent with wave-turbulence interaction in a rotational wave field. The detailed structure of the turbulence and bubble field associated with breaking waves will be presented. Implications for air-sea exchange processes will be discussed.

  7. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  8. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  9. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Donald

    1991-04-01

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang.

  10. Magnetosphere-ionosphere waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Wright, A. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent electrodynamic coupling of the ionosphere and magnetosphere produces waves with clearly defined properties, described here for the first time. Large scale (ideal) disturbances to the equilibrium, for which electron inertia is unimportant, move in the direction of the electric field at a characteristic speed. This may be as fast as several hundred meters per second or approximately half the E × B drift speed. In contrast, narrow scale (strongly inertial) waves are nearly stationary and oscillate at a specific frequency. Estimates of this frequency suggest periods from several tenths of a second to several minutes may be typical. Both the advection speed and frequency of oscillation are derived for a simple model and depend on a combination of ionospheric and magnetospheric parameters. Advection of large scale waves is nonlinear: troughs in E-region number density move faster than crests and this causes waves to break on their trailing edge. Wavebreaking is a very efficient mechanism for producing narrow (inertial) scale waves in the coupled system, readily accessing scales of a few hundred meters in just a few minutes. All magnetosphere-ionosphere waves are damped by recombination in the E-region, suggesting that they are to be best observed at night and in regions of low ionospheric plasma density. Links with observations, previous numerical studies and ionospheric feedback instability are discussed, and we propose key features of experiments that would test the new theory.

  11. Ocean wave electric generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.R.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an apparatus for generating electricity from ocean waves. It consists of: 1.) a hollow buoyant duck positioned in the path of waves including a core about the center axis of which the duck rotates, a lower chamber portion having liquid therein and an upper chamber portion having air therein. The air is alternately compressed and expanded by the liquid in the chamber during the rotational motion of the duck caused by waves. A turbine mounted in the upper portion of the duck is driven by the compressed and expanded air. A generator is coupled to the turbine and operated to produce electrical energy and an air bulb; 2.) a spine having a transverse axial shaft anchoring the spine to the ocean floor. The upper portion of the spine engages the duck to maintain the duck in position. The spine has a curved configuration to concentrate and direct wave energy. The spine configuration acts as a scoop to increase the height of wave peaks and as a foil to increase the depth of wave troughs.

  12. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  13. Surfing a magnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Quere, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Surfing is a free surface sport in which the athlete rides a wave standing on a board. However, any object plunged into the water or put on its surface is not always captured by an approaching wave, just like the classic example of a fisching float. So, a particle can be captured or not by a wave. Two regimes are defined: surf (captured) and drift (not captured). We focus on the question of the transition between these two regimes. Here we address the question with a magnetic wave. We have developed an experimental setup which allows the control of all relevant physical parameters. Liquid oxygen, which is paramagnetic and undergoes Leidenfrost effect, can be used to ensure magnetic and frictionless particles. A permanent magnet in translatory movement allows us to create a definite magnetic wave. We discuss the motion of oxygen drops deposited on an smooth and horizontal surface above an approaching magnet. First we show the existence of a critical speed below which drops are captured and determine how it depends on the velocity and intensity of the magnetic wave. Then we experimentally investigate the parameters that would affect the movement of drops in each regime. Finally, models have been developed to interpret magnetic drops motion and guarantee an efficient control.

  14. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  15. The gravitational wave decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John

    2016-03-01

    With the expected direct detection of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO and pulsar timing arrays in the near future, and with the recent launch of LISA Pathfinder this can arguably be called the decade of gravitational waves. Low frequency gravitational waves in the mHz range, which can only be observed from space, provide the richest science and complement high frequency observatories on the ground. A space-based observatory will improve our understanding of the formation and growth of massive black holes, create a census of compact binary systems in the Milky Way, test general relativity in extreme conditions, and enable searches for new physics. LISA, by far the most mature concept for detecting gravitational waves from space, has consistently ranked among the nation's top priority large science missions. In 2013, ESA selected the science theme ``The Gravitational Universe'' for its third large mission, L3, under the Cosmic Visions Program, with a planned launch date of 2034. NASA has decided to join with ESA on the L3 mission as a junior partner and has recently assembled a study team to provide advice on how NASA might contribute to the European-led mission. This talk will describe these efforts and the activities of the Gravitational Wave Science Interest Group and the L3 Study Team, which will lead to the first space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  16. A simple wave driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kağan Temiz, Burak; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the wheel starts to turn at a constant angular speed. A rod that is fixed on the wheel turns at the same constant angular speed, too. A tight string that the wave will be created on is placed at a distance where the rod can touch the string. During each rotation of the wheel, the rod vibrates the string up and down. The vibration frequency of this rod equals the wheel’s rotation frequency, and this frequency value can be measured easily with a small magnet and a bicycle speedometer. In this way, the frequency of the waves formed in the rope can also be measured.

  17. Waving in the rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bertotti, Luciana; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-05-01

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Historical and sailors' reports suggest that this leads to calmer wave conditions, certainly so for the action of breakers. We have explored this situation using a fully coupled meteorological-wave model system, adding an artificial rain rate-dependent damping of the tail. Contrarily to direct marine experience, the experimental results show higher wind speeds and wave heights. A solid indication of the truth is achieved with the direct comparison between operational model (where rain effect is ignored) and measured data. These strongly support the sailors' claims of less severe wave conditions under heavy rain. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping, and how this is presently modeled in operational activity. We suggest that some revision is due and that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  18. Rain waves-wind waves interaction application to scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharif, C.; Giovanangeli, J. P.; Bliven, L.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of a rain wave pattern by longer waves has been studied. An analytical model taking into account capillarity effects and obliquity of short waves has been developed. Modulation rates in wave number and amplitude have been computed. Experiments were carried out in a wave tank. First results agree with theoretical models, but higher values of modulation rates are measured. These results could be taken into account for understanding the radar response from the sea surface during rain.

  19. Eye Movements and Abducens Motoneuron Behavior after Cholinergic Activation of the Nucleus Reticularis Pontis Caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Escudero, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this work was to characterize eye movements and abducens (ABD) motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis (NRPC). Methods: Six female adult cats were prepared for chronic recording of eye movements (using the scleral search-coil technique), electroencephalography, electromyography, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves in the lateral geniculate nucleus, and ABD motoneuron activities after microinjections of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the NRPC. Results: Unilateral microinjections of carbachol in the NRPC induced tonic and phasic phenomena in the oculomotor system. Tonic effects consisted of ipsiversive rotation to the injected side, convergence, and downward rotation of the eyes. Phasic effects consisted of bursts of rhythmic rapid eye movements directed contralaterally to the injected side along with PGO-like waves in the lateral geniculate and ABD nuclei. Although tonic effects were dependent on the level of drowsiness, phasic effects were always present and appeared along with normal saccades when the animal was vigilant. ABD motoneurons showed phasic activities associated with ABD PGO-like waves during bursts of rapid eye movements, and tonic and phasic activities related to eye position and velocity during alertness. Conclusion The cholinergic activation of the NRPC induces oculomotor phenomena that are somewhat similar to those described during REM sleep. A precise comparison of the dynamics and timing of the eye movements further suggests that a temporal organization of both NRPCs is needed to reproduce the complexity of the oculomotor behavior during REM sleep. Citation: Márquez-Ruiz J; Escudero M. Eye movements and abducens motoneuron behavior after cholinergic activation of the nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis. SLEEP 2010;33(11):1517-1527. PMID:21102994

  20. Various Boussinesq solitary wave solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations have been used to model nonlinear wave evolution over variable topography and wave interactions with structures. Like the KdV equation, the gB equations support a solitary wave solution which propagates without changing shape, and this solitary wave is often used as a primary test case for numerical studies of nonlinear waves using either the gB or other model equations. Nine different approximate solutions of the generalized Boussinesq equations are presented with simple closed form expressions for the wave elevation and wave speed. Each approximates the free propagation of a single solitary wave, and eight of these solutions are newly obtained. The author compares these solutions with the well known KdV solution, Rayleigh`s solution, Laitone`s higher order solution, and ``exact`` numerical integration of the gB equations. Existing experimental data on solitary wave shape and wave speed are compared with these models.

  1. Waves Within Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu Tapia, A. L.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-05-01

    Complex events are formed by two or more large-scale structures which interact in the solar wind. Typical cases are interactions of: (i) a magnetic cloud/interplanetary coronal mass ejection (MC/ICME) with another MC/ICME transient; (ii) a MC/ICME embedded within a stream interaction region (SIR); and (iii) a MC/ICME followed by a fast stream. Using data from the STEREO mission during the years 2007-2011 we found 17 ICMEs forming complex events with an associated shock wave. All the ICMEs included in this study showed a smooth rotation of the magnetic field and low proton beta plasma, and were classified as MCs. We use magnetic field and plasma data to study the waves observed within these MCs. To determine wave characteristics we perform Power Spectra and Minimum Variance Analysis. We also analyze 10 MCs driving shocks which were not associated with complex events. We compare wave characteristics within the Magnetic Clouds forming Complex Events (MCCE), with those waves observed within the Magnetic Clouds that were isolated (IMC), i. e., not associated with complex events. Transverse and almost parallel propagating ion cyclotron waves were observed within both, MCCE and IMC. Compressive mirror mode waves were observed only within MCCE. Both modes can grow due to temperature anisotropy. Most of the mirror mode events found within MCCE are observed in regions with enhanced plasma beta. This is in agreement with kinetic theory, which predicts that mirror mode growth is favored by high plasma beta values. It is possible that the observed enhancements in plasma beta are due to compressions inside MCCE.

  2. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2012-03-01

    If two black holes collide in a vacuum, can they be observed? Until recently, the answer would have to be "no." After all, how would we observe them? Black holes are "naked" mass: pure mass, simple mass, mass devoid of any matter whose interactions might lead to the emission of photons or neutrinos, or any electromagnetic fields that might accelerate cosmic rays or leave some other signature that we could observe in our most sensitive astronomical instruments. Still, black holes do have mass. As such, they interact—like all mass—gravitationally. And the influence of gravity, like all influences, propagates no faster than that universal speed we first came to know as the speed of light. The effort to detect that propagating influence, which we term as gravitational radiation or gravitational waves, was initiated just over 50 years ago with the pioneering work of Joe Weber [1] and has been the object of increasingly intense experimental effort ever since. Have we, as yet, detected gravitational waves? The answer is still "no." Nevertheless, the accumulation of the experimental efforts begun fifty years ago has brought us to the point where we can confidently say that gravitational waves will soon be detected and, with that first detection, the era of gravitational wave astronomy—the observational use of gravitational waves, emitted by heavenly bodies—will begin. Data analysis for gravitational wave astronomy is, today, in its infancy and its practitioners have much to learn from allied fields, including machine learning. Machine learning tools and techniques have not yet been applied in any extensive or substantial way to the study or analysis of gravitational wave data. It is fair to say that this owes principally to the fields relative youth and not to any intrinsic unsuitability of machine learning tools to the analysis problems the field faces. Indeed, the nature of many of the analysis problems faced by the field today cry-out for the application of

  3. THz wave emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao

    Sensing and imaging using Terahertz (THz) radiation has attracted more and more interest in the last two decades thanks to the abundant material 'finger prints' in the THz frequency range. The low photon energy also makes THz radiation an attractive tool for nondestructive evaluation of materials and devices, biomedical applications, security checks and explosive screening. Due to the long wavelength, the far-field THz wave optical systems have relatively low spatial resolution. This physical limitation confines THz wave sensing and imaging to mostly macro-size samples. To investigate local material properties or micro-size structures and devices, near-field technology has to be employed. In this dissertation, the Electro-Optical THz wave emission microscope is investigated. The basic principle is to focus the femtosecond laser to a tight spot on a thin THz emitter layer to produce a THz wave source with a similar size as the focus spot. The apparatus provides a method for placing a THz source with sub-wavelength dimension in the near-field range of the investigated sample. Spatial resolution to the order of one tenth of the THz wavelength is demonstrated by this method. The properties of some widely used THz wave emission materials under tight focused pump light are studied. As an important branch of THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), THz wave emission spectroscopy has been widely used as a tool to investigate the material physics, such as energy band structure, carrier dynamics, material nonlinear properties and dynamics. As the main work of this dissertation, we propose to combine the THz wave emission spectroscopy with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to build a tip-assisted THz wave emission microscope (TATEM), which is a valuable extension to current SPM science and technology. Illuminated by a femtosecond laser, the biased SPM tip forms a THz wave source inside the sample beneath the tip. The source size is proportional to the apex size of the tip so

  4. Wave interaction in relativistic harmonic gyro-traveling-wave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ngogang, R.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2006-05-15

    In gyro-traveling-wave devices, several waves can be excited at different cyclotron harmonics simultaneously. This paper analyzes the interaction between three waves synchronous with gyrating electrons at different cyclotron harmonics in two relativistic gyro-amplifier configurations; viz., gyro-traveling-wave tubes and gyrotwystrons. Two types of nonlinear interactions are considered: (a) excitation of two waves at cyclotron harmonics by a wave excited at the fundamental resonance, and (b) excitation of a wave at the fundamental resonance and another wave at the third harmonic by a wave excited at the second cyclotron harmonic. The effect of the overlapping of electron cyclotron resonances on the performance of relativistic gyrodevices is investigated as well.

  5. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  6. Waves in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGourty, L.; Rideout, K.

    2005-12-01

    "Waves in Motion" This teaching unit was created by Leslie McGourty and Ken Rideout under the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at MIT Haystack Observatory during the summer of 2005. The RET program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of this teaching unit are to deepen students' understanding about waves, wave motion, and the electromagnetic spectrum as a whole. Specifically students will comprehend the role radio waves play in our daily lives and in the investigation of the universe. The lessons can be used in a high school physics, earth science or astronomy curriculum. The unit consists of a series of interlocking lectures, activities, and investigations that can be used as stand alone units to supplement a teacher's existing curriculum, as an independent investigation for a student, or as a long exploration into radio astronomy with a theme of waves in space: how and where they carry their information. Special emphasis is given to the Relativity theories in honor of the "World Year of Physics" to celebrate Einstein's 1905 contributions. The lessons are currently being implemented at the high school level, the preliminary results of which will be presented. At the end of the academic year, the units will be evaluated and updated, reflecting student input and peer review after which they will be posted on the internet for teachers to use in their classrooms.

  7. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  8. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  9. Bent Marshak Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A; Hammer, J H

    2005-10-11

    Radiation driven heat waves (Marshak Waves) are ubiquitous in astrophysics and terrestrial laser driven high energy density plasma physics (HEDP) experiments. Generally, the equations describing Marshak waves are so nonlinear, that solutions involving more than one spatial dimension require simulation. However, in this paper we show how one may analytically solve the problem of the two-dimensional nonlinear evolution of a Marshak wave, bounded by lossy walls, using an asymptotic expansion in a parameter related to the wall albedo and a simplification of the heat front equation of motion. Three parameters determine the nonlinear evolution, a modified Markshak diffusion constant, a smallness parameter related to the wall albedo, and the spacing of the walls. The final nonlinear solution shows that the Marshak wave will be both slowed and bent by the non-ideal boundary. In the limit of a perfect boundary, the solution recovers the original diffusion-like solution of Marshak. The analytic solution will be compared to a limited set of simulation results and experimental data.

  10. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  11. Potential changes of wave steepness and occurrence of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta M.; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Wave steepness is an important characteristic of a sea state. It is also well established that wave steepness is one of the parameter responsible for generation of abnormal waves called also freak or rogue waves. The study investigates changes of wave steepness in the past and future wave climate in the North Atlantic. The fifth assessment report IPCC (2013) uses four scenarios for future greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere called Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). Two of these scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 have been selected to project future wave conditions in the North Atlantic. RCP 4.5 is believed to achieve the political target of a maximum global mean temperature increase of 2° C while RPC 8.5 is close to 'business as usual' and expected to give a temperature increase of 4° C or more. The analysis includes total sea, wind sea and swell. Potential changes of wave steepness for these wave systems are shown and compared with wave steepness derived from historical data. Three historical data sets with different wave model resolutions are used. The investigations show also changes in the mean wind direction as well as in the relative direction between wind sea and swell. Consequences of wave steepness changes for statistics of surface elevation and generation of rogue waves are demonstrated. Uncertainties associated with wave steepness projections are discussed.

  12. Neural field theory of nonlinear wave-wave and wave-neuron processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Roy, N.

    2015-06-01

    Systematic expansion of neural field theory equations in terms of nonlinear response functions is carried out to enable a wide variety of nonlinear wave-wave and wave-neuron processes to be treated systematically in systems involving multiple neural populations. The results are illustrated by analyzing second-harmonic generation, and they can also be applied to wave-wave coalescence, multiharmonic generation, facilitation, depression, refractoriness, and other nonlinear processes.

  13. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  14. Traveling wave tube circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A traveling wave tube (TWT) has a slow wave structure (SWS) which is severed into two or more sections. A signal path, connects the end of an SWS section to the beginning of the following SWS section. The signal path comprises an impedance matching coupler (IMC), followed by an isolator, a variable phase shifter, and a second IMC. The aggregate band pass characteristic of the components in the signal path is chosen to reject, or strongly attenuate, all frequencies outside the desired operating frequency range of the TWT and yet pass, with minimal attenuation in the forward direction, all frequencies within the desired operating frequency range. The isolator is chosen to reject, or strongly attenuate, waves, of all frequencies, which propagate in the backward direction. The aggregate phase shift characteristic of the components in the signal path is chosen to apply signal power to the beginning of the following SWS section with the phase angle yielding maximum efficiency.

  15. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  17. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  18. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  19. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  20. The gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, B.; Ambrosini, R.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Comoretto, G.; Giampieri, G.; Less, L.; Messeri, A.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Since the optimum size of a gravitational wave detector is the wave length, interplanetary dimensions are needed for the mHz band of interest. Doppler tracking of Ulysses will provide the most sensitive attempt to date at the detection of gravitational waves in the low frequency band. The driving noise source is the fluctuations in the refractive index of interplanetary plasma. This dictates the timing of the experiment to be near solar opposition and sets the target accuracy for the fractional frequency change at 3.0 x 10 exp -14 for integration times of the order of 1000 sec. The instrumentation utilized by the experiment is distributed between the radio systems on the spacecraft and the seven participating ground stations of the Deep Space Network and Medicina. Preliminary analysis is available of the measurements taken during the Ulysses first opposition test.

  1. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  2. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  3. Upstream waves at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Weak, about 0.15 nT, narrow band emissions at the proton gyro frequency are observed by the Phobos magnetometer MAGMA, upstream from the bow shock of Mars. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized. They may be associated with the pick up of protons from the Martian hydrogen exosphere. Strong turbulence, similar to that observed at the terrestrial bow shock, is found on occasion in the upstream region when the IMF connects to the bow shock. On two occasions this turbulence occurred when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos. This coincidence raises the possibility that material in the orbits of Phobos interacts with the solar wind in such a way to either affect the direction of the IMF or to cause instabilities in the solar wind plasma. However, since on a third occasion these waves did not occur, these waves may be shock associated rather than Phobos associated.

  4. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  5. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  6. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  7. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Wave Turbulence on Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Lukaschuk, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We overview the wave turbulence approach by example of one physical system: gravity waves on the surface of an infinitely deep fluid. In the theoretical part of our review, we derive the nonlinear Hamiltonian equations governing the water-wave system and describe the premises of the weak wave turbulence theory. We outline derivation of the wave-kinetic equation and the equation for the probability density function, and most important solutions to these equations, including the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra corresponding to a direct and an inverse turbulent cascades, as well as solutions for non-Gaussian wave fields corresponding to intermittency. We also discuss strong wave turbulence as well as coherent structures and their interaction with random waves. We describe numerical and laboratory experiments, and field observations of gravity wave turbulence, and compare their results with theoretical predictions.

  9. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  10. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  11. Offshore wave energy experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, K.; Scholten, N.C.; Soerensen, K.A. |

    1995-12-31

    This article describes the second phase of the off-shore wave energy experiment, taking place in the Danish part of the North Sea near Hanstholm. The wave power converter is a scale model consisting of a float 2.5 meter in diameter connected by rope to a seabed mounted piston pump installed on 25 meter deep water 2,5 km offshore. The structure, installation procedure results and experience gained during the test period will be presented and compared to calculations based on a computer model.

  12. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  13. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  14. Wave Motion Electric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, E. F.; Winkler, R. J.

    1983-12-27

    Set out herein is an electrical generator conformed for installation in a buoy, the generator comprising an inverted pendulum having two windings formed at the free end thereof and aligned to articulate between two end stops each provided with a magnetic circuit. As the loops thus pass through the magnetic circuit, electrical current is induced which may be rectified through a full way rectifier to charge up a storage battery. The buoy itself may be ballasted to have its fundamental resonance at more than double the wave frequency with the result that during each passing of a wave at least two induction cycles occur.

  15. Standing waves braneworlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Mantidze, Irakli; Sakhelashvili, Otari; Shengelia, Tsotne

    2016-05-01

    The class of nonstationary braneworld models generated by the coupled gravitational and scalar fields is reviewed. The model represents a brane in a spacetime with single time and one large (infinite) and several small (compact) spacelike extra dimensions. In some particular cases the model has the solutions corresponding to the bulk gravi-scalar standing waves bounded by the brane. Pure gravitational localization mechanism of matter particles on the node of standing waves, where the brane is placed, is discussed. Cosmological applications of the model is also considered.

  16. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  17. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  18. Electron Signatures and Alfven Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, Laila; Ivchenko, N.; Clemmons, J.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Gustavsson, B.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Eliasson, L.; Yurik, R. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The electron signatures which appear together with Alfven waves observed by the Freja satellite in the auroral region are reported. Precipitating electrons are detected both with and just before the wave. The observed Alfven waves must therefore be capable of accelerating electrons to higher energies than the local phase velocity of these waves in order for the electrons to move in advance of the wave. The characteristics of such electrons suggest electrons moving infront of the wave have characteristics of origin from warmer and lower density plasma while the electrons moving with the wave have characteristics of cooler and denser plasma. The pitch angle distribution of the electrons moving with the wave indicates that there is continuous acceleration of new particles by the wave, i.e. a propagating Alfven wave is the source of these electrons . A simple model of a propagating source is made to model the electrons that are moving in advance of the wave. Depending on whether accelerated electrons leave the wave above or below the altitude where the Alfven wave has the highest phase velocity, the detected electron signatures will be different; electron dispersion or potential drop like, respectively. It is shown that the Alfven wave acceleration can create electron signatures similar to inverted-V structures.

  19. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  20. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  1. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  2. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  3. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Torrezan, Antonio C; Woskov, Paul P

    2006-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  4. Continuous-wave submillimeter-wave gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2006-10-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine.

  5. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Lakhina, Gurbax; Remya, Banhu; Lee, Lou

    2016-04-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency and quasicoherency for: electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and plasmaspheric hiss waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively. This will be important for modeling purposes. Perhaps even more important is how coherent waves affect wave-particle interactions. Specific wave examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rate for energetic electrons is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves).

  6. mm-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, H. P.

    1985-07-01

    The present low profile seeker front end's slotted waveguide antenna was primarily developed to investigate the feasibility of the application of standard manufacturing techniques to mm-wave hardware. A dual plane monopulse comparator was constructed to mate with the antenna via integrated packaging techniques. The comparator was fabricated by CAD/CAM milling operations.

  7. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  8. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  9. Waves on Ice

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Waves on White: Ice or Clouds?     View ... captured this image showing a wavy pattern in a field of white. At most other latitudes, such wavy patterns would likely indicate ... are yellow; dark blue shows confidently clear areas, while light blue indicates clear with lower confidence. The ASCM works particularly ...

  10. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  11. Oblique dust density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  12. Twisting Neutron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    Most waves encountered in nature can be given a ``twist'', so that their phase winds around an axis parallel to the direction of wave propagation. Such waves are said to possess orbital angular momentum (OAM). For quantum particles such as photons, atoms, and electrons, this corresponds to the particle wavefunction having angular momentum of Lℏ along its propagation axis. Controlled generation and detection of OAM states of photons began in the 1990s, sparking considerable interest in applications of OAM in light and matter waves. OAM states of photons have found diverse applications such as broadband data multiplexing, massive quantum entanglement, optical trapping, microscopy, quantum state determination and teleportation, and interferometry. OAM states of electron beams have been used to rotate nanoparticles, determine the chirality of crystals and for magnetic microscopy. Here I discuss the first demonstration of OAM control of neutrons. Using neutron interferometry with a spatially incoherent input beam, we show the addition and conservation of quantum angular momenta, entanglement between quantum path and OAM degrees of freedom. Neutron-based quantum information science heretofore limited to spin, path, and energy degrees of freedom, now has access to another quantized variable, and OAM modalities of light, x-ray, and electron beams are extended to a massive, penetrating neutral particle. The methods of neutron phase imprinting demonstrated here expand the toolbox available for development of phase-sensitive techniques of neutron imaging. Financial support provided by the NSERC Create and Discovery programs, CERC and the NIST Quantum Information Program is acknowledged.

  13. Oscilloscope Traveling Wave Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    The moving pattern that appears on an oscilloscope screen is used to illustrate two kinds of wave motion and the relationship between them. Suggestions are presented for measuring wavelength, frequency, phase shift, and phase velocity in this college-level laboratory exercise. (DH)

  14. Submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Ward, John (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In an embodiment, a submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver includes a finline ortho-mode transducer comprising thin tapered metallic fins deposited on a thin dielectric substrate to separate a vertically polarized electromagnetic mode from a horizontally polarized electromagnetic mode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  16. Waves and Crops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses wave patterns on the surfaces of ripening wheat and barley crops when the wind is moderately strong. Examines the structure of the turbulence over such natural surfaces and conditions under which the crop may be damaged by the wind. (JR)

  17. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  18. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  19. [Heat waves: health impacts].

    PubMed

    Marto, Natália

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health

  20. Gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H. B.; Midgley, J. E.

    1966-01-01

    Internal atmospheric gravity waves in isothermal medium, solving hydrodynamic equations, determining wave propagation in realistic atmosphere for range of wave parameters, wind amplitude, reflected energy, etc

  1. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  2. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  3. Heat Waves Hit Seniors Hardest

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160425.html Heat Waves Hit Seniors Hardest Risk of high-temperature trouble ... much of the Northeast struggles with a heat wave that isn't expected to ease until the ...

  4. Heat Waves Are Health Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159694.html Heat Waves Are Health Threats Drink plenty of water and ... 2016 SATURDAY, July 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heat waves are more than uncomfortable, they can be deadly. ...

  5. Are Rogue Waves Really Unexpected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    An unexpected wave is defined by Gemmrich & Garrett (2008) as a wave that is much taller than a set of neighboring waves. Their definition of "unexpected" refers to a wave that is not anticipated by a casual observer. Clearly, unexpected waves defined in this way are predictable in a statistical sense. They can occur relatively often with a small or moderate crest height, but large unexpected waves that are rogue are rare. Here, this concept is elaborated and statistically described based on a third-order nonlinear model. In particular, the conditional return period of an unexpected wave whose crest exceeds a given threshold is developed. This definition leads to greater return periods or on average less frequent occurrences of unexpected waves than those implied by the conventional return periods not conditioned on a reference threshold. Ultimately, it appears that a rogue wave that is also unexpected would have a lower occurrence frequency than that of a usual rogue wave. As specific applications, the Andrea and WACSIS rogue wave events are examined in detail. Both waves appeared without warning and their crests were nearly $2$-times larger than the surrounding $O(10)$ wave crests, and thus unexpected. The two crest heights are nearly the same as the threshold~$h_{0.3\\cdot10^{6}}\\sim1.6H_{s}$ exceeded on average once every~$0.3\\cdot 10^{6}$ waves, where $H_s$ is the significant wave height. In contrast, the Andrea and WACSIS events, as both rogue and unexpected, would occur slightly less often and on average once every~$3\\cdot10^{6}$ and~$0.6\\cdot10^6$ waves respectively.

  6. ULF waves in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazue )

    1991-01-01

    Research efforts in the area of magnetospheric ULF waves in the 1987-1990 period are reviewed. Attention is given to externally excited hydromagnetic waves including field line resonance, the global cavity mode, bow-shock-associated upstream waves, and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. Consideration is given to internally excited Pc 4-5 pulsations and the role of these pulsations in the diffusion of ring-current ions based on the observed properties of the pulsations. 154 refs.

  7. Are freaque waves really freak?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. C.; Schwab, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    Navigation records are rife with tragic accounts of shipping disasters due to freaque wave encounters. Generations of sailors and mariners have experienced it throughout the ages but for decades ocean-wave scholars have disregarded its existence. Now with emerging recognition and enlivened interest on this natural hazard, we still have to contend with a dearth of freaque wave data in actual field measurements. In essence, along with widening conjecture and numerical simulation of freaque waves, we do not really know what is actually happening out there in the ocean. To remedy the lack of wave data the GLERL deployed two bottomed-mounted, upward-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at depths of 20 m and 12 m to make wave measurements in eastern Lake Michigan in the late autumn of 2002. From the middle of October to the beginning of December, over 40 days of continuous, non-intermittent wave measurements were collected. While we might expect to capture some freaque waves from this extensive data set, preliminary analysis of these data show that waves with a ratio of maximum wave height to significant wave height greater than 2.2 turn up quite frequently. It is distinctively possible that the so called freaque waves are really an intrinsic part of the natural ocean wave process, only the paradigm we use for inferring the wave process in the last 50 years - the random Gaussian process and the frequency wave spectrum - actually prevented its total recognition. So a plausible answer to the question posted by the title of this paper would be: "No, there is nothing really freak about the freaque waves!"

  8. Phenomena Associated with EIT Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with 'EIT Wave' transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to infer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  9. Phenomena Associated With EIT Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with "EIT Wave" transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to mfer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  10. Spiral Waves in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, Emilios

    A review with the most characteristic spiral waves in accretion disks of cataclysmic variables will be presented. Recent work on experiments targeting the detection of spiral waves from time lapse movies of real disks and the study of permanent spiral waves will be discussed. The relevance of spiral waves with other systems such as star-planet X-ray binaries and Algols will be reviewed.

  11. Stationary waves in the wintertime mesosphere: Evidence for gravity wave filtering by stratospheric planetary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Siskind, D. E.

    2013-04-01

    Quasi-stationary planetary-scale waves in the wintertime mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) are thought to be forced in part by drag imparted by gravity waves that have been modulated by underlying stratospheric waves. Although this mechanism has been demonstrated numerically, there have been very few observational studies that examine wave driving as a source of planetary waves in the MLT. This study uses data from EOS Aura and TIMED between 2005 and 2011 to examine the momentum budget of MLT wintertime planetary waves. Monthly averages for January indicate that the dynamics of zonal wave number 1 are determined from a three-way balance among the Coriolis acceleration, the pressure gradient force, and a momentum residual term that reflects wave drag. The MLT circulations in January 2005, 2006, 2009, and 2011 are qualitatively consistent with a simple model of wave forcing by drag from gravity waves that have been modulated by stratospheric planetary waves. MLT winds during these years are also consistent with analyses from a high-altitude operational prediction model that includes parameterized nonorographic gravity wave drag. The importance of wave drag for the MLT momentum budget suggests that the gradient wind approximation is inadequate for deriving planetary-scale winds from global temperature measurements. Our results underscore the need for direct global wind measurements in the MLT.

  12. Energy in a String Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  13. A Note on Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.

    1988-10-01

    Some simple general properties of wave breaking are deduced from the known behaviour of surface gravity waves in deep water, on the assumption that breaking occurs in association with wave groups. In particular we derive equations for the time interval, τ, between the onset of breaking of successive waves: τ = T/|1-(c\\cdot c_g)/c^2|, and for the propagation vector c_b (referred to as the 'wave-breaking vector') of the position at which breaking, once initiated, will proceed: c_b = c(1-frac{c\\cdot c_g}/{c^2})+c_g. Here c is the phase velocity, and c_g the group velocity, of waves of period T. Interfacial waves, internal gravity waves, inertial waves and planetary waves are considered as particular examples. The results apply not only to wave breaking, but to the movement of any property (e.g. fluid acceleration, gradient Richardson number) that is carried through a medium in association with waves. One application is to describe the distribution, in space and time, of regions of turbulent mixing, or transitional phenomena, in the oceans or atmosphere.

  14. ECG Diagnosis: Hyperacute T Waves.

    PubMed

    Levis, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    After QT prolongation, hyperacute T waves are the earliest-described electrocardiographic sign of acute ischemia, preceding ST-segment elevation. The principle entity to exclude is hyperkalemia-this T-wave morphology may be confused with the hyperacute T wave of early transmural myocardial infarction. PMID:26176573

  15. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  16. The Wave Carpet: An Omnidirectional and Broadband Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.-Reza

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by the strong attenuation of ocean surface waves by muddy seafloors, we have designed, theoretically investigated the performance, and experimentally tested the ``Wave Carpet:'' a mud-resembling synthetic seabed-mounted mat composed of vertically-acting linear springs and generators that can be used as an efficient wave energy absorption device. The Wave Carpet is completely under the water surface hence imposes minimal danger to boats and the sea life (i.e. no mammal entanglement). It is survivable against the high momentum of storm surges and in fact can perform even better under very energetic (e.g. stormy) sea conditions when most existing wave energy devices are needed to shelter themselves by going into an idle mode. In this talk I will present an overview of analytical results for the linear problem, direct simulation of highly nonlinear wave fields, and results of the experimental wave tank investigation.

  17. Looking for radio waves with a simple radio wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto (Stray Cats), Norihiro

    2011-11-01

    I created a simple device that can detect radio waves in a classroom. In physics classes I tell students that we live in a sea of radio waves. They come from TV, radio, and cell phone signals as well as other sources. Students don't realize this because those electromagnetic waves are invisible. So, I wondered if I could come up with a way to detect the waves and help students to understand them better. Electromagnetic wave meters, which measure intensity of radio waves quantitatively, are commercially available. However, to students most of these are black boxes, and at the introductory level it is more effective to detect radio waves in a simpler way. This paper describes my device and how I have used it in my classes.

  18. The wave and wave forecasting in the China Seas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuxiang

    1993-12-31

    The China Seas located at the Southeastern part of the large Eurasia continent, and beside the largest ocean, the Pacific. They are greatly influenced by continent and the ocean. Due to it across the tropical zone, the subtropical zone and the extropical zone, the cold and warm air circulation in Northsouth is a very active exchange. In the summer, the South China Sea and the East China Sea are frequently hit by typhoon waves. In spring and autumn, the bohai sea, the Yellow sea and the East China Seas had series disasters caused by the extropical cyclone wave and the cold air wave. In this paper the time-space distribution and formative cases of wave disaster in the China Seas, and the wave monitoring and prediction system, the wave prediction method, and two automatic systems of numerical wave forecasting are briefly introduced.

  19. Evaluation of Fracture Azimuth by EM Wave and Elastic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, C.; Lu, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Liang, W.; Yu, Y.; Ren, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture system plays an important role in the development of underground energy, for example enhanced geothermal system (EGS), oil shale and shale gas, etc. Therefore, it becomes more and more important to detect and evaluate the fracture system. Geophysical prospecting is an useful method to evaluate the characteristics of the subsurface fractures. Currently, micro-seismology, multi-wave seismic exploration, and electromagnetic (EM) survey are reported to be used for the purpose. We are studying a method using both elastic wave and EM wave to detect and evaluate the fracture azimuth in laboratory. First, we build a 3D horizontal transverse isotropy (HTI) model, shown in the figure 1, by dry parallel fractures system, which was constructed by plexiglass plates and papers. Then, we used the ultrasonic system to obtain reflected S-wave data. Depending on the shear wave splitting, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the algorithm of Pearson correlation coefficient. In addition, we used the full Polarimetric ultra wide band electromagnetic (FP-UWB-EM) wave System, shown in the figure 2, to obtain full polarimetric reflected EM-wave data. Depending on the rotation of the EM wave polarimetry, we evaluated the fracture azimuth by the the ration between maximum amplitude of co-polarimetric EM wave and maximum amplitude of cross-polarimetric EM wave. Finally, we used both EM-wave data and S-wave data to evaluate the fracture azimuth by the method of cross plot and statistical mathematics. To sum up, we found that FP-UWB-EM wave can be used to evaluated the fracture azimuth and is more accurate than ultrasound wave. Also joint evaluation using both data could improve the precision.

  20. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  1. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  2. Wave energy desalinization

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfe, H.H.

    1982-06-22

    A device for producing fresh water from salt sea water by utilizing the hydrodynamic energy of waves, comprising a buoyant platform; means for mooring the platform; a pump connected to the mooring means; a reservoir for pressurized sea water; a desalination system for extracting fresh water from the sea water; hydraulic flow control means for causing the pump to pump sea water into the sea water reservoir, as motion of the buoyant platform is produced due to the passing of waves beneath it; measuring means for measuring parameters of the sea adjacent the buoyant platform; and a control device connected to control the pressure in the sea water reservoir and the flow of sea water from the reservoir through the desalination system in response to the parameters of the sea.

  3. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves.

    PubMed

    Cabaret, J; Béquin, P; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-07-31

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters. PMID:26274421

  4. Gravitational wave astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, L. S.

    Astronomers rely on a multiplicity of observational perspectives in order to infer the nature of the Universe. Progress in astronomy has historically been associated with new or improved observational perspectives. Gravitational wave detectors now under construction will provide us with a perspective on the Universe fundamentally different from any we have come to know. With this new perspective comes the hope of new insights and understanding, not just of exotic astrophysical processes, but of "bread-and-butter" astrophysics: e.g., stars and stellar evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, neutron star structure, and cosmology. In this report the author discusses briefly a small subset of the areas of conventional, "bread-and-butter" astrophysics where we can reasonably hope that gravitational wave observations will provide us with valuable new insights and understandings.

  5. Millimeter wave nonreciprocal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group within the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Research Laboratory of Electronics proposed a three year research program aimed at developing coherent magnetic wave signal-processing techniques for microwave energy which may form either the primary signal or else the intermediate frequency (IF) modulation of millimeter wavelength signals-especially at frequencies in the 50-94 GHz. range. Emphasis has been placed upon developing advanced types of signal processors that make use of quasi-optical propagation of electromagnetic and magnetostatic waves propagating in high quality single crystal ferrite thin films. A strong theoretical effort is required in order to establish valid models useful for predicting device performance. We emphasized new filter and circulator designs that employ combinations of the Faraday effect, field displacement nonreciprocity and magnetostatic resonance and periodic structures.

  6. Supersymmetric string waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bergshoeff, E.A. ); Kallosh, R.; Ortin, T. )

    1993-06-15

    We present plane-wave-type solutions of the lowest-order superstring effective action which have unbroken space-time supersymmetries. They are given by a stringy generalization of the Brinkmann metric, dialton, axion, and gauge fields. Some conspiracy between the metric and the axion field is required. The [alpha][prime] stringy corrections to the effective on-shell action, to the equations of motion (and therefore to the solutions themselves), and to the supersymmetry transformations are shown to vanish for a special class of these solutions that we call supersymmetric string waves (SSW's). In the SSW solutions, there exists a conspiracy not only between the metric and the axion field, but also between the gauge fields and the metric, since the embedding of the spin connection in the gauge group is required.

  7. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaret, J.; Béquin, P.; Theocharis, G.; Andreev, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Tournat, V.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  8. Waves in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Eugene R

    2009-09-21

    Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic

  9. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  10. Catching the Telecom Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jing

    2001-03-01

    The telecom wave is sweeping the globe; however, many of us feel caught in backwater disciplines. How does one leverage her skills to become a player in a fast-growing field? This talk will suggest some strategies and share some personal experiences: in transitioning from established companies (electronics and biotech) to a very early stage telecom start-up; in choosing an appropriate industry segment and the right startup; and in preparing for immersing oneself in the start up environment.

  11. Internal Ocean Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves are waves that travel within the interior of a fluid. The waves propagate at the interface or boundary between two layers with sharp density differences, such as temperature. They occur wherever strong tides or currents and stratification occur in the neighborhood of irregular topography. They can propagate for several hundred kilometers. The ASTER false-color VNIR image off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 60 by 120 kilometers (37.2 by 74.4 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 129.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1

  12. DNA waves and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnier, L.; Aissa, J.; Del Giudice, E.; Lavallee, C.; Tedeschi, A.; Vitiello, G.

    2011-07-01

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  13. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  14. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1989-01-01

    Spiral density waves and spiral bending waves have been observed at dozens of locations within Saturn's rings. These waves are excited by resonant gravitational perturbations from moons orbiting outside the ring system. Modeling of spiral waves yields the best available estimates for the mass and the thickness of Saturn's ring system. Angular momentum transport due to spiral density waves may cause significant orbital evolution of Saturn's rings and inner moons. Similar angular momentum transfer may occur in other astrophysical systems such as protoplanetary disks, binary star systems with disks and spiral galaxies with satellites.

  15. Wave transformation over coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ian R.

    1989-07-01

    Ocean wave attenuation on coral reefs is discussed using data obtained from a preliminary field experiment and from the Seasat altimeter. Marked attenuation of the waves is observed, the rate being consistent with existing theories of bottom friction and wave breaking decay. In addition, there is a significant broadening of the spectrum during propagation across reefs. Three-dimensional effects, such as refraction and defraction, can also lead to substantial wave height reduction for significant distances adjacent to coral reefs. As a result, a matrix of such reefs provides significantly more wave attenuation than may initially be expected.

  16. Wave Engine Topping Cycle Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The performance benefits derived by topping a gas turbine engine with a wave engine are assessed. The wave engine is a wave rotor that produces shaft power by exploiting gas dynamic energy exchange and flow turning. The wave engine is added to the baseline turboshaft engine while keeping high-pressure-turbine inlet conditions, compressor pressure ratio, engine mass flow rate, and cooling flow fractions fixed. Related work has focused on topping with pressure-exchangers (i.e., wave rotors that provide pressure gain with zero net shaft power output); however, more energy can be added to a wave-engine-topped cycle leading to greater engine specific-power-enhancement The energy addition occurs at a lower pressure in the wave-engine-topped cycle; thus the specific-fuel-consumption-enhancement effected by ideal wave engine topping is slightly lower than that effected by ideal pressure-exchanger topping. At a component level, however, flow turning affords the wave engine a degree-of-freedom relative to the pressure-exchanger that enables a more efficient match with the baseline engine. In some cases, therefore, the SFC-enhancement by wave engine topping is greater than that by pressure-exchanger topping. An ideal wave-rotor-characteristic is used to identify key wave engine design parameters and to contrast the wave engine and pressure-exchanger topping approaches. An aerodynamic design procedure is described in which wave engine design-point performance levels are computed using a one-dimensional wave rotor model. Wave engines using various wave cycles are considered including two-port cycles with on-rotor combustion (valved-combustors) and reverse-flow and through-flow four-port cycles with heat addition in conventional burners. A through-flow wave cycle design with symmetric blading is used to assess engine performance benefits. The wave-engine-topped turboshaft engine produces 16% more power than does a pressure-exchanger-topped engine under the specified topping

  17. Snell's Law for Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigloher, J.; Decker, M.; Körner, H. S.; Tanabe, K.; Moriyama, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Hata, H.; Madami, M.; Gubbiotti, G.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of Snell's law for magnetostatic spin waves in thin ferromagnetic Permalloy films by imaging incident, refracted, and reflected waves. We use a thickness step as the interface between two media with different dispersion relations. Since the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves in thin ferromagnetic films is anisotropic, deviations from the isotropic Snell's law known in optics are observed for incidence angles larger than 25 ° with respect to the interface normal between the two magnetic media. Furthermore, we can show that the thickness step modifies the wavelength and the amplitude of the incident waves. Our findings open up a new way of spin wave steering for magnonic applications.

  18. Guided Waves with and Without Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narayan R.

    2008-02-01

    In the application of elastic waves of ultrasonic frequencies for nondestructive evaluations of industrial components and welded structures various types of waves like Rayleigh waves, Surface waves, Longitudinal body waves, Shear body waves, and Lamb waves are used to detect defects in the objects under investigation. In many cases these waves travel in bounded media and are affected by boundaries. Because they are guided by boundaries of objects under investigation, they are called sometimes guided waves or waveguides at other times. Some of these guided waves are dispersive in character while others are nondispersive. Efforts are made here to distinguish between guided waves with dispersion and those without dispersion.

  19. Upstream waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    Since the Mach number of the solar wind increases with increasing heliocentric distance, the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, or beta, of the Uranian magnetosheath is expected to be much higher than in the terrestrial magnetosheath. Consistent with this expectation, the magnetosheat is observed to be extremely turbulent, and many particles may leak back upstream into the solar wind and/or be scattered from the bow shock. In accord with the expected presence of backstreaming particles, waves of the type associated with terrestrial backstreaming particles are seen outbound along the trajectory of Voyager in the preshock solar wind with frequencies close to 0.001 Hz. The wave frequency is close to that expected for upstream waves based on measurements closer to the sun. Upstream from the bow shock, the magnetic field was found to be much weaker than expected from observations in the inner solar system. The cause of this depression is unlikely to be the upstream particles; rather, the cause is probably intrinsic to the solar wind such as reconnection across the heliospheric current sheet.

  20. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  1. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of datamore » from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.« less

  2. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  3. Gravitational wave astronomy and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott A.

    2014-09-01

    The first direct observation of gravitational waves' action upon matter has recently been reported by the BICEP2 experiment. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are being installed. They will soon be commissioned, and then begin searches for high-frequency gravitational waves at a sensitivity level that is widely expected to reach events involving compact objects like stellar mass black holes and neutron stars. Pulsar timing arrays continue to improve the bounds on gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies, and may detect a signal on roughly the same timescale as ground-based detectors. The science case for space-based interferometers targeting millihertz sources is very strong. The decade of gravitational-wave discovery is poised to begin. In this writeup of a talk given at the 2013 TAUP conference, we will briefly review the physics of gravitational waves and gravitational-wave detectors, and then discuss the promise of these measurements for making cosmological measurements in the near future.

  4. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  5. Generation of rogue waves in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechuga, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rogue waves have been reported as causing damages and ship accidents all over the oceans of the world. For this reason in the past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of their main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this line we are trying to generate them in a water tank. The description of the procedure to do that is the objective of this presentation. After Akhmediev et al. (2011) we use a symmetric spectrum as input on the wave maker to produce waves with a rate(Maximun wave height/ significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77, clearly between the limits of rogue waves. As it was pointed out by Janssen (2003), Onorato et al. (2006) and Kharif, Pelinovsky and Slunyaev (2009) modulation instability is enhanced when waves depart from Gaussian statistics (i.e. big kurtosis) and therefore both numbers enforce the criterion that we are generating genuine rogue waves. The same is confirmed by Shemer (2010) and Dudley et al.(2009) from a different perspective. If besides being symmetrical the spectrum is triangular, following Akhmediev(2011),the generated waves are even more conspicuously rogue waves.

  6. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  7. Relevance of Infragravity Waves in a Wave Dominated Shallow Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabarrieta, M.; Bertin, X.

    2014-12-01

    Infragravity (IG) waves have received a growing attention over the last decade and they have been shown to partly control dune erosion, barrier breaching, development of seiches in harbors or the circulation on fringing reefs. Although the relevance IG waves in surf and swash zone dynamics is well recognized, their dynamics and effects on tidal inlets and estuaries have not been analyzed. This study investigates the importance of IG waves at Albufeira Lagoon Inlet, a shallow wave-dominated inlet located on the western Coast of Portugal. Water levels and currents were measured synchronously during a two-day field experiment carried out at Albufeira Lagoon Inlet in September 2010. Apart from the tidally induced gravity wave modulations and wave induced setup inside the lagoon, an important IG wave contribution was identified. Low frequency oscillations were noticeable in the free surface elevation records and produced fluctuations of up to 100% in current intensities. While IG waves in the ebb shoal were present during the whole tidal cycle, the absence of IG waves characterized the ebbing tide inside the lagoon. The energy in the IG frequency band gradually increased from low tide to high tide, and disappeared during the ebbing tide. The modeling system Xbeach was applied to hindcast the hydrodynamics during the field experiment period. The model captures the main physics related with the IG wave generation and propagation inside the inlet, and reproduced the IG blocking during the ebb as identified in the measurements. This behavior was explained by the combination of advection and wave blocking induced by opposing tidal currents. Both measurements and numerical results suggested the bound wave release as the dominant mechanism responsible for IG wave generation. The fact that IG waves only propagate at flood tide has strong implications on the sediment balance of the inlet and contribute to inlet infilling under energetic wave conditions. It is expected that IG

  8. Wave age and wave forecasting in the NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, A.; Bolaños, R.; Gómez Aguar, J.; Sairoun, A.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction The North-western Mediterranean is characterized by a high industrial and touristic activity and is vulnerable to environmental phenomena such as snow, rain and wave storms. This paper will focus on the improvement of wave predictions by using the wave-age parameter with a view to reduce coastal vulnerability. This will be done with the WAM model (WAMDI group, 1988). The runs have used a grid covering the Mediterranean with a resolution of 0.166º (approximately 18km). The wind fields used as input for the wave model were generated by the MASS model (Codina et al, 1997) with the same spatial resolution as the wave model. The wind input selected to force the wave model was updated every 6 hours. Wave forecasting The WAM model is relatively slow to respond to rapidly variable wind events, particularly for limited fetches. This is the situation normally found in the North-western Mediterranean where atmospheric storms may last less than 12 hours and feature heavy land originated winds. The characterization and parameterization of conditions for such waves is far from straight forward and even the classical distintion between sea and swell needs a different threshold. In this context the wave-age parameter (wave celerity to wind spin ratio) can help to understand and parameterize the momentum transfer of wind to surface waves (Donelan, 1988). This can allow increasing the drag coefficient for younger seas, such as the ones presented in (Bortkovskii and Novak, 1993) or (Volkov, 2001). By selecting as test storms the ones recorded by buoys in November 2001 and March/April 2002, the paper will show an analysis of wave-age and wave prediction quality for these two periods. Discussion The obtained simulations show that the more complex sea states are well correlated with higher error bounds. This suggests using the wave-age parameter for parameterizing the momentum transfer and even various other related parameters involved in wave predictions. This also

  9. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics. PMID:25314555

  10. WAVE DELAYING STRUCTURE FOR RECTANGULAR WAVE-GUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Dain, J.

    1956-11-13

    This patent relates to wave-guides and in particular describes wave delaying structure located within a wave-guide. The disclosed wave-guide has an elongated fiat metal sheet arranged in a central plane of the guide and formed with a series of transverse inductive slots such that each face presents an inductive impedance to the guide. The sheet is thickened in the area between slots to increase the self capacity of the slots. Experimental results indicate that in a wave-guide loaded in accordance with the invention the guided wavelength changes more slowly as the air wavelength is changed than the guided wavelength does in wave-guides loaded by means of corrugations.

  11. Upper atmospheric planetary-wave and gravity-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Previously collected data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 25 and 200 km from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others were analyzed by a daily-difference method, and results on the magnitude of atmospheric perturbations interpreted as gravity waves and planetary waves are presented. Traveling planetary-wave contributions in the 25-85 km range were found to have significant height and latitudinal variation. It was found that observed gravity-wave density perturbations and wind are related to one another in the manner predicted by gravity-wave theory. It was determined that, on the average, gravity-wave energy deposition or reflection occurs at all altitudes except the 55-75 km region of the mesosphere.

  12. Are Electron Partial Waves Real

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, O.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments determining the partial wave content of electrons are uncommon. The standard approach to partial wave expansion of the wavefunction of electrons often ignores their spin. In this non-relativistic approximation the partial waves are labeled by their orbital angular momentum quantum number, e.g. d-waves. As our previous work has shown, this non-relativistic approximation usually fails for photoelectrons. Partial waves should be further specified by their total angular momentum. With d-waves for example, one would need to distinguish between d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves. Although energetically degenerate, fully relativistic d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves of photoelectrons have fundamentally different angular distributions. Using experimental and theoretical methods we have developed, we obtain partial wave probabilities of photoelectrons from polarization measurements of ionic fluorescence. We found that for selected states of the residual ion, there are energy regions where the photoelectron is in a single partial wave with predictable angular distributions.

  13. One-dimensional wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Vladimir; Dias, Frédéric; Pushkarev, Andrei

    2004-08-01

    The problem of turbulence is one of the central problems in theoretical physics. While the theory of fully developed turbulence has been widely studied, the theory of wave turbulence has been less studied, partly because it developed later. Wave turbulence takes place in physical systems of nonlinear dispersive waves. In most applications nonlinearity is small and dispersive wave interactions are weak. The weak turbulence theory is a method for a statistical description of weakly nonlinear interacting waves with random phases. It is not surprising that the theory of weak wave turbulence began to develop in connection with some problems of plasma physics as well as of wind waves. The present review is restricted to one-dimensional wave turbulence, essentially because finer computational grids can be used in numerical computations. Most of the review is devoted to wave turbulence in various wave equations, and in particular in a simple one-dimensional model of wave turbulence introduced by Majda, McLaughlin and Tabak in 1997. All the considered equations are model equations, but consequences on physical systems such as ocean waves are discussed as well. The main conclusion is that the range in which the theory of pure weak turbulence is valid is narrow. In general, wave turbulence is not completely weak. Together with the weak turbulence component, it can include coherent structures, such as solitons, quasisolitons, collapses or broad collapses. As a result, weak and strong turbulence coexist. In situations where coherent structures cannot develop, weak turbulence dominates. Even though this is primarily a review paper, new results are presented as well, especially on self-organized criticality and on quasisolitonic turbulence.

  14. Coded Excitation Plane Wave Imaging for Shear Wave Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) compared to conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2-4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (Body Mass Index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue. PMID:26168181

  15. Wave and particle dynamics of the beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, P. )

    1989-10-15

    We present two-dimensional wave-envelope studies of the interaction between a plasma beat-wave and the laser pumps which drive it. A new method of focusing is demonstrated which requires the plasma wave to be driven slightly below its resonant frequency. Test particles are employed to investigate possible means of extending the accelerator stage length. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  16. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  17. Hydrodynamic Performance of a Wave Energy Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen

    2010-11-01

    To harvest energy from ocean waves, a new wave energy converter (WEC) was proposed and tested in a wave tank. The WEC freely floats on the water surface and rides waves. It utilizes its wave-driven angular oscillation to convert the mechanical energy of waves into electricity. To gain the maximum possible angular oscillation of the WEC under specified wave conditions, both floatation of the WEC and wave interaction with the WEC play critical roles in a joint fashion. During the experiments, the submersion condition of the WEC and wave condition were varied. The results were analyzed in terms of the oscillation amplitude, stability, auto-orientation capability, and wave frequency dependency.

  18. Spin waves in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A working report is presented in order to document early results of research on the stability of laminar boundary layers. The report shows that constitutive equations for a structured continua may be derived by the technique of reinterpreting velocity in the conventional stress to rate-of-strain relationship so as to account for effects of particle rotation. It is demonstrated that accounting for particle structure even at a molecular level makes the fluid viscoelastic with the ability to propagate vector waves. It is shown that particle structure modifies the basic stability equation for the system, which in turn would alter values for critical Reynolds number.

  19. Ion wave breaking acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Bamberg, K.-U.; Ma, W. J.; Liu, J.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-07-01

    Laser driven ion wave breaking acceleration (IWBA) in plasma wakefields is investigated by means of a one-dimensional (1D) model and 1D/3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. IWBA operates in relativistic transparent plasma for laser intensities in the range of 1020- 1023 W /cm2 . The threshold for IWBA is identified in the plane of plasma density and laser amplitude. In the region just beyond the threshold, self-injection takes place only for a fraction of ions and in a limited time period. This leads to well collimated ion pulses with peaked energy spectra, in particular for 3D geometry.

  20. Strong acoustic wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  1. Spin Wave Genie

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce themore » time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.« less

  2. Spin Wave Genie

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-16

    The four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,w) obtained by inelastic neutron scattering measurements provides unique "dynamical fingerprints" of the spin state and interactions present in complex magnetic materials. Extracting this information however is currently a slow and complex process that may take an expert -depending on the complexity of the system- up to several weeks of painstaking work to complete. Spin Wave Genie was created to abstract and automate this process. It strives to both reduce the time to complete this analysis and make these calculations more accessible to a broader group of scientists and engineers.

  3. Astrophysical blast wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Nathan; Geissel, Matthias; Lewis, Sean M; Porter, John L.

    2015-03-01

    The data described in this document consist of image files of shadowgraphs of astrophysically relevant laser driven blast waves. Supporting files include Mathematica notebooks containing design calculations, tabulated experimental data and notes, and relevant publications from the open research literature. The data was obtained on the Z-Beamlet laser from July to September 2014. Selected images and calculations will be published as part of a PhD dissertation and in associated publications in the open research literature, with Sandia credited as appropriate. The authors are not aware of any restrictions that could affect the release of the data.

  4. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-01

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  5. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  6. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  7. Conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to channel waves in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the mode conversion of borehole Stoneley waves to stratigraphically guided channel waves was discovered in data from a crosswell acoustic experiment conducted between wells penetrating thin coal strata located near Rifle, Colorado. Traveltime moveout observations show that borehole Stoneley waves, excited by a transmitter positioned at substantial distances in one well above and below a coal stratum at 2025 m depth, underwent partial conversion to a channel wave propagating away from the well through the coal. In an adjacent well the channel wave was detected at receiver locations within the coal, and borehole Stoneley waves, arising from a second partial conversion of channel waves, were detected at locations above and below the coal. The observed channel wave is inferred to be the third-higher Rayleigh mode based on comparison of the measured group velocity with theoretically derived dispersion curves. The identification of the mode conversion between borehole and stratigraphically guided waves is significant because coal penetrated by multiple wells may be detected without placing an acoustic transmitter or receiver within the waveguide. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  9. Midlatitude Rossby wave forcing of equatorial Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biello, J. A.; Kiladis, G. N.; Back, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations strongly suggest that convectively coupled Kelvin waves can be generated by extratropical wave activity. This mechanism is particularly efficient over Australia, where wave activity appears immediately after the extratropical Rossby waves propagate into the region during the Austral winter. This interaction occurs where the zonal wind is strongly sheared both in the meridional and vertical directions. In order to understand this phenomenon the authors study the linear primitive equations in the presence of barotropic and baroclinic shear and the dispersion characteristics of the sheared Matsuno modes are calculated. Depending on the shear strength, the waves are stable or unstable and can be categorized into three groups. First there are the classical Matsuno modes modified by shear. Second there are extratropical "free" Rossby waves. Third, there are Rossby waves meridionally confined to the shear layer - these latter modes can be unstable, or stable and part of the continuous spectrum. In examples where the zonal winds are barotropically and baroclinically stable, we show that a continuous spectrum of Rossby waves exists. If the zonal winds are strong enough, the Rossby waves in the continuous spectrum have an equatorial signature exactly like the Matsuno Kelvin wave - despite the fact that, in these examples, the Matsuno Kelvin wave also exists on its own and that all modes are stable. For stronger shears, these continuous spectrum modes become unstable. Although the appear similar to Sakai's Rossby/Kelvin instability, their existence arises from a completely different phenomenon. The Sakai instability requires the frequency of a stable equatorial Rossby mode to coincide with the stable Kelvin wave frequency in order for the two modes to create a stable/unstable pair. Our results show that unstable Rossby waves need only have their frequencies Doppler shifted to that of the Kelvin wave frequency by the underlying shear in order that they acquire a

  10. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch. PMID:11488494

  11. Solitary waves in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1996-07-01

    Since space charge waves on a particle beam exhibit both dispersive and nonlinear character, solitary waves or solitons are possible. Dispersive, nonlinear wave propagation in high current beams is found to be similar to ion-acoustic waves in plasmas with an analogy between Debye screening and beam pipe shielding. Exact longitudinal solitary wave propagation is found for potentials associated with certain transverse distributions which fill the beam pipe. For weak dispersion, the waves satisfy the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, but for strong dispersion they exhibit breaking. More physically realizable distributions which do not fill the beam pipe are investigated and shown to also satisfy a KdV equation for weak dispersion if averaging over rapid transverse motion is physically justified. Scaling laws are presented to explore likely parameter regimes where these phenomena may be observed experimentally.

  12. Plasma waves near the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoppe, M. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Etcheto, J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma waves associated with the magnetosphere from the magnetosheath to the outer magnetosphere are investigated to obtain a clear definition of the boundaries and regions, to characterize the waves observed in these regions, to determine which wave modes are present, and to determine their origin. Emphasis is on high time resolution data and a comparison between measurements by different antenna systems. It is shown that the magnetosheath flux transfer events, the magnetopause current layer, the outer magnetosphere, and the boundary layer can be identified by their magnetic field and plasma wave characteristics, as well as by their plasma and energetic particle signatures. The plasma wave characteristics in the current layer and in the boundary layer are very similar to the features in the flux transfer events, and upon entry into their outer magnetosphere, the plasma wave spectra are dominated by intense electromagnetic chorus bursts and electrostatic emissions.

  13. Random focusing of tsunami waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Henri; Metzger, Jakob J.; Geisel, Theo; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2016-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit surprisingly strong height fluctuations. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that lead to these variations in wave height is a prerequisite for reliable tsunami forecasting. It is known, for example, that the presence of large underwater islands or the shape of the tsunami source can affect the wave heights. Here we show that the consecutive effect of even tiny fluctuations in the profile of the ocean floor (the bathymetry) can cause unexpectedly strong fluctuations in the wave height of tsunamis, with maxima several times higher than the average wave height. A novel approach combining stochastic caustic theory and shallow water wave dynamics allows us to determine the typical propagation distance at which the strongly focused waves appear. We demonstrate that owing to this mechanism the small errors present in bathymetry measurements can lead to drastic variations in predicted tsunami heights. Our results show that a precise knowledge of the ocean's bathymetry is absolutely indispensable for reliable tsunami forecasts.

  14. WINDII atmospheric wave airglow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.T.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Solheim, B.H.; Shepherd, G.G.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary WINDII nighttime airglow wave-imaging data in the UARS rolldown attitude has been analyzed with the goal to survey gravity waves near the upper boundary of the middle atmosphere. Wave analysis is performed on O[sub 2](0,0) emissions from a selected 1[sup 0] x 1[sup 0] oblique view of the airglow layer at approximately 95 km altitude, which has no direct earth background and only an atmospheric background which is optically thick for the 0[sub 2](0,0) emission. From a small data set, orbital imaging of atmospheric wave structures is demonstrated, with indication of large variations in wave activity across land and sea. Comparison ground-based imagery is discussed with respect to similarity of wave variations across land/sea boundaries and future orbital mosaic image construction.

  15. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  16. Coherent Waves in Seismic Researches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, A.; Seleznev, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    Development of digital processing algorithms of seismic wave fields for the purpose of useful event picking to study environment and other objects is the basis for the establishment of new seismic techniques. In the submitted paper a fundamental property of seismic wave field coherence is used. The authors extended conception of coherence types of observed wave fields and devised a technique of coherent component selection from observed wave field. Time coherence and space coherence are widely known. In this paper conception "parameter coherence" has been added. The parameter by which wave field is coherent can be the most manifold. The reason is that the wave field is a multivariate process described by a set of parameters. Coherence in the first place means independence of linear connection in wave field of parameter. In seismic wave fields, recorded in confined space, in building-blocks and stratified mediums time coherent standing waves are formed. In prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping head waves are coherent by parallel correlation course or, in other words, by one measurement on generalized plane of observation system. For detail prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping on basis of coherence property by one measurement of area algorithms have been developed, permitting seismic records to be converted to head wave time sections which have neither reflected nor other types of waves. Conversion in time section is executed on any specified observation base. Energy storage of head waves relative to noise on basis of multiplicity of observation system is realized within area of head wave recording. Conversion on base below the area of wave tracking is performed with lack of signal/noise ratio relative to maximum of this ratio, fit to observation system. Construction of head wave time section and dynamic plots a basis of automatic processing have been developed, similar to CDP procedure in method of

  17. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  18. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  19. Short-wave Diathermy

    PubMed Central

    1935-01-01

    It is submitted that the thermal action of short-wave therapy does not account for the therapeutic results obtained. The theory is put forward that many of the results obtained can be better explained by the disruptive and dispersive action of the impact of the electromagnetic vibrations. An analogy, indicating such disruptive effects at high frequency, is drawn from the molecular vibrations—transmitted through transformer oil, and excited by the application of high frequency currents to the layers of quartz in the piezo-electric oscillator of quartz. It is submitted that these disruptive and dispersive effects will be greatest where the conductivity of the tissues is low, such as in bones and fat, and it is shown that it is in these regions that the therapeutic action of these currents is most obvious. It is also pointed out that, if effects, comparable to those obtained in the subcutaneous area, are obtained in the deeper tissues and organs, the application of deep-wave therapy would be attended by serious risk. PMID:19990107

  20. Rarefaction wave gun propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathe, Eric Lee

    A new species of gun propulsion that dramatically reduces recoil momentum imparted to the gun is presented. First conceived by the author on 18 March 1999, the propulsion concept is explained, a methodology for the design of a reasonable apparatus for experimental validation using NATO standard 35mm TP anti-aircraft ammunition is developed, and the experimental results are presented. The firing results are juxtaposed by a simple interior ballistic model to place the experimental findings into a context within which they may better be understood. Rarefaction wave gun (RAVEN) propulsion is an original contribution to the field of armament engineering. No precedent is known, and no experimental results of such a gun have been published until now. Recoil reduction in excess of 50% was experimentally achieved without measured loss in projectile velocity. RAVEN achieves recoil reduction by means of a delayed venting of the breech of the gun chamber that directs the high enthalpy propellant gases through an expansion nozzle to generate forward thrust that abates the rearward momentum applied to the gun prior to venting. The novel feature of RAVEN, relative to prior recoilless rifles, is that sufficiently delayed venting results in a rarefaction wave that follows the projectile though the bore without catching it. Thus, the projectile exits the muzzle without any compromise to its propulsion performance relative to guns that maintain a sealed chamber.

  1. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  2. Roll waves in mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, N. J.; Liu, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    The stability of a viscoplastic fluid film falling down an inclined plane is explored, with the aim of determining the critical Reynolds number for the onset of roll waves. The Herschel Bulkley constitutive law is adopted and the fluid is assumed two-dimensional and incompressible. The linear stability problem is described for an equilibrium in the form of a uniform sheet flow, when perturbed by introducing an infinitesimal stress perturbation. This flow is stable for very high Reynolds numbers because the rigid plug riding atop the fluid layer cannot be deformed and the free surface remains flat. If the flow is perturbed by allowing arbitrarily small strain rates, on the other hand, the plug is immediately replaced by a weakly yielded ‘pseudo-plug’ that can deform and reshape the free surface. This situation is modelled by lubrication theory at zero Reynolds number, and it is shown how the fluid exhibits free-surface instabilities at order-one Reynolds numbers. Simpler models based on vertical averages of the fluid equations are evaluated, and one particular model is identified that correctly predicts the onset of instability. That model is used to describe nonlinear roll waves.

  3. Holographic p -wave superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Zhang, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Lu, Jian-Bo; Yu, Fang

    2014-12-01

    In the probe limit, we numerically construct a holographic p -wave superfluid model in the four-dimensional (4D) and five-dimensional (5D) anti-de Sitter black holes coupled to a Maxwell-complex vector field. We find that, for the condensate with the fixed superfluid velocity, the results are similar to the s -wave cases in both 4D and 5D spacetimes. In particular, the Cave of Winds and the phase transition, always being of second order, take place in the 5D case. Moreover, we find that the translating superfluid velocity from second order to first order S/yμ increases with the mass squared. Furthermore, for the supercurrent with fixed temperature, the results agree with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction near the critical temperature. In addition, this complex vector superfluid model is still a generalization of the SU(2) superfluid model, and it also provides a holographic realization of the H e3 superfluid system.

  4. Large amplitude ion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerenkov Masers, which are mildly relativistic (100-200 KV), moderate-current, electron-beam (1-20A)-driven dielectric resonators, have been used to produce multihendred kW power levels in the middle part of the mm wavelength range. The devices make use of the fact that the evanescence scale length in the transverse direction of a slow wave is given by (lambda)(beta)(gamma) lambda - wavelength, beta velocity measured in units of the speed of light, gamma = 1/sg. root of(1-beta squared). The scaling (lambda)(beta)(gamma) approx. 1 will maintain good beam-to-wave-coupling in the mm range, while also maintaining convenient transverse resonator dimension. A variety of configurations and modifications are considered and discussed in detail. All experimental results presented pertain to oscillator configurations of the basic device. The basic interaction can, however, be used as the basis of an amplifier and a theoretical analysis of such a device is presented.

  5. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  6. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  7. Wave powered machine

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.A.

    1986-12-09

    A device is described to convert the motion of waves in a body of water to other forms of energy comprising: a. vertical supports fixed to the bottom of the body of water, b. rail means supported by the vertical supports, c. a frame fixed to the vertical supports at an elevation above the surface of the body of water, d. a shaft supported on the frame to rotate, e. rotating means fixed to the shaft, f. a float engaged with the rail means to move vertically up and down from the influence of waves, the float carrying actuating means in the form of two vertical racks pivotally connected to the float and with their upper extremities pivotally connected to a common link. One of the racks is adapted to drive the rotating means on an upstroke of the float and the other of the racks to drive the rotating means on a downstroke of the float. The actuating means cooperates with the rotating means to cause the rotating means to rotate unidirectionally during a power stroke of the actuating means, g. a power take-off from the shaft, and h. the float having a skirt fixed to the bottom thereof, the skirt having means to vent the space beneath it.

  8. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  9. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  10. Infragravity waves across the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Arshad; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jerome

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of transoceanic Infragravity (IG) wave was investigated using a global spectral wave model together with deep-ocean pressure recorders. IG waves are generated mostly at the shorelines due to non-linear hydrodynamic effects that transfer energy from the main windsea and swell band, with periods of 1 to 25 s, to periods up to 500 s. IG waves are important for the study of near-shore processes and harbor agitation, and can also be a potential source of errors in satellite altimetry measurements. Setting up a global IG model was motivated by the investigation of these errors for the future planned SWOT mission. Despite the fact that the infragravity waves exhibit much smaller vertical amplitudes than the usual high frequency wind-driven waves, of the order of 1 cm in the deep oceans, their propagation throughout the oceans and signature in the wave spectrum can be clearly observed. Using a simplified empirical parameterization of the nearshore source of free IG waves as a function of the incoming wave parameters we extended to WAVEWATCH III model, used so far for windseas and swell, to the IG band, up to periods of 300 s. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled IG energy was well correlated to the DART station records, making it useful to interpret the records of IG waves. Open ocean IG wave records appear dominated by trans-oceanic events with well defined sources concentrated on a few days, usually on West coasts, and affecting the entire ocean basin, with amplitude patterns very similar to those of tsunamis. Three particular IG bursts during 2008 are studied, 2 in the Pacific Ocean and 1 in the North Atlantic. It was observed that the liberated IG waves can travel long distances often crossing whole oceans with negligible dissipation. The IG signatures are clearly observed at sensors along their propagation paths.

  11. Conformal Gravity and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; Paranjape, M. B.

    We consider monochromatic, plane gravitational waves in a conformally invariant theory of general relativity. We show that the simple, standard ansatz for the metric, usually that which is taken for the linearized theory of these waves, is reducible to the metric of Minkowski spacetime via a sequence of conformal and coordinate transformations. This implies that we have in fact, exact plane wave solutions. However they are simply coordinate/conformal artifacts. As a consequence, they carry no energy.

  12. Quantitative wave-particle duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Tabish

    2016-07-01

    The complementary wave and particle character of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is here described not just as two extreme cases of wave and particle characteristics, but in terms of quantitative measures of these characteristics, known to follow a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of a closely related duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to the introductory student.

  13. Quantum Emulation of Gravitational Waves.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Cirio, Mauro; Büse, Alexander; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein's general relativity theory, appear as ripples in the fabric of spacetime traveling at the speed of light. We prove that the propagation of small amplitude gravitational waves in a curved spacetime is equivalent to the propagation of a subspace of electromagnetic states. We use this result to propose the use of entangled photons to emulate the evolution of gravitational waves in curved spacetimes by means of experimental electromagnetic setups featuring metamaterials. PMID:26169801

  14. Wave energy: a Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Robert; Ruehl, Kelley; Hovland, Justin; Meicke, Stephen

    2012-01-28

    This paper illustrates the status of wave energy development in Pacific rim countries by characterizing the available resource and introducing the region's current and potential future leaders in wave energy converter development. It also describes the existing licensing and permitting process as well as potential environmental concerns. Capabilities of Pacific Ocean testing facilities are described in addition to the region's vision of the future of wave energy. PMID:22184673

  15. Effects of Wave Nonlinearity on Wave Attenuation by Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. C.; Cox, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The need to explore sustainable approaches to maintain coastal ecological systems has been widely recognized for decades and is increasingly important due to global climate change and patterns in coastal population growth. Submerged aquatic vegetation and emergent vegetation in estuaries and shorelines can provide ecosystem services, including wave-energy reduction and erosion control. Idealized models of wave-vegetation interaction often assume rigid, vertically uniform vegetation under the action of waves described by linear wave theory. A physical model experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of wave nonlinearity on the attenuation of random waves propagating through a stand of uniform, emergent vegetation in constant water depth. The experimental conditions spanned a relative water depth from near shallow to near deep water waves (0.45 < kh <1.49) and wave steepness from linear to nonlinear conditions (0.03 < ak < 0.18). The wave height to water depth ratios were in the range 0.12 < Hs/h < 0.34, and the Ursell parameter was in the range 2 < Ur < 68. Frictional losses from the side wall and friction were measured and removed from the wave attenuation in the vegetated cases to isolate the impact of vegetation. The normalized wave height attenuation decay for each case was fit to the decay equation of Dalrymple et al. (1984) to determine the damping factor, which was then used to calculate the bulk drag coefficients CD. This paper shows that the damping factor is dependent on the wave steepness ak across the range of relative water depths from shallow to deep water and that the damping factor can increase by a factor of two when the value of ak approximately doubles. In turn, this causes the drag coefficient CD to decrease on average by 23%. The drag coefficient can be modeled using the Keulegan-Carpenter number using the horizontal orbital wave velocity estimate from linear wave theory as the characteristic velocity scale. Alternatively, the Ursell

  16. Tropical Cyclogenesis in a Tropical Wave Critical Layer: Easterly Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, T. J.; Montgomery, M. T.; Wang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tropical depressions within tropical waves over the Atlantic and eastern Pacific is usually preceded by a "surface low along the wave" as if to suggest a hybrid wave-vortex structure in which flow streamlines not only undulate with the waves, but form a closed circulation in the lower troposphere surrounding the low. This structure, equatorward of the easterly jet axis, is identified herein as the familiar critical layer of waves in shear flow, a flow configuration which arguably provides the simplest conceptual framework for tropical cyclogenesis resulting from tropical waves, their interaction with the mean flow, and with diabatic processes associated with deep moist convection. The recirculating Kelvin cat's eye within the critical layer represents a sweet spot for tropical cyclogenesis in which a proto-vortex may form and grow within its parent wave. A common location for storm development is given by the intersection of the wave's critical latitude and trough axis at the center of the cat's eye, with analyzed vorticity centroid nearby. The wave and vortex live together for a time, and initially propagate at approximately the same speed. In most cases this coupled propagation continues for a few days after a tropical depression is identified. For easterly waves, as the name suggests, the propagation is westward. It is shown that in order to visualize optimally the associated Lagrangian motions, one should view the flow streamlines, or stream function, in a frame of reference translating horizontally with the phase propagation of the parent wave. In this co-moving frame, streamlines are approximately equivalent to particle trajectories. The closed circulation is quasi-stationary, and a dividing streamline separates air within the cat's eye from air outside.

  17. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  18. Wave energy and intertidal productivity

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Egbert G.; Paine, Robert T.; Quinn, James F.; Suchanek, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    In the northeastern Pacific, intertidal zones of the most wave-beaten shores receive more energy from breaking waves than from the sun. Despite severe mortality from winter storms, communities at some wave-beaten sites produce an extraordinary quantity of dry matter per unit area of shore per year. At wave-beaten sites of Tatoosh Island, WA, sea palms, Postelsia palmaeformis, can produce > 10 kg of dry matter, or 1.5 × 108 J, per m2 in a good year. Extraordinarily productive organisms such as Postelsia are restricted to wave-beaten sites. Intertidal organisms cannot transform wave energy into chemical energy, as photosynthetic plants transform solar energy, nor can intertidal organisms “harness” wave energy. Nonetheless, wave energy enhances the productivity of intertidal organisms. On exposed shores, waves increase the capacity of resident algae to acquire nutrients and use sunlight, augment the competitive ability of productive organisms, and protect intertidal residents by knocking away their enemies or preventing them from feeding. PMID:16593813

  19. Source modeling sleep slow waves

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael; Riedner, Brady A.; Huber, Reto; Massimini, Marcello; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Slow waves are the most prominent electroencephalographic (EEG) feature of sleep. These waves arise from the synchronization of slow oscillations in the membrane potentials of millions of neurons. Scalp-level studies have indicated that slow waves are not instantaneous events, but rather they travel across the brain. Previous studies of EEG slow waves were limited by the poor spatial resolution of EEGs and by the difficulty of relating scalp potentials to the activity of the underlying cortex. Here we use high-density EEG (hd-EEG) source modeling to show that individual spontaneous slow waves have distinct cortical origins, propagate uniquely across the cortex, and involve unique subsets of cortical structures. However, when the waves are examined en masse, we find that there are diffuse hot spots of slow wave origins centered on the lateral sulci. Furthermore, slow wave propagation along the anterior−posterior axis of the brain is largely mediated by a cingulate highway. As a group, slow waves are associated with large currents in the medial frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate, the precuneus, and the posterior cingulate. These areas overlap with the major connectional backbone of the cortex and with many parts of the default network. PMID:19164756

  20. Current drive by helicon waves

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Manash Kumar; Bora, Dhiraj

    2009-01-01

    Helicity in the dynamo field components of helicon wave is examined during the novel study of wave induced helicity current drive. Strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field components is observed during helicon discharges formed in a toroidal vacuum chamber of small aspect ratio. High frequency regime is chosen to increase the phase velocity of helicon waves which in turn minimizes the resonant wave-particle interactions and enhances the contribution of the nonresonant current drive mechanisms. Owing to the strong poloidal asymmetry in the wave magnetic field structures, plasma current is driven mostly by the dynamo-electric-field, which arise due to the wave helicity injection by helicon waves. Small, yet finite contribution from the suppressed wave-particle resonance cannot be ruled out in the operational regime examined. A brief discussion on the parametric dependence of plasma current along with numerical estimations of nonresonant components is presented. A close agreement between the numerical estimation and measured plasma current magnitude is obtained during the present investigation.

  1. Properties of resonance wave functions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, R. M.; Gerjuoy, E.

    1973-01-01

    Construction and study of resonance wave functions corresponding to poles of the Green's function for several illustrative models of theoretical interest. Resonance wave functions obtained from the Siegert and Kapur-Peierls definitions of the resonance energies are compared. The comparison especially clarifies the meaning of the normalization constant of the resonance wave functions. It is shown that the wave functions may be considered renormalized in a sense analogous to that of quantum field theory. However, this renormalization is entirely automatic, and the theory has neither ad hoc procedures nor infinite quantities.

  2. Wave propagation in isogrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    This work focuses on an analysis of wave propagation in isogrid structures as it relates to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods. Assembly, integration, and testing (AI&T) of satellite structures in preparation for launch includes significant time for testing and reworking any issues that may arise. SHM methods are being investigated as a means to validate the structure during assembly and truncate the number of tests needed to qualify the structure for the launch environment. The most promising of these SHM methods uses an active wave-based method in which an actuator propagates a Lamb wave through the structure; the Lamb wave is then received by a sensor and evaluated over time to detect structural changes. To date this method has proven effective in locating structural defects in a complex satellite panel; however, the attributes associated with the first wave arrival change significantly as the wave travels through ribs and joining features. Previous studies have been conducted in simplified ribbed structures, giving initial insight into the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this work, the study has been extended numerically to the isogrid plate case. Wave propagation was modeled using commercial finite element analysis software. The results of the analyses offer further insight into the complexities of wave propagation in isogrid structures.

  3. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  4. Stabilized wave segments in an excitable medium with a phase wave at the wave back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, V. S.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation velocity and the shape of a stationary propagating wave segment are determined analytically for excitable media supporting excitation waves with trigger fronts and phase backs. The general relationships between the medium's excitability and the wave segment parameters are obtained in the framework of the free boundary approach under quite usual assumptions. Two universal limits restricting the region of existence of stabilized wave segments are found. The comparison of the analytical results with numerical simulations of the well-known Kessler-Levine model demonstrates their good quantitative agreement. The findings should be applicable to a wide class of systems, such as the propagation of electrical waves in the cardiac muscle or wave propagation in autocatalytic chemical reactions, due to the generality of the free-boundary approach used.

  5. Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi-Chiuan; Chen, Shyan-Shiou; Yuan, Juan-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

  6. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  7. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  8. Novel itinerant transverse spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John Delaney

    In 1956, Lev Davidovich Landau put forth his theory on systems of interacting fermions, or fermi liquids. A year later, Viktor Pavlovich Silin described spin waves that such a system of fermions would support. The treatment of the contribution of the molecular field to the spin wave dispersion was a novel aspect of these spin waves. Silin predicted that there would exist a hierarchy of spin waves in a fermi liquid, one for each component of the spherical harmonic expansion of the fermi surface. In 1968, Anthony J. Leggett and Michael J. Rice derived from fermi liquid theory how the behavior of the spin diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid could be directly experimentally observable via the spin echo effect [24]. Their prediction, that the diffusion coefficient of a fermi liquid would not decay exponentially with temperature, but rather would have a maximum at some non-zero temperature, was a direct consequence of the fermi liquid molecular field and spin wave phenomena, and this was corroborated by experiment in 1971 by Corruccini, et al. [13]. A parallel advancement in the theory of fermi liquid spin waves came with the extension of the theory to describe weak ferromagnetic metals. In 1959, Alexei Abrikosov and I. E. Dzyaloshiski put forth a theoretical description of a ferromagnetic fermi liquid [1]. In 2001, Kevin Bedell and Krastan Blagoev showed that a non-trivial contribution to the dispersion of the ferromagnetic current spin wave arises from the necessary consideration of higher harmonic moments in the distortion of the fermi surface from its ground state [8]. In the chapters to follow, the author presents new results for transverse spin waves in a fermi liquid, which arise from a novel ground state of a fermi liquid-one in which an l = 1 harmonic distortion exists in the ground state polarization. It is shown that such an instability can lead to spin waves with dispersions that are characterized by a linear dependence on the wave number at long

  9. Advanced millimeter wave chemical sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.

    1999-03-24

    This paper discusses the development of an advanced millimeter-wave (mm-wave) chemical sensor and its applications for environmental monitoring and arms control treaty verification. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of fingerprint-type molecular rotational signatures in the mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave sensor, operating in the frequency range of 220-300 GHz, can work under all weather conditions and in smoky and dusty environments. The basic configuration of the mm-wave sensor is a monostatic swept-frequency radar consisting of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer or Schottky barrier detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 220-350 GHz. Using the Russian BWO tube, a mm-wave radar system was built and field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. The mm-wave system detected chemical plumes very well; the detection sensitivity for polar molecules like methyl chloride was down to a concentration of 12 ppm.

  10. Relativistic electron scattering by magnetosonic waves: Effects of discrete wave emission and high wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we study relativistic electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We compare results of test particle simulations and the quasi-linear theory for different spectra of waves to investigate how a fine structure of the wave emission can influence electron resonant scattering. We show that for a realistically wide distribution of wave normal angles θ (i.e., when the dispersion δθ≥0.5{sup °}), relativistic electron scattering is similar for a wide wave spectrum and for a spectrum consisting in well-separated ion cyclotron harmonics. Comparisons of test particle simulations with quasi-linear theory show that for δθ>0.5{sup °}, the quasi-linear approximation describes resonant scattering correctly for a large enough plasma frequency. For a very narrow θ distribution (when δθ∼0.05{sup °}), however, the effect of a fine structure in the wave spectrum becomes important. In this case, quasi-linear theory clearly fails in describing accurately electron scattering by fast magnetosonic waves. We also study the effect of high wave amplitudes on relativistic electron scattering. For typical conditions in the earth's radiation belts, the quasi-linear approximation cannot accurately describe electron scattering for waves with averaged amplitudes >300 pT. We discuss various applications of the obtained results for modeling electron dynamics in the radiation belts and in the Earth's magnetotail.

  11. Beating HF waves to generate VLF waves in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Kossey, Paul; Chang, Chia-Lie; Labenski, John

    2012-03-01

    Beat-wave generation of very low frequency (VLF) waves by two HF heaters in the ionosphere is formulated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The heater-induced differential thermal pressure force and ponderomotive force, which dominate separately in the D and F regions of the ionosphere, drive an electron current for the VLF emission. A comparison, applying appropriate ionospheric parameters shows that the ponderomotive force dominates in beat-wave generation of VLF waves. Three experiments, one in the nighttime in the absence of D and E layers and two in the daytime in the presence of D and E layers, were performed. X mode HF heaters of slightly different frequencies were transmitted at CW full power. VLF waves at 10 frequencies ranging from 3.5 to 21.5 kHz were generated. The frequency dependencies of the daytime and nighttime radiation intensities are quite similar, but the nighttime radiation is much stronger than the daytime one at the same radiation frequency. The intensity ratio is as large as 9 dB at 11.5 kHz. An experiment directly comparing VLF waves generated by the beat-wave approach and by the amplitude modulation (AM) approach was also conducted. The results rule out the likely contribution of the AM mechanism acting on the electrojet and indicate that beat-wave in the VLF range prefers to be generated in the F region of the ionosphere through the ponderomotive nonlinearity, consistent with the theory. In the nighttime experiment, the ionosphere was underdense to the HF heaters, suggesting a likely setting for effective beat-wave generation of VLF waves by the HF heaters.

  12. Standing wave tube electro active polymer wave energy converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Philippe; Wattez, Ambroise; Ardoise, Guillaume; Melis, C.; Van Kessel, R.; Fourmon, A.; Barrabino, E.; Heemskerk, J.; Queau, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 4 years SBM has developed a revolutionary Wave Energy Converter (WEC): the S3. Floating under the ocean surface, the S3 amplifies pressure waves similarly to a Ruben's tube. Only made of elastomers, the system is entirely flexible, environmentally friendly and silent. Thanks to a multimodal resonant behavior, the S3 is capable of efficiently harvesting wave energy from a wide range of wave periods, naturally smoothing the irregularities of ocean wave amplitudes and periods. In the S3 system, Electro Active Polymer (EAP) generators are distributed along an elastomeric tube over several wave lengths, they convert wave induced deformations directly into electricity. The output is high voltage multiphase Direct Current with low ripple. Unlike other conventional WECs, the S3 requires no maintenance of moving parts. The conception and operating principle will eventually lead to a reduction of both CAPEX and OPEX. By integrating EAP generators into a small scale S3, SBM achieved a world first: direct conversion of wave energy in electricity with a moored flexible submerged EAP WEC in a wave tank test. Through an extensive testing program on large scale EAP generators, SBM identified challenges in scaling up to a utility grid device. French Government supports the consortium consisting of SBM, IFREMER and ECN in their efforts to deploy a full scale prototype at the SEMREV test center in France at the horizon 2014-2015. SBM will be seeking strategic as well as financial partners to unleash the true potentials of the S3 Standing Wave Tube Electro Active Polymer WEC.

  13. The role of wave-wave interaction during stratospheric splits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Andreas; Plumb, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are the most studied example of troposphere-stratosphere coupling. They are often categorized as either splits (dominated by wavenumber 2) or displacements (wavenumber 1) and many studies (e.g. Charlton and Polvani (2007)) found statistically significant differences between the zonal wind fields and associated momentum fluxes. These differences are observed from the stratosphere to the surface. Our study focuses on how wave-wave interactions within the stratosphere can determine the type of SSW. We derive an energy budget for each wavenumber that allows us to quantify the major stratospheric processes within each wavenumber as well as the energy transfer from one wavenumber into another. Calculating these budgets, using MERRA reanalysis data, we find that for many split events the energy flux into the stratosphere is predominantly in wavenumber one. Thus, wave-wave interactions within the stratosphere, which can flux energy between wavenumbers, play a key role in splitting the polar stratospheric vortex. However, the signal is weak when we calculate composites over all splits as the timing of wave-wave interactions is unrelated to classic definitions (e.g. central date) highlighting the need for a dynamically more meaningful definition of SSWs. In order to better understand the role of wave-wave interactions, we employ GFDL's FMS shallow water model to simulate the stratospheric vortex under idealized forcings (similar to Polavani et al. (1994)). Contrary to many other idealized experiments, we are able to simulate both types of warmings with pure wavenumber one or two forcings. We further explore the strength of the necessary forcing to cause stratospheric splits in relation to the state of of the polar vortex. These results are compared to the work of Matthewman and Esler (2011) on splits being a result of resonance. We finally use the energy budget described above to determine the importance of wave-wave interaction in this

  14. Ion cyclotron waves at Mars: Occurrence and wave properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Russell, C. T.; Leinweber, H. K.

    2014-07-01

    Ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) are generated during the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian exosphere in a process called ion pickup. Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) detected waves near the proton gyrofrequency, indicating pickup of the exospheric hydrogen. To analyze these waves, we first improve the zero levels of the MGS magnetic field data taken during the first aerobreaking phase and then perform a statistical study of the ICWs observed from just outside the Martian bow shock to over 14 Mars radii away. These ICW events typically last for 5 to 30 min but can occasionally last for hours. The wave power decreases slowly with distance on both the upstream and downstream sides. From the variation of wave properties with the strength of the background field, we find that there are likely still remaining offsets in at least some the data sets even after applying our calibration technique. Thus, we use the events with a strong background field to examine the wave properties that depend on an accurate determination of the field direction and strength. We find the pickup angle associated with the largest occurrence rate of ICWs to be around 45°, but neither the wave amplitude, nor wave frequency, nor wave duration appear to vary with pickup angle. Finally, we find the waves with background field strength greater than 4 nT occur on both the positive and negative electric field sides of Mars but have a larger occurrence rate on the side of Mars in the positive electric field direction (which is defined as the direction of the cross product of the magnetic field vector and solar wind flow vector).

  15. Three-dimensional freak waves and higher-order wave-wave resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badulin, S. I.; Ivonin, D. V.; Dulov, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    Quite often the freak wave phenomenon is associated with the mechanism of modulational (Benjamin-Feir) instability resulted from resonances of four waves with close directions and scales. This weakly nonlinear model reflects some important features of the phenomenon and is discussing in a great number of studies as initial stage of evolution of essentially nonlinear water waves. Higher-order wave-wave resonances attract incomparably less attention. More complicated mathematics and physics explain this disregard partially only. The true reason is a lack of adequate experimental background for the study of essentially three-dimensional water wave dynamics. We start our study with the classic example of New Year Wave. Two extreme events: the famous wave 26.5 meters and one of smaller 18.5 meters height (formally, not freak) of the same record, are shown to have pronounced features of essentially three-dimensional five-wave resonant interactions. The quasi-spectra approach is used for the data analysis in order to resolve adequately frequencies near the spectral peak fp ≈ 0.057Hz and, thus, to analyze possible modulations of the dominant wave component. In terms of the quasi-spectra the above two anomalous waves show co-existence of the peak harmonic and one at frequency f5w = 3/2fp that corresponds to maximum of five-wave instability of weakly nonlinear waves. No pronounced marks of usually discussed Benjamin-Feir instability are found in the record that is easy to explain: the spectral peak frequency fp corresponds to the non-dimensional depth parameter kD ≈ 0.92 (k - wavenumber, D ≈ 70 meters - depth at the Statoil platform Draupner site) that is well below the shallow water limit of the instability kD = 1.36. A unique data collection of wave records of the Marine Hydrophysical Institute in the Katsiveli platform (Black Sea) has been analyzed in view of the above findings of possible impact of the five-wave instability on freak wave occurrence. The data cover

  16. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. PMID:22627995

  17. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  18. Localized wave pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D L; Henderson, T L; Krueger, K L; Lewis, D K; Zilkowski, R N

    1999-06-01

    The Localized Wave project of the Strategic System Support Program has recently finished an experiment in cooperation with the Advanced SONAR group of the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin. The purpose of the experiment was three-fold. They wanted to see if (1) the LW pulse could propagate over significant distances, to see if (2) a new type of array and drive system specifically designed for the pulse would increase efficiency over single frequency tone bursts, and to see if (3) the complexity of our 24 channel drivers resulted in better efficiency than a single equivalent pulse driving a piston. In the experiment, several LW pulses were launched from the Lake Travis facility and propagated over distances of either 100 feet or 600 feet, through a thermocline for the 600 foot measurements. The results show conclusively that the Localized Wave will propagate past the near field distance. The LW pulses resulted in extremely broad frequency band width pulses with narrow spatial beam patterns and unmeasurable side lobes. Their array gain was better than most tone bursts and further, were better than their equivalent piston pulses. This marks the first test of several Low Diffraction beams against their equivalent piston pulses, as well as the first propagation of LW pulses over appreciable distances. The LW pulse is now proven a useful tool in open water, rather than a laboratory curiosity. The experimental system and array were built by ARL, and the experiments were conducted by ARL staff on their standard test range. The 600 feet measurements were made at the farthest extent of that range.

  19. Optimization of one-way wave equations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Suh, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of wave extrapolation is based on the square-root equation or one-way equation. The full wave equation represents waves which propagate in both directions. On the contrary, the square-root equation represents waves propagating in one direction only. A new optimization method presented here improves the dispersion relation of the one-way wave equation. -from Authors

  20. Magnetodynamic waves in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Alexander I.

    2013-02-01

    The paper describes experiments to search for a variable magnetic field close to a rechargeable conductive flat plate and a ball in the air, as well as an experiment looking for a variable electric field near a rotating permanent magnet. It has been found that variable electric and magnetic fields do not induce each other within the measurement error. It means that rotary Maxwell's equations are not applicable in the near-field zone and the classical concept of displacement current in vacuum (air) has no physical meaning. A conclusion is made on the existence of transverse magnetodynamic waves. Statics and dynamics of the magnetic field near the permanent magnet rod are investigated experimentally. The methods to compute magnetodynamic waves from any source are presented. Four types of polarization of these waves are identified: linear, circular, toroidal and mixed. Concentration and deflection of magnetodynamic waves are observed on introducing inhomogeneity in the form of a ferrite rod into their propagation way, which is similar to diffraction in optics. Secondary magnetodynamic waves from the induced magnetic moments in atoms of ferrite are registered near its surface, which is like reflection in optics. Some ideas for observation of effects similar to dispersion and interference are presented for magnetodynamic waves. The structure and properties of electrodynamic, magnetodynamic and electromagnetic waves are discussed. The ideas of experiments to search for their unknown properties are described. In conclusion, technical applications of magnetodynamic waves such as magnetography, magnetic tomography and other are considered.