Science.gov

Sample records for sucker rod string

  1. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi; Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-01

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  2. 13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SOUTHEAST TO SUCKER ROD WORK BENCH AND WOODEN SUCKER ROD STORAGE RACKS ALONG EAST WALL OF FACTORY INTERIOR. AT THIS BENCH WORKERS RIVETED THREADED WROUGHT IRON CONNECTORS TO THE ENDS OF 20' LONG WOODEN SUCKER RODS (THE RODS WHICH EXTEND DOWNWARD IN THE WELL FROM THE GROUND SURFACE TO PISTON DISPLACEMENT PUMPS WHICH ACTUALLY ELEVATE WATER TO THE SURFACE). ROZNOR HEATER AT THE FAR RIGHT WAS ADDED CIRCA 1960. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  3. Rod coupling for oil well sucker rods and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.

    1986-07-29

    A coupling is described for joining solid reciprocating sucker rods to form a rod string in a well pump or the like comprising a unitary metal sleeve having an axial threaded bore and an irregular outer surface, and a homogeneous and non-fibrous coating on the sleeve over the outer surface providing an externally substantially cylindrical coupling, the coating comprising a flexible and abrasive resistant thermoplastic hydrourethane polymer formed on the irregular outer surface of the sleeve while in the molten state.

  4. Gas Interference in Sucker Rod Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Abdus

    2010-10-01

    Commonly used artificial lift or dewatering system is sucker rod pump and gas interference of the pump is the biggest issue in the oil and gas industry. Gas lock or fluid pound problems occur due to the gas interference when the pump has partially or completely unfilled plunger barrel. There are several techniques available in the form of patents to solve these problems but those techniques have positive as well as negative aspects. Some of the designs rely on the leakage and some of the designs rely on the mechanical arrangements etc to break the gas lock. The present article compares the existing gas interference handling techniques.

  5. Finite element analysis of sucker rod couplings with guidelines for improving fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1997-09-01

    The response of a variety of sucker rod couplings to an applied axial load was simulated using axisymmetric finite element models. The calculations investigated three sucker rod sizes and various combinations of the slimhole, Spiralock, and Flexbar modifications to the coupling. In addition, the effect of various make-ups (assembly tightness) on the performance of coupling was investigated. An axial load was applied to the sucker rod ranging from {minus}5 ksi to 40 ksi, encompassing three load cycles identified on a modified Goodman diagram as acceptable for indefinite service life of the sucker rods. The simulations of the various coupling geometries and make-ups were evaluated with respect to how well they accomplish the two primary objectives of preloading threaded couplings: (1) to lock the threaded coupling together so that it will not loosen and eventually uncouple, and (2) to improve the fatigue resistance of the threaded connection by reducing the stress amplitude in the coupling when subjected to cyclic loading. Perhaps the most significant finding in this study was the characterization of the coupling parameters which affect two stress measures. The mean hydrostatic stress, which determines the permissible effective alternating stress, is a function of the coupling make-up. Whereas, the alternating effective stress is a function of the relative stiffnesses of the pin and box sections of the coupling and, as long as the coupling does not separate, is unaffected by the amount of circumferential displacement applied during make-up. The results of this study suggest approaches for improving the fatigue resistance of sucker rod couplings.

  6. A Dynamic Investigation of Sucker-Rod Pumping

    E-print Network

    Knapp, Roy M.

    1969-01-01

    u _ lim P A r o d ^ - i ; *rod & X+Ax x AX (2) (3) (4) If the rod has a constant cross-section, this can be reduced to: 32u m K 82u TET p "SxT * (5) This is the familiar one-dimensional wave equation. The wave equation describes forced... + cos2 0 and cos 0 * -cos 0 - 0). 10 + D Q •D B r D Figure 3 Figure 4. Figure 5 The pump begins to ascend and the traveling valve closes just past point D. The standing valve remains closed until the gas in the pump expands enough to lower...

  7. What`s new in artificial lift. Part 1 -- Sucker rod pumping, progressing cavity pumping, gas lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1997-03-01

    Breaking the overall concept of artificially lifting producing oil and gas wells--vs. relying solely on the wells` ability to flow at desired rates--into two parts, this article discusses the three techniques of sucker rod and progressing cavity (PC) pumping, and gas lift. In the major category of sucker rod pumping, nine recently introduced new techniques include: a new standing valve cage; three types of improved stuffing boxes; a pump inlet gas separator; a computerized well monitor; improved paraffin removal techniques; tubing lining with polyethylene; and a novel way to dispose of produced water in a gas well. Three advances for PC pumping include: introduction of a metallic stator, a flowrate controller to prevent pump damage and a locking tubing collar to prevent backoff. Two gas-lift innovations describe a wireline retrievable valve for coiled tubing and applications of CO{sub 2} gas lift in West Texas.

  8. Relativistic elasticity of rigid rods and strings

    E-print Network

    Natario, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We show that the equation of motion for a rigid one-dimensional elastic body (i.e. a rod or string whose speed of sound is equal to the speed of light) in a two-dimensional spacetime is simply the wave equation. We then solve this equation in a few simple examples: a rigid rod colliding with an unmovable wall, a rigid rod being pushed by a constant force, a rigid string whose endpoints are simultaneously set in motion (seen as a special case of Bell's spaceships paradox), and a radial rigid string that has partially crossed the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole while still being held from the outside.

  9. Relativistic elasticity of rigid rods and strings

    E-print Network

    Jose Natario

    2014-09-30

    We show that the equation of motion for a rigid one-dimensional elastic body (i.e. a rod or string whose speed of sound is equal to the speed of light) in a two-dimensional spacetime is simply the wave equation. We then solve this equation in a few simple examples: a rigid rod colliding with an unmovable wall, a rigid rod being pushed by a constant force, a rigid string whose endpoints are simultaneously set in motion (seen as a special case of Bell's spaceships paradox), and a radial rigid string that has partially crossed the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole while still being held from the outside.

  10. Mechanics performance test and feasibility analysis to replace the rigid sucker rod for 6K T300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Changhong

    2015-07-01

    A experiment plan was designed according to the working conditions of sucker rod and the requirements for pump depth in 3000 m in the oil field, the tensile strength for 6K T300 under a normal temperature and high temperature was measured by using universal testing machine, and then, the resistance to corrosion for a crude oil was verified by measuring the tensile strength for 6K T300 after crude oil immersion at a certain time, and the conclusions are that the material is sensitive relatively to corrosion of crude oil and that the tensile strength of the 6K T300 compared with similar products is lower, a proposal to the GH company that to meet the need of oil field production instead of the rigid rod the tensile strength and corrosion resistant for a crude of the T300 6 k materials have to do further efforts was pointed out.

  11. Fiberglass rods present a new economic model to marginal well producers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiselin, D.

    1996-08-01

    Fiberglass sucker rods are not new. They`ve been around for over a decade, and much has been done to improve upon their basic promise of high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and ease of handling. Likely the main, if not the only, reason they have not assumed prominence in the market is a resistance to change, particularly when a well becomes marginal. Operators feel that changing out their rod string is like betting on a tired horse. But there are several different scenarios involving fiberglass rods that make economic sense. To understand the argument for fiberglass rods, a case by case analysis is presented.

  12. Fluid inertia consideration in sucker rod pump diagnosis 

    E-print Network

    Csaszar, Albert Bela

    1993-01-01

    conditions. However, existing state-of-the-art diagnostic models neglect fluid-inertia forces. In shallow wells with large lifting rates, dynamic fluid forces can be significant and result in poor diagnostic model performance. This research is motivated...

  13. Well tool

    SciTech Connect

    Sable, D.E.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a stabilizer rod conductible in a sucker rod string to constitute the bottom end portion of a rod sting and connect it to a reciprocable member of a well pump, the sucker rod string having sucker rods whose elongate shanks are provided.

  14. Demographic analysis of Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker populations in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janney, E.C.; Shively, R.S.; Hayes, B.S.; Barry, P.M.; Perkins, D.

    2008-01-01

    We used 13 years (1995-2007) of capture-mark-recapture data to assess population dynamics of endangered Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. The Cormack-Jolly-Seber method was used to estimate survival, and information theoretic modeling was used to assess variation due to time, gender, species, and spawning subpopulations. Length data were used to detect multiple year-class failures and events of high recruitment into adult spawning populations. Average annual survival probability was 0.88 for Lost River suckers and 0.76 for shortnose suckers. Mean life span estimates based on these survival rates indicated that Lost River suckers survived long enough on average to attempt reproduction eight times, whereas shortnose suckers only survived to spawn three to four times. Shortnose sucker survival was not only poor in years of fish kills (1995-1997) but also was low in years without fish kills (i.e., 2002 and 2004). This suggests that high mortality occurs in some years but is not necessarily associated with fish kills. Annual survival probabilities were not only different between the two species but also differed between two spawning subpopulations of Lost River suckers. Length composition data indicated that recruitment into spawning populations only occurred intermittently. Populations of both species transitioned from primarily old individuals with little size diversity and consistently poor recruitment in the late 1980s and early 1990s to mostly small, recruit-sized fish by the late 1990s. A better understanding of the factors influencing adult survival and recruitment into spawning populations is needed. Monitoring these vital parameters will provide a quantitative means to evaluate population status and assess the effectiveness of conservation and recovery efforts.

  15. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4420 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. (a)...

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF WHITE SUCKER, CATOSTOMUS COMMERSONI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Growth responses of the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, were examined in relation to the influence of temperature, body size, season, daylength, light intensity, food ration level and food quality. Sucker growth was maximum at a temperature range of 19-26C, depending upon ex...

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ? 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  18. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ? 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  19. Habitat features affect bluehead sucker, flannelmouth sucker, and roundtail chub across a headwater tributary system in the Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bower, M.R.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the distributions of three species of conservation concern, bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), and roundtail chub (Gila robusta), relative to habitat features across a headwater tributary system of the Colorado River basin in Wyoming. We studied the upper Muddy Creek watershed, Carbon County, portions of which experience intermittent flows during late summer and early fall. Fish and habitat were sampled from 57 randomly-selected, 200-m reaches and 416 habitat units (i.e., pools, glides, or runs) during the summer and fall of 2003 and 2004. Among reaches, the occurrences of adults and juveniles of all three species were positively related to mean wetted width and the surface area of pool habitat, and the occurrences of adult bluehead sucker and roundtail chub were also positively related to the abundance of rock substrate. Only juvenile bluehead sucker appeared to be negatively influenced by the proportion of a reach that was dry at the time of sampling. Within individual pools, glides, and runs, the occurrences of adults and juveniles of all three species were positively related to surface area and maximum depth, and occurrences of bluehead sucker and flannelmouth sucker juveniles were more probable in pools than in glides or runs.

  20. Age-0 Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker nearshore habitat use in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: A patch occupancy approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, S.M.; Hendrixson, H.A.; VanderKooi, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    We examined habitat use by age-0 Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris over six substrate classes and in vegetated and nonvegetated areas of Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. We used a patch occupancy approach to model the effect of physical habitat and water quality conditions on habitat use. Our models accounted for potential inconsistencies in detection probability among sites and sampling occasions as a result of differences in fishing gear types and techniques, habitat characteristics, and age-0 fish size and abundance. Detection probability was greatest during mid- to late summer, when water temperatures were highest and age-0 suckers were the largest. The proportion of sites used by age-0 suckers was inversely related to depth (range = 0.4-3.0 m), particularly during late summer. Age-0 suckers were more likely to use habitats containing small substrate (64 mm) and habitats with vegetation than those without vegetation. Relatively narrow ranges in dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH prevented us from detecting effects of these water quality features on age-0 sucker nearshore habitat use.

  1. The Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Octopus vulgaris Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  2. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species. PMID:23750233

  3. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 TOBACCO SUCKER CONTROL

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 278 TOBACCO SUCKER CONTROL Dewitt Gooden, Extension Tobacco Specialist Chemical sucker control is necessary for high yields of good quality management techniques will result in reduced production costs through reduced hand suckering labor

  4. Beachfront nourishment decisions: the "sucker-free rider" problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-06-01

    Coastal communities and beachfront property owners often respond to erosion by adding sand to restore local beaches. However, beach nourishment alters shoreline dynamics, not only at the replenishment site but also in adjacent coastal regions, as natural coastal processes shift sand from one location to another. The result is that "sucker" communities pay to build up their beaches, but that replenishment also helps protect the coastlines of "free rider" communities. The sucker-free rider situation is an example of a classic problem studied in economics and game theory frameworks.

  5. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. BIOLOGY OF THE LEECH ACTINOBDELLA INEQUIANNULATA MOORE, 1901 (ANNELIDA: HIRUDINEA: RHYNCHOBDELLIDA: GLOSSIPHONIIDAE), PARASITIC ON THE WHITE SUCKER, CATOSTOMUS COMMERSONI LACEPEDE, 1803 AND THE LONGNOSE SUCKER, CATOSTOMUS CATOSTOMUS FORSTER, 1773, IN ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK, ONTARIO, CANADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Actinobdella inequiannulata was found on the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, and less frequently on the longnose sucker, Catostomus catostomus, in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Catostomus commersoni parasitized with Act. inequiannulata was collected from July ...

  8. 75 FR 5279 - Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II), Rogue River-Siskiyou National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ...Forest Service Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II), Rogue...purpose of the Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration--Phase II project is...more sinuous and contained a larger floodplain, characteristic of a Rosgen C...

  9. BIOLOGY AND OCCURRENCE OF THE LEECH, ACTINOBDELLA INEQUIANNULATA (ANNELIDA: HIRUDINEA: GLOSSIPHONIIDAE) PARASITIC ON TWO SPECIES OF SUCKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Actinobdella inequiannulata was found on the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, and less frequently on the longnose sucker, Catostomus catostomus, in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. This study established the presence of only one species of leech, Actinobdela inequ...

  10. INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 42:11461153 (2002) The Structure and Adhesive Mechanism of Octopus Suckers1

    E-print Network

    Kier, William M.

    2002-01-01

    1146 INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 42:1146­1153 (2002) The Structure and Adhesive Mechanism of Octopus College, Ithaca, New York 14850 SYNOPSIS. Octopus suckers consist of a tightly packed three. INTRODUCTION Octopuses use suckers for a remarkable variety of tasks including anchoring the body

  11. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado: I. Adults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.; Weston, L.K.; McDonald, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    Adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) were exposed to various selenium concentrations in ponds and isolated river channels of the Colorado River near Grand Junction, CO, to determine effects on their growth and residue accumulation over an 11-month period. Adults at Horsethief ponds were fed a commercial diet, whereas fish at Adobe Creek channel and North Pond foraged on natural food items. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 2.2 ??g/L in water, 0.1-1.4 ??g/g in sediment, and 2.3-3.1 ??g/g in food organisms (1.1 ??g/g in commercial fish food), at Adobe Creek were 3.8 ??g/L in water, 0.5-2.1 ??g/g in sediment, and 4-56 ??g/g in food organisms, and at North Pond were 9.5 ??g/L in water, 7-55 ??g/g in sediment, and 20-81 ??g/g in food organisms. The selenium concentrations in muscle plugs from adults at Adobe Creek (11.7 ??g/g, SD=0.4, n=6) and North Pond (16.6 ??g/g, SD=1.0, n=6) were greater than at Horsethief (4.5 ??g/g, SD=0.2, n=6). During a depuration period adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond lost 1-2% of their selenium burden in 32 days and 14-19% in 66 days. Selenium accumulated in razorback sucker above toxic thresholds reported in other studies, yet those residues were less than those reported in muscle plugs of 40% of wild razorback sucker caught in the Green River, Utah.

  12. Monitoring of Adult Lost River and Shortnose Suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, 2008–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, David A.; Hayes, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Geological Survey began a consistent monitoring program for endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, in the fall of 2004. The program was intended to develop a more complete understanding of the Clear Lake Reservoir populations because they are important to the recovery efforts for these species. We report results from this ongoing program and include sampling efforts from fall 2008 to spring 2010. We summarize catches and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging efforts from trammel net sampling in fall 2008 and fall 2009, as well as detections of PIT-tagged suckers on remote antennas in the spawning tributary, Willow Creek, in spring 2009 and spring 2010. Trammel net sampling resulted in a relatively low catch of suckers in fall 2008 and a high catch of suckers in fall 2009. We attribute the high catch of suckers to low lake levels in 2009, which concentrated fish. As in previous years, shortnose suckers made up the vast majority of the sucker catch and recaptures of previously PIT-tagged suckers were relatively uncommon. Across the 2 years, we captured and tagged 389 new Lost River suckers and 2,874 new shortnose suckers. Since the program began, we have tagged a total of about 1,200 Lost River suckers and 5,900 shortnose suckers that can be detected on the remote antennas in Willow Creek. Detections of tagged suckers were low in both spring 2009 and spring 2010. The magnitude of the spawning migration was presumably small in both years because of low flows in Willow Creek; detections were similar to a previous low-flow year (spring 2007) and much lower than previous years with higher flows (spring 2006 and spring 2008). The size composition of fish captured in fall trammel net sampling over time suggests that the Lost River sucker population probably has decreased in abundance from what it was in the early 2000s. Shortnose suckers are smaller than Lost River suckers, and we are unable to infer any trend in abundance for shortnose suckers because it is impossible to separate recruitment of small fish from size selectivity of the trammel nets. Nonetheless, the substantial catch of small shortnose suckers in 2009, especially females, indicates that some new individuals recruited to the population. Problems with inferring status and population dynamics from size composition data can be overcome by a robust capture-recapture program that follows the histories of PIT-tagged individuals. Inferences from such a program are currently hindered by poor detection rates during spawning seasons with low flows in Willow Creek, which indicate that a key assumption of capture-recapture models is violated. We suggest that the most straightforward solution to this issue would be to collect detection data during the spawning season using remote PIT tag antennas in the strait between the west and east lobes of the lake.

  13. Development of a small sucker manipulator for underwater surgery support.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Nobuto; Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei

    2014-01-01

    WaFLES (Water-Filled LaparoEndoscopic Surgery) is an operative method suggested by Igarashi et al., which has several advantages, such as, preventing the drying of inner organs, and being able to use ultrasound devices for real time monitoring. However, grasping of inner organs with usual forceps for move and incision purpose is difficult. Therefore our ultimate goal is to develop a small sucker manipulator for WaFLES support. Experiments were conducted to explore suitable suction cups for underwater application, and suitable structure (cup-to-cup distance, elasticity of binding material, layouts of multiple cups) for a multiple-cup assembly, in terms of adsorption force and tolerance to sideslip. Experiment results showed that 1) the shape of each single suction cup for the underwater application was identified; 2) the structure of the multiple-cup assembly affects the adsorption force and tolerance to sideslip. PMID:25569977

  14. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Rodding Surgery 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981-2663 (301) 947-0083 Fax: (301) 947-0456 Internet: www.oif.org ... osteogenesis imperfecta contact: Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation 804 W. Diamond Avenue, Suite 210, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Tel: 800- ...

  15. Demographics and 2008 Run Timing of Adult Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and Shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) Suckers in Upper Klamath Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janney, Eric C.; Hayes, Brian S.; Hewitt, David A.; Barry, Patrick M.; Scott, Alta; Koller, Justin; Johnson, Mark; Blackwood, Greta

    2009-01-01

    We used capture-recapture data to assess population dynamics of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. The Cormack-Jolly-Seber method was used to estimate apparent survival probabilities, and a temporal symmetry model was used to estimate annual seniority probabilities. Information theoretic modeling was used to assess variation in parameter estimates due to time, gender, and species. In addition, length data were used to detect multiple year-class failures and events of high recruitment into adult spawning populations. Survival of adult Lost River and shortnose suckers varied substantially across years. Relatively high annual mortality was observed for the lakeshore-spawning Lost River sucker subpopulation in 2002 and for the river spawning subpopulation in 2001. Shortnose suckers experienced high mortality in 2001 and 2004. This indicates that high mortality events are not only species specific, but also are specific to subpopulations for Lost River suckers. Seniority probability estimates and length composition data indicate that recruitment of new individuals into adult sucker populations has been sparse. The overall fitness of Upper Klamath Lake sucker populations are of concern given the low observed survival in some years and the paucity of recent recruitment. During most years, estimates of survival probabilities were lower than seniority probabilities, indicating net losses in adult sucker population abundances. The evidence for decline was more marked for shortnose suckers than for Lost River suckers. Our data indicated that sucker survival for both species, but especially shortnose suckers, was sometimes low in years without any observed fish kills. This indicates that high mortality can occur over a protracted period, resulting in poor annual survival, but will not necessarily be observed in association with a fish kill. A better understanding of the factors influencing adult survival and recruitment into spawning populations is needed. Monitoring these vital parameters will provide a quantitative means to evaluate population status and assess the effectiveness of conservation and recovery efforts.

  16. CHANGES IN GENETIC DIVERSITY OF A WHITE SUCKER POPULATION FOLLOWING EXPERIMENTAL WHOLE-LAKE ACIDIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite great strides to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions over the last decade, acid precipitation remains a persistent threat to North American fish communities. A demographic analysis of white suckers in an experimentally acidified oligotrophic lake in northwest Ontario demonst...

  17. Musculoskeletal determinants of pelvic sucker function in Hawaiian stream gobiid fishes: interspecific comparisons and allometric scaling.

    PubMed

    Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Gobiid fishes possess a distinctive ventral sucker, formed from fusion of the pelvic fins. This sucker is used to adhere to a wide range of substrates including, in some species, the vertical cliffs of waterfalls that are climbed during upstream migrations. Previous studies of waterfall-climbing goby species have found that pressure differentials and adhesive forces generated by the sucker increase with positive allometry as fish grow in size, despite isometry or negative allometry of sucker area. To produce such scaling patterns for pressure differential and adhesive force, waterfall-climbing gobies might exhibit allometry for other muscular or skeletal components of the pelvic sucker that contribute to its adhesive function. In this study, we used anatomical dissections and modeling to evaluate the potential for allometric growth in the cross-sectional area, effective mechanical advantage (EMA), and force generating capacity of major protractor and retractor muscles of the pelvic sucker (m. protractor ischii and m. retractor ischii) that help to expand the sealed volume of the sucker to produce pressure differentials and adhesive force. We compared patterns for three Hawaiian gobiid species: a nonclimber (Stenogobius hawaiiensis), an ontogenetically limited climber (Awaous guamensis), and a proficient climber (Sicyopterus stimpsoni). Scaling patterns were relatively similar for all three species, typically exhibiting isometric or negatively allometric scaling for the muscles and lever systems examined. Although these scaling patterns do not help to explain the positive allometry of pressure differentials and adhesive force as climbing gobies grow, the best climber among the species we compared, S. stimpsoni, does exhibit the highest calculated estimates of EMA, muscular input force, and output force for pelvic sucker retraction at any body size, potentially facilitating its adhesive ability. PMID:23450656

  18. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huashan; Chai, Ningli; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles' distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems. PMID:26536352

  19. Effect of suspended sediment on vulnerability of young razorback suckers to predation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.E.; Hines, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    The decline of native fishes in North America is principally a result of altered habitats, and the impact of mainstream dams has accounted for many of the habitat changes. Diminished turbidity, and introduced nonnative predators were investigated as possible reasons for the decline of endangered razorback suckers Xyrauchen texanus in the Colorado River. In laboratory tests, young razorback suckers selected clear water over two water samples with higher concentrations of suspended sediment. In clear water, however, young razorback suckers were extremely susceptible to predation; native Colorado squawfish Ptychocheilus lucius consumed 90% of test razorback suckers, and nonnative green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus consumed 99.6%. As turbidity increased, razorback sucker predator avoidance improved and differences in predator success disappeared. Winter-spring spawning by razorback suckers in Lake Mohave, along with the extreme susceptibility of larvae to predation in clear water, may account for total recruitment failure in that lake. However, in upper basin rivers, suspended sediments remain high enough to limit predation by fishes tested, suggesting that other impacts, including contaminants and lack of floodplain habitat, may be thwarting recruitment in those rivers.

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles’ distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems. PMID:26536352

  1. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado River, Colorado: II. Eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Effects on hatching and development of fertilized eggs in adult razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) exposed to selenium in flooded bottomland sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, were determined. After 9 months exposure, fish were collected and induced to spawn and eggs collected for inorganic element analyses. A 9-day egg study was conducted with five spawns from Horsethief ponds, six spawns from Adobe Creek channel, and four spawns from North Pond using a reference water and site waters. Selenium concentrations in eggs were 6.5 ??g/g from Horsethief, 46 ??g/g from Adobe Creek, 38 ??g/g from North Pond, and 6.0 ??g/g from brood stock. Eggs from young adults had a smaller diameter and higher moisture content than brood stock. There were no differences among the four sources in viability, survival, hatch, hatchability, or mortality of deformed embryos or larvae. Adobe Creek larvae had more deformed embryos in eggs held in site water than held in reference water. There were significant negative correlations between selenium concentrations in adult muscle plugs and percent hatch, egg diameter, and deformities in embryos. Results from this study suggest that selenium contamination in parts of the upper basin of the Colorado River should be a major concern to recovery efforts for endangered fish.

  2. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged <1.6 ??g/L from 24-Road, 0.9 ??g/L from Horsethief, 5.5 ??g/L from Adobe Creek, and 10.7 ??g/L from the North Pond. Selenium in dietary items averaged 2.7 ??g/g in brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  3. Sperm quality assessments for endangered razorback suckers Xyrauchen Texanus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Eilts, Bruce E.; Guitreau, Amy M.; Figiel, Chester R.; Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) and computer-assisted sperm motion analysis (CASA) methods were developed and validated for use with endangered razorback suckers Xyrauchen texanus collected (n=64) during the 2006 spawning season. Sperm motility could be activated within osmolality ranges noted during milt collections (here 167–343 mOsm/kg). We hypothesized that sperm quality of milt collected into isoosmotic (302 mOsm/kg) or hyperosmotic (500 mOsm/kg) Hanks' balanced salt solution would not differ. Pre-freeze viabilities were similar between osmolalities (79%±6 (S.E.M.) and 76%±7); however, post-thaw values were greater in hyperosmotic buffer (27%±3 and 12%±2; P=0.0065), as was mitochondrial membrane potential (33%±4 and 13%±2; P=0.0048). Visual estimates of pre-freeze motility correlated with total (r=0.7589; range 23–82%) and progressive motility (r=0.7449) by CASA and were associated with greater viability (r=0.5985; Pr=-0.83; P=0.0116) and mitochondrial function (r=-0.91; P=0.0016). By FCM-based assessments of DNA integrity, whereby increased fluorochrome binding indicated more fragmentation, higher levels were negatively correlated with count (r=-0.77; Pr=-0.66; P=0.0004). Fragmentation was higher in isotonic buffer (P=0.0234). To increase reproductive capacity of natural populations, the strategy and protocols developed can serve as a template for use with other imperiled fish species, biomonitoring, and genome banking.

  4. 75 FR 5279 - Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II), Rogue River-Siskiyou National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration Project (Phase II..., Oregon. Purpose and Need for Action The purpose of the Sucker Creek Channel and Floodplain Restoration... show that the stream channel was more sinuous and contained a larger floodplain, characteristic of...

  5. Factors affecting condition of flannelmouth suckers in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.; Rogers, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    The impoundment of the Colorado River by Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in 1963 created a highly regulated environment in the Grand Canyon that altered the native fish populations, including the flannelmouth sucker Catostomus latipinnis. Flannelmouth suckers were sampled from 1991 to 2001 to determine seasonal, annual, and spatial trends in fish condition (i.e., relative weight [Wr]). Mean Wr peaked during the prespawn and spawning periods and was lowest in summer and fall, but it was never lower than 93. Condition was variable throughout the Grand Canyon but was typically greatest at intermediate distances from Glen Canyon Dam, possibly because of the increased number of warmwater tributaries in this reach. Flannelmouth sucker condition in September was positively correlated with Glen Canyon Dam discharge during summer (June-August); this result may be due to the larger euphotic zone and greater macroinvertebrate abundance observed during higher water flows. Increased dam discharge that stimulates river productivity may provide benefits for this native fish.

