Science.gov

Sample records for successful beam tests

  1. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  2. Report of test beam subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; Groom, D.; Harrison, M.; Toohig, T.; Gustafson, R.; Kirk, T.

    1986-01-01

    Tasks reported on include: exploration of issues of demand for test beams, and particularly for high energy; fleshing out the possibilities of the High Energy Booster beams; and seeking inexpensive ways of providing high energy facilities. (LEW)

  3. GLAST beam test at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Engovatov, D.; Anthony, P.; Atwood, W.

    1996-10-01

    In May and June, a beam test for GLAST calorimeter technologies was conducted. A parasitic low intensity electron/tagged photon beam line into the End Station A at SLAC was commissioned and used. The preliminary stage of the test was devoted to measuring the performance of the parasitic beam. In the main test we studied the response of GLAST prototype CsI and scintillating fiber calorimeters to the electrons and photons. Results of this work are discussed.

  4. Flight-Tested Prototype of BEAM Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi; James, Mark; Wang, David

    2006-01-01

    Researchers at JPL have completed a software prototype of BEAM (Beacon-based Exception Analysis for Multi-missions) and successfully tested its operation in flight onboard a NASA research aircraft. BEAM (see NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9; and Vol. 27, No. 3) is an ISHM (Integrated Systems Health Management) technology that automatically analyzes sensor data and classifies system behavior as either nominal or anomalous, and further characterizes anomalies according to strength, duration, and affected signals. BEAM (see figure) can be used to monitor a wide variety of physical systems and sensor types in real time. In this series of tests, BEAM monitored the engines of a Dryden Flight Research Center F-18 aircraft, and performed onboard, unattended analysis of 26 engine sensors from engine startup to shutdown. The BEAM algorithm can detect anomalies based solely on the sensor data, which includes but is not limited to sensor failure, performance degradation, incorrect operation such as unplanned engine shutdown or flameout in this example, and major system faults. BEAM was tested on an F-18 simulator, static engine tests, and 25 individual flights totaling approximately 60 hours of flight time. During these tests, BEAM successfully identified planned anomalies (in-flight shutdowns of one engine) as well as minor unplanned anomalies (e.g., transient oil- and fuel-pressure drops), with no false alarms or suspected false-negative results for the period tested. BEAM also detected previously unknown behavior in the F- 18 compressor section during several flights. This result, confirmed by direct analysis of the raw data, serves as a significant test of BEAM's capability.

  5. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, Sarah E; Du Bois, Andrew J; Storlie, Curtis B; Rust, William N; Du Bois, David H; Modl, David G; Quinn, Heather M; Blanchard, Sean P; Manuzzato, Andrea

    2010-12-16

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  6. An Accelerated Collaboration Meets with Beaming Success

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-09

    Maintaining a smaller, aging U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without underground nuclear testing requires the capability to verify and validate the complex computer calculations on which stockpile confidence is based. This capability, in turn, requires nonnuclear hydrodynamic tests (hydrotests) that can x-ray stages of the implosion process, providing freeze-frame photos of materials imploding at speeds of more than 16,000 kilometers per hour. The images will yield important information on shapes and densities of metals and other materials under the extreme pressures and temperatures generated by the detonation of high explosives. The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamics Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos national Laboratory is a two-arm x-ray imaging system that will provide such images, capturing the inner workings of a mock nuclear explosion with high resolution. Scientists compare the radiographic images with computer models, examine the differences, and refine the models to more accurately represent weapon behavior. One of DARHT's arms (now called DARHT-II) recently got a ''leg up'' through a collaboration of Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos scientists, using a Livermore accelerator to test its subsystems and codes.

  7. Successive approximation algorithm for beam-position-monitor-based LHC collimator alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Nosych, Andriy A.; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Wollmann, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Collimators with embedded beam position monitor (BPM) button electrodes will be installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the current long shutdown period. For the subsequent operation, BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam orbit. In this manner, a better beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation and takes into account a correction of the nonlinear BPM sensitivity to beam displacement and an asymmetry of the electronic channels processing the BPM electrode signals. A software implementation was tested with a prototype collimator in the Super Proton Synchrotron. This paper presents results of the tests along with some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC.

  8. NASA, ATK Successfully Test Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Video Gallery

    With a loud roar and mighty column of flame, NASA and ATK Aerospace Systems successfully completed a two-minute, full-scale test of the largest and most powerful solid rocket motor designed for fli...

  9. Testing the assumptions of chronosequences in succession.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Edward A; Miyanishi, Kiyoko

    2008-05-01

    Many introductory ecology textbooks illustrate succession, at least in part, by using certain classic studies (e.g. sand dunes, ponds/bogs, glacial till, and old fields) that substituted space for time (chronosequence) in determining the sequences of the succession. Despite past criticisms of this method, there is continued, often uncritical, use of chronosequences in current research on topics besides succession, including temporal changes in biodiversity, productivity, nutrient cycling, etc. To show the problem with chronosequence-based studies in general, we review evidence from studies that used non-chronosequence methods (such as long-term study of permanent plots, palynology, and stand reconstruction) to test the space-for-time substitution in four classic succession studies. In several cases, the tests have used the same locations and, in one case, the same plots as those in the original studies. We show that empirical evidence invalidates the chronosequence-based sequences inferred in these classic studies. PMID:18341585

  10. The final focus test beam project

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 {mu}m. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Beam-based alignment of the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Raimondi, P.; Oide, K.; Floettmann, K.

    1995-12-01

    Beam-based alignment of quadrupole and sextupole magnets is crucial for the overall performance of linear collider final focus systems, especially for elimination of backgrounds and higher-order aberrations. At the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), alignment tolerances required for achieving the desired spot size are 100 microns in the horizontal and 30 microns in the vertical. Using a combination of independent magnet power supplies, hi-h-resolution stripline beam position monitors and precision magnet movers, the FFTB can be aligned to these tolerances in about 8 hours. Description of the algorithm, presentation of alignment results, and possible improvements to the system are discussed.

  12. Results from the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.; Final Focus Test Beam Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    first experimental results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) are given in this report. The FFTB has been constructed as a prototype for the final focus system of a future TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider. The vertical dimension of the 47 GeV electron beam form the SLAC linac has been reduced at the focal point of the FFTB by a demagnification of 320 to a beam height of approximately 70 nanometers.

  13. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; ,

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  14. QCD tests with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Takashi; SLD Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The authors present three QCD studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, utilizing the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. They performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method. They studied the correlation between the Z{sup 0} spin and the event-plane orientation in polarized Z{sup 0} decays into three jets.

  15. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Vicario, C.; Serafini, L.; Jones, S.

    2006-11-27

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the tendency of intense electron beams to rearrange to produce uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation. We show that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  16. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J.; Zavala, G.

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  17. Beam alignment tests for therapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.R.; Larsen, R.D.; Bjarngard, B.E.

    1981-12-01

    Beam spot displacement, collimator asymmetry, and movement of either collimator or gantry rotational axis can cause misalignment of the X ray beam from a therapy accelerator. A test method, sensitive to all the above problems, consists of double-exposing a film, located at the isocenter, for two gantry positions, 180/sup 0/ apart. Opposite halves of the field are blocked for each exposure. A lateral shift of one half with respect to the other indicates the presence of one of the problems mentioned above. Additional tests are described, each of which is sensitive to only one of the problems and capable of quantifying the error.

  18. Operational test of micro-oven for 48Ca beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, K.; Kageyama, T.; Kidera, M.; Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    In order to supply a high-intensity and stable 48Ca beam from the RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, we are conducting operational tests of a micro-oven. A mixture of CaO and Al powders is placed into the crucible of the micro-oven and heated to produce metallic calcium by a reductive reaction. The successful production of a calcium beam was confirmed. In addition, we reduced the material consumption rate by using a so-called "hot liner," and we enhanced the beam intensity by applying a negative voltage bias to the micro-oven, the effect of which is similar to the effect of a "biased disk."

  19. The NuMI proton beam at Fermilab successes and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, S.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The NuMI beam at Fermilab has delivered over 5 x 10{sup 20} 120 GeV protons to the neutrino production target since the start for MINOS [1] neutrino oscillation experiment operation in 2005. We report on proton beam commissioning and operation status, including successes and challenges with this beam.

  20. The Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference. Terrestrial Test for Space Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Terrestrial Test for Space Success' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme of 'terrestrial test for space success.'

  1. TFTR neutral-beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Turitzin, N.M.; Newman, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    TFTR Neutral Beam System will have thirteen discharge ion sources, each with its own power supply. Twelve of these will be utilized for supplemental heating of the TFTR tokamak plasma, while the thirteenth will be dedicated to an off-machine test chamber for source development and/or conditioning. A test installation for one source was set up using prototype equipment to discover and correct possible deficiencies, and to properly coordinate the equipment. This test facility represents the first opportunity for assembling an integrated system of hardware supplied by diverse vendors, each of whom designed and built his equipment to performance specifications. For the installation and coordination of the different portions of the total system, particular attention was given to personnel safety and safe equipment operation. This paper discusses various system components, their characteristics, interconnection and control. Results of the recently initiated test phase will be reported at a later date.

  2. Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference: Space Mission Success Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Space Mission Success Through Testing' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme 'Space Mission Success Through Testing.'

  3. Vacuum straw tracker test beam run

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau; /Chicago U.

    2005-08-01

    This memorandum of understanding requests beam time at Fermilab during the 2005 Meson Test Beam run to measure the detection inefficiency of vacuum straw tubes. One of the future kaon experiments at J-PARC has the goal to measure the branching ratio of the neutral kaon ''Golden Mode'' K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} with a few hundred event sensitivity. This future J-PARC experiment is a follow up of a current KEK experiment, E391a which has been taking data since February 2004. E391a is a collaboration of five countries (Japan, United States, Russia, Korea, and Taiwan) with ten institutions (KEK, Saga U, Yamagata U, Osaka U, U of Chicago, Pusan U, JINR, NDA, Kyoto U, National Taiwan U, and RCNP). The branching ratio of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} is small, about 3 x 10{sup -11}. To first order, all kaon decays with final states with charged particles need to be vetoed, and those include K{sub e3}, K{sub {mu}3}, and K{sub {+-}0} (about 80% of all neutral kaon decay). The standard and typical veto power comes from sheet scintillator and may not be adequate. Vacuum straw tubes provides additional, independent and orthogonal veto power, but the detection inefficiency has not been known or measured in a detail way. The inefficiency of the straw has three sources, the electronics, the straw wall/wire, and the gas. We like to perform beam test to measure all three sources. There is much experience in straw detector technology, and some in vacuum straw technology (CKM R&D effort). The possible use of straws in the future K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} experiment will allow absolute photon/electron energy calibration (via K{sub {+-}0} decays), possible measurement of photon inefficiencies (via K{sub 000} with {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz), and as mentioned, charged particle veto. The results of this proposed beam test will provide new knowledge on the absorption cross section and will direct us on design issues for future neutral kaon decay experiments. Regarding

  4. Successful communications test for ESA's Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-10-01

    Mars Express in orbit around Mars hi-res Size hi-res: 592 kb Credits: ESA - Illustration by Medialab Mars Express in orbit around Mars Mars Express will left Earth for Mars in June 2003 when the positions of the two planets made for the shortest possible route, a condition that occurs once every twenty-six months. The intrepid spacecraft started its six-month journey from the Baikonur launch pad in Kazakhstan onboard a Russian Soyuz/Fregat launcher. Mars Express began the six-month interplanetary cruise at a velocity of 10 800 km/h relative to Earth. Five days before arrival in December 2003, Mars Express will eject the Beagle 2 lander, which will make its own way to the correct landing site on the surface. The orbiter will then manoeuvre into a highly elliptical capture orbit, from which it can move into its operational near-polar orbit. communications test Mars Express The MELACOM system is designed to communicate with Beagle 2, passing the lander's data to Mars Express's main antenna for relaying to Earth. The MELACOM test was done in collaboration between sites at Stanford (USA), New Norcia (Australia) and ESA's Space Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany. The 34-metre dish at Stanford pretended to be Beagle 2, using its greater size to overcome the large distance between Earth and the spacecraft. The test consisted of two sessions, a first one in which the Stanford's signal was sent to Mars Express's MELACOM, and a second one in which MELACOM sent a signal back to Stanford. Con McCarthy, ESA's Beagle 2 manager, who supervised the operation, said: "We were on a hilltop, outside San Francisco. It was 4:10 UT and Mars was clearly visible in the sky. The Stanford dish tracked Mars Express slowly, transmitting to it for 40 minutes." Then the spacecraft re-oriented itself to point its main antenna to Earth to confirm it had received the signal. The confirmation was received by ESA's New Norcia ground station and relayed to ESOC. Following this, at 6:10 UT

  5. High Test Scores: The Wrong Road to National Economic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A widely held view is that good schools are essential to a nation's international economic success and that high test scores on international tests of academic skills and knowledge indicate how good a nation's schools are. The widespread belief that good schools are an important contributor to a nation's economic success in the world is supported…

  6. Testing Time Dilation on Fast Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saathoff, G.; Reinhardt, S.; Bernhardt, B.; Holzwarth, R.; Udem, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Bing, D.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Botermann, B.; Karpuk, S.; Novotny, C.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Huber, G.; Geppert, C.; Kühl, T.; Stöhlker, T.; Rempel, T.; Gwinner, G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the status of an experimental test of special-relativistic time dilation. Following an idea of Ives and Stilwell in 1938, we measure the forward and backward Doppler shifts of an electronic transition of fast moving ions, using high-precision laser spectroscopy. From these Doppler shifts both the ion velocity β = υ/c and the time dilation factor γ = γ {SR} (1 + hat α β 2 ) can be derived for testing Special Relativity. From measurements based on saturation spectroscopy on lithium ions stored at β = 0.03 and β = 0.06, we achieved an upper limit for deviation from Special Relativity of <=ft| {hat α } ; | \\underline < 8 × 10{ - 8} . Recent measurements on a β = 0.338 Li+ beam show similar sensitivity and promise an improvement by at least one order of magnitude. Finally we discuss present sensitivities to various coefficients in the photon and particle sector of the Standard-Model Extension, as well as possible modifications of the experiment for the test of further, hitherto unbounded, coefficients.

  7. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  8. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sojeong; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-01

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  9. Relativistic-beam Pickup Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Simpson, J.; Konecny, R.; Suddeth, D.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical response of pickups and cavities to charged particle beams has been an area of considerable activity and concern for accelerator systems. With the advent of stochastic beam cooling, the position and frequency response of beam pickups has become a crucial parameter in determining the performance of these systems. The most frequently used method for measuring and calibrating beam pickups has been the use of current carrying wires to simulate relativistic beams. This method has sometimes led to incorrect predictions of the pickup response to particle beams. The reasons for the differences are not always obvious but could arise from: (1) wires are incapable of exciting or permitting many of the modes that beams excite or (2) the interaction of the wire with large arrays of pickups produce results which are not easily predicted. At Argonne these deficiencies are resolved by calibrating pickups with a relativistic electron beam. This facility is being used extensively by several groups to measure beam pickup devices and is the primary calibration facility for pickups to be used in the FNAL TEV-I Antiproton Source.

  10. Differentiation of Schools by Successfulness on a Statewide Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, William D.

    The Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) offers a relatively new way to measure achievement in schools. Six content areas are tested in grades 3 and 5. The use of the MSPAP to differentiate among schools in terms of success was studied using data for the 775 Maryland elementary schools that were active in 1995. Test results for…

  11. Thirteenth Space Simulation Conference. The Payload: Testing for Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, J. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and test measurements and techniques are presented. Simulation of upper atmosphere oxygen was discussed. Problems and successes of retrieving and repairing orbiting spacecrafts by utilizing the shuttle are outlined.

  12. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, M.; Hesse, B. M.; Nairz, O.; Jäkel, O.

    2011-05-01

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  13. Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results

    SciTech Connect

    Temnykh A.; Babzien M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

    2010-11-10

    A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with {approx}60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

  14. Increasing Student Success at Minority-Serving Institutions: Findings from the BEAMS Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rios, Melissa; Leegwater, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    This monograph details the process Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS) institutions used to craft data-driven action plans to improve student success. More than 100 four-year Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal colleges and universities participated in the five-year program that produced best practices…

  15. Application of successive test feature classifier to dynamic recognition problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yukinobu; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Tanaka, Takayuki

    2005-12-01

    A novel successive learning algorithm is proposed for efficiently handling sequentially provided training data based on Test Feature Classifier (TFC), which is non-parametric and effective even for small data. We have proposed a novel classifier TFC utilizing prime test features (PTF) which is combination feature subsets for getting excellent performance. TFC has characteristics as follows: non-parametric learning, no mis-classification of training data. And then, in some real-world problems, the effectiveness of TFC is confirmed through way applications. However, TFC has a problem that it must be reconstructed even when any sub-set of data is changed. In the successive learning, after recognition of a set of unknown objects, they are fed into the classifier in order to obtain a modified classifier. We propose an efficient algorithm for reconstruction of PTFs, which is formalized in cases of addition and deletion of training data. In the verification experiment, using the successive learning algorithm, we can save about 70% on the total computational cost in comparison with a batch learning. We applied the proposed successive TFC to dynamic recognition problems from which the characteristic of training data changes with progress of time, and examine the characteristic by the fundamental experiments. Support Vector Machine (SVM) which is well established in algorithm and on practical application, was compared with the proposed successive TFC. And successive TFC indicated high performance compared with SVM.

  16. Review of tolerances at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Roy, G.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    We review the tolerances associated with the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). We have computed the acceptability window of the input beam for orbit jitter, emittance beta functions mismatch, incoming dispersion and coupling; tolerances on magnet alignment, strength and multipole content; and the initial tuneability capture of the line. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Fatigue test of RC beams strengthened with prestressed CFLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Xie, Jianhe

    2008-11-01

    Applying prestress to fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) can be used more efficiently since a greater portion energy of its tensile capacity is engaged. Based on carbon fiber laminate (CFL), fatigue tests are made to find out the fatigue behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with prestressed CFL. The interfacial debonding is a main failure mode for RC beams strengthened with prestressed CFLs under the cyclic loading. Furthermore, it has been found that the stress value of CFLs decide whether the additional prestressing has a negative or positive effect on the fatigue behavior of the strengthened beam, and the excessive prestressing would reduce the fatigue life of the strengthened beam.

  18. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  19. Beam-based optical tuning of the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Burke, D.; Hartman, S.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Iverson, R.; Raimondi, P.; Spence, W.; Bharadwaj, V.; Halling, M.

    1995-05-01

    In order to reduce the SLAC 46.6 GeV beam to submicron sizes, the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) must meet tight tolerances on many aberrations. These aberrations include: mismatch and coupling of the incoming beam; dispersion; chromaticity; lattice errors in the chromatic correction sections; lattice coupling; and residual sextupole content in the quadrupoles. In order to address these aberrations, the authors have developed a procedure which combines trajectory analysis, use of intermediate wire scanners, and a pair of novel beam size monitors at the IP. This procedure allows the FFTB IP spot to be reduced to sizes under 100 nanometers.

  20. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O`Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Green, D.; Martin, P.; Morfin, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Okusawa, T.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Asano, Y.; Mann, T.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-08-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal.

  1. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100×150 μm2 pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  2. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xufei, X. Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  3. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  4. Relaxation training affects success and activation on a teaching test.

    PubMed

    Helin, P; Hänninen, O

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of an audiocassette-relaxation training period (ART) and its timing on success at a teaching test (lecture type), on observed tension and on a number of physiological responses. The electrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (EMG), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), of female and male instructor candidates, were examined before, during and after the teaching test as well as during its critique. The relaxation period (18 min) was presented either on the preceding night (ARTnt) or immediately before the teaching test (ARTimm). The influence of personality (types A-B and extrovert-introvert) was also studied. ART improved success at the teaching test in both sexes. In males (but not in females), ARTimm decreased EMG level during the test, but ARTnt increased EMG at the test period as compared to the control group. In females, both ARTnt and ARTimm lowered HR more than in the control group. ARTimm lowered systolic BP in both sexes. Personality types affected the ART responses; ART was more beneficial for type A than B subjects. PMID:3325481

  5. Fatigue Testing of Wing Beam by the Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleakney, William M

    1938-01-01

    Preliminary fatigue tests on two aluminum-alloy wing-beam specimens subjected to reversed axial loading are described. The motion used consists in incorporating one or two reciprocating motors in a resonance system of which the specimen is the spring element. A description is given of the reciprocating motors, and of the method of assembling and adjusting the vibrating system. The results indicate that the method is well adapted to fatigue tests of not only uniform wing beams but also wing beams with asymmetrical local reinforcements.

  6. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  7. Buckling tests on eccentrically loaded beam columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassens, J

    1941-01-01

    Formulas are obtained for computing the buckling load of rods eccentrically loaded at each end, the computation being extended in particular to the inelastic range. The test results are graphically presented on three sets of curves. Two of these, at least for the elastic range, are independent of the material tested. The third set, which is independent of the material, possesses greater clearness and is therefore used for comparing the test results with the theoretical.

  8. Shashlik calorimeter Beam-test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badier, J.; Busson, Ph.; Charlot, C.; Dobrzynski, L.; Tanaka, R.; Bordalo, P.; Ramos, S.; Bityukov, S.; Obraztsov, V.; Ostankov, A.; Zaitchenko, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guschin, E.; Issakov, V.; Mussienko, Y.; Semenjuk, I.

    1994-08-01

    Results from an extensive study of nonprojective Shashlik calorimeter prototypes are reported. Nine (47 × 47 mm 2) towers were exposed to a high energy electron beam at CERN SPS and read out by silicon photodiodes followed by low noise preamplifiers. The main results are the measurements of the energy and shower position resolution and the angular resolution of the electron shower direction. The shower direction measurement is encouraging being in agreement at the tower center with a resolution of σθ(mrad) = 70/√ E (10 mrad for 50 GeV electrons). The uniformity of the calorimeter response is found to be better than ± 1%. The mean light yield measured in Shashlik towers equipped with Kuraray Y7 WLS fibres and aluminized at the front end of the tower is of the order of 13 photons/MeV.

  9. ESTB: A New Beam Test Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Fieguth, T.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Jaros, J.; Jobe, K.; Keller, L.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) is a beam line at SLAC using a small fraction of the bunches of the 13.6 GeV electron beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), restoring test beam capabilities in the large End Station A (ESA) experimental hall. ESTB will provide one of a kind test beam essential for developing accelerator instrumentation and accelerator R&D, performing particle and particle astrophysics detector research, linear collider machine and detector interface (MDI) R&D studies, development of radiation-hard detectors, and material damage studies with several distinctive features. In the past, 18 institutions participated in the ESA program at SLAC. In stage I, 4 new kicker magnets will be added to divert 5 Hz of the LCLS beam to the A-line. A new beam dump will be installed and a new Personnel Protection System (PPS) is being built in ESA. In stage II, a secondary hadron target will be installed, able to produce pions up to about 12 GeV/c at 1 particle/pulse.

  10. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, B. |; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  11. The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

    2012-05-20

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

  12. beam loss scenarios for MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Johnstone, Carol; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets, gas-filled RF cavities, and other apparatus being developed to cool intense, large-emittance muon beams. In this study the results of Monte Carlo modeling of several beam loss scenarios are presented. The MTA facility was designed to test targets and other muon cooling apparatus using the intense Fermilab Linac beam. The requested intensity of the proton beam for the MTA is essentially full Linac capability, or 1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse and an energy of 400 MeV. Two modes of operation will be supported in the MuCOOL beamline: one mode for emittance measurements (and beamline studies) and a second mode for MTA experiments. Maximum beam intensity for these two modes is: 9.6 x 10{sup 15} protons/hr - 600 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity (1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) to the emittance beam absorber and 9.6 x 10{sup 14} protons/hour - 60 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity to experiments in the MTA experimental hall. This extremely high intensity implies careful investigation into and application of proper shielding materials and configuration in order to satisfy the following two requirements: (i) to reduce the instantaneous dose rate outside of the experimental enclosure to prescribed levels appropriate for the area considered; (ii) to ensure the civil construction of the hall is capable of additional shielding and, further, that the weight of the shielding is commensurate with the loading specifications of the enclosure, notably the ceiling. A number of scenarios for beam loss at different locations were studied in order to determine the maximum beam intensity which is in compliance with the existing shielding. The modeling was performed with the MARS15 code.

  13. Beam Profile Monitor Tests at the SLAC FFTB^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norem, J.; Dawson, J.; Haberichter, W.; Reed, L.; Yang, X.-F.; Spencer, J.; Saleski, M.

    1996-05-01

    The next generation linear colliders require beam sizes as small as 5 nm for efficient collisions between electron and positron beams. The difficulty of producing and maintaining such beams in stable collision means that bunch-to-bunch measurements need to be made quickly and precisely. We are developing a new technique using non-imaging gamma optics having good time resolution and sensitivity to correlations when the expected resolution is a few nm. Apparatus has been set up and made operational in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC and we have begun to tune and test components. We will describe this setup and our initial measurements together with Monte Carlo simulations based on using foils and wires (bremsstrahlung) and laser backscattering (Compton) as gamma sources to measure the beam size at IP1 of experiment E144. For the NLC we could also use beamsstrahlung generated by the strong beam-beam interaction at the IP to provide a comparable nonintercepting monitor. \\overline ^1Funded by the US Department of Energy under contracts W-31-109-ENG-38 and DE-AC03-76SF00515.

  14. Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B.; Sonato, P.; De Muri, M.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

  15. ATM/cable arch and beam structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structural testing is described of an Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) cable arch and beam assembly, using static loads to simulate the critical conditions expected during transportation and launch of the ATM. All test objectives were met. Stress and deflection data show that the assembly is structurally adequate for use in the ATM.

  16. Beam test results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for future upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellist, C.; Gligorova, A.; Huse, T.; Pacifico, N.; Sandaker, H.

    2013-12-01

    3D silicon has undergone an intensive beam test programme which has resulted in the successful qualification for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade project to be installed in 2013-2014. This paper presents selected results from this study with a focus on the final IBL test beam of 2012 where IBL prototype sensors were investigated. 3D devices were studied with 4 GeV positrons at DESY and 120 GeV pions at the SPS at CERN. Measurements include tracking efficiency, charge sharing, time over threshold and cluster size distributions as a function of incident angle for IBL 3D design sensors. Studies of 3D silicon sensors in an anti-proton beam test for the AEgIS experiment are also presented.

  17. Beam 'notching' tests with the main ring super damper

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike; Crisp, Jim; /Fermilab

    1995-01-01

    The original operations scenario to provide 12 proton bunches for the accelerator studies in the fall had them injecting 12 partial Booster batches into the main ring, accelerating them to flattop, then coalescing them. One of the main limitations of these coalescing studies for the last few months has been the inability of the Booster to provide enough beam without radiation trips. These radiation trips are considered difficult to eliminate due to the fact that the unwanted Booster beam cannot be aborted cleanly. During last week's study period they successfully used a new method that shows much promise.

  18. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    SciTech Connect

    Nocentini, R. Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-04-08

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m{sup 2} in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m{sup 2}, for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and

  19. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocentini, R.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m2 in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m2, for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and correlates

  20. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Panel Successfully Tested in Rocket Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Actively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) components are enabling or enhancing for a broad range of hypersonic and reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems. Teaming with other NASA centers, the Air Force, and industry, the Glenn Ceramics Branch has successfully tested multiple cooled CMC panel concepts in high-heat-flux, high-pressure, flowing rocket engine combustion gas environments. Sub-element components survived multiple cycles and the severe thermal gradients imposed by combustion gas temperatures in excess of 5500 F and cryogenic hydrogen or ambient temperature water internal coolants. These demonstrations are critical for the continued development of this class of materials, and the research is expected to continue with additional concepts and increasingly larger and more complex geometries being fabricated and tested in a broad range of engine operating conditions.

  1. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    A full-scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite/epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 percent of design limit load during the combined upbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  2. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    A full scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite-epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 pct. of design limit load during the combined unbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  3. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-09-01

    A full-scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite/epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 percent of design limit load during the combined upbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  4. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jachim, S.P.; Natter, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be a heavily beam-loaded H/sup minus/ linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outlined. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Neutralization tests on the SERT II spacecraft. [of ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Orbit precession returned the SERT II spacecraft to continuous sunlight in January 1979 for the first time since early 1972, and new experiments were planned and conducted. Neutralization of an ion beam was accomplished by a second neutralizer cathode located 1 meter away. Plasma potential measurements were made of the plasma surrounding the ion beam and connecting the beam to the second neutralizer. When the density of the connecting plasma was increased by turning on the main discharge of a neighboring ion thruster, the neutralization of the ion beam occurred with improved (lower) coupling voltage. These and other tests reported should aid in the future design of spacecraft using electric thruster systems. Data taken indicate that cross neutralization of ion thrusters in a multiple thruster array should occur readily.

  6. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  7. TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injected power measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Dudek, L.E.; Gammel, G.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Lagin, L.; O'Connor, T.E.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.

    1989-05-01

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Test and control computer user's guide for a digital beam former test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexovich, Robert E.; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A Digital Beam Former Test System was developed to determine the effects of noise, interferers and distortions, and digital implementations of beam forming as applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite 2 (TDRS 2) architectures. The investigation of digital beam forming with application to TDRS 2 architectures, as described in TDRS 2 advanced concept design studies, was conducted by the NASA/Lewis Research Center for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. A Test and Control Computer (TCC) was used as the main controlling element of the digital Beam Former Test System. The Test and Control Computer User's Guide for a Digital Beam Former Test System provides an organized description of the Digital Beam Former Test System commands. It is written for users who wish to conduct tests of the Digital Beam forming Test processor using the TCC. The document describes the function, use, and syntax of the TCC commands available to the user while summarizing and demonstrating the use of the commands wtihin DOS batch files.

  9. Beam Test of a Time-of-Flight Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Ramberg, E.; Albrow, M.; Ronzhin, A.; Ertley, C.; Natoli, T.; May, E.; Byrum, K.; /Argonne

    2009-04-01

    We report on results of a Time-of-Flight, TOF, counter prototype in beam tests at SLAC and Fermilab. Using two identical 64-pixel Photonis Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers, MCP-PMTs, to provide start and stop signals, each having a 1 cm-long quartz Cherenkov radiator, we have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 14 ps.

  10. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  11. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; et al

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixelmore » cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.« less

  12. Lunar RFC Reliability Testing for Assured Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program has selected the closed cycle hydrogen oxygen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) as its baseline solar energy storage system for the lunar outpost and manned rover vehicles. Since the outpost and manned rovers are "human-rated", these energy storage systems will have to be of proven reliability exceeding 99 percent over the length of the mission. Because of the low (TRL=5) development state of the closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC at present, and because there is no equivalent technology base in the commercial sector from which to draw or infer reliability information from, NASA will have to spend significant resources developing this technology from TRL 5 to TRL 9, and will have to embark upon an ambitious reliability development program to make this technology ready for a manned mission. Because NASA would be the first user of this new technology, NASA will likely have to bear all the costs associated with its development. When well-known reliability estimation techniques are applied to the hydrogen oxygen RFC to determine the amount of testing that will be required to assure RFC unit reliability over life of the mission, the analysis indicates the reliability testing phase by itself will take at least 2 yr, and could take up to 6 yr depending on the number of QA units that are built and tested and the individual unit reliability that is desired. The cost and schedule impacts of reliability development need to be considered in NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) plans, since life cycle testing to build meaningful reliability data is the only way to assure "return to the moon, this time to stay, then on to Mars" mission success.

  13. RESULTS OF BEAM TESTS ON A HIGH CURRENT EBIS TEST STAND.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.; BELLAVIA,S.; HERSHCOVITCH,A.; KPONOU,A.; LOCKEY,R.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    1999-03-29

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory there is an R&D program to design an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for use in a compact ion injector to be developed for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The BNL effort is directed at developing an EBIS with intensities of 3 x 10{sup 9} particles/pulse of ions such as Au{sup 35+} and U{sup 45+}, and requires an electron beam on the order of 10A. The construction of a test stand (EBTS) with the full electron beam power and 1/3 the length of the EBIS for RHIC is nearing completion. Initial commissioning of the EBTS was made with pulsed electron beams of duration < 1ms and current up to 13 A. Details of the EBTS construction, results of the pulse tests, and preparations for DC electron beam tests are presented.

  14. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  15. Cooled Ceramic Composite Panel Tested Successfully in Rocket Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2003-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) structures are being considered for use along the walls of the hot-flow paths of rocket-based or turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion systems. They offer the combined benefits of substantial weight savings, higher operating temperatures, and reduced coolant requirements in comparison to components designed with traditional metals. These cooled structures, which use the fuel as the coolant, require materials that can survive aggressive thermal, mechanical, acoustic, and aerodynamic loads while acting as heat exchangers, which can improve the efficiency of the engine. A team effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and various industrial partners has led to the design, development, and fabrication of several types of regeneratively cooled panels. The concepts for these panels range from ultra-lightweight designs that rely only on CMC tubes for coolant containment to more maintainable designs that incorporate metal coolant containment tubes to allow for the rapid assembly or disassembly of the heat exchanger. One of the cooled panels based on an all-CMC design was successfully tested in the rocket combustion facility at Glenn. Testing of the remaining four panels is underway.

  16. Test beam performance of CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; CDF Upgrade Group

    1998-01-01

    CDF Plug Upgrade(tile-fiber) EM Calorimeter performed resolution of 15%/{radical}E{circle_plus}0.7% with non-linearity less than 1% in a energy range of 5-180 GeV at Fermilab Test Beam. Transverse uniformity of inside-tower-response of the EM Calorimeter was 2.2% with 56 GeV positron, which was reduced to 1.0% with response map correction. We observed 300 photo electron/GeV in the EM Calorimeter. Ratios of EM Calorimeter response to positron beam to that to {sup 137}Cs Source was stable within 1% in the period of 8 months.

  17. The space telescope NINA: results of a beam test calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; Pascale, M. P. D.; Morselli, A.; Furano, G.; Picozza, P.; Scoscini, A.; Sparvoli, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bonvicini, W.; Cirami, R.; Schiavon, P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Ciacio, F.; Castellano, M.; Circella, M.; Marzo, C. D.; Bartalucci, S.; Giuntoli, S.; Ricci, M.; Papini, P.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P.; Bakaldin, A.; Batishev, A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldashov, S.; Korotkov, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Murashov, A.; Voronov, S.; Boezio, M.

    1999-03-01

    In June 1998 the telescope NINA will be launched in space on board of the Russian satellite Resource-01 n.4. The main scientific objective of the mission is the study of the anomalous, galactic and solar components of the cosmic rays in the energy interval 10-200MeV/n. The core of the instrument is a silicon detector whose performances have been tested with a particle beam at the GSI Laboratory in Germany in 1997; we report here on the results obtained during the beam calibration.

  18. Final focus test beam alignment: A draft proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; Ruland, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam is a transport line designed to transmit 50 GeV electron beams of SLC emittance (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} radian-meters) straight through the central arm of the Beam Switchyard (BSY C line) with a final focus point out in the Research Yard but relatively near the end of the switchyard tunnel. The hardware, methods and procedures outlined in this proposal are dedicated to measuring the placement of mechanical objects with respect to certain defined geometric axes. We wish to emphasize that the very difficult problems of locating the effective magnetic axes of focusing elements, the effective electrical center of beam position monitors and even the effective axis of the incident beam relative to mechanical reference surfaces is outside the scope of this work. Further, this proposal is restricted to the act of measurement and does not consider the vital task of on-line mechanical repositioning of elements that will, in likelihood, be called upon during operation of the system. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Beam Physics of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V.V.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Fermilab's Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron storage ring designed for testing advanced accelerator physics concepts, including implementation of nonlinear integrable beam optics and experiments on optical stochastic cooling. The machine is currently under construction at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. In this report we present the goals and the current status of the project, and describe the details of machine design. In particular, we concentrate on numerical simulations setting the requirements on the design and supporting the choice of machine parameters.

  20. Testing the Weak Equivalence Principle with an antimatter beam at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Derking, H.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E. J.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O. M.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Strojek, I. M.; Storey, J.; Subieta, M.; Testera, G.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.; (AEgIS Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The goal of the AEgIS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen - the simplest atom consisting entirely of antimatter - with the ultimate precision of 1%. We plan to verify the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), one of the fundamental laws of nature, with an antimatter beam. The experiment consists of a positron accumulator, an antiproton trap and a Stark accelerator in a solenoidal magnetic field to form and accelerate a pulsed beam of antihydrogen atoms towards a free-fall detector. The antihydrogen beam passes through a moiré deflectometer to measure the vertical displacement due to the gravitational force. A position and time sensitive hybrid detector registers the annihilation points of the antihydrogen atoms and their time-of-flight. The detection principle has been successfully tested with antiprotons and a miniature moiré deflectometer coupled to a nuclear emulsion detector.

  1. Operational test of micro-oven for {sup 48}Ca beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, K. Kageyama, T.; Kidera, M.; Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-15

    In order to supply a high-intensity and stable {sup 48}Ca beam from the RIKEN 18-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, we are conducting operational tests of a micro-oven. A mixture of CaO and Al powders is placed into the crucible of the micro-oven and heated to produce metallic calcium by a reductive reaction. The successful production of a calcium beam was confirmed. In addition, we reduced the material consumption rate by using a so-called “hot liner,” and we enhanced the beam intensity by applying a negative voltage bias to the micro-oven, the effect of which is similar to the effect of a “biased disk.”.

  2. Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H.

    2006-04-27

    We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system.The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar{center_dot}l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

  3. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-21

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing (22)Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy. PMID:27352107

  4. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing 22Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3–5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  5. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  6. Test beam performance of the CDF plug upgrade hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, P.; CDF Plug Upgrade Group

    1998-01-13

    We report on the performance of the CDF End Plug Hadron Calorimeter in a test beam. The sampling calorimeter is constructed using 2 inch iron absorber plates and scintillator planes with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The linearity and energy resolution of the calorimeter response to pions, and the transverse uniformity of the response to muons and pions are presented. The parameter e/h, representing the ratio of the electromagnetic to hadronic response, is extracted from the data.

  7. Beam Test Results of the GlueX Forward Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Kevin; Moriya, Kei; Shepherd, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    GlueX is an experiment to begin running in the near future at Jefferson Lab. Our research group is responsible for the forward calorimeter (FCAL) that is designed to measure the energy of photons produced from the decays of mesons. Recently, we conducted a beam test at Jefferson Lab using a prototype of the FCAL. Its goal was to experimentally verify the energy resolution of the FCAL as a function of beam energy. The prototype was tested with recoil electrons ranging in energy from 113MeV to 277MeV. We obtained the resolution by comparing the reconstructed energy to the known energy. In addition, we corrected our measured resolution for multiple scattering and energy loss based on a GEANT4 simulation of the prototype. Another important goal of the beam test was to measure the timing resolution of the channels on our flash analog to digital converters (fADCs). For GlueX, we need to require the timing resolution to be much less than the bunch spacing (2ns). The results of our studies indicate that the energy resolution of the FCAL is consistent with our predictions. We also found the timing resolution as a function of signal size and the results agreed with a similar study. For signals of about at least 75mV, the timing resolution achieved was significantly lower than 2ns.

  8. Dynamic testing of a two-dimensional box truss beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Testing to determine the effects of joint freeplay and pretensioning of diagonal members on the dynamic characteristics of a two-dimensional box truss beam was conducted. The test article was ten bays of planar truss suspended by long wires at each joint. Each bay measured 2 meters per side. Pins of varying size were used to simulate various joint freeplay conditions. Single-point random excitation was the primary method of test. The rational fraction polynomial method was used to extract modal characteristics from test data. A finite element model of the test article was generated from which modal characteristics were predicted. These were compared with those obtained from tests. With the exception of the fundamental mode, correlation of theoretical and experimental results was poor, caused by the resonant coupling of local truss member bending modes with global truss beam modes. This coupling introduced many modes in the frequency range of interest whose frequencies were sensitive to joint boundary conditions. It was concluded that local/global coupling must be avoided in the frequency range where accurate modal characteristics are required.

  9. Beam tests of ionization chambers for the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Zwaska et al.

    2003-09-25

    We have conducted tests at the Fermilab Booster of ionization chambers to be used as monitors of the NuMI neutrino beamline. The chambers were exposed to proton fluxes of up to 10{sup 12} particles/cm{sup 2}/1.56 {micro}s. We studied space charge effects which can reduce signal collection from the chambers at large charged particle beam intensities.

  10. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    SciTech Connect

    Campabadal, F.; Fleta, C.; Key, M.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J.M.; Ullan, M.; Johansen, L.; Pommeresche, B.; Stugu, B.; Ciocio, A.; Fadeyev, V.; Gilchriese, M.; Haber, C.; Siegrist,J.; Spieler, H.; Vu, C.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Dowell, J.D.; Gallop, B.J.; Homer, R.J.; Jovanovic, P.; Mahout, G.; McMahon, T.J.; Wilson, J.A.; Barr, A.J.; Carter, J.R.; Fromant, B.P.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hill, J.C.; Lester, C.G.; Palmer, M.J.; Parker, M.A.; Robinson, D.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Shaw, R.J.; Anghinolfi, F.; Chesi, E.; Chouridou, S.; Fortin, R.; Grosse-Knetter, M.; Gruwe, M.; Ferrari, P.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Macpherson, A.; Niinikoski, T.; Pernegger, H.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Ruggiero, G.; Wallny, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Bialas, W.; Dabrowski, W.; Grybos, P.; Koperny, S.; Blocki, J.; Bruckman, P.; Gadomski, S.; Godlewski, J.; Gornicki, E.; Malecki, P.; Moszczynski, A.; Stanecka, E.; Stodulski, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Turala, M.; Wolter, M.; Ahmad, A.; Benes, J.; Carpentieri, C.; Feld, L.; Ketterer, C.; Ludwig,J.; Meinhardt, J.; Runge, K.; Mikulec, B.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; D'Onofrio,M.; Donega, M.; Moed, S.; Sfyrla, A.; Ferrere, D.; Clark, A.G.; Perrin,E.; Weber, M.; Bates, R.L.; Cheplakov, A.; Saxon, D.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.M.; Iwata, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kohriki, T.; Kondo, T.; Terada, S.; Ujiie, N.; Ikegami, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Brodbeck, T.; Chilingarov, A.; Hughes, G.; Ratoff, P.; Sloan, T.; Allport, P.P.; Casse,G.-L.; Greenall, A.; Jackson, J.N.; Jones, T.J.; King, B.T.; Maxfield,S.J.; Smith, N.A.; Sutcliffe, P.; Vossebeld, J.; Beck, G.A.; Carter,A.A.; Lloyd, S.L.; Martin, A.J.; Morris, J.; Morin, J.; Nagai, K.; Pritchard, T.W.; Anderson, B.E.; Butterworth, J.M.; Fraser, T.J.; Jones,T.W.; Lane, J.B.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.R.M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Freestone, J.; Foster, J.M.; Ibbotson, M.; Loebinger, F.K.; Pater, J.; Snow, S.W.; Thompson, R.J.; Atkinson, T.M.; et al.

    2004-08-18

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalized in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 1014 protons per square centimeter. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  11. Test beam performance of CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.

    1998-11-01

    CDF Plug Upgrade(tile-fiber) EM Calorimeter performed resolution of 15{percent}/{radical} (E) {circle_plus}0.7{percent} with non-linearity less than 1{percent} in a energy range of 5{endash}180 GeV at Fermilab Test Beam. Transverse uniformity of inside-tower-response of the EM Calorimeter was 2.2{percent} with 56 GeV positron, which was reduced to 1.0{percent} with response map correction. We observed 300 photo electron/GeV in the EM Calorimeter. Ratios of EM Calorimeter response to positron beam to that to {sup 137}C{sub s} Source was stable within 1{percent} in the period of 8 months. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Geant4 validation with CMS calorimeters test-beam data

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    CMS experiment is using Geant4 for Monte-Carlo simulation of the detector setup. Validation of physics processes describing hadronic showers is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c.

  13. Micromachining of commodity plastics by proton beam writing and fabrication of spatial resolution test-chart for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.; Kada, W.; Kohka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Ishii, Y.; Takano, K.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam writing is a direct-write technique and a promising method for the micromachining of commodity plastics such as acrylic resins. Herein, we describe the fabrication of microscopic devices made from a relatively thick (∼75 μm) acrylic sheet using proton beam writing. In addition, a software package that converts image pixels into coordinates data was developed, and the successful fabrication of a very fine jigsaw puzzle was achieved. The size of the jigsaw puzzle pieces was 50 × 50 μm. For practical use, a prototype of a line and space test-chart was also successfully fabricated for the determination of spatial resolution in neutron radiography.

  14. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  15. Representing School Success and Failure: Media Coverage of International Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    It is through the media that audiences come to learn about the apparent successes and failure of the education system. Despite this power, the connection of the media to educational leadership and policy making is often given little attention in determining the forces at play in evaluating what happens in schools. Using a critical discourse…

  16. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  17. Beam tests of a 3-D position sensitive scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labanti, C.; Hall, C.J.; Agrinier, B.; Byard, K.; Dean, A.J.; Goldwurm, A.; Harding, J.S.

    1989-02-01

    An array of 30 position sensitive scintillator bars has been tested in a gamma-ray beam from I.N.S.T.N. Van de Graff facility at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay, France. The gamma-ray energies ranged from 6 MeV to 17 MeV. The bars are similar to those proposed for use in the GRASP gamma-ray telescope satellite imaging plane. They are manufactured from CsI(T1) covered with a highly reflective diffusive wrapping, and are read out using large area PIN photodiodes. Each bar measures 15.0 cm by 1.3 cm by 1.3 cm. The beam test unit was comprised of 30 bars stacked in a 5 by 6 array. The photodiodes were optically coupled to the end face of each bar and were connected to a processing chain comprised of a low noise preamplifier, a high gain shaping amplifier, and a digitisation and data collection system. Several experiments were performed with the unit to assess the spectral response, position resolution, and background rejection capabilities of the complete detector. The test procedure is explained and some results are presented.

  18. Use of the argon aiming beam in visual function testing.

    PubMed

    Kelley, J S

    1978-12-01

    The aiming beam of the argon laser photocoagulator can be a useful tool in visual function testing. Applied with the slit lamp delivery system and fundus contact lens, it clearly documents the size of the blind spot surrounding the optic nerve head and the normal area of nonfunctional retina in the periphery. The size of pathologic field defects can be recorded on fundus photographs or retinal drawings by an observer. Safety precautions must be taken to protect all patients from excessive laser energy. PMID:736394

  19. The Final Focus Test Beam laser referene system

    SciTech Connect

    Bressler, V.E.; Ruland, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    The original design for the SLAC linac included an alignment reference system with 270 diffraction gratings situated along the 3000 meter linac. These gratings have provided SLAC with a global reference line repeatable to within 200 micro meters. For the Final Focus Test Beam, this laser system has been extended and 13 new diffraction gratings have been installed. Improvements targets and the availability of new instruments allows us to evaluate the performance of the laser reference system at the 510 micro meter level. An explanation of the system and the results of our evaluation are presented.

  20. Testing a Model of Teaching for Anxiety and Success for English Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Önem, Evrim; Ergenç, Iclal

    2013-01-01

    Much research has shown that there is a negative relationship between high levels of anxiety and success for English language teaching. This paper aimed to test a model of teaching for anxiety and success in English language teaching to affect anxiety and success levels at the same time in a control-experiment group with pre- and post-test study…

  1. Modified Mode-I Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) Fracture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    2001-01-01

    Five composite sandwich panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four of these panels had E-glass/vinylester facesheets and one had carbon/epoxy facesheets. The sandwich panels had different density PVC foam cores. The four E-glass panels had core densities of 80, 100, 130, 200 kg/cu m. The sandwich with carbon/epoxy 3 facesheets had a core with density of 100 kg/cu m. Fracture tests were conducted using a modified Cracked Sandwich Beam (CSB) test configuration. Load displacement curves were obtained for loading and unloading of the specimens during crack growth. Various increments of crack growth were monitored. Critical Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) were determined from the tests using the area method. The critical values of SERR can be considered the fracture toughness of the sandwich material. The fracture toughness ranged 367 J/sq m to 1350 J/sq m over the range of core densities. These results are compared to the Mode-I fracture toughness of the PVC foam core materials and values obtained for foam-cored sandwiches using the TSD specimen. Finite-element analyses (FEA) were performed for the test configuration and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). The SERR values determined from the FEA were scaled to the fracture loads, or critical loads, obtained from the modified CSB tests. These critical loads were in close agreement with the test values.

  2. Measuring the photon energy scale through test beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, Karina Flavia

    This dissertation aims at measuring the photon energy scale combining specialized Monte Carlo simulation with data taken during the combined ATLAS test beam in 2004. This work explains the steps taken to arrive at the photon energy scale, starting from the knowledge acquired for electrons. The chapters are structured as follows: Chapters 1 and 2 briefly introduce this work and the motivation behind it. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the LHC experiment and the ATLAS detector as a whole. Chapters 4 and 5 address in detail the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter and signal reconstruction at the cell level. Chapter 6 concentrates on the setup for the combined test beam with emphasis on the photon run. Chapter 7 details the event selection strategy used for the photon run analysis. Chapter 8 describes the generation and tuning of the special Monte Carlo for the photon run. Chapter 9 focuses on the highly specialized Monte Carlo studies that employed special calibration objects known as calibration hits. Chapter 10 details the methodology behind the measurement of the photon scale and evaluates it in terms of the electromagnetic calorimeter resolution. Chapters 11 and 12 present a summary of the results and the conclusions, respectively.

  3. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  4. STS-3, busiest and most successful test mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A short description of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia's third orbital test flight is presented. Included are discussions of the space science mission, medical and materials processing experiments, as well as the minor problems encountered.

  5. Successful First J-2X Combustion Stability Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA conducted a key stability test firing of the J-2X rocket engine Dec. 1, marking another step forward in development of the upper-stage engine that will carry humans farther into space than eve...

  6. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    In part one of this article, a description was given of a Ka-band test package developed to enable testing of the Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at 32 GHz. Test results were given for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration. This article is a companion article concerned with Ka-band test results for the test package in an on-the-antenna test configuration. Included are Ka-band zenith noise-temperature values, tipping-curve data, and subreflector test results obtained at the Cassegrain focal point, as well as at the final BWG focal point (located in a subterranean pedestal room). Test results show that, through the use of the Ka-band test package, the BWG antenna performance was successfully evaluated at Ka-band. The Ka-band test package operated well in all of the different antenna test configurations.

  7. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  8. Durability and behavior of prestressed concrete beams. Posttensioned concrete beam investigation, supplemental laboratory tests of beams exposed from 1961 to 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneil, E. F.; Odom, G. L.

    1984-10-01

    This report is the sixth in a series describing a study being conducted to develop information on the durability of prestressed concrete beams. This phase of the study is concerned with field and laboratory testing and with observation of posttensioning systems including end anchorages, end anchorage protection, posttensioning conduit, and posttensioning wires. In June 1961, 20 air-entrained, posttensioned concrete beams were placed at the Treat Island, Maine, exposure station. The beams were fabricated using four different types of posttensioning systems with 12 different types of end anchorage protection over external and flush anchorages. End anchorage protection was attached to the beams using six different types of joint preparation: bush-hammering, epoxy adhesive on sandblasted surface, retarding agent, sandblasted, sandblasted with primer, and no preparation. The end protections were made from three different mixtures: portland-cement concrete, epoxy concrete, and sand mortar. Eight beams were returned to the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) for autopsy and testing in September 1973 and December 1974. These beams were tested to determine the effects of severe environment described above on the posttensioning system. In January 1983, three more beams were returned to WES from Treat Island for autopsy and additional testing. The results of these additional tests are the subject of this investigation. If no further tests are made on the nine posttensioned beams that remain at Treat Island, this report will be the final report in the series.

  9. Study of internal energy flows in dipole vortex beams by knife edge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Bahl, Monika; Mehta, Dalip Singh; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2013-04-01

    The rotation of Poynting vector in dipole vortex beam (DVB) during propagation has been experimentally detected in a knife edge test. The dipole vortex beam is generated, when a collimated laser beam is incident on a phase mask, displayed on spatial light modulator (SLM) in reflection mode. The knife edge test reveals dipole configurations through strikingly distinct intensity intrusions in the geometrical shadow region.

  10. Adult Learning and High-Stakes Testing: Strategies for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Grace

    2004-01-01

    In this world of increasing competition for jobs and accountability in the workplace, adults are facing many new pressures, one of which is passing tests as part of the application process. This is especially difficult for adults who are academically challenged or did not go far enough with their education to feel comfortable in testing…

  11. Testing 1-2-3: The Way to Firing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Why do glaze tests? For a number of reasons. With so many glazes and underglazes being manufactured by different companies that label and number them differently, it can be confusing. Though some of the properties are similar, many are different. Glazes can be influenced by the cone or temperature they are fired to, the clay body they are placed…

  12. The 50 MeV Beam Test Facility at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.; Behrsing, G.; Kim, K.J.; Krupnick, J.; Matuk, C.; Selph, F.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1993-05-01

    A new beam line, expected to be built by September 1993, will transport the 50 MeV electron beam from the ALS LINAC into an experimental area to support various R&D activities in the Center for Beam Physics at LBL. A variety of experiments are planned involving the interaction of such a relativistic electron beam with plasmas (plasma focusing), laser beams (generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses) and electromagnetic cavities (Crab cavities etc....). The beam line is designed using the measured emittance and Twiss parameters of the ALS linac. It accommodates the different requirements of the various experiments on the electron beam properties (charge, energy, pulse length) and on the handling of the beam before and after the interaction point. Special attention has also been given to incorporate diagnostics for measuring the beam properties (such as the electron energy, bunch length and charge) needed in the interpretation of the experiments.

  13. The Use of Psychological Tests in Predicting Vocational Success of Disadvantaged Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Charlton S.

    A study of the relationship between certain test scores and probable training and vocational success was made. Examined were three major training areas: power sewing machine, nurse aide, and clerical office work. Six tests were tested for their ability to predict success: the WAIS Revised Beta; Purdue Pegboard; English, California Surveys of…

  14. T.E.S.T.S. (Taking Every Student to Success): Another Way To Assess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Lindy C.

    This article on the T.E.S.T.S. (Taking Every Student To Success) strategy promotes using a variety of assessment strategies in order to alleviate the stress students experience during exams, enabling those who are not "good test takers" to achieve a higher degree of success. If the primary purpose of giving a test is to determine whether or not a…

  15. The Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test A Highly Successful Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Robert; Taylor, Anthony P. (Tony); Johnston, Justin

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) flight test was designed as an early demonstration of the Launch Abort System (LAS) for the Orion capsule. The LAS was designed developed and manufactured by the Lockheed Martin/Orbital Sciences team. At inception it was realized that recovery of the Orion Capsule simulator would be useful from an engineering analysis and data recovery point of view. Additionally this test represented a flight opportunity for the Orion parachute system, which in a real abort would provide final landing deceleration. The Orion parachute program is named CPAS (CEV Parachute Assembly System). Thus CPAS became a part of the PA-1 flight, as a secondary test objective. At program kick off, the CPAS system was in the design state described below. Airbag land landing of the spacecraft was the program baseline. This affected the rigging of the parachutes. The system entry deployment conditions and vehicle mass have both evolved since that original design. It was decided to use the baseline CPAS Generation 1 (Gen 1) parachute system for the recovery of the PA-1 flight. As CPAS was a secondary test objective, the system would be delivered in its developmental state. As the PA-1 program evolved, the parachute recovery system (CPAS) moved from a secondary objective to a more important portion of the program. Tests were added, weights and deployment conditions changed and some hardware portions of the CPAS configuration were not up to the new challenges. Additional tests were added to provide confidence in the developmental system. This paper will review a few of these aspects with the goal of showing some preliminary and qualitative results from what we believe was a highly successful test.

  16. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

  17. Data acquisition and online monitoring software for CBM test beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Kurz, N.; Linev, S.; Zumbruch, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is intended to run at the FAIR facility that is currently being built at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. For testing of future CBM detector and read-out electronics prototypes, several test beam campaigns have been performed at different locations, such as GSI, COSY, and CERN PS. The DAQ software has to treat various data inputs: standard VME modules on the MBS system, and different kinds of FPGA boards, read via USB, Ethernet, or optical links. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core framework (DABC) is able to combine such different data sources with event-builder processes running on regular Linux PCs. DABC can also retrieve the instrumental set-up data from EPICS slow control systems and insert it into the event data stream for later analysis. Vice versa, the DIM based DABC control protocol has been integrated to the general CBM EPICS IOC by means of an EPICS-DIM interface. Hence the DAQ can be monitored and steered with a CSS based operator GUI. The CBM online monitoring analysis is based on the GSI Go4 framework which can directly connect to DABC online data via sockets, or process stored data from list-mode files. A Go4 sub-framework has been implemented to provide possibility of parallel development of analysis code for different sub-detectors groups. This allows divide the Go4 components up into independent software packages that can run either standalone, or together at the beam-time in a full set-up.

  18. A portable telescope based on the ALIBAVA system for test beam studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, J.; Casse, G.; Garcia, C.; Greenall, A.; Lacasta, C.; Lozano, M.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Ullan, M.; Tsurin, I.

    2013-12-01

    A test beam telescope has been built using the ALIBAVA system to drive its data acquisition. The basic telescope planes consist of four XYT stations. Each station is built from a detector board with two strip sensors, mounted one in each side (strips crossing at 90°). The ensemble is coupled to an ALIBAVA daughter board. These stations act as reference frame and allow a precise track reconstruction. The system is triggered by the coincidence signal of the two scintillators located up and down stream. The telescope can hold several devices under tests. Each ALIBAVA daughter board is linked to its corresponding mother board. The system can hold up to 16 mother boards. A master board synchronizes and controls all the mother boards and collects their data. The off-line analysis software has been developed to study the charge collection, cluster width, tracking efficiency, resolution, etc., of the devices under test. Moreover, the built-in ALIBAVA TDC allows the analysis of the time profile of the device signal. The ALIBAVA telescope has been successfully operated in two test runs at the DESY and CERN-SPS beam lines.

  19. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  20. The optics of the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.; Brown, K.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N. ); Oide, K. )

    1991-05-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), currently under construction at the end of the SLAC Linac, is being built by an international collaboration as a test bed for ideas and methods required in the design and construction of final focus systems for next generation e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. The FFTB lattice is based on the previously developed principle of using sextupole pairs in a dispersive region to compensate chromaticity. The linear lattice was optimized for length, and implementation of diagnostic procedures. The transformations between sextupole pairs (CCX and CCY) are exactly {minus}I, the matrix for the intermediate transformer (BX) is exactly diagonal, and the dispersion function has zero slope at the sextupoles and is thus zero at the minimum of the {beta}{sub x} function in the intermediate transformer. The introduction of sextupoles in final focus systems leads to the presence of additional optical aberrations, and synchrotron radiation in the dipoles also enlarges the final spot size. The important fourth-order optical aberrations which determine the main features of the design have been identified. Additional lower order aberrations arise in the implementation of these designs, since the real system is not the ideal design. We concentrate on these aberrations and describe strategies for their diagnosis and correction.

  1. Fan Beam Emission Tomography Demonstrated Successfully in the Reduced-Gravity Environment of Drop Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    Fires onboard manned spacecraft and launch vehicles are a particularly feared hazard because one cannot jump ship while in orbit 240 nmi above the Earth at 17 000 mph! Understanding the physical properties of fires in free fall and on orbit is, therefore, a very important endeavor for NASA s Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. However, detailed information concerning the structure of microgravity fires remained elusive until recently since robustness, limited power, limited volume, and limited mass place severe constraints on diagnostic equipment for use in space and in NASA Glenn Research Center s reduced-gravity facilities. Under NASA Research Associate funding since 2001, En'Urga, Inc. (Dr. Sivathanu, principal investigator, and Dr. Lim, co-investigator) in collaboration with Glenn (Dr. Feikema, coinvestigator) have successfully demonstrated a new technology for use in microgravity combustion. A midinfrared scanning spectrometer has been developed by En'Urga and tested at Glenn to measure 30 spectra per second at different spatial locations in a flame from 1.8 to 4.8 microns.

  2. Tests of a 3 meter curved superconducting beam transport dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Allinger, J E; Carroll, A S; Danby, G T; DeVito, B; Jackson, J W; Leonhardt, W J; Prodell, A G; Weisenbloom, J

    1981-01-01

    Initial tests of one of the curved 3 m long superconducting dipole magnets intended to generate 6.0 T and produce a 20.4/sup 0/ bend in the primary proton beam to a new D-target station at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS have been completed. Although this magnet, whose window frame design generally follows that of the successful 8/sup 0/ and Model T superconducting dipoles, demonstrates many of the desirable characteristics of these earlier magnets such as excellent quench propagation and good ramping properties, it has only reached a disappointingly low magnetic field of 3.5 to 4.0 T. Because of the great interest in superconducting magnet technology, this report will describe the diagnostic tests performed and plans for future modifications.

  3. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  4. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration and 30 GHz power production in the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H. H.; Carron, G.; Chanudet, M.; Chautard, F.; Delahaye, J. P.; Godot, J. C.; Hutchins, S.; Martinez, C.; Suberlucq, G.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thorndahl, L.; Trautner, H.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1999-05-07

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has recently demonstrated Two-Beam power production and acceleration at 30 GHz. With 41 MW of 30 GHz power produced in 14 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, the main beam has been accelerated by 28 MeV. The 30 GHz RF power is extracted in low impedance decelerating structures from a low-energy, high-current 'drive beam' which runs parallel to the main beam. The average current in the drive-beam train is 25 A, while the peak current exceeds 2 kA. Crosschecks between measured drive-beam charge, 30 GHz power and main-beam energy gain are in good agreement. In this paper, some relevant experimental and technical issues on drive-beam generation, two-beam power production and acceleration are presented.

  5. Development and testing of an ion probe for tightly-bunched particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, M.; Pasour, J.

    1996-06-01

    Many high-energy physics experiments require a high-quality and well-diagnosed charged-particle beam (CPB). Precise knowledge of beam size, position, and charge distribution is often crucial to the success of the experiment. It is also important in many applications that the diagnostic used to determine the beam parameters be nonintercepting and nonperturbing. This requirement rules out many diagnostics, such as wire scanners, thin foils which produce Cerenkov or transition radiation, and even some rf cavity diagnostics. Particularly difficult to diagnose are tightly-focused (r{sub b} << 1 mm), short-duration (psec) beams, such as those in state-of-the-art or next-generation particle colliders. In this paper we describe an ion probe that is capable of penetrating the space-charge field of densely bunched CPBs without perturbation, thereby enabling the measurement of the microstructure of the bunch. This diagnostic probe uses a finely-focused stream of ions to interact with the CPB. Related techniques have been discussed in the literature. In fact, the present work evolved from an electron deflection diagnostic for CPBs that we previously described. A similar electron probe was tested even earlier at TRIUMF and in the Former Soviet Union. Electron probes have also been used to measure plasma sheaths and potentials and the neutralization of heavy ion beams. Also, Mendel has used an ion beam (22 keV He{sup +}) to probe rapidly varying fields in plasmas. The probe ions are injected across the beam tube and into the path of the high-energy CPB. The ions are deflected by the CPB, and the direction and magnitude of the deflection are directly related to the spatial and temporal charge distribution of the CPB. Easily-resolved deflections can be produced by microbunches having total charge on the order of a nCoul and pulse durations of a few psec. The deflected ions are monitored with a suitable detector, in this case a microchannel plate capable of detecting single ions.

  6. Test Beam Results for ALICE TPC Upgrade Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, James; Alice Tpc-Upgrade Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ALICE detector is one of four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and its main purpose is to study the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector within ALICE, and currently has an intrinsic rate limitation of 3 kHz. The LHC will be upgraded during Long Shutdown 2 in 2018 to have Pb-Pb collision rates up to 50 kHz, and so the TPC readout must be accordingly upgraded. This will be done by replacing the current Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber assembly, which uses a gating grid to prevent ion backflow, with Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structures (MMGs), which allow for continuous rather than gated readout. A substantial R&D effort is underway for a 4-GEM design, as well as an alternate 2-GEM/MMG design. Prototypes of each design were tested in November-December 2014 at the PS and SPS beams at CERN; the results for the 2-GEM/MMG chambers will be presented.

  7. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

    2011-07-26

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

  8. Experimental tests of beam-riding sail dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Gornostaeva, Olga; Garate, Eusebio; Anderson, Michael; Prichard, Alan; Harris, Henry

    2002-01-01

    Stability is a neglected issue in concepts for propelling ultralight sails by beamed power. Whether the beam comes from a laser or a microwave antenna, power falls with angle from the beam center. This drives a sail sideways under any lateral perturbation-``tumbling down the hill.'' The basic mechanics of pressures and sail averaging of them across its area remain unexplored in experiment, and have only recently been treated in theory. Here we report the first experiments on beam-riding dynamics in the laboratory, using a slightly over-weighted pendulum. In the experiments, a sail attached to the pendulum bottom is made unstable by adding weight to the top end. Sail stability and oscillation are possible if this is countered by electrodynamic beam pressure on the sail, directed from below, torquing the pendulum into a stable state. We present both data and analysis that shows that the beam-riding effect does in fact occur: microwave powers of a few hundred W can hold an otherwise unstable sail steady. This is made possible because of the gradient in beam power with sidewise angle. Our experiments verify the University of New Mexico simulations, which show similar stability conditions. Beam powers comparable to the strength of perturbing forces can plausibly achieve these stability effects in free sail flight. .

  9. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Molon, F.; Muraro, A.; Nakano, H.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Takeiri, Y.; Tollin, M.; Tsumori, K.; Veltri, P.

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  10. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Molon, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. Tollin, M.; Veltri, P.; De Muri, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Muraro, A.

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  11. Nondestructive testing of electron beam sterilization by means of an optically active marker material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtling, Thomas; Reitzig, Manuela; Mayer, Anton; Wetzel, Christiane; Röder, Olaf; Schreiber, Jürgen; Opitz, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Secure proof of sterilization processes on packaging materials is an important issue in many economic sectors. In this context, electron beam sterilization is a highly effective low temperature technique. However, verifying the application of a sufficient electron dose is still difficult - especially on products with complex geometry. Here we report on an optical, hence fast and contactless approach which gives reliable evidence of a successful e-beam treatment. The technique is based on placing a suitable marker material (rare-earth based particles) inside or as a coating on the packaging material. By electron irradiation these particles change their optical properties and thus indicate the successful application of the electron beam.

  12. Repeat-until-success distributed quantum computation by using single-photon interference at a beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xun-Li; Qian, Jun; Kwek, L. C.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-07-01

    A repeat-until-success (RUS) measurement-based scheme for the implementation of the distributed quantum computation by using single-photon interference at a 50:50 beam splitter is proposed. It is shown that the 50:50 beam splitter can naturally project a suitably encoded matter-photon state to either a desired entangling gate-operated state of the matter qubits or to their initial state when the photon is detected. The recurrence of the initial state permits us to implement the desired entangling gate in a RUS way. To implement a distributed quantum computation we suggest an encoding method by means of the effect of dipole-induced transparency proposed recently [E. Waks and J. Vuckovic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 153601 (2006)]. The effects of the unfavorable factors on our scheme are also discussed.

  13. Radiation safety considerations for the parasitic Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Iverson, R.H.; Keller, L.P.

    1996-11-01

    A low intensity electron beam parasitic to the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been transported through the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility making secondary test beams available for users. Photons generated in collimation of the SLC electron and positron beams in the linac pass through a splitter magnet that deflects the primary beams away from the linac axis into the SLC beam lines. These photons are converted to electrons and positrons in a secondary production target located down beam on the linac axis. The secondary electrons are then transported through the FFTB beam line onto experimental detectors. The average power of the parasitic beam is very low, thus, it presents no hazards. However, various accident scenarios involving failure of the splitter magnet and the active protection devices could send much more powerful SLC beams (up to 90 kilo-watts) into this zero-degree secondary beam line. For the accident cases, the average power in the transmitted beam was calculated using the Monte Carlo programs EGS4 and TURTLE. Results from analysis of the radiation protection systems that assure safety during the parasitic operation are presented.

  14. Nonverbal Communication Tests as Predictors of Success in Psychology and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Samuel A.

    The selection and development of six tests measuring the ability to receive and interpret nonverbal communications are described, as is an attempt to gather evidence of their value as predictors of success in two occupations requiring high levels of interpersonal skills-- psychology and counseling. The tests were: (1) Inter-Person Perception Test;…

  15. Ultrafast beam dump materials and mirror coatings tested with the ELI beamlines LIDT test station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durák, Michal; Kramer, Daniel; Velpula, Praveen K.; Cupal, Josef; Medřík, TomáÅ.¡; Hřebíček, Jan; Golasowski, Jiří; Peceli, Davorin; Fekete, Ladislav; Å tepán, Václav; Kozlová, Michaela; Rus, Bedřich

    2015-11-01

    The ELI Beamlines project will deliver ultrafast laser pulses with peak powers up to 10PW available every minute and PW class beams at 10Hz complemented by a 10TW 1kHz beamline. To properly determine damage thresholds of involved optical components in conditions similar to the operational environment and with expected laser parameters, a high vacuum LIDT test station was constructed at PALS facility. Our study presents results of ISO based S-on-1 and R-on-1 tests in femtosecond regime (50fs, 800nm, 10Hz/1kHz) performed on two different types of coatings: a) highabsorption black coatings with low outgassing rates, intended for use as a beam dump surface; and b) high-reflectivity, low-dispersion 45° AOI ultrafast mirror coatings. Testing of absorptive coatings was accompanied with QMS residual gas analysis to verify, that high intensity laser radiation approaching the damage threshold does not increase concentration of volatile organic compounds in the vacuum chamber. In case of HR mirror coatings, we also investigate the effect of cleaning on LIDT value, comparing characteristic S-on-1 curves of given sample with values obtained after 12h immersion in ethanol-water solution.

  16. Incorporating Results of Avian Toxicity Tests into a Model of Annual Reproductive Success

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript presents a modeling approach for translating results from laboratory avian reproduction tests into an estimate of pesticide-caused change in the annual reproductive success of birds, also known as fecundity rate.

  17. A Method for Calculating the Probability of Successfully Completing a Rocket Propulsion Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Bradley P.

    2004-01-01

    Propulsion ground test facilities face the daily challenges of scheduling multiple customers into limited facility space and successfully completing their propulsion test projects. Due to budgetary and schedule constraints, NASA and industry customers are pushing to test more components, for less money, in a shorter period of time. As these new rocket engine component test programs are undertaken, the lack of technology maturity in the test articles, combined with pushing the test facilities capabilities to their limits, tends to lead to an increase in facility breakdowns and unsuccessful tests. Over the last five years Stennis Space Center's propulsion test facilities have performed hundreds of tests, collected thousands of seconds of test data, and broken numerous test facility and test article parts. While various initiatives have been implemented to provide better propulsion test techniques and improve the quality, reliability, and maintainability of goods and parts used in the propulsion test facilities, unexpected failures during testing still occur quite regularly due to the harsh environment in which the propulsion test facilities operate. Previous attempts at modeling the lifecycle of a propulsion component test project have met with little success. Each of the attempts suffered form incomplete or inconsistent data on which to base the models. By focusing on the actual test phase of the tests project rather than the formulation, design or construction phases of the test project, the quality and quantity of available data increases dramatically. A logistic regression model has been developed form the data collected over the last five years, allowing the probability of successfully completing a rocket propulsion component test to be calculated. A logistic regression model is a mathematical modeling approach that can be used to describe the relationship of several independent predictor variables X(sub 1), X(sub 2),..,X(sub k) to a binary or dichotomous

  18. Aptitude Tests and Successful College Students: The Predictive Validity of the General Aptitude Test (GAT) in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnahdi, Ghaleb Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Aptitude tests should predict student success at the university level. This study examined the predictive validity of the General Aptitude Test (GAT) in Saudi Arabia. Data for 27420 students enrolled at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University were analyzed. Of these students, 17565 were male students, and 9855 were female students. Multiple…

  19. The Prediction of Success in Engineering Graphics Using the Group Embedded Figures Test and the Hidden Figures Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Russell C.; Davis, Paul D.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to continue the assessment of the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), to assess the value of the Hidden Figures Test (HFT), and to assess the usefulness of the two instruments used in combination as tools for predicting student success and early identification of students who may need special assistance in engineering…

  20. Test of large area glass RPCs at the DAΦNE Test Beam Facility (BTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Gamba, D.; Mannocchi, G.; Patteri, P.; Picchi, P.; Piccolo, M.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Satta, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Trapani, P.; Trinchero, G. C.

    2004-11-01

    The CaPiRe program has been started to develop a new detector design, in order to produce large areas of glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors, overcoming the previous limitations. As a first step we produced our glass RPC detectors (1m2) at General Tecnica exploiting their standard procedures, materials and production techniques simply using 2 mm glass electrodes instead of the bakelite ones. A set of RPC was produced by using pre-coated (silk screen printed) electrodes, while others were produced with the standard graphite coating. All the detectors, together with four old Glass RPC acting as reference, were tested at the DAΦNE Test Beam Facility with 500 MeV electrons in order to study the efficiency in different positions inside the detectors (i.e. near spacers and edges) and to study the detector behavior as a function of the local particle rate.

  1. Design and testing of a refractive laser beam homogenizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernelius, N. C.; Bradley, K. R.; Hoekstra, B. L.

    1984-09-01

    A survey is made of various techniques to create a homogeneous or flat top laser beam profile. A refractive homogenizer was designed for use with a ND:YAG laser with output at its fundamental (1.06 micrometer) and frequency doubled (532 nm) modes. The system consists of a 2X beam expander and two faceted cylindrical lenses with differing focal lengths. Each cylindrical lens focusses its input into a strip the width of a facet. By orienting their axes at a 90 degree angle and focussing them on the same plane, the beam is concentrated into a square focus. Formulae for calculating the facet angles are derived and a FORTRAN computer square focus. Formulae for calculating the facet angles are derived and a FORTRAN computer program was written to calculate them with a precision greater than one is able to fabricate them.

  2. Tandem mirror experiment-upgrade neutral beam test stand: a powerful tool for development and quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, S.M.; Kane, R.J.; Kerr, R.G.; Poulsen, P.

    1983-12-02

    During construction of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we assembled a test stand to develop electronics for the neutral beam system. In the first six months of test stand use we operated a few neutral beam injector modules and directed considerable effort toward improving the electronic system. As system development progressed, our focus turned toward improving the injector modules themselves. The test stand has proved to be the largest single contributor to the successful operation of neutral beams on TMX-U, primarily because it provides quality assurance andd development capability in conjunction with the scheduled activities of the main experiment. This support falls into five major categories: (1) electronics development, (2) operator training, (3) injector module testing and characterization, (4) injector module improvements, and (5) physics improvements (through areas affected by injector operation). Normal day-to-day operation of the test stand comes under the third category, testing and characterization, and comprises our final quality assurance activity for newly assembled or repaired modules before they are installed on TMX-U.

  3. A Method for Calculating the Probability of Successfully Completing a Rocket Propulsion Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Bradley

    2007-01-01

    Propulsion ground test facilities face the daily challenge of scheduling multiple customers into limited facility space and successfully completing their propulsion test projects. Over the last decade NASA s propulsion test facilities have performed hundreds of tests, collected thousands of seconds of test data, and exceeded the capabilities of numerous test facility and test article components. A logistic regression mathematical modeling technique has been developed to predict the probability of successfully completing a rocket propulsion test. A logistic regression model is a mathematical modeling approach that can be used to describe the relationship of several independent predictor variables X(sub 1), X(sub 2),.., X(sub k) to a binary or dichotomous dependent variable Y, where Y can only be one of two possible outcomes, in this case Success or Failure of accomplishing a full duration test. The use of logistic regression modeling is not new; however, modeling propulsion ground test facilities using logistic regression is both a new and unique application of the statistical technique. Results from this type of model provide project managers with insight and confidence into the effectiveness of rocket propulsion ground testing.

  4. Predicting Success in Graduate School Using GRE and PAEG Aptitude Test Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornheimer, Deane G.

    1984-01-01

    Performance of limited-English speaking graduate school applicants on the Prueba de Admision para Estudios Graduados aptitude test is compared with Graduate Record Examination results, and the validity of the two tests as predictors of academic success for bilingual doctoral students in the New York University Puerto Rico program is examined. (MSE)

  5. Beam quality of the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) injector

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Caporaso, G.J.; Cole, A.G.; Weir, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The beam quality of the ATA injector has been experimentally measured using a magnetic collimator. These measurements have been performed for a variety of magnetic field profiles, including field strengths where the collimator is shorter than a cyclotron wavelength. The experimental currents transmitted through the collimator have been predicted numerically. The numerical predictions and experimental data are in good agreement.

  6. Synchrotron beam test with a photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Brönnimann, C; Florin, S; Lindner, M; Schmitt, B; Schulze-Briese, C

    2000-09-01

    Synchrotron beam measurements were performed with a single-photon-counting pixel detector to investigate the influence of threshold settings on charge sharing. Improvement of image homogeneity by adjusting the threshold of each pixel individually was demonstrated. With a flat-field correction, the homogeneity could be improved. A measurement of the point spread function is reported. PMID:16609212

  7. RHIC Beam Loss Monitor System Design and Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam abort criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized by a standard RHIC VME MADC preceded by a switchable gain amplifier. The output also goes to an analog multiplier used to reduce energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. Fast and slow filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent trip levels. The gains, fast and slow abort levels, and abort bit masks are set for each channel on receipt of specific RHIC Event Codes. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a BNL designed micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer for real-time operation.

  8. Laser beam homogenization, splitting and three spot image formation: system design, analysis and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Dickey, Fred; Brown, Dan

    2010-08-01

    Beam shaping technology can greatly improve laser process efficiency by enabling parallel processes and increasing precision, quality and process stability. This paper outlines a system design, optical code analysis and the bench testing of a patented [1,2] laser beam homogenization and imaging system using prism beam splitting to produce a three spot array. The system uses a beam integrator to produce a rectangular spot that is split into three beams by two prisms. A second set of prisms directs the two outer beams onto an imaging lens and sets the pitch of the virtual spots. These beams, with the central beam, are imaged to form three spots with the required pitch. A prototype system design was developed for two approaches based on the first principles. The prototype system parameters were adjusted to minimize the requirements of the elements such as the imaging lens and prisms. Since the two systems require a relatively fast imaging lens, and there are aberrations associated with the prisms, a detailed optical design was conducted to determine the performance of the two approaches and to assess the complexity of the imaging lens. This paper will present the various positive and negative attributes of the two beam shaper designs within an optical system and how the best design was selected for prototyping and bench testing. Various data will be presented at each stage of design evaluation to the final bench test.

  9. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  10. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Freemire, Ben

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  11. Development of picoseconds Time of Flight systems in Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; Malik, S.; Pronko, S.; Ramberg, E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-11-01

    The goal of the work is to develop time of flight (TOF) system with about 10 picosecond time resolution in real beam line when start and stop counters separated by some distance. We name the distance as 'base' for the TOF. This 'real' TOF setup is different from another one when start and stop counters located next to each other. The real TOF is sensitive to beam momentum spread, beam divergence, etc. Anyway some preliminary measurements are useful with close placement of start and stop counter. We name it 'close geometry'. The work started about 2 years ago at Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF). The devices tested in 'close geometry' were Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers (MCP PMT) with Cherenkov radiators. TOF counters based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPms) with Cherenkov radiators also in 'close geometry' were tested. We report here new results obtained with the counters in the MTBF at Fermilab, including beam line data.

  12. Analysis of DESY-Flash LLRF Measurements for the ILC Heavy Beam Loading Test

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, Gustavo; Chase, Brian; Davidsaver, Michael; Carwardine, J.; Simrock, Stefan; Ayvazyan, Valeri; Grecki, Mariusz; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-06-01

    In September 2008 the DESY-FLASH accelerator was run with up to 550, 3 nano-coulomb bunches at 5 Hz repetition rate. This test is part of a longer-term study aimed at validating ILC parameters by operation as close as possible to ILC beam currents and RF gradients. The present paper reports on the analysis that has been done in order to understand the RF control system performance during this test. Actual klystron power requirements and beam stability are evaluated with heavy beam loading conditions. Results include suggested improvements for upcoming tests in 2009.

  13. The progress of funnelling gun high voltage condition and beam test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D. M.; Lambiase, R.; Meng, W.; Rahman, O.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Pietz, J.; Ackeret, M.; Yeckel, C.; Miller, R.; Dobrin, E.; Thompson, K.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype of a high average current polarized electron funneling gun as an eRHIC injector has been built at BNL. The gun was assembled and tested at Stangenes Incorporated. Two beams were generated from two GaAs photocathodes and combined by a switched combiner field. We observed the combined beams on a YAG crystal and measured the photocurrent by a Faraday cup. The gun has been shipped to Stony Brook University and is being tested there. In this paper we will describe the major components of the gun and recent beam test results. High voltage conditioning is discussed as well.

  14. The Orion Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) Flight Test: A Propulsion Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    This poster provides a concise overview of the highly successful Orion Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) flight test, and the three rocket motors that contributed to this success. The primary purpose of the Orion PA-1 flight was to help certify the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS), which can be utilized in the unlikely event of an emergency on the launchpad or during mission vehicle ascent. The PA-1 test was the first fully integrated flight test of the Orion LAS, one of the primary systems within the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The Orion MPCV is part of the architecture within the Space Launch System (SLS), which is being designed to transport astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit for future exploration missions. Had the Orion PA-1 flight abort occurred during launch preparations for a real human spaceflight mission, the PA-1 LAS would have saved the lives of the crew. The PA-1 flight test was largely successful due to the three solid rocket motors of the LAS: the Attitude Control Motor (ACM); the Jettison Motor (JM); and the Abort Motor (AM). All three rocket motors successfully performed their required functions during the Orion PA-1 flight test, flown on May 6, 2010 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, culminating in a successful demonstration of an abort capability from the launchpad.

  15. Performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring tested with clinical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliero, M. A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Cerello, P.; Del Guerra, A.; Fiorina, E.; Liu, B.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Pirrone, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring during the irradiation of a PMMA phantom with a clinical proton beam. The experimental set-up was based on 4 independent detection modules. Two detection modules were placed at one side of a PMMA phantom and the other two modules were placed at the opposite side of the phantom. One detection module was composed of a Silicon Photon Multiplier produced by AdvanSiD coupled to a single scintillating LYSO crystal. The read-out system was based on the TOFPET ASIC managed by a Xilinx ML605 FPGA Evaluation Board (Virtex 6). The irradiation of the PMMA phantom was performed at the CNAO hadrontherapy facility (Pavia, Italy) with a 95 MeV pulsed proton beam. The pulsed time structure of the proton beam was reconstructed by each detection module. The β+ annihilation peak was successfully measured and the production of β+ isotopes emitters was observed as increasing number of 511 keV events detected during irradiation. Finally, after the irradiation, the half lives of the 11C and 15O radioactive isotopes were estimated.

  16. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gianola, D. S.; Sedlmayr, A.; Moenig, R.; Kraft, O.; Volkert, C. A.; Major, R. C.; Cyrankowski, E.; Asif, S. A. S.; Warren, O. L.

    2011-06-15

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  17. CMS validation experience: Test-beam 2004 data vs GEANT4

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Fermilab /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res.

    2007-01-01

    A comparison between the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation of CMS Detector's Calorimetric System and data from the 2004 Test-Beam at CERN's SPS H2 beam-line is presented. The overall simulated response agrees quite well with the measured response. Slight differences in the longitudinal shower profiles between the MC predictions made with different Physics Lists are observed.

  18. Theory of longitudinal beam halo in RF linacs: I. core/test-particle formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    1997-05-01

    For intense beams, the analysis of tenuous halo components of the particle distribution that surround the main core of the distribution can be challenging. So-called core/test particle models in which a test particle is evolved in the applied and space-charge forces of the beam core have been instrumental in understanding the structure and extent of transverse beam halo produced by resonant particle interactions with the oscillating space-charge forces of a mismatched beam core. Here we present a core/test particle model developed for the analysis of longitudinal beam halo in intense, ion-beam rf linacs. Equations of motion are derived for a test particle moving interior to, and exterior to, a uniform density ellipsoidal beam bunch. Coupled transverse-longitudinal mismatch modes of the ellipsoidal beam envelope are analyzed. Typical parameters suggest the possibility of a low-order resonant interaction between longitudinal particle oscillations and a low-frequency envelope mode. Properties of this resonance are in an accompanying paper by the authors in these proceedings.

  19. The e/[pi] and [pi][sup 0]/[pi] ratios measured, and monochromatic [gamma] and [pi][sup 0] beams explored in the D0 test calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    The e/[pi] response ratio of the DO end calorimeter has been measured by comparing data from 10 to 150 GeV/c electron and pion beams. The intrinsic'' e/[pi] of the fine-hadronic module has also been studied with the pions alone, by selecting [pi][sup 0]-like showers contained within individual layers of the calorimeter. The measurements are compared to GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. A technique to generate monochromatic test beams of photons and neutral pions was successfully investigated. Preliminary results from central calorimeter modules exposed to these beams are discussed, and are compared to calculated expectations.

  20. The e/{pi} and {pi}{sup 0}/{pi} ratios measured, and monochromatic {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} beams explored in the D0 test calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; D0 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The e/{pi} response ratio of the DO end calorimeter has been measured by comparing data from 10 to 150 GeV/c electron and pion beams. The ``intrinsic`` e/{pi} of the fine-hadronic module has also been studied with the pions alone, by selecting {pi}{sup 0}-like showers contained within individual layers of the calorimeter. The measurements are compared to GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. A technique to generate monochromatic test beams of photons and neutral pions was successfully investigated. Preliminary results from central calorimeter modules exposed to these beams are discussed, and are compared to calculated expectations.

  1. Characterization of a tagged γ-ray beam line at the DAΦNE Beam Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, P. W.; Argan, A.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Buonomo, B.; Chen, A. W.; D'Ammando, F.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellizzoni, A.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Quintieri, L.; Rappoldi, A.; Tavani, M.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Valente, P.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zambra, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cocco, V.; Costa, E.; De Paris, G.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorini, M.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Mastropietro, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Porrovecchio, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.; Soffitta, P.; Striani, E.; Vittorini, V.; Zanello, D.; Colafrancesco, S.; Giommi, P.; Pittori, C.; Santolamazza, P.; Verrecchia, F.; Salotti, L.

    2012-05-01

    At the core of the AGILE scientific instrument, designed to operate on a satellite, there is the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) consisting of a Silicon Tracker (ST), a Cesium Iodide Mini-Calorimeter and an Anti-Coincidence system of plastic scintillator bars. The ST needs an on-ground calibration with a γ-ray beam to validate the simulation used to calculate the energy response function and the effective area versus the energy and the direction of the γ rays. A tagged γ-ray beam line was designed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF), based on an electron beam generating γ-rays through bremsstrahlung in a position-sensitive target. The γ-ray energy is deduced by difference with the post-bremsstrahlung electron energy [1,2]. The electron energy is measured by a spectrometer consisting of a dipole magnet and an array of position sensitive silicon strip detectors, the Photon Tagging System (PTS). The use of the combined BTF-PTS system as tagged photon beam requires understanding the efficiency of γ-ray tagging, the probability of fake tagging, the energy resolution and the relation of the PTS hit position versus the γ-ray energy. This paper describes this study comparing data taken during the AGILE calibration occurred in 2005 with simulation.

  2. Hitting a High Note on Math Tests: Remembered Success Influences Test Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Bridgid; Miele, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Remembered utility is the retrospective evaluation about the pleasure and pain associated with a past experience. It can influence choices about repeating or avoiding similar situations in the future (Kahneman, 2000). A set of 5 experiments explored the remembered utility of effortful test episodes and how it impacted future test choices.…

  3. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; Huning, M.; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  4. Speckle reference beam holographic and speckle photographic interferometry in non-destructive test systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    The techniques of speckle beam holographic interferometry and speckle photographic interferometry are described. In particular, their practical limitations and their applications to the existing holographic nondestructive test system are discussed.

  5. Beam Tests of a Clearing Electrode for Electron Cloud Mitigation at KEKB Positron Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Suetsugu, Y.; Fukuma, H.; Shibata, K.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2010-06-15

    In order to mitigate the electron cloud instability in an intense positron ring, an electron clearing electrode with a very thin structure has been developed. The electrode was tested with a positron beam of the KEKB B-factory (KEKB). A drastic reduction in the electron density around the beam was demonstrated in a wiggler magnet with a dipole-type magnetic field of 0.78 T. The clearing electrode was then applied to a copper beam pipe with antechambers assuming an application of the electrode to a wiggler section in the Super KEKB. The beam pipe was installed at a magnetic-free region in the ring and tested with beam. No extra heating of the electrodes and feed-throughs were observed. A reduction in the electron density reasonable in a magnetic-free region was also obtained.

  6. Ti foil light in the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.R.; Chong, Y.P.; Goosman, D.R.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1987-09-01

    An experiment is in progress to characterize the visible light produced when a Ti foil is immersed in the ATA 2 kA, 43 MeV beam. Results obtained to date indicate that the optical condition of the foil surface is a critical determinant of these characteristics, with a very narrow angular distribution obtained when a highly polished and flat foil is used. These data are consistent with the present hypothesis that the light is produced by transition radiation. Incomplete experiments to determine the foil angle dependence of the detected light and its polarization are summarized and remaining experiments are described.

  7. Effects of perceived efficacy and prospect of success on detection in the Guilty Actions Test.

    PubMed

    Zvi, Lisa; Nachson, Israel; Elaad, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in order to examine factors that might influence the motivation of guilty and informed innocent examinees to either cope or cooperate with the Guilty Actions Test. Guilty participants committed a mock-crime and informed innocent participants handled the critical items of the crime in an innocent context. In Experiment 1 the participants were led to believe that the prospects of being found innocent on the test were either high or low. In Experiment 2 the participants were led to believe that the test was either highly accurate or of questionable validity. Results indicated that for both guilty and informed innocent participants low prospects of success and low detection efficacy of the test were associated with enhanced physiological responses to the critical information, whereas high prospects of success and high detection efficacy were associated with attenuated physiological responses. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed. PMID:25543067

  8. The Nurse Entrance Test (NET): an early predictor of academic success.

    PubMed

    Abdur-Rahman, V; Femea, P L; Gaines, C

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a relationship exists between beginning nursing students' Nurse Entrance Test (NET) scores and their academic success within the first year of professional study. The major goal is to identify predictors of academic success so that supportive academic strategies could be implemented for the at-risk student. A statistically significant relationship is found between NET reading comprehension, math and composite scores and nursing grades during the first semester. Test-taking skills, social stressors and learning styles were also significantly related to course performance. Successful students had significantly higher reading, math, and composite scores and lower family and social stress scores than unsuccessful students. NET scores were also predictive of nursing grades, accounting for 10-33% of the variance when entered into a multiple regression equation. PMID:8286768

  9. Use of Standardized Test Scores to Predict Success in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert V.; King, Stephanie B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if a relationship existed between American College Testing (ACT) scores (i.e., English, reading, mathematics, science reasoning, and composite) and student success in a computer applications course at a Mississippi community college. The study showed that while the ACT scores were excellent predictors of…

  10. The Different Effects of Family on Objective Career Success across Gender: A Test of Alternative Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchmeyer, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Gender gaps in achieved rank and salary, common indicators of objective success, often are attributed to the different family roles and responsibilities of men and women. This study tested three explanations for the different effects of family on careers: that is, choice, performance, and signaling explanations. In a sample of American doctoral…

  11. Predicting Success Using HESI A2 Entrance Tests in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A challenge presented to nurse educators is retention of nursing students. This has led nursing faculty to review admission requirements and question how well entrance tests predict success in Associate Degree Nursing Programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the HESI Admission Assessment Exam (HESI A2) and…

  12. Exploring and Testing the Predictors of New Faculty Success: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupnisky, R. H.; Weaver-Hightower, M. B.; Kartoshkina, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to investigate and test the factors contributing to new faculty members' success. In the first phase, qualitative analysis of focus groups revealed four prominent themes affecting new faculty members: expectations, collegiality, balance, and location. In the second phase, new faculty members…

  13. Factors affecting initial training success of blood glucose testing in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Reamer, Lisa A; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Freeman, Hani D; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be a problem for captive chimpanzees. Accurate blood glucose (BG) readings are necessary to monitor and treat this disease. Thus, obtaining voluntary samples from primates through positive reinforcement training (PRT) is critical. The current study assessed the voluntary participation of 123 chimpanzees in BG sampling and investigated factors that may contribute to individual success. All subjects participate in regular PRT sessions as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program. Basic steps involved in obtaining BG values include: voluntarily presenting a finger/toe; allowing digit disinfection; holding for the lancet device; and allowing blood collection onto a glucometer test strip for analysis. We recorded the level of participation (none, partial, or complete) when each chimpanzee was first asked to perform the testing procedure. Nearly 30% of subjects allowed the entire procedure in one session, without any prior specific training for the target behavior. Factors that affected this initial successful BG testing included sex, personality (chimpanzees rated higher on the factor "openness" were more likely to participate with BG testing), and past training performance for "present-for-injection" (chimpanzees that presented for their most recent anesthetic injection were more likely to participate). Neither age, rearing history, time since most recent anesthetic event nor social group size significantly affected initial training success. These results have important implications for captive management and training program success, underlining individual differences in training aptitude and the need for developing individual management plans in order to provide optimal care and treatment for diabetic chimpanzees in captivity. PMID:24706518

  14. Recent Results From The ATLAS Endcap Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schacht, Peter

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN is entering the last phase of construction, with the ATLAS calorimeter passing already the first steps of commissioning. The endcap region in the range of pseudorapidity 2.4 < |{eta}| < 4.0 is a particular complex one, with the electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. In a dedicated beam run this region has been studied using the individual calorimeter modules. The set-up was as close as possible to the real ATLAS calorimeter, including all details like inactive support material structures. The goal is to validate the MC simulation for the different regions and to cross check the intercalibration of the various calorimeters. Electron and pion data have been taken in an energy range 6 < E < 200 GeV with special emphasis on lateral and vertical scans to study the transition regions in detail.

  15. Three-beam interferogram analysis method for surface flatness testing of glass plates and wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Zofia; Patorski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    When testing transparent plates with high quality flat surfaces and a small angle between them the three-beam interference phenomenon is observed. Since the reference beam and the object beams reflected from both the front and back surface of a sample are detected, the recorded intensity distribution may be regarded as a sum of three fringe patterns. Images of that type cannot be succesfully analyzed with standard interferogram analysis methods. They contain, however, useful information on the tested plate surface flatness and its optical thickness variations. Several methods were elaborated to decode the plate parameters. Our technique represents a competitive solution which allows for retrieval of phase components of the three-beam interferogram. It requires recording two images: a three-beam interferogram and the two-beam one with the reference beam blocked. Mutually subtracting these images leads to the intensity distribution which, under some assumptions, provides access to the two component fringe sets which encode surfaces flatness. At various stages of processing we take advantage of nonlinear operations as well as single-frame interferogram analysis methods. Two-dimensional continuous wavelet transform (2D CWT) is used to separate a particular fringe family from the overall interferogram intensity distribution as well as to estimate the phase distribution from a pattern. We distinguish two processing paths depending on the relative density of fringe sets which is connected with geometry of a sample and optical setup. The proposed method is tested on simulated data.

  16. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  17. Does Successful Attainment of Developmental Tasks Lead to Happiness and Success in Later Developmental Tasks? A Test of Havighurst's (1948) Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Gelhaar, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This study tested Havighurst's (1948) contention that successful attainment of age-specific developmental tasks leads to happiness and success in achieving subsequent tasks. A longitudinal study on 146 participants was carried out to investigate the links between developmental progression in adolescence and young adulthood and happiness, which was…

  18. Managing the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Vacuum Test for Safety and Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory is a NASA/JPL mission to send the next generation of rover to Mars. Originally slated for launch in 2009, development problems led to a delay in the project until the next launch opportunity in 2011. Amidst the delay process, the Launch/Cruise Solar Thermal Vacuum Test was undertaken as risk reduction for the project. With varying maturity and capabilities of the flight and ground systems, undertaking the test in a safe manner presented many challenges. This paper describes the technical and management challenges and the actions undertaken that led to the ultimate safe and successful execution of the test.

  19. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A.

    2012-02-15

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

  20. Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A

    2012-02-01

    The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed. PMID:22380336

  1. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2012-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  2. Dose-rate scaling factor estimation of THOR BNCT test beam.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Tung, C J; Chen, J C; Wang, Y L; Huang, H C; Zamenhof, R G

    2004-11-01

    In 1998, an epithermal neutron test beam was designed and constructed at the Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) for the purpose of preliminary dosimetric experiments in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A new epithermal neutron beam was designed at this facility, and is currently under construction, with clinical trials targeted in late 2004. Depth dose-rate distributions for the THOR BNCT test beam have been measured by means of activation foil and dual ion chamber techniques. Neutron and structure-induced gamma spectra measured at the test beam exit were configured into a source function for the Monte Carlo-based treatment planning code NCTPlan. Dose-rate scaling factors (DRSFs) were determined to normalize computationally derived dose-rate distributions with experimental measurements in corresponding mathematical and physical phantoms, and to thus enable accurate treatment planning using the NCTPlan code. A similar approach will be implemented in characterizing the new THOR epithermal beam in preparation for clinical studies. This paper reports the in-phantom calculated and experimental dosimetry comparisons and derived DRSFs obtained with the THOR test beam. PMID:15308162

  3. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.; Alabau Pons, M.; Amann, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Apsimon, R.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bellomo, P.; Bett, D.; Blair, G.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Deacon, L.; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  4. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambade, P.; Alabau Pons, M.; Amann, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Apsimon, R.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bellomo, P.; Bett, D.; Blair, G.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Deacon, L.; Elsen, E.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Fukuda, M.; Gao, J.; Geffroy, N.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Guler, H.; Hayano, H.; Heo, A.-Y.; Honda, Y.; Huang, J. Y.; Hwang, W. H.; Iwashita, Y.; Jeremie, A.; Jones, J.; Kamiya, Y.; Karataev, P.; Kim, E.-S.; Kim, H.-S.; Kim, S. H.; Komamiya, S.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuroda, S.; Lam, B.; Lyapin, A.; Masuzawa, M.; McCormick, D.; Molloy, S.; Naito, T.; Nakamura, T.; Nelson, J.; Okamoto, D.; Okugi, T.; Oroku, M.; Park, Y. J.; Parker, B.; Paterson, E.; Perry, C.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.; Renier, Y.; Resta-Lopez, J.; Rimbault, C.; Ross, M.; Sanuki, T.; Scarfe, A.; Schulte, D.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Suehara, T.; Sugahara, R.; Swinson, C.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; Urakawa, J.; Urner, D.; Verderi, M.; Wang, M.-H.; Warden, M.; Wendt, M.; White, G.; Wittmer, W.; Wolski, A.; Woodley, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Yan, Y.; Yoda, H.; Yokoya, K.; Zhou, F.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-04-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  5. Experimental testing of a self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanlei; Hao, Qingduo; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    A new kind of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP)-concrete composite beam, which consists of a FRP box beam combined with a thin layer of concrete in the compression zone, was developed by using two embedded FBG sensors in the top and bottom flanges of FRP box beam at mid-span section along longitudinal direction, respectively. The flexural behavior of the proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam was experimentally studied in four-point bending. The longitudinal strains of the composite beam were recorded using the embedded FBG sensors as well as the surfacebonded electric resistance strain gauges. Test results indicate that the FBG sensors can faithfully record the longitudinal strain of the composite beam in tension at bottom flange of the FRP box beam or in compression at top flange over the entire load range, as compared with the surface-bonded strain gauges. The proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam can monitor its longitudinal strains in serviceability limit state as well as in strength limit state, and will has wide applications for long-term monitoring in civil engineering.

  6. The 10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant: Beam safety tests and analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumleve, T. D.

    1984-07-01

    Potential eye hazards of reflected heliostat beams were evaluated and the adequacy of the beam safety central strategy at the 10 MWe solar thermal central receiver pilot plant was verified. Special video techniques were used during helicopter flyovers and a ground level to determine retinal irradiance and image size relative to a reference Sun. Receiver brightness was also measured. Measured values were consistent with analyses, and safety provisions at the plant were found to be adequate. Other beam control strategies for heliostats designed to stow face-up in high winds are studied, and one strategy is checked experimentally during the helicopter flyover tests.

  7. Tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider Intra-Train Beam Feedback System at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; Frisch, J.C.; Markiewicz, T.W.; McCormick, D.J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; Kalinin, A.; Perry, C.; /Oxford Instruments

    2006-03-14

    We report preliminary results of beam tests of the FONT3 Linear Collider intra-train position feedback system prototype at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a novel beam position monitor (BPM) processor with a latency below 5 nanoseconds, and a kicker driver amplifier with similar low latency. The 56 nanosecond-long bunchtrain in the ATF extraction line was used to test the prototype BPM processor. The achieved latency will allow a demonstration of intra-train feedback on timescales relevant even for the CLIC Linear Collider design.

  8. Cryogenic System for J-Parc Neutrino Superconducting Magnet Beam LINE—DESIGN, Construction and Performance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Y.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Suzuki, S.; Araoka, O.; Ogitsu, T.; Kimura, N.; Nakamoto, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kaneda, S.; Takahashi, T.; Ito, A.; Nagami, M.; Kumaki, T.; Nakashima, T.

    2010-04-01

    A helium cryogenic plant has been constructed in the proton accelerator research complex, J-PARC, to cool a string of superconducting magnets in the neutrino beam line since 2005. It consists of a screw compressor with a capacity of 160 g/s at 1.4 MPa, a 1.5 kW refrigerator, a centrifugal SHE pump with a flow rate of 300 g/s and peripherals. After system integration, performance tests have been carried out. In a preliminary cooling test without magnets, the cryogenic system attained a cooling capacity of 522 W by circulating supercritical helium flow of 300 g/s at 0.4 MPa and at 4.5 K. Afterwards a full system test with the magnets was carried out. The magnets were successfully charged up to an ultimate current of 5000 A beyond a nominal current of 4400 A. This paper describes the plant design and the result of performance measurements.

  9. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Energy-Absorbing Keel Beams for General Aviation Type Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A lightweight energy-absorbing keel-beam concept was developed and retrofitted in a general aviation type aircraft to improve crashworthiness performance. The energy-absorbing beam consisted of a foam-filled cellular structure with glass fiber and hybrid glass/kevlar cell walls. Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the keel beams prior to installation and subsequent full-scale crash testing of the aircraft are described. Factors such as material and fabrication constraints, damage tolerance, crush stress/strain response, seat-rail loading, and post crush integrity, which influenced the course of the design process are also presented. A theory similar to the one often used for ductile metal box structures was employed with appropriate modifications to estimate the sustained crush loads for the beams. This, analytical tool, coupled with dynamic finite element simulation using MSC.Dytran were the prime design and analysis tools. The validity of the theory as a reliable design tool was examined against test data from static crush tests of beam sections while the overall performance of the energy-absorbing subfloor was assessed through dynamic testing of 24 in long subfloor assemblies.

  10. [Predicting the success of occupational retraining using the occupational aptitude test battery].

    PubMed

    Kreuzpointner, L

    2009-04-01

    In vocational retraining centres, a test battery including several performance tests is generally administered to assess the occupational aptitude of rehabilitants and to predict their success in occupational retraining. This paper presents the multiple regressions of a set of achievement scores on "grades of retraining" and "grades of final examination", respectively, concerning retraining to become an office management assistant. It was shown that only few variables are adequate to clarify a maximum of variance of the criterions. Four different regression models were identified; each of them could clarify about 25% of variance. Significant predictors were indicators for verbal skills and basic numeracy. In each model a measurement for nonverbal intelligence had to be taken into account as a suppressor variable. To put all in a nutshell, in order to predict the success of vocational retraining to become an office management assistant it is more important to focus on strengthening school knowledge than on general intelligence. PMID:19421942

  11. Sen. John C. Stennis celebrates a successful Space Shuttle Main Engine test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Sen. John C. Stennis dances a jig on top of the Test Control Center at Stennis Space Center following the successful test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine in 1978. A staunch supporter of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the senior senator from DeKalb, Miss., supported the establishment of the space center in Hancock County and spoke personally with local residents who would relocate their homes to accommodate Mississippi's entry into the space age. Stennis Space Center was named for Sen. Stennis by Executive Order of President Ronald Reagan on May 20, 1988.

  12. Predictive value of early maximal exercise test and thallium scintigraphy after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Wijns, W; Serruys, P W; Simoons, M L; van den Brand, M; de Feijter, P J; Reiber, J H; Hugenholtz, P G

    1985-01-01

    Restenosis of the dilated vessel after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty can be detected by non-invasive procedures but their ability to predict later restenosis soon after a successful angioplasty as well as recurrence of angina has not been assessed. A maximal exercise test and myocardial thallium perfusion scintigraphy were, therefore, performed in 91 asymptomatic patients a median of 5 weeks after they had undergone a technically successful angioplasty. Primary success of the procedure was confirmed by the decrease in percentage diameter stenosis from 64(12)% to 30(13)% as measured from the coronary angiograms and in the trans-stenotic pressure gradient (normalised for mean aortic pressure) from 0.61(0.16) to 0.17(0.09). A clinical follow up examination (8.6(4.9) months later) was carried out in all patients and a late coronary angiogram obtained in 77. The thallium perfusion scintigram showing the presence or absence of a reversible defect was highly predictive for restenosis whereas the exercise test was not. The positive predictive value of an abnormal scintigram was 82% compared with 60% for the exercise test (ST segment depression/or angina or both at peak workload). Angina or a new myocardial infarction occurred in 60% of patients with abnormal and in 21% of patients with normal scintigrams. PMID:3155619

  13. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for Mode 3 delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1989-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  14. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for mode III delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick, H.

    1991-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  15. Evaluation test of the energy monitoring device in industrial electron beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuochi, P. G.; Lavalle, M.; Martelli, A.; Corda, U.; Cornia, G.; Kovács, A.

    2009-07-01

    The electron beam energy monitoring device, previously developed and tested under standard laboratory conditions using electron beams in the energy range 4-12 MeV, has now been tested under industrial irradiation conditions in high-energy, high-power electron beam facilities. The measuring instrument was improved in order to measure high peak current delivered at low pulse repetition rate as well. Tests, with good results, were carried out at two different EB plants: one equipped with a LUE-8 linear electron accelerator of 7 MeV maximum energy used for cross-linking of cables and for medical device sterilization, and the other with a 10 MeV Rhodotron type TT 100 used for in-house sterilization.

  16. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  17. Development of a machine protection system for the Superconducting Beam Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Church, M.; Neswold, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Fermilab's Superconducting RF Beam Test Facility currently under construction will produce electron beams capable of damaging the acceleration structures and the beam line vacuum chambers in the event of an aberrant accelerator pulse. The accelerator is being designed with the capability to operate with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 1.5 GeV beam energy. It will be able to sustain an average beam power of 72 KW at the bunch charge of 3.2 nC. Operation at full intensity will deposit enough energy in niobium material to approach the melting point of 2500 C. In the early phase with only 3 cryomodules installed the facility will be capable of generating electron beam energies of 810 MeV and an average beam power that approaches 40 KW. In either case a robust Machine Protection System (MPS) is required to mitigate effects due to such large damage potentials. This paper will describe the MPS system being developed, the system requirements and the controls issues under consideration.

  18. Gas utilization in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T/sub 2/ allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H/sub 2/ to D/sub 2/ could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Overview of the SNS Target System Testing and Initial Beam Operation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Crabtree, J Allen; DeVore, Joe R; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lousteau, David C; Rennich, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) construction project has been completed including initial beam operation with the mercury target, moderators and associated systems. The project was initiated in 1999, with groundbreaking in December of 1999. Final integrated system testing for the mercury target, cryogenic moderators, shutter systems, water and other utility systems and all control and safety systems were completed in April 2006 and first beam on target delivered April 28, 2006. This paper will give an overview of the system testing conducted in preparation for beam operation and initial operating experience with low power beams. One area of testing was extensive remote handling testing in the Target Service Bay to demonstrate all key operations associated with the target and mercury loop. Many improvements were implemented as a result of this experience. Another set of tests involved bringing the supercritical cryogenic moderator systems on line. Again, lesions learned here resulted in system changes. Testing of the four water loops was very time consuming because of the complexity of the systems and many instrumentation issues had to be resolved. A temporary phosphor view screen was installed on the front of the target which has been extremely useful in evaluating the beam profile on the target. Initial profile results will be presented. Target System performance for initial beam operation will be discussed. In general, all systems performed well with excellent availability. There were some unexpected findings. For example, xenon spallation gas products are believed to have deposited on a downstream gold amalgamation bed designed to remove mercury vapor and increased the local dose rate. A summary of findings and plans for ramping up in power will be given.

  20. A wire calorimeter for the SPIDER beam: Experimental tests and feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Mario, I.; Veltri, P.; Zanini, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.

    2015-04-01

    To study and optimize negative ion production and acceleration, in view of the use of neutral beam injectors in the ITER project, the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A, distributed over 1280 beamlets) is under construction in Padova, with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation, by means of several diagnostic systems. An array of tungsten wires, directly exposed to the beam and consequently heated to high temperature, is used in similar experiments at IPP-Garching to study the beam optics, which is one of the most important issues, in a qualitative way. The present contribution gives a description of an experimental investigation of the behavior of tungsten wires under high heat loads in vacuum. Samples of tungsten wires are heated by electrical currents and the emitted light is measured by a camera in the 400-1100nm wavelength range, which is proposed as a calibration tool. Simultaneously, the voltage applied to the wire is measured to study the dependency of emissivity on temperature. The feasibility study of a wire calorimeter for SPIDER is finally proposed; to this purpose, the expected behaviour of tungsten with the two-dimensional beam profile in SPIDER is numerically addressed.

  1. A wire calorimeter for the SPIDER beam: Experimental tests and feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R. Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Mario, I.; Zanini, M.

    2015-04-08

    To study and optimize negative ion production and acceleration, in view of the use of neutral beam injectors in the ITER project, the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A, distributed over 1280 beamlets) is under construction in Padova, with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation, by means of several diagnostic systems. An array of tungsten wires, directly exposed to the beam and consequently heated to high temperature, is used in similar experiments at IPP-Garching to study the beam optics, which is one of the most important issues, in a qualitative way. The present contribution gives a description of an experimental investigation of the behavior of tungsten wires under high heat loads in vacuum. Samples of tungsten wires are heated by electrical currents and the emitted light is measured by a camera in the 400-1100nm wavelength range, which is proposed as a calibration tool. Simultaneously, the voltage applied to the wire is measured to study the dependency of emissivity on temperature. The feasibility study of a wire calorimeter for SPIDER is finally proposed; to this purpose, the expected behaviour of tungsten with the two-dimensional beam profile in SPIDER is numerically addressed.

  2. Initial beam-profiling tests with the NML prototype station at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.; Flora, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Scarpine, V.; Sun, Y.-E.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Church, M.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The beam-profile diagnostics station prototype for the superconducting rf electron linac being constructed at Fermilab at the New Muon Lab has been tested. The station uses intercepting radiation converter screens for the low-power beam mode: either a 100-{micro}m thick YAG:Ce single crystal scintillator or a 1-{micro}m thin Al optical transition radiation (OTR) foil. The screens are oriented with the surface perpendicular to the beam direction. A downstream mirror with its surface at 45 degrees to the beam direction is used to direct the radiation into the optical transport. The optical system has better than 20 (10) {micro}m rms spatial resolution when covering a vertical field of view of 18 (5) mm. The initial tests were performed at the A0 Photoinjector at a beam energy of {approx}15 MeV and with micropulse charges from 25 to 500 pC for beam sizes of 45 to 250 microns. Example results will be presented.

  3. System tests with electric thruster beam and accelerator directly powered from laboratory solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory high voltage solar arrays were operated directly connected to power the beam and accelerator loads of an 8-centimeter ion thruster. The beam array comprised conventional 2 by 2 centimeter solar cells; the accelerator array comprised multiple junction edge-illuminated solar cells. Conventional laboratory power supplies powered the thruster's other loads. Tests were made to evaluate thruster performance and to investigate possible electrical interactions between the solar arrays and the thruster. Thruster performance was the same as with conventional laboratory beam and accelerator power supplies. Most of the thruster beam short circuits that occurred during solar array operation were cleared spontaneously without automatic or manual intervention. No spontaneous clearing occurred during conventional power supply operation.

  4. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented. PMID:26931949

  5. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  6. Successful completion of a cyclic ground test of a mercury Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.; Low, Charles A., Jr.; Power, John L.

    1988-01-01

    An engineering model Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) 8-cm thruster (S/N 905) has completed a life test at NASA Lewis Research Center. The mercury ion thruster successfully completed and exceeded the test goals of 2557 on/off cycles and 7057 hr of operation at full thrust. The final 1200 cycles and 3600 hr of the life test were conducted using an engineering model of the IAPS power electronics unit (PEU) and breadboard digital controller and interface unit (DCIU). This portion of the test is described in this paper with a charted history of thruster operating parameters and off-normal events. Performance and operating characteristics were constant throughout the test with only minor variations. The engineering model power electronics unit operated without malfunction; the flight software in the digital controller and interface unit was exercised and verified. Post-test inspection of the thruster revealed facility enhanced accelerator grid erosion but overall the thruster was in good condition. It was concluded that the thruster performance was not drastically degraded by time or cycles. Additional cyclic testing is currently under consideration.

  7. Successful completion of a cyclic ground test of a mercury ion auxiliary propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.; Low, Charles A., Jr.; Power, John L.

    1988-01-01

    An engineering model Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) 8-cm thruster (S/N 905) has completed a life test at NASA Lewis Research Center. The mercury ion thruster successfully completed and exceeded the test goals of 2557 on/off cycles and 7057 hr of operation at full thrust. The final 1200 cycles and 3600 hr of the life test were conducted using an engineering model of the IAPS power electronics unit (PEU) and breadboard digital controller and interface unit (DCIU). This portion of the test is described in this paper with a charted history of thruster operating parameters and off-normal events. Performance and operating characteristics were constant throughout the test with only minor variations. The engineering model power electronics unit operated without malfunction; the flight software in the digital controller and interface unit was exercised and verified. Post-test inspection of the thruster revealed facility enhanced accelerator grid erosion but overall the thruster was in good condition. It was concluded that the thruster performance was not drastically degraded by time or cycles. Additional cyclic testing is currently under consideration.

  8. Design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Fong, M.; Koehler, G.W.; Low, W.; Purgalis, P.; Wells, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline is also equpped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities.

  9. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  10. The NASA MLAS Flight Demonstration - A Review of a Highly Successful Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Anthony P.; Kelley, Christopher; Magner, Eldred; Peterson, David; Hahn, Jeffrey; Yuchnovicz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    NASA has tested the Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) as a risk-mitigation design should problems arise with the baseline Orion spacecraft launch abort design. The Max in MLAS is not Maximum, but rather dedicated to Max Faget, The renowned NASA Spacecraft designer. In the fall of 2009, the mission was flown, with great success, from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The MLAS flight test vehicle prototype consists of a boost ring, coast ring, and the MLAS fairing itself, which houses an Orion Command Module (CM) boilerplate. The objective of the MLAS flight test is to reorient the fairing with the CM, weighing approximately 29,000 lbs and traveling 290 fps, 180 degrees to an orientation suitable for the release of the CM during a pad abort and low altitude abort. Although multiple parachute deployments are used in the MLAS flight test vehicle to complete its objective, there are only two parachute types employed in the flight test. Five of the nine parachutes used for MLAS are 27.6 ft DO ribbon parachutes, and the remaining four are standard G-12 cargo parachutes. This paper presents an overview of the 27.6 ft DO ribbon parachute system employed on the MLAS flight test vehicle for coast ring separation, fairing reorientation, and as drogue parachutes for the CM after separation from the fairing. Discussion will include: the process used to select this design, previously proven as a spin/stall recovery parachute; descriptions of all components of the parachute system; the minor modifications necessary to adapt the parachute to the MLAS program; the techniques used to analyze the parachute for the multiple roles it performs; a discussion of the rigging techniques used to interface the parachute system to the vehicle; a brief description of how the evolution of the program affected parachute usage and analysis; and a summary of the results of the flight test, including video of the flight test and subsequent summary analysis. . A discussion of the flight test which was

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Success Stories of X-Plane Design to Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of the design and flight test of three true X-planes are described, particularly X-plane design techniques that relied heavily on computational fluid dynamics(CFD) analysis. Three examples are presented: the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, the X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle, and the X-48B Blended Wing Body Demonstrator Aircraft. An overview is presented of the uses of CFD analysis, comparison and contrast with wind tunnel testing, and information derived from CFD analysis that directly related to successful flight test. Lessons learned on the proper and improper application of CFD analysis are presented. Highlights of the flight-test results of the three example X-planes are presented. This report discusses developing an aircraft shape from early concept and three-dimensional modeling through CFD analysis, wind tunnel testing, further refined CFD analysis, and, finally, flight. An overview of the areas in which CFD analysis does and does not perform well during this process is presented. How wind tunnel testing complements, calibrates, and verifies CFD analysis is discussed. Lessons learned revealing circumstances under which CFD analysis results can be misleading are given. Strengths and weaknesses of the various flow solvers, including panel methods, Euler, and Navier-Stokes techniques, are discussed.

  12. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  13. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  14. X-ray beam size measurements on the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.; Chambers, F.W.; Lauer, E.J.; Slaughter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam size has been determined on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) by intercepting the beam with a target and measuring the resulting x-ray intensity as a function of time as the target is moved through the beam. Several types of targets have been used. One is a tantalum rod which extends completely across the drift chamber. Another is a tungsten powder filled carbon crucible. Both of these probes are moved from shot to shot so that the x-ray signal intensity varies with probe position. A third is a larger tantalum disk which is inserted on beam axis to allow determining beam size on a one shot basis. The x-ray signals are detected with an MCP photomultiplier tube located at 90/sup 0/ to the beamline. It is sufficiently shielded to reject background x-rays and neutrons. The signals were digitized, recorded and later unfolded to produce plots of x-ray intensity versus probe position for several times during the pulse. The presumption that the x-ray intensity is proportional to beam current density is checked computationally. Details of the probe construction and PMT shielding, as well as sample measurements are given.

  15. Beam test results for the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel, G. Chiodini et al.

    2000-09-28

    The authors report the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector tests carried out in the MTest beam at Fermilab in 1999--2000. The pixel detector spatial resolution has been studied as a function of track inclination, sensor bias, and readout threshold.

  16. Beam tests of CALET with BBM electronics and STM at CERN-SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Tadahisa

    We have been developing flight hardware of CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) to observe electrons, gamma rays, and nuclei at the Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo” Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) on the International Space Station (ISS). The main calorimeter of CALET consists of a charge detector (CHD) to identify particles by charge, an imaging calorimeter (IMC) to determine incident angles and shower starting points, and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC) to measure energies and to discriminate electromagnetic particles from nuclei. We carried out beam experiments at CERN-SPS to confirm consistency between our simulation and beam test data. It is important for performance check and flight data analyses. We assembled a Beam Test Model detector by using BBM (Bread Board Model) of front end electronics and STM (Structure and Thermal Model) of CHD, IMC, and TASC for electron/proton runs in 2012. We made ion runs mainly to test CHD readout with BBM front end electronics in 2013. Basic results of the beam tests will be reported here.

  17. Design and Application of a Beam Testing System for Experiential Learning in Mechanics of Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, R. Warsi; Rais-Rohani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that students can significantly improve their understanding and retention of topics presented in an engineering course when discussions of theoretical and mathematical approaches are combined with active-learning exercises involving hands-on physical experiments. In this paper, the design and application of a beam testing system…

  18. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 78 FR 76410 - Request for Information on Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Strategies to Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS) Financing Models (78 FR 60998... Request for Information on Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS... information; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury is reopening the...

  20. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.J.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February, 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM/sub 130/ at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and, therefore, the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high-current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced B sub solar loops.

  1. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-01

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam Hα Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration—both for the wavelength and the emission—is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the Hα MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  2. Lightweight, Actively Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Thrustcells Successfully Tested in Rocket Combustion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Elam, Sandra K.; Effinger, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) thrustcells were developed and successfully tested in Glenn's Rocket Combustion Lab. Cooled CMC's offer the potential for substantial weight savings over more traditional metallic parts. Two CMC concepts were investigated. In the first of these concepts, an innovative processing approach utilized by Hyper-Therm, Inc., allowed woven CMC coolant containment tubes to be incorporated into the complex thruster design. In this unique design, the coolant passages had varying cross-sectional shapes but maintained a constant cross-sectional area along the length of the thruster. These thrusters were silicon carbide matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibers. The second concept, which was supplied by Ceramic Composites, Inc., utilized copper cooling coils surrounding a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon matrix composite. In this design, a protective gradient coating was applied to the inner thruster wall. Ceramic Composites, Inc.'s, method of incorporating the coating into the fiber and matrix eliminated the spallation problem often observed with thermal barrier coatings during hotfire testing. The focus of the testing effort was on screening the CMC material's capabilities as well as evaluating the performance of the thermal barrier or fiber-matrix interfacial coatings. Both concepts were hot-fire tested in gaseous O2/H2 environments. The test matrix included oxygen-to-fuel ratios ranging from 1.5 to 7 with chamber pressures to 400 psi. Steady-state internal wall temperatures in excess of 4300 F were measured in situ for successful 30-sec test runs. Photograph of actively cooled composite thrustcell fabricated by Hyper-Therm is shown. The thrustcell is a silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite with woven cooling channels. The matrix is formed via chemical vapor infiltration. Photograph of

  3. Improving Hispanic students' performance on science standardized tests: Successful practices from four elementary campuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Yvonne Lynne

    This qualitative, descriptive multiple case study took place in a Southwest Texas city bordering Mexico. The study examined specific resources and practices used in four different exemplary-rated elementary school campuses, with standardized test data reflecting 93% or more of their 5th-grade Hispanic student population passing the state mandated standardized science test. The sample for this study included one principal, one assistant principal, and three 5th-grade teachers from each campus. In total, the sample participants consisted of four principals, four assistant principals, and 12 5th-grade teachers. Data collection involved conducting in-depth, semi-structured interviews guided by five literature-based, researcher-generated questions. Fifth grade teachers and administrators reflected and reported upon their pedagogy for best practices in helping Hispanic students achieve success. Analysis of the data revealed eight themes: (a) successful schools have committed teachers, an environment conducive to learning, and incorporate best practices that work for all students; (b) curriculum alignment is very important; (c) teachers have access to a variety of resources; (d) teacher collaboration and planning is very important; (e) science camps, science reviews, and hands-on centers are effective in preparing students for the standardized test; (f) the most effective instructional practices include high emphasis on vocabulary, hands-on and differentiated instruction, and the 5E Model; (g) teachers see value in self-contained, dual-language classes; and (h) professional development and performance feedback are important to educators. The results of this study provide educational leaders with specific science instructional resources, practices, and interventions proven effective for the 5 th-grade Hispanic student population in passing the science state standardized test.

  4. Cold- and Beam Test of the First Prototypes of the Superstructure for the TESLA Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, Nicoleta

    2003-08-08

    After three years of preparation, two superstructures, each made of two superconducting 7-cell weakly coupled subunits, have been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac (TTF) for the cold- and beam-test. The energy stability, the HOMs damping, the frequency and the field adjustment methods were tested. The measured results confirmed expectation on the superstructure performance and proved that alternative layout for the 800 GeV upgrade of the TESLA collider, as it was proposed in TDR, is feasible. We report on the test and give here an overview of its results which are commented in more detail elsewhere in these Proceedings.

  5. Factors influencing success in quality-improvement collaboratives: development and psychometric testing of an instrument

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To increase the effectiveness of quality-improvement collaboratives (QICs), it is important to explore factors that potentially influence their outcomes. For this purpose, we have developed and tested the psychometric properties of an instrument that aims to identify the features that may enhance the quality and impact of collaborative quality-improvement approaches. The instrument can be used as a measurement instrument to retrospectively collect information about perceived determinants of success. In addition, it can be prospectively applied as a checklist to guide initiators, facilitators, and participants of QICs, with information about how to perform or participate in a collaborative with theoretically optimal chances of success. Such information can be used to improve collaboratives. Methods We developed an instrument with content validity based on literature and the opinions of QIC experts. We collected data from 144 healthcare professionals in 44 multidisciplinary improvement teams participating in two QICs and used exploratory factor analysis to assess the construct validity. We used Cronbach's alpha to ascertain the internal consistency. Results The 50-item instrument we developed reflected expert-opinion-based determinants of success in a QIC. We deleted nine items after item reduction. On the basis of the factor analysis results, one item was dropped, which resulted in a 40-item questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis showed that a three-factor model provided the best fit. The components were labeled 'sufficient expert team support', 'effective multidisciplinary teamwork', and 'helpful collaborative processes'. Internal consistency reliability was excellent (alphas between .85 and .89). Conclusions This newly developed instrument seems a promising tool for providing healthcare workers and policy makers with useful information about determinants of success in QICs. The psychometric properties of the instrument are satisfactory and warrant

  6. Minnesota Scholastic Aptitude Test and Vocational Development Inventory. Training Success Norms and Employment Success Norms. Project MINI-SCORE, Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.; Nelson, Howard F.

    Presented in this document are data on post-secondary vocational education students as collected by means of the Vocational Development Inventory (VDI) and the Minnesota Scholastic Aptitude Test (MSAT). For training success norms, 27 occupational groups were separated into three clusters on the basis of sex (primarily male, both male and female,…

  7. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  8. An overview of the HSST Full-Thickness Shallow-Crack Clad Beam Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, J.A.; Theiss, T.J.; McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.

    1994-09-01

    A testing program is described that will utilize full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow flaws in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow flaws in the beam specimen include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. Fracture toughness tests focusing on shallow flaws in plate and weld material will also provide data for evaluating the relative influence of absolute and normalized crack depth on constraint conditions. Pretest finite-element analyses are described that provide near-tip stress and strain fields for characterization of constraint in the shallow-crack specimens in terms of the Q-stress. Analysis results predict a constraint loss in the shallow-crack clad beam specimen similar to that determined for a previously tested shallow-crack single-edge notch homogeneous bend specimen with the same normalized crack depth.

  9. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J.B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick,, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gottfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Hartel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J.C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Unel, M. Karagoz; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C.G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K.F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wellsf, P.S.; Zhelezkow, A.

    2008-06-02

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system(Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignmentof the silicon modules is of the order of 5 mm in their most precise coordinate.

  10. TCT and test beam results of irradiated magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luukka, P.; Harkonen, J.; Maenpaa, T.; Betchart, B.; Czellar, S.; Demina, R.; Furgeri, A.; Gotra, Y.; Frey, M.; Hartmann, F.; Korjenevski, S.; ,

    2009-01-01

    Pad and strip detectors processed on high resistivity n-type magnetic Czochralski silicon (MCz-Si) were irradiated to several different fluences with protons. The pad detectors were characterized with the transient current technique (TCT) and the full-size strip detectors with a reference beam telescope and a 225 GeV muon beam. The TCT measurements indicate a double junction structure and space charge sign inversion in MCz-Si detectors after 6x1014 1 MeV neq/cm2 fluence. In the beam test a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 50 was measured for a non-irradiated MCz-Si sensor, and a S/N ratio of 20 for the sensors irradiated to the fluences of 1x1014 1 and 5x1014 1 MeV neq/cm2.

  11. An Architecture Proposal for the ILC Test Beam Silicon Telescope at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Turqueti, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The requirements for an ILC Test Beam silicon telescope system are foreseen to be very stringent. Resolution, noise, and throughput must be carefully managed in order to provide a useful instrument for the high energy physics community to develop detector technologies for the ILC. Since the ILC Test Beam is meant to test a wide variety of different detectors, it must employ universally accepted software techniques, hardware standards and protocols as well as easy integration of hardware and software with the various clients using the system. In this paper, we describe an open modular architecture to achieve these goals, including an analysis of the entire chain of software and hardware needed to meet the requirements.

  12. Design and performance of beam test electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The system architecture and test results of the custom circuits and beam test system for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented in this paper. The final detector per-channel signal processing chain will consist of a preamplifier-gain stage, a current-mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64-deep analog memory (simultaneous read-write), a post-memory analog correlator, and a 10-bit 5 {mu}s ADC. The Heap Manager provides all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Beam test (16-cell deep memory) performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 {mu} n-well CMOS process used for preamplifier fabrication.

  13. Design, fabrication and first beam tests of the C-band RF acceleration unit at SINAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Sheng, Xing; Wang, Chaopeng; Tong, Dechun; Chen, Lifang; Zhong, Shaopeng; Tan, Jianhao; Lin, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-07-01

    C-band RF acceleration is a crucial technology for the compact Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A project focusing on C-band RF acceleration technology was launched in 2008, based on high-gradient accelerating structures powered by klystron and pulse compressor units. The target accelerating gradient is 40 MV/m or higher. Recently one prototype of C-band RF unit, consisting of a 1.8 m accelerating structure and a klystron with a TE0115 mode pulse compressor, has been tested with high-power and electron beam. Stable operation at 40 MV/m was demonstrated and, 50 MV/m approached by the end of the test. This paper introduces the C-band R&D program at SINAP and presents the experiment results of high-power and beam tests.

  14. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  15. Transverse beam motion on the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y J; Fawley, W M; Paul, A C

    1999-03-23

    The accelerator on the second-axis of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT-II) facility will generate a 20 MeV, 2-4 kA, 2 µs long electron beam with an energy variation {<=} ± 0.5%. Four short current pulses with various lengths will be selected out of this 2 µs long current pulse and delivered to an x-ray converter target. The DARHT-II radiographic resolution requires these electron pulses to be focused to sub-millimeter spots on Bremsstrahlung targets with peak-to-peak transverse beam motion less than a few hundred microns. We have modeled the transverse beam motion, including the beam breakup instability, corkscrew motion, transverse resistive wall instability and beam induced transverse deflection in the kicker system, from the DARHT-II injector exit to the x-ray converter target. Simulations show that the transverse motion at the x-ray converters satisfies the DARHT-II radiographic requirements.

  16. ATTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAMS GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION EXPERIMENT AT THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZOLOTOREV, M.; ZHOLENTS, A.; WANG, X.J.; BABZIEN, M.; SKARITKA, J.; RAKOWSKY, G.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2002-02-01

    We are proposing an Atto-second electron beam generation and diagnostics experiment at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) using 1 {micro}m Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). The proposed experiment will be carried out by an BNL/LBNL collaboration, and it will be installed at the ATF beam line II. The proposed experiment will employ a one-meter long undulator with 1.8 cm period (VISA undulator). The electron beam energy will be 63 MeV with emittance less than 2 mm-mrad and energy spread less than 0.05%. The ATF photocathode injector driving laser will be used for energy modulation by Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). With 10 MW laser peak power, about 2% total energy modulation is expected. The energy modulated electron beam will be further bunched through either a drift space or a three magnet chicane into atto-second electron bunches. The attosecond electron beam bunches will be analyzed using the coherent transition radiation (CTR).

  17. Modelling of tests performed in order to evaluate the residual strength of corroded beams in the framework of the benchmark of the rance beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, A.; Vivier, M.

    2006-11-01

    The Benchmark of the Rance beams has been organised in order to evaluate the capabilities of various modelling tools, to predict the residual load carrying capacity of corroded beams. The Rance beams have been corroded in a marine environment for nearly 40years. Different types of prestressed beams, made of different types of cement, have been subjected to four points bending monotonous and cyclic tests as well as direct traction tests. The tests have been carried on up to failure, in order to evaluate the residual carrying capacity of the beams. Different teams have participated to the blind prediction of the tests results. In this framework, the CEA/DM2S/LM2S team has performed bidimensionnal modellings which are described in details in this paper. The various constitutive elements of the beams are represented : for concrete, the isotropic Mazars' damage model is used, in a non local version, for prestressing and passive steels, an elasto-plastic strain hardening model is adopted. The corrosion effects, taken into account for the longitudinal rebars, are derived on one hand from the measurements performed on the beams after the tests, and on the other hand from the literature. They consist mainly in a reduction of the rebars cross-section, as well as in their ductility. In principle, the properties of the bond between steel and rebars are also modified by the corrosion. Here, because of the unavailability of specific data on the smooth rebars of the Rance beams, the bond has been modelled by means of specific joint finite elements. The load carrying capacity has been calculated for the monotonous as well as the cyclic tests. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis has been performed, by considering variants where either the rebars are sane, or they have only reduced sections, with their original ductility. The results are compared to the experimental database, and discussed.

  18. Test beam and irradiation test results of Triple-GEM detector prototypes for the upgrade of the muon system of the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vai, I.

    2016-07-01

    The CMS Collaboration is developing GEM detectors for the upgrade of the CMS muon system. Their performance will be presented, analyzing the results of several test beams and an irradiation test performed in the last years.

  19. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, S.; Baselga, M.; Boscardin, M.; Christophersen, M.; Da Via, C.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Darbo, G.; Fadeyev, V.; Fleta, C.; Gemme, C.; Grenier, P.; Jimenez, A.; Lopez, I.; Micelli, A.; Nelist, C.; Parker, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Phlips, B.; Pohl, D.-L.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sicho, P.; Tsiskaridze, S.

    2013-12-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  20. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    SciTech Connect

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A.

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  1. Test results on the silicon pixel detector for the TTF-FEL beam trajectory monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, S.; Ischebeck, R.; Müller, U. C.; Roth, S.; Hansen, K.; Holl, P.; Karstensen, S.; Kemmer, J.; Klanner, R.; Lechner, P.; Leenen, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Schmüser, P.; Strüder, L.

    2001-02-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free-electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of the detector and the read-out electronics and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels, the 6 keV photons of the manganese K α/K β line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: in one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moves across the pixel structure. In the other, the detector is scanned using a low-intensity electron beam of an electron microscope. Both methods show that the symmetry axis of the detector defines a straight line within 0.4 μm. The sensitivity of the detector to low-energy X-rays is measured using a vacuum ultraviolet beam at the synchrotron light source HASYLAB. Additionally, the electron microscope is used to study the radiation hardness of the detector.

  2. Compact Undulator for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source: Design and Beam Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, A.; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Li, Y.; Lyndaker, A.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Woll, A.

    2013-03-01

    We developed, built and beam tested a novel, compact, in-vacuum undulator magnet based on an adjustable phase (AP) scheme. The undulator is 1 m long with a 5mm gap. It has a pure permanent magnet structure with 24.4mm period and 1.1 Tesla maximum peak field. The device consists of two planar magnet arrays mounted on rails inside of a rectangular box-like frame with 156 mm × 146 mm dimensions. The undulator magnet is enclosed in a 273 mm (10.75") diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel with a driver mechanism placed outside. In May 2012 the CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) was installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring and beam tested. During four weeks of dedicated run we evaluated undulator radiation properties as well as magnetic, mechanical and vacuum properties of the undulator magnet. We also studied the effect of the CCU on storage ring beam. The spectral characteristics and intensity of radiation were found to be in very good agreement with expected. The magnet demonstrated reproducibility of undulator parameter K at 1.4 × 10-4 level. It was also found that the undulator K. parameter change does not affect electron beam orbit and betatron tunes.

  3. Test beam results of a high granularity LuAG fibre calorimeter prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, A.; Lucchini, M.; Pauwels, K.; Tully, C.; Medvedeva, T.; Heering, A.; Dujardin, C.; Kononets, V.; Lebbou, K.; Aubry, N.; Faraj, S.; Ferro, G.; Lecoq, P.; Auffray, E.

    2016-05-01

    The progresses in the micropulling-down technique allow heavy scintillating crystals to be grown directly into a fibre geometry of variable shape, length and diameter. Examples of materials that can be grown with this technique are Lutetium Aluminum Garnets (LuAG, Lu3Al5O12) and Yttrium Aluminum Garnets (YAG, Y3Al5O12). Thanks to the flexibility of this approach, combined with the high density and good radiation hardness of the materials, such a technology represents a powerful tool for the development of future calorimeters. As an important proof of concept of the application of crystal fibres in future experiments, a small calorimeter prototype was built and tested on beam. A grooved brass absorber (dimensions 26cm×7cm×16cm) was instrumented with 64 LuAG fibres, 56 of which were doped with Cerium, while the remaining 8 were undoped. Each fibre was readout individually using 8 eightfold Silicon Photomultiplier arrays, thus providing a highly granular description of the shower development inside the module as well as good tracking capabilities. The module was tested at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility using electrons and pions in the 2–16 GeV energy range. The module performance as well as fibre characterization results from this beam test are presented.

  4. Lunar Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) Reliability Testing for Assured Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program has selected the closed cycle hydrogen oxygen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) as its baseline solar energy storage system for the lunar outpost and manned rover vehicles. Since the outpost and manned rovers are "human-rated," these energy storage systems will have to be of proven reliability exceeding 99 percent over the length of the mission. Because of the low (TRL=5) development state of the closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC at present, and because there is no equivalent technology base in the commercial sector from which to draw or infer reliability information from, NASA will have to spend significant resources developing this technology from TRL 5 to TRL 9, and will have to embark upon an ambitious reliability development program to make this technology ready for a manned mission. Because NASA would be the first user of this new technology, NASA will likely have to bear all the costs associated with its development.When well-known reliability estimation techniques are applied to the hydrogen oxygen RFC to determine the amount of testing that will be required to assure RFC unit reliability over life of the mission, the analysis indicates the reliability testing phase by itself will take at least 2 yr, and could take up to 6 yr depending on the number of QA units that are built and tested and the individual unit reliability that is desired. The cost and schedule impacts of reliability development need to be considered in NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) plans, since life cycle testing to build meaningful reliability data is the only way to assure "return to the moon, this time to stay, then on to Mars" mission success.

  5. The Effectiveness of Using the Successive Perception Test I to Measure Visual-Haptic Tendencies in Engineering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Study, Nancy E.

    2002-01-01

    Compares results of Successive Perception Test I (SPT) for the study population of freshman engineering students to their results on the group-administered Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Visualization of Rotations (PSVT) and the individually administered Haptic Visual Discrimination Test (HVDT). Concludes that either visual and haptic…

  6. (Acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam furnace)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Howell, C.R.

    1990-09-18

    The travelers observed the acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam (EB) furnace constructed by Leybold (Hanau) Technologies prior to disassembly and shipping. The testing included: (1) operation of the mold withdrawal system (2) vacuum pumping and vacuum chamber leak-up rates, (3) power stability at full power, (4) x-radiation monitoring at full power, and (5) demonstration of system interlocks for loss of water cooling, loss of vacuum, loss of power, and emergency shutdown. Preliminary training was obtained in furnace operation, EB gun maintenance, and use of the programmable logic controller for beam manipulation. Additional information was obtained on water-cooling requirements and furnace platform construction necessary for the installation. The information gained and training received will greatly assist in minimizing the installation and startup operation costs of the furnace.

  7. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  8. Test of QED using a laser at the SLAC final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    Experiment {number sign}144 at SLAC has three parts: the search for low-mass states excited in {gamma}{gamma} collisions and observed in pair decay, the study of nonlinear, nonperturbative QED in {gamma}e and {gamma}{gamma} collisions, and its possible applications to general purpose linear colliders. Such colliders could produce the full range of J{sub q{center dot}{center dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC} states, leptoquarks J{sub l{center dot}{center dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC}, the particles of supersymmetry, the top quark or Higgs. However, to realize them a number of technical problems need resolution that are addressed in E144 together with interesting possibilities for highly polarized, high brightness {gamma}/{sup {yields}} e{sup {yields}{plus minus}} beams that are needed for electroweak studies.

  9. Test of QED using a laser at the SLAC final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    Experiment {number_sign}144 at SLAC has three parts: the search for low-mass states excited in {gamma}{gamma} collisions and observed in pair decay, the study of nonlinear, nonperturbative QED in {gamma}e and {gamma}{gamma} collisions, and its possible applications to general purpose linear colliders. Such colliders could produce the full range of J{sub q{center_dot}{center_dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC} states, leptoquarks J{sub l{center_dot}{center_dot}{bar q}}/{sup PC}, the particles of supersymmetry, the top quark or Higgs. However, to realize them a number of technical problems need resolution that are addressed in E144 together with interesting possibilities for highly polarized, high brightness {gamma}/{sup {yields}} e{sup {yields}{plus_minus}} beams that are needed for electroweak studies.

  10. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  11. Test of pixel detectors for laser-driven accelerated particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, S.; Granja, C.; Krejci, F.; Assmann, W.

    2011-12-01

    Laser-driven accelerated (LDA) particle beams have due to the unique acceleration process very special properties. In particular they are created in ultra-short bunches of high intensity exceeding more than 107 \\frac{particles}{cm^{2} \\cdot ns} per bunch. Characterization of these beams is very limited with conventional particle detectors. Non-electronic detectors such as imaging plates or nuclear track detectors are, therefore, conventionally used at present. Moreover, all these detectors give only offline information about the particle pulse position and intensity as they require minutes to hours to be processed, calling for a new highly sensitive online device. Here, we present tests of different pixel detectors for real time detection of LDA ion pulses. Experiments have been performed at the Munich 14MV Tandem accelerator with 8-20 MeV protons in dc and pulsed beam, the latter producing comparable flux as a LDA ion pulse. For detection tests we chose the position-sensitive quantum-counting semiconductor pixel detector Timepix which also provides per-pixel energy- or time-sensitivity. Additionally other types of commercially available pixel detectors are being evaluated such as the RadEye™1, a large area (25 x 50 mm2) CMOS image sensor. All of these devices are able to resolve individual ions with high spatial- and energy-resolution down to the level of μm and tens of keV, respectively. Various beam delivering parameters of the accelerator were thus evaluated and verified. The different readout modes of the Timepix detector which is operated with an integrated USB-based readout interface allow online visualization of single and time-integrated events. Therefore Timepix offers the greatest potential in analyzing the beam parameters.

  12. The Goodrich 3rd generation DB-110 system: successful flight test on the F-16 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Davis; Iyengar, Mrinal; Maver, Larry; Dyer, Gavin; Francis, John

    2007-04-01

    The 3rd Generation Goodrich DB-110 system provides users with a three (3) field-of-view high performance Airborne Reconnaissance capability that incorporates a dual-band day and nighttime imaging sensor, a real time recording and a real time data transmission capability to support long range, medium range, and short range standoff and over-flight mission scenarios, all within a single pod. Goodrich developed their 3rd Generation Airborne Reconnaissance Pod for operation on a range of aircraft types including F-16, F-15, F-18, Euro-fighter and older aircraft such as the F-4, F-111, Mirage and Tornado. This system upgrades the existing, operationally proven, 2nd generation DB-110 design with enhancements in sensor resolution, flight envelope and other performance improvements. Goodrich recently flight tested their 3rd Generation Reconnaissance System on a Block 52 F-16 aircraft with first flight success and excellent results. This paper presents key highlights of the system and presents imaging results from flight test.

  13. Perceived organizational problems in health care: a pilot test of the structured problem and success inventory.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Monica E; Terris, Darcey D; Sparring, Vibeke; Tolf, Sara; Brown, Claire R

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to test whether the Structured Problem and Success Inventory (SPI) instrument could capture mental representations of organizational and work-related problems as described by individuals working in health care organizations and to test whether these representations varied according to organizational position. A convenience sample (n = 56) of middle managers (n = 20), lower-level managers (n = 20), and staff (n = 16) from health care organizations in Stockholm (Sweden) attending organizational development courses during 2003-2004 was recruited. Participants used the SPI to describe the 3 most pressing organizational and work-related problems. Data were systematically reviewed to identify problem categories and themes. One hundred sixty-four problems were described, clustered into 13 problem categories. Generally, middle managers focused on organizational factors and managerial responsibilities, whereas lower-level managers and staff focused on operational issues and what others did or ought to do. Furthermore, we observed similarities and variation in perceptions and their association with respondents' position within an organization. Our results support the need for further evaluation of the SPI as a promising tool for health care organizations. Collecting structured inventories of organizational and work-related problems from multiple perspectives may assist in the development of shared understandings of organizational challenges and lead to more effective and efficient processes of solution planning and implementation. PMID:22453820

  14. Detecting Blending End-Point Using Mean Squares Successive Difference Test and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Bertelsen, Poul; Van Den Berg, Frans; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm based on mean squares successive difference test applied to near-infrared and principal component analysis scores was developed to monitor and determine the blending profile and to assess the end-point in the statistical stabile phase. Model formulations consisting of an active compound (acetylsalicylic acid), together with microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of calcium carbonate with dramatically different particle shapes, were prepared. The formulation comprising angular-shaped calcium carbonate reached blending end-point slower when compared with the formulation comprising equant-shaped calcium carbonate. Utilizing the ring shear test, this distinction in end-point could be related to the difference in flowability of the formulations. On the basis of the two model formulations, a design of experiments was conducted to characterize the blending process by studying the effect of CaCO3 grades and fill level of the bin on blending end-point. Calcium carbonate grades, fill level, and their interaction were shown to have a significant impact on the blending process. PMID:26094601

  15. Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, P.; Alimonti, G.; Barbero, M.; Bates, R.; Bolle, E.; Borri, M.; Boscardin, M.; Buttar, C.; Capua, M.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cobal, M.; Cristofoli, A.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Darbo, G.; Da Via, C.; Devetak, E.; DeWilde, B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Esseni, D.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Manchester U. /CERN /LBL, Berkeley /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Oslo U. /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SLAC /SLAC /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /SLAC /SINTEF, Oslo /Manchester U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Bonn U. /Bonn U. /CERN /Manchester U. /SINTEF, Oslo /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Manchester U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Glasgow U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Hawaii U. /Freiburg U. /Manchester U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /CERN /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /Prague, Tech. U. /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /CERN /Oslo U. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /SLAC /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /SLAC /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo

    2011-08-19

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance. Full and partial 3D pixel detectors have been tested, with and without a 1.6T magnetic field, in high energy pion beams at the CERN SPS North Area in 2009. Sensors characteristics have been measured as a function of the beam incident angle and compared to a regular planar pixel device. Overall full and partial 3D devices have similar behavior. Magnetic field has no sizeable effect on 3D performances. Due to electrode inefficiency 3D devices exhibit some loss of tracking efficiency for normal incident tracks but recover full efficiency with tilted tracks. As expected due to the electric field configuration 3D sensors have little charge sharing between cells.

  16. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.; Steffens, E.; Stancari, M.

    2009-08-04

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC)[2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  17. Design, fabrication, and testing of superconducting RF cavities for high average beam currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, David Joseph

    For high current applications, it is desirable for the cavity shape to have a low longitudinal loss factor and to have a high beam-breakup threshold current. This dissertation describes three different cavities designed for this purpose: a six-cell elliptical cavity for particles traveling at the speed of light, a two-cell elliptical cavity for subluminal particle speeds, and a single cell cavity which uses the TM012 mode for acceleration. SUPERFISH simulations predict the peak fields in both of the elliptical cavities will not exceed the TeSLA values by more than 10% but both will have 28.7% larger apertures. The elliptical designs assume the bunch frequency equals the accelerating mode frequency. The beam pipe radius is chosen so that the cutoff frequency is less than twice that of the accelerating mode. Hence all of the monopole and dipole higher-order modes (HOMs) that can be driven by a Fourier component of the beam have low loaded Q values. This simplifies the problem of HOM damping. The TM012 cavity is predicted to have much higher peak fields than a pi-mode elliptical cavity, but offers potential advantages from its simplified shape; it is essentially a circular waveguide with curved end plates. This basic shape results in easier fabrication and simplified tuning. Two prototype two-cell cavities were fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures without beam.

  18. Experimental Tests and FEM Model for SFRC Beams under Flexural and Shear Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Colajanni, Piero; Spinella, Nino; La Mendola, Lidia; Priolo, Salvatore

    2008-07-08

    The complete load-vs-displacement curves obtained by four-point-bending tests on Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) beams are predicted by using a nonlinear finite element code based on the Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT) and the Disturbed Stress Field Model (DSFM) suitably adapted for SFRC elements. The effect of fibers on the shear-flexure response is taken into account, mainly incorporating tensile stress-strain analytical relationship for SFRC. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the model for prediction of the behavior of the tested specimens reinforced with light amount of stirrups or with fibers only.

  19. Experimental Tests and FEM Model for SFRC Beams under Flexural and Shear Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colajanni, Piero; La Mendola, Lidia; Priolo, Salvatore; Spinella, Nino

    2008-07-01

    The complete load-vs-displacement curves obtained by four-point-bending tests on Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) beams are predicted by using a nonlinear finite element code based on the Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT) and the Disturbed Stress Field Model (DSFM) suitably adapted for SFRC elements. The effect of fibers on the shear-flexure response is taken into account, mainly incorporating tensile stress-strain analytical relationship for SFRC. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the model for prediction of the behavior of the tested specimens reinforced with light amount of stirrups or with fibers only.

  20. Beam test results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2000-09-28

    The authors have described the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector beam test. The pixel detectors under test used samples of the first two generations of Fermilab pixel readout chips, FPIX0 and FPIX1, (indium bump-bonded to ATLAS sensor prototypes). The spatial resolution achieved using analog charge information is excellent for a large range of track inclination. The resolution is still very good using only 2-bit charge information. A relatively small dependence of the resolution on bias voltage is observed. The resolution is observed to depend dramatically on the discriminator threshold, and it deteriorates rapidly for threshold above 4000e{sup {minus}}.

  1. Beam test characterization of CMS silicon pixel detectors for the phase-1 upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector forms the innermost part of the CMS tracking system and is critical to track and vertex reconstruction. Being in close proximity to the beam interaction point, it is exposed to the highest radiation levels in the silicon tracker. In order to preserve the tracking performance with the LHC luminosity increase which is foreseen for the next years, the CMS collaboration has decided to build a new pixel detector with four barrel layers mounted around a reduced diameter beam pipe, as compared to the present three layer pixel detector in the central region. A new digital version of the front-end readout chip has been designed and tested; it has increased data buffering and readout link speed to maintain high efficiency at increasing occupancy. In addition, it offers lower charge thresholds that will improve the tracking efficiency and position resolution. Single chip modules have been evaluated in the DESY electron test beam in terms of charge collection, noise, tracking efficiency and position resolution before and after irradiation with 24 GeV protons from the CERN Proton Synchroton equivalent to the fluence expected after 500 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in the fourth layer of the pixel tracker. High efficiency and an excellent position resolution have been observed which are well maintained even after the proton irradiation. The results are well described by the CMS pixel detector simulation.

  2. Fracture Tests of Etched Components Using a Focused Ion Beam Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan, L.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many optical MEMS device designs involve large arrays of thin (0.5 to 1 micron components subjected to high stresses due to cyclic loading. These devices are fabricated from a variety of materials, and the properties strongly depend on size and processing. Our objective is to develop standard and convenient test methods that can be used to measure the properties of large numbers of witness samples, for every device we build. In this work we explore a variety of fracture test configurations for 0.5 micron thick silicon nitride membranes machined using the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. Testing was completed using an FEI 620 dual focused ion beam milling machine. Static loads were applied using a probe. and dynamic loads were applied through a piezo-electric stack mounted at the base of the probe. Results from the tests are presented and compared, and application for predicting fracture probability of large arrays of devices are considered.

  3. A Genetically Optimized Predictive System for Success in General Chemistry Using a Diagnostic Algebra Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Cameron I.; Pearson, Paul T.

    2012-02-01

    In higher education, many high-enrollment introductory courses have evolved into "gatekeeper" courses due to their high failure rates. These courses prevent many students from attaining their educational goals and often become graduation roadblocks. At the authors' home institution, general chemistry has become a gatekeeper course in which approximately 25% of students do not pass. This failure rate in chemistry is common, and often higher, at many other institutions of higher education, and mathematical deficiencies are perceived to be a large contributing factor. This paper details the development of a highly accurate predictive system that identifies students at the beginning of the semester who are "at-risk" for earning a grade of C- or below in chemistry. The predictive accuracy of this system is maximized by using a genetically optimized neural network to analyze the results of a diagnostic algebra test designed for a specific population. Once at-risk students have been identified, they can be helped to improve their chances of success using techniques such as concurrent support courses, online tutorials, "just-in-time" instructional aides, study skills, motivational interviewing, and/or peer mentoring.

  4. Status of PRIMA, the test facility for ITER neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, P.; Antoni, V.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Zaccaria, P.; ITER International Team

    2013-02-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1MV a 40A beam of negative deuterons, delivering to the plasma about 17MW up to one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was decided to build a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. The Japan and the India Domestic Agencies participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as KIT-Karlsruhe, IPP-Garching, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. In the paper the main requirements are discussed and the design of the main components and systems are described.

  5. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  6. First test experiment to produce the slowed-down RI beam with the momentum-compression mode at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikama, T.; Ahn, D. S.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kubo, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Aoi, N.; Beaumel, D.; Hasegawa, K.; Ideguchi, E.; Imai, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S.; Otsu, H.; Shimoura, S.; Teranishi, T.

    2016-06-01

    The 82Ge beam has been produced by the in-flight fission reaction of the 238U primary beam with 345 MeV/u at the RIKEN RI beam factory, and slowed down to about 15 MeV/u using the energy degraders. The momentum-compression mode was applied to the second stage of the BigRIPS separator to reduce the momentum spread. The energy was successfully reduced down to 13 ± 2.5 MeV/u as expected. The focus was not optimized at the end of the second stage, therefore the beam size was larger than the expectation. The transmission of the second stage was half of the simulated value mainly due to out of focus. The two-stage separation worked very well for the slowed-down beam with the momentum-compression mode.

  7. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1990-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semi-circular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semi-circular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is under way to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  8. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1991-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  9. SRF test facility for the superconducting LINAC ``RAON'' — RRR property and e-beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joo, Jongdae; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-02-01

    Equipment, such as a vacuum furnace, high pressure rinse (HPR), eddy current test (ECT) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP), are installed in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) test facility. Three different sizes of cryostats (diameters of 600 mm for a quarter wave resonator (QWR), 900 mm for a half wave resonator (HWR), and 1200 mm for single spoke resonator 1&2 (SSR 1&2)) for vertical RF tests are installed for testing cavities. We confirmed that as-received niobium sheets (ASTM B393, RRR300) good electrical properties because they showed average residual resistance ratio (RRR) values higher than 300. However, serious RRR degradation occurred after joining two pieces of Nb by e-beam welding because the average RRR values of the samples were ˜179, which was only ˜60% of as-received RRR value. From various e-beam welding experiments in which the welding current and a speed at a fixed welding voltage were changed, we confirmed that good welding results were obtained at a 53 mA welding current and a 20-mm/s welding speed at a fixed welding voltage of 150 kV.

  10. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  11. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Chu, Tak Sum; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  12. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hiel, C.C.; Sumich, M.; Chappell, D.P. )

    1991-07-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout). 10 refs.

  13. The Predictors of Success in Turkish High School Placement Exams: Exam Prep Courses, Perfectionism, Parental Attitudes and Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basol, Gülsah; Zabun, Engin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine to what extent the following four variables explain K-8 students' SBS success levels; these variables being attendance to private SBS preperation courses, multidimensional perfectionism, parental attitude types, and test anxiety. SBS is a nationwide, high stake, high school placement test taken…

  14. Development, Administration and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Secondary School Test Based on the Theory of Successful Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zbainos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate an application of the theory of Successful Intelligence (Sternberg, 1997) in lower Greek secondary schools, through a school tests believing that school assessments should be based on solid, empirically investigated theoretical foundations. The test was administered to 2663 students with a mean age of…

  15. Wind Tunnel Testing of a One-Dimensional Laser Beam Scanning and Laser Sheet Approach to Shock Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger; Adamovsky, Grigory; Anderson, Robert; Hirt, Stefanie; Huang, John; Floyd, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    A 15- by 15-cm supersonic wind tunnel application of a one-dimensional laser beam scanning approach to shock sensing is presented. The measurement system design allowed easy switching between a focused beam and a laser sheet mode for comparison purposes. The scanning results were compared to images from the tunnel Schlieren imaging system. The tests revealed detectable changes in the laser beam in the presence of shocks. The results lend support to the use of the one-dimensional scanning beam approach for detecting and locating shocks in a flow, but some issues must be addressed in regards to noise and other limitations of the system.

  16. CMC Nose Skirt Panels for X-38 - Successfully Qualification Tested and Fit-Checked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabandt, Ulrich; Handrik, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The X-38 Nose assembly follows an advanced design concept by considering light-weight C/SiC structures with C/SiC attachments for the Nose Cap and metallic attachments for the Nose Skirt. The design concept of the C/SiC nose assembly contains the advantages of low expansion and stable contour at high temperatures which enabled 3 different companies with different C/SiC materials to combine 4 different C/SiC components to a complete hot structural element. The Nose Cap, fabricated by DLR, can be seen as a separate part of the Nose Assembly due to the special fastening concepts, whereas the Nose Skirt follows a similar design concept for the panels and the metallic fastening concept is identical. The Nose Skirt is divided into the two large side panels, manufactured by Astrium and the small lower part of the skirt, the Chin Panel has been delivered by MAN-Technologie (see figure below). The design of the 3 Skirt panels comprises a light-weight, stringer stiffened concept which compensates the thermal expansion by a system of flexible metallic stand-offs. An optimum in flexibility and stiffness to fulfil all requirements had to be found: strong and stiff enough to carry the thermo-mechanical loads, but flexible enough to realise a fastening concept which does not fail due to thermal expansion. The thermal and vibration qualification tests have been successfully performed with a complete nose assembly full scale qualification model on a nose tip cold structure. These tests provided data with respect to the thermal deflection of the Nose Skirt Panels and the temperature gradients into the cold structure. On a sub-scale model the influences of the steps and gaps between the different panels and to the nose cap were investigated and were found non-critical for the re-entry environmental conditions. The paper gives an overview of the design concept of the newly developed TPS, presents the results of thermal, structural and plasma testing and gives an outlook for further

  17. Test and Development of a 10 MW 1.3 GHz Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Martin, David; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, 1.3 GHz plug-compatible Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. Earlier this year a beam tester was constructed and began test. Device fabrication issues have complicated the analysis of the data collected from an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Since the goal of the beam tester is to confirm 3d beam simulations it was necessary to rebuild the device in order to mitigate unwanted effects due to imperfect focusing construction. Measurements are underway to verify the results of this latest incarnation. Measurement will then be made of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. In the klystron design, a TE oscillation was discovered during long simulation runs of the entire device which has since prompted two design changes to eliminate the beam disruption. The general theory of operation, the design choices made, and results of testing of these various devices will be discussed.

  18. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  19. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  20. Using Middle School Test Scores to Predict Success in Ninth Grade Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Lorrie D.

    2013-01-01

    Success in ninth grade is essential to a student's success throughout high school. Many high schools retain the traditional science course sequence of teaching biology first to ninth graders who may or may not be cognitively ready for today's biology content. A few school districts in Georgia are offering a flexible science course sequence in the…

  1. Testing the Theory of Successful Intelligence in Teaching Grade 4 Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Jarvin, Linda; Birney, Damian P.; Naples, Adam; Stemler, Steven E.; Newman, Tina; Otterbach, Renate; Parish, Carolyn; Randi, Judy; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    This study addressed whether prior successes with educational interventions grounded in the theory of successful intelligence could be replicated on a larger scale as the primary basis for instruction in language arts, mathematics, and science. A total of 7,702 4th-grade students in the United States, drawn from 223 elementary school classrooms in…

  2. Successful Combination of Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Diagnostics and Targeted Deferred Neisseria gonorrhoeae Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wind, Carolien M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are recommended for the diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of their superior sensitivity. Increasing NAAT use causes a decline in crucial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance data, which rely on culture. We analyzed the suitability of the ESwab system for NAAT diagnostics and deferred targeted N. gonorrhoeae culture to allow selective and efficient culture based on NAAT results. We included patients visiting the STI Clinic Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 2013. Patient characteristics and urogenital and rectal samples for direct N. gonorrhoeae culture, standard NAAT, and ESwab were collected. Standard NAAT and NAAT on ESwab samples were performed using the Aptima Combo 2 assay for N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. Two deferred N. gonorrhoeae cultures were performed on NAAT-positive ESwab samples after storage at 4°C for 1 to 3 days. We included 2,452 samples from 1,893 patients. In the standard NAAT, 107 samples were N. gonorrhoeae positive and 284 were C. trachomatis positive. The sensitivities of NAAT on ESwab samples were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 75 to 90%) and 87% (95% CI, 82 to 90%), respectively. ESwab samples were available for 98 of the gonorrhea-positive samples. Of these, 82% were positive in direct culture and 69% and 56% were positive in the 1st and 2nd deferred cultures, respectively (median storage times, 27 and 48 h, respectively). Deferred culture was more often successful in urogenital samples or when the patient had symptoms at the sampling site. Deferred N. gonorrhoeae culture of stored ESwab samples is feasible and enables AMR surveillance. To limit the loss in NAAT sensitivity, we recommend obtaining separate samples for NAAT and deferred culture. PMID:25832300

  3. The Neutral Beam Test Facility and Radiation Effects Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) and a Radiation Effects Facility (REF). These two facilities use the surplus capacity of the 200-MeV Linac injector for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The REF can be used to simulate radiation damage effects in space from both natural and man made radiation sources. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can be varied over a wide range leading to a broad field of application. The NBTF has been designed to carry out high precision experiments and contains an absolute reference target system for the on-line calibration of measurements carried out in the experimental hall. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can also be varied over a wide range but with tradeoffs depending on the required accuracy. Both facilities are fully operational and will be described together with details of the associated experimental programs.

  4. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

    2006-10-01

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  5. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-10-27

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  6. Development of ion beams for space effects testing using an ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, Janilee; Hodgkinson, Adrian; Johnson, Mike; Loew, Tim; Lyneis, Claude; Phair, Larry

    2013-04-19

    At LBNL's 88-Inch Cyclotron and Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility, a range of ion beams at energies from 1 to 55 MeV/nucleon are used for radiation space effects testing. By bombarding a component with ion beams the radiation component of the space environment can be simulated and single event effects (SEEs) determined. The performance of electronic components used in space flight and high altitude aircraft can then be evaluated. The 88- Inch Cyclotron is coupled to the three electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECR, AECR-U, VENUS). These ion sources provide a variety of ion species, ranging from protons to heavy ions such as bismuth, for these tests. In particular the ion sources have been developed to provide {sup c}ocktails{sup ,} a mixture of ions of similar mass-to-charge ratio, which can be simultaneously injected into the cyclotron, but selectively extracted from it. The ions differ in both their linear energy transfer (LET) deposited to the part and in their penetration depth into the tested part. The current heavy ion cocktails available are the 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV per nucleon.

  7. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  8. Development of ion beams for space effects testing using an ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, Janilee; Hodgkinson, Adrian; Johnson, Mike; Loew, Tim; Lyneis, Claude; Phair, Larry

    2013-04-01

    At LBNL's 88-Inch Cyclotron and Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility, a range of ion beams at energies from 1 to 55 MeV/nucleon are used for radiation space effects testing. By bombarding a component with ion beams the radiation component of the space environment can be simulated and single event effects (SEEs) determined. The performance of electronic components used in space flight and high altitude aircraft can then be evaluated. The 88- Inch Cyclotron is coupled to the three electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECR, AECR-U, VENUS). These ion sources provide a variety of ion species, ranging from protons to heavy ions such as bismuth, for these tests. In particular the ion sources have been developed to provide "cocktails", a mixture of ions of similar mass-to-charge ratio, which can be simultaneously injected into the cyclotron, but selectively extracted from it. The ions differ in both their linear energy transfer (LET) deposited to the part and in their penetration depth into the tested part. The current heavy ion cocktails available are the 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV per nucleon.

  9. Facilities to Support Beamed Energy Launch Testing at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, Michael L.

    2003-05-01

    The Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL) has been characterizing material responses to laser energy in support of national defense programs and the aerospace industry for the past 26 years. This paper reviews the overall resources available at LHMEL to support fundamental materials testing relating to impulse coupling measurement and to explore beamed energy launch concepts. Located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, LHMEL is managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory Materials Directorate AFRL/MLPJ and operated by Anteon Corporation. The facility's advanced hardware is centered around carbon dioxide lasers producing output power up to 135kW and neodymium glass lasers producing up to 10 kilojoules of repetitively pulsed output. The specific capabilities of each laser device and related optical systems are discussed. Materials testing capabilities coupled with the laser systems are also described including laser output and test specimen response diagnostics. Environmental simulation capabilities including wind tunnels and large-volume vacuum chambers relevant to beamed energy propulsion are also discussed. This paper concludes with a summary of the procedures and methods by which the facility can be accessed.

  10. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis after ART success: the role of early combined screening tests in counselling pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Ghisoni, L; Ferrazzi, E; Castagna, C; Levi Setti, P E; Masini, A C; Pigni, A

    2003-10-01

    First-trimester Down syndrome screening may cause a higher false positive rate in pregnant patients who have undergone ART (assisted reproductive technologies). The aim of this paper is to contribute to this analysis with the second largest series of combined biophysical and biochemical tests in the first trimester of pregnancy after ART. One hundred and forty-two singleton successful ART pregnancies were selected for this study: 50 pregnancies induced by using in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and 92 using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Each patient was matched with three naturally conceived pregnancies based on maternal age and gestational age. Free beta-HCG and PAPP-A were measured on dried blood spots and converted to MoMs. Nuchal translucency (NT) was measured by certified operators. Mean maternal age was 33 +/- 4. NT, free beta-HCG and PAPP-A values of the control cases were not significantly different from local standards evaluated on 3043 cases. NT between ART pregnancies and matched controls was not significantly different. PAPP-A was reduced but not significantly lower in ART pregnancies. Free beta-HCG was the only analyte that resulted in significantly higher values in ART pregnancies (1.12 MoM) versus controls (0.99 MoM). No significant differences were found for biochemical values observed between ICSI and IVF patients. The screen positive rates observed in ART and control pregnancies were 5.5 per cent and 4.6 per cent respectively. NT measurements were not affected by ART pregnancies. Our results (non-significant lower values of PAPP-A and significantly higher free beta-HCG values) were consistent with other reported series. The increase in the screen positive rate determined by these biological variations was not greater than 0.9 per cent. This higher false positive rate has a negligible impact on counselling ART patients. The algorithm used to calculate the relative risk after the combined tests should not be changed until the detection rate

  12. Test beam analysis of the effect of highly ionizing particles on the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2004-09-01

    Highly ionizing particles (HIPs) created by nuclear interactions in the silicon sensors cause a large signal which can saturate the APV readout chip used in the CMS Silicon Tracker system. This phenomenon was studied in two different beam-tests performed at PSI and at the CERN X5 experimental areas in 2002. The probability of a HIP-like event to occur per incident pion was measured and the dependence of the APV capability to detect a MIP signal on the time required to recover from such an event is derived. From these results, the expected inefficiency of the CMS Tracker due to HIPS is inferred.

  13. Development of a beam test telescope based on the Alibava readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Hernández, R.

    2011-01-01

    A telescope for a beam test have been developed as a result of a collaboration among the University of Liverpool, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (CNM) of Barcelona and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC) of Valencia. This system is intended to carry out both analogue charge collection and spatial resolution measurements with different types of microstrip or pixel silicon detectors in a beam test environment. The telescope has four XY measurement as well as trigger planes (XYT board) and it can accommodate up to twelve devices under test (DUT board). The DUT board uses two Beetle ASICs for the readout of chilled silicon detectors. The board could operate in a self-triggering mode. The board features a temperature sensor and it can be mounted on a rotary stage. A peltier element is used for cooling the DUT. Each XYT board measures the track space points using two silicon strip detectors connected to two Beetle ASICs. It can also trigger on the particle tracks in the beam test. The board includes a CPLD which allows for the synchronization of the trigger signal to a common clock frequency, delaying and implementing coincidence with other XYT boards. An Alibava mother board is used to read out and to control each XYT/DUT board from a common trigger signal and a common clock signal. The Alibava board has a TDC on board to have a time stamp of each trigger. The data collected by each Alibava board is sent to a master card by means of a local data/address bus following a custom digital protocol. The master board distributes the trigger, clock and reset signals. It also merges the data streams from up to sixteen Alibava boards. The board has also a test channel for testing in a standard mode a XYT or DUT board. This board is implemented with a Xilinx development board and a custom patch board. The master board is connected with the DAQ software via 100M Ethernet. Track based alignment software has also been developed for the data obtained with the DAQ software.

  14. Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) as a Predictor of Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, James W.; Bourne, David W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Correlations were made between grade point averages calculated after one year and PCAT scores and/or prepharmacy grade point averages. Findings are presented and a model is given for using PCAT scores as a predictor of academic success. (LBH)

  15. Selective reinforcement of a 2m-class lightweight mirror for horizontal beam optical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besuner, R. W.; Chow, K. P.; Kendrick, S. E.; Streetman, S.

    2008-07-01

    Optical testing of large mirrors for space telescopes can be challenging and complex. Demanding optical requirements necessitate both precise mirror figure and accurate prediction of zero gravity shape. Mass and packaging constraints require mirrors to be lightweighted and optically fast. Reliability and low mass imply simple mounting schemes, with basic kinematic mounts preferable to active figure control or whiffle trees. Ground testing should introduce as little uncertainty as possible, ideally employing flight mounts without offloaders. Testing mirrors with their optical axes horizontal can result in less distortion than in the vertical orientation, though distortion will increase with mirror speed. Finite element modeling and optimization tools help specify selective reinforcement of the mirror structure to minimize wavefront errors in a one gravity test, while staying within mass budgets and meeting other requirements. While low distortions are necessary, an important additional criterion is that designs are tolerant to imperfect positioning of the mounts relative to the neutral surface of the mirror substrate. In this paper, we explore selective reinforcement of a 2-meter class, f/1.25 primary mirror for the proposed SNAP space telescope. We specify designs optimized for various mount radial locations both with and without backup mount locations. Reinforced designs are predicted to have surface distortions in the horizontal beam test low enough to perform optical testing on the ground, on flight mounts, and without offloaders. Importantly, the required accuracy of mount locations is on the order of millimeters rather than tenths of millimeters.

  16. Comparisons of the MINOS Near and Far Detector Readout Systems at a Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, A.; Adamson, P.; Barker, M.; Belias, A.; Boyd, S.; Crone, G.; Drake, G.; Falk, E.; Harris, P.G.; Hartnell, J.; Jenner, L.; /University Coll. London /Texas U.

    2009-02-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two detectors separated by 734 km. The readout systems used for the two detectors are different and have to be independently calibrated. To verify and make a direct comparison of the calibrated response of the two readout systems, test beam data were acquired using a smaller calibration detector. This detector was simultaneously instrumented with both readout systems and exposed to the CERN PS T7 test beam. Differences in the calibrated response of the two systems are shown to arise from differences in response non-linearity, photomultiplier tube crosstalk, and threshold effects at the few percent level. These differences are reproduced by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to better than 1% and a scheme that corrects for these differences by calibrating the MC to match the data in each detector separately is presented. The overall difference in calorimetric response between the two readout systems is shown to be consistent with zero to a precision of 1.3% in data and 0.3% in MC with no significant energy dependence.

  17. 3D-FBK Pixel Sensors: Recent Beam Tests Results with Irradiated Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Micelli, A.; Helle, K.; Sandaker, H.; Stugu, B.; Barbero, M.; Hugging, F.; Karagounis, M.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kruger, H.; Tsung, J.W.; Wermes, N.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Susinno, G.; Gallrapp, C.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; La Rosa, A.; Pernegger, H.; Roe, S.; /CERN /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Hawaii U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /New Mexico U. /New Mexico U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /VTT Electronics, Espoo /VTT Electronics, Espoo

    2012-04-30

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider, and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary vertices from the collisions and secondary vertices produced by short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradiated 3D devices produced at FBK (Trento, Italy). The performance of these devices, all bump-bonded with the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 read-out chip, is compared to that observed before irradiation in a previous beam test.

  18. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  19. The width-tapered double cantilever beam for interlaminar fracture testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Jensen, R. M.; Bullman, G. W.; Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The width-tapered double-cantilever-beam (WTDCB) specimen configuration used to determine the Mode-I interlaminar fracture energy (IFE) of composites has special advantages for routine development work and for quality-assurance purposes. These advantages come primarily from the simplicity of testing and the fact that the specimen is designed for constant change in compliance with crack length, so that the computation of Mode-I IFE is independent of crack length. In this paper, a simplified technique for fabrication and testing WTDCB specimens is described. Also presented are the effects of fiber orientation and specimen dimensions, a comparison of data obtained using the WTDCB specimens and other specimen geometries, and comparison of data obtained at different laboratories. It is concluded that the WTDCB gives interlaminar Mode-I IFE essentially equal to other type specimens, and that it can be used for rapid screening in resin-development work and for quality assurance of composite materials.

  20. Test of a fine pitch SOI pixel detector with laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liu; Yunpeng, Lu; Xudong, Ju; Qun, Ou-Yang

    2016-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector with fine pitch size of 19 μm × 19 μm, developed based on SOI (silicon-on-insulator) technology, was tested under the illumination of infrared laser pulses. As an alternative method for particle beam tests, the laser pulses were tuned to very short duration and small transverse profile to simulate the tracks of MIPs (minimum ionization particles) in silicon. Hit cluster sizes were measured with focused laser pulses propagating through the SOI detector perpendicular to its surface and most of the induced charge was found to be collected inside the seed pixel. For the first time, the signal amplitude as a function of the applied bias voltage was measured for this SOI detector, deepening understanding of its depletion characteristics. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375226)

  1. A Comparison of Zero Mean Strain Rotating Beam Fatigue Test Methods for Nitinol Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwich, Dennis W.

    2014-07-01

    Zero mean strain rotating beam fatigue testing has become the standard for comparing the fatigue properties of Nitinol wire. Most commercially available equipment consists of either a two-chuck or a chuck and bushing system, where the wire length and center-to-center axis distance determine the maximum strain on the wire. For the two-chuck system, the samples are constrained at either end of the wire, and both chucks are driven at the same speed. For the chuck and bushing system, the sample is constrained at one end in a chuck and rides freely in a bushing at the other end. These equivalent systems will both be herein referred to as Chuck-to-Chuck systems. An alternate system uses a machined test block with a specific radius to guide the wire at a known strain during testing. In either system, the test parts can be immersed in a temperature-controlled fluid bath to eliminate any heating effect created in the specimen due to dissipative processes during cyclic loading (cyclic stress induced the formation of martensite) Wagner et al. ( Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 378, p 105-109, 1). This study will compare the results of the same starting material tested with each system to determine if the test system differences affect the final results. The advantages and disadvantages of each system will be highlighted and compared. The factors compared will include ease of setup, operator skill level required, consistency of strain measurement, equipment test limits, and data recovery and analysis. Also, the effect of test speed on the test results for each system will be investigated.

  2. Repeat HIV Testing at Voluntary Testing and Counseling Centers in Croatia: Successful HIV Prevention or Failure to Modify Risk Behaviors?

    PubMed Central

    Matković Puljić, Vlatka; Kosanović Ličina, Mirjana Lana; Kavić, Marija; Nemeth Blažić, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing plays a critical role in preventing the spread of the virus and identifying infected individuals in need of care. Voluntary counseling and testing centers (VCTs) not only conduct testing but they also provide counseling. Since a proportion of people who test negative for HIV on their previous visit will return for retesting, the frequency of retesting and the characteristics of those who retest may provide insights into the efficacy of testing and counseling strategies. In this cross-sectional, retrospective study of 1,482 VCT clients in Croatia in 2010, 44.3% had been tested for HIV before. The rate of repeat HIV testing is lower in Croatia than in other countries. Men who have sex with men (MSM) clients, those with three or more sexual partners in the last 12 months, consistent condom users with steady partners, and intravenous drug users were more likely to be repeat testers. This finding suggests that clients presenting for repeat HIV testing are those who self-identify as being at a higher risk of infection. Our data showed that testing positive for HIV was not associated with repeat testing. However, the effects of repeat testing on HIV epidemiology needs to be explored. PMID:24705595

  3. Implementation of Math Pre-testing and Tutorials for Improving Student Success in Algebra-based Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Donna

    2012-10-01

    The student success rate in the algebra-based Introductory General Physics I course at the University of Houston (UH) and across the United States is low in comparison to success rates in other service courses. In order to improve student success rates, we have implemented, in addition to interactive teaching techniques, pre-testing as an early intervention process to identify and remediate at-risk students. The pre-testing includes a math and problem-solving skills diagnostic exam and pre-tests administered prior to all regular exams. Students identified as at risk based on their scores on these pre-tests are given incentives to utilize a tutoring intervention consisting of on-line math tutoring to address math deficiencies and tutoring by graduate Physics Teaching Assistants to address student understanding of the physics concepts. Results from 503 students enrolled in three sections of the course showed that 78% of the students identified as at-risk students by the diagnostic exam who completed the math tutorial successfully completed the course, as compared to 45% of at-risk students who did not complete the math tutorial. Results of the pre-testing before each regular exam showed that all students who were identified as at risk based on pre-test scores had positive gains ranging from 9 -- 32% for the three regular exams. However, the large standard deviations of these gains indicate that they are not statistically significant; therefore, pretesting before exams will not be offer in the course. However, utilization of the math tutorials as remediation will continue to be offered to all sections of the algebra-based course at UH with the goal of significantly improving the overall success rates for the introductory physics courses.

  4. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Auty, David John

    2010-03-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0%$\\bar{v}$μ, which can be separated from the vμ because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study $\\bar{v}$μ oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for vμ, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam $\\bar{v}$μ before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure $\\bar{v}$μ beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% $\\bar{v}$μ component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The $\\bar{v}$μ of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3-7.6+7.6(stat.)-3.6+3.6(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 σ deficit, and a best fit value of Δ$\\bar{m}$322 = 18 x 10-3 eV2 and sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$23 = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of $\\bar{v}$μ events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The

  5. Testing and Evaluating Student Success with Laboratory Blocks, A Resource Book for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Addison E.

    Guidelines are given for the preparation of test items and tests for BSCS (Biological Sciences Curriculum Study) biology, including examples of items testing four major kinds of abilities: ability to repeat or use information and meanings, ability to apply principles, ability to apply intellectual skills crucial to the understanding of biological…

  6. The Nelson-Denny Reading Test as a Predictor of Academic Success in Selected Classes in a Specific Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudan, Sirkka

    A review of the literature indicates that the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (NDRT) may be a viable instrument for screening students and predicting their academic success in particular circumstances. In 1981, a study was conducted at Schoolcraft College to determine the extent of the relationship between the reading abilities of entering students and…

  7. Differential Validity and Utility of Successive and Simultaneous Approaches to the Development of Equivalent Achievement Tests in French and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, W. Todd; Gierl, Mark J.; Tardif, Claudette; Lin, Jie; Rinaldi, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Described in this paper are the first three activities of a research program designed to assess the differential validity and utility of successive and simultaneous approaches to the development of equivalent achievement tests in the French and English languages. Two teams of multilingual/multicultural French-English teachers used the simultaneous…

  8. The Validity of Interpersonal Skills Assessment via Situational Judgment Tests for Predicting Academic Success and Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievens, Filip; Sackett, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides conceptual and empirical arguments why an assessment of applicants' procedural knowledge about interpersonal behavior via a video-based situational judgment test might be valid for academic and postacademic success criteria. Four cohorts of medical students (N = 723) were followed from admission to employment. Procedural…

  9. Standardized Testing Placement and High School GPA as Predictors of Success in Remedial Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrow, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine if a relationship existed between success in elementary algebra and a set of predictor variables including COMPASS score and high school GPA. Relationships for intermediate algebra and college credit accumulation over three semesters were also examined with COMPASS score and high school GPA…

  10. From Early Intervention to Early Childhood Programs: Timeline for Early Successful Transitions (TEST)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandes, Joyce A.; Ormsbee, Christine K.; Haring, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    More than one million transitions between early intervention services and early childhood programs are facilitated annually for youngsters with special needs. To be successful, these transitions require planning and ongoing communication between all parties. This article substantiates the need for a timeline/checklist and provides a model of…

  11. Success for Ohio: MathWings Schools in Ohio Gain on Ohio Proficiency Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Success for All Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    MathWings is the mathematics program of the Success for All Foundation, a non-profit organization that develops and disseminates school reform programs originally developed at Johns Hopkins University. MathWings, based on NCTM standards, emphasizes the use of cooperative learning, problem solving, and metacognitive strategies to help all children …

  12. Testing the Stability of Experts' Opinions between Successive Rounds of Delphi Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yu Nu

    The Delphi method is a means of structuring group communication process so that a group of experts can gather information or forecast future problems effectively. A primary objective of a Delphi study is to obtain consensual and consistent opinions from a group of experts in two or more successive rounds on a given research subject. Consensus and…

  13. Cognitive Testing and the Validity of Child-Report Data from the Elementary School Success Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Natasha K.

    2008-01-01

    The Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) is a social environmental assessment tool that collects data from third, fourth, and fifth graders, their parents or guardians, and their teachers. Ensuring the validity of the data collected with the child-report component was a primary concern during the development of the ESSP. This article describes…

  14. Physician barriers to successful implementation of US Preventive Services Task Force routine HIV testing recommendations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Micha Yin; Suneja, Amit; Chou, Ann Love; Arya, Monisha

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued recommendations supporting routine HIV testing in health care settings for all persons aged 13 to 64 years. Despite these recommendations, physicians are not offering HIV testing routinely. We apply a model that has previously identified 3 central, inter-related factors (knowledge-, attitude-, and behavior-related barriers) for why physicians do not follow practice guidelines in order to better understand why physicians are not offering HIV testing routinely. This model frames our review of the existing literature on physician barriers to routine HIV testing. Within the model, knowledge barriers include lack of familiarity or awareness of clinical recommendations, attitude barriers include lack of agreement with guidelines, while behavioral barriers include external barriers related to the guidelines themselves, to patients, or to environmental factors. Our review reveals that many physicians face these barriers with regards to implementing routine HIV testing. Several factors underscore the importance of determining how to best address physician barriers to HIV testing, including: provisions of the Affordable Care Act that are likely to require or incentivize major payers to cover HIV testing, evidence which suggests that a physician's recommendation to test for HIV is a strong predictor of patient testing behavior, and data which reveals that nearly 20% of HIV-positive individuals may be unaware of their status. In April 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force released a recommendation supporting routine HIV testing; strategies are needed to help address ongoing physician barriers to testing. PMID:24442739

  15. A Positional X-ray Instrumentation Test Stand For Beam-Line Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoleyczik, Jonathan; Prieskorn, Z.; Burrows, D. N.; Falcone, A.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-axis, motion controlled test stand has been built in the PSU 47 m X-ray beam-line for the purpose of testing X-ray instrumentation and mirrors using parallel rays. The test stand is capable of translation along two axes and rotation about two axes with motorized fine position control. The translation stages have a range of motion of 200 mm with a movement accuracy of ± 2.5 microns. Rotation is accomplished with a two-axis gimbal which can rotate 360° about one axis and 240° about another; movement with ± 35 arcsecond accuracy are achieved in both axes. The position and status are monitored using a LabView program. An XCalibr source with multiple target materials is used as an X-ray source and can produce multiple lines between 0.8 and 8 keV. Some sample spectra are shown from a Si-PIN diode detector. This system is well suited for testing X-ray mirror segments which are currently being developed.

  16. Quantitative testing of physiotherapy ultrasound beam patterns within a clinical environment using a thermochromic tile.

    PubMed

    Žauhar, Gordana; Radojčić, Đeni Smilović; Dobravac, Denis; Jurković, Slaven

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of the non-standardized method developed at the National Physical Laboratory (UK) supporting the quality assurance of therapeutic ultrasonic beam parameters within a clinical environment is presented. The method consists of exposing an acoustic absorber tile, part of which contains a thermochromic pigment, to the ultrasonic beam, thereby forming an image of the two-dimensional intensity profile of the transducer. Nine different physiotherapy ultrasound treatment heads currently used clinically were tested using this method. Thermochromic images were postprocessed in order to estimate the Effective Radiating Area (ERA) for treatment heads operating within the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3.2 MHz, and nominal applied intensities in the range of 1-3 W/cm(2). Experimental results and comparisons with manufacturer specified values of ERA are presented. Differences in the experimentally derived results and the manufacturer values are typically well within 25%. The root-mean squared difference calculated over the nine treatment heads is 15.1%, with the thermochromic material tended to underestimate the ERA. PMID:25638714

  17. Tests of a single-wire drift chamber for possible use in low intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, H.

    1986-02-01

    A single cell drift chamber with two dimensional readout has been evaluated as a candidate for reliable and inexpensive momentum tagging of low intensity calibration beams. Charges induced on shaped cathode pads allow a measurement of the coordinate parallel to the wire, while the drift time allows a measurement of the coordinate perpendicular to the wire. Two chamber orientations were used during the tests. In one the chambers were arranged with their wires parallel. In this case the intrinsic resolution of the chambers was measured; the top and bottom cells were used to define a track coordinate and this was compared to the coordinate in the middle chamber. To see if either of the two coordinate measurements is linear in real space, the chambers were rearranged to the second orientation, with the middle chamber rotated 90/sup 0/. The drift time was plotted against the charge ratio. The conclusion drawn from this study is that while the drift time measurement has adequate resolution, the charge ratio measurement is not a viable option for beam line use. (LEW)

  18. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  19. Multiple mechanisms have been tested in pain--how can we improve the chances of success?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ann G; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Tate, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of pain have led to a wealth of molecular targets for novel analgesic drugs and many clinical drug trials. There have been successes, like the gabapentinoids for neuropathic pain and calcium channel blockers for otherwise intractable pain states; and drugs which show promise in clinical trials, like nerve growth factor inhibitors and p38 kinase inhibitors. Unfortunately there have also been a number of failures. We suggest factors which might predispose to success, for example some clinical precedence for the mechanism in pain or a genetic link for the mechanism, for example a mutation linked to a pain syndrome. We also stress the importance of demonstrating molecular target engagement with a novel compound and suggest pain biomarkers which can be used for mechanistic drug profiling. PMID:24565006

  20. Higher mind-brain development in successful leaders: testing a unified theory of performance.

    PubMed

    Harung, Harald S; Travis, Frederick

    2012-05-01

    This study explored mind-brain characteristics of successful leaders as reflected in scores on the Brain Integration Scale, Gibbs's Socio-moral Reasoning questionnaire, and an inventory of peak experiences. These variables, which in previous studies distinguished world-class athletes and professional classical musicians from average-performing controls, were recorded in 20 Norwegian top-level managers and in 20 low-level managers-matched for age, gender, education, and type of organization (private or public). Top-level managers were characterized by higher Brain Integration Scale scores, higher levels of moral reasoning, and more frequent peak experiences. These multilevel measures could be useful tools in selection and recruiting of potential managers and in assessing leadership education and development programs. Future longitudinal research could further investigate the relationship between leadership success and these and other multilevel variables. PMID:22193866

  1. Low-energy beam test results of a calorimeter prototype for the CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagliesi, M. G.; Lomtadze, T.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Meucci, M.; Millucci, V.; Morsani, F.; Valle, G.; Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Seo, E. S.

    2003-09-01

    CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) is an experiment under construction for a direct measurement of high energy cosmic rays (1012 to > 5 · 1014 eV) over the elemental range from proton to iron. The first flight of CREAM is intended to demonstrate the new Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) capability under development by NASA. A prototype of a tungsten-SciFi imaging calorimeter designed for CREAM has been tested at CERN with electron beam energies ranging from 5 to 100 GeV. Although the calorimeter module is optimized for cosmic-ray spectral measurements in the multi-TeV region, the response of its electromagnetic section to low energy electrons has been studied with this dedicated prototype. Results show good agreement with the expected behaviour in terms of linearity and energy resolution.

  2. RAP: thermoacoustic detection at the DAPHgrNE beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolucci, S.; Coccia, E.; D'Antonio, S.; DeWaard, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Fafone, V.; Fauth, A. C.; Frossati, G.; Ligi, C.; Marini, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Modestino, G.; Pizzella, G.; Quintieri, L.; Ronga, F.; Tripodi, P.; Valente, P.

    2004-03-01

    In order to investigate the anomalous response at ultra-low temperatures of the resonant-mass gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS, the RAP experiment has been planned to measure the vibrations in a small cylindrical aluminium bar when hit by 105 510 MeV electrons from the DAPHgrNE beam test facility, corresponding to the energies released by typical extensive air showers. The results of the measurement at low temperature and in the superconducting regime are crucial to understand the interaction of ionizing particles with bulk superconductors and to confirm the results on the thermoacoustic model of the past experiments. The first run of RAP experiment is scheduled for the end of June. The scheme of operation and the preliminary results at room temperature will be presented.

  3. Development, characterization and beam tests of a small-scale TORCH prototype module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) R&D project, a small-scale TORCH prototype module is currently under study. Circular-shaped micro-channel plate photon detectors with finely segmented square anodes (32 × 32 channels) have been produced for TORCH requirements in industrial partnership. A new generation of custom multi-channel electronics based on the 32-channel NINO and HPTDC ASICs has been developed. The performance of the photon detector coupled to these customized electronics has been assessed in the laboratory and is reported on. A time resolution of 80 ps and a spatial resolution of 0.03 mm have been measured. Finally, tests of the TORCH prototype module illuminated with laser light and in a charged particle beam will be highlighted.

  4. Pilot-scale test for electron beam purification of flue gas from coal-combustion boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Hideki; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Hashimoto, Shoji; Tanaka, Tadashi; Ogura, Yoshimi; Doi, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Shinji; Izutsu, Masahiro

    1995-09-01

    A pilot-scale test for electron beam treatment of flue gas (12,000m3N/hr) from coal-fired boiler was conducted by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chubu Electric Power Company and Ebara Corporation, in the site of Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Plant in Nagoya, Japan. During 14 months operation, it was proved that the method is possible to remove SO2 and NOX simultaneously in wide concentration range of SO2 (250-2,000ppm) and NOX (140-240ppm) with higher efficiency than the conventional methods, with appropriate operation conditions (dose, temperature etc.). The pilot plant was easily operated with well controllability and durability, and was operated for long period of time without serious problems. The byproduct, ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate, produced by the treatment was proved to be a nitrogenous fertilizer with excellent quality.

  5. Fabrication and tests of 3He and 2H targets for beam polarization measurement

    PubMed

    Naqvi; Aksoy; Nagadi; Al-Ohali; Kidwai; Fageeha

    2000-09-01

    3He and 2H targets were fabricated through implantation of 3He and 2H ions in 0.2-0.3 mm thick tantalum and titanium foils. The energy of 3He and 2H ions was 45-100 and 78 keV, respectively. Ions beams with typical current of 90-300 microA were used for implantation. Stability tests of 3He and 2H targets were carried out by monitoring the yield of 3He(d, p)4He and 2H(d, p)3H reactions. For the 3He target, the reaction yield was stable for both tantalum and titanium foils but the most stabilized maximum yield was observed for the 100 keV tantalum target. In the case of 2H targets, the yield increased with increasing total dose implanted on the target. PMID:10972150

  6. Test of English as a Foreign Language and First Certificate of English Tests as Predictors of Academic Success for Undergraduate Students at the University of Bahrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musawi, N. M.; Al-Ansari, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined multivariate relationships of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the First Certificate of English (FCE) and determined whether students' total score on the TOEFL or their overall score on the FCE tends to be a better predictor of success in university as measured by overall grade-point average (GPA). Subjects…

  7. The Relationship of the Objectively Scoreable Apperception Test (OAT) to Success in Naval Aviation Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Ronald M.; Waldeisen, Lewis E.

    The Objectively Scoreable Apperception Test (OAT) was administered to 725 naval aviation officer candidates during their first week of training to examine the potential of the test as a supplement to the primary selection system. Multiple correlations were first determined by using only the scores from existing primary selection variables; the…

  8. Determining Paths to Success: Preparing Students for Experimental Design Questions on Standardized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Matthew J.; Rios, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent education reform efforts are at the forefront of educators' minds across the nation, science teachers notwithstanding. At least 48 states have developed a mandated standardized test, the majority of which also publish an individual school proficiency report. Washington State's new standardized science test is an example of such reforms…

  9. Successful development and validation of an in vitro replacement assay for Leptospira vaccine potency tests.

    PubMed

    Kulpa-Eddy, J

    2012-01-01

    The standard requirement for serial release potency testing of Leptospira bacterins in the United States is the hamster vaccination challenge test. It is a test that uses a large number of animals experiencing pain or distress, takes weeks to conduct, can be expensive and requires that laboratory personnel handle a viable zoonotic pathogen. In an effort to address these concerns, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) developed an in vitro method for potency testing of four Leptospira serovars. This enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was subsequently validated in the target species. USDA informed their biologics licensees, permittees and applicants of the availability of reference bacterins and the regulatory acceptance regarding this alternative test method in notices issued in 2007 and 2009. This presentation describes how the initial research and subsequent development and validation work were accomplished. PMID:22888601

  10. Proposal for a shift register approach to RPC calorimeter readout for test beam, cosmics, and sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    2004-09-28

    Resistive Plate Chambers for Hadronic Particle-Flow calorimetry will have a large number of pixels. We present tests of a system for readout with parallel vertical shift registers, somewhat like that used in CCD imaging. In our case we discriminate on the signal immediately after amplification and shaping, and only shift single bits. We discuss the issues involved in a particular model for using off-the-shelf commercial chips for readout on a moderate scale. We have a 32 channel prototype in operation on an RPC, and we describe tests with the amplifiers etc leading up to this. The prototype is an example of a layout for the chips to be mounted on the readout pad for an RPC to make a thin assembly. Comparisons to other systems are made for cost scaling, modes of operation, etc. This particular implementation uses analog delay instead of a digital pipeline, and has no clock on the board during detector live time. This RPC readout system could be implemented quickly. Production of this system should have minimal start-up costs and minimal start-up times. One advantage of the present system would be to provide readout of large numbers of channels on a short development time scale at low cost. This would allow initial tuning of the reconstruction and analysis software in a test beam before other readout systems are ready. It also provides risk management by development of another technology at small additional cost.

  11. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Wong, F G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

  12. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

  13. Successful delivery of adjuvant external beam radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mehee; Thoma, Miranda; Tolekidis, George; Byrne, Richard W; Diaz, Aidnag Z

    2015-01-01

    Ondine׳s curse is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by loss of automatic breathing during sleep and preserved voluntary breathing. It is seldom encountered in the radiotherapy clinic but can pose significant technical challenges and safety concerns in the delivery of a prescribed radiation course. We report a unique case of successful delivery of radiotherapy for ependymoma in a patient with Ondine׳s curse. A 53-year-old gentleman presented with vertigo when lying down. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing mass in the floor of the fourth ventricle. He underwent maximal safe resection. Pathology revealed ependymoma. The patient was referred for radiotherapy. Computed tomography simulation was performed in supine position with 3-point thermoplastic mask immobilization. Sequential TomoTherapy plans were developed. At first scheduled treatment, shortly after mask placement, his arms went limp and he was unresponsive. Vitals showed oxygen saturation 83%, pulse 127, and blood pressure 172/97mmHg. He was diagnosed with Ondine׳s curse thought secondary to previous brainstem damage; the combination of lying flat and pressure from the mask was causing him to go into respiratory arrest. As supine positioning did not seem clinically advisable, he was simulated in prone position. A RapidArc plan and a back-up conformal plan were developed. Prescriptions were modified to meet conservative organs-at-risk constraints. Several strategies were used to minimize uncertainties in set-up reproducibility associated with prone positioning. He tolerated prone RapidArc treatments well. The report highlights the importance of applying practical patient safety and treatment planning/delivery strategies in the management of this challenging case. PMID:26087849

  14. On the Use of a Driven Wedge Test to Acquire Dynamic Fracture Energies of Bonded Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, David A.; Pohilt, David; Jacob, George Chennakattu; Starbuck, Michael; Rakesh, Kapania

    2011-01-01

    A driven wedge test is used to characterize the mode I fracture resistance of adhesively bonded composite beam specimens over a range of crosshead rates up to 1 m/s. The shorter moment arms (between wedge contact and crack tip) significantly reduce inertial effects and stored energy in the debonded adherends, when compared with conventional means of testing double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. This permitted collecting an order of magnitude more crack initiation events per specimen than could be obtained with end-loaded DCB specimens bonded with an epoxy exhibiting significant stick-slip behavior. The localized contact of the wedge with the adherends limits the amount of both elastic and kinetic energy, significantly reduces crack advance during slip events, and facilitates higher resolution imaging of the fracture zone with high speed imaging. The method appears to work well under both quasi-static and high rate loading, consistently providing substantially more discrete fracture events for specimens exhibiting pronounced stick-slip failures. Deflections associated with beam transverse shear and root rotation for the shorter beams were not negligible, so simple beam theory was inadequate for obtaining qualitative fracture energies. Finite element analysis of the specimens, however, showed that fracture energies were in good agreement with values obtained from traditional DCB tests. The method holds promise for use in dynamic testing and for characterizing bonded or laminated materials exhibiting significant stick slip behavior, reducing the number of specimens required to characterize a sufficient number of fracture events.

  15. Ion source for tests of ion behavior in the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Lukic, S.; Bornschein, B.; Drexlin, G.; Glueck, F.; Kazachenko, O.; Zoll, M. C. R.; Schoeppner, M.; Weinheimer, Ch.

    2011-01-15

    An electron-impact ion source based on photoelectron emission was developed for ionization of gases at pressures below 10{sup -4} mbar in an axial magnetic field in the order of 5 T. The ion source applies only dc fields, which makes it suitable for use in the presence of equipment sensitive to radio-frequency (RF) fields. The ion source was successfully tested under varying conditions regarding pressure, magnetic field, and magnetic-field gradient, and the results were studied with the help of simulations. The processes in the ion source are well understood, and possibilities for further optimization of generated ion currents are clarified.

  16. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  17. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  18. Measurement of Deflection in Concrete Beams During Fatigue Loading Test Using the Microsoft Kinect 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamy, Herve; Lichti, Derek D.; Steward, Jeremy; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on 3 Hz fatigue load testing of a reinforced concrete beam in laboratory conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) image time series of the beam's top surface were captured with the Microsoft time-of-flight Kinect 2.0 sensor. To estimate the beam deflection, the imagery was first segmented to extract the top surface of the beam. The centre line was then modeled using third-order B-splines. The deflection of the beam as a function of time was estimated from the modeled centre line and, following past practice, also at several witness plates attached to the side of the beam. Subsequent correlation of the peak displacement with the applied loading cycles permitted estimation of fatigue in the beam. The accuracy of the deflections was evaluated by comparison with the measurements obtained using a Keyence LK-G407 laser displacement sensors. The results indicate that the deflections can be recovered with sub-millimetre accuracy using the centreline profile modelling method.

  19. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  20. First-principles simulation and comparison with beam tests for transverse instabilities and damper performance in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis; Foster, G.William; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    An end-to-end performance calculation and comparison with beam tests was performed for the bunch-by-bunch digital transverse damper in the Fermilab Main Injector. Time dependent magnetic wakefields responsible for ''Resistive Wall'' transverse instabilities in the Main Injector were calculated with OPERA-2D using the actual beam pipe and dipole magnet lamination geometry. The leading order dipole component was parameterized and used as input to a bunch-by-bunch simulation which included the filling pattern and injection errors experienced in high-intensity operation of the Main Injector. The instability growth times, and the spreading of the disturbance due to newly misinjected batches was compared between simulations and beam data collected by the damper system. Further simulation models the effects of the damper system on the beam.

  1. The 20 GHz proof-of-concept test model results for a multiple scan beam dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, T.; Smoll, A.; Luh, H.; Matthews, E. W.; Scott, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    A full scale 20 GHz antenna model was designed, fabricated and tested. The model is intended to test the low sidelobe beam scanning capability of a new class of an offset dual reflector and feed array configuration. The offset main reflector and subreflector surfaces are custom shaped by a computer synthesis procedure. The derived optics result in beam scan loss under 1 db over the + or - 12.3 beamwidths by + or - 5.8 beamwidths scan volume while maintaining low sidelobes. It is found that the measured and computed patterns are in good agreement.

  2. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic.

    PubMed

    Jewett, A; Al-Tayyib, A A; Ginnett, L; Smith, B D

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC) testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC). All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative). Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection. PMID:24455220

  3. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; Bai, Sha; Bambade, Philip; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  4. Successive mycological nail tests for onychomycosis: a strategy to improve diagnosis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Tereza Elizabeth Fernandes; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2008-08-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails caused by dermatophytes, yeasts and moulds, accounting for about 50% of onychopathies. A high frequency of onychomycosis caused by Candida species has been reported during the last few years in northeast Brazil, as well as in other regions of the world. A clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis needs to be confirmed through laboratory exams. We evaluated the importance of serial repetition of direct microscopic exams and fungal culture for the diagnosis of onychomycosis in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, in northeast Brazil. We first made a retrospective study of 127 patients with onychomycosis, identifying the fungi that had been isolated from fingernails and toenails. We then made a prospective study of 120 patients, who were submitted to three successive mycological examinations. Ungual residues were scraped off and directly examined with a microscope and fungal cultures were made. In the retrospective study, in which only one sample was analyzed, the incidence of onychomycosis was 25.0%. In our prospective study, in which we had data from successive mycological examinations, 37.8% had onychomycosis. The most commonly isolated fungi in both studies were yeasts from the genera Candida, especially C albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. We found a high proportion of onychomycosis caused by Candida species. We also concluded that serial repetition of direct microscopic examination and fungal culture, with intervals of 2-5 days improved the diagnosis of onychomycosis. We suggest that this laboratorial strategy is necessary for accurate diagnosis of this type of mycosis, especially when the standard procedures fail to diagnose fungal infection, despite strong clinical suspicion. PMID:19030737

  5. Effects of T-tabs and large deflections in double cantilever beam specimen tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.; Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    1991-01-01

    A simple strength of materials analysis was developed for a double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen to account for geometric nonlinearity effects due to large deflections and T-tabs. A new DCB data analysis procedure was developed to include the effects of these nonlinearities. The results of the analysis were evaluated by DCB tests performed for materials having a wide range of toughnesses. The materials used in the present study were T300/5208, IM7/8551-7, and AS4/PEEK. Based on the present analysis, for a typical deflection/crack length ratio of 0.3 (for AS4/PEEK), T-tabs and large deflections cause a 15 and 3 percent error, respectively, in the computer Mode I strain energy release rate. Design guidelines for DCB specimen thickness and T-tab height were also developed in order to keep errors due to these nonlinearities within 2 percent. Based on the test results, for both hinged and tabbed specimens, the effects of large deflection on the Mode I fracture toughness (G sub Ic) were almost negligible (less than 1 percent) in the case of T300/5208 and IM7/8551-7; however, AS4/PEEK showed a 2 to 3 percent effect. The effects of T-tabs G sub Ic were more significant for all the materials with T300/5208 showing a 5 percent error, IM7/8551-7 a 15 percent error, and, AS4/PEEK a 20 percent error.

  6. 75 FR 82407 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Testing Successful Health Communications Surrounding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...); Document Citation: 75 FR 59723; Document Number: 2010-24277) and allowed 60-days for public comment. One.../development of health messages and communications strategies; Pre-test health messages and outreach strategies... include focus groups, individual interviews, self-administered questionnaires, and website surveys....

  7. Ready to Go: Using the EXPLORE Test to Increase 8th Grade Readiness for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochford, Joseph A.; O'Neill, Adrienne; Gelb, Adele

    2010-01-01

    During the 2009-10 academic year, 1,444 8th grade students in the Canton City, Plain and Marlington Local School Districts (hereafter called Stark students) took the EXPLORE Test as part of a pilot project, "Ready to Go: Increasing Eighth Grade Readiness," sponsored by the Stark Education Partnership with funding from the Ohio College Access…

  8. Test Scores, Class Rank and College Performance: Lessons for Broadening Access and Promoting Success

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Sunny X.; Tienda, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Using administrative data for five Texas universities that differ in selectivity, this study evaluates the relative influence of two key indicators for college success—high school class rank and standardized tests. Empirical results show that class rank is the superior predictor of college performance and that test score advantages do not insulate lower ranked students from academic underperformance. Using the UT-Austin campus as a test case, we conduct a simulation to evaluate the consequences of capping students admitted automatically using both achievement metrics. We find that using class rank to cap the number of students eligible for automatic admission would have roughly uniform impacts across high schools, but imposing a minimum test score threshold on all students would have highly unequal consequences by greatly reduce the admission eligibility of the highest performing students who attend poor high schools while not jeopardizing admissibility of students who attend affluent high schools. We discuss the implications of the Texas admissions experiment for higher education in Europe. PMID:23788828

  9. International Tests and the U.S. Educational Reforms: Can Success Be Replicated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Guliz

    2013-01-01

    The ranking of the United States in major international tests such as the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS), Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), and Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is used as the driving force and rationale for the current educational reforms in the United…

  10. An Evaluation of an Innovation: Standardized Test Scores Were Not Valid Indicators of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uslick, JoAnn; Walker, Carole

    An overview is provided of the evaluation of the Lighthouse Project, an education enhancement project that began in one urban and two suburban districts. Its methodology was the context for showing how the focus on the results of a standardized achievement test in mathematics inhibited the implementation of mathematics reform in the elementary…

  11. STS-4 test mission simulates operational flight: President terms success golden spike in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The fourth Space Shuttle flight is summarized. STS certification as operational, applications experiments, experiments involving crew, the first Getaway Special, a lightning survey. Shuttle environment measurement, prelaunch rain and hail, loss of solid rocket boosters, and modification of the thermal test program are reviewed.

  12. Mission Report: STS-4 Test Mission Simulates Operational Flight. President Terms Success Golden Spike in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The fourth space shuttle flight is summarized. An onboard electrophoresis experiment is reviewed. Crew physiology, the first getaway special, a lightning survey, shuttle environment measurement, prelaunch weather conditions, loss of solid rocket boosters, modification of thermal test program, and other events are also reviewed.

  13. Sacramento Power Authority experience of building and testing a successful turn key combined cycle project

    SciTech Connect

    Maring, J.; Yost, J.; Zachary, J.

    1998-07-01

    The following paper will describe a combined cycle power plant providing power and steam to a food processing plant. The project owner is Sacramento Power Authority in Sacramento, California, USA. A consortium led by Siemens supplied the equipment and provided the turn key project management. The project was completed in 23 months and the plant was released for dispatch 3 weeks ahead of schedule. The formal performance tests conducted in December 1997, indicated a better net output and a lower net heat rate from the guaranteed values. The thermal acceptance test procedure was in full compliance with the new Performance Test Code PTC-46 of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for combined cycle power plant testing, issued in 1996 and also met all the requirements of ISO 2314 Procedure. The paper will also discuss the performance of an evaporative cooler, used to lower compressor air inlet temperature and the methodology used to reduce the additional instrumentation uncertainty associated with such devices. The paper will also deal with the unique environmental emissions restrictions imposed on the project.

  14. The Introduction of Standardized External Testing in Ukraine: Challenges and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalchuk, Serhiy; Koroliuk, Svitlana

    2012-01-01

    Standardized external testing (SET) began to be implemented in Ukraine in 2008 as an instrument for combating corruption in higher education and ensuring fair university admission. This article examines the conditions and processes that led to the introduction of SET, overviews its implementation over three years (2008-10), analyzes SET and…

  15. Miracle Math: A Successful Program from Singapore Tests the Limits of School Reform in the Suburbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garelick, Barry

    2006-01-01

    In December of 2004, media outlets across the country were abuzz with news of the just-released results of the latest Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) tests. Once again despite highly publicized efforts to reform American math education over the past two decades, the United States did little better than average. Taken…

  16. Situational Judgment Tests and Their Predictiveness of College Students' Success: The Influence of Faking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Helga; Lievens, Filip

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using situational judgment tests (SJTs) to supplement traditional student admission procedures. An important unexplored issue is whether students can intentionally distort or fake their responses on SJTs. This study examined the fakability of an SJT of college students' performance. Two hundred ninety-three…

  17. A portable X-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 2: Tests on the antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are given for an X-band (8.45 GHz) test package for testing the new 34-m beam-waveguide antenna at Goldstone in an 'on-the-antenna' configuration. Included are X-band zenith noise temperature values and tipping-curve data obtained at the Cassegrain focal point F1 as well as at the pedestal room focal point F3. Subreflector Z-defocus test results for both F1 and F3 are also presented. The X-band test package operated well in all of the different test configurations and exceeded expected performance.

  18. Successful Development of the Long-Test-Duration Hypervelocity Detonation-Driven Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. L.; Yu, H. R.

    The hypersonic technology is one of the key issues for future aerospace industries, and hypersonic physics is a challenging topic in gas dynamics research area [1]. The hypersonic test facility being capable of duplicating hypersonic flight conditions is the most important tool not only for developing hypersonic vehicles, but also for promoting the fundamental study on high temperature gas flows. Advanced hypersonic test facilities have been developed for more than 50 years [2], but there is still a lack of the facility for generating high-enthalpy flows with a Mach number higher than 7 for hypersonic propulsion due to huge technological barriers in wind tunnel techniques, especially for facility damages due to severe heat transfer problems [3].

  19. Successive Pattern Learning based on Test Feature Classifier and its application to Defect Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yukinobu; Kaneko, Shun'Ichi; Takagi, Yuji; Okuda, Hirohito

    A novel sequential learning algorithm of Test Feature Classifier (TFC) which is non-parametric and effective even for small data is proposed for efficiently handling consecutively provided training data. Fundamental characteristics of the sequential learning are examined. In the learning, after recognition of a set of unknown objects, they are fed into the classifier in order to obtain a modified classifier. We propose an efficient algorithm for reconstruction of prime tests, which are irreducible combinations of features which are capable to discriminate training patterns into correct classes, is formalized in cases of addition and removal of training patterns. Some strategies for the modification of training patterns are investigated with respect to their precision and performance by use of real pattern data. A real world problem of classification of defects on wafer images has been tackled by the proposed classifier, obtaining excellent performance even through efficient modification strategies.

  20. Predicting Student Success on the Texas Chemistry STAAR Test: A Logistic Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Background: The context is the new Texas STAAR end-of-course testing program. Purpose: The authors developed a logistic regression model to predict who would pass-or-fail the new Texas chemistry STAAR end-of-course exam. Setting: Robert E. Lee High School (5A) with an enrollment of 2700 students, Tyler, Texas. Date of the study was the 2011-2012…

  1. Beam Tests of Beampipe Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation in Fermilab Main Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backfish, Michael; Eldred, Jeffrey; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Dedicated tests have shown beampipe coatings dramatically reduce the density of electron cloud in particle accelerators. In this work, we evaluate the performance of titanium nitride, amorphous carbon, and diamond-like carbon as beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Altogether our tests represent 2700 ampere-hours of proton operation spanning five years. Three electron cloud detectors, retarding field analyzers, are installed in a straight section and allow a direct comparison between the electron flux in the coated and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. We characterize the electron flux as a function of intensity up to a maximum of 50 trillion protons per cycle. Each beampipe material conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the changes in these materials as a function of time and the number of absorbed electrons. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. We measure the energy spectrum of electrons incident on the stainless steel, titanium nitride and amorphous carbon beampipes. We find the electron cloud signal is highly sensitive to stray magnetic fields and bunch-length over the Main Injector ramp cycle. We conduct a complete survey of the stray magnetic fields at the test station and compare the electron cloud signal to that in a field-free region.

  2. Beam tests of beampipe coatings for electron cloud mitigation in Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Backfish, Michael; Eldred, Jeffrey; Tan, Cheng Yang; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-10-26

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Dedicated tests have shown beampipe coatings dramatically reduce the density of electron cloud in particle accelerators. In this work, we evaluate the performance of titanium nitride, amorphous carbon, and diamond-like carbon as beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Altogether our tests represent 2700 ampere-hours of proton operation spanning five years. Three electron cloud detectors, retarding field analyzers, are installed in a straight section and allow a direct comparison between the electron flux in the coated and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. We characterize the electron flux as a function of intensity up to a maximum of 50 trillion protons per cycle. Each beampipe material conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the changes in these materials as a function of time and the number of absorbed electrons. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. We measure the energy spectrum of electrons incident on the stainless steel, titanium nitride and amorphous carbon beampipes. We find the electron cloud signal is highly sensitive to stray magnetic fields and bunch-length over the Main Injector ramp cycle. In conclusion, we conduct a complete survey of the stray magnetic fields at the test station and compare the electron cloud signal to that in a field-free region.

  3. Beam Tests of Beampipe Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation in Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Backfish, Michael; Eldred, Jeffrey; Tan, Cheng Yang; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-07-26

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Dedicated tests have shown beampipe coatings dramatically reduce the density of electron cloud in particle accelerators. In this work, we evaluate the performance of titanium nitride, amorphous carbon, and diamond-like carbon as beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Altogether our tests represent 2700 ampere-hours of proton operation spanning five years. Three electron cloud detectors, retarding field analyzers, are installed in a straight section and allow a direct comparison between the electron flux in the coated and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. We characterize the electron flux as a function of intensity up to a maximum of 50 trillion protons per cycle. Each beampipe material conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the changes in these materials as a function of time and the number of absorbed electrons. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. We measure the energy spectrum of electrons incident on the stainless steel, titanium nitride and amorphous carbon beampipes. We find the electron cloud signal is highly sensitive to stray magnetic fields and bunch-length over the Main Injector ramp cycle. We conduct a complete survey of the stray magnetic fields at the test station and compare the electron cloud signal to that in a field-free region.

  4. Beam tests of beampipe coatings for electron cloud mitigation in Fermilab Main Injector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Backfish, Michael; Eldred, Jeffrey; Tan, Cheng Yang; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-10-26

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Dedicated tests have shown beampipe coatings dramatically reduce the density of electron cloud in particle accelerators. In this work, we evaluate the performance of titanium nitride, amorphous carbon, and diamond-like carbon as beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Altogether our tests represent 2700 ampere-hours of proton operation spanning five years. Three electron cloud detectors, retarding field analyzers, are installed in a straight section and allow a direct comparisonmore » between the electron flux in the coated and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. We characterize the electron flux as a function of intensity up to a maximum of 50 trillion protons per cycle. Each beampipe material conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the changes in these materials as a function of time and the number of absorbed electrons. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. We measure the energy spectrum of electrons incident on the stainless steel, titanium nitride and amorphous carbon beampipes. We find the electron cloud signal is highly sensitive to stray magnetic fields and bunch-length over the Main Injector ramp cycle. In conclusion, we conduct a complete survey of the stray magnetic fields at the test station and compare the electron cloud signal to that in a field-free region.« less

  5. Single versus successive pop-in modes in nanoindentation tests of single crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Yuzhi; Gao, Yanfei; Pharr, George M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-05-24

    From recent nanoindentation experiments, two types of pop-in modes have been identified: a single pop-in with a large displacement excursion, or a number of pop-ins with comparable and small displacement excursions. Theoretical analyses are developed here to study the roles played by indenter tip radius, pre-existing defect density, heterogeneous nucleation source type, and lattice resistance on the pop-in modes. The evolution of dislocation structures in earlier pop-ins provides input to modeling a stochastic, heterogeneous mechanism that may be responsible for the subsequent pop-ins. It is found that when the first pop-in occurs near theoretical shear stress, the pop-in mode ismore » determined by the lattice resistance and tip radius. When the first pop-in occurs at low shear stress, whether the successive pop-in mode occurs depends on how the heterogeneous dislocation nucleation source density increases as compared to the increase of the total dislocation density. Lastly, the above transitions are found to correlate well with the ratio of indenter tip radius to the mean spacing of dislocation nucleation sources.« less

  6. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  7. Integration and testing of the GRAVITY infrared camera for multiple telescope optical beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordo, Paulo; Amorim, Antonio; Abreu, Jorge; Eisenhauer, Frank; Anugu, Narsireddy; Garcia, Paulo; Pfuhl, Oliver; Haug, Marcus; Sturm, Eckhard; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Straubmeier, Christian; Perraut, Karine; Naia, M. Duarte; Guimarães, M.

    2014-07-01

    The GRAVITY Acquisition Camera was designed to monitor and evaluate the optical beam properties of the four ESO/VLT telescopes simultaneously. The data is used as part of the GRAVITY beam stabilization strategy. Internally the Acquisition Camera has four channels each with: several relay mirrors, imaging lens, H-band filter, a single custom made silica bulk optics (i.e. Beam Analyzer) and an IR detector (HAWAII2-RG). The camera operates in vacuum with operational temperature of: 240k for the folding optics and enclosure, 100K for the Beam Analyzer optics and 80K for the detector. The beam analysis is carried out by the Beam Analyzer, which is a compact assembly of fused silica prisms and lenses that are glued together into a single optical block. The beam analyzer handles the four telescope beams and splits the light from the field mode into the pupil imager, the aberration sensor and the pupil tracker modes. The complex optical alignment and focusing was carried out first at room temperature with visible light, using an optical theodolite/alignment telescope, cross hairs, beam splitter mirrors and optical path compensator. The alignment was validated at cryogenic temperatures. High Strehl ratios were achieved at the first cooldown. In the paper we present the Acquisition Camera as manufactured, focusing key sub-systems and key technical challenges, the room temperature (with visible light) alignment and first IR images acquired in cryogenic operation.

  8. High-Brightness Beam Generation and Characterization at the Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewellen, John; Biedron, Sandra; Borland, Michael; Hahne, Michael; Harkay, Katherine; Lumpkin, Alex; Milton, Stephen; Sereno, Nicholas; Travish, Gil

    2000-04-01

    Improvements to the Advanced Photon Source injector linac have been made to allow for the production and characterization of high-brightness beams in support of fourth-generation light source research. In particular, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) free-electron laser (FEL). We describe the enhancements to the linac operational and diagnostic capabilities that enabled self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm. Electron beam measurement techniques and recent results will be discussed. Beam properties are measured under the same operational conditions as those used for FEL studies. The nominal FEL beam parameters are as follows: 217 MeV beam energy; less than 0.15 mm-mrad normalized emittance; 100 A peak current from a 0.7-nC charge at a 7-psec bunch. * Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38

  9. Crater Count Ages of Young Martian Ray Craters: a Successful Test of the Crater Chronometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, C.; Werner, S. C.; Popova, O.

    2008-09-01

    McEwen et al. (2005) developed a useful test of crater-count chronometry systems [1]. They argued that fresh-looking, Zunil-style Martian ray craters are the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size ranges. The "McEwen et al. test" is that crater-count ages from small craters (D 10-25 m), superimposed on these "Zunils," should be comparable to the expected formation intervals of these host Zunil-style primaries themselves, typically 1 to a few My. McEwen et al., however, found few or no small superposed craters in MOC frames, and concluded that crater chronometry systems are in error by factors of 700 to 2000. Since then, Malin et al. discovered that 10-25m craters form at essentially the rate we used in our isochron system [2,3,4]. Thus, 10-25m craters should be usable for dating these "Zunils." We re-evaluate the "McEwen et al. test" with HiRise images, studying three young craters they discussed, and five others. In every case we found small-crater populations, giving approximately the expected ages. We conclude that the alleged large errors are incorrect. The semi-independent crater count systems of Neukum and of Hartmann agree with the Malin cratering rate, are internally consistent, and appear to give valid age information within about a factor 2 to 4. We thank the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, for hosting our working group. [1] McEwen et al. 2005 Icarus,176, 351-381. [2] Malin, M. et al. 2006 Science 314, 1573-1557. [3] Hartmann, W.K. 2007 Icarus, 189, 274-278. [4] Kreslavsky, M.A. 2007 7th Internatl. Conf. on Mars, Abstract 3325.

  10. Comparison of Mental Toughness and Power Test Performances in High-Level Kickboxers by Competitive Success

    PubMed Central

    Slimani, Maamer; Miarka, Bianca; Briki, Walid; Cheour, Foued

    2016-01-01

    Background Kickboxing is a high-intensity intermittent striking combat sport, which is characterized by complex skills and tactical key actions with short duration. Objectives The present study compared and verified the relationship between mental toughness (MT), countermovement jump (CMJ) and medicine ball throw (MBT) power tests by outcomes of high-level kickboxers during National Championship. Materials and Methods Thirty two high-level male kickboxers (winner = 16 and loser = 16: 21.2 ± 3.1 years, 1.73 ± 0.07 m, and 70.2 ± 9.4 kg) were analyzed using the CMJ, MBT tests and sports mental toughness questionnaire (SMTQ; based in confidence, constancy and control subscales), before the fights of the 2015 national championship (16 bouts). In statistical analysis, Mann-Withney test and a multiple linear regression were used to compare groups and to observe relationships, respectively, P ≤ 0.05. Results The present results showed significant differences between losers vs. winners, respectively, of total MT (7(7;8) vs. 11(10.2;11), confidence (3(3;3) vs. 4(4;4)), constancy (2(2;2) vs. 3(3;3)), control (2(2;3) vs. 4(4;4)) subscales and MBT (4.1(4;4.3) vs. 4.6(4.4;4.8)). The multiple linear regression showed a strong associations between MT results and outcome (r = 0.89), MBT (r = 0.84) and CMJ (r = 0.73). Conclusions The findings suggest that MT will be more predictive of performance in those sports and in the outcome of competition. PMID:27625755

  11. Different Traits Determine Introduction, Naturalization and Invasion Success In Woody Plants: Proteaceae as a Test Case

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Desika; Geerts, Sjirk; Richardson, David M.; Wilson, John R. U.

    2013-01-01

    A major aim of invasion ecology is to identify characteristics of successful invaders. However, most plant groups studied in detail (e.g. pines and acacias) have a high percentage of invasive taxa. Here we examine the global introduction history and invasion ecology of Proteaceae—a large plant family with many taxa that have been widely disseminated by humans, but with few known invaders. To do this we compiled a global list of species and used boosted regression tree models to assess which factors are important in determining the status of a species (not introduced, introduced, naturalized or invasive). At least 402 of 1674 known species (24%) have been moved by humans out of their native ranges, 58 species (14%) have become naturalized but not invasive, and 8 species (2%) are invasive. The probability of naturalization was greatest for species with large native ranges, low susceptibility to Phytophthora root-rot fungus, large mammal-dispersed seeds, and with the capacity to resprout. The probability of naturalized species becoming invasive was greatest for species with large native ranges, those used as barrier plants, tall species, species with small seeds, and serotinous species. The traits driving invasiveness of Proteaceae were similar to those for acacias and pines. However, while some traits showed a consistent influence at introduction, naturalization and invasion, others appear to be influential at one stage only, and some have contrasting effects at different stages. Trait-based analyses therefore need to consider different invasion stages separately. On their own, these observations provide little predictive power for risk assessment, but when the causative mechanisms are understood (e.g. Phytophthora susceptibility) they provide valuable insights. As such there is considerable value in seeking the correlates and mechanisms underlying invasions for particular taxonomic or functional groups. PMID:24086442

  12. Test beam results of a low-pressure micro-strip gas chamber with a secondary-electron emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, S.; Anderson, D.F.; Zimmerman, J.; Sbarra, C.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We present recent results, from a beam test, on the angular dependence of the efficiency and the distribution of the signals on the anode strips of a low-pressure microstrip gas chamber with a thick CsI layer as a secondary-electron emitter. New results of CVD diamond films as secondary-electron emitters are discussed.

  13. Beam-Beam Simulations with the Gaussian Code TRS

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, Regina S.

    2000-06-26

    The authors have summarized the main features of the beam-beam simulation code TRS and presented two sample applications to the PEP-II collider. The code has been successfully tested against analytic results and against other simulation codes whenever such comparisons are meaningful. The soft-gaussian approximation is believed to represent reliably incoherent beam-beam effects. The code has been used to perform studies for the PEP-II collider. For example, simulated tune scans reveal undesirable operating points due to beam blowup from synchrotron sidebands. The dynamical beta effect, clearly seen in these simulations, also influences the choice of a working point. The code has been used to establish the adequate beam separation at the parasitic collision points [24], and has been applied to the proposed muon collider [25], including the effects from the instability of the muon.

  14. Study on a test of optical stochastic cooling scheme in a single pass beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Kim, C.; Massoletti, D.; Zholents, A.

    1997-01-01

    A feasibility study of an experiment to test the principle of optical stochastic cooling is presented. We propose to build a new beamline in the extraction area of the ALS Booster synchrotron, where we will include a bypass lattice similar to the lattice that could be used in the cooling insertion in a storage ring. Of course, in the single pass beamline we cannot achieve cooling, but we can test all the functions of the bypass lattice that are required to achieve cooling in a storage ring. As it is stated in, there are stringent requirements on the time-of-flight properties of the bypass lattice employed in a cooling scheme. The pathlengths of particle trajectories in the bypass must be fairly insensitive to the standard set of errors that usually affect the performance of storage rings. Namely, it is necessary to preserve all fluctuations in the longitudinal particle density within the beam from the beginning to the end of the bypass lattice with the accuracy of {lambda}/2{pi}, where A is the carrying (optical) wavelength. According to, cooling will completely vanish if a combined effect of all kinds of errors will produce a spread of the pathlengths of particle trajectories larger than {lambda}/2 and the cooling time will almost double if the spread of the pathlengths is {lambda}/2{pi}. At a first glance, {lambda}/2{pi} {approx_equal} 0.1/{mu}m is such a small value that satisfying this accuracy looks nearly impossible. However, simulations show that a carefully designed bypass can meet all the requirements even with rather conservative tolerance to errors.

  15. Pre-Flight Tests with Astronauts, Flight and Ground Hardware, to Assure On-Orbit Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    On-Orbit Constraints Test (OOCT's) refers to mating flight hardware together on the ground before they will be mated on-orbit or on the Lunar surface. The concept seems simple but it can be difficult to perform operations like this on the ground when the flight hardware is being designed to be mated on-orbit in a zero-g/vacuum environment of space or low-g/vacuum environment on the Lunar/Mars Surface. Also some of the items are manufactured years apart so how are mating tasks performed on these components if one piece is on-orbit/on Lunar/Mars surface before its mating piece is planned to be built. Both the Internal Vehicular Activity (IVA) and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) OOCT's performed at Kennedy Space Center will be presented in this paper. Details include how OOCT's should mimic on-orbit/Lunar/Mars surface operational scenarios, a series of photographs will be shown that were taken during OOCT's performed on International Space Station (ISS) flight elements, lessons learned as a result of the OOCT's will be presented and the paper will conclude with possible applications to Moon and Mars Surface operations planned for the Constellation Program.

  16. Beam test results for a tungsten-cerium fluoride sampling calorimeter with wavelength-shifting fiber readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Candelise, V.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Della Ricca, G.; Diemoz, M.; del Re, D.; D'Imperio, G.; Dissertori, G.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Gelli, S.; Haller, C.; Jorda Lope, C.; Lustermann, W.; Martelli, A.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Pastrone, N.; Pellegrino, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Schönenberger, M.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Vazzoler, F.

    2015-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with heavy absorber plates, and read out by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers is being studied as a calorimeter option for detectors at the upgraded High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) collider at CERN. A prototype has been exposed to electron beams of different energies at the INFN Frascati (Italy) Beam Test Facility. This paper presents results from the studies performed on the prototype, such as signal amplitudes, light yield and energy resolution.

  17. Pilot-scale test for electron beam purification of flue gas from a municipal waste incinerator with slaked-lime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Koichi; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Miyata, Teijiro; Sato, Shoichi; Osada, You; Sudo, Masahiro; Doi, Takeshi; Shibuya, Eiichi; Baba, Shigekazu; Hatomi, Toshinori; Komiya, Mikihisa; Miyajima, Kiyonori

    1995-09-01

    The flue gas treatment by electron beam irradiation with the blowing of slaked-lime powder was tested in the pilot plant built at a municipal waste incinerator. The flue gas containing NOx, SO2 and HCl was irradiated by electron beam with slaked-lime powder(Ca(OH)2). Approximately 70 % ofNOx, and 100 % of SO2 and HCl in the flue gas were removed by the irradiation at a dose of 10 kGy at 150°C with two stoichiometric amount of slaked-lime powder. Lower irradiation temperature and increased amounts of the powder resulted in higher removal rates of NOX.

  18. Assessment of Corona/Arcing Hazard for Electron Beam Welding in Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for ISWE: Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Vaughn, J.; Stocks, C.; ODell, D.; Bhat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Test welds were made in argon over a range of pressures from 10-5 to 10-3 torr (the latter pressure an order of magnitude above pressures anticipated in the space shuttle bay during welding) with and without plasma on 304 stainless steel, 6Al-4V titanium, and 5456 aluminum in search of any possible unwanted electrical discharges. Only a faint steady glow of beam-excited atoms around the electron beam and sometimes extending out into the vacuum chamber was observed. No signs of current spiking or of any potentially dangerous electrical discharge were found.

  19. Education and communication is the key for the successful management of vitamin D test requesting

    PubMed Central

    López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, María; Ahumada, Miguel; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-preanalytical and post-postanalytical phases are steps where the laboratory professional may play a crucial role. Measuring the serum circulating 25 hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) is recommended to evaluate vitamin D status in patients at risk for vitamin D deficiency while 1,25 hydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) is only recommended to monitor several particular conditions (chronic kidney disease, hereditary phosphate-losing disorders, and some other) clearly defined by the current clinical guidelines of Endocrine Society.
Our research hypothesis was that through education and communication through comments in the Laboratory Information System (LIS), we could improve appropriateness in the request vitamin D tests. Materials and methods A retrospective observational cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2005 to December 2014. Each 1,25(OH)2D request was reviewed individually by a member of the laboratory staff. Starting in November 2011, each inappropriate 1,25(OH)2D request was registered in LIS and 25(OH)D was measured instead of 1,25(OH)2D. We counted the overall number of 1,25(OH)2D requests and the number of inappropriate requests which then were marked with a comment. Results The request of 25(OH)D increased along years. However, 1,25(OH)2D requests increased until 2012 when demand began to diminish. Conclusions Education and communication through comments in the LIS, corrected the inappropriate request of 1,25(OH)2D and promoted the use of 25(OH)D to study vitamin D deficiency. PMID:26110036

  20. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Piot, Philippe; Zhu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  1. 0.22 THz wideband sheet electron beam traveling wave tube amplifier: Cold test measurements and beam wave interaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, Anisullah; Gamzina, Diana; Barchfeld, Robert; Domier, Calvin; Barnett, Larry R.; Luhmann, Neville C. Jr.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, we describe micro-fabrication, RF measurements, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation modeling analysis of the 0.22 THz double-vane half period staggered traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) circuit. The TWTA slow wave structure comprised of two sections separated by two sever ports loaded by loss material, with integrated broadband input/output couplers. The micro-metallic structures were fabricated using nano-CNC milling and diffusion bonded in a three layer process. The 3D optical microscopy and SEM analysis showed that the fabrication error was within 2-3 {mu}m and surface roughness was measured within 30-50 nm. The RF measurements were conducted with an Agilent PNA-X network analyzer employing WR5.1 T/R modules with a frequency range of 178-228 GHz. The in-band insertion loss (S{sub 21}) for both the short section and long section (separated by a sever) was measured as {approx}-5 dB while the return loss was generally around {approx}-15 dB or better. The measurements matched well with the S-matrix simulation analysis that predicted a 3 dB bandwidth of {approx}45 GHz with an operating frequency at 220 GHz. However, the measured S{sub 21} was {approx}3 dB less than the design values, and is attributed to surface roughness and alignment issues. The confirmation measurements were conducted over the full frequency band up to 270 GHz employing a backward wave oscillator (BWO) scalar network analyzer setup employing a BWO in the frequency range 190 GHz-270 GHz. PIC simulations were conducted for the realistic TWT output power performance analysis with incorporation of corner radius of 127 {mu}m, which is inevitably induced by nano-machining. Furthermore, the S{sub 21} value in both sections of the TWT structure was reduced to correspond to the measurements by using a degraded conductivity of 10% International Annealed Copper Standard. At 220 GHz, for an elliptic sheet electron beam of 20 kV and 0.25 A, the average output power of the tube was predicted

  2. An evaluation of the sandwich beam in four-point bending as a compressive test method for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental phase of the study included compressive tests on HTS/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide, 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, and 5052 aluminum honeycomb at room temperature, and tensile tests on graphite/polyimide at room temperature, -157 C, and 316 C. Elastic properties and strength data are presented for three laminates. The room temperature elastic properties were generally found to differ in tension and compression with Young's modulus values differing by as much as twenty-six percent. The effect of temperature on modulus and strength was shown to be laminate dependent. A three-dimensional finite element analysis predicted an essentially uniform, uniaxial compressive stress state in the top flange test section of the sandwich beam. In conclusion, the sandwich beam can be used to obtain accurate, reliable Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio data for advanced composites; however, the ultimate compressive stress for some laminates may be influenced by the specimen geometry.

  3. PRIMARY TESTS OF LASER / E BEAM INTERACTION IN A PLASMA CHANNEL.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.; BEN ZVI,I.; HIROSE,T.; YAKIMENKO,V.; KUSCHE,K.; SIDDONS,P.; ET AL

    2002-06-23

    A high-energy CO{sub 2} laser is channeled in a capillary discharge. Plasma dynamic simulations confirm occurrence of guiding conditions at the relatively low axial plasma density 1 {divided_by} 4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. A relativistic electron beam transmitted through the capillary changes its properties depending upon the plasma density. We observe focusing, defocusing or steering of the e-beam. Counter-propagation of the electron and laser beams in the plasma channel results in generation of intense picosecond x-ray pulses.

  4. Evaluation of proof testing as a means of assuring mission success for the Space Shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. J.; Lange, F. F.; Ritter, J. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The reliability analysis of a thermal protection system (TPS) incorporating low density, fibrous ceramic materials must take into account the time-dependency and variability of the system's strength. Fracture mechanics concepts can be used to estimate the allowable strength and expected lifetime, as well as to define a proof test scheme for assuring mission success of TPS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the proof testing scheme used on the TPS of the Space Shuttle with these fracture mechanics concepts. The analysis confirmed that proof testing was necessary for the undensified system and that proof testing should lead to adequate reliability with respect to the design stresses. For the undensified system, fracture mechanics predictions were confirmed by measuring the strength of samples that survived proof testing. It was also found that the time-dependent nature of the system's strength was controlled mainly by the ceramic and that this time-strength dependency is similar to that observed for bulk glasses that have compositions similar to the glass fibers present in the ceramic tiles.

  5. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  6. Preliminary testing of GaN-based dosimeters for electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wang, R; Chaikh, A; Pittet, P; Balosso, J

    2015-07-01

    The response of an implantable in vivo dosimetric system based on gallium nitride radioluminescence was investigated for electron beam radiotherapy using ELEKTA SLi and VARIAN Clinac 2100 CD Linear Accelerators. A bi-channel method has been implemented for fibre background rejection. The percentage depth dose (PDD) profiles were measured in polymethyl methacrylate for 6, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams. The PDD results were in excellent agreement with those measured with reference to ionisation chambers. PMID:25813482

  7. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, F.; Golnik, C.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu2SiO5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  8. Microbial succession and stimulation following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into shallow Newark Basin aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M.; Clauson, K.; Yang, Q.; Umemoto, K.; Seltzer, A. M.; Zakharova, N. V.; Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Takahashi, T.; Goldberg, D.; O'Mullan, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite growing appreciation for the importance of microbes in altering geochemical reactions in the subsurface, the microbial response to geological carbon sequestration injections and the role of microbes in altering metal mobilization following leakage scenarios in shallow aquifers remain poorly constrained. A Newark Basin test well was utilized in field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2 saturated water into isolated aquifer intervals. Additionally, laboratory mesocosm experiments, including microbially-active and inactive (autoclave sterilized) treatments, were used to constrain the microbial role in mineral dissolution, trace metal release, and gas production (e.g. hydrogen and methane). Hydrogen production was detected in both sterilized and unsterilized laboratory mesocosm treatments, indicating abiotic hydrogen production may occur following CO2 leakage, and methane production was detected in unsterilized, microbially active mesocosms. In field experiments, a decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), the production of hydrogen gas, and increased bacterial cell concentrations. 16S ribosomal RNA clone libraries, from samples collected before and after the test well injection, were compared in an attempt to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injection, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria and other microbes associated with iron reducing and syntrophic metabolism. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentration, and rapid microbial community succession, with increased concentrations of hydrogen gas suggests that abiotically produced hydrogen may serve as an ecologically-relevant energy

  9. Microbial Stimulation and Succession following a Test Well Injection Simulating CO₂ Leakage into a Shallow Newark Basin Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M. Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  10. Microbial stimulation and succession following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into a shallow Newark basin aquifer.

    PubMed

    O'Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  11. Test beam results with a sampling calorimeter of cerium fluoride scintillating crystals and tungsten absorber plates for calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donegà, M.; Dröge, M.; Haller, C.; Horisberger, U.; Lustermann, W.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Quittnat, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; D`Imperio, G.; del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Jorda Lope, C.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Martelli, A.; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Della Ricca, G.

    2016-07-01

    A sampling calorimeter using cerium fluoride scintillating crystals as active material, interleaved with absorber plates made of tungsten, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres has been tested with high-energy electron beams at the CERN SPS H4 beam line, as well as with lower-energy beams at the INFN Frascati Beam Test Facility in Italy. Energy resolution studies revealed a low stochastic term (< 10 % /√{ E }). This result, combined with high radiation hardness of the material used, marks this sampling calorimeter as a good candidate for the detectors' forward regions during the high luminosity phase of LHC.

  12. IR (infrared radiation) observations of the ETA (Experimental Test Accelerator) beam channel. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.L.; Ditteon, R.P.; Frazier, E.N.; Giguere, R.P.; Rice, C.J.

    1985-09-30

    Aerospace Corporation scientists observed infrared radiation from the ETA beam channel in the wavelength range 0.65 -14.4 micrometer on September 12-16, 1983. The data consisted of time profiles of radiation pulses from the beam channel, measured with a limiting time resolution of 100 nanoseconds. Isolation of spectral bands was achieved through the use of broadband filters and circular variable filters (CVF). The latter had resolution lambda/delta lambda = 50 - 100, where lambda is wavelength. A total of 1076 radiation pulses were recorded. The beam propagation tube was filled with either ambient laboratory air or synthetic (dry) air at pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 500 Torr.

  13. Monte Carlo uncertainty assessment of ultrasonic beam parameters from immersion transducers used to non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, A V; Silva, C E R; Costa-Félix, R P B

    2016-07-01

    The uncertainty of ultrasonic beam parameters from non-destructive testing immersion probes was evaluated using the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) uncertainty framework and Monte Carlo Method simulation. The calculated parameters such as focal distance, focal length, focal widths and beam divergence were determined according to EN 12668-2. The typical system configuration used during the mapping acquisition comprises a personal computer connected to an oscilloscope, a signal generator, axes movement controllers, and a water bath. The positioning system allows moving the transducer (or hydrophone) in the water bath. To integrate all system components, a program was developed to allow controlling all the axes, acquire waterborne signals, and calculate essential parameters to assess and calibrate US transducers. All parameters were calculated directly from the raster scans of axial and transversal beam profiles, except beam divergence. Hence, the positioning system resolution and the step size are principal source of uncertainty. Monte Carlo Method simulations were performed by another program that generates pseudo-random samples for the distributions of the involved quantities. In all cases, there were found statistical differences between Monte Carlo and GUM methods. PMID:27107164

  14. Ion beam induced charge collection (IBICC) from integrated circuit test structures using a 10 MeV carbon microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B. N.; El Bouanani, M.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Renfrow, S. N.; Doyle, B. L.; Walsh, D. S.; Aton, T. J.

    1999-06-10

    As feature sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink, the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICs. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories, employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1{mu}m diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICs. With the aid of IC layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented.

  15. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  16. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  17. An expanded x-ray beam facility (BEaTriX) to test the modular elements of the ATHENA optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Pelliciari, C.; Bonnini, E.; Buffagni, E.; Ferrari, C.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-07-01

    Future large X-ray observatories like ATHENA will be equipped with very large optics, obtained by assembling modular optical elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOU) based on the technology of either Silicon Pore Optics or Slumped Glass Optics. In both cases, the final quality of the modular optic (a 5 arcsec HEW requirement for ATHENA) is determined by the accuracy alignment of the XOUs within the assembly, but also by the angular resolution of the individual XOU. This is affected by the mirror shape accuracy, its surface roughness, and the mutual alignment of the mirrors within the XOU itself. Because of the large number of XOUs to be produced, quality tests need to be routinely done to select the most performing stacked blocks, to be integrated into the final optic. In addition to the usual metrology based on profile and roughness measurements, a direct measurement with a broad, parallel, collimated and uniform Xray beam would be the most reliable test, without the need of a focal spot reconstruction as usually done in synchrotron light. To this end, we designed the BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility) to be realized at INAF-OAB, devoted to the functional tests of the XOUs. A grazing incidence parabolic mirror and an asymmetrically cut crystal will produce a parallel X-ray beam broad enough to illuminate the entire aperture of the focusing elements. An X-ray camera at the focal distance from the mirrors will directly record the image. The selection of different crystals will enable to test the XOUs in the 1 - 5 keV range, included in the X-ray energy band of ATHENA (0.2-12 keV). In this paper we discuss a possible BEaTriX facility implementation. We also show a preliminary performance simulation of the optical system.

  18. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  19. Leak Rate Test for a Fiber Beam Monitor Contained in a Vacuum for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Lane, Noel; Gross, Eisen; Gray, Frederick; Muon g-2 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions and have determined the leak rate of the FBMs within the constructed vacuum apparatus. This leak rate will be reported, along with preliminary results from tests of the light output from the scintillating fibers. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions

  20. A Beam Shape Oscillation Monitor for HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, O. V.; Baluev, A. B.; Gubrienko, K. I.; Merker, E. A.; Wittenburg, K.; Krouptchenkow, I.

    2006-11-01

    The perfect matching of the injecting beam phase space with the accelerator lattice is a very important problem. Its successful solution allows excluding possible mismatch emittance blow-up and worsening of the beam characteristics, that is necessary to get the highest possible luminosity in hadron accelerators. The mismatch can be controlled by measuring sizes oscillation on the first revolutions of the injected beam at a certain orbit point. Designed for this purpose the construction, acquisition electronics, software controlling of the operation and data processing of such a monitor are described. A first test result with beam is presented.

  1. First tests for an online treatment monitoring system with in-beam PET for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraan, A. C.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cappucci, F.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferretti, S.; Mairani, A.; Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M.; Retico, A.; Sala, P.; Sportelli, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2015-01-01

    PET imaging is a non-invasive technique for particle range verification in proton therapy. It is based on measuring the β+ annihilations caused by nuclear interactions of the protons in the patient. In this work we present measurements for proton range verification in phantoms, performed at the CNAO particle therapy treatment center in Pavia, Italy, with our 10 × 10 cm2 planar PET prototype DoPET. PMMA phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams and clinical treatment plans, and PET data were acquired during and shortly after proton irradiation. We created 1-D profiles of the β+ activity along the proton beam-axis, and evaluated the difference between the proximal rise and the distal fall-off position of the activity distribution. A good agreement with FLUKA Monte Carlo predictions was obtained. We also assessed the system response when the PMMA phantom contained an air cavity. The system was able to detect these cavities quickly after irradiation.

  2. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  3. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Michigan Ultra-Cold Jet Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, T.; Blinov, B. B.; Denbow, J. M.; Kandes, M. C.; Krisch, A. D.; Kulkarni, D. A.; Lehman, M. A.; Luppov, V. G.; Morozov, V. S.; Murray, J. R.; Peters, C. C.; Raymond, R. S.; Ross, M. R.; Yonehara, K.; Borisov, N. S.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kleppner, D.; Grishin, V. N.; Mysnik, A. L.

    2001-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Michigan Jet Target). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. The Jet produced, at the detector, a spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam with a measured intensity of about 1.7 10^15 H s-1 and a FWHM area of less than 0.13 cm^2. This intensity corresponds to a free jet density of about 1.3 10^12 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. When the transition RF unit is installed, we expect a proton polarization higher than 90%.

  4. Polarized beams at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1995-11-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 {times} 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes, which will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production.

  5. Prototype design of DAMPE Calorimeter readout electronics and performance in CERN beam test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Changqing; Hu, Yiming; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Yunlong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    A high energy cosmic ray detector to be in space, called DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), is now being developed in China. The major scientific objectives of the DAMPE mission are primary cosmic ray, gamma ray astronomy and dark matter particles, by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The DAMPE detector is intended to operate in a 500 km satellite orbit, and a calorimeter, which is composed of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate) crystal logs with a size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log, is a critical sub-detector for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. Each BGO crystal log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. In order to achieve a large dynamic range, each PMT base incorporates a three dynode (2, 5, 8) pick off, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. According to the design specification, a dynamic range of 10(5) is need for each BGO detector units. The large amount of detector components and signal channels, as well as large dynamic range, greatly challenge the design of readout electronics, because the physical space of PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and cable layout, crosstalk between signal channels and power budget, are strictly constrained. In year 2012, a prototype of DAMPE was accomplished, including a scaled-down BGO calorimeter with 132 short BGO bars. Each short BGO bar, with a size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*30cm, is coupled with a R5610A PMT on one end, while the other end is wrapped by heat-shrinkable black sleeves. A prototype of the readout electronics, using VA32 ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) and Actel Flash-based FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), are developed and assembled with the detector. After 1 month ground-based cosmic ray tests in China, an accelerator

  6. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  7. The Cryoplant for the Iter Neutral Beam Test Facility to BE Built at Rfx in Padova, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengo, R.; Fellin, F.; Sonato, P.

    2010-04-01

    The Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), planned to be constructed in Padua (Italy), will constitute the prototype of the two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI), which will be installed in the ITER plant (Cadarache-France). The NBTF is composed of a 1 MV accelerator that can produce a 40 A deuteron pulsed neutral beam particles. The necessary vacuum needed in the accelerator is achieved by two large cryopumps, designed by FZK-Karlsruhe, with radiation shields cooled between 65 K and 90 K and with cryopanels cooled by 4 bar supercritical helium (ScHe) between 4.5 K and 6.5 K. A new cryoplant facility will be installed with two large helium refrigerators: a Shield Refrigerator (SR), whose cooling capacity is up to 30 kW between 65 K and 90 K, and a helium Main Refrigerator (MR), whose equivalent cooling capacity is up to 800 W at 4.5 K. The cooling of the cryopanels is obtained with two (ScHe) 30 g/s pumps (one redundant), working in a closed cycle around 4 bar producing a pressure head of 100 mbar. Two heat exchangers are immersed in a buffer dewar connected to the MR. The MR and SR different operation modes are described in the paper, as well as the new cryoplant installation.

  8. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  9. Biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic correlation of Neoproterozoic sedimentary successions: upper Tindir Group, northwestern Canada, as a test case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. J.; Knoll, A. H.; Awramik, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in Proterozoic micropaleontology and sedimentary isotope geochemistry suggest that improved interbasinal correlation of Neoproterozoic (1000-540 Ma) successions is possible. Because widely varying interpretations of its age have been suggested and no reliable radiometric dates or paleomagnetic data are available, the upper Tindir Group of northwestern Canada provides an opportunity to test this hypothesis. The age of these strata is of paleontological importance because silicified carbonates near the top of the group contain disc-shaped-scale microfossils that may provide insights into the early evolution of biomineralization. A reinterpretation of upper Tindir microfossil assemblages suggests a late Riphean age. Although diagenesis and contact metamorphism have altered the isotopic compositions of some carbonates, least altered samples indicate that delta 13C of contemporaneous seawater was at least +4.7%, typical of Neoproterozoic, but not Cambrian, carbonates. Strontium isotopic compositions of the least altered samples yield values of approximately 0.7065, which can be uniquely correlated with late Riphean seawater. Together, micropaleontology and the isotopic tracers of C and Sr constrain the upper Tindir carbonates and their unique fossils to be late Riphean, likely between 620 and 780 Ma.

  10. Biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic correlation of Neoproterozoic sedimentary successions: upper Tindir Group, northwestern Canada, as a test case.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A J; Knoll, A H; Awramik, S M

    1992-02-01

    Recent advances in Proterozoic micropaleontology and sedimentary isotope geochemistry suggest that improved interbasinal correlation of Neoproterozoic (1000-540 Ma) successions is possible. Because widely varying interpretations of its age have been suggested and no reliable radiometric dates or paleomagnetic data are available, the upper Tindir Group of northwestern Canada provides an opportunity to test this hypothesis. The age of these strata is of paleontological importance because silicified carbonates near the top of the group contain disc-shaped-scale microfossils that may provide insights into the early evolution of biomineralization. A reinterpretation of upper Tindir microfossil assemblages suggests a late Riphean age. Although diagenesis and contact metamorphism have altered the isotopic compositions of some carbonates, least altered samples indicate that delta 13C of contemporaneous seawater was at least +4.7%, typical of Neoproterozoic, but not Cambrian, carbonates. Strontium isotopic compositions of the least altered samples yield values of approximately 0.7065, which can be uniquely correlated with late Riphean seawater. Together, micropaleontology and the isotopic tracers of C and Sr constrain the upper Tindir carbonates and their unique fossils to be late Riphean, likely between 620 and 780 Ma. PMID:11537751

  11. Development of Zn and Eu beams by plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Rodrigues, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Singh, Beer Pal; Kumar, R.

    2006-05-01

    Accelerated ion beams of various species are important tools to engineer the materials. The low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) provides the ion beams of energy in the range of a few keV to a few MeV. The LEIBF is fully operational since 2001 and its performance has been tested very well with ion beams from noble gases. Metallic and rare earth ion beams have important role in the field of nano-technology and enhancement of optical properties of semiconducting nano-particles inside various matrices. During the last few years, an effort was made to extract ion beams of various metal and rare earth elements using different techniques. Here we describe the successful development of Zn and Eu ion beams using sputtering technique in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. Operational experience to produce such kind of beams and results on beam analysis are described in the paper.

  12. Performance of a tungsten-cerium fluoride sampling calorimeter in high-energy electron beam tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Bianchini, L.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Cavallari, F.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, M.; Lope, C. Jorda; Meridiani, P.; Nuccetelli, M.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Rahatlou, S.; Soffi, L.; Brianza, L.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Fatis, T. Tabarelli de; Monti, V.; Pastrone, N.; Trapani, P. P.; Candelise, V.; Ricca, G. Della

    2015-12-01

    A prototype for a sampling calorimeter made out of cerium fluoride crystals interleaved with tungsten plates, and read out by wavelength-shifting fibres, has been exposed to beams of electrons with energies between 20 and 150 GeV, produced by the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator complex. The performance of the prototype is presented and compared to that of a GEANT4 simulation of the apparatus. Particular emphasis is given to the response uniformity across the channel front face, and to the prototype's energy resolution.

  13. Reproducibilty test of ferrous xylenol orange gel dose response with optical cone beam CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.; Battista, J.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies of ferrous xylenol orange gelatin gel have revealed a spatial dependence to the dose response of samples contained in 10 cm diameter cylinders. Dose response is defined as change in optical attenuation coefficient divided by the dose (units cm-1 Gy-1). This set of experiments was conducted to determine the reproducibility of our preparation, irradiation and full 3D optical cone beam CT scanning. The data provided an internal check of a larger storage time-dose response dependence study.

  14. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U. /Manchester U. /Notre Dame U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Birmingham U. /Bristol U. /UC, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /University Coll. London /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Oregon U.

    2005-05-23

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  15. Beam commissioning of the RFQ for the RHIC-EBIS project

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura,M.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Lodestro, V.; Pikin, A.; Ritter, J.; Tamura, J.; Kanesue, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, J.; Vossberg, M.

    2009-05-04

    Beam commissioning of a new 4 rod RFQ has started at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The RFQ will accelerate intense heavy ion beams provided by an Electron Beam ion Source (EBIS) up to 300 keV/u. The RFQ will accelerate a range of Q/M from 1 to 1/6, and the accelerated beam will be finally delivered to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The first beam was successfully accelerated and the bunch structures of He{sup +} and Cu{sup 10+} beams were measured. The further beam tests are in progress.

  16. Fatigue experience from tests carried out with forged beam and frame structures in the development of the Saab aircraft Viggen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    A part of the lower side of the main wing at the joint of the main spar with the fuselage frame was investigated. This wing beam area was simulated by a test specimen consisting of a spar boom of AZ 74 forging (7075 aluminum alloy modified with 0.3 percent Ag) and a portion of a honeycomb sandwich panel attached to the boom flange with steel bolts. The cross section was reduced to half scale. However, the flange thickness, the panel height, and the bolt size were full scale. Further, left and right portions of the fuselage frame intended to carry over the bending moment of the main wing were tested. Each of these frame halves consisted of a forward and a rear forging (7079 aluminum alloy, overaged) connected by an outer and inner skin (Alclad 7075) creating a box beam. These test specimens were full scale and were constructed principally of ordinary aircraft components. The test load spectrum was common to both types of specimens with regard to percentage levels. It consisted of maneuver and gust loads, touchdown loads, and loads due to ground roughness. A load history of 200 hours of flight with 15,000 load cycles was punched on a tape. The loads were randomized in groups according to the flight-by-flight principle. The highest positive load level was 90 percent of limit load and the largest negative load was -27 percent. A total of 20 load levels were used. Both types of specimens were provided with strain gages and had a nominal stress of about 300 MN/sq m in some local areas. As a result of the tests, steps were taken to reduce the risk of fatigue damage in aircraft. Thus stress levels were lowered, radii were increased, and demands on surface finish were sharpened.

  17. BEaTriX, expanded x-ray beam facility for testing modular elements of telescope optics: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliciari, C.; Spiga, D.; Bonnini, E.; Buffagni, E.; Ferrari, C.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present in this paper an update on the design of BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility), an X-ray apparatus to be realized at INAF/OAB and that will generate an expanded, uniform and parallel beam of soft X-rays. BEaTriX will be used to perform the functional tests of X-ray focusing modules of large X-ray optics such as those for the ATHENA X-ray observatory, using the Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) as a baseline technology, and Slumped Glass Optics (SGO) as a possible alternative. Performing the tests in X-rays provides the advantage of an in-situ, at-wavelength quality control of the optical modules produced in series by the industry, performing a selection of the modules with the best angular resolution, and, in the case of SPOs, there is also the interesting possibility to align the parabolic and the hyperbolic stacks directly under X-rays, to minimize the aberrations. However, a parallel beam with divergence below 2 arcsec is necessary in order to measure mirror elements that are expected to reach an angular resolution of about 4 arcsec, since the ATHENA requirement for the entire telescope is 5 arcsec. Such a low divergence over the typical aperture of modular optics would require an X-ray source to be located in a several kilometers long vacuum tube. In contrast, BEaTriX will be compact enough (5 m x 14 m) to be housed in a small laboratory, will produce an expanded X-ray beam 60 mm x 200 mm broad, characterized by a very low divergence (1.5 arcsec HEW), strong polarization, high uniformity, and X-ray energy selectable between 1.5 keV and 4.5 keV. In this work we describe the BEaTriX layout and show a performance simulation for the X-ray energy of 4.5 keV.

  18. First beam commissioning at BNL ERL SRF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Altinbas, Z.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Deonarine, S.; DeSanto, L.; Gassner, D.; Gupta, R. C.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Ho, C.; Jamilkoski, J.; Kankiya, P.; Kayran, D.; Kellerman, R.; Laloudakis, N.; Lambiase, R.; Liaw, C.; Litvinenko, V.; Mahler, G.; Masi, L.; McIntyre, G.; Miller, T.; Philips, D.; Ptitsyn, V.; Seda, T.; Sheehy, B.; Smith, K.; Rao, T.; Steszyn, A.; Tallerico, T.; Than, R.; Tuozollo, J.; Wang, E.; Weiss, D.; Wiliniski, M.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The 704 MHz SRF gun successfully generated the first photoemission beam in November of 2014. The configurations of the test and the sub-systems are described.The latest results of SRF commissioning, including the cavity performance, cathode QE measurements, beam current/energy measurements, are presented in the paper.

  19. Induction of apoptosis by accelerated heavy-ion beams in cultured fetal rat testes and its modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Shang, Yi; Fujita, Kazuko; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Moreno, Stephanie G.; Coffigny, Herve; Hayata, Isamu; Murakami, Masahiro; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    The increasing human activities in space missions make the study on effects from high-LET ionizing radiation an important issue to be addressed. We reported previously that prenatal irradiations with heavy-ion beams on gestation day 15 generally induced markedly detrimental effects on prenatal gonads, postnatal testicular development and male breeding activity in rats. To explore the mechanisms involved in radiation-induced gonocyte apoptosis in fetal gonads, which played a critical role in the fate of postnatal testis development, accelerated heavy-ion irradiations and organotypic culture of Wistar fetal rat testes were applied to investigations focused on cellular and molecular events after irradiations with or without chemical addition. Results showed that, in addition to the clustered distribution, both the time course and the percentage of apoptosis in gonocytes on gestation day 15 equivalent in vitro appeared similar to that in utero after exposure to either carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV/µm or neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV/µm. Irradiations induced increased p53 expression in a dose dependent manner and decreased expressions of p21 and Bcl- 2 by Western Blot examination. Administration of pan-caspase inhibitor prior to irradiations effectively inhibited apoptosis occurrence and reduced the extent of clustered apoptosis, while such effects were not observed with the presence of p53 inhibitor, gap junction inhibitor, or nitric oxide specific scavenger. These findings indicated that irradiations of cultured fetal rat testes manifested pathologically similar apoptosis induction in gonocytes to that in utero. P53 expression was possibly responsible for the response to radiation damage rather than induction of apoptosis. The syncytial organization of gonocytes played a key role in formation of the clustered apoptosis, an event that both gap junction inhibitor and nitric oxide specific scavenger were incapable of preventing.

  20. Guide for 3D WARP simulations of hollow electron beam lenses. Practical explanation on basis of Tevatron electron lens test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, Vince

    2014-06-08

    The purpose of this guide is to help successive students handle WARP. It outlines the installation of WARP on personal computers as well as super-computers and clusters. It furthermore teaches the reader how to handle the WARP environment and run basic scripts. Lastly it outlines how to execute the current Hollow Electron Beam Lens scripts.

  1. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Torun, Y.

    2013-06-15

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  2. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Chung, M; Freemire, B; Hanlet, P; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Palmer, M; Schwarz, T; Tollestrup, A; Torun, Y; Yonehara, K

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and∕or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment. PMID:23822337

  3. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-06-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  4. Testing a Model of Environmental Risk and Protective Factors to Predict Middle and High School Students' Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, S. Colby; Woolley, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the School Success Profile generated by 19,228 middle and high school students were organized into three broad categories of risk and protective factors--control, support, and challenge--to examine the relative and combined power of aggregate scale scores in each category so as to predict academic success. It was hypothesized that higher…

  5. Dichroic beam combiner to support hardware-in-the-loop testing of dual-mode common aperture seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Scott B.; Cole, John S., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    The advent of missile seekers with dual-mode millimeter wave and infrared common-aperture sensors has led to a requirement to develop simulation tools necessary to test these systems. Traditionally, one of the most important techniques for supporting systems development has been a full seeker hardware-in-the-loop simulation. For the past three years, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has been developing the simulation technologies to test these types of system in a hardware-in-the-loop environment. The dichroic beam combiner is the key component of such a facility. This paper focuses on the various dichroic beam combiner technologies that have been considered and are currently under development at AMCOM. This paper will present both experimental and analytical data to describe the performance of each technology. The basis for this paper is work performed at the AMCOM Advanced Simulation Center (ASC). The ASC is managed and operated by the Systems Simulation and Development Directorate of the Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

  6. Beam Test of a Prototype Phoswich Detector Assembly forthe PoGOLite Astronomical Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y.; Ueno, M.; Kataoka, J.; Arimoto, M.; Kawai, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizuno, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kiss, M.; Ylinen, T.; Bettolo, C.Marini; Carlson, P.; P.Chen d, B.Craig d, T.Kamae d, G.Madejski d, J.S.T.Ng; Rogers, R.; Tajima, H.; Thurston, T.S.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, T. Gunji, S.; Bjornsson, C-I.; Larsson, S.; /Stockholm U. /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-01-17

    We report about the beam test on a prototype of the balloon-based astronomical soft gamma-ray polarimeter, PoGOLite (Polarized Gamma-ray Observer--Light Version) conducted at KEK Photon Factory, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. The synchrotron beam was set at 30, 50, and 70 keV and its polarization was monitored by a calibrated polarimeter. The goal of the experiment was to validate the flight design of the polarimeter. PoGOLite is designed to measure polarization by detecting a Compton scattering and the subsequent photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells (PDCs). The test setup included a first flight model PDC and a front-end electronics to select and reconstruct valid Compton scattering events. The experiment has verified that the flight PDC can detect recoil electrons and select valid Compton scattering events down to 30 keV from background. The measure azimuthal modulations (34.4 %, 35.8 % and 37.2 % at 30, 50, and 70 keV, respectively) agreed within 10% (relative) with the predictions by Geant4 implemented with dependence on the initial and final photon polarizations.

  7. Secondary Electron Yield Measurements and Groove Chambers Tests in the PEP-II Beam Line Straights Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Markiewicz, T; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2008-07-03

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders such as ILC and CLIC [1, 2]. In the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed vacuum chambers with rectangular grooves in a straight magnetic-free section to test this promising possible electron cloud mitigation technique. We have also installed a special chamber to monitor the secondary electron yield of TiN and TiZrV (NEG) coating, Copper, Stainless Steel and Aluminum under the effect of electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R&D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the ILC damping ring, the latest results on in situ secondary electron yield conditioning and recent update on the groove tests in PEP-II.

  8. Invasion success in a marginal habitat: an experimental test of competitive ability and drought tolerance in Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    te Beest, Mariska; Elschot, Kelly; Olff, Han; Etienne, Rampal S

    2013-01-01

    Climatic niche models based on native-range climatic data accurately predict invasive-range distributions in the majority of species. However, these models often do not account for ecological and evolutionary processes, which limit the ability to predict future range expansion. This might be particularly problematic in the case of invaders that occupy environments that would be considered marginal relative to the climatic niche in the native range of the species. Here, we assess the potential for future range expansion in the shrub Chromolaena odorata that is currently invading mesic savannas (>650 mm MAP) in South Africa that are colder and drier than most habitats in its native range. In a greenhouse experiment we tested whether its current distribution in South Africa can be explained by increased competitive ability and/or differentiation in drought tolerance relative to the native population. We compared aboveground biomass, biomass allocation, water use efficiency and relative yields of native and invasive C. odorata and the resident grass Panicum maximum in wet and dry conditions. Surprisingly, we found little differentiation between ranges. Invasive C. odorata showed no increased competitive ability or superior drought tolerance compared to native C. odorata. Moreover we found that P. maximum was a better competitor than either native or invasive C. odorata. These results imply that C. odorata is unlikely to expand its future range towards more extreme, drier, habitats beyond the limits of its current climatic niche and that the species' invasiveness most likely depends on superior light interception when temporarily released from competition by disturbance. Our study highlights the fact that species can successfully invade habitats that are at the extreme end of their ranges and thereby contributes towards a better understanding of range expansion during species invasions. PMID:23936301

  9. Invasion Success in a Marginal Habitat: An Experimental Test of Competitive Ability and Drought Tolerance in Chromolaena odorata

    PubMed Central

    te Beest, Mariska; Elschot, Kelly; Olff, Han; Etienne, Rampal S.

    2013-01-01

    Climatic niche models based on native-range climatic data accurately predict invasive-range distributions in the majority of species. However, these models often do not account for ecological and evolutionary processes, which limit the ability to predict future range expansion. This might be particularly problematic in the case of invaders that occupy environments that would be considered marginal relative to the climatic niche in the native range of the species. Here, we assess the potential for future range expansion in the shrub Chromolaena odorata that is currently invading mesic savannas (>650 mm MAP) in South Africa that are colder and drier than most habitats in its native range. In a greenhouse experiment we tested whether its current distribution in South Africa can be explained by increased competitive ability and/or differentiation in drought tolerance relative to the native population. We compared aboveground biomass, biomass allocation, water use efficiency and relative yields of native and invasive C. odorata and the resident grass Panicum maximum in wet and dry conditions. Surprisingly, we found little differentiation between ranges. Invasive C. odorata showed no increased competitive ability or superior drought tolerance compared to native C. odorata. Moreover we found that P. maximum was a better competitor than either native or invasive C. odorata. These results imply that C. odorata is unlikely to expand its future range towards more extreme, drier, habitats beyond the limits of its current climatic niche and that the species’ invasiveness most likely depends on superior light interception when temporarily released from competition by disturbance. Our study highlights the fact that species can successfully invade habitats that are at the extreme end of their ranges and thereby contributes towards a better understanding of range expansion during species invasions. PMID:23936301

  10. Electron and optical beam testing of integrated circuits using CIVA, LIVA, and LECIVA

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA), Light-Induced Voltage Alteration, (LIVA), and Low Energy CIVA (LECIVA) are three new failure analysis imaging techniques developed to quickly localize defects on ICs. All three techniques utilize the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as an electron or photon beam is scanned across an IC. CIVA and LECIVA yield rapid localization of open interconnections on ICs. LIVA allows quick localization of open-circuited and damaged semiconductor junctions. LIVA can also be used to image transistor logic states and can be performed from the backside of ICs with an infrared laser source. The physics of signal generation for each technique and examples of their use in failure analysis are described.

  11. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models. PMID:26880341

  12. Assessment of similarity of HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) with separate effects test

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Slovik, G.C.

    1990-11-01

    A Separate Effects Test (SET) facility was constructed in 1963 to demonstrate the feasibility of the HFBR design and to determine the core power limits for a safe flow reversal event. The objective of the task reported here is to review the capability of the test to scale the dominant phenomena in the HFBR during a flow reversal event and the applicability of the range of the power level obtained from the test to the HFBR. The conclusion of this report was that the flow during the flow reversal event will not be similar in the two facilities. The causes of the dissimilarity are the differences in the core inlet friction, bypass path friction, the absence of the check valve in the test, and the materials used to represent the fuel plates. The impact of these differences is that the HFBR will undergo flow reversal sooner than the test and will have a higher flow rate in the final Natural Circulation Period. The shorter duration of the flow reversal event will allow less time for the plate to heat up and the larger flow in the Natural Circulation Period will lead to higher critical heat flux limits in the HFBR than in the test. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the HFBR can undergo flow reversal safely for heat fluxes up to 46,700 (BTU/hr ft{sup 2}), the heat flux limit obtained from the 1963 test.

  13. Measurements of neutral beam species, impurities, spatial divergence, energy dispersion, pressure, and reionization for the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) US Common Long Pulse Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Gammel, G.M.; Grisham, L.R.; Kaita, R.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Langley, R.A.; Magee, C.W.; Medley, S.S.; Murphy, T.J.; Roquemore, A.L.; Williams, M.D.

    1988-06-01

    Physical characteristics of TFTR neutral beams were measured during the first tests and initial operating experience with production TFTR US Common Long Pulse Ion Sources on beamlines in the TFTR experimental environment under actual user conditions. These measurements were performed with different power supply systems, controls, diagnostics, and operating methods compared to those used at LBL during the development phase. The set of diagnostics included water calorimetry, thermocouples, vacuum ionization gauges, photodiodes, neutron, gamma-ray and charged particle backscatter spectroscopy, and implantation/secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These systems were used to perform complementary measurements of neutral beam species, measurements were performed either in the neutralizer region, where the beam contained both ions and neutrals, or in the region of the output neutral beam. In general, consistent with estimates made during the LBL development phase. They can provide guidance for the optimization of TFTR neutral beam heating operations and the understanding of auxilliary heated TFTR plasmas. 21 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Using an On-Line Test To Assess Reading Skills and Predict the Ability To Successfully Pass a Reading SOL Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Katherine P.

    Designing a remediation program to meet students' needs involves finding out what a student knows and needs to know. An online testing program, such as eduTest, may provide the answers. This test is a versatile instrument that offers benchmark tests, grade specific tests, and strand tests in the four content areas for grades K through 8. The…

  15. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  16. Missile and aircraft field test data acquired with the rapid optical beam steering (ROBS) sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Bruce; Dunn, Murray; Herr, David W.; Hyman, Howard; Leslie, Daniel H.; Lovern, Michael G.

    1997-08-01

    The ROBS instrument has recently acquired unique imagery of a missile intercepting an airborne drone target. We present a summary of that mission. We also present imagery of three airborne targets collected while the ROBS instrument simultaneously tracked all three aircraft. The recent test data highlights the capability of the ROBS instrument for autonomous acquisition, tracking, and imaging of multiple targets under field test conditions. We also describe improvements to the optical system currently underway.

  17. Beam-beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  18. 'OHANA-Iki: a test-bed for the 'OHANA beam combiner and delay line at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baril, Marc; Lai, Olivier; Zahariade, George; Bouchacourt, Flora; Perrin, Guy; Fedou, Pierre; Woillez, Julien

    2010-07-01

    The possibility of interferometrically coupling large telescopes using single-mode (SM) fibers is a very attractive one, especially at topographically complex and culturally sensitive astronomical observing sites such as the Mauna-Kea summit in Hawaii. The 'OHANA project (Optical Hawaiian Array for Nanoradian Astronomy) aims to link up seven of the large telescopes on Mauna-Kea. The concept of using SM fiber links for interferometry has been demonstrated using the two W. M. Keck telescopes. A beam-combiner and optical delay line has been installed at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) to link up Gemini North and CFHT. In order to test the CFHT beam-combiner without making use of CFHT and Gemini observing time, the idea of using two small, 20 cm aperture telescopes to inject starlight into the 'Ohana interferometer fibers was devised. This project, dubbed 'OHANA-Iki, is also exploring the concept of a "soft" optical interferometer, specifically one in which the telescopes are easily movable and would not require the heavy, fixed infrastructure found in conventional freespace interferometers such as the VLTI.

  19. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation. PMID:26133854

  20. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  1. Testing of optical diagnostics for ion-beam-driven WDM experiments at NDCX-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Leitner, M.; Weber, C.; Waldron, W. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report on the testing of optical diagnostics developed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments on the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX-1) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The diagnostics consists of a fast optical pyrometer, a streak camera spectrometer, and a Doppler-shift laser interferometer (VISAR). While the NDCX is in the last stage of commissioning for the target experiments, the diagnostics were tested elsewhere in an experiment where an intense laser pulse was used to generate the WDM state in metallic and carbon samples.

  2. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  3. Study program for design improvements of the X-3060 klystron. Phase 3: Electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation. Phase 4: Klystron prototype fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1981-01-01

    A full scale model was produced to verify suggested design changes. Through beam analyzer study, the correct electron beam diameter and cross sectional profile were established in conjunction with the desired confining magnetic field. Comparative data on the performance of the X-3060 klystron, design predictions for the improved klystron, and performance data taken during acceptance testing of the prototype VKS-8274 JPL are presented.

  4. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  5. Stress and stress relaxation behaviors of multi-layered polarizer structures under a reliability test condition characterized by use of a bending beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Taiy-In; Hsieh, Chih-Yung; Li, I.-Yin; Leu, Jihperng

    2015-04-01

    The bending curvature, stresses, and stress relaxation of various multi-layered structures with different adhesive layers pertaining to the polarizer in a thin-film transistor liquid-crystal display (TFT-LCD) have been successfully characterized by using bending beam technique under reliability test. To be more specific, three different types of pressure-sensitive adhesive (hard-, middle-, and soft-type) and various poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stretched directions are devised to examine to key stress contributors and correlations with light leakage. The shrinkage stress in stretched PVA film and stress relaxation ability of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSA) layers are found to be the key factors determining the stress distribution and out-of-plane displacement of a polarizer stack. For hard-type PSA, its polarizer stack generates the highest bending curvature with maximum out-of-plane displacement but minimum in-plane displacement, leading to anisotropic stress distribution with high stress around the edges. On the other hand, polarizer stack with soft-type PSA yields the maximum in-plane displacement but the minimum out-of-plane displacement, resulting in isotropic stress distribution.

  6. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization.

    PubMed

    Gobin, R; Bogard, D; Cara, P; Chauvin, N; Chel, S; Delferrière, O; Harrault, F; Mattei, P; Mosnier, A; Senée, F; Shidara, H; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported. PMID:24593497

  7. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  8. Effects of initial delamination on CIc and GIth values from glass/epoxy double cantilever beam tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insert thickness and method of precracking on mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GIc, and delamination fatigue threshold, GIth, values were determined for a glass/epoxy double cantilever beam specimen. The results of the static tests showed that precracking in tension would cause fiber bridging and thus may yield unconservative values of GIc and GIth. Precracking in shear yields suitable values of GIc but overly conservative values of GIth. For the glass/epoxy composite used, an insert thickness of 0.5 mil was most suitable for determining GIc and GIth values, although an insert thickness up to 3 mil was acceptable. Inserts thicker than 3 mil were not acceptable for determining GIc and GIth values.

  9. Beam test of silicon strip sensors for the ZEUS micro vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Borsato, E.; Burgard, C.; Carli, T.; Carlin, R.; Casaro, M.; Chiochia, V.; Dal Corso, F.; Dannheim, D.; Garfagnini, A.; Kappes, A.; Klanner, R.; Koffeman, E.; Koppitz, B.; Kötz, U.; Maddox, E.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Petrucci, M. C.; Redondo, I.; Rautenberg, J.; Tiecke, H.; Turcato, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Weber, A.

    2003-04-01

    For the HERA upgrade, the ZEUS experiment has designed and installed a high precision Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) using single sided μ-strip sensors with capacitive charge division. The sensors have a readout pitch of 120 μm, with five intermediate strips ( 20 μm strip pitch). An extensive test program has been carried out at the DESY-II testbeam facility. In this paper we describe the setup developed to test the ZEUS MVD sensors and the results obtained on both irradiated and non-irradiated single sided μ-strip detectors with rectangular and trapezoidal geometries. The performances of the sensors coupled to the readout electronics (HELIX chip, version 2.2) have been studied in detail, achieving a good description by a Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements of the position resolution as a function of the angle of incidence are presented, focusing in particular on the comparison between standard and newly developed reconstruction algorithms.

  10. Beam and Torsion Tests of Aluminum-alloy 61S-T Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Holt, Marshall

    1942-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effect of length and the effect of ratios of diameter to wall thickness upon the flexural and torsional moduli of failure of 61S-T aluminum-alloy tubing. The moduli of failure in bending, as determined by tests in which the tubing was loaded on the neutral axis at the one-third points of the span, were found to bear an approximately linear relationship with diameter-thickness ratio and were practically independent of span within the limits investigated. Empirical equations are given describing the relations obtained. The moduli of failure in torsion were found to be dependent upon length as well as upon diameter-thickness ratios. Empirical equations are given for predicting strengths within the range of plastic buckling. Within the elastic range, available torsion theories were found to be satisfactory.

  11. Predicting Success in College: The Importance of Placement Tests and High School Transcripts. CCRC Working Paper No. 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive R.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses student-level data from a statewide community college system to examine the validity of placement tests and high school information in predicting course grades and college performance. We consider the ACCUPLACER and COMPASS placement tests, using two quantitative and two literacy tests from each battery. We find that placement…

  12. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  13. The Relationship between the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Scores and Academic Success of International Master's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcuino, Cathy Lee T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are related to academic success defined by final cumulative grade point average (GPA). The data sample, from three Midwestern universities, was comprised of international graduate students who…

  14. The Secrets of Taking Any Test: Learn the Techniques Successful Test-Takers Know. The Basics Made Easy...in 20 Minutes a Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Judith N.

    The test-preparation program in this guide covers all forms of test taking to help students deal with real-world problems like test anxiety and insufficient preparation time. The chapters are: (1) "Finding Out about the Tests You Must Take"; (2) "Making a Study Plan"; (3) "Carrying Out Your Study Plan"; (4) "Learning Strategies"; (5) "Coping with…

  15. Successful Technology Integration: Student Test Scores Improved in an English Literature Course through the Use of Supportive Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maninger, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Educators are under increasing pressure to raise student achievement on state-mandated exams, and they are at the same time expected to increase the use of technology in their classrooms. Although the number of classrooms incorporating computers has increased, technology integration has been less than successful. The purpose of this study was to…

  16. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days. PMID:26595777

  17. ALCBEAM - Neutral beam formation and propagation code for beam-based plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Rowan, W. L.; Liao, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    ALCBEAM is a new three-dimensional neutral beam formation and propagation code. It was developed to support the beam-based diagnostics installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The purpose of the code is to provide reliable estimates of the local beam equilibrium parameters: such as beam energy fractions, density profiles and excitation populations. The code effectively unifies the ion beam formation, extraction and neutralization processes with beam attenuation and excitation in plasma and neutral gas and beam stopping by the beam apertures. This paper describes the physical processes interpreted and utilized by the code, along with exploited computational methods. The description is concluded by an example simulation of beam penetration into plasma of Alcator C-Mod. The code is successfully being used in Alcator C-Mod tokamak and expected to be valuable in the support of beam-based diagnostics in most other tokamak environments. Program summaryProgram title: ALCBEAM Catalogue identifier: AEKU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 66 459 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 841 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: IDL Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 1 GB Classification: 19.2 Nature of problem: Neutral beams are commonly used to heat and/or diagnose high-temperature magnetically-confined laboratory plasmas. An accurate neutral beam characterization is required for beam-based measurements of plasma properties. Beam parameters such as density distribution, energy composition, and atomic excited populations of the beam atoms need to be known. Solution method: A neutral beam is initially formed as an ion beam which is extracted from

  18. Beam test results of pixel triggerless prototypes for the PbarANDA MVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Daniela; De Remigis, Paolo; Filippi, Alessandra; Mazza, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Wheadon, Richard; De Mori, Francesca; Marcello, Simonetta; Zotti, Laura; Bianco, Simone; Zaunick, Hans-Georg; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Quagli, Tommaso; Schnell, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Hybrid pixel and double sided silicon microstrip devices will equip the Micro Vertex Detector of the PbarANDA experiment. The most challenging request of the experiment is the continuous readout at the rate of 2×107 interactions/s. The detector is in an advanced R&D phase and pixel assemblies, composed of thinned epitaxial sensor read out by the custom chip prototype ToPix, developed in the 130 nm CMOS technology, were produced. The triggerless ASIC implements readout channels that are able to detect signals and transmit the information with a precise timestamp. It performs the energy loss measurement using the Time over Threshold technique, in the input range to about 50 fC. A dedicated testing bench allows the control and the readout of each single chip assembly. Two experimental setups were assembled for testing these first single chip prototypes with pions at CERN, T9, in August 2012. The first one is based on a pixel assembly positioned in the middle of a telescope composed of double sided silicon strips sensors. A 50 MHz clock signal synchronizes these two systems, the triggerless pixels and the strip detectors triggered by scintillation detectors. The second experimental setup is a tracking station housing four pixel assemblies. First results will be reported.

  19. Transient elastodynamic model for beam defect interaction: application to non-destructive testing

    PubMed

    Raillon; Lecoeur-Taibi

    2000-03-01

    Modeling tools have been developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for the simulation of ultrasonic non-destructive testing inspections. In this paper the model for the prediction of echoes arising from defects within a piece (Mephisto) is presented and some examples are given and compared with experimental results. The model for computing wave defect interaction is based on Kirchhoff's approximation, and uses the principle of reciprocity and a mode-by-mode (between the transducer and the defect) calculation of the echoes. It accounts for possible mode conversions. These approximations and other approximations for the radiated field incident on the defect allow us to obtain a formulation of the echo received at the transducer, which is able to be computed rapidly. PMID:10829719

  20. Test-beam results of a silicon pixel detector with Time-over-Threshold read-out having ultra-precise time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Fiorini, M.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Albarran, M. E. Martin; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Tiuraniem, S.; Velghe, B.

    2015-12-01

    A time-tagging hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for beam tracking in the NA62 experiment has been tested in a dedicated test-beam at CERN with 10 GeV/c hadrons. Measurements include time resolution, detection efficiency and charge sharing between pixels, as well as effects due to bias voltage variations. A time resolution of less than 150 ps has been measured with a 200 μm thick silicon sensor, using an on-pixel amplifier-discriminator and an end-of-column DLL-based time-to-digital converter.

  1. Beam test results of the dependence of signal size on incident particle flux in diamond pixel and pad detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallny, R.

    2015-07-01

    We present results of beam tests of charged particle detectors based on single-crystal and poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond. We measured the signal pulse height dependence on the particle flux. The detectors were tested over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 20 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad and pixel readout electronics. The pulse height of the non-irradiated single-crystal CVD diamond pad sensors was stable with respect to flux, while the pulse height of irradiated single-crystal CVD diamond pad sensors decreased with increasing particle flux. The pulse height of the non-irradiated single-crystal CVD diamond pixel detectors decreased slightly with increasing particle flux while the pulse height of the irradiated single-crystal CVD diamond pixel detectors decreased significantly with increasing particle flux. The observed sensitivity to flux is similar in both the diamond pad sensors constructed using diamonds from the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) irradiated during its pilot run in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector and in neutron irradiated diamond pad sensors from the same manufacturer irradiated to the same fluence of neutrons. The pulse height for irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond pad sensors proved to be stable with respect to particle flux.

  2. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) from Integrated Circuit Test Structures Using a 10 MeV Carbon Microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Aton, T.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; El Bouanani, M.; Guo, B.N.; McDaniel, F.D.; Renfrow, S.N.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-11-18

    As future sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICS. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1pm diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICS. With the aid of layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented. In the present work a 10 MeV Carbon high-resolution microbeam was used to demonstrate the differential charge collection efficiency in ICS with the aid of the IC design Information. When ions strike outside the FET, the charge was only measured on the outer ring, and decreased with strike distance from this diode. When ions directly strike the inner and ring diodes, the collected charge was localized to these diodes. The charge for ions striking the gate region was shared between the inner and ring diodes. I The IBICC measurements directly confirmed the interpretations made in the earlier work.

  3. Using the Access Test as a Predictive Measure of English Learner Success on the Biology End-of-Course-Test in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeman, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    In order to be successful in an educational setting, a student must acquire a particular register of language specific to academia, or an academic register. It cannot be acquired through ordinary social intercourse. It is specific to school. Acquiring the academic register is the greatest challenge English Learners (EL) face during their academic…

  4. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  5. ATA beam director experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

    1986-06-23

    This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

  6. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Sportelli, G.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Cecchetti, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Retico, A.; Romano, F.; Sala, P.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-04-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β+ activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β+ activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo.

  7. Successful xenogeneic germ cell transplantation from Jundia catfish (Rhamdia quelen) into adult Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) testes.

    PubMed

    Silva, M A; Costa, G M J; Lacerda, S M S N; Brandão-Dias, P F P; Kalapothakis, E; Silva Júnior, A F; Alvarenga, E R; França, L R

    2016-05-01

    Fish germ cell transplantation presents several important potential applications for aquaculture, including the preservation of germplasm from endangered fish species with high genetic and commercial values. Using this technique in studies developed in our laboratory with adult male Nile tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus), all the necessary procedures were successfully established, allowing the production of functional sperm and healthy progeny approximately 2months after allogeneic transplantation. In the present study, we evaluated the viability of the adult Nile tilapia testis to generate sperm after xenogeneic transplant of germ cells from sexually mature Jundia catfish (Rhamdia quelen) that belong to a different taxonomic order. Therefore, in order to investigate at different time-periods post-transplantation, the presence and development of donor PKH26 labeled catfish germ cells were followed in the tilapia seminiferous tubules. From 7 to 20days post-transplantation, only PKH26 labeled spermatogonia were observed, whereas spermatocytes at different stages of development were found at 70days. Germ cell transplantation success and progression of spermatogenesis were indicated by the presence of labeled PKH26 spermatids and sperm on days 90 and 120 post-transplantation, respectively. Confirming the presence of the catfish genetic material in the tilapia testis, all recipient tilapias evaluated (n=8) showed the genetic markers evaluated. Therefore, we demonstrated for the first time that the adult Nile tilapia testis offers the functional conditions for development of spermatogenesis with sperm production from a fish species belonging to a different order, which provides an important new venue for aquaculture advancement. PMID:26972155

  8. Strategies for Maximizing Successful Drug Substance Technology Transfer Using Engineering, Shake-Down, and Wet Test Runs.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sushil; Bain, David; Bowers, John; Larivee, Victor; Leira, Francisco; Xie, Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    The technology transfer of biological products is a complex process requiring control of multiple unit operations and parameters to ensure product quality and process performance. To achieve product commercialization, the technology transfer sending unit must successfully transfer knowledge about both the product and the process to the receiving unit. A key strategy for maximizing successful scale-up and transfer efforts is the effective use of engineering and shake-down runs to confirm operational performance and product quality prior to embarking on good manufacturing practice runs such as process performance qualification runs. We consider key factors to consider in making the decision to perform shake-down or engineering runs. We also present industry benchmarking results of how engineering runs are used in drug substance technology transfers alongside the main themes and best practices that have emerged. Our goal is to provide companies with a framework for ensuring the "right first time" technology transfers with effective deployment of resources within increasingly aggressive timeline constraints. PMID:26429113

  9. Defining Success: Insights From a Random Assignment, Multisite Study of Implementing HIV Prevention, Testing, and Linkage to Care in U.S. Jails and Prisons.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Willett, Jennifer; Swan, Holly; Monico, Laura B; Yang, Yang; Patterson, Yvonne O; Belenko, Steven; Schwartz, Robert P; Visher, Christy A

    2015-10-01

    In the emerging field of implementation science, measuring the extent to which a new or modified healthcare program or practice is successfully implemented following an intervention is a critical component in understanding how evidence-based treatments become part of regular practice. This paper is intended to expand our understanding of factors that influence the successful adoption of new or modified HIV services in correctional settings. The nine-site project developed and directed an organization-level intervention designed to implement improvements in preventing, detecting, and treating HIV for persons under correctional supervision. Using semi-structured interviews to elicit perceptions from Senior Researchers and Executive Sponsors at each of the nine sites, this paper presents their views and observations regarding the success of the experimental intervention in their criminal justice setting. Within the areas of focus for implementation (either HIV prevention, testing, or linkage to community treatment) the complexity of programmatic needs was very influential with regards to perceptions of success. An organization's pre-existing characteristics, staffing, funding, and interorganizational relationships contributed to either the ease or difficulty of programmatic implementation. Results are discussed pertaining to furthering our understanding of why new or modified healthcare interventions achieve success, including whether the intervention is a modification of existing practice or is a new intervention, and the choice of implementation strategy. PMID:26485233

  10. TOEFL and FCE Tests as Predictors of Academic Success for Undergraduate Students at the University of Bahrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man M.; Al-Ansari, Saif H.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the multivariate relationship of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the First Certificate of English (FCE), administered by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, and to determine whether students' total score on the TOEFL or their overall score on the FCE tends to be a…

  11. Development of a Methodology for Successful Multigeneration Life-Cycle Testing of the Estuarine Sheepshead Minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability of wildlife populations exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals in natural water bodies has sparked sufficient concern that the U.S.EPA is developing methods for multiple generation exposures of fishes. Established testing methods and the short life-cycle of the ...

  12. When Standardized Test Success Represents Survival: Creating Opportunities for Democratic Participatory Development in Class 5-340

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coviello, Alison Goss

    2010-01-01

    In many of today's public school classrooms serving students from low-income and minority backgrounds, high-stakes standardized testing overwhelmingly drives both the explicit and implicit curricula. Accordingly, the lessons that children in these classrooms may learn about valid knowledge and knowers, collaboration, or personal and collective…

  13. A Successful Application of Latent Trait Theory to Tailored Achievement Testing. Research Report No. 80-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, Robert L.; Reckase, Mark D.

    A live tailored achievement testing study was conducted to compare procedures based on the one- and three-parameter logistic models. Previous studies yielded inconclusive results because of the procedures by which item calibrations were linked and because of the item selection procedures. Using improved procedures, 83 college students were tested…

  14. A Small Learning Community's Impact on Students' Success Assessed by State Test Scores in Reading and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christiana Helen Croson

    2013-01-01

    Drastic reform measures have taken place at Howard High School of Technology to incorporate a 10th grade small learning community. Due to the costs and resources associated with implementing small learning communities, it is important to examine if the 10th graders' achievement on the state tests in reading and math were significantly different…

  15. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  16. THERMAL SHOCK INDUCED BY A 24 GEV PROTON BEAM IN THE TEST WINDOWS OF THE MUON COLLIDER EXPERIMENT E951 - TEST RESULTS AND THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; KIRK,H.; FINFROCK,C.; PRIGL,R.; BROWN,K.; KAHN,S.; LUDEWIG,H.; MCDONALDK.; CATES,M.; TSAI,J.; BESHEARS,D.; RIEMER,B.

    2001-11-11

    The need for intense muon beams for muon colliders and neutrino factories has lead to a concept of a high performance target station in which a 1-4 MW proton beam of 6-24 GeV impinges on a target inside a high field solenoid channel. While novel technical issues exist regarding the survivability of the target itself, the need to pass the tightly focused proton beam through beam windows poses additional concerns. In this paper, issues associated with the interaction of a proton beam with window structures designed for the muon targetry experiment E951 at BNL are explored. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam up to 16 x 10{sup 12} per pulse and a pulse length of approximately 100 ns is expected to be tightly focused (to 0.5 mm rms one sigma radius) on an experimental target. Such beam will induce very high thermal, quasi-static and shock stresses in the window structure that exceed the strength of most common materials. In this effort, a detailed assessment of the thermal/shock response of beam windows is attempted with a goal of identifying the best window material candidate. Further, experimental strain results and comparison with the predicted values are presented and discussed.

  17. Beam test evaluation of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made from proton-damaged PbWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Adzic, P.; Ahuja, S.; Anderson, D.; Andrews, M. B.; Antropov, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Arcidiacono, R.; Arenton, M. W.; Argirò, S.; Askew, A.; Attikis, A.; Auffray, E.; Baccaro, S.; Baffioni, S.; Bailleux, D.; Baillon, P.; Barney, D.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Bartosik, N.; Becheva, E.; Bein, S.; Silva, C. Beirāo Da Cruz E.; Bell, K. W.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Berry, D.; Besancon, M.; Betev, B.; Bialas, W.; Bianchini, L.; Biino, C.; Bitioukov, S.; Bornheim, A.; Brianza, L.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Brown, R. M.; Brummitt, A.; Busson, P.; Candelise, V.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cartiglia, N.; Cavallari, F.; Chang, Y. W.; Chen, K. F.; Chevenier, G.; Chipaux, R.; Clement, E.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Corpe, L.; Couderc, F.; Courbon, B.; Cox, B.; Cucciati, G.; Cussans, D.; D'imperio, G.; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D. R.; Dafinei, I.; Daguin, J.; Daskalakis, G.; Tinoco Mendes, A. D.; De Guio, F.; Degano, A.; Dejardin, M.; Del Re, D.; Della Ricca, G.; Denegri, D.; Depasse, P.; Dev, N.; Deyrail, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diamond, B.; Diemoz, M.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Doan, T. H.; Dobrzynski, L.; Dolgopolov, A.; Donegà, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dröge, M.; Durkin, T.; Dutta, D.; El Mamouni, H.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Elmalis, E.; Fabbro, B.; Fasanella, G.; Faure, J.; Fay, J.; Fedorov, A.; Ferri, F.; Francis, B.; Frank, N.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Ganjour, S.; Gascon, S.; Gastal, M.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gelli, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Givernaud, A.; Gninenko, S.; Godinovic, N.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Golubev, N.; Govoni, P.; Gras, P.; Guilloux, F.; Haller, C.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, J.; Hirosky, R.; Hobson, P. R.; Holme, O.; Honma, A.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Iiyama, Y.; Ille, B.; Ingram, Q.; Jain, S.; Jarry, P.; Jessop, C.; Jovanovic, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, K. Y.; Kellams, N.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khatiwada, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korzhik, M.; Kovac, M.; Kubota, Y.; Kucher, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Kuo, C.; Kyberd, P.; Kyriakis, A.; Latyshev, G.; Lecoq, P.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lei, Y. J.; Lelas, D.; Lethuillier, M.; Li, H.; Lin, W.; Liu, Y. F.; Locci, E.; Longo, E.; Loukas, D.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchini, M. T.; Lustermann, W.; Mackay, C. K.; Magniette, F.; Malcles, J.; Malhotra, S.; Mandjavidze, I.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marinelli, N.; Marini, A. C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Massironi, A.; Matveev, V.; Mechinsky, V.; Meng, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Milosevic, J.; Mousa, J.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Neu, C.; Newman, H.; Nicolaou, C.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Obertino, M. M.; Organtini, G.; Orimoto, T.; Paganini, P.; Paganis, E.; Paganoni, M.; Pandolfi, F.; Panov, V.; Paramatti, R.; Parracho, P.; Pastrone, N.; Paulini, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauwels, K.; Pellegrino, F.; Pena, C.; Perniè, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrakou, E.; Petyt, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Piroué, P.; Planer, M.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Prosper, H.; Ptochos, F.; Puljak, I.; Quittnat, M.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahatlou, S.; Rander, J.; Ranjan, K.; Rasteiro Da Silva, J.; Razis, P. A.; Romanteau, T.; Rosowsky, A.; Rovelli, C.; Rusack, R.; Salerno, R.; Santanastasio, F.; Santra, A.; Schönenberger, M.; Seez, C.; Sharma, V.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Shiu, J. G.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Singovsky, A.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sirois, Y.; Smiljkovic, N.; Soffi, L.; Sun, M.; Symonds, P.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tambe, N.; Tarasov, I.; Taroni, S.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Thiant, F.; Titov, M.; Torbet, M.; Trapani, P. P.; Tropea, P.; Tsai, J. f.; Tsirou, A.; Turkewitz, J.; Tyurin, N.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Uzunian, A.; Valls, N.; Varela, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Verdini, P. G.; Vichoudis, P.; Vlassov, E.; Wang, J.; Wang, T.; Weinberg, M.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Zabi, A.; Zahid, S.; Zelepoukine, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, R.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of electromagnetic calorimeter modules made of proton-irradiated PbWO4 crystals has been studied in beam tests. The modules, similar to those used in the Endcaps of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), were formed from 5×5 matrices of PbWO4 crystals, which had previously been exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between 2.1× 1013 and 1.3× 1014 cm‑2. These correspond to the predicted charged-hadron fluences in the ECAL Endcaps at pseudorapidity η = 2.6 after about 500 fb‑1 and 3000 fb‑1 respectively, corresponding to the end of the LHC and High Luminosity LHC operation periods. The irradiated crystals have a lower light transmission for wavelengths corresponding to the scintillation light, and a correspondingly reduced light output. A comparison with four crystals irradiated in situ in CMS showed no significant rate dependence of hadron-induced damage. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The latter is interpreted, through comparison with simulation, as a side-effect of the degradation in light transmission. The experimental results obtained can be used to estimate the long term performance of the CMS ECAL.

  18. Test results for electron beam charging of flexible insulators and composites. [solar array substrates, honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staskus, J. V.; Berkopec, F. D.

    1979-01-01

    Flexible solar-array substrates, graphite-fiber/epoxy - aluminum honeycomb panels, and thin dielectric films were exposed to monoenergetic electron beams ranging in energy from 2 to 20 keV in the Lewis Research Center's geomagnetic-substorm-environment simulation facility to determine surface potentials, dc currents, and surface discharges. The four solar-array substrate samples consisted of Kapton sheet reinforced with fabrics of woven glass or carbon fibers. They represented different construction techniques that might be used to reduce the charge accumulation on the array back surface. Five honeycomb-panel samples were tested, two of which were representative of Voyager antenna materials and had either conductive or nonconductive painted surfaces. A third sample was of Navstar solar-array substrate material. The other two samples were of materials proposed for use on Intelsat V. All the honeycomb-panel samples had graphite-fiber/epoxy composite face sheets. The thin dielectric films were 2.54-micrometer-thick Mylar and 7.62-micrometer-thick Kapton.

  19. Further tests on liquid-nitrogen-cooled, thin silicon-crystal monochromators using a focused wiggler synchrotron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C. S.; Mills, D. M.; Fernandez, P. B.; Knapp, G. S.; Wulff, M.; Hanfland, M.; Freund, A.; Rossat, M.; Holmberg, J.; Yamaoka, H.

    2000-05-09

    A newly designed cryogenically cooled, thin Si crystal monochromator was tested at the European Synchrotrons Radiation Facility (ESRF) beamline BL3. It exhibited less than 1 arcsec of thermal strain up to a maximum incident power of 186 W and average power density of 521 W/mm{sup 2}. Data were collected for the thin (0.7 mm) portion of the crystal and for the thick (>25 mm) part. Rocking curves were measured as a function of incident power. With a low power beam, the Si(333) rocking curve at 30 keV for the thin and thick sections was < 1 arcsec FWHM at room temperature. The rocking curve of the thin section increased to 2.0 arcsec when cooled to 78 K, while the thick part was unaffected by the reduction in temperature. The rocking curve of the this section broadened to 2.5 arcsec FWHM and that of the thick section broadened to 1.7 arcsec at the highest incident power. The proven range of performance for this monochromator has been extended to the power density, but not the absorbed power, expected for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulator A in closed-gap operation (first harmonic at 3.27 kev) at a storage-ring current of 300 mA.

  20. Flat beams in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Barklow, T.; Burke, D.

    1993-05-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to operate with round beams; horizontal and vertical emittance made equal in the damping rings. The main motivation was to facilitate the optical matching through beam lines with strong coupling elements like the solenoid spin rotator magnets and the SLC arcs. Tests in 1992 showed that ``flat`` beams with a vertical to horizontal emittance ratio of around 1/10 can be successfully delivered to the end of the linac. Techniques developed to measure and control the coupling of the SLC arcs allow these beams to be transported to the Interaction Point (IP). Before flat beams could be used for collisions with polarized electrons, a new method of rotating the electron spin orientation with vertical arc orbit bumps had to be developed. Early in the 1993 run, the SLC was switched to ``flat`` beam operation. Within a short time the peak luminosity of the previous running cycle was reached and then surpassed. The average daily luminosity is now a factor of about two higher than the best achieved last year. In the following we present an overview of the problems encountered and their solutions for different parts of the SLC.

  1. First plasma of megawatt high current ion source for neutral beam injector of the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak on the test bed

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Chundong; Xie Yahong; Liu Sheng; Xie Yuanlai; Jiang Caichao; Song Shihua; Li Jun; Liu Zhimin

    2011-02-15

    High current ion source is the key part of the neutral beam injector. In order to develop the project of 4 MW neutral beam injection for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) on schedule, the megawatt high current ion source is prestudied in the Institute of Plasma Physics in China. In this paper, the megawatt high current ion source test bed and the first plasma are presented. The high current discharge of 900 A at 2 s and long pulse discharge of 5 s at 680 A are achieved. The arc discharge characteristic of high current ion source is analyzed primarily.

  2. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, Daniel; Stancari, Giulio

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  3. Beam dynamics studies of the photo-injector in low-charge operation mode for the ERL test facility at IHEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Xiao, Ou-Zheng

    2014-06-01

    The energy recovery linac test facility (ERL-TF), which is a compact ERL-FEL (free electron laser) two-purpose machine, was proposed at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing. As one important component of the ERL-TF, the photo-injector that started with a photocathode direct-current gun has been designed. In this paper, optimization of the injector beam dynamics in low-charge operation mode is performed with iterative scans using Impact-T. In addition, the dependencies between the optimized beam quality and the initial offset at cathode and element parameters are investigated. The tolerance of alignment and rotation errors is also analyzed.

  4. Ion-beam cleaning for cold welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    1000 eV beam bombarding metal surfaces to be joined removes oxides and contaminants at rate of several atomic layers per second for current density of 1 mA/squ. cm. Clean surfaces can then be joined by squeezing them together. With ion-beam cleaning, mating force for strong bond is low enough to cause only 1% deformation. Conventional cold-welding requires about 70% deformation for bonding. Technique was tested successfully on aluminum to aluminum welds, copper to copper, copper to aluminum, copper to nickel, and silver to iron. Base metals failed before welds in tear test.

  5. Development of bellows and gate valves with a comb-type rf shield for high-current accelerators: Four-year beam test at KEK B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Shibata, Kyo; Shirai, Mitsuru; Bondar, Aleksander E.; Kuzminykh, Victor S.; Gorbovsky, Aleksander I.; Sonderegger, Kurt; Morii, Minoru; Kawada, Kakuyu

    2007-04-15

    Since a comb-type rf shield was proposed in 2003 as a rf shield for future high-intensity accelerators, various types of bellow chambers and gate valves with this rf shield have been installed in the KEK B-Factory rings in series and tested with beams. Through beam tests to check the performance, a structural simplification has been tried in parallel. The temperatures of the bellow corrugations decreased by a factor of 3-6 compared to those with a conventional finger-type rf shield in most cases. The temperatures of the body of the gate valves also decreased by a factor of 2-5. These results demonstrated the availability of the comb-type rf shield. Although a discharge was observed in one simplified model, the latest model has shown no problem up to a stored beam current of 1.8 A (1.3 mA/bunch, 6 mm bunch length). Experiences with the comb-type rf shield in these four-year beam tests are reviewed here.

  6. CFD to Flight: Some Recent Success Stories of X-plane Design to Flight Test at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.

    2007-01-01

    Several examples from the past decade of success stories involving the design and ight test of three true X-planes will be described: in particular, X-plane design techniques that relied heavily upon computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three specific examples chosen from the authors personal experience are presented: the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, the X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle, and, most recently, the X-48B Blended Wing Body Demonstrator Aircraft. An overview will be presented of the uses of CFD analysis, comparisons and contrasts with wind tunnel testing, and information derived from the CFD analysis that directly related to successful flight test. Some lessons learned on the proper application, and misapplication, of CFD are illustrated. Finally, some highlights of the flight-test results of the three example X-planes will be presented. This overview paper will discuss some of the authors experience with taking an aircraft shape from early concept and three-dimensional modeling through CFD analysis, wind tunnel testing, further re ned CFD analysis, and, finally, flight. An overview of the key roles in which CFD plays well during this process, and some other roles in which it does not, are discussed. How wind tunnel testing complements, calibrates, and verifies CFD analysis is also covered. Lessons learned on where CFD results can be misleading are also given. Strengths and weaknesses of the various types of ow solvers, including panel methods, Euler, and Navier-Stokes techniques, are discussed. The paper concludes with the three specific examples, including some flight test video footage of the X-36, the X-45A, and the X-48B.

  7. CFD to Flight: Some Recent Success Stories of X-Plane Design to Flight Test at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosentino, Gary B.

    2007-01-01

    Several examples from the past decade of success stories involving the design and flight test of three true X-planes will be described: in particular, X-plane design techniques that relied heavily upon computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three specific examples chosen from the author s personal experience are presented: the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, the X-45A Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle, and, most recently, the X-48B Blended Wing Body Demonstrator Aircraft. An overview will be presented of the uses of CFD analysis, comparisons and contrasts with wind tunnel testing, and information derived from the CFD analysis that directly related to successful flight test. Some lessons learned on the proper application, and misapplication, of CFD are illustrated. Finally, some highlights of the flight-test results of the three example X-planes will be presented. This overview paper will discuss some of the author s experience with taking an aircraft shape from early concept and three-dimensional modeling through CFD analysis, wind tunnel testing, further refined CFD analysis, and, finally, flight. An overview of the key roles in which CFD plays well during this process, and some other roles in which it does not, are discussed. How wind tunnel testing complements, calibrates, and verifies CFD analysis is also covered. Lessons learned on where CFD results can be misleading are also given. Strengths and weaknesses of the various types of flow solvers, including panel methods, Euler, and Navier-Stokes techniques, are discussed. The paper concludes with the three specific examples, including some flight test video footage of the X-36, the X-45A, and the X-48B.

  8. Capacity building and predictors of success for HIV-1 drug resistance testing in the Asia-Pacific region and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sally; Zhou, Julian; Cunningham, Philip; Sohn, Annette H; Singtoroj, Thida; Katzenstein, David; Mann, Marita; Sayer, David; Kantor, Rami

    2013-01-01

    Background The TREAT Asia Quality Assessment Scheme (TAQAS) was developed as a quality assessment programme through expert education and training, for laboratories in the Asia-Pacific and Africa that perform HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR) genotyping. We evaluated the programme performance and factors associated with high-quality HIVDR genotyping. Methods Laboratories used their standard protocols to test panels of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive plasma samples or electropherograms. Protocols were documented and performance was evaluated according to a newly developed scoring system, agreement with panel-specific consensus sequence, and detection of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) and mixtures of wild-type and resistant virus (mixtures). High-quality performance was defined as detection of ≥95% DRMs. Results Over 4.5 years, 23 participating laboratories in 13 countries tested 45 samples (30 HIV-1 subtype B; 15 non-B subtypes) in nine panels. Median detection of DRMs was 88–98% in plasma panels and 90–97% in electropherogram panels. Laboratories were supported to amend and improve their test outcomes as appropriate. Three laboratories that detected <80% DRMs in early panels demonstrated subsequent improvement. Sample complexity factors – number of DRMs (p<0.001) and number of DRMs as mixtures (p<0.001); and laboratory performance factors – detection of mixtures (p<0.001) and agreement with consensus sequence (p<0.001), were associated with high performance; sample format (plasma or electropherogram), subtype and genotyping protocol were not. Conclusion High-quality HIVDR genotyping was achieved in the TAQAS collaborative laboratory network. Sample complexity and detection of mixtures were associated with performance quality. Laboratories conducting HIVDR genotyping are encouraged to participate in quality assessment programmes. PMID:23845227

  9. Status and test report on the LANL-Boeing APLE/HPO flying-wire beam-profile monitor. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, M.; Barlow, D.; Fortgang, C.; Gilpatrick, J.; Meyer, R.; Rendon, A.; Warren, D.; Greegor, R.

    1994-07-01

    The High-Power Oscillator (HPO) demonstration of the Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) is a collaboration by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Boeing to demonstrate a 10 kW average power, 10 {mu}m free electron laser (FEL). As part of the collaboration, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for many of the electron beam diagnostics in the linac, transport, and laser sections. Because of the high duty factor and power of the electron beam, special diagnostics are required. This report describes the flying wire diagnostic required to monitor the beam profile during high-power, high-duty operation. The authors describe the diagnostic and prototype tests on the Los Alamos APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) FEL. They also describe the current status of the flying wires being built for APLE.

  10. First look at the beam test results of the FPIX2 readout chip for the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Uplegger, L.; Appel, J.A.; Artuso, M.; Cardoso, G.; Cease, H.P.; Chiodini, G.; Christian, D.C.; Cinabro, D.A.; Coluccia, R.; Hoff, J.; Kwan, S.; Magni, S.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menasce, D.; Newsom, C.; Papavassiliou, V.; Schreiner, A.; Turqueti, M.A.; Yarema, R.; Wang, J.C.; /Fermilab /Syracuse U. /INFN, Lecce /Wayne State U. /INFN, Milan /Iowa U. /New Mexico State U.

    2004-11-01

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with excellent spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is a technology able to meet these challenges. We report the first results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector beam test carried out at Fermilab in summer 2004. Tests were performed using a 120 GeV/c proton beam incident on a 6 planes pixel detector telescope. The last prototype developed for the BTeV experiment (FPIX2) is tested in the middle of the telescope. There is no external trigger and events were built using the time-stamp information provided by the readout chips.

  11. Scanning Optical Head with Nontilted Reference Beam: Assuring Nanoradian Accuracy for a New Generation Surface Profiler in the Large-Slope Testing Range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Shinan

    2011-01-01

    Nmore » anoradian Surface Profilers (NSPs) are required for state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation optics and high-precision optical measurements.ano-radian accuracy must be maintained in the large-angle test range. However, the beams' notable lateral motions during tests of most operating profilers, combined with the insufficiencies of their optical components, generate significant errors of ∼ 1  μ rad rms in the measurements. The solution to nano-radian accuracy for the new generation of surface profilers in this range is to apply a scanning optical head, combined with nontilted reference beam. I describe here my comparison of different scan modes and discuss some test results.« less

  12. Magnetotelluric 3-D inversion—a review of two successful workshops on forward and inversion code testing and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, Marion P.; Queralt, Pilar; Jones, Alan G.; 3D MT modellers

    2013-06-01

    Over the last half decade the need for, and importance of, three-dimensional (3-D) modelling of magnetotelluric (MT) data have increased dramatically and various 3-D forward and inversion codes are in use and some have become commonly available. Comparison of forward responses and inversion results is an important step for code testing and validation prior to `production' use. The various codes use different mathematical approximations to the problem (finite differences, finite elements or integral equations), various orientations of the coordinate system, different sign conventions for the time dependence and various inversion strategies. Additionally, the obtained results are dependent on data analysis, selection and correction as well as on the chosen mesh, inversion parameters and regularization adopted, and therefore, a careful and knowledge-based use of the codes is essential. In 2008 and 2011, during two workshops at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies over 40 people from academia (scientists and students) and industry from around the world met to discuss 3-D MT inversion. These workshops brought together a mix of code writers as well as code users to assess the current status of 3-D modelling, to compare the results of different codes, and to discuss and think about future improvements and new aims in 3-D modelling. To test the numerical forward solutions, two 3-D models were designed to compare the responses obtained by different codes and/or users. Furthermore, inversion results of these two data sets and two additional data sets obtained from unknown models (secret models) were also compared. In this manuscript the test models and data sets are described (supplementary files are available) and comparisons of the results are shown. Details regarding the used data, forward and inversion parameters as well as computational power are summarized for each case, and the main discussion points of the workshops are reviewed. In general, the responses

  13. First experimental test of quadrupole lens-free multiple profile monitor technique for electron beam emittance measurement with a PW laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krus, M.; Levato, T.; Kim, H. T.; Grittani, G.; Margarone, D.; Jeong, T. M.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    The quadrupole lens free multiple profile emittance measurement method is an adaptation of the standard multiple profile monitor method for electron beam emittance measurement which was tested at PW laser system. This single shot technique allows to obtain the emittance from beam profile radii fit by means of Twiss (Courant-Snyder) parameters. Lanex scintillating screens were used as profile monitors due to their high yield of visible photons. However, on the other hand, the screen is a source of multiple Coulomb scattering which can influence the beam profile on the following screens at relatively low electron energies. Nevertheless, the contribution of the multiple scattering can be effectively subtracted from the signal by e.g. Bayes unfolding. For high energy beams (E > 0.5 GeV), the multiple scattering contribution is negligible. The presented diagnostics is easy to be implemented into standard experimental setups without any special requests for alignment procedure. Moreover, it can be useful in the optimization phase of the laser plasma accelerator where beam fundamental parameters (energy, energy spread, divergence, pointing) typically fluctuate shot-to- shot.

  14. Technical Assistance Needs for Successful Implementation of Couples HIV Testing and Counseling (CHTC) Intervention for Male Couples at US HIV Testing Sites.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Rob; Grabbe, Kristina L; Sidibe, Turquoise; McWilliams, Anthony; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    The African couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) model, which focuses on heterosexual couples, was adapted for same-sex male couples in the US. This paper presents the results of a follow-up survey conducted with representatives of the agencies that received CHTC training. The paper aims to understand the post-training implementation and identify critical technical assistance gaps. There are clear needs for continual learning opportunities, focused on the key skills required for CHTC, and for resources aimed at tackling agency-level concerns about service provision and integration. Central to this is the need for implementation science research that can identify the messages that are effective in encouraging couples to utilize CHTC and test models of service integration. PMID:26253221

  15. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  16. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Arun

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  17. Analysis of the effect of cone-beam geometry and test object configuration on the measurement accuracy of a computed tomography scanner used for dimensional measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jagadeesha; Attridge, Alex; Wood, P. K. C.; Williams, Mark A.

    2011-03-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are used for non-contact dimensional measurement of small, fragile components and difficult-to-access internal features of castings and mouldings. However, the accuracy and repeatability of measurements are influenced by factors such as cone-beam system geometry, test object configuration, x-ray power, material and size of test object, detector characteristics and data analysis methods. An attempt is made in this work to understand the measurement errors of a CT scanner over the complete scan volume, taking into account only the errors in system geometry and the object configuration within the scanner. A cone-beam simulation model is developed with the radiographic image projection and reconstruction steps. A known amount of errors in geometrical parameters were introduced in the model to understand the effect of geometry of the cone-beam CT system on measurement accuracy for different positions, orientations and sizes of the test object. Simulation analysis shows that the geometrical parameters have a significant influence on the dimensional measurement at specific configurations of the test object. Finally, the importance of system alignment and estimation of correct parameters for accurate CT measurements is outlined based on the analysis.

  18. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  19. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam-matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Raginel, V.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam-matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the numerical

  20. On-Orbit Constraints Test - Performing Pre-Flight Tests with Flight Hardware, Astronauts and Ground Support Equipment to Assure On-Orbit Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    On-Orbit Constraints Test (OOCT's) refers to mating flight hardware together on the ground before they will be mated on-orbit. The concept seems simple but it can be difficult to perform operations like this on the ground when the flight hardware is being designed to be mated on-orbit in a zero-g and/or vacuum environment of space. Also some of the items are manufactured years apart so how are mating tasks performed on these components if one piece is on-orbit before its mating piece is planned to be built. Both the Internal Vehicular Activity (IVA) and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) OOCT's performed at Kennedy Space Center will be presented in this paper. Details include how OOCT's should mimic on-orbit operational scenarios, a series of photographs will be shown that were taken during OOCT's performed on International Space Station (ISS) flight elements, lessons learned as a result of the OOCT's will be presented and the paper will conclude with possible applications to Moon and Mars Surface operations planned for the Constellation Program.