  6. Development of 20 TaqMan assays differentiating the endangered shortnose and Lost River suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Ostberg, Carl O.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate species identification is vital to conservation and management of species at risk. Species identification is challenging when taxa express similar phenotypic characters and form hybrids, for example the endangered shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris) and Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus). Here, we developed 20 Taqman assays that differentiate these species (19 nuclear DNA and one mitochondrial DNA). Assays were evaluated in 160 young-of-the-year identified to species using meristic counts. Alleles were not fixed between species, but species were highly differentiated (F ST = 0.753, P < 0.001). The assays developed herein will be a valuable tool for resource managers.

  7. STRING/NOT STRING: FIBER ART RESPONDS TO STRING THEORY

    E-print Network

    Zallen, Richard

    STRING/NOT STRING: FIBER ART RESPONDS TO STRING THEORY Installations #12;STRING/NOT STRING: FIBER ART RESPONDS TO STRING THEORY An exhibition of installations inspired by a lecture on string theory by physicist & Professor Djordje Minic, Department

  8. Rod examination gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Bacvinskas, W.S.; Bayer, J.E.; Davis, W.W.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Matchett, R.L.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1991-12-31

    The present invention is directed to a semi-automatic rod examination gauge for performing a large number of exacting measurements on radioactive fuel rods. The rod examination gauge performs various measurements underwater with remote controlled machinery of high reliability. The rod examination gauge includes instruments and a closed circuit television camera for measuring fuel rod length, free hanging bow measurement, diameter measurement, oxide thickness measurement, cladding defect examination, rod ovality measurement, wear mark depth and volume measurement, as well as visual examination. A control system is provided including a programmable logic controller and a computer for providing a programmed sequence of operations for the rod examination and collection of data.

  9. Development of a quantitative assay to measure expression of transforming growth factor ß (TGF-ß) in Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris) and evaluation of potential pitfalls in use with field-collected samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Laura S.; Ottinger, Christopher A.; Burdick, Summer M.; VanderKooi, Scott P.

    2012-01-01

    The Nature Conservancy is in the process of restoring the Williamson River Delta in an attempt to recreate important juvenile habitat for the endangered shortnose sucker Chasmistes brevirostris and the endangered Lost River sucker Deltistes luxatus. Measurement of TGF-? mRNA expression level was one of the indicators chosen to evaluate juvenile sucker health during the restoration process. TGF-? mRNA expression level has been correlated with disease status in several laboratory studies and TGF-? mRNA expression level has been used as a species-specific indicator of immune status in field-based fish health assessments. We describe here the identification of TGF-? and a possible splice variant from shortnose sucker and from Lost River sucker. The performance of a quantitative RT-PCR assay to measure TGF-? mRNA expression level was evaluated in field-collected spleen and kidney tissue samples. The quality of extracted RNA was higher in tissues harvested in September compared to July and higher in tissues harvested at lower temperature compared to higher temperature. In addition, the expression level of both TGF-? and 18S as assessed by qRT-PCR was higher in samples with higher quality RNA. TGF-? mRNA expression was lower in kidney than in spleen in both Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker.

  10. Underwater attachment using hairs: the functioning of spatula and sucker setae from male diving beetles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Shih, Ming-Chih; Wu, Ming-Huang; Yang, En-Cheng; Chi, Kai-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Males of Dytiscinae beetles use specialized adhesive setae to adhere to female elytra during underwater courtship. This coevolution of male setae and female elytra has attracted much attention since Darwin. However, there has been little examination of their biomechanical functioning despite increasing knowledge on biofibrillar adhesion. Here, we report and compare, for the first time, the mechanisms of underwater attachment using two hair types, the primitive spatula and derived ‘passive’ sucker, found in male diving beetles. Results from interspecific scaling of protarsal palettes and adhesion by single seta suggest better performance in the later-evolved circular (sucker) setae. Spatula setae with a modified shallow sucker and channels use the combined mechanisms of suction and viscous resistance for adhesion. Velocity-dependent adhesion provides sufficient control for resisting the female's erratic movements while also detaching easily through slow peeling. Direction-dependent shear resistance helps reorient setae surfaces into a preferred direction for effective adhesion. Seta deformation using different mechanisms for circular and spatula setae reduces the force that is transmitted to the contact interface. A softer spring in spatula setae explains their adhesion at lower preloads and assists in complete substrate contact. Attachment mechanisms revealed in adhesive setae with modified spatula and passive suckers provide insights for bioinspired designs of underwater attachment devices. PMID:24920108

  11. chemical sensory cells distributed all over the body, arms and suckers.

    E-print Network

    Hochner, Binyamin

    Magazine R897 chemical sensory cells distributed all over the body, arms and suckers. Learning, watching what is happening around its tank. In this aspect octopuses differ completely from Aplysia, garden million nerve cells, more than four orders of magnitude greater than in other molluscs (garden snails

  12. Comparison of White Sucker Age Estimates from Scales, Pectoral Fin Rays, and Otoliths

    E-print Network

    Comparison of White Sucker Age Estimates from Scales, Pectoral Fin Rays, and Otoliths RYAN M, and lapilli otolith sections to evaluate the potential bias of age estimates between structures. Age estimates precision of age estimates from pectoral fin rays and otoliths was higher than that of age estimates from

  13. EXPLOITATION OF FLOODPLAIN RESOURCES BY ADULT LARGESCALE SUCKER OF THE WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested two predictions of the flood-pulse concept on a large, temperate alluvial river that historically flooded an extensive fringing floodplain. We predicted adult largescale sucker, Catostomus macrocheilus, would: (1) migrate onto the floodplain during high water; and (2) e...

  14. 75 FR 77961 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Santa Ana Sucker

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Santa Ana sucker in this final rule. In the proposed rule (74 FR 65056; December 9, 2009) and the document that made available the draft economic analysis (DEA) (75 FR 38441; July 2, 2010), we stated that... River that we did not discuss in the 2005 final critical habitat designation for this species (70 FR...

  15. Preliminary Testing of the Role of Exercise and Predator Recognition for Bonytail and Razorback Sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon A.; Carpenter, Jeanette; Krapfel, Robert; Figiel, Chester

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hatchery-reared juvenile, 45-cm TL) flathead catfish. Predator-nai??ve juveniles (20- to 25-cm TL) exhibited no discernable preference when provided areas with and without (52 percent and 48 percent, n = 16 observations; 46 percent and 54 percent, n = 20 observations) large flathead catfish. However, once predation occurred, use of predator-free areas nearly doubled in two trials (36 percent and 64 percent, n = 50 observations; 33 percent and 67 percent, n = 12 observations). A more stringent test examining available area indicated predator-savvy razorback suckers used predator-free areas (88 percent, n = 21) illustrating predator avoidance was a learned behavior. Razorback suckers exercised (treatment) in water current (<0.3 m/s) for 10 weeks exhibited greater swimming stamina than unexercised, control fish. When exercised and unexercised razorback suckers were placed together with large predators in 2006, treatment fish had significantly fewer (n = 9, z = 1.69, p = 0.046) mortalities than control fish, suggesting increased stamina improved predator escape skills. Predator/prey tests comparing razorback suckers that had been previously exposed to a predation event with control fish, found treatment fish also had significantly fewer losses than predator-nai??ve fish (p = 0.017). Similar tests exposing predator-savvy and predator-nai??ve bonytail with largemouth bass showed a similar trend; predator-savvy bonytail suffered 38 percent fewer losses than control fish. However, there was not a statistically significant difference between the test groups (p = 0.143) due to small sample size. All exercise and predator exposure trials increased the survival rate of razorback sucker and bonytail compared to untreated counterparts.

  16. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  17. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan (Malmo, SE)

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  18. Biological characteristics of the blue sucker in the James River and the Big Sioux River, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morey, N.M.; Berry, C.R., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the relative abundance and biology of the blue sucker (Cycleptus elongatus), a species that may be declining in some parts of its range. We described the age, growth, condition, length distribution, and habitat preference of the blue sucker in two South Dakota rivers. Specimens were collected from the James River (n=74) and Big Sioux River (n=28) during the summer of 2000. Although five macrohabitats were sampled with electrofishing and hoopnets, most individuals were collected from riffle habitats and downstream of rock dams. Total length-weight relationships were log10W=-6.14+3.37(log10L) (r2 = 0.92) for blue suckers from the James River and log10W = -6.52+3.50(log10L) (r2 = 0.97) for fish from the Big Sioux River. Mean condition factors (K = W(105)/L3) of blue suckers were 0.79 (SE = 0.07) for the James River and 0.73 (SE = 0.07) for the Big Sioux River. Blue suckers between 500 and 700 mm dominated length distributions (range = 374-717 mm) of both samples. Ages ranged from two to nine years, but six-year-old fish were captured most frequently. Blue suckers grew rapidly during juvenile stages (< age 5); however, growth slowed afterward.

  19. Age, growth, and maturity of the longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus, of western Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Merryll M.

    1969-01-01

    Studies of age, growth, and maturity were based on 1760 fish collected in western Lake Superior in 1964-65. The body:scale relation was curvilinear and the curve had an intercept of 1.65 inches on the length axis. The weight increased as the 2.85 power of the length. Some fish formed an annulus before May 18 in 1965; all had completed annuli by late September. Longnose suckers grew 3.6 inches the 1st year, reached 12 inches in the 6th year, and 18 inches in the 11th year. Fish from Pikes Bay grew faster than those from Gull Island Shoal. Over 6 years were required for weight to reach 1 lb and nearly 10 years to reach 2 lb. Minimum length at maturity was 10.5 inches for males and 11.5 inches for females. The youngest mature male belonged to age-group IV and the youngest mature female to age-group V. All males were mature at 14.5-14.9 inches (age-group VIII) and all females at 15.0-15.4 inches (age-group IX). Finclipped longnose suckers returned to spawn in the Brule River in successive years. One fish returned to spawn in 4 successive years. Many of the fish were not recaptured until 2 or 3 years after marking. The time of the Brule River spawning migration depended more on water temperature than on length of day. The average water temperature during the peak of the spawning runs of 1958-64 was 55.4 F. Larval suckers apparently spend little time in the Brule River and adjacent streams and drift downstream to the lake soon after hatching. The number of eggs in the ovaries of eight suckers ranged from 14 to 35 thousand and averaged 24 thousand for fish 13.9-17.7 inches long.

  20. Preliminary juvenile Lost River and shortnose sucker investigations in Clear Lake, California--2011 pilot study summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; Rasmussen, Josh

    2012-01-01

    Poor recruitment appears to limit the recovery of Lost River and shortnose sucker populations in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, but the cause is unknown. Adult suckers migrate up Willow Creek and its tributaries to spawn in some years, but low flow in Willow Creek may inhibit spawning migrations in other years. It is unclear whether spawning is successful, larvae survive, or juveniles persist to adulthood. Environmental variables associated with successful spawning or young-of-year survival have not been identified and early life history for these populations is poorly understood. The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ruby Pipeline L.L.C. Corporation (El Paso, Tex.) initiated a study in 2011 to better understand juvenile sucker life history in Clear Lake Reservoir, and to identify constraints in the early life history that may limit recruitment to the adult spawning populations. This is a report on the 2011 pilot study for this project.

  1. Sublethal effects of aged oil sands-affected water on white sucker (Catostomus commersonii).

    PubMed

    Arens, Collin J; Hogan, Natacha S; Kavanagh, Richard J; Mercer, Angella G; Kraak, Glen J Van Der; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    To investigate impacts of proposed oil sands aquatic reclamation techniques on benthic fish, white sucker (Catostomus commersonii Lacépède, 1803) were stocked in 2 experimental ponds-Demonstration Pond, containing aged fine tailings capped with fresh water, consistent with proposed end-pit lake designs, and South Bison Pond, containing aged unextracted oil sands material-to examine the effects of unmodified hydrocarbons. White sucker were stocked from a nearby reservoir at both sites in May 2010 and sampled 4 mo later to measure indicators of energy storage and utilization. Comparisons were then made with the source population and 2 reference lakes in the region. After exposure to aged tailings, white sucker had smaller testes and ovaries and reduced growth compared with the source population. Fish introduced to aged unextracted oil sands material showed an increase in growth over the same period. Limited available energy, endocrine disruption, and chronic stress likely contributed to the effects observed, corresponding to elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids, aromatic compounds in bile, and increased CYP1A activity. Because of the chemical and biological complexity of these systems, direct cause-effect relationships could not be identified; however, effects were associated with naphthenic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ammonia, and high pH. Impacts on growth have not been previously observed in pelagic fishes examined in these systems, and may be related to differences in sediment interaction. PMID:25545538

  2. Correlation of gene expression and contaminat concentrations in wild largescale suckers: a field-based study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Helena E.; Mehinto, Alvina C.; Yu, Fahong; Perry, Russell W.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Maule, Alec G.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    Toxic compounds such as organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs) have been detected in fish, birds, and aquatic mammals that live in the Columbia River or use food resources from within the river. We developed a custom microarray for largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) and used it to investigate the molecular effects of contaminant exposure on wild fish in the Columbia River. Using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) we identified 72 probes representing 69 unique genes with expression patterns that correlated with hepatic tissue levels of OCs, PCBs, or PBDEs. These genes were involved in many biological processes previously shown to respond to contaminant exposure, including drug and lipid metabolism, apoptosis, cellular transport, oxidative stress, and cellular chaperone function. The relation between gene expression and contaminant concentration suggests that these genes may respond to environmental contaminant exposure and are promising candidates for further field and laboratory studies to develop biomarkers for monitoring exposure of wild fish to contaminant mixtures found in the Columbia River Basin. The array developed in this study could also be a useful tool for studies involving endangered sucker species and other sucker species used in contaminant research.

  3. Correlation of gene expression and contaminant concentrations in wild largescale suckers: a field-based study.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Helena E; Mehinto, Alvine C; Yu, Fahong; Perry, Russell W; Denslow, Nancy D; Maule, Alec G; Mesa, Matthew G

    2014-06-15

    Toxic compounds such as organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs) have been detected in fish, birds, and aquatic mammals that live in the Columbia River or use food resources from within the river. We developed a custom microarray for largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) and used it to investigate the molecular effects of contaminant exposure on wild fish in the Columbia River. Using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) we identified 72 probes representing 69 unique genes with expression patterns that correlated with hepatic tissue levels of OCs, PCBs, or PBDEs. These genes were involved in many biological processes previously shown to respond to contaminant exposure, including drug and lipid metabolism, apoptosis, cellular transport, oxidative stress, and cellular chaperone function. The relation between gene expression and contaminant concentration suggests that these genes may respond to environmental contaminant exposure and are promising candidates for further field and laboratory studies to develop biomarkers for monitoring exposure of wild fish to contaminant mixtures found in the Columbia River Basin. The array developed in this study could also be a useful tool for studies involving endangered sucker species and other sucker species used in contaminant research. PMID:24050789

  4. Cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Pogosian, Levon; Steer, Danièle A.

    2015-06-01

    "Strings" are solutions of certain field theories, whose energy is concentrated along an infinite line. Strings exist in many field theories motivated by particle physics, and this suggests that they may exist in the universe -- hence the name "cosmic strings". String solutions are also present in condensed matter systems where they are called "vortices". In cosmological applications, strings are generally curved, dynamical, and may form closed loops. The energy of a string remains concentrated along a time-dependent curve for a duration that is very long compared to the dynamical time of the string.

  5. Pull rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Cioletti, O.C.

    1988-04-21

    A pull rod assembly comprising a pull rod having three peripheral grooves, a piston device including an adaptor ring and a seal ring, said piston device being mounted on the pull rod by a split ring retainer situated in one groove and extending into an interior groove in the adaptor and a resilient split ring retained in another groove and positioned to engage the piston device and to retain the seal on its adaptor.

  6. Test report for drill string seal pressure test

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.F.

    1996-02-06

    A basic question was asked concerning the drill string which is used in rotary Mode coring operations: ``...what is the volume leak rate loss in a drill rod string under varying condiditons of the joint boxes and pins being either dry or coated with lubricant...``. A Variation of this was to either have an o-ring installed or absent on the drill rod that was grooved on the pin. A series of tests were run with both the o-ring grooved Longyear drill rod and the plain pin end rod manufactured by Diamond Drill. Test results show that drill rod leakage of both types is lowered dramatically when thread lubricant is applied to the threaded joints and the joints made up tight. The Diamond Drill rod with no o-ring groove has virtually no leakage when used with thread lubricant and the joints are properly tightened.

  7. Characterization of a novel hepadnavirus in the white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Great Lakes Region of the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cornman, Robert S.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Blazer, Vicki S.

    2015-01-01

    The white sucker Catostomus commersonii is a freshwater teleost often utilized as a resident sentinel. Here, we sequenced the full genome of a hepatitis B-like virus that infects white suckers from the Great Lakes Region of the USA. Dideoxysequencing confirmed the white sucker hepatitis B virus (WSHBV) has a circular genome (3542 bp) with the prototypical codon organization of hepadnaviruses. Electron microscopy demonstrated that complete virions of approximately 40 nm were present in the plasma of infected fish. Compared to avi- and orthohepadnaviruses, sequence conservation of the core, polymerase and surface proteins was low and ranged from 16-27% at the amino acid level. An X protein homologue common to the orthohepadnaviruses was not present. The WSHBV genome included an atypical, presumptively non-coding region absent in previously described hepadnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed WSHBV as distinct from previously documented hepadnaviruses. The level of divergence in protein sequences between WSHBV other hepadnaviruses, and the identification of an HBV-like sequence in an African cichlid provide evidence that a novel genus of the family Hepadnaviridae may need to be established that includes these hepatitis B-like viruses in fishes. Viral transcription was observed in 9.5% (16 of 169) of white suckers evaluated. The prevalence of hepatic tumors in these fish was 4.9%, of which only 2.4% were positive for both virus and hepatic tumors. These results are not sufficient to draw inferences regarding the association of WSHBV and carcinogenesis in white sucker.

  8. Hammered Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    In the next three chapters we consider the science of hammered string instruments. In this chapter, we present a brief discussion of vibrating strings excited by a hard or soft hammer. Chapter 20 discusses the most important hammered string instrument, the piano - probably the most versatile and popular of all musical instruments. Chapter 21 discusses hammered dulcimers, especially the American folk dulcimer.

  9. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-01

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. PMID:24835454

  10. Effects of lake surface elevation on shoreline-spawning Lost River Suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; Hewitt, David A.; Rasmussen, J.E.; Hayes, Brian; Janney, Eric; Harris, Alta C.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed remote detection data from PIT-tagged Lost River Suckers Deltistes luxatus at four shoreline spawning areas in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, to determine whether spawning of this endangered species was affected by low water levels. Our investigation was motivated by the observation that the surface elevation of the lake during the 2010 spawning season was the lowest in 38 years. Irrigation withdrawals in 2009 that were not replenished by subsequent winter-spring inflows caused a reduction in available shoreline spawning habitat in 2010. We compared metrics of skipped spawning, movement among spawning areas, and spawning duration across 8 years (2006-2013) that had contrasting spring water levels. Some aspects of sucker spawning were similar in all years, including few individuals straying from the shoreline areas to spawning locations in lake tributaries and consistent effects of increasing water temperatures on the accumulation of fish at the spawning areas. During the extreme low water year of 2010, 14% fewer female and 8% fewer male suckers joined the shoreline spawning aggregation than in the other years. Both males and females visited fewer spawning areas within Upper Klamath Lake in 2010 than in other years, and the median duration at spawning areas in 2010 was at least 36% shorter for females and 20% shorter for males relative to other years. Given the imperiled status of the species and the declining abundance of the population in Upper Klamath Lake, any reduction in spawning success and egg production could negatively impact recovery efforts. Our results indicate that lake surface elevations above 1,262.3-1,262.5 m would be unlikely to limit the number of spawning fish and overall egg production.

  11. Relationship of length of fish to incidence of sea lamprey scars on white suckers, Catostomus commersoni, in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, A.E.; Elliott, Oliver R.

    1954-01-01

    During the course of experimental fishing operations conducted by the staff of Hammond Bay Fishery Laboratory (a field station of Great Lakes Fishery Investigations) in 1950-1951, length measurements and records of scarring incidence and number of scars per individual were obtained for a sample of 552 white suckers, Catostomus commersoni (Lacepede). The results of this study indicate that if information on the incidence of sea lamprey scars on white suckers is to be used to judge the relative abundance of sea lampreys and the damages inflicted by that parasite on the sucker stock, data must include records of the lengths of fish. It is to be suspected strongly that a similar conclusion applies in other localities and to other species preyed upon by the sea lamprey.

  12. Algal Toxins in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: Linking Water Quality to Juvenile Sucker Health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanderKooi, S.P.; Burdick, S.M.; Echols, K.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Rosen, B.H.; Wood, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    As the lead science agency for the Department of Interior, the U.S. Geological Survey is actively involved in resource issues in the Klamath River basin. Activities include research projects on endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers, threatened coho salmon, groundwater resources, seasonal runoff forecasting, water quality in Upper Klamath Lake and the Klamath River, nutrient cycling in wetlands, and assessment of land idling programs to reduce water consumption. Many of these studies are collaborations with various partners including Department of Interior agencies, Indian Tribes, and State agencies.

  13. A review of possible causes of nutrient enrichment and decline of endangered sucker populations in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert C.; Fretwell, Marvin O.

    1993-01-01

    Ten possible causes for this excessive enrichment in nutrients are described. Three of these hypotheses are suggested for immediate testing because of large-scale changes in nutrient loading that may have occurred as a result of man’s activities. These three hypotheses relate nutrient enrichment to (1) conversion of marshland to agricultural land, (2) agricultural drainage from the basin, and (3) reservoir regulation. Eleven possible hypothetical causes for the decline in sucker populations also are described. The decline in sucker population may be related to excessive nutrient enrichment (eutrophication) of the lake.

  14. Control rod driveline and grapple

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A control rod driveline and grapple is disclosed for placement between a control rod drive and a nuclear reactor control rod containing poison for parasitic neutron absorption required for reactor shutdown. The control rod is provided with an enlarged cylindrical handle which terminates in an upwardly extending rod to provide a grapple point for the driveline. The grapple mechanism includes a tension rod which receives the upwardly extending handle and is provided with a lower annular flange. A plurality of preferably six grapple segments surround and grip the control rod handle. Each grapple rod segment grips the flange on the tension rod at an interior upper annular indentation, bears against the enlarged cylindrical handle at an intermediate annulus and captures the upwardly flaring frustum shaped handle at a lower and complementary female segment. The tension rods and grapple segments are surrounded by and encased within a cylinder. The cylinder terminates immediately and outward extending annulus at the lower portion of the grapple segments. Excursion of the tension rod relative to the encasing cylinder causes rod release at the handle by permitting the grapple segments to pivot outwardly and about the annulus on the tension rod so as to open the lower defined frustum shaped annulus and drop the rod. Relative movement between the tension rod and cylinder can occur either due to electromagnetic release of the tension rod within defined limits of travel or differential thermal expansion as between the tension rod and cylinder as where the reactor exceeds design thermal limits.

  15. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Endangered Juvenile Lost River and Shortnose Suckers in Relation to Environmental Variables in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: 2008 Annual Data Summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; VanderKooi, Scott P.

    2010-01-01

    Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris) were listed as endangered in 1988 for a variety of reasons including apparent recruitment failure. Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, and its tributaries are considered the most critical remaining habitat for these two species. Age-0 suckers are often abundant in Upper Klamath Lake throughout the summer months, but catches decline dramatically between late August and early September each year and age-1 and older sub-adult suckers are rare. These rapid declines in catch rates and a lack of substantial recruitment into adult sucker populations in recent years suggests sucker populations experience high mortality between their first summer and first spawn. A lack of access to, or abundance of, optimal rearing habitat may exacerbate juvenile sucker mortality or restrict juvenile growth or development. Summer age-0 sucker habitat use and distribution has been studied extensively, but many uncertainties remain about age-1 and older juvenile habitat use, distribution, and movement patterns within Upper Klamath Lake. We designed a study to examine seasonal changes in distribution of age-1 suckers in Upper Klamath Lake as they relate to depth and water quality. In this document, which meets our annual data summary and reporting obligations, we discuss the results of our second annual spring and summer sampling effort. Catch data collected in 2007 and 2008 indicate seasonal changes in age-1 and older juvenile sucker habitat use coincident with changes in water quality, which were previously undocumented. In both years during April and May, age-1 and older juvenile suckers were found in shallow water environments. Then, as water temperatures began to warm throughout Upper Klamath Lake in June, age-1 and older juvenile suckers primarily were captured along the western shore in some of the deepest available environments. Following a dramatic decrease in dissolved oxygen concentrations in Eagle Ridge Trench, juvenile suckers were no longer found along the western shore but were captured throughout the rest of Upper Klamath Lake. When dissolved oxygen concentrations were 4 milligrams per liter or greater along the western shore, juvenile sucker captures were again concentrated in that area. Although this pattern indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentration or another related water-quality limitation may force juvenile suckers to leave the western shore, it is unclear as to why age-1 and older juveniles might be attracted to the area in the first place. Understanding this apparent behavior could be important to managing habitat for these species. In this data summary, we also describe the distribution of catches of age-0 suckers and other fishes in Upper Klamath Lake. These data corroborate previous studies that describe age-0 sucker habitat as shallow relative to depths available in Upper Klamath Lake. In this study, we did not seek, nor find additional clarification on age-0 sucker habitat use and distribution in Upper Klamath Lake. Our brief description of the distribution and abundance of all other fish species caught provides a context in which to assess the rarity of juvenile suckers within the fish community of Upper Klamath Lake.

  16. Near-Shore and Off-Shore Habitat Use by Endangered Juvenile Lost River and Shortnose Suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: 2006 Data Summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; Wilkens, Alexander X.; VanderKooi, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris, listed as endangered in 1988 under the Endangered Species Act, have shown infrequent recruitment into adult populations in Upper Klamath Lake (NRC 2004). In an effort to understand the causes behind and provide management solutions to apparent recruitment failure, a number of studies have been conducted including several on larval and juvenile sucker habitat use. Near-shore areas in Upper Klamath Lake with emergent vegetation, especially those near the mouth of the Williamson River, were identified as important habitat for larval suckers (Cooperman and Markle 2000; Reiser et al. 2001). Terwilliger et al. (2004) characterized primary age-0 sucker habitat as near-shore areas in the southern portion of Upper Klamath Lake with gravel and cobble substrates. Reiser et al. (2001) provided some evidence that juvenile suckers use habitats with emergent vegetation, but nothing concerning the extent or timing of use. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began investigating the importance of near-shore and off-shore habitats with and without emergent vegetation for juvenile suckers in 2000. We found substantial numbers of juvenile suckers using these habitats near the mouth of the Williamson River into late August (VanderKooi and Buelow 2003). The distribution and relative abundance of juvenile suckers showed high spatial variability throughout the summer for all species combined, Lost River suckers, and shortnose suckers (VanderKooi et al. 2006; Hendrixson et al. 2007a). Results from sampling near-shore areas in 2002 suggested juvenile sucker proximity to shoreline changes depending on the presence or absence of shoreline vegetation (VanderKooi et al. 2006), whereas in 2004 and 2005 results were equivocal (Hendrixson et al. 2007a, 2007b). Research by USGS of juvenile suckers in Upper Klamath Lake conducted since 2000 provides a valuable long-term data set which can be used to evaluate multi-year trends in juvenile sucker relative abundance and habitat use. Data on the relative abundance of juvenile suckers and their habitat use patterns will provide valuable information to guide restoration and management decisions in the Upper Klamath Basin. Information on juvenile sucker catch rates may also be valuable for evaluating year class success, estimating early life stage survival rates, and predicting upper bounds of future recruitment to adult spawning populations. We continued sampling juvenile suckers in 2006 as part of an effort to develop bioenergetics models for juvenile Lost River and shortnose suckers. This study required us to collect fish to determine growth rates and energy content of juvenile suckers. We followed the sampling protocols and methods described by Hendrixson et al. (2007b) to maintain continuity and facilitate comparisons with data collected in recent years, but sampled at a reduced level of effort compared to previous years (approximately one-third) due to limited funding. Here we present a summary of catch data collected in 2006. Bioenergetics models will be reported separately.

  17. Ecological risk assessment of irrigation drainage selenium to the endangered razorback sucker

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    The razorback sucker is an endangered species in the Colorado River Basin that is nearing extinction. A remnant population is threatened by contamination from irrigation drainage and other sources. Biomarkers and toxicity tests indicate reproductive impairment to adults and acute and chronic toxicity to larval fish. Adult fish are generally more than 20 years old, and no recruitment is occurring. The assessment evaluates all selenium sources, natural and man induced, to the Green River. Selenium discharged directly to the river as inorganic selenate represents a decrease in exposure compared to organic dietary sources introduced to a critical habitat. Fate and transport modeling, biotransformation, and profiling exposure at critical life history ecological boundaries are all important considerations in the risk analysis. Determining realistic safety factors for naturally occurring and essential but potentially toxic trace elements is also essential to formulate alternatives that make common sense. Establishing an obtainable cleanup criteria must consider natural background concentrations, cost effectiveness, and public acceptability. In this case it is more cost effective and provides a greater overall benefit to the river basin to remediate a non-irrigation selenium source. A multi-agency task force has been formed to select and implement remediation that is economically feasible, scientifically sound, politically acceptable, makes common sense, and that protects the razorback sucker.

  18. Dispersal of larval suckers at the Williamson River Delta, Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Hendrixson, Heather A.; Markle, Douglas F.; Erdman, Charles S.; Burdick, Summer M.; Ellsworth, Craig M.; Buccola, Norman L.

    2012-01-01

    An advection/diffusion modeling approach was used to simulate the transport of larval suckers from spawning areas in the Williamson River, through the newly restored Williamson River Delta, to Upper Klamath Lake. The density simulations spanned the years of phased restoration, from 2006/2007 prior to any levee breaching, to 2008 when the northern part of the delta was reconnected to the lake, and 2009 when levees on both sides of the delta had been breached. Model simulation results from all four years were compared to field data using rank correlation. Spearman ? correlation coefficients were usually significant and in the range 0.30 to 0.60, providing moderately strong validation of the model. The correlation coefficients varied with fish size class in a way that suggested that the model best described the distribution of smaller fish near the Williamson River channel, and larger fish away from the channel. When Lost River and shortnose/Klamath largescale suckers were simulated independently, the correlation results suggested that the model better described the transport and dispersal of the latter species. The incorporation of night-time-only drift behavior in the Williamson River channel neither improved nor degraded correlations with field data. The model showed that advection by currents is an important factor in larval dispersal.

  19. Assessment of Population Status for a White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni) Population Exposed to Bleached Kraft Pulp Mill Effluent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Credible ecological risk assessments often need to include analysis of population-level impacts. In the present study, a predictive model was developed to translate changes in the fecundity and the age structure of a breeding population of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) co...

  20. 78 FR 22556 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for Lost River Sucker and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ...Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for Lost River...Sucker AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service...following objectives for recovery, which we believe...healthy, stable populations of these species...successful spawning populations. As these species...reclassification and recovery criteria, we...

  1. Assessment of Population Status for a White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni) Population Exposed to Bleached Kraft Pulp Mill Effluent

    EPA Science Inventory

    A predictive model was developed to translate changes in the fecundity and the age structure of a breeding population of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) collected in the field to alterations in population growth rate. Application of this density dependent population ...

  2. Spawning migration movements of Lost River and shortnose suckers in the Williamson and Sprague Rivers, Oregon, following the removal of Chiloquin Dam-2009 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, Craig M.; VanderKooi, Scott P.

    2011-01-01

    The Chiloquin Dam was located at river kilometer (rkm) 1.3 on the Sprague River near the town of Chiloquin, Oregon. The dam was identified as a barrier that potentially inhibited or prevented the upstream spawning migrations and other movements of endangered Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus), shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris), and other fish in the Sprague River. Our research objectives in 2009 were to evaluate adult catostomid spawning migration patterns using radio telemetry to identify and describe shifts in spawning area distribution and migration behavior following the removal of Chiloquin Dam in 2008. We attached external radio transmitters to 58 Lost River suckers and 59 shortnose suckers captured at the Williamson River fish weir. A total of 17 radio-tagged Lost River suckers and one radio-tagged shortnose sucker were detected approaching the site of the former Chiloquin Dam but only two radio-tagged fish (one male Lost River sucker and one female Lost River sucker) were detected crossing upstream of the dam site. A lower proportion of radio-tagged shortnose suckers were detected migrating into the Sprague River when compared with previous years. Detections on remote passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag arrays located in the Sprague River show that although the proportion of fish coming into the Sprague River is small when compared to the number of fish crossing the Williamson River fish weir, the number of fish migrating upstream of the Chiloquin Dam site increased exponentially in the first year since its removal. These data will be used in conjunction with larval production and adult spawning distribution data to evaluate the effectiveness of dam removal in order to provide increased access to underutilized spawning habitat located further upstream in the Sprague River and to reduce the crowding of spawning fish below the dam site.

  3. Transducin translocation contributes to rod survival and enhances synaptic transmission from rods to rod bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Anurima; Pahlberg, Johan; Boyd, Kimberly K; Kerov, Vasily; Kolandaivelu, Saravanan; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Sampath, Alapakkam P; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2013-07-23

    In rod photoreceptors, several phototransduction components display light-dependent translocation between cellular compartments. Notably, the G protein transducin translocates from rod outer segments to inner segments/spherules in bright light, but the functional consequences of translocation remain unclear. We generated transgenic mice where light-induced transducin translocation is impaired. These mice exhibited slow photoreceptor degeneration, which was prevented if they were dark-reared. Physiological recordings showed that control and transgenic rods and rod bipolar cells displayed similar sensitivity in darkness. After bright light exposure, control rods were more strongly desensitized than transgenic rods. However, in rod bipolar cells, this effect was reversed; transgenic rod bipolar cells were more strongly desensitized than control. This sensitivity reversal indicates that transducin translocation in rods enhances signaling to rod bipolar cells. The enhancement could not be explained by modulation of inner segment conductances or the voltage sensitivity of the synaptic Ca(2+) current, suggesting interactions of transducin with the synaptic machinery. PMID:23836670

  4. Characterization of plasma vitellogenin and sex hormone concentrations during the annual reproductive cycle of the endangered razorback sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Papoulias, Diana M.; Annis, Mandy L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Marr, Carrie; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Nachtmann, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Population declines of the endangered razorback sucker Xyrauchen texanus in the Colorado River basin have been attributed to predation by and competition with nonnative fishes, habitat alteration, and dam construction. The reproductive health and seasonal variation of the reproductive end points of razorback sucker populations are currently unknown. Using nonlethal methods, we characterized the plasma hormonal fluctuations of reproductively mature female and male razorback suckers over a 12-month period in a hatchery by measuring their vitellogenin (VTG) and three sex hormones: 17?-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), and 11-ketotestosterone (KT). Fish were identified as reproductive or nonreproductive based on their body weight, VTG, and sex hormone profiles. In reproductive females, the E2 concentration increased in the fall and winter, and increases in T and VTG concentrations were generally associated with the spawning period. Mean T concentrations were consistently greater in reproductive females than in nonreproductive females, but this pattern was even more pronounced during the spawning period (spring). Consistently low T concentrations (<3 ng/mL) in adult females during the spawning period may indicate reproductive impairment. In reproductive males, spring increases in KT and T concentrations were associated with spawning; concentrations of E2 (<0.48 ng/mL) and VTG (<0.001 mg/mL) were low in males throughout the study. In addition, the E2 : KT ratio and T were the best metrics by which to distinguish female from male adult razorback suckers throughout the year. These metrics of reproductive health and condition may be particularly important to recovery efforts of razorback suckers given that the few remaining wild populations are located in a river where water quality and quantity issues are well documented. In addition to the size, age, and recruitment information currently considered in the recovery goals of this endangered species, reproductive end points could be included as recovery metrics with which to monitor seasonal trends and determine whether repatriated populations are cycling naturally.

  5. Hazard assessment of selenium and other trace elements in wild larval razorback sucker from the Green River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Muth, R.T.; Waddell, B.; May, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant investigations of the Green River in northeastern Utah have documented selenium contamination at sites receiving irrigation drainage. The Green River provides critical habitat for four endangered fishes including the largest extant riverine population of endangered razorback sucker. Although 2175 larval razorback suckers were collected from the river between 1992 and 1996, very few juveniles have been captured within recent decades. Selenium concentrations were measured in larval razorback suckers collected from five sites in the Green River (Cliff Creek, Stewart Lake Drain, Sportsman's Drain, Greasewood Corral, and Old Charlie Wash) to assess the potential for adverse effects on recruitment of larvae to the juvenile stage and the adult population. Larvae from all sites contained mean selenium concentrations ranging from 4.3 to 5.8 ??g/g. These values were at or above the proposed toxic threshold of 4 ??g/g for adverse biological effects in fish, which was derived from several laboratory and field studies with a wide range of fish species. At two sites, Cliff Creek and Stewart Lake Drain, selenium concentrations in larvae increased over time as fish grew, whereas selenium concentrations decreased as fish grew at Sportsman's Drain. Evaluation of a 279-larvae composite analyzed for 61 elements demonstrated that selenium and, to a lesser extent, vanadium were elevated to concentrations reported to be toxic to a wide range of fish species. Elevated selenium concentrations in larval razorback suckers from the five sites suggest that selenium contamination may be widespread in the Green River, and that survival and recruitment of larvae to the juvenile stage may be limited due to adverse biological effects. Selenium contamination may be adversely affecting the reproductive success and recruitment of endangered razorback sucker.

  6. Estimating geographic variation on allometric growth and body condition of Blue Suckers with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.; Terrell, J.W.; Neely, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing our understanding of how environmental factors affect fish body condition and improving its utility as a metric of aquatic system health require reliable estimates of spatial variation in condition (weight at length). We used three statistical approaches that varied in how they accounted for heterogeneity in allometric growth to estimate differences in body condition of blue suckers Cycleptus elongatus across 19 large-river locations in the central USA. Quantile regression of an expanded allometric growth model provided the most comprehensive estimates, including variation in exponents within and among locations (range = 2.88–4.24). Blue suckers from more-southerly locations had the largest exponents. Mixed-effects mean regression of a similar expanded allometric growth model allowed exponents to vary among locations (range = 3.03–3.60). Mean relative weights compared across selected intervals of total length (TL = 510–594 and 594–692 mm) in a multiplicative model involved the implicit assumption that allometric exponents within and among locations were similar to the exponent (3.46) for the standard weight equation. Proportionate differences in the quantiles of weight at length for adult blue suckers (TL = 510, 594, 644, and 692 mm) compared with their average across locations ranged from 1.08 to 1.30 for southern locations (Texas, Mississippi) and from 0.84 to 1.00 for northern locations (Montana, North Dakota); proportionate differences for mean weight ranged from 1.13 to 1.17 and from 0.87 to 0.95, respectively, and those for mean relative weight ranged from 1.10 to 1.18 and from 0.86 to 0.98, respectively. Weights for fish at longer lengths varied by 600–700 g within a location and by as much as 2,000 g among southern and northern locations. Estimates for the Wabash River, Indiana (0.96–1.07 times the average; greatest increases for lower weights at shorter TLs), and for the Missouri River from Blair, Nebraska, to Sioux City, Iowa (0.90–1.00 times the average; greatest decreases for lower weights at longer TLs), were examined in detail to explain the additional information provided by quantile estimates.

  7. String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Foreword; Preface; Notation; 10. Type I and type II superstrings; 11. The heterotic string; 12. Superstring interactions; 13. D-branes; 14. Strings at strong coupling; 15. Advanced CFT; 16. Orbifolds; 17. Calabi-Yau compactification; 18. Physics in four dimensions; 19. Advanced topics; Appendix B. Spinors and SUSY in various dimensions; References; Glossary; Index.

  8. String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1998-10-01

    Volume 2: Superstring Theory and Beyond, begins with an introduction to supersymmetric string theories and goes on to a broad presentation of the important advances of recent years. The book first introduces the type I, type II, and heterotic superstring theories and their interactions. It then goes on to present important recent discoveries about strongly coupled strings, beginning with a detailed treatment of D-branes and their dynamics, and covering string duality, M-theory, and black hole entropy, and discusses many classic results in conformal field theory. The final four chapters are concerned with four-dimensional string theories, and have two goals: to show how some of the simplest string models connect with previous ideas for unifying the Standard Model; and to collect many important and beautiful general results on world-sheet and spacetime symmetries.

  9. Lethal levels of selected water quality variables to larval and juvenile Lost River and shortnose suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Monda, D.P.; Bellerud, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource managers hypothesize that occasional fish kills during summer-early fall in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, may be linked to unfavorable water quality conditions created by massive algal blooms. In a preliminary effort to address this concern, short-term (96-h-long) laboratory tests were conducted with larval and juvenile Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers to determine the upper median lethal concentrations (LC50s; also referred to as median tolerance limits) for pH, un-ionized ammonia, and water temperature, and the lower LC50s for dissolved oxygen. The mean LC50s varied among species and life stages as follows: for pH, 10.30-10.39; for un-ionized ammonia, 0.48-1.06 mg litre-1; for temperature, 30.35-31.82??C; and for dissolved oxygen, 1.34-2.10 mg litre-1. Comparisons of 95% confidence limits indicated that, on average, the 96-h LC50s were not significantly different from those computed for shorter exposure times (i.e., 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h). According to two-way analysis of variance, LC50s for the four water quality variables did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) between fish species. However, LC50s for pH (exposure times of 24 h and 48 h) and dissolved oxygen (exposure times of 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h) differed significantly (p ??? 0.05) between life stages, whereas LC50s for un-ionized ammonia and water temperature did not exhibit significant differences. In general, larvae were more sensitive than juveniles to high pH and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. When compared to ambient water quality conditions in Upper Klamath Lake, our results strongly suggest that near-anoxic conditions associated with the senescence phase of algal blooms are most likely to cause high mortalities of larval and juvenile suckers.

  10. Bullfrog tadpole (Rana catesbeiana) and red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) predation on early life stages of endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, G.A.; Carpenter, J.; Thornbrugh, D.

    2006-01-01

    Bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) and red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) are widespread introduced taxa that are problematic throughout the western United States. Their impact on native amphibians and crustaceans is well documented, but less is known regarding their influence on native fishes. Predator-prey tank tests showed both species consumed eggs and larvae of the endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) in a laboratory setting. Tadpoles consumed 2.2 razorback sucker eggs/d and 1.4 razorback sucker larvae/d, while crayfish ate 6.0 eggs/d and 3.5 larvae/d. Relatively high densities of bullfrog tadpoles and crayfish in razorback sucker spawning areas suggest that these nonnative taxa might pose a threat to the recruitment success of this and other imperiled native fish.

  11. Characterization of a Novel Hepadnavirus in the White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Great Lakes Region of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Cassidy M.; Cornman, Robert S.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Blazer, Vicki S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The white sucker Catostomus commersonii is a freshwater teleost often utilized as a resident sentinel. Here, we sequenced the full genome of a hepatitis B-like virus that infects white suckers from the Great Lakes Region of the United States. Dideoxy sequencing confirmed that the white sucker hepatitis B virus (WSHBV) has a circular genome (3,542 bp) with the prototypical codon organization of hepadnaviruses. Electron microscopy demonstrated that complete virions of approximately 40 nm were present in the plasma of infected fish. Compared to avi- and orthohepadnaviruses, sequence conservation of the core, polymerase, and surface proteins was low and ranged from 16 to 27% at the amino acid level. An X protein homologue common to the orthohepadnaviruses was not present. The WSHBV genome included an atypical, presumptively noncoding region absent in previously described hepadnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed WSHBV as distinct from previously documented hepadnaviruses. The level of divergence in protein sequences between WSHBV and other hepadnaviruses and the identification of an HBV-like sequence in an African cichlid provide evidence that a novel genus of the family Hepadnaviridae may need to be established that includes these hepatitis B-like viruses in fishes. Viral transcription was observed in 9.5% (16 of 169) of white suckers evaluated. The prevalence of hepatic tumors in these fish was 4.9%, and only 2.4% of fish were positive for both virus and hepatic tumors. These results are not sufficient to draw inferences regarding the association of WSHBV and carcinogenesis in white sucker. IMPORTANCE We report the first full-length genome of a hepadnavirus from fishes. Phylogenetic analysis of this genome indicates divergence from genomes of previously described hepadnaviruses from mammalian and avian hosts and supports the creation of a novel genus. The discovery of this novel virus may better our understanding of the evolutionary history of hepatitis B-like viruses of other hosts. In fishes, knowledge of this virus may provide insight regarding possible risk factors associated with hepatic neoplasia in the white sucker. This may also offer another model system for mechanistic research. PMID:26378165

  12. Carbon rod furnace infrared source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Blass, W. E.; Gailar, N. M.

    1974-01-01

    A carbon rod furnace infrared source has been built and has proven to be a reliable and trouble-free source despite the high rod temperature of 2500 K. The furnace offers several advantages over previous furnaces. These include an increase in usable rod length to 6.35 cm, extended rod life, and a fully automated power supply for the furnace. Construction and operational details are discussed.

  13. Ecological effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of [{sup 14}C]-2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran on feral populations of lake trout and white suckers

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, P.D.; Lockhart, W.L.; Muir, D.C.G.; Mills, K.H.; Brown, S.B.

    1994-12-31

    In 1989 a total of 24 lake trout and 35 white suckers from a small lake located in the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario were each targeted with an I.P. injection of [{sup 14}C]-s,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran in corn oil, to a dose of 1 ng{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}. Fish were tagged, returned to the lake and recaptured during spawning runs in 1990, 1991 and 1992. Sub-samples of treated and control fish were sacrificed each year for residue and biochemical analyses. Treated females were spawned in 1990 and 1991. Analysis of tag-recapture data showed lower survival of treated lake trout over four years. Growth was significantly lower in white suckers in all years but unaffected in lake trout. Fertilization rate of eggs was lower in eggs from treated female white suckers, but not in lake trout. However, only 1 of 4 treated female lake trout recaptured had undergone oogenesis in the last two years of recaptures. Measurements of EROD showed sustained induction in both lake trout and white suckers. Hepatic levels of retinoids were significantly decreased in lake trout but not in white suckers. Calculated half-lives of P{sub 5}CDF were 9.6 years for lake trout and 4.3 years for white suckers. It appears that long term ecological performance was impaired in both species.

  14. Learning with Rods: One Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Donald Esha

    This paper discusses one English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher's attempts to use cuisenaire rods as a language learning tool. Cuisenaire rods (sometimes called algebricks) vary in size from 1 x 1 x 10 centimeter sticks to 1 x 1 x 1 centimeter cubes, with each of the 10 sizes a different color. Although such rods have been used to teach…

  15. Cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects which are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characterisitc microwave background anisotropy. It was recently discovered that details of cosmic string evolution are very differnt from the so-called standard model that was assumed in most of the string-induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain.

  16. Cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.

    1988-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects that are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation that are based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characteristic microwave background anistropy. It has recently been discovered by F. Bouchet and myself that details of cosmic string evolution are very different from the so-called ''standard model'' that has been assumed in most of the string induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Demographics and Chronology of a Spawning Aggregation of Blue Sucker (Cycleptus elongatus) in the Grand River, Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vokoun, J.C.; Guerrant, T.L.; Rabeni, C.F.

    2003-01-01

    The blue sucker (Cycleptus elongatus) was sampled as individuals arrived, spawned, and departed from a spawning riffle in the Grand River of northcentral Missouri, USA. The Grand River basin was not known to support blue sucker reproduction with few individuals ever recorded. The spawning site is unique in character for the lower river. Individuals began arriving in early April when water temperatures reached 10-12??C. Females with freely-flowing roe were sampled in late April after a large rise in river stage and concurrent lowering of the water temperature 4-5 degrees to 16.5??C. The spawning aggregation had a mean age of 15 y and ranged from 9 to 22 y based on scales that probably underestimated true ages. Males outnumbered females 5.5:1. Mean length was 659 mm for males and 721 mm for females. Females were longer at age than males and no significant age-length relationship was evident.

  18. Chemical and ecological health of white sucker (Catostomus Commersoni) in Rock Creek Park, Washington, D.C., 2003?04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.V.; Weyers, H.S.; Blazer, V.S.; Freeman, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Several classes of chemicals that are known or suspected contaminants were found in bed sediment in Rock Creek, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate esters, organochlorine pesticides, dioxins and furans, trace metals and metalloids (mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, silver, and zinc), and polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs and selected aroclors). Concentrations of many of these chemicals consistently exceeded thresholdor chronic-effects guidelines for the protection of aquatic life and often exceeded probable effects levels (PELs). Exceedance of PELs was dependent on the amount of total organic carbon in the sediments. Concurrent with the collection of sediment-quality data, white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) were evaluated for gross-external and internal-organ anomalies, whole-body burdens of chemical contaminants, and gut contents to determine prey. The histopathology of internal tissues of white sucker was compared to contaminant levels in fish tissue and bed sediment. Gut contents were examined to determine preferential prey and thus potential pathways for the bioaccumulation of chemicals from bed sediments. Male and female fish were tested separately. Lesions and other necroses were observed in all fish collected during both years of sample collection, indicating that fish in Rock Creek have experienced some form of environmental stress. No direct cause and effect was determined for chemical exposure and compromised fish health, but a substantial weight of evidence indicates that white sucker, which are bottom-feeding fish and low-order consumers in Rock Creek, are experiencing some reduction in vitality, possibly due to immunosuppression. Abnormalities observed in gonads of both sexes of white sucker and observations of abnormal behavior during spawning indicated some interruption in reproductive success.

  19. Chemical and Ecological Health of White Sucker (Catostomus Commersoni) in Rock Creek Park, Washington, D.C., 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Cherie V.; Weyers, Holly S.; Blazer, Vicki; Freeman, Mary E.

    2006-01-01

    Several classes of chemicals that are known or suspected contaminants were found in bed sediment in Rock Creek, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate esters, organochlorine pesticides, dioxins and furans, trace metals and metalloids (mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel, silver, and zinc), and polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs and selected aroclors). Concentrations of many of these chemicals consistently exceeded threshold or chronic-effects guidelines for the protection of aquatic life and often exceeded probable effects levels (PELs). Exceedance of PELs was dependent on the amount of total organic carbon in the sediments. Concurrent with the collection of sediment-quality data, white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) were evaluated for gross-external and internal-organ anomalies, whole-body burdens of chemical contaminants, and gut contents to determine prey. The histopathology of internal tissues of white sucker was compared to contaminant levels in fish tissue and bed sediment. Gut contents were examined to determine preferential prey and thus potential pathways for the bioaccumulation of chemicals from bed sediments. Male and female fish were tested separately. Lesions and other necroses were observed in all fish collected during both years of sample collection, indicating that fish in Rock Creek have experienced some form of environmental stress. No direct cause and effect was determined for chemical exposure and compromised fish health, but a substantial weight of evidence indicates that white sucker, which are bottom-feeding fish and low-order consumers in Rock Creek, are experiencing some reduction in vitality, possibly due to immunosuppression. Abnormalities observed in gonads of both sexes of white sucker and observations of abnormal behavior during spawning indicated some interruption in reproductive success.

  20. Spawning by walleye (Sander vitreus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) in the Detroit River: Implications for spawning habitat enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, B.A.; Kennedy, G.W.; Boase, J.C.; Allen, J.D.; Roseman, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Few active fish spawning grounds have been found in channels connecting the Great Lakes. Here, we describe one near Belle Isle in the Detroit River, part of the channel connecting lakes Huron and Erie. There, in 2005, we collected 1,573 fish eggs, cultured them, and identified the hatched larvae as walleye (Sander vitreus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni). Walleye spawning peaked during the week of April 12-19; white sucker spawning peaked on May 10. Average areal rate of egg deposition by walleye and white sucker at this spawning ground in 2005 was 346 and 25 eggs/m2, respectively. Our environmental measurements showed that bottom substrates on this spawning ground were largely sand, not optimal for fish reproduction. We hypothesize that reproduction of these fish at this spawning ground could be enhanced by adding rock and gravel substrates for protection of deposited fish eggs and suggest that reproduction by walleye in the Detroit River may add resilience to production of walleye in western Lake Erie. ?? 2010.

  1. Milt characteristics, reproductive performance, and larval survival and development of white sucker exposed to bleached kraft mill effluent

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, M.E.; Portt, C.B.; Munkittrick, K.R.; Dixon, D.G. )

    1992-02-01

    White sucker from a Lake Superior bay which receives bleached kraft mill effluent (BKME) show increased hepatic mixed-function oxygenase (MFO) activity, reduced plasma sex steroid levels, decreased egg and gonad size, a decrease in the occurrence of secondary sexual characteristics, and an increased age to maturation. This study evaluated the reproductive performance of that white sucker population relative to a similar reference population. Spawning male white sucker from the BKME site had reduced spermatozoan motility but no significant differences in milt volume, spermatocrit levels, or seminal plasma constituents. BKME male and female fish had equal or greater fertilization potential compared to both male and female fish at the reference site. There was no difference either in the hatchability of the eggs or in larval size at hatch. BKME larvae did show reduced growth rates by 24 days posthatch but showed equal rates of yolk utilization. No difference in larval MFO activity was detected between sites at 21 days posthatch, indicating no parental transfer of induction to the progeny.

  2. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  3. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  4. Cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund

    1988-01-01

    The possible consequences of forming cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings in the early universe are discussed. Lecture 1 describes the group theoretic reasons for and the field theoretic reasons why cosmic strings can form in spontaneously broken gauge theories. Lecture 2 discusses the accretion of matter onto string loops, emphasizing the scenario with a cold dark matter dominated universe. In lecture 3 superconducting cosmic strings are discussed, as is a mechanism which leads to the formation of structure from such strings.

  5. A mode method for an elastic rod in a fluid pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D. G.; Lee, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A rod pumping system, as used to lift oil to the surface in non-flowing wells, is analyzed by describing longitudinal rod stretch vibrations as a sum of fixed-free modes. The rod oscillates vertically, driven at the fixed end by a constant speed motor through a four-bar mechanism. Equilibrium is used to derive the partial differential equation of rod upstroke and downstroke motion. The partial differential equation is reduced by modal analysis (and aided by a convenient transformation to simplify an inhomogeneous boundary condition at the plunger on the upstroke) to a set of piecewise linear (and hence non-linear) and uncoupled ordinary differential equations. Based on response studies, a one-mode representation is found to capture most of the rod string stretch at practical operating speeds, and was used to investigate the response with dimensional and non-dimensionalized equations at various crank speeds, crank lengths and damping rates.

  6. Macroecology of North American suckers (Catostomidae): tests of Bergmann's and Rapoport's rules.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Doll, Jason C

    2015-09-01

    Discerning spatial macroecological patterns in freshwater fishes has broad implications for community assembly, ecosystem dynamics, management, and conservation. This study explores the potential interspecific covariation of geographic range (Rapoport's rule) and body size (Bergmann's rule) with latitude in North American sucker fishes (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae). While numerous tests of Rapoport's and Bergmann's rules are documented in the literature, comparatively few of these studies have specifically tested for these patterns, and none have incorporated information reflecting shared ancestry into analyses of North American freshwater fish through a hierarchical model. This study utilized a hierarchical modeling approach with Bayesian inference to evaluate the role that evolution has played in shaping these distributional corollaries. Rapoport's rule was supported at the tribe level but not across family and subfamily groupings. Particularly within the Catostominae subfamily, two tribes reflected strong support for Rapoport's rule while two suggested a pattern was present. Conversely, Bergmann's rule was not supported in Catostomidae. This study provides additional information regarding the pervasiveness of these "rules" by expanding inferences in freshwater fishes and specifically addressing the potential for these macroecological patterns to play a role in the distribution of the understudied group Catostomidae. PMID:26445650

  7. White sucker (Catostomus commersoni) growth and sexual maturation in pulp mill-contaminated and reference rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, M.M.; Bussieres, D.; Dodson, J.J. ); Hodson, P.V. )

    1995-02-01

    Induction of hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and accumulation of chlorophenolic compounds typical of bleached-kraft mill effluent (BKME) in fish sampled downstream of a pulp mill on the St. Maurice River, Quebec, Canada, provided evidence of chemical exposure to BKME. In comparison, fish sampled over the same distances and in similar habitats in a noncontaminated reference river, the Gatineau River, demonstrated low EROD activity and contamination levels. Accelerated growth of white suckers occurred between 2 and 10 years of age in both rivers at downstream stations relative to upstream stations, suggesting the existence of gradients of nutrient enrichment independent of BKME contamination. The impact of BKME exposure was expressed as reduced investment in reproduction, as revealed by greater length at maturity, reduced gonad size, and more variable fecundity. These effects were not obvious in simple upstream-downstream comparisons, but became evident when fish from the uncontaminated Gatineau River showed increased gonadal development and reduced age and size at maturity in response to enhanced growth rates.

  8. Nanoconfined ?-sheets mechanically reinforce the supra-biomolecular network of robust squid Sucker Ring Teeth.

    PubMed

    Guerette, Paul A; Hoon, Shawn; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Masic, Admir; Ravi, Vydianathan; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Weaver, James C; Miserez, Ali

    2014-07-22

    The predatory efficiency of squid and cuttlefish (superorder Decapodiformes) is enhanced by robust Sucker Ring Teeth (SRT) that perform grappling functions during prey capture. Here, we show that SRT are composed entirely of related structural “suckerin” proteins whose modular designs enable the formation of nanoconfined ?-sheet-reinforced polymer networks. Thirty-seven previously undiscovered suckerins were identified from transcriptomes assembled from three distantly related decapodiform cephalopods. Similarity in modular sequence design and exon–intron architecture suggests that suckerins are encoded by a multigene family. Phylogenetic analysis supports this view, revealing that suckerin genes originated in a common ancestor ~350 MYa and indicating that nanoconfined ?-sheet reinforcement is an ancient strategy to create robust bulk biomaterials. X-ray diffraction, nanomechanical, and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the modular design of the suckerins facilitates the formation of ?-sheets of precise nanoscale dimensions and enables their assembly into structurally robust supramolecular networks stabilized by cooperative hydrogen bonding. The suckerin gene family has likely played a key role in the evolutionary success of decapodiform cephalopods and provides a large molecular toolbox for biomimetic materials engineering. PMID:24911543

  9. Through tubing progressing cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.E.

    1986-06-03

    A method is described of installing a progressing cavity pump assembly within a well, the pump assembly being of the type having a stator, a helical rotor located in the stator and rotated by a string of sucker rods extending through tubing to the surface. The method consists of: securing a tubular seating member to a lower end of the tubing and lowering the tubing into the well; mounting a seating member on a lower end of the pump assembly; mounting a rotor nipple to the upper end of the stator and a drive rod to the upper end of the rotor, and providing the rotor nipple and drive rod with engaging means that allows a selected amount of vertical movement of the rotor with respect to the stator; connecting the upper end of the drive rod to the sucker rods; lowering the pump assembly into the tubing on the sucker rods until the seating member on the pump assembly contacts the tubular seating member; continuing to lower the sucker rods without rotation, moving the rotor downward with respect to the stator and forcing the seating members together with the weight of the sucker rods applied to the stator through the engaging means; then moving the sucker rods and the rotor a selected distance upward while the stator remains stationary to position the top of the rotor above the stator a selected distance; then connecting the sucker rods at the surface to a rotary power source and rotating the sucker rods to cause the pump to operate.

  10. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  11. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  12. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  13. Population Dynamics of Adult Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and Shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) Suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barry, Patrick M.; Janney, Eric C.; Hewitt, David A.; Hayes, Brian S.; Scott, Alta C.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from ongoing research into the population dynamics of endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers in Clear Lake Reservoir, California. Results are included for sampling that occurred from fall 2006 to spring 2008. We summarize catches and passive integrated transponder tagging efforts from trammel net sampling in fall 2006 and fall 2007, and report on detections of tagged suckers on remote antennas in the primary spawning tributary, Willow Creek, in spring 2007 and spring 2008. Results from trammel net sampling were similar to previous years, although catches of suckers in fall 2006 were lower than in 2007 and past years. Lost River and shortnose suckers combined made up about 80 percent of the sucker catch in each year, and more than 2,000 new fish were tagged across the 2 years. Only a small number of the suckers captured in fall sampling were recaptures of previously tagged fish, reinforcing the importance of remote detections of fish for capture-recapture analysis. Detections of tagged suckers in Willow Creek were low in spring 2007, presumably because of low flows. Nonetheless, the proportions of tagged fish that were detected were reasonably high and capture-recapture analyses should be possible after another year of data collection. Run timing for Lost River and shortnose suckers was well described by first detections of individuals by antennas in Willow Creek, although we may not have installed the antennas early enough in 2008 to monitor the earliest portion of the Lost River sucker migration. The duration and magnitude of the spawning runs for both species were influenced by flows and water temperature. Flows in Willow Creek were much higher in 2008 than in 2007, and far more detections were recorded in 2008 and the migrations were more protracted. In both years and for both species, migrations began in early March at water temperatures between 5 and 6 deg C and peaks were related to periods of increasing water temperature. The sex ratio of Lost River suckers detected in Willow Creek was skewed toward males, despite consistently more females having been tagged in fall sampling. This pattern indicates that some tagged female Lost River suckers may be spawning elsewhere in the system, and we intend to investigate this possibility to verify or alter the representativeness of our spring monitoring. Length frequency analysis of fall trammel net catches showed that the populations of both species in Clear Lake Reservoir have undergone major demographic transitions during the last 15 years. In the mid-1990s, the populations were dominated by larger fish and showed little evidence of recent recruitment. These larger fish apparently disappeared in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and the populations are now dominated by fish that recruited into the adult populations in the late 1990s. The length frequencies from the last 4 years provide evidence of consistent recruitment into the Lost River sucker population, but provide no such evidence for the shortnose sucker population. Overall, annual growth rates for both species in Clear Lake were 2-4 times greater than growth rates for conspecifics in Upper Klamath Lake. However, little or no growth occurred for either species in Clear Lake between 2006 and 2007. Based on available evidence, we are unable to fully explain differences in growth rates between systems or among years within Clear Lake.

  14. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  15. Teaching Strings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    Intended primarily for use by instrumental music teachers who do not have a major concentration in strings, this guide provides pertinent basic resources, materials, teaching--learning expectation, and a general overall guide to achievement levels at various stages of development. Discussions are presented of Choosing the Proper Method Book,…

  16. Oxidative stress and bioindicators of reproductive function in pulp and paper mill effluent exposed white sucker.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Ken D; McMaster, Mark E; Pryce, Andrea C; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Portt, Cam B; Hewitt, L Mark; MacLean, Dan D; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2003-07-01

    This study investigates oxidative stress and bioindicators of reproductive function in wild white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) collected from environments receiving pulp and paper mill effluent discharges in northern Ontario. Samples were collected over an eight-year period adjacent to three pulp and paper mills using a variety of processing and bleaching techniques. Fish collected downstream of pulp and paper mills within the Moose River basin exhibited elevated hepatic and gonadal 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), the presence of which is indicative of oxidative stress in these tissues. Within the Jackfish Bay system, exposure to pulp and paper mill effluent did not elevate hepatic or gonadal TBARS. Hepatic cytochrome P4501A activity (CYP1A) and fatty acyl-CoA oxidase (FAO) activities were frequently increased in livers of Moose River basin fish exposed to pulp and paper mill effluent, while lower activities of both enzymes were found within fish from the Jackfish Bay system. This suggests that oxidative stress may be related to CYP1A and FAO activities. Within the Moose River system, increases in measures of oxidative stress (TBARS, FAO) were generally coincident with decreased levels of 17 beta-estradiol; however, testosterone was often lower in Jackfish Bay system fish without any commensurate changes in oxidative stress. The suite of reproductive and oxidative stress parameters measured in this study varied between seasons and mills suggesting responses to effluent are dynamic and effects are complicated by different receiving environments. The relationship between gonad size, gonadal oxidative stress, and circulating plasma steroids remains unclear. PMID:12730610

  17. Impact of selenium and other trace elements on the endangered adult razorback sucker.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven J; Holley, Kathy M; Buhl, Kevin J; Bullard, Fern A; Weston, L Ken; McDonald, Susan F

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted with endangered the razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) to determine if environmental exposure to selenium in flooded bottomland sites affected survival, growth, and egg-hatching success. Adults were stocked at three sites adjacent to the Colorado River near Grand Junction, Colorado, in July 1996: hatchery ponds at Horsethief Canyon State Wildlife Area (referred to here as Horsethief; the reference site), a diked tertiary channel at Adobe Creek, and North Pond at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA). Fish were collected in April 1997 and spawned. After two spawnings adults from the three sites were held at Horsethief for an 86-day selenium depuration period. Selenium concentrations at Horsethief were 1.4-3.0 microg/L in water, 0.8-0.9 microg/g in sediment, 4.5 microg/g in muscle plug, and 6.0 microg/g in eggs; at Adobe Creek, <0.7-4.5 microg/L in water, 1.2-2.5 microg/g in sediment, 16-20 microg/g in zooplankton, 9.6 microg/g in muscle plug, and 40 microg/g in eggs; and at North Pond, 3.2-17 microg/L in water, 16-94 microg/g in sediment, 32-48 microg/g in zooplankton, 14 microg/g in muscle plug, and 55 microg/g in eggs. During the depuration period, when adults from Adobe Creek and North Pond were held at Horsethief, the fish lost 7%-13% of their selenium burden in 59 days and 14%-21% in 86 days. Larvae from North Pond adults had the most deformities, followed by Adobe Creek adults, with the fewest deformities found in the Horsethief adults. PMID:12203951

  18. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide in controlling mortality associated with saprolegniasis on walleye, white sucker, and paddlefish eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Drobish, M.; Hamilton, J.; Harder, T.; Lee, L.A.; Moen, C.; Moore, A.

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide in controlling saprolegniasis on eggs of walleye Stizostedion vitreum, white sucker Catostomus commersoni, and paddlefish Polyodon spathula was evaluated at four private, state, and federal production hatcheries participating in an Investigational New Animal Drug efficacy study (experiment 1; walleyes) and in a laboratory-based miniature egg jar incubation system (experiment 2; walleyes, white suckers, and paddlefish). Naturally occurring fungal infestations (saprolegniasis) were observed on eggs in both experiments. Confirmatory diagnosis of infested eggs from one hatchery in experiment 1 identified the pathogen as Saprolegnia parasitica. During experiment 1, eggs were treated daily for 15 min with either 0, 500, or 750 mg/L of hydrogen peroxide, and one trial compared a 500-mg/L hydrogen peroxide treatment with a formalin treatment at 1,667 mg/L. Saprolegniasis infestation was observed in control egg jars, whereas treatment with either formalin or hydrogen peroxide virtually eliminated the infestation. Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 500 mg/L either increased egg hatch or were as effective as physical removal of infested eggs in controlling mortality. Although treatment with formalin at 1,667 mg/L significantly increased the percent eye-up of walleye eggs compared with that of those treated with hydrogen peroxide at 500 mg/L, the difference was only 1.9-2.6%. In experiment 2, noneyed eggs were treated for 15 min every other day with 0, 283, 565, or 1,130 mg/L of hydrogen peroxide until the viable eggs hatched. Saprolegniasis infestation engulfed most control eggs, whereas infestation of treated eggs was either reduced or not visible. Hydrogen peroxide significantly increased egg hatch for all three species tested in experiment 2. Although hydrogen peroxide treatments as low as 283 mg/L significantly increased walleye and white sucker hatch, treatments between 500 and 1,000 mg/L are more likely to be effective in production egg incubation systems.

  19. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  20. Topological Mixing with Ghost Rods

    E-print Network

    Emmanuelle Gouillart; Jean-Luc Thiffeault; Matthew D. Finn

    2006-05-10

    Topological chaos relies on the periodic motion of obstacles in a two-dimensional flow in order to form nontrivial braids. This motion generates exponential stretching of material lines, and hence efficient mixing. Boyland et al. [P. L. Boyland, H. Aref, and M. A. Stremler, J. Fluid Mech. 403, 277 (2000)] have studied a specific periodic motion of rods that exhibits topological chaos in a viscous fluid. We show that it is possible to extend their work to cases where the motion of the stirring rods is topologically trivial by considering the dynamics of special periodic points that we call ghost rods, because they play a similar role to stirring rods. The ghost rods framework provides a new technique for quantifying chaos and gives insight into the mechanisms that produce chaos and mixing. Numerical simulations for Stokes flow support our results.

  1. Distribution, Health, and Development of Larval and Juvenile Lost River and Shortnose Suckers in the Williamson River Delta Restoration Project and Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: 2008 Annual Data Summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; Ottinger, Christopher; Brown, Daniel T.; VanderKooi, Scott P.; Robertson, Laura; Iwanowicz, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Federally endangered Lost River sucker Deltistes luxatus and shortnose sucker Chasmistes brevirostris were once abundant throughout their range but populations have declined; they have been extirpated from several lakes, and may no longer reproduce in others. Poor recruitment into the adult spawning populations is one of several reasons cited for the decline and lack of recovery of these species, and may be the consequence of high mortality during juvenile life stages. High larval and juvenile sucker mortality may be exacerbated by an insufficient quantity of suitable rearing habitat. Within Upper Klamath Lake, a lack of marshes also may allow larval suckers to be swept from suitable rearing areas downstream into the seasonally anoxic waters of the Keno Reservoir. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) flooded about 3,600 acres to the north of the Williamson River mouth (Tulana Unit) in October 2007, and about 1,400 acres to the south and east of the Williamson River mouth (Goose Bay Unit) a year later, to retain larval suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, create nursery habitat for suckers, and improve water quality. In collaboration with TNC, the Bureau of Reclamation, and Oregon State University, we began a long-term collaborative research and monitoring program in 2008 to assess the effects of the Williamson River Delta restoration on the early life-history stages of Lost River and shortnose suckers. Our approach includes two equally important aspects. One component is to describe habitat use and colonization processes by larval and juvenile suckers and non-sucker fish species. The second is to evaluate the effects of the restored habitat on the health and condition of juvenile suckers. This report contains a summary of the first year of data collected as a part of this monitoring effort.

  2. $?-$string - a hybrid between wormhole and string

    E-print Network

    V. Dzhunushaliev

    2003-01-14

    The flux tube solutions in 5D Kaluza-Klein theory can be considered as a string-like object - $\\Delta-$string. The initial 5D metric can be reduced to some inner degrees of freedom living on the $\\Delta-$string. The propagation of electromagnetic waves through the $\\Delta-$string is considered. It is shown that the difference between $\\Delta$ and ordinary strings are connected with the fact that for the $\\Delta-$string such limitations as critical dimensions are missing.

  3. Quantum cards and quantum rods

    E-print Network

    Milan Batista; Joze Peternelj

    2006-11-02

    Quantum mechanical analysis of a rigid rod with one end fixed to a flat table is presented. It is shown, that for a macroscopic rod the ground state is orientationally delocalized only if the table is absolutely horizontal. In this latter case the rod, assumed to be initally in the upright orientation, falls down symmetrically and simultaneously in both directions, as claimed by Tegmark and Wheeler. In addition, the time of fall is calculated using WKB wavefunctions representing energy eigenstates near the barrier summit.

  4. Inflation, string theory and cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2015-02-01

    At its very beginning, the universe is believed to have grown exponentially in size via the mechanism of inflation. The almost scale-invariant density perturbation spectrum predicted by inflation is strongly supported by cosmological observations, in particular the cosmic microwave background (MB) radiation. However, the universe's precise inflationary scenario remains a profound problem for cosmology and for fundamental physics. String theory, the most-studied theory as the final physical theory of nature, should provide an answer to this question. Some of the proposals on how inflation is realized in string theory are reviewed. Since everything is made of strings, some string loops of cosmological sizes are likely to survive in the hot big bang that followed inflation. They appear as cosmic strings, which can have intricate properties. Because of the warped geometry in flux compactification of the extra spatial dimensions in string theory, some of the cosmic strings may have tensions substantially below the Planck or string scale. Such strings cluster in a manner similar to dark matter leading to hugely enhanced densities. As a result, numerous fossil remnants of the low tension cosmic strings may exist within the galaxy. They can be revealed through the optical lensing of background stars in the near future and studied in detail through gravitational wave emission. We anticipate that these cosmic strings will permit us to address central questions about the properties of string theory as well as the birth of our universe.

  5. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  6. Health of white sucker within the St. Louis River area of concern associated with habitat usage as assessed using stable isotopes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spring 2011, 200 adult white sucker were collected in four areas of the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC), located in Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. The areas included the upper AOC as a reference area, the upper estuary, St. Louis Bay and Superior Bay. Grossly visible abno...

  7. Tagging age-1 Lost River and shortnose suckers with passive integrated transponders, Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon–Summary of 2009–11 effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.

    2012-01-01

    A passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging study was initiated in 2009 for age-1 endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, for the purpose of examining causes of mortality, validating estimated age to maturity, and examining movement patterns. This study, which was done opportunistically in 2009 and 2010, received funding in 2011 for a directed tagging effort. Tags were redetected using an existing infrastructure of remote PIT tag readers and tag scanning surveys at American white pelican and double-crested cormorant breeding and loafing areas. Individual fish histories are used to describe the distance, direction, and timing of age-1 sucker movement. Sucker PIT tag detections in the Sprague and Williamson rivers in mid-summer and in autumn indicate age-1 suckers use these tributaries outside of the known spring spawning season. PIT tags detected in bird habitats indicate predation by birds may have been a cause of mortality in 2009. Field conditions prevented scanning bird breeding and loafing areas in Upper Klamath Wildlife National Refuge for tags in 2011, however, limiting our ability to make inferences about bird predation in those years.

  8. Hierarchical nanostructures self-assembled from a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction ?RR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the ?RR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures. PMID:25965726

  9. Hierarchical Nanostructures Self-Assembled from a Mixture System Containing Rod-Coil Block Copolymers and Rigid Homopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction ?RR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the ?RR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures.

  10. Hierarchical Nanostructures Self-Assembled from a Mixture System Containing Rod-Coil Block Copolymers and Rigid Homopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongliang; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua; Zhu, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly behavior of a mixture system containing rod-coil block copolymers and rigid homopolymers was investigated by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The morphologies of formed hierarchical self-assemblies were found to be dependent on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction ?RR between rod blocks, lengths of rod and coil blocks in copolymer, and mixture ratio of block copolymers to homopolymers. As the ?RR value decreases, the self-assembled structures of mixtures are transformed from an abacus-like structure to a helical structure, to a plain fiber, and finally are broken into unimers. The order parameter of rod blocks was calculated to confirm the structure transition. Through varying the length of rod and coil blocks, the regions of thermodynamic stability of abacus, helix, plain fiber, and unimers were mapped. Moreover, it was discovered that two levels of rod block ordering exist in the helices. The block copolymers are helically wrapped on the homopolymer bundles to form helical string, while the rod blocks are twistingly packed inside the string. In addition, the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The present work reveals the mechanism behind the formation of helical (experimentally super-helical) structures and may provide useful information for design and preparation of the complex structures. PMID:25965726

  11. Patterns of Larval Sucker Emigration from the Sprague and Lower Williamson Rivers of the Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon, Prior to the Removal of Chiloquin Dam - 2006 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, Craig M.; Tyler, Torrey J.; VanderKooi, Scott P.; Markle, Douglas F.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, we collected larval Lost River sucker Deltistes luxatus (LRS), shortnose sucker Chasmistes brevirostris (SNS), and Klamath largescale sucker Catostomus snyderi (KLS) emigrating from spawning areas in the Williamson and Sprague Rivers. This work is part of a multi-year effort to characterize the relative abundance, drift timing, and length frequencies of larval suckers in this watershed prior to the removal of Chiloquin Dam on the lower Sprague River. Additional larval drift samples were collected from the Fremont Bridge on Lakeshore Drive on the south end of Upper Klamath Lake near its outlet to the Link River. Because of difficulties in distinguishing KLS larvae from SNS larvae, individuals identified as either of these two species were grouped together and reported as KLS-SNS in this report. We found that larval densities varied by site with the highest densities being collected at the most upstream site on the Sprague River at river kilometer (rkm) 108.0 near Beatty, Oregon (Beatty), and the most downstream sites near Chiloquin, Oregon; one site on the Sprague River at rkm 0.7 (Chiloquin) and the other site on the Williamson River at rkm 7.4 (Williamson). Larval catches were relatively small and sporadic at two other sites on the Sprague River located between Chiloquin and Beatty (Power Station at rkm 9.5 and Lone Pine at rkm 52.7) and one site on the Sycan River at rkm 4.7. Most larvae (79 percent) collected in 2006 were identified as LRS. More larvae and eggs were collected at Chiloquin than at any other site. The seasonal timing of larval drift varied by location; larvae generally were captured earlier at upstream sites than at downstream sites. Cumulative catch percentages of drifting larvae suggest that larval LRS emigrated earlier than KLS-SNS larvae at every site. Drift of LRS larvae at Beatty began 3 to 4 weeks earlier than at Chiloquin or Williamson. At Chiloquin, peak larval catches occurred 3 and 5 weeks after peak egg catches. The daily peak in larval drift at Chiloquin occurred approximately 1.5 to 2.0 hours after sunset. Nightly peak larval drift varied by location; larvae were captured earlier in the evening at sites closer to known spawning locations than sites farther away from these areas. The highest numerical catches of sucker-sized eggs were at Chiloquin indicating that this site is in close proximity to a spawning area. Numerical catches of older, more developed larval and juvenile suckers also were highest at Chiloquin. This may be due to the turbulent nature of this site, which could have swept larger fish into the drift. Proportional catches of older, more developed larval and juvenile suckers were highest at Sycan, Lone Pine, Power Station, and Fremont Bridge. This indicates these sites are located nearer to sucker nursery areas rather than spawning areas. Very few larval LRS were collected at Fremont Bridge at the south end of Upper Klamath Lake. Larval KLS-SNS densities at Fremont Bridge were the third highest of the seven sampling sites. Peak drift of larval KLS-SNS at Fremont Bridge occurred the week after peak drift of larval KLS-SNS at Williamson. Although inter-annual variation continues to appear in the larval drift data, our results continue to show consistent patterns of larval emigration in the drainage basin. In combination with data collected from the spawning movements and destinations of radio-tagged and PIT-tagged adult suckers, this larval drift data will provide a baseline standard by which to determine the effects of dam removal on the spawning distribution of endangered Klamath Basin suckers in the Sprague River.

  12. Evidence for string substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, O.

    1996-06-01

    The author argues that the behavior of string theory at high temperature and high longitudinal boosts, combined with the emergence of p-branes as necessary ingredients in various string dualities, point to a possible reformulation of strings, as well as p-branes, as composites of bits. He reviews the string-bit models, and suggests generalizations to incorporate p-branes.

  13. Constraint Reasoning Over Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to representing and reasoning about constraints over strings. We discuss how many string domains can often be concisely represented using regular languages, and how constraints over strings, and domain operations on sets of strings, can be carried out using this representation.

  14. Cosmic global strings

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

  15. RP cone-rod degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Heckenlively, J R

    1987-01-01

    A group of patients with progressive retinal degeneration and visual field loss, who meet the basic definition of RP were investigated to better define the relationship of the findings on the ERG with clinical characteristics such as visual field size, presence or absence of scotomata or pseudo-altitudinal defects on visual field, amount of night blindness; and presence or absence of macular or optic nerve changes. These studies suggest that cone-rod degeneration patients of the RP type go through the following stages; early, the ERG has a definite cone-rod pattern where the rod ERG is larger than the cone ERG while both are abnormal. As the disease advances, there is more of a reduction in the scotopic ERG such that both the rod and cone ERGs become nearly equal. As the disease further progresses the ERG becomes non-recordable on single-flash technique, but there is good residual rod function and the final rod threshold remains good until the visual field is reduced, typically less than 10 degrees with the IV-4 isopter. Finally with advanced disease the patient becomes night blind and generally becomes very difficult to distinguished from patients who have advanced rod-cone degeneration. While it may seem logical to find that visual field size correlates with various ERG parameters; this has not been as consistent a finding in patients with rod-cone degeneration in the author's experience. The analysis shows several new pieces of information about visual field changes in cone-rod degeneration; enlarged blind spots are seen earlier in cases which have recordable cone-rod patterns (group I), and pseudo-altitudinal changes are more likely to occur in autosomal recessive patients. Patients with macular lesions and central scotomata had larger amplitudes than patients with normal appearing maculae and no central scotomata. Patients with temporal optic atrophy had an earlier onset of symptoms and significant correlation with both photopic a- and b-waves and bright flash dark-adapted b-wave implicit times. Macular edema was present in patients with smaller amplitudes and longer implicit times which suggest that these patients have greater panretinal dysfunction which correlates with the macular alterations. Pigment changes within the classes of none, mild, and moderate deposition correlated with ERG parameters; there was more pigment in cases where ERG parameters were worse. However, cases with heavy pigmentation did not correlate with the ERG degree of severity, suggesting that independent factors influence the amount of pigmentation that occurs in these cases. PMID:3447340

  16. Fluid Mechanics of Strings

    E-print Network

    Daniel Schubring; Vitaly Vanchurin

    2013-06-02

    We consider conserved currents in an interacting network of one-dimensional objects (or strings). Singular currents localized on a single string are considered in general, and a formal procedure for coarse-graining over many strings is developed. This procedure is applied to strings described by the Nambu-Goto action such as cosmic strings. In addition to conserved currents corresponding to the energy-momentum tensor, we consider an antisymmetric tensor of conserved currents related to the string tangent vector. Under the assumption of local equilibrium we derive a complete set of hydrodynamic equations for strings.

  17. Exposure to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent disrupts the pituitary-gonadal axis of white sucker at multiple sites

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Kraak, G.J.; Munkittrick, K.R.; McMaster, M.E.; Portt, C.B.; Chang, J.P. )

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated reproductive problems in white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) exposed to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent (BKME) at Jackfish Bay on Lake Superior. These fish exhibit delayed sexual maturity, reduced gonadal size, reduced secondary sexual characteristics, and circulating steroid levels depressed relative to those of reference populations. The present studies were designed to evaluate sites in the pituitary-gonadal axis of prespawning white sucker affected by BKME exposure. At the time of entry to the spawning stream, plasma levels of immunoreactive gonadotropin (GtH)-II (LH-type GtH) in male and female white sucker were 30- and 50-fold lower, respectively, than the levels in fish from a reference site. A single intraperitoneal injection of D-Arg6, Pro9N-Et sGnRH (sGnRH-A, 0.1 mg/kg) increased plasma GtH levels in male and female fish at both sites, although the magnitude of the response was greatly reduced in BKME-exposed fish. Fish at the BKME site did not ovulate in response to sGnRH-A, while 10 of 10 fish from the reference site ovulated within 6 hr. Plasma 17 alpha,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20 beta-P) levels were depressed in BKME-exposed fish and unlike fish at the reference site, failed to increase in response to sGnRH-A. Testosterone levels in both sexes and 11-ketostestosterone levels in males were elevated in fish from the reference site but were not further increased by GnRH treatment. In contrast, BKME-exposed fish exhibit a transitory increase in testosterone levels in response to the GnRH analog. In vitro incubations of ovarian follicles obtained from fish at the BKME site revealed depressed basal secretion of testosterone and 17,20 beta-P and reduced responsiveness to the GtH analog human chorionic gonadotropin and to forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase.

  18. Using spatial, seasonal, and diel drift patterns of larval Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae) and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae) to help identify a site for a water withdrawal structure on the Williamson River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, Craig M.; Tyler, Torrey J.; VanderKooi, Scott P.

    2010-01-01

    A small irrigation diversion dam near Chiloquin, Oregon, was removed and replaced with a pump station to improve fish passage for Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) entering the Sprague River on their spawning migrations. During the developmental phase of the pump station, a need was identified to better understand the larval drift characteristics of these endangered catostomids in order to reduce entrainment into the irrigation system. The spatial, seasonal, and diel distribution of drifting larvae was measured during the 2004 spawning season at two proposed sites on the Williamson River where the pump station could be located. Larval drift for both species coincided with the irrigation season making them subject to entrainment into the irrigation system. Drift occurred almost exclusively at night with larvae entering the drift at sunset and exiting the drift at sunrise. Nighttime larval densities were concentrated near the surface and at midchannel at both sites. Densities were generally greater on the side of mid-channel with greater flow. During early morning sampling we detected a general shift in larval drift from surface to subsurface drift. We also observed an increase in larval densities towards the shore opposite from the proposed pump station at the upper site whereas larval densities remained high at midchannel at the lower site. During daytime sampling, the few larvae that were collected were distributed throughout the water column at both pump sites. This study found that larvae drifting during all time periods were generally distributed further across the cross section, deeper in the water column, and closer to where the proposed water withdrawal structure would be built at the downstream site when compared to the upstream site. Recommendations were provided to locate the withdrawal facility at the upstream site and operate it in a manner such that larval entrainment would likely be minimized.

  19. String driven inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Turok, N.

    1987-11-01

    It is argued that, in fundamental string theories, as one traces the universe back in time a point is reached when the expansion rate is so fast that the rate of string creation due to quantum effects balances the dilution of the string density due to the expansion. One is therefore led into a phase of constant string density and an exponentially expanding universe. Fundamental strings therefore seem to lead naturally to inflation. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  20. String-driven inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turok, Neil

    1988-01-01

    It is argued that, in fundamental string theories, as one traces the universe back in time a point is reached when the expansion rate is so fast that the rate of string creation due to quantum effects balances the dilution of the string density due to the expansion. One is therefore led into a phase of constant string density and an exponentially expanding universe. Fundamental strings therefore seem to lead naturally to inflation.

  1. Lectures on String Theory

    E-print Network

    Tong, David

    2009-01-01

    This is a one semester course on bosonic string theory aimed at beginning graduate students. The lectures assume a working knowledge of quantum field theory and general relativity. Contents: 1. The Classical String 2. The Quantum String 3. Open Strings and D-Branes 4. Introducing Conformal Field Theory 5. The Polyakov Path Integral and Ghosts 6. String Interactions 7. The Low-Energy Effective Action 8. Compactification and T-Duality

  2. Rod gripper, changer, and storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Mark; Demi, Todd; Mcneill, Robert; Waldo, Keith; Afghan, Alex; Oliver, Jim

    1989-01-01

    A rod changer and storage design is presented for the lunar deep drill apparatus to be used in conjunction with the Skitter walking platform. The design must take into account all of the lunar environment and working conditions. Some of these are: (1) the moon has one sixth the gravity of earth; (2) temperature gradients can range from about -170 to 265 C; (3) because of the high transportation costs, the design must be as light as possible; and (4) the process must be remotely operated (from earth or satellite) and must be automated. Because of Skitter's multiple degree of freedom movement, the design will utilize Skitter's movement to locate an implement and transport it from the rack to the drill string. The implement will be gripped by a thumb and two finger device, identified through an electronic sensing device on the thumb, and transported from the rack to the footplate and back from the footplate to the rack. The major designs discussed in this report have been broken down into three major areas: (1) gripper design (linear transport mechanism); (2) indexing system; and (3) rack design.

  3. Assessing genetic diversity of wild and hatchery samples of the Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) by the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiayun; Wu, Bo; Hou, Feixia; Chen, Yongbai; Li, Chong; Song, Zhaobin

    2016-03-01

    To restore the natural populations of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus), a hatchery release program has been underway for nearly 10 years. Using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region, we assessed the genetic diversity and genetic structure among samples collected from three sites of the wild population as well as from three hatcheries. The haplotype diversity of the wild samples (h?=?0.899-0.975) was significantly higher than that of the hatchery ones (h?=?0.296-0.666), but the nucleotide diversity was almost identical between them (??=?0.0170-0.0280). Relatively high gene flow was detected between the hatchery and wild samples. Analysis of effective population size indicated that M. asiaticus living in the Yangtze River has been expanding following a bottleneck in the recent past. Our results suggest the hatchery release programs for M. asiaticus have not reduced the genetic diversity, but have influenced the genetic structure of the species in the upper Yangtze River. PMID:25242190

  4. Microphase separation in polydisperse rod-rod diblock copolymer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, M. A.; Kuzminyh, N. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    The stability limits of the isotropic state of melt of rod-rod AB polydisperse diblock copolymer have been studied within weak segregation theory. The number of units in A block is assumed to be a random variable distributed by the Schulz-Zimm distribution. Inspection of the spinodal curves shows that the copolymer melt with polydisperse rigid blocks is less stable with respect to formation of the nematic and microphase separated states than the monodisperse melt. The values of ratios between strengths of isotropic and anisotropic interactions in the system strongly influences the forms of isotropic-nematic boundary curves.

  5. Microphase separation in polydisperse rod-rod diblock copolymer melt.

    PubMed

    Aliev, M A; Kuzminyh, N Yu

    2015-08-28

    The stability limits of the isotropic state of melt of rod-rod AB polydisperse diblock copolymer have been studied within weak segregation theory. The number of units in A block is assumed to be a random variable distributed by the Schulz-Zimm distribution. Inspection of the spinodal curves shows that the copolymer melt with polydisperse rigid blocks is less stable with respect to formation of the nematic and microphase separated states than the monodisperse melt. The values of ratios between strengths of isotropic and anisotropic interactions in the system strongly influences the forms of isotropic-nematic boundary curves. PMID:26328869

  6. The nonlinear bending-torsion theory for curved rods as Gamma-limit of three-dimensional elasticity

    E-print Network

    Lucia Scardia

    2008-03-06

    The problem of the rigorous derivation of one-dimensional models for nonlinearly elastic curved beams is studied in a variational setting. Considering different scalings of the three-dimensional energy and passing to the limit as the diameter of the beam goes to zero, a nonlinear model for strings and a bending-torsion theory for rods are deduced.

  7. Particle-tracking investigation of the retention of sucker larvae emerging from spawning grounds in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Wherry, Susan A.; Simon, David C.; Markle, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to use the results of an individual-based particle-tracking model of larval sucker dispersal through the Williamson River delta and Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, to interpret field data collected throughout Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, and (2) to use the model to investigate the retention of sucker larvae in the system as a function of Williamson River flow, wind, and lake elevation. This is a follow-up study to work reported in Wood and others (2014) in which the hydrodynamic model of Upper Klamath Lake was combined with an individual-based, particle-tracking model of larval fish entering the lake from spawning areas in the Williamson River. In the previous study, the performance of the model was evaluated through comparison with field data comprising larval sucker distribution collected in 2009 by The Nature Conservancy, Oregon State University (OSU), and the U.S. Geological Survey, primarily from the (at that time) recently reconnected Williamson River Delta and along the eastern shoreline of Upper Klamath Lake, surrounding the old river mouth. The previous study demonstrated that the validation of the model with field data was moderately successful and that the model was useful for describing the broad patterns of larval dispersal from the river, at least in the areas surrounding the river channel immediately downstream of the spawning areas and along the shoreline where larvae enter the lake. In this study, field data collected by OSU throughout the main body of Upper Klamath Lake, and not just around the Williamson River Delta, were compared to model simulation results. Because the field data were collected throughout the lake, it was necessary to include in the simulations larvae spawned at eastern shoreline springs that were not included in the earlier studies. A complicating factor was that the OSU collected data throughout the main body of the lake in 2011 and 2012, after the end of several years of larval drift collection in the Williamson River by the U.S. Geological Survey. Those larval drift data provided necessary boundary-condition information for the earlier studies, but there were no measured boundary conditions for larval input into model simulations during the years of this study (2011?12). Therefore, we developed a method to estimate a time series of larval drift in the Williamson River, and of the emergence of larvae from the gravel at the eastern shoreline springs, that captured the approximate timing of the larval pulse of the Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris) and the relative magnitude of the pulses by species and spawning location. The method is not able to predict larval drift on any given day, but it can reasonably predict the approximate temporal progression of the larval drift through the season, based on counts of adult suckers returning to spawn. The accuracy in the timing of the larval pulses is not better than about plus or minus 5 days. Model results and field data were consistent in the basic progression of both catch per unit effort (CPUE) and larval length through time. The model simulation results also duplicated some of the characteristics of the spatial patterns of density in the field data, notably the tendency for high larval densities closer to the eastern and western shorelines. However, the model simulations could not explain high densities in the northern part of the lake or far into Ball Bay, locations that are far from the source of larvae in the Williamson River or eastern shoreline springs (as measured along the predominant transport pathways simulated in the model). This suggests the possibility of unaccounted-for spawning areas in the northern part of the lake and also that the period during which larvae are transported passively by the currents is shorter than the 46 days simulated in the model. Similarly, the progression of larval lengths in the field data is not a simple progression from smaller to larger fish away from sources in the river and springs, as simulated by the parti

  8. String Field Theory

    E-print Network

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  9. Stuck fuel rod capping sleeve

    DOEpatents

    Gorscak, Donald A. (Bethel Park, PA); Maringo, John J. (McKeesport, PA); Nilsen, Roy J. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    1988-01-01

    A stuck fuel rod capping sleeve to be used during derodding of spent fuel assemblies if a fuel rod becomes stuck in a partially withdrawn position and, thus, has to be severed. The capping sleeve has an inner sleeve made of a lower work hardening highly ductile material (e.g., Inconel 600) and an outer sleeve made of a moderately ductile material (e.g., 304 stainless steel). The inner sleeve may be made of an epoxy filler. The capping sleeve is placed on a fuel rod which is then severed by using a bolt cutter device. Upon cutting, the capping sleeve deforms in such a manner as to prevent the gross release of radioactive fuel material

  10. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  11. String axiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dubovsky, Sergei; Kaloper, Nemanja; March-Russell, John

    2010-06-15

    String theory suggests the simultaneous presence of many ultralight axions, possibly populating each decade of mass down to the Hubble scale 10{sup -33} eV. Conversely the presence of such a plenitude of axions (an axiverse) would be evidence for string theory, since it arises due to the topological complexity of the extra-dimensional manifold and is ad hoc in a theory with just the four familiar dimensions. We investigate how several upcoming astrophysical experiments will be observationally exploring the possible existence of such axions over a vast mass range from 10{sup -33} eV to 10{sup -10} eV. Axions with masses between 10{sup -33} eV to 10{sup -28} eV can cause a rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization that is constant throughout the sky. The predicted rotation angle is independent of the scale of inflation and the axion decay constant, and is of order {alpha}{approx}1/137-within reach of the just launched Planck satellite. Axions in the mass range 10{sup -28} eV to 10{sup -18} eV give rise to multiple steps in the matter power spectrum, providing us with a snapshot of the axiverse that will be probed by galaxy surveys-such as BOSS, and 21 cm line tomography. Axions in the mass range 10{sup -22} eV to 10{sup -10} eV can affect the dynamics and gravitational wave emission of rapidly rotating astrophysical black holes through the Penrose superradiance process. When the axion Compton wavelength is of order of the black hole size, the axions develop superradiant atomic bound states around the black hole nucleus. Their occupation number grows exponentially by extracting rotational energy and angular momentum from the ergosphere, culminating in a rotating Bose-Einstein axion condensate emitting gravitational waves. For black holes lighter than {approx}10{sup 7} solar masses accretion cannot replenish the spin of the black hole, creating mass gaps in the spectrum of rapidly rotating black holes that diagnose the presence of destabilizing axions. In particular, the highly rotating black hole in the X-ray binary LMC X-1 implies an upper limit on the decay constant of the QCD axion f{sub a} < or approx. 2x10{sup 17} GeV, much below the Planck mass. This reach can be improved down to the grand unification scale f{sub a}< or approx. 2x10{sup 16} GeV, by observing smaller stellar mass black holes.

  12. String Axiverse

    E-print Network

    Asimina Arvanitaki; Savas Dimopoulos; Sergei Dubovsky; Nemanja Kaloper; John March-Russell

    2009-10-23

    String theory suggests the simultaneous presence of many ultralight axions possibly populating each decade of mass down to the Hubble scale 10^-33eV. Conversely the presence of such a plenitude of axions (an "axiverse") would be evidence for string theory, since it arises due to the topological complexity of the extra-dimensional manifold and is ad hoc in a theory with just the four familiar dimensions. We investigate how upcoming astrophysical experiments will explore the existence of such axions over a vast mass range from 10^-33eV to 10^-10eV. Axions with masses between 10^-33eV to 10^-28eV cause a rotation of the CMB polarization that is constant throughout the sky. The predicted rotation angle is of order \\alpha~1/137. Axions in the mass range 10^-28eV to 10^-18eV give rise to multiple steps in the matter power spectrum, that will be probed by upcoming galaxy surveys. Axions in the mass range 10^-22eV to 10^-10eV affect the dynamics and gravitational wave emission of rapidly rotating astrophysical black holes through the Penrose superradiance process. When the axion Compton wavelength is of order of the black hole size, the axions develop "superradiant" atomic bound states around the black hole "nucleus". Their occupation number grows exponentially by extracting rotational energy from the ergosphere, culminating in a rotating Bose-Einstein axion condensate emitting gravitational waves. This mechanism creates mass gaps in the spectrum of rapidly rotating black holes that diagnose the presence of axions. The rapidly rotating black hole in the X-ray binary LMC X-1 implies an upper limit on the decay constant of the QCD axion f_amuch below the Planck mass. This reach can be improved down to the grand unification scale f_a<2*10^16GeV, by observing smaller stellar mass black holes.

  13. Effects of Chiloquin Dam on spawning distribution and larval emigration of Lost River, shortnose, and Klamath largescale suckers in the Williamson and Sprague Rivers, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Barbara A.; Hewitt, David A.; Ellsworth, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Chiloquin Dam was constructed in 1914 on the Sprague River near the town of Chiloquin, Oregon. The dam was identified as a barrier that potentially inhibited or prevented the upstream spawning migrations and other movements of endangered Lost River (Deltistes luxatusChasmistes brevirostris) suckers, as well as other fish species. In 2002, the Bureau of Reclamation led a working group that examined several alternatives to improve fish passage at Chiloquin Dam. Ultimately it was decided that dam removal was the best alternative and the dam was removed in the summer of 2008. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a long-term study on the spawning ecology of Lost River, shortnose, and Klamath largescale suckers (Catostomus snyderi) in the Sprague and lower Williamson Rivers from 2004 to 2010. The objective of this study was to evaluate shifts in spawning distribution following the removal of Chiloquin Dam. Radio telemetry was used in conjunction with larval production data and detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) to evaluate whether dam removal resulted in increased utilization of spawning habitat farther upstream in the Sprague River. Increased densities of drifting larvae were observed at a site in the lower Williamson River after the dam was removed, but no substantial changes occurred upstream of the former dam site. Adult spawning migrations primarily were influenced by water temperature and did not change with the removal of the dam. Emigration of larvae consistently occurred about 3-4 weeks after adults migrated into a section of river. Detections of PIT-tagged fish showed increases in the numbers of all three suckers that migrated upstream of the dam site following removal, but the increases for Lost River and shortnose suckers were relatively small compared to the total number of fish that made a spawning migration in a given season. Increases for Klamath largescale suckers were more substantial. Post-dam removal monitoring only included 2 years with below average river discharge during the spawning season; data from years with higher flows may provide a different perspective on the effects of dam removal on the spawning migrations of the two endangered sucker species.

  14. Fundamental strings in SFT

    E-print Network

    L. Bonora; C. Maccaferri; R. J. Scherer Santos; D. D. Tolla

    2005-01-14

    In this letter we show that vacuum string field theory contains exact solutions that can be interpreted as macroscopic fundamental strings. They are formed by a condensate of infinitely many completely space-localized solutions (D0-branes).

  15. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  16. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.793 Rod, lock. A rod, attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse...

  17. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.793 Rod, lock. A rod, attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse...

  18. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.793 Rod, lock. A rod, attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse...

  19. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.793 Rod, lock. A rod, attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse...

  20. 49 CFR 236.793 - Rod, lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.793 Rod, lock. A rod, attached to the front rod or lug of a switch, movable-point frog or derail, through which a locking plunger may extend when the switch points or derail are in the normal or reverse...

  1. Drill string enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1993-03-02

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  2. [The string of Einthoven's string galvanometer].

    PubMed

    Wyers, P J

    1996-01-01

    The Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) published in 1901 his construction of a string galvanometer. With this apparatus he opened the era for electrocardiography. As the quality of his instrument largely depended on the string of the string galvanometer it is surprising to note that in his publications Einthoven never mentioned the exact way of producing the string. However, Einthoven's hand written laboratory notes are preserved at the Museum Boerhaave in Leiden. From these notes it comes clear what problems Einthoven had with the string. To get a very thin thread of quarts he first used the method of shooting the thread as was described by Boys (1887), later the blowing method of Nichols (1894). The silvering of the thread was done first chemically, later by cathode spray. In all cases premature breaking of the thread was a nuisance. Because of these failures Einthoven might have decided not to publish any details. PMID:11624925

  3. Rod cluster having improved vane configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Shockling, L.A.; Francis, T.A.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a pressurized water reactor vessel, the vessel defining a predetermined axial direction of the flow of coolant therewithin and having plural spider assemblies supporting, for vertical movement within the vessel, respective clusters of rods in spaced, parallel axial relationship, parallel to the predetermined axial direction of coolant flow, and a rod guide for each spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The rod guide having horizontally oriented support plates therewithin, each plate having an interior opening for accommodating axial movement therethrough of the spider assembly and respective cluster of rods. The opening defining plural radially extending channels and corresponding parallel interior wall surfaces of the support plate.

  4. Monopoles on strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2015-09-01

    In cosmological scenarios based on grand unification, string theory or braneworlds, many kinds of topological or non-topological defects, including monopoles and cosmic strings, are predicted to be formed in the early Universe. Here we review specifically the physics of composite objects involving monopoles tied to strings. There is a wide variety of these, including for example ‘dumbbells’ and ‘necklaces’, depending on how many strings attach to each monopole and on the extent to which the various fluxes are confined to the strings. We also briefly survey the prospects for observing such structures, the existing observational limits, and potential evidence for a cosmological role.

  5. Closed strings from nothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew; Lawrence, Albion; Shenker, Stephen

    2001-09-01

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type-II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori, and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and world sheet boundary renormalization group flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings existing in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size of order ?' through sigma model and string coupling effects, and that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting.

  6. Closed strings from nothing

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Lawrence, Albion; Shenker, Stephen

    2001-09-15

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type-II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori, and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and world sheet boundary renormalization group flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings existing in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size of order {alpha}' through sigma model and string coupling effects, and that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting.

  7. Closed Strings From Nothing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Albion

    2001-07-25

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and worldsheet boundary RG flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge, it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings living in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size or order {alpha}' through sigma model and string coupling effects; and we argue that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting.

  8. Exploiting rod technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-06-01

    ROD development was proceeding apace until recent budgetary decisions caused funding support for ROD development to be drastically reduced. The funding which was originally provided by DARPA and the Balanced Technology Initiative (BTI) Office has been cut back to zero from $800K. To determine the aeroballistic coefficients of a candidate dart, ARDEC is currently supporting development out of its own 6.2 funds at about $100K. ARDEC has made slow progress toward achieving this end because of failures in the original dart during testing. It appears that the next dart design to be tested will diverge from the original concept visualized by DARPA and Science and Technology Associates (STA). STA, the design engineer, takes exception to these changes on the basis of inappropriate test conditions and insufficient testing. At this time, the full resolution of this issue will be difficult because of the current management structure, which separates the developer (ARDEC) from the designer (STA).

  9. Tribe kills fuel rod proposal

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-13

    This article is a review of nuclear utilities` efforts to find a repository of spent fuel rods. The rejection by the Mescalero Apaches of plans to build a waste repository on tribal lands has left a number of utilities scrambling to find interim solutions. Prairie Island will have to close before the end of the year unless a solution is found, and the Hope Creek/Salem units, exhausting there storage capacity within ten years, are considering dry-cask storage.

  10. Coiling rods onto moving substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawed, Mohammad; da, Fang; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    We present results on the nonlinear patterns obtained when a thin elastic rod is deployed onto a moving substrate. Our experiments comprise an injector that deposits an elastomeric rod onto a conveyor belt, where it coils in a variety of nonlinear patterns, depending on the control parameters. The portion of the rod that is suspended between the injector and the point of contact with the belt can exhibit strong geometric nonlinearities that are a challenge for traditional analytical and numerical methods. We tackle this challenge by coupling our precision model experiments with cutting-edge simulation tools ported from the computer graphics community. By systematically exploring parameter space, we map out the basins of stability of the various nonlinear coiling patterns, which are then rationalized using a detailed energy balance. We give particular emphasis to the sinusoidal patterns that emerge from a straight-to-meandering instability that we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation. Closed-form solutions are derived to describe the amplitude and wavelength of the meandering patterns. The excellent agreement between experiments, simulations and theory conveys the predictive ability of our tools to be used, upon scaling, in the original engineering applications that motivated this study: serpentines created from the coiling of carbon nanotubes (at the micron-scale) and the laying down of transoceanic undersea cables (at the kilometer-scale).

  11. String theory effective action; String loop corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, A.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the general ideology of the computation of string loop corrections to the effective action for the massless modes of the string. Both the S-matrix and the sigma-model approaches are presented. It is emphasized that the effective action is more general and better defined object than the S-matrix. In particular, it is finite in spite of modular infinities that may be present in loop amplitudes computed near a wrong vacuum. The case of the disc topology in the open-closed string theory is treated in some detail. Some issues concerning the soft dilation vertex operators related to the infinities of the string amplitudes are discussed.

  12. Nonlocality in string theory

    E-print Network

    Gianluca Calcagni; Leonardo Modesto

    2014-08-19

    We discuss an aspect of string theory which has been tackled from many different perspectives, but incompletely: the role of nonlocality in the theory and its relation to the geometric shape of the string. In particular, we will describe in quantitative terms how one can zoom out from an extended object such as the string in such a way that, at sufficiently large scales, it appears structureless. Since there are no free parameters in free-string theory, the notion of large scales will be unambiguously determined. In other words, we will be able to answer the question: How and at which scale can the string be seen as a particle? In doing so, we will employ the concept of spectral dimension in a new way with respect to its usual applications in quantum gravity. The operational notions of worldsheet and target spacetime dimension in string theory are also clarified and found to be in mutual agreement.

  13. Letter: Delta-String-A Hybrid Between Wormhole and String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, V.

    2003-08-01

    The flux tube solutions in 5D Kaluza-Klein theory can be considered as string-like objects-?-strings. The initial 5D metric can be reduced to some inner degrees of freedom living on the ?-string. The propagation of electromagnetic waves through the ?-string is considered. It is shown that the difference between ? and ordinary strings are connected with the fact that for the ?-string such limitations as critical dimensions are missing.

  14. Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Wu, P.T.K.

    1980-03-18

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  15. Drill string enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a drill string enclosure which consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  16. String Theory and Duality

    E-print Network

    Paul S. Aspinwall

    1998-09-01

    This is a very brief survey of some results in the geometry of string duality delivered at a lecture given at ICM 1998, Berlin. String Duality is the statement that one kind of string theory compactified on one space is equivalent in some sense to another string theory compactified on a second space. This draws a connection between two quite different spaces. Mirror symmetry is an example of this. Here we discuss mirror symmetry and another ``heterotic/type II'' duality which relates vector bundles on a K3 surface to a Calabi-Yau threefold.

  17. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  18. Introduction to string field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, J.; Raby, S.

    1986-01-01

    An action is proposed for an interacting closed bosonic string. Our formalism relies heavily on ideas discussed by Witten for the open bosonic string. The gauge fixed quantum action for the fully interacting open bosonic string is obtained.

  19. Ultrasonic profilometry system for control rod wear

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, J.W.; Kelly, M.J.; Latham, W.M.; Stinnett, C.E.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes an apparatus for scanning the outer profile of control rods. It comprises a module support positioned at a fixed location with respect to a control rod to be scanned, a transducer drive tube mounted for rotation about the axis of a control rod for receiving a control rod therein, a transducer holder connected to the transducer drive tube carrying ultrasonic transducer means facing an interior of the transducer drive tube, for sending an ultrasonic beam to and receiving ultrasonic echo energy from the surface of the control rod, the holder having at least one part for carrying the ultrasonic transducer means which is mounted for limited radial movement with respect to the transducer drive tube; rotation means, mounted to the module support and engaged with the transducer drive tube for rotating the transducer drive tube and the ultrasonic transducer means around the axis of the control rod; and translation means for translating the control rod with respect to the ultrasonic transducer means, in a direction parallel to the axis of the control rod, for scanning the surface of the control rod along a helical path.

  20. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.; Pardini, J.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1984-03-13

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  1. Temperature actuated automatic safety rod release

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL); Pardini, John A. (Brookfield, IL); Walker, David E. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A temperature-actuated apparatus is disclosed for releasably supporting a safety rod in a nuclear reactor, comprising a safety rod upper adapter having a retention means, a drive shaft which houses the upper adapter, and a bimetallic means supported within the drive shaft and having at least one ledge which engages a retention means of the safety rod upper adapter. A pre-determined increase in temperature causes the bimetallic means to deform so that the ledge disengages from the retention means, whereby the bimetallic means releases the safety rod into the core of the reactor.

  2. String Theory and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit

    2004-03-02

    It appears that string theory can give rise to many different 4d worlds, manifesting different values of fundamental parameters such as the cosmological constant. We discuss the structure of this 'landscape' of string vacua, and show that some aspects are amenable to calculation. We also describe simple models of inflation, dark energy, and particle physics that have been proposed in this context

  3. Playing with Black Strings

    E-print Network

    Gary T. Horowitz

    2002-05-07

    We review recent work showing that there exists a large class of new stable black strings which are not translationally invariant. Both neutral and charged black strings are considered. The discussion includes known properties of these new solutions, attempts to find them explicitly, and a list of open questions.

  4. k-Strings as Fundamental Strings

    E-print Network

    Giataganas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    It has been noticed that the k-string observables can be expressed in terms of the fundamental string ones. We identify a sufficient condition for a generic gravity dual background which when satisfied the mapping can be done. The condition is naturally related to a preserved quantity under the T-dualities acting on the Dp-brane describing the high representation Wilson loops. We also find the explicit relation between the observables of the heavy k-quark and the single quark states. As an application to our generic study and motivated by the fact that the anisotropic theories satisfy our condition, we compute the width of the k-string in these theories to find that the logarithmic broadening is still present, but the total result is affected by the anisotropy of the space.

  5. k-Strings as Fundamental Strings

    E-print Network

    Dimitrios Giataganas

    2015-03-31

    It has been noticed that the k-string observables can be expressed in terms of the fundamental string ones. We identify a sufficient condition for a generic gravity dual background which when satisfied the mapping can be done. The condition is naturally related to a preserved quantity under the T-dualities acting on the Dp-brane describing the high representation Wilson loops. We also find the explicit relation between the observables of the heavy k-quark and the single quark states. As an application to our generic study and motivated by the fact that the anisotropic theories satisfy our condition, we compute the width of the k-string in these theories to find that the logarithmic broadening is still present, but the total result is affected by the anisotropy of the space.

  6. PT-symmetric strings

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Fernández, Francisco M.; Garcia, Javier; Gutierrez, German

    2014-04-15

    We study both analytically and numerically the spectrum of inhomogeneous strings with PT-symmetric density. We discuss an exactly solvable model of PT-symmetric string which is isospectral to the uniform string; for more general strings, we calculate exactly the sum rules Z(p)??{sub n=1}{sup ?}1/E{sub n}{sup p}, with p=1,2,… and find explicit expressions which can be used to obtain bounds on the lowest eigenvalue. A detailed numerical calculation is carried out for two non-solvable models depending on a parameter, obtaining precise estimates of the critical values where pair of real eigenvalues become complex. -- Highlights: •PT-symmetric Hamiltonians exhibit real eigenvalues when PT symmetry is unbroken. •We study PT-symmetric strings with complex density. •They exhibit regions of unbroken PT symmetry. •We calculate the critical parameters at the boundaries of those regions. •There are exact real sum rules for some particular complex densities.

  7. String Cosmology: A Review

    E-print Network

    Gerald Cleaver

    2003-09-12

    The second string revolution, which begin around 1995, has led to a drastic alteration in our perception of the universe, perhaps even more so then did the first string revolution of 1984. That is, extending 10-dimensional string theory to 11-dimensional M-theory has had more profound implications than did the original extension of 4-dimensional quantum mechanics and relativity to 10-dimensional string theory. After a brief review of M-theory, I discuss some implications of large extra dimensions. I then consider astronomical evidence for, and constraints on, large compactified dimensions. I conclude with a possible resolution to the apparent inconsistency between the MSSM scale and string scale in the weak coupling limit. Talk presented at COSPAR '02, Houston, Texas, October 2002.

  8. Napier's bones and Genaille-Lucas's rods

    E-print Network

    Roegel, Denis

    virgulas libri duo [26], John Napier (1550­1617) introduced his famous "bones." Three years afterNapier's bones and Genaille-Lucas's rods Denis Roegel 20 May 2015 Abstract This note presents a survey of Napier's bones and of their more "auto- matic" evolution, the Genaille-Lucas rods

  9. Tipping Time of a Quantum Rod

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrikar, Onkar

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of a quantum rod, pivoted at its lower end on an impenetrable floor and restricted to moving in the vertical plane under the gravitational potential, is studied analytically under the approximation that the rod is initially localized to a "small-enough" neighbourhood around the point of classical unstable equilibrium. It is shown…

  10. Arenas for String Phenomenology String Phenomenology 2011, Madison

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Phenomenology #12;String Theory and Cosmology Cosmology is another arena in which a would-be theory of gravity may confront observation. For string theory, the challenges include: 1 Nature of inflation 2Arenas for String Phenomenology String Phenomenology 2011, Madison Michael Dine Department

  11. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. ...An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3020 Intramedullary fixation rod. ...An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as...

  13. Noise removal at the rod synapse of mammalian retina 

    E-print Network

    van Rossum, Mark; Smith, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Mammalian rods respond to single photons with a hyperpolarization of about 1 mV which is accompanied by continuous noise. Since the mammalian rod bipolar cell collects signals from 20-100 rods, the noise from the converging ...

  14. Closed String Cohomology in Open String Field Theory

    E-print Network

    Nicolas Moeller; Ivo Sachs

    2010-10-20

    We show that closed string states in bosonic string field theory are encoded in the cyclic cohomology of cubic open string field theory (OSFT) which, in turn, classifies the deformations of OSFT. This cohomology is then shown to be independent of the open string background. Exact elements correspond to closed string gauge transformations, generic boundary deformations of Witten's 3-vertex and infinitesimal shifts of the open string background. Finally it is argued that the closed string cohomology and the cyclic cohomology of OSFT are isomorphic to each other.

  15. Fusing E-strings to heterotic strings: E +E ?H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighat, Babak; Lockhart, Guglielmo; Vafa, Cumrun

    2014-12-01

    E-strings arise from M2 branes suspended between an M5 brane and an M9 plane. In this paper we obtain explicit expressions for the elliptic genus of two E-strings using a series of string dualities. Moreover we show how this can be used to recover the elliptic genus of two E8×E8 heterotic strings using the Ho?ava-Witten realization of heterotic strings in M-theory. This involves highly nontrivial identities among Jacobi forms and is remarkable in light of the fact that E-strings are "sticky" and form bound states whereas heterotic strings do not form bound states.

  16. QCD String as Vortex String in Seiberg-Dual Theory

    E-print Network

    Minoru Eto; Koji Hashimoto; Seiji Terashima

    2007-06-14

    We construct a classical vortex string solution in a Seiberg-dual theory of N=1 supersymmetric SO(N_c) QCD which flows to a confining phase. We claim that this vortex string is a QCD string, as previouly argued by M.Strassler. In SO(N_c) QCD, it is known that stable QCD strings exist even in the presence of dynamical quarks. We show that our vortex strings are stable in the Seiberg-dual theory.

  17. String field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, M.

    1987-02-01

    In this article, the authors summarize the rapid progress in constructing string field theory actions, such as the development of the covariant BRST theory. They also present the newer geometric formulation of string field theory, from which the BRST theory and the older light cone theory can be derived from first principles. This geometric formulation allows us to derive the complete field theory of strings from two geometric principles, in the same way that general relativity and Yang-Mills theory can be derived from two principles based on global and local symmetry. The geometric formalism therefore reduces string field theory to a problem of finding an invariant under a new local gauge group they call the universal string group (USG). Thus, string field theory is the gauge theory of the universal string group in much the same way that Yang-Mills theory is the gauge theory of SU(N). The geometric formulation places superstring theory on the same rigorous group theoretical level as general relativity and gauge theory.

  18. Lumpy cosmic strings

    E-print Network

    Matthew J. Lake; Tiberiu Harko

    2015-02-16

    We outline a model of abelian-Higgs strings with variable scalar and vector core radii. In general, the functions determining the time and position-dependent core widths may be expressed as arbitrary left or right movers, of which the usual constant values are a particular solution. In this case the string may carry momentum, even if the embedding of its central axis remains fixed, and the resulting objects resemble "necklaces". Some possible astrophysical applications of lumpy strings, including as potential engines for anomalous gamma ray bursts, are also discussed.

  19. Cosmological cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an infinite cosmic string on a cosmological background is investigated. It is found that the metric is approximately a scaled version of the empty space string metric, i.e., conical in nature. Results are used to place bounds on the amount of cylindrical gravitational radiation currently emitted by such a string. The gravitational radiation equations are then analyzed explicitly and it is shown that even initially large disturbances are rapidly damped as the expansion proceeds. The implications of the gravitational radiation background and the limitations of the quadrupole formula are discussed.

  20. Integrability in String Theories

    E-print Network

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-04-03

    The solution term by term to the scattering of all consistent string theories is given. The moduli space of M-theory is derived and connects the various string theories. The solutions contain both the perturbative and non-perturbative sectors of the string. Modular forms found by differential equations on subspaces of the M-theory moduli space and transfinite algebras play an essential role in deriving the coefficients. Various results and identities in algebra are found from the explicit solution. Archetypes and models are presented in accord with phenomenology and cosmology.

  1. Gelation and mechanical response of patchy rods.

    PubMed

    Kazem, Navid; Majidi, Carmel; Maloney, Craig E

    2015-10-28

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to study the gelation of suspensions of attractive, rod-like particles. We show that in detail the rod-rod surface interactions can dramatically affect the dynamics of gelation and the structure and mechanics of the networks that form. If the attraction between the rods is perfectly smooth along their length, they will collapse into compact bundles. If the attraction is sufficiently corrugated or patchy, over time, a rigid space-spanning network will form. We study the structure and mechanical properties of the networks that form as a function of the fraction of the surface, f, that is allowed to bind. Surprisingly, the structural and mechanical properties are non-monotonic in f. At low f, there are not a sufficient number of cross-linking sites to form networks. At high f, rods bundle and form disconnected clusters. At intermediate f, robust networks form. The elastic modulus and yield stress are both non-monotonic in the surface coverage. The stiffest and strongest networks show an essentially homogeneous deformation under strain with rods re-orienting along the extensional axis. Weaker, more clumpy networks at high f re-orient relatively little with strong non-affine deformation. These results suggest design strategies for tailoring surface interactions between rods to yield rigid networks with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:26381995

  2. Control Rod Malfunction at the NRAD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Maddock

    2010-05-01

    The neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a training, research, and isotope (TRIGA) reactor located at the INL. The reactor is normally shut down by the insertion of three control rods that drop into the core when power is removed from electromagnets. During a routine shutdown, indicator lights on the console showed that one of the control rods was not inserted. It was initially thought that the indicator lights were in error because of a limit switch that was out of adjustment. Through further testing, it was determined that the control rod did not drop when the scram switch was initially pressed. The control rod anomaly led to a six month shutdown of the reactor and an in depth investigation of the reactor protective system. The investigation looked into: scram switch operation, console modifications, and control rod drive mechanisms. A number of latent issues were discovered and corrected during the investigation. The cause of the control rod malfunction was found to be a buildup of corrosion in the control rod drive mechanism. The investigation resulted in modifications to equipment, changes to both operation and maintenance procedures, and additional training. No reoccurrences of the problem have been observed since corrective actions were implemented.

  3. Cosmic string loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational backreaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusplike structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  4. QCD and String Theory

    E-print Network

    Igor R. Klebanov

    2005-10-19

    This talk begins with some history and basic facts about string theory and its connections with strong interactions. Comparisons of stacks of Dirichlet branes with curved backgrounds produced by them are used to motivate the AdS/CFT correspondence between superconformal gauge theory and string theory on a product of Anti-de Sitter space and a compact manifold. The ensuing duality between semi-classical spinning strings and long gauge theory operators is briefly reviewed. Strongly coupled thermal SYM theory is explored via a black hole in 5-dimensional AdS space, which leads to explicit results for its entropy and shear viscosity. A conjectured universal lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio, and its possible relation to recent results from RHIC, are discussed. Finally, some available results on string duals of confining gauge theories are briefly reviewed.

  5. Subsurface drill string

    DOEpatents

    Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  6. Finite volume approach for the instationary Cosserat rod model describing the spinning of viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arne, Walter; Marheineke, Nicole; Meister, Andreas; Schiessl, Stefan; Wegener, Raimund

    2015-08-01

    The spinning of slender viscous jets can be asymptotically described by one-dimensional models that consist of systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Whereas well-established string models only possess solutions for certain choices of parameters and configurations, the more sophisticated rod model is not limited by restrictions. It can be considered as an ?-regularized string model, but containing the slenderness ratio ? in the equations complicates its numerical treatment. We develop numerical schemes for fixed or enlarging (time-dependent) domains, using a finite volume approach in space with mixed central, up- and down-winded differences and stiffly accurate Radau methods for the time integration. For the first time, results of instationary simulations for a fixed or growing jet in a rotational spinning process are presented for arbitrary parameter ranges.

  7. String Theory at LHC Using Top Quarks From String Balls

    E-print Network

    Gouranga C Nayak

    2009-06-23

    According to string theory, string ball is a highly excited long string which decays to standard model particles at the Hagedorn temperature with thermal spectrum. If there are extra dimensions, the string scale can be $\\sim$ TeV, and we should produce string balls at CERN LHC. In this paper we study top quark production from string balls at LHC and compare with the parton fusion results at NNLO using pQCD. We find significant top quark production from string balls at LHC which is comparable to standard model pQCD results. We also find that $\\frac{d\\sigma}{dp_T}$ of top quarks from string balls does not decrease significantly with increase in $p_T$, whereas it deceases sharply in case of standard model pQCD scenario. Hence, in the absence of black hole production at LHC, an enhancement in top quark cross section and its abnormal $p_T$ distribution can be a signature of TeV scale string physics at LHC. String theory is also studied at LHC via string Regge excitations in the weak coupling limit in model independent framework. Since massive quark production amplitude is not available in string Regge excitations scenario, we compute massless quark production in string Regge excitations scenario and make a clear comparison with that produced from string balls at LHC for a given luminosity.

  8. String Theory and Cosmology

    E-print Network

    M. C. Bento; O. Bertolami

    1995-05-22

    We discuss the main cosmological implications of considering string-loop effects and a potential for the dilaton in the lowest order string effective action. Our framework is based on the effective model arising from regarding homogeneous and isotropic dilaton, metric and Yang-Mills field configurations. The issues of inflation, entropy crisis and the Polonyi problem as well as the problem of the cosmological constant are discussed.

  9. Matrix String Theory

    E-print Network

    R. Dijkgraaf; E. Verlinde; H. Verlinde

    1997-03-13

    Via compactification on a circle, the matrix model of M-theory proposed by Banks et al suggests a concrete identification between the large N limit of two-dimensional N=8 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and type IIA string theory. In this paper we collect evidence that supports this identification. We explicitly identify the perturbative string states and their interactions, and describe the appearance of D-particle and D-membrane states.

  10. Hydroball string sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, Michael J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Squarer, David (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A hydroball string sensing system for a nuclear reactor that includes stainless tubes positioned to guide hydroball strings into and out of the nuclear reactor core. A sensor such as an ultrasonic transducer transmitter and receiver is positioned outside of the nuclear reactor core and adjacent to the tube. The presence of an object such a bullet member positioned at an end a hydroball string, or any one of the hydroballs interrupts the transmission of ultrasound from the transmitter to the receiver. Alternatively, if the bullet member and hydroballs include a ferritic material, either a Hall effect sensor or other magnetic field sensors such as a magnetic field rate of change sensor can be used to detect the location and position of a hydroball string. Placing two sensors along the tube with a known distance between the sensors enables the velocity of a hydroball string to be determined. This determined velocity can be used to control the flow rate of a fluid within the tube so as to control the velocity of the hydroball string.

  11. Taylor impact of glass rods

    SciTech Connect

    Willmott, G.R.; Radford, D.D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10 GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below {approx}2 GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above {approx}3 GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at {approx}4 GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7{+-}0.5 and 4.6{+-}0.5 mm {mu}s{sup -1} for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  12. Taylor impact of glass rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Radford, D. D.

    2005-05-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of soda-lime and borosilicate glass rods was examined during classic and symmetric Taylor impact experiments for impact pressures to 4 and 10GPa, respectively. High-speed photography and piezoresistive gauges were used to measure the failure front velocities in both glasses, and for impact pressures below ˜2GPa the failure front velocity increases rapidly with increasing pressure. As the pressure was increased above ˜3GPa, the failure front velocities asymptotically approached maximum values between the longitudinal and shear wave velocities of each material; at ˜4GPa, the average failure front velocities were 4.7±0.5 and 4.6±0.5mm?s-1 for the soda-lime and borosilicate specimens, respectively. The observed mechanism of failure in these experiments involved continuous pressure-dependent nucleation and growth of microcracks behind the incident wave. As the impact pressure was increased, there was a decrease in the time to failure. The density of cracks within the failed region was material dependent, with the more open-structured borosilicate glass showing a larger fracture density.

  13. Control rod drive hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Ose, Richard A. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A hydraulic system for a control rod drive (CRD) includes a variable output-pressure CR pump operable in a charging mode for providing pressurized fluid at a charging pressure, and in a normal mode for providing the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure, less than the charging pressure. Charging and purge lines are disposed in parallel flow between the CRD pump and the CRD. A hydraulic control unit is disposed in flow communication in the charging line and includes a scram accumulator. An isolation valve is provided in the charging line between the CRD pump and the scram accumulator. A controller is operatively connected to the CRD pump and the isolation valve and is effective for opening the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a charging mode for charging the scram accumulator, and closing the isolation valve and operating the CRD pump in a normal mode for providing to the CRD through the purge line the pressurized fluid at a purge pressure lower than the charging pressure.

  14. [Reactions of frog retinal rods to light].

    PubMed

    Gusel'nikov, V I; Sidorov, A S; Suponitski?, V L

    1975-01-01

    The amplitude and shape of the rod photoresponses were investigated at different intensity, duration, wavelength and diameter of the light spot. Intracellular recordings were performed from the green and red rod outer sigments. An increase in the light intensity produced an increase in the amplitude and a decrease in the time rise of the response. An intensive light flash suppressed for a time the rod sensitivity to test flashes. At light spots of large diameter (100--1500 mum) delayed depolarizing deflection was observed. The latter was conditioned by illumination of receptor surroundings and, apparently, was due to horizontal cells activity. The possible role of the depolarizing effect of the rod surroundings illumination is discussed. PMID:1207798

  15. Impact of AD995 alumina rods

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.; Grady, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Gas guns and velocity interferometric techniques have been used to determine the loading behavior of an AD995 alumina rod 19 mm in diameter by 75 mm and 150 mm long, respectively. Graded-density materials were used to impact both bare and sleeved alumina rods while the velocity interferometer was used to monitor the axial-velocity of the free end of the rods. Results of these experiments demonstrate that (1) a time-dependent stress pulse generated during impact allows an efficient transition from the initial uniaxial strain loading to a uniaxial stress state as the stress pulse propagates through the rod, and (2) the intermediate loading rates obtained in this configuration lie between split Hopkinson bar and shock-loading techniques.

  16. Mechanical behavior of elastic rods under constraint

    E-print Network

    Miller, James Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the mechanics of thin elastic rods under a variety of loading conditions. Four scenarios are explored, with increasing complexity: i) the shape of a naturally ...

  17. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    E-print Network

    Khalid Jawed, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations towards ...

  18. A Cambrian origin for vertebrate rods.

    PubMed

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Grillner, Sten; Cangiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates acquired dim-light vision when an ancestral cone evolved into the rod photoreceptor at an unknown stage preceding the last common ancestor of extant jawed vertebrates (~420 million years ago Ma). The jawless lampreys provide a unique opportunity to constrain the timing of this advance, as their line diverged ~505 Ma and later displayed high-morphological stability. We recorded with patch electrodes the inner segment photovoltages and with suction electrodes the outer segment photocurrents of Lampetra fluviatilis retinal photoreceptors. Several key functional features of jawed vertebrate rods are present in their phylogenetically homologous photoreceptors in lamprey: crucially, the efficient amplification of the effect of single photons, measured by multiple parameters, and the flow of rod signals into cones. These results make convergent evolution in the jawless and jawed vertebrate lines unlikely and indicate an early origin of rods, implying strong selective pressure toward dim-light vision in Cambrian ecosystems. PMID:26095697

  19. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    E-print Network

    Khalid Jawed, Mohammad

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward ...

  20. Colloidal Interactions in Suspensions of Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Keng-hui; Crocker, John C.; Zeri, Ana C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-08-20

    We report direct measurements of entropic interactions of colloidal spheres in suspensions of rodlike fd bacteriophage. We investigate the influence of sphere size, rod concentration, and ionic strength on these interactions. Although the results compare favorably with a recent calculation, small discrepancies reveal entropic effects due to rod flexibility. At high salt concentrations, the potential turns repulsive as a result of viral adsorption on the spheres and viral bridging between the spheres.

  1. Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, William H. (Los Altos, CA); Atcheson, Donald B. (Cupertino, CA); Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan (San Jose, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

  2. Measurements of control rod efficiency in RBMK critical assembly upon dropping of the rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitarev, V. E. Kachanov, V. M.; Sergevnin, A. Yu.; Lebedev, G. V.

    2014-12-15

    The efficiency of control rods in the RBMK critical assembly was measured in the case where one manual-control rod (MCR) is dropped from a steady critical state, and several other MCRs were additionally dropped after 44 s. The measured number of neutrons in the assembly during and after dropping of the rods was used to calculate the efficiency values of the rods by solution of the system of point kinetics equations. A series of methods of the initial data treatment for determination of the desired values of reactivity without the calculated corrections were used.

  3. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  4. Topological optimisation of rod-stirring devices

    E-print Network

    Matthew D. Finn; Jean-Luc Thiffeault

    2010-04-05

    There are many industrial situations where rods are used to stir a fluid, or where rods repeatedly stretch a material such as bread dough or taffy. The goal in these applications is to stretch either material lines (in a fluid) or the material itself (for dough or taffy) as rapidly as possible. The growth rate of material lines is conveniently given by the topological entropy of the rod motion. We discuss the problem of optimising such rod devices from a topological viewpoint. We express rod motions in terms of generators of the braid group, and assign a cost based on the minimum number of generators needed to write the braid. We show that for one cost function -- the topological entropy per generator -- the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the golden ratio. For a more realistic cost function,involving the topological entropy per operation where rods are allowed to move together, the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the silver ratio, $1+\\sqrt{2}$. We show how to construct devices that realise this optimal growth, which we call silver mixers.

  5. Topological optimisation of rod-stirring devices

    E-print Network

    Finn, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    There are many industrial situations where rods are used to stir a fluid, or where rods repeatedly stretch a material such as bread dough or taffy. The goal in these applications is to stretch either material lines (in a fluid) or the material itself (for dough or taffy) as rapidly as possible. The growth rate of material lines is conveniently given by the topological entropy of the rod motion. We discuss the problem of optimising such rod devices from a topological viewpoint. We express rod motions in terms of generators of the braid group, and assign a cost based on the minimum number of generators needed to write the braid. We show that for one cost function -- the topological entropy per generator -- the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the golden ratio. For a more realistic cost function,involving the topological entropy per operation where rods are allowed to move together, the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the silver ratio, $1+\\sqrt{2}$. We show how to construct devices that realise th...

  6. On a nonlinear theory of thin rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Albert C. J.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear theory for a straight rod is presented from the general theory of the three-dimensional deformable-body in the Cartesian coordinate frame. A set of nonlinear strains is presented, and the stretch on central curve exactly satisfies the deformation geometrical relations. The relations between the Euler angles and deformation are given from the curvatures and torsion curvatures of the central curves, which can easily explain the existing theories of rods and beams. Full nonlinear equations of motion for a nonlinear rod are developed via the vector form. Such a treatise is different from the traditional treatises of nonlinear rods, based on the Cosserat's theory (e.g., Cosserat and Cosserat [1] in 1896) or the Kirchhoff assumptions (e.g., Kirchhoff [18] in 1859; Love [3] in 1944). This paper extends the ideas of Galerkin [4] in 1915. The nonlinear theory of thin rods can reduce to the existing theories for thin rods and beams, such ideas presented in this paper can be applied for development of the nonlinear theory for plates and shells as well.

  7. String Theory: Progress and Problems

    E-print Network

    John H. Schwarz

    2007-03-05

    String theory builds on the great legacy of Yukawa and Tomonaga: New degrees of freedom and control of the UV are two important themes. This talk will give an overview of some of the progress and some of the unsolved problems that characterize string theory today. It is divided into two parts: (1) Connecting String Theory to the Real World; (2) Gauge Theory/String Theory Duality. Two other major subjects, which I will omit, are Black Holes in String Theory and The Impact of String Theory on Mathematics.

  8. The Birth of String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Castellani, Elena; Colomo, Filippo; Di Vecchia, Paolo

    2012-04-01

    Part I. Overview: 1. Introduction and synopsis; 2. Rise and fall of the hadronic string G. Veneziano; 3. Gravity, unification, and the superstring J. H. Schwarz; 4. Early string theory as a challenging case study for philosophers E. Castellani; Part II. The Prehistory: The Analytic S-Matrix: 5. Introduction to Part II; 6. Particle theory in the sixties: from current algebra to the Veneziano amplitude M. Ademollo; 7. The path to the Veneziano model H. R. Rubinstein; 8. Two-component duality and strings P. G. O. Freund; 9. Note on the prehistory of string theory M. Gell-Mann; Part III. The Dual Resonance Model: 10. Introduction to Part III; 11. From the S-matrix to string theory P. Di Vecchia; 12. Reminiscence on the birth of string theory J. A. Shapiro; 13. Personal recollections D. Amati; 14. Early string theory at Fermilab and Rutgers L. Clavelli; 15. Dual amplitudes in higher dimensions: a personal view C. Lovelace; 16. Personal recollections on dual models R. Musto; 17. Remembering the 'supergroup' collaboration F. Nicodemi; 18. The '3-Reggeon vertex' S. Sciuto; Part IV. The String: 19. Introduction to Part IV; 20. From dual models to relativistic strings P. Goddard; 21. The first string theory: personal recollections L. Susskind; 22. The string picture of the Veneziano model H. B. Nielsen; 23. From the S-matrix to string theory Y. Nambu; 24. The analogue model for string amplitudes D. B. Fairlie; 25. Factorization in dual models and functional integration in string theory S. Mandelstam; 26. The hadronic origins of string theory R. C. Brower; Part V. Beyond the Bosonic String: 27. Introduction to Part V; 28. From dual fermion to superstring D. I. Olive; 29. Dual models with fermions: memoirs of an early string theorist P. Ramond; 30. Personal recollections A. Neveu; 31. Aspects of fermionic dual models E. Corrigan; 32. The dual quark models K. Bardakci and M. B. Halpern; 33. Remembering the dawn of relativistic strings J.-L. Gervais; 34. Early string theory in Cambridge: personal recollections C. Montonen; Part VI. The Superstring: 35. Introduction to Part VI; 36. Supersymmetry in string theory F. Gliozzi; 37. Gravity from strings: personal reminiscences of early developments T. Yoneya; 38. From the Nambu-Goto to the ?-model action L. Brink; 39. Locally supersymmetric action for superstring P. Di Vecchia; 40. Personal recollections E. Cremmer; 41. The scientific contributions of Joël Scherk J. H. Schwarz; Part VII. Preparing the String Renaissance: 42. Introduction to Part VII; 43. From strings to superstrings: a personal perspective M. B. Green; 44. Quarks, strings and beyond A. M. Polyakov; 45. The rise of the superstring theory A. Cappelli and F. Colomo; Appendices; Index.

  9. Analytic progress in open string field theory

    E-print Network

    Kiermaier, Michael Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Open string field theory provides an action functional for open string fields, and it is thus a manifestly off-shell formulation of open string theory. The solutions to the equation of motion of open string field theory ...

  10. Simulation studies of self-assembly of end-tethered nanorods in solution and role of rod aspect ratio and tether length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsch, Mark A.; Zhang, Zhenli; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2006-11-01

    We present temperature versus concentration phase diagrams for "shape amphiphiles" comprised of tethered moderate and low aspect ratio rods. Simulations of moderate aspect ratio rods (first reported by Horsch et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 056105 (2005)]) predict their self-assembly into spherical micelles with bcc order, long micelles with nematic order, a racemic mixture of hexagonally ordered chiral cylinders, two perforated phases: one with tetragonal order and one with hexagonal order, and a smectic C lamellar phase. In contrast, we predict here that small aspect ratio tethered rods self-assemble into bcc ordered spherical micelles, hexagonally ordered cylinders, and a smectic C lamellar phase. We compare and contrast the phases obtained for the two aspect ratios and examine in further detail several unusual phases. Our simulations also reveal that for moderate aspect ratio rods there is a tendency toward phases with decreasing interfacial curvature with decreasing coil size, including a double gyroid phase. In addition, we investigate the role of tether length on the assembled structures. Our results are applicable to short rod-coil block copolymers and rodlike nanoparticles with polymer tethers, and to colloidal building blocks comprised of a flexible string of colloids tethered to a rigid string of colloids, with the interactions scaled appropriately.

  11. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  12. Effects of Wastewater Discharges on Endocrine and Reproductive Function of Western Mosquitofish (Gambusia spp.) and Implications for the Threatened Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Goodbred, Steven L.; Olivier, Heather M.; Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.; Alvarez, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Ana River (SAR) in southern California is impacted by effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), which are sources of organic wastewater compounds (OWCs) and urban runoff. The Santa Ana River is one of only three river basins supporting native populations of the federally listed Santa Ana sucker (Catostomus santaanae) at the time the fish was included on the list 2000. In 2004 and 2005, a U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study was undertaken to determine if the threatened Santa Ana sucker was potentially exposed to OWCs and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the SAR by using the western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) as a surrogate fish model. Four Santa Ana River sites were chosen along a gradient of proximity to WWTP effluents: (1) a point source of tertiary treated wastewater effluent (TTWE), (2) Rialto Drain (just below a WWTP), (3) Prado Dam (11 kilometers [km] below WWTPs), and (4) Sunnyslope Creek (no WWTP but having urban runoff influence). A reference site having no WWTPs or urban runoff, Thousand Palms, was also sampled. Chemical analyses of passive sampler extracts results showed that 15 OWCs and EDCs were detected in water from the Santa Ana River sites. Many of these compounds contributed to activity from an estrogenic in-vitro assay that showed a significant potential for impacting endocrine and reproductive systems compared to the 25 organochlorine compounds detected in aquatic biota. The site showing compounds having highest influence on sex steroid hormone activities was the point source for TTWE. Sex steroid hormone levels, secondary sex characteristics, organosomatic indices, and sperm quality parameters indicated impairment of endocrine and reproductive function of male western mosquitofish in the Santa Ana River. Exposure to EDCs and consequent impairment in mosquitofish followed the gradient of proximity to WWTP effluents, where the most significant effects were found at TTWE point source and Rialto Drain, followed by Prado Dam and Sunnyslope Creek. Each of these sites is suitable habitat for the Santa Ana sucker, especially Sunnyslope Creek and Rialto Drain where juveniles reside. Various OWCs and EDCs were detected at each Santa Ana River site, although one specific compound or group of compounds could not be singled out as a causative factor. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was strongly negatively correlated with testosterone in male mosquitofish. One group of potent environmental estrogens that likely contributed to endocrine and reproductive impairment are the natural and synthetic estrogen hormones, especially ethinyl estradiol; however, this compound was not targeted in these investigations. The multiple lines of evidence for impaired reproductive and endocrine function in western mosquitofish due to OWCs and EDCs from the Santa Ana River can be used to identify potential problems for the Santa Ana sucker inhabiting the same and nearby sites.

  13. Periodic string comparison Alexander Tiskin

    E-print Network

    Lonardi, Stefano

    ;1 Introduction 2 Semi-local string comparison 3 The seaweed algorithm 4 Conclusions and future work Alexander The seaweed algorithm 4 Conclusions and future work Alexander Tiskin (Warwick) Periodic string comparison 3

  14. Contaminants of legacy and emerging concern in largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) and the foodweb in the lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Elena; Zaugg, Steven; Alvarez, David; Morace, Jennifer; Waite, Ian; Counihan, Timothy; Hardiman, Jill; Torres, Leticia; Patiño, Reynaldo; Mesa, Matthew; Grove, Robert

    2014-06-15

    We investigated occurrence, transport pathways, and effects of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants and other endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in aquatic media and the foodweb in the lower Columbia River. In 2009 and 2010, foodweb sampling at three sites along a gradient of contaminant exposure near Skamania (Washington), Columbia City (Oregon) and Longview (Washington) included water (via passive samplers), bed sediment, invertebrate biomass residing in sediment, a resident fish species (largescale suckers [Catostomus macrocheilus]), and eggs from osprey (Pandion haliaetus). This paper primarily reports fish tissue concentrations. In 2009, composites of fish brain, fillet, liver, stomach, and gonad tissues revealed that overall contaminant concentrations were highest in livers, followed by brain, stomach, gonad, and fillet. Concentrations of halogenated compounds in tissue samples from all three sites ranged from <1 to 400nanograms per gram of wet tissue. Several chemical classes, including PBDEs, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were detected at all sites and in nearly all fish tissues sampled. In 2010, only fish livers were sampled and inter-site concentration differences were not as pronounced as in 2009. Chemical concentrations in sediments, fish tissues, and osprey eggs increased moving downstream from Skamania to the urbanized sites near Columbia City and Longview. Numerous organochlorine (OC) pesticides, both banned and currently used, and PBDEs, were present at each site in multiple media and concentrations exceeded environmental quality benchmarks in some cases. Frequently detected OC compounds included hexachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its degradates, chlorpyrifos, and oxyfluorofen. Biomagnification of BDE47, 100, 153, and 154 occurred in largescale suckers and osprey eggs. Results support the hypothesis that contaminants in the environment lead to bioaccumulation and potential negative effects in multiple levels of the foodweb. PMID:24462179

  15. Deriving the four-string and open-closed string interactions from geometric string field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kaku, M. )

    1990-02-20

    One of the questions concerning the covariant open string field theory is why there are two distinct BRST theories and why the four-string interaction appears in one version but not the other. The authors solve this mystery by showing that both theories are gauge-fixed versions of a higher gauge theory, called the geometric string field theory, with a new field, a string verbein e{sub {mu}{sigma}}{sup {nu}{rho}}, which allows us to gauge the string length and {sigma} parametrization. By fixing the gauge, the authors can derive the endpoint gauge (the covariantized light cone gauge), the midpoint gauge of Witten, or the interpolating gauge with arbitrary string length. The authors show explicitly that the four-string interaction is a gauge artifact of the geometric theory (the counterpart of the four-fermion instantaneous Coulomb term of QED). By choosing the interpolating gauge, they produce a new class of four-string interactions which smoothly interpolate between the endpoint gauge and the midpoint gauge (where it vanishes). Similarly, they can extract the closed string as a bound state of the open string, which appears in the endpoint gauge but vanishes in the midpoint gauge. Thus, the four-string and open-closed string interactions do not have to be added to the action as long as the string vierbein is included.

  16. Final Report Strings 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, Edward

    2015-10-21

    DOE Final Report “Strings 2014” PI: Edward Witten, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 CO-PI: Igor Klebanov, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 DOE Grant Number: DE-SC0011919 The Strings 2014 meeting was held at Princeton University in June 2014, co-sponsored by Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. Plenary lectures at Strings 2014 were held in Richardson Auditorium of Princeton University. This comfortable and spacious facility easily accommodated the 616 participants registered participants at Strings 2014. The rental fee for the auditorium was $11,000. This grant provided $5,500 from the Department of Energy to pay for one-half of the cost of the facility rental and videotaping. Speakers were supported with funds from the National Science Foundation Clay Mathematics Institute, the Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University. The organization of Strings 2014 consisted of an International Organizing Committee of 60 prominent scientists around the world, and a Local Advisory Committee consisting of an additional 15 distinguished scientists from neighboring institutions. Additionally, the Local Organizing Committee assisted them with about 15 members (mostly faculty at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study). These groups (which are listed at the end of this narrative) offered important input concerning the selection of speakers and helped to ensure that the speakers were selected from the broadest possible pool. The conference was held on June 23-7 at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. The 616 registered participants included 272 participants from the United States and 344 from 32 institutions outside of the U.S. We believe that we were successful at providing a stimulating and up-to-date overview of research in string theory and its relations to other areas of physics and mathematics, ranging from geometry to quantum field theory, condensed matter physics, and more. There were a total of 45 plenary speakers and 27 speakers at parallel sessions. (Parallel sessions were held at the Institute for Advanced Study.) Overall the speakers did an excellent job of presenting their topics and some presented surprising and novel results. The talks at Strings 2014 were videotaped and are available on the conference website: http://physics.princeton.edustrings2014/Talk_titles.shtml. One important facet of Strings 2014 and one of the reasons it was so well-attended was that it had a strong educational component. The week before the meeting, there was a summer school, Prospects in Theoretical Physics (PiTP), held at the Institute for Advanced Study on the subject of string theory. 260 graduate students attended both PiTP and Strings 2014. The group consisted of 25 females and 235 males; 208 graduate students and 52 postdocs. 129 participants were from the United States, and 131 participants came from institutions in 25 countries outside of the U.S. The Institute for Advanced Study substantially subsidized the summer school for students. Over two dozen students had the chance to give short (six minute) talks at the “gong shows” that were held at PiTP and Strings 2014, and nearly 60 students and postdocs made poster presentations at Strings 2014.

  17. Quantum String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Noboru; Kugo, Taichiro

    String theories seem to have created a breakthrough in theoretical physics. At long last a unified theory of all the fundamental interactions, including gravity, looks possible. This, according to theorist Stephen Hawking, will mark the end of theoretical physics as we have known it, since we will then have a single consistent theory within which to explain all natural phenomena from elementary particles to galactic superclusters. Strings themselves are extremely tiny entities, smaller than the Planck scale, which form loops whose vibrational harmonics can be used to model all the standard elementary particles. Of course the mathematical complexities of the theory are daunting, and physicists are still at a very early stage in understanding how strings and their theoretical cousins superstrings can be used. This proceedings volume gives an overview of the intense recent work in the field and reports latest developments.

  18. The confining trailing string

    E-print Network

    E. Kiritsis; L. Mazzanti; F. Nitti

    2014-12-03

    We extend the holographic trailing string picture of a heavy quark to the case of a bulk geometry dual to a confining gauge theory. We compute the classical trailing confining string solution for a static as well as a uniformly moving quark. The trailing string is infinitely extended and approaches a confining horizon, situated at a critical value of the radial coordinate, along one of the space-time directions, breaking boundary rotational invariance. We compute the equations for the fluctuations around the classical solutions, which are used to obtain boundary force correlators controlling the Langevin dynamics of the quark. The imaginary part of the correlators has a non-trivial low-frequency limit, which gives rise to a viscous friction coefficient induced by the confining vacuum. The vacuum correlators are used to define finite-temperature dressed Langevin correlators with an appropriate high-frequency behavior.

  19. Strings on Bubbling Geometries

    E-print Network

    Hai Lin; Alexander Morisse; Jonathan P. Shock

    2011-07-27

    We study gauge theory operators which take the form of a product of a trace with a Schur polynomial, and their string theory duals. These states represent strings excited on bubbling AdS geometries which are dual to the Schur polynomials. These geometries generically take the form of multiple annuli in the phase space plane. We study the coherent state wavefunction of the lattice, which labels the trace part of the operator, for a general Young tableau and their dual description on the droplet plane with a general concentric ring pattern. In addition we identify a density matrix over the coherent states on all the geometries within a fixed constraint. This density matrix may be used to calculate the entropy of a given ensemble of operators. We finally recover the BMN string spectrum along the geodesic near any circle from the ansatz of the coherent state wavefunction.

  20. Strings on bubbling geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Morisse, Alexander; Shock, Jonathan P.

    2010-06-01

    We study gauge theory operators which take the form of a product of a trace with a Schur polynomial, and their string theory duals. These states represent strings excited on bubbling AdS geometries which are dual to the Schur polynomials. These geometries generically take the form of multiple annuli in the phase space plane. We study the coherent state wavefunction of the lattice, which labels the trace part of the operator, for a general Young tableau and their dual description on the droplet plane with a general concentric ring pattern. In addition we identify a density matrix over the coherent states on all the geometries within a fixed constraint. This density matrix may be used to calculate the entropy of a given ensemble of operators. We finally recover the BMN string spectrum along the geodesic near any circle from the ansatz of the coherent state wave-function.

  1. Strings on Bubbling Geometries

    E-print Network

    Lin, Hai; Shock, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    We study gauge theory operators which take the form of a product of a trace with a Schur polynomial, and their string theory duals. These states represent strings excited on bubbling AdS geometries which are dual to the Schur polynomials. These geometries generically take the form of multiple annuli in the phase space plane. We study the coherent state wavefunction of the lattice, which labels the trace part of the operator, for a general Young tableau and their dual description on the droplet plane with a general concentric ring pattern. In addition we identify a density matrix over the coherent states on all the geometries within a fixed constraint. This density matrix may be used to calculate the entropy of a given ensemble of operators. We finally recover the BMN string spectrum along the geodesic near any circle from the ansatz of the coherent state wavefunction.

  2. Wormholes in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollick, Dan N.

    1999-05-01

    A wormhole is constructed by cutting and joining two spacetimes satisfying the low-energy string equations with a dilaton field. In spacetimes described by the `string metric', the dilaton energy-momentum tensor need not satisfy the weak or dominant energy conditions. In the cases considered here the dilaton field violates these energy conditions and is the source of the exotic matter required to maintain the wormhole. There is also a surface stress-energy, that must be produced by additional matter, where the spacetimes are joined. It is shown that wormholes can be constructed for which this additional matter satisfies the weak and dominant energy conditions, so that it could be a form of `normal' matter. Charged dilaton wormholes with a coupling between the dilaton and the electromagnetic field that is more general than in string theory are also briefly discussed.

  3. String radiative backreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, R.A.; Shellard, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    We discuss radiative backreaction for global strings described by the Kalb-Ramond action with an analogous derivation to that for the point electron in classical electrodynamics. We show how local corrections to the equations of motion allow one to separate the self-field of the string from that of the radiation field. Modifications to this {open_quote}{open_quote}local backreaction approximation{close_quote}{close_quote} circumvent the runaway solutions, allowing these corrections to be used to evolve string trajectories numerically. Comparisons are made with analytic and numerical radiation calculations from previous work and the merits and limitations of this approach are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Soft Theorems from String Theory

    E-print Network

    Di Vecchia, Paolo; Mojaza, Matin

    2015-01-01

    Soft behaviour of closed string amplitudes involving dilatons, gravitons and anti-symmetric tensors, is studied in the framework of bosonic string theory. The leading double soft limit of gluons is analysed as well, starting from scattering amplitudes computed in the open bosonic string. Field theory expressions are then obtained by sending the string tension to infinity. The presented results have been derived in the papers of Ref.[1].

  5. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  6. BookProcessing public Book(string tit, string au, double pr, bool av)

    E-print Network

    Krupski, Vladimir Nickolayevich

    Processing Delegate b public Book(string tit, string au, double pr, bool av) - public delegate void Book; public bool avail; public Book(string tit, string au, double pr, bool av) { title = tit; author = au string author; private double price; private bool avail; public Book(string tit, string au, double pr

  7. Demographics and run timing of adult Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, David A.; Janney, Eric C.; Hayes, Brian S.; Harris, Alta C.

    2012-01-01

    Data from a long-term capture-recapture program were used to assess the status and dynamics of populations of two long-lived, federally endangered catostomids in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) have been captured and tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags during their spawning migrations in each year since 1995. In addition, beginning in 2005, individuals that had been previously PIT-tagged were re-encountered on remote underwater antennas deployed throughout sucker spawning areas. Captures and remote encounters during spring 2011 were used to describe the spawning migrations in that year and also were incorporated into capture-recapture analyses of population dynamics. Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) open population capture-recapture models were used to estimate annual survival probabilities, and a reverse-time analog of the CJS model was used to estimate recruitment of new individuals into the spawning populations. In addition, data on the size composition of captured fish was examined to provide corroborating evidence of recruitment. Survival and recruitment estimates were used to derive estimates of changes in population size over time and to determine the status of the populations in 2010. Separate analyses were conducted for each species and also for each subpopulation of Lost River suckers (LRS). One subpopulation of LRS migrates into tributaries to spawn, similar to shortnose suckers (SNS), whereas the other subpopulation spawns at upwelling areas along the eastern shoreline of the lake. In 2011, we captured, tagged, and released 806 LRS at four lakeshore spawning areas and recaptured an additional 1,006 individuals that had been tagged in previous years. Across all four areas, the remote antennas detected 6,547 individual LRS during the spawning season. Spawning activity peaked in April and most individuals were encountered at Sucker Springs and Cinder Flats. In the Williamson River, we captured, tagged, and released 2,742 LRS and 123 SNS, and recaptured 376 LRS and 58 SNS that had been tagged in previous years. Remote PIT tag antennas in the traps at the weir on the Williamson River and remote antenna systems that spanned the river at four different locations on the Williamson and Sprague Rivers detected a total of 16,494 LRS and 5,450 SNS. Most LRS passed upstream between mid-April and mid-May when water temperatures were rising and near or greater than 10 °C. In contrast, the largest peaks in upstream passage of SNS occurred in early and mid-May when water temperatures were rising and near or greater than 12 °C. Finally, an additional 875 LRS and 1,600 SNS were captured in trammel net sampling at pre-spawn staging areas in the northeastern portion of the lake. Of these, 191of the LRS and 571 of the SNS had been PIT-tagged in previous years. For LRS, encounter histories showed that more than 90 percent of the fish captured at the staging areas were members of the subpopulation that spawns in the tributaries. Capture-recapture analyses for the LRS subpopulation that spawns at the shoreline areas included encounter histories for more than 10,500 individuals, and analyses for the subpopulation that spawns in the tributaries included more than 22,000 encounter histories. With a few exceptions, the survival of males and females in both subpopulations was high (greater than 0.9) between 1999 and 2009. Notably lower survival occurred for both sexes from the tributaries in 2000, for both sexes from the shoreline areas in 2002, and for males from the tributaries in 2006. Between 2001 and 2010, the abundance of males in the lakeshore spawning subpopulation decreased by 50-60 percent and the abundance of females decreased by 29-44 percent. Capture-recapture models suggested that the abundance of the river spawning subpopulation of LRS has increased substantially since 2006. The increase over this period was largely due to large estimated recruitment events in 2003, 2006, and 2008. We know that the estimate in 2006 is subst

  8. Demographics and run timing of adult Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and short nose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, David A.; Janney, Eric C.; Hayes, Brian S.; Harris, Alta C.

    2014-01-01

    Data from a long-term capture-recapture program were used to assess the status and dynamics of populations of two long-lived, federally endangered catostomids in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) have been captured and tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags during their spawning migrations in each year since 1995. In addition, beginning in 2005, individuals that had been previously PIT-tagged were re-encountered on remote underwater antennas deployed throughout sucker spawning areas. Captures and remote encounters during spring 2012 were used to describe the spawning migrations in that year and also were incorporated into capture-recapture analyses of population dynamics. Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) open population capture-recapture models were used to estimate annual survival probabilities, and a reverse-time analog of the CJS model was used to estimate recruitment of new individuals into the spawning populations. In addition, data on the size composition of captured fish were examined to provide corroborating evidence of recruitment. Model estimates of survival and recruitment were used to derive estimates of changes in population size over time and to determine the status of the populations in 2011. Separate analyses were conducted for each species and also for each subpopulation of Lost River suckers (LRS). Shortnose suckers (SNS) and one subpopulation of LRS migrate into tributary rivers to spawn, whereas the other LRS subpopulation spawns at groundwater upwelling areas along the eastern shoreline of the lake. In 2012, we captured, tagged, and released 749 LRS at four lakeshore spawning areas and recaptured an additional 969 individuals that had been tagged in previous years. Across all four areas, the remote antennas detected 6,578 individual LRS during the spawning season. Spawning activity peaked in April and most individuals were encountered at Cinder Flats and Sucker Springs. In the Williamson River, we captured, tagged, and released 3,376 LRS and 299 SNS, and recaptured 551 LRS and 125 SNS that had been tagged in previous years. Remote PIT tag antennas in the traps at the weir on the Williamson River and remote antenna systems that spanned the river at four different locations on the Williamson and Sprague Rivers detected a total of 19,321 LRS and 6,124 SNS. Most LRS passed upstream between late April and mid-May when water temperatures were increasing and greater than 10 °C. In contrast, most upstream passage for SNS occurred in early and mid-May when water temperatures were increasing and near or greater than 12 °C. Finally, an additional 1,188 LRS and 1,665 SNS were captured in trammel net sampling at pre-spawn staging areas in the northeastern part of the lake. Of these, 291 of the LRS and 653 of the SNS had been PIT-tagged in previous years. For LRS captured at the staging areas that had encounter histories that were informative about their spawning location, over 90 percent of the fish were members of the subpopulation that spawns in the rivers. Capture-recapture analyses for the LRS subpopulation that spawns at the shoreline areas included encounter histories for more than 12,150 individuals, and analyses for the subpopulation that spawns in the rivers included more than 29,500 encounter histories. With a few exceptions, the survival of males and females in both subpopulations was high (greater than 0.9) between 1999 and 2010. Notably lower survival occurred for both sexes from the rivers in 2000, for both sexes from the shoreline areas in 2002, and for males from the rivers in 2006. Between 2001 and 2011, the abundance of males in the lakeshore spawning subpopulation decreased by 53–65 percent and the abundance of females decreased by 36–48 percent. Capture-recapture models suggested that the abundance of both sexes in the river spawning subpopulation of LRS had increased substantially since 2006; increases were due to large estimated recruitment events in 2006 and 2008. We know that the estimates in 200

  9. Secure quantum string seal exists

    E-print Network

    Guang Ping He

    2006-02-18

    It was claimed that all quantum string seals are insecure [H. F. Chau, quant-ph/0602099]. However, here it will be shown that for imperfect quantum string seals, the information obtained by the measurement proposed in that reference is trivial. Therefore imperfect quantum string seals can be unconditionally secure.

  10. String Theory and Quark Confinement

    E-print Network

    A. Polyakov

    1997-11-01

    This article is based on a talk given at the ``Strings'97'' conference. It discusses the search for the universality class of confining strings. The key ingredients include the loop equations, the zigzag symmetry, the non-linear renormalization group. Some new tests for the equivalence between gauge fields and strings are proposed.

  11. and Surprises in String Theory

    E-print Network

    Agnor, Craig B.

    Symmetries and Surprises in String Theory Sanjaye Ramgoolam December 09, 2013 Psi-Star #12;OUTLINE Symmetries - geometrical figures, Newtonian Physics Beyond Newton : quantum field theory (QFT) , string theory, extra dimensions The big surprise : AdS/CFT correspondence 10D strings and gravity hidden in 4D

  12. Inflation, String Theory and Cosmology

    E-print Network

    David F. Chernoff; S. -H. Henry Tye

    2014-12-20

    At its very beginning, the universe is believed to have grown exponentially in size via the mechanism of inflation. The almost scale-invariant density perturbation spectrum predicted by inflation is strongly supported by cosmological observations, in particular the cosmic microwave background radiation. However, the universe's precise inflationary scenario remains a profound problem for cosmology and for fundamental physics. String theory, the most-studied theory as the final physical theory of nature, should provide an answer to this question. Some of the proposals on how inflation is realized in string theory are reviewed. Since everything is made of strings, some string loops of cosmological sizes are likely to survive in the hot big bang that followed inflation. They appear as cosmic strings, which can have intricate properties. Because of the warped geometry in flux compactification of the extra spatial dimensions in string theory, some of the cosmic strings may have tensions substantially below the Planck or string scale. Such strings cluster in a manner similar to dark matter leading to hugely enhanced densities. As a result, numerous fossil remnants of the low tension cosmic strings may exist within the galaxy. They can be revealed through the optical lensing of background stars in the near future and studied in detail through gravitational wave emission. We anticipate that these cosmic strings will permit us to address central questions about the properties of string theory as well as the birth of our universe.

  13. String Theory and Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Maldacena, Juan

    2009-02-20

    We will see how gauge theories, in the limit that the number of colors is large, give string theories. We will discuss some examples of particular gauge theories where the corresponding string theory is known precisely, starting with the case of the maximally supersymmetric theory in four dimensions which corresponds to ten dimensional string theory. We will discuss recent developments in this area.

  14. Embellished String Prints. Cover Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on a printmaking activity in which students create embellished string prints using the relief process of string glued to chip board. Explains that string prints can easily be embellished with oil pastels. Provides a description of the procedure and a list of materials and methods. (CMK)

  15. Spinning Dragging Strings

    E-print Network

    C. P. Herzog; A. Vuorinen

    2007-10-15

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to compute the drag force experienced by a heavy quark moving through a maximally supersymmetric SU(N) super Yang-Mills plasma at nonzero temperature and R-charge chemical potential and at large 't Hooft coupling. We resolve a discrepancy in the literature between two earlier studies of such quarks. In addition, we consider small fluctuations of the spinning strings dual to these probe quarks and find no evidence of instabilities. We make some comments about suitable D7-brane boundary conditions for the dual strings.

  16. Probing the String Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Dienes

    2009-12-01

    We are currently in the throes of a potentially huge paradigm shift in physics. Motivated by recent developments in string theory and the discovery of the so-called "string landscape", physicists are beginning to question the uniqueness of fundamental theories of physics and the methods by which such theories might be understood and investigated. In this colloquium, I will give a non-technical introduction to the nature of this paradigm shift and how it developed. I will also discuss some of the questions to which it has led, and the nature of the controversies it has spawned.

  17. String Theory and Turbulence

    E-print Network

    Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

    2010-05-17

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  18. Twisted Skyrmion String

    E-print Network

    Hadi, Miftachul; Husein, Andri

    2014-01-01

    We study nonlinear sigma model, especially Skyrme model without twist and Skyrme model with twist: twisted Skyrmion string. Twist term, $mkz$, is indicated in vortex solution. Necessary condition for stability of vortex solution has consequence that energy of vortex is minimum and scale-free (vortex solution is neutrally stable to changes in scale). We find numerically that the value of vortex minimum energy per unit length for twisted Skyrmion string is $20.37\\times 10^{60}~\\text{eV/m}$.

  19. Twisted Skyrmion String

    E-print Network

    Miftachul Hadi; Malcolm Anderson; Andri Husein

    2014-05-07

    We study nonlinear sigma model, especially Skyrme model without twist and Skyrme model with twist: twisted Skyrmion string. Twist term, $mkz$, is indicated in vortex solution. Necessary condition for stability of vortex solution has consequence that energy of vortex is minimum and scale-free (vortex solution is neutrally stable to changes in scale). We find numerically that the value of vortex minimum energy per unit length for twisted Skyrmion string is $20.37\\times 10^{60}~\\text{eV/m}$.

  20. Probing the String Landscape

    ScienceCinema

    Keith Dienes

    2010-01-08

    We are currently in the throes of a potentially huge paradigm shift in physics. Motivated by recent developments in string theory and the discovery of the so-called "string landscape", physicists are beginning to question the uniqueness of fundamental theories of physics and the methods by which such theories might be understood and investigated. In this colloquium, I will give a non-technical introduction to the nature of this paradigm shift and how it developed. I will also discuss some of the questions to which it has led, and the nature of the controversies it has spawned.

  1. Drill string shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. A.; Webb, D. D.

    1985-11-12

    A telescopic shock absorber for use in a drill string includes a resilient arrangement to cushion telescopic contraction and extension of the shock absorber in response to shock loads and vibrations imparted during drilling. The shock absorber operates independently of the drilling fluid pressure conducted through the structure during drilling operations. A dampening system assists in cushioning the shock loads and vibrations and the dampening system and resilient arrangement are deactivated when jarring impacts are delivered to the well string by a drilling jar carried therein. The resilient arrangement provides a combination mechanical and hydraulic system for cushioning the impact loads and vibrations encountered.

  2. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  3. Nonlinear weakly curved rod by Gamma convergence

    E-print Network

    Vel?i?, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We present a nonlinear model of weakly curved rod, namely the type of curved rod where the curvature is of the order of the diameter of the cross-section. We use the approach analogous to the one for rods and curved rods and start from the strain energy functional of three dimensional nonlinear elasticity and do not presuppose any constitutional behavior. To derive the model, by means of $\\Gamma$-convergence, we need to propose how is the order of strain energy related to the thickness of the body $h$. We analyze the situation when the strain energy (divided by the order of volume) is of the order $h^4$. That is the same approach as the one when F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an model for plates and the analogous model for rods are obtained. The obtained model is analogous to Marguerre-von K\\'arm\\'an for shallow shells and its linearization is the linear shallow arch model which can be found in the literature.

  4. Single Rod Vibration in Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Noah; Wang, Shengfu; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Fluid structure interaction of a single rod in axial flow is a coupled dynamical system present in many application including nuclear reactors, steam generators, and towed antenna arrays. Fluid-structure response can be quantified thanks to detailed experimental data where both structure and fluid responses are recorded. Such datum deepen understanding of the physics inherent to the system and provide high-dimensionality quantitative measurements to validate coupled structural and CFD codes with various level of complexity. In this work, single rods fixed on both ends in a concentric pipe, are subjected to an axial flow with Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter of Re =4000. Rods of varying material stiffness and diameter are utilized in the experiment resulting in a range of dimensionless U between 0.5 and 1, where U = (?A/EI)1/2uL. Experimental measurements of the velocity field around the rod are taken with PIV from time-resolved Nd:YLF laser and a high speed CMOS camera. Three-dimensional and temporal vibration and deflection of the rod is recorded with shadowgraphy utilizing two sets of pulsed high power LED and dedicated CMOS camera. Through integration of these two diagnostics, it is possible to reconstruct the full FSI domain providing unique validation data.

  5. Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Concentrations of cadmium, Cobalt, Lead, Nickel, and Zinc in Blood and Fillets of Northern Hog Sucker (Hypentelium nigricans) from streams contaminated by lead-Zinc mining: Implications for monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and other metals can accumulate in northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans) and other suckers (Catostomidae), which are harvested in large numbers from Ozark streams by recreational fishers. Suckers are also important in the diets of piscivorous wildlife and fishes. Suckers from streams contaminated by historic Pb-zinc (Zn) mining in southeastern Missouri are presently identified in a consumption advisory because of Pb concentrations. We evaluated blood sampling as a potentially nonlethal alternative to fillet sampling for Pb and other metals in northern hog sucker. Scaled, skin-on, bone-in "fillet" and blood samples were obtained from northern hog suckers (n = 75) collected at nine sites representing a wide range of conditions relative to Pb-Zn mining in southeastern Missouri. All samples were analyzed for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), Pb, nickel (Ni), and Zn. Fillets were also analyzed for calcium as an indicator of the amount of bone, skin, and mucus included in the samples. Pb, Cd, Co, and Ni concentrations were typically higher in blood than in fillets, but Zn concentrations were similar in both sample types. Concentrations of all metals except Zn were typically higher at sites located downstream from active and historic Pb-Zn mines and related facilities than at nonmining sites. Blood concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Co were highly correlated with corresponding fillet concentrations; log-log linear regressions between concentrations in the two sample types explained 94% of the variation for Pb, 73-83% of the variation for Co, and 61% of the variation for Cd. In contrast, relations for Ni and Zn explained <12% of the total variation. Fillet Pb and calcium concentrations were correlated (r = 0.83), but only in the 12 fish from the most contaminated site; concentrations were not significantly correlated across all sites. Conversely, fillet Cd and calcium were correlated across the range of sites (r = 0.78), and the inclusion of calcium in the fillet-to-blood relation explained an additional 12% of the total variation in fillet Cd. Collectively, the results indicate that blood sampling could provide reasonably accurate and precise estimates of fillet Pb, Co, and Cd concentrations that would be suitable for identifying contaminated sites and for monitoring, but some fillet sampling might be necessary at contaminated sites for establishing consumption advisories. ?? 2009 US Government.

  7. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  8. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  9. Number of cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Using recent simulation results, we provide the mass and speed spectrum of cosmic string loops. This is the quantity of primary interest for many phenomenological signatures of cosmic strings, and it can be accurately predicted using recently acquired detailed knowledge of the loop production function. We emphasize that gravitational smoothing of long strings plays a negligible role in determining the total number of existing loops. We derive a bound on the string tension imposed by recent constraints on the stochastic gravitational wave background from pulsar timing arrays, finding G? ?2.8×10-9. We also provide a derivation of the Boltzmann equation for cosmic string loops in the language of differential forms.

  10. Evolution of cosmic string networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the evolution and observable consequences of a network of cosmic strings is given. A simple model for the evolution of the string network is presented, and related to the statistical mechanics of string networks. The model predicts the long string density throughout the history of the universe from a single parameter, which researchers calculate in radiation era simulations. The statistical mechanics arguments indicate a particular thermal form for the spectrum of loops chopped off the network. Detailed numerical simulations of string networks in expanding backgrounds are performed to test the model. Consequences for large scale structure, the microwave and gravity wave backgrounds, nucleosynthesis and gravitational lensing are calculated.

  11. Tachyon Condensation and Black Strings

    E-print Network

    Gary T. Horowitz

    2005-06-30

    We show that under certain conditions, closed string tachyon condensation produces a topology changing transition from black strings to Kaluza-Klein "bubbles of nothing." This can occur when the curvature at the horizon is much smaller than the string scale, so the black string is far from the correspondence point when it would make a transition to an excited fundamental string. This provides a dramatic new endpoint to Hawking evaporation. A similar transition occurs for black p-branes, and can be viewed as a nonextremal version of a geometric transition. Applications to AdS black holes and the AdS soliton are also discussed.

  12. Current balancing for battery strings

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, James H. (New Baltimore, MI)

    1985-01-01

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

  13. Wing on a String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an activity that shows students how flight occurs. The "wing on a string" is a simple teacher-made frame that consists of PVC pipe, fishing line, and rubber bands--all readily available hardware store items. The only other materials/tools involved are a sheet of paper, some pieces of a soda straw, a stapler,…

  14. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  15. Update on String Theory

    E-print Network

    John H. Schwarz

    2003-04-28

    The first part of this report gives a very quick sketch of how string theory concepts originated and evolved during its first 25 years (1968-93). The second part presents a somewhat more detailed discussion of the highlights of the past decade. The final part discusses some of the major problems that remain to be solved.

  16. Aspects of String Cosmology

    E-print Network

    Costas Kounnas; Nicolaos Toumbas

    2013-05-27

    We review recent progress in string cosmology, where string dualities are applied so as to obtain complete cosmological evolutions, free of any essential singularities. Two classes of models are analyzed. The first class consists of string gas cosmologies associated to certain thermal configurations of type II N=(4,0) models. Finite temperature is introduced along with non-trivial "gravito-magnetic" fluxes that lift the Hagedorn instabilities of the canonical ensemble and restore thermal T-duality symmetry. At a critical maximal temperature additional thermal states become massless sourcing stringy S-branes, which facilitate a bounce between the two dual, asymptotically cold phases. Unlike previous incarnations of pre-Big Bang cosmologies, the models remain perturbative throughout the cosmological evolution. The second class consists of exact solutions to classical string theory that admit a Euclidean description in terms of compact parafermionic worldsheet systems. The Euclidean target space corresponds to a non-singular, compact T-fold, which can be used to construct a normalizable Hartle-Hawking wavefunction for the cosmology.

  17. Spacetime in String Theory

    E-print Network

    Gary T. Horowitz

    2004-11-01

    We give a brief overview of the nature of spacetime emerging from string theory. This is radically different from the familiar spacetime of Einstein's relativity. At a perturbative level, the spacetime metric appears as ``coupling constants" in a two dimensional quantum field theory. Nonperturbatively (with certain boundary conditions), spacetime is not fundamental but must be reconstructed from a holographic, dual theory.

  18. Exotic nonrelativistic string

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-12-15

    We construct a classical nonrelativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the noncommutative structure of the model. Under double-dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic nonrelativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  19. Gravity and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortín, Tomás

    2015-03-01

    1. Differential geometry; 2. Symmetries and Noether's theorems; 3. A perturbative introduction to general relativity; 4. Action principles for gravity; 5. Pure N=1,2,d=4 supergravities; 6. Matter-coupled N=1,d=4 supergravity; 7. Matter-coupled N=2,d=4 supergravity; 8. A generic description of all the N>2,d=4 SUEGRAS; 9. Matter-coupled N=1,d=5 supergravity; 10. Conserved charges in general relativity; 11. The Schwarzschild black hole; 12. The Reissner-Nordström black hole; 13. The Taub-NUT solution; 14. Gravitational pp-waves; 15. The Kaluza-Klein black hole; 16. Dilaton and dilaton/axion black holes; 17. Unbroken supersymmetry I: supersymmetric vacua; 18. Unbroken supersymmetry II: partially supersymmetric solutions; 19. Supersymmetric black holes from supergravity; 20. String theory; 21. The string effective action and T duality; 22. From eleven to four dimensions; 23. The type-IIB superstring and type-II T duality; 24. Extended objects; 25. The extended objects of string theory; 26. String black holes in four and five dimensions; 27. The FGK formalism for (single, static) black holes and branes; Appendices: A.1 Lie groups, symmetric spaces, and Yang-Mills fields; A.2 The irreducible, non-symmetric Riemannian spaces of special holonomy; A.3 Miscellanea on the symplectic group; A.4 Gamma matrices and spinors; A.5 Kähler geometry; A.6 Special Kähler geometry; A.7 Quaternionic-Kähler geometry.

  20. A Vibrating String Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsutsumanova, Gichka; Russev, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    A simple experiment demonstrating the excitation of a standing wave in a metal string is presented here. Several tasks using the set-up are considered, which help the students to better understand the standing waves, the interaction between electric current and magnetic field and the resonance phenomena. This can serve also as a good lecture…

  1. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); Argetsinger, Edward R. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  2. Device for balancing parallel strings

    DOEpatents

    Mashikian, Matthew S. (Storrs, CT)

    1985-01-01

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means in association with each of the battery strings in the battery plant for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings by equalizing the voltage across each of the battery strings. Each of the magnetic circuit means generally comprises means for sensing the electrical current flow through one of the battery strings, and a saturable reactor having a main winding connected electrically in series with the battery string, a bias winding connected to a source of alternating current and a control winding connected to a variable source of direct current controlled by the sensing means. Each of the battery strings is formed by a plurality of batteries connected electrically in series, and these battery strings are connected electrically in parallel across common bus conductors.

  3. String theories and millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N.; Signore, M.

    1988-11-01

    We discuss the two ways of connecting string theories (cosmic, fundamental and the connection between them) to the observational reality: (i) radioastronomy observations (millisecond pulsar timing), and (ii) elementary particle phenomenology (compactification schemes). We study the limits imposed on the string parameter G? by recent millisecond pulsar timings. Cosmic strings derived from GUTs agree with (i). For cosmic strings derived from fundamental strings themselves there is contradiction between (i) and (ii). One of these scenarios connecting string theory to reality must be revised (or the transition from fundamental into cosmic strings rejected). Meanwhile, millisecond pulsar can select one scenario, or reject both of them. UA 336 Laboratoire Associé au CNRS, Observatoire de Meudon et Ecole Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05, France.

  4. Demographics and run timing of adult Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, David A.; Hayes, Brian S.; Janney, Eric C.; Harris, Alta C.; Koller, Justin P.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Data from a long-term capture-recapture program were used to assess the status and dynamics of populations of two long-lived, federally endangered catostomids in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) have been captured and tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags during their spawning migrations in each year since 1995. In addition, beginning in 2005, individuals that had been previously PIT-tagged were re-encountered on remote underwater antennas deployed throughout the spawning areas. Captures and remote encounters during spring 2009 were used to describe the spawning migrations in that year and also were incorporated into capture-recapture analyses of population dynamics over the last decade. Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) open population capture-recapture models were used to estimate annual survival probabilities, and a reverse-time analog of the CJS model was used to estimate recruitment of new individuals into the spawning populations. In addition, data on the size composition of captured fish was examined for any additional evidence of recruitment. Survival and recruitment estimates were combined to estimate changes in population size over time and to determine the status of the populations through 2007. Separate analyses were conducted for each species and also for each subpopulation of Lost River suckers (LRS). One subpopulation of LRS migrates into tributaries to spawn, similar to shortnose suckers (SNS), whereas the other subpopulation spawns at upwelling areas along the eastern shoreline of the lake. In 2009, we captured and tagged 781 LRS at four shoreline areas and recaptured an additional 638 individuals that had been tagged in previous years. Across all four areas, the remote antennas detected 6,056 individual LRS during the spawning season. Spawning activity peaked in April and most individuals were encountered at Sucker Springs and Cinder Flats. In the Williamson River, we captured and tagged 3,008 LRS and 287 SNS, and recaptured 271 LRS and 81 SNS that had been tagged in previous years. Remote antennas that spanned the river downstream of the tributary spawning areas detected a total of 12,509 LRS and 5,023 SNS. Most LRS passed upstream in mid-April when water temperatures were rising and near or greater than 10 degreesC. In contrast, peaks in upstream passage of SNS occurred in late April and early May when water temperatures were rising and near or greater than 12 degreesC. Finally, an additional 1,569 LRS and 1,794 SNS were captured in trammel net sampling at pre-spawn staging areas in the northeastern portion of the lake. Of these, 209 of the LRS and 452 of the SNS had been PIT-tagged in previous years. For LRS, encounter histories showed that nearly all of the fish captured at the staging areas were members of the subpopulation that spawns in the tributaries. Capture-recapture analyses for the LRS subpopulation that spawns at the shoreline areas included encounter histories for more than 9,000 individuals, and analyses for the subpopulation that spawns in the tributaries included more than 14,000 encounter histories. With a few exceptions, the survival of males and females in both subpopulations was high (> 0.9) between 1999 and 2007. Notably lower survival occurred for both sexes from the tributaries in 2000, for males from the shoreline areas in 2002, and for males from the tributaries in 2006. Recruitment of new individuals into either spawning population was trivial in all years between 2002 and 2007. Over that period, the abundance of males in the lakeshore spawning subpopulation declined by 44-53 percent and the abundance of females declined by 25-38 percent. Similarly, the abundance of males in the tributary spawning subpopulation declined by as much as 39 percent and the abundance of females declined by as much as 33 percent. Capture-recapture analyses for SNS included encounter histories for m

  5. 5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF ROD MILL BASE AND CONVEYOR BELT SUPPORT, EAST VIEW. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Grinding Rod Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  6. Colloidal rods and spheres in partially miscible binary liquids 

    E-print Network

    Hijnen, Niek

    2013-11-28

    Different scenarios for assembling rod-like and spherical colloidal particles using binary mixtures of partially miscible liquids were investigated experimentally. Suitable rod-like colloids were developed first. The ...

  7. Uniformly Hard Languages \\Lambda Rod Downey y

    E-print Network

    Downey, Rod

    Uniformly Hard Languages \\Lambda Rod Downey y Department of Mathematics Victoria University P. O of ``uniformly hard languages,'' where a language is just not merely infinitely often not computable in polynomial­time but in fact the languages are hard nearly everywhere. We conjecture that all NP

  8. Rod Soltis: Making Connections. Appalachian Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the work of Rod Soltis in developing interlinked telecommunications networks in all 14 of New York's Appalachian counties. The networks connect to each other, state and federal agencies and networks, schools, social service agencies, hospitals, and museums, and include private partnerships with telephone and cable TV companies. Soltis'…

  9. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Wilbur (Schenectady, NY)

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  10. Reorientation kinetics of superparamagnetic nanostructured rods

    E-print Network

    J. Fresnais; J. -F. Berret; B. Frka-Petesic; O. Sandre; R. Perzynski

    2008-09-24

    The attractive interactions between oppositely charged species (colloids, macromolecules etc) dispersed in water are strong, and the direct mixing of solutions containing such species generally yields to a precipitation, or to a phase separation. We have recently developed means to control the electrostatically-driven attractions between nanoparticles and polymers in water, and at the same time to preserve the stability of the dispersions. We give here an account of the formation of supracolloidal aggregates obtained by co-assembly of 7 nm particles with copolymers. Nanostructured rods of length comprised between 5 and 50 microns and diameter 500 nm were investigated. By application of a magnetic field, the rods were found to reorient along with the magnetic field lines. The kinetics of reorientation was investigated using step changes of the magnetic field of amplitude 90 degrees. From the various results obtained, among which an exponential decay of the tangent of the angle made between the rod and the field, we concluded that the rods are superparamagnetic.

  11. Asymptotic modeling of linearly piezoelectric slender rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Thibaut; Licht, Christian

    2008-07-01

    The piezoelectric thin plate modeling already derived by the authors is extended to rod-like structures. Two models corresponding to sensor or actuator behavior are obtained. The conditions of existence of non-local terms in the limit models are discussed. To cite this article: T. Weller, C. Licht, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  12. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  13. On the temperature of the moving rod

    E-print Network

    M. Kozlowski; J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc

    2007-08-30

    In this paper the Lorentz transformation for temperature is derived and discussed. Considering the hyperbolic heat transport equation it is shown that T(prim) = gamma T, where gamma is the Lorentz factor, T denotes the temperature in the rest system and T(prim) is the temperature in the moving system (rod).

  14. Monodisperse hard rods in external potentials.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Benaoumeur; Karbach, Michael; Maass, Philipp; Müller, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We consider linear arrays of cells of volume V_{c} populated by monodisperse rods of size ?V_{c},?=1,2,..., subject to hardcore exclusion interaction. Each rod experiences a position-dependent external potential. In one application we also examine effects of contact forces between rods. We employ two distinct methods of exact analysis with complementary strengths and different limits of spatial resolution to calculate profiles of pressure and density on mesoscopic and microscopic length scales at thermal equilibrium. One method uses density functionals and the other statistically interacting vacancy particles. The applications worked out include gravity, power-law traps, and hard walls. We identify oscillations in the profiles on a microscopic length scale and show how they are systematically averaged out on a well-defined mesoscopic length scale to establish full consistency between the two approaches. The continuum limit, realized as V_{c}?0,??? at nonzero and finite ?V_{c}, connects our highest-resolution results with known exact results for monodisperse rods in a continuum. We also compare the pressure profiles obtained from density functionals with the average microscopic pressure profiles derived from the pair distribution function. PMID:26565173

  15. Image analysis for measuring rod network properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjae; Choi, Jungkyu; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, metallic nanowires have been attracting significant attention as next-generation flexible transparent conductive films. The performance of films depends on the network structure created by nanowires. Gaining an understanding of their structure, such as connectivity, coverage, and alignment of nanowires, requires the knowledge of individual nanowires inside the microscopic images taken from the film. Although nanowires are flexible up to a certain extent, they are usually depicted as rigid rods in many analysis and computational studies. Herein, we propose a simple and straightforward algorithm based on the filtering in the frequency domain for detecting the rod-shape objects inside binary images. The proposed algorithm uses a specially designed filter in the frequency domain to detect image segments, namely, the connected components aligned in a certain direction. Those components are post-processed to be combined under a given merging rule in a single rod object. In this study, the microscopic properties of the rod networks relevant to the analysis of nanowire networks were measured for investigating the opto-electric performance of transparent conductive films and their alignment distribution, length distribution, and area fraction. To verify and find the optimum parameters for the proposed algorithm, numerical experiments were performed on synthetic images with predefined properties. By selecting proper parameters, the algorithm was used to investigate silver nanowire transparent conductive films fabricated by the dip coating method.

  16. Monodisperse hard rods in external potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhti, Benaoumeur; Karbach, Michael; Maass, Philipp; Müller, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We consider linear arrays of cells of volume Vc populated by monodisperse rods of size ? Vc,? =1 ,2 ,... , subject to hardcore exclusion interaction. Each rod experiences a position-dependent external potential. In one application we also examine effects of contact forces between rods. We employ two distinct methods of exact analysis with complementary strengths and different limits of spatial resolution to calculate profiles of pressure and density on mesoscopic and microscopic length scales at thermal equilibrium. One method uses density functionals and the other statistically interacting vacancy particles. The applications worked out include gravity, power-law traps, and hard walls. We identify oscillations in the profiles on a microscopic length scale and show how they are systematically averaged out on a well-defined mesoscopic length scale to establish full consistency between the two approaches. The continuum limit, realized as Vc?0 ,? ?? at nonzero and finite ? Vc , connects our highest-resolution results with known exact results for monodisperse rods in a continuum. We also compare the pressure profiles obtained from density functionals with the average microscopic pressure profiles derived from the pair distribution function.

  17. Dark Current and Photocurrent in Retinal Rods

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, W. A.; Penn, R. D.; Yoshikami, S.

    1970-01-01

    The interstitial voltages, currents, and resistances of the receptor layer of the isolated rat retina have been investigated with arrays of micropipette electrodes inserted under direct visual observation by infrared microscopy. In darkness a steady current flows inward through the plasma membrane of the rod outer segments. It is balanced by equal outward current distributed along the remainder of each rod. Flashes of light produce a photocurrent which transiently reduces the dark current with a waveform resembling the PII and a-wave components of the electroretinogram. The photocurrent is produced by a local action of light within 12 ?m of its point of absorption in the outer segments. The quantum current gain of the photocurrent is greater than 106. The electrical space constant of rat rods is greater than 25 ?m, so that the electrical effects of the photocurrent are large enough at the rod synapses to permit single absorbed photons to be detected by the visual system. The photocurrent is apparently the primary sensory consequence of light absorption by rhodopsin. ImagesFigure 3Figure 8Figure 14 PMID:5439318

  18. Adjustable solitary waves in electroactive rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, H.-H.; Chen, W. Q.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an asymptotic analysis of solitary waves propagating in an incompressible isotropic electroactive circular rod subjected to a biasing longitudinal electric displacement. Several asymptotic expansions are introduced to simplify the rod governing equations. The boundary conditions on the lateral surface of the rod are satisfied from the asymptotic point of view. In the limit of finite-small amplitude and long wavelength, a set of ten simplified one-dimensional nonlinear governing equations is established. To validate our approach and the derivation, we compare the linear dispersion relation with the one directly derived from the three-dimensional linear theory in the limit of long wavelength. Then, by the reductive perturbation method, we deduce the far-field equation (i.e. the KdV equation). Finally, the leading order of the electroelastic solitary wave solution is presented. Numerical examples are provided to show the influences of the biasing electric displacement and material constants on the solitary waves. It is found that the biasing electric displacement can modulate the velocity of solitary waves with a prescribed amplitude in the electroactive rod, a very interesting result which may promote the particular application of solitary waves in solids with multi-field coupling.

  19. Patterns of Larval Sucker Emigration from the Sprague and Lower Williamson Rivers of the Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon, after the Removal of Chiloquin Dam - 2009-10 Annual Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, Craig M.; Martin, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, drift samples were collected from six sites on the lower Sprague and Williamson Rivers to assess drift patterns of larval Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) (LRS) and shortnose suckers (Chasmistes brevirostris) (SNS). The objective of this study was to characterize the drift timing, relative abundance, and growth stage frequencies of larval suckers emigrating from the Sprague River watershed. These data were used to evaluate changes in spawning distribution of LRS and SNS in the Sprague River after the 2008 removal of Chiloquin Dam. Drift samples were collected at four sites on the Sprague River and one site each on the Williamson and Sycan Rivers. Data presented in this report is a continuation of a research project that began in 2004. Larval drift parameters measured in 2009 and 2010 were similar to those measured from 2004 to 2008. Most larvae and eggs were collected at the two drift sites downstream of the former Chiloquin Dam (river kilometer 0.7 on the Sprague River and river kilometer 7.4 on the Williamson River). Mean and peak sample densities increased with proximity to Upper Klamath Lake. Peak larval densities continued to be collected between 1 and 3 hours after sunset at Chiloquin, which is the drift site nearest a known spawning area. Catch distribution of larvae and eggs in the lower Sprague and Williamson Rivers suggests that most SNS and LRS spawning continues to occur downstream of the site of the former Chiloquin Dam. The sizes and growth stages indicate that larval emigration from spawning areas resulting from drift occurs within a few days after swim-up. Larval suckers appear to move downstream quickly until they reach suitable rearing habitat.

  20. ABWR-II Core Design with Spectral Shift Rods for Operation with All Control Rods Withdrawn

    SciTech Connect

    Masanao Moriwaki; Motoo Aoyama; Takafumi Anegawa; Hiroyuki Okada; Koichi Sakurada; Akira Tanabe

    2002-07-01

    An innovative reactor core concept applying spectral shift rods (SSRs) is proposed to improve the plant economy and the operability of the 1700 MWe ABWR-II reactor. The SSR is a new type of water rod, in which a water level is naturally developed during operation and changed according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By taking advantage of the largeness of the ABWR-II bundle, the enhanced spectral shift operation by eight SSRs allows operation of the ABWR-II with all control rods withdrawn. In addition, the uranium saving factor of 6-7% against the reference ABWR-II core with conventional water rods can be expected owing to the higher spectral shift effect. The combination of these advantages means the ABWR-II with SSRs should be an attractive alternative for the next generation nuclear reactor. (authors)

  1. ABWR-II Core Design with Spectral Shift Rods for Operation with All Control Rods Withdrawn

    SciTech Connect

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Anegawa, Takafumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Sakurada, Koichi; Tanabe, Akira

    2004-03-15

    An innovative reactor core concept applying spectral shift rods (SSRs) is proposed to improve the plant economy and the operability of the 1700-MW(electric) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor II (ABWR-II). The SSR is a new type of water rod in which a water level is naturally developed during operation and changed according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By taking advantage of the large size of the ABWR-II bundle, the enhanced spectral shift operation by eight SSRs allows operation of the ABWR-II with all control rods withdrawn. In addition, the uranium-saving factor of 6 to 7% relative to the reference ABWR-II core with conventional water rods can be expected due to the greater effect of spectral shift. The combination of these advantages means the ABWR-II with SSRs should be an attractive alternative for the next-generation nuclear reactor.

  2. Articulated rods – a novel class of molecular rods based on oligospiroketals (OSK)

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Roswitha; Müller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary We developed a new type of molecular rods consisting of two (or more) rigid units linked by a flexible joint. Consequently we called these constructs articulated rods (ARs). The syntheses of ARs were carried out by a flexible and modular approach providing access to a number of compounds with various functionalizations in terminal positions. First applications were presented with pyrene, cinnamoyl and anthracenyl labelled ARs. PMID:25670995

  3. Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Svrcek, Peter; Witten, Edward; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2006-06-09

    In the context of string theory, axions appear to provide the most plausible solution of the strong CP problem. However, as has been known for a long time, in many string-based models, the axion coupling parameter Fa is several orders of magnitude higher than the standard cosmological bounds. We re-examine this problem in a variety of models, showing that Fa is close to the GUT scale or above in many models that have GUT-like phenomenology, as well as some that do not. On the other hand, in some models with Standard Model gauge fields supported on vanishing cycles, it is possible for Fa to be well below the GUT scale.

  4. Oct. 18, 2000 1 Graphite Rod Test / Simulation

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Oct. 18, 2000 1 Graphite Rod Test / Simulation Response from LANSCE- WNR Proton Beam B. W. Riemer Oak Ridge National Laboratory SNS Target Systems October 3, 2000 Graphite rods were instrumented graphite rod was the ATJ variety. Although it has some amount of anisotropy, isotropic thermal - mechanical

  5. Discrete Variational Mechanics for Elastic Rods concepts and techniques

    E-print Network

    Leyendecker, Sigrid

    equilibrium equations (spatial description) theory of special Cosserat rods idea: rod problem (elastostatics , v = R-1 s r strain vectors shear, dilatation flexure twist materialdescription : u=u1 e1u2 e2u, depending only on the strain vectors m = w u , n = w v hyperelastic rod: forces and moments are given

  6. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  7. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  8. A Warped Cosmic String

    SciTech Connect

    Slagter, R. J.

    2010-06-23

    We present a cosmic string solution in Einstein-Yang-Mills Gauss-Bonnet theory on a warped 5 dimensional space-time conform the Randall-Sundrum-2 theory. In a simplipied model, we find an exact solutions with exponential decreasing or periodic warp function. In a more general setting, where the metric- and Yang-Mills components depend on both scales and one of the YM components resides in the bulk, we find a time dependent numerical solution.

  9. Anyons from strings.

    PubMed

    Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul K

    2010-11-01

    The Nambu-Goto string in a three-dimensional (3D) Minkowski spacetime is quantized preserving Lorentz invariance and parity. The spectrum of massive states contains anyons. An ambiguity in the ground state energy is resolved by the 3D N=1 Green-Schwarz superstring, which has massless ground states describing a dilaton and dilatino, and first-excited states of spin 1/4. PMID:21231159

  10. Anyons from Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul K.

    2010-11-05

    The Nambu-Goto string in a three-dimensional (3D) Minkowski spacetime is quantized preserving Lorentz invariance and parity. The spectrum of massive states contains anyons. An ambiguity in the ground state energy is resolved by the 3D N=1 Green-Schwarz superstring, which has massless ground states describing a dilaton and dilatino, and first-excited states of spin 1/4.

  11. Logic and String Theory

    E-print Network

    A. Nicolaidis

    2008-05-07

    The unification of Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity remains the primary goal of Theoretical Physics, with string theory appearing as the only plausible unifying scheme. In the present work, in a search of the conceptual foundations of string theory, we analyze the relational logic developed by C. S. Peirce in the late nineteenth century. The Peircean logic has the mathematical structure of a category with the relation $R_{ij}$ among two individual terms $S_i$ and $S_j$, serving as an arrow (or morphism). We introduce a realization of the corresponding categorical algebra of compositions, which naturally gives rise to the fundamental quantum laws, thus underscoring the relational character of Quantum Mechanic. The same relational algebra generates a number of group structures, among them $W_{\\infty}$. The group $W_{\\infty}$ is embodied and realized by the matrix models, themselves closely linked with string theory. It is suggested that relational logic and in general category theory may provide a new paradigm, within which to develop modern physical theories.

  12. The String of Pearls

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-07-01

    A team of collaborators within the Southwest Regional Partnership (SRP) on Carbon Sequestration developed an interactive software tool to help facilitate discussions involving the science, engineering, economic and policy considerations for a carbon sequestration pilot project. This model illustrates the "String of Pearls" algorithm used to develop a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) transportation network in sequence with existing infrastructure. The "String of Pearls" model can assess geological sink combinations according to their distance from themore »point source (e.g., power plant), relative size (to maintain a useful fill lifetime for a project), relative distance from existing CO2 transportation infrastructure, and other salient project attributes. The results indicate that the cost to capture CO2 at point sources (e.g. power plants) is the largest component of the overall CO2 capture, transportation and storage system's initial cost estimate. The "String of Pearls" Integrated Assessment model can help planners assess these issues using an integrated, systems view when deciding where to develop future carbon sequestration pilot projects. Likely users of this model include partners within the SRP, other regional partnerships and interested individuals, and private industry interested in carbon sequestration systems. The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability and emission trade-offs associated with all stages of carbone sequestration systems analysis.« less

  13. The String of Pearls

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    A team of collaborators within the Southwest Regional Partnership (SRP) on Carbon Sequestration developed an interactive software tool to help facilitate discussions involving the science, engineering, economic and policy considerations for a carbon sequestration pilot project. This model illustrates the "String of Pearls" algorithm used to develop a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) transportation network in sequence with existing infrastructure. The "String of Pearls" model can assess geological sink combinations according to their distance from the point source (e.g., power plant), relative size (to maintain a useful fill lifetime for a project), relative distance from existing CO2 transportation infrastructure, and other salient project attributes. The results indicate that the cost to capture CO2 at point sources (e.g. power plants) is the largest component of the overall CO2 capture, transportation and storage system's initial cost estimate. The "String of Pearls" Integrated Assessment model can help planners assess these issues using an integrated, systems view when deciding where to develop future carbon sequestration pilot projects. Likely users of this model include partners within the SRP, other regional partnerships and interested individuals, and private industry interested in carbon sequestration systems. The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability and emission trade-offs associated with all stages of carbone sequestration systems analysis.

  14. Quantum String Seal Is Insecure

    E-print Network

    H. F. Chau

    2006-12-06

    A quantum string seal encodes the value of a (bit) string as a quantum state in such a way that everyone can extract a non-negligible amount of available information on the string by a suitable measurement. Moreover, such measurement must disturb the quantum state and is likely to be detected by an authorized verifier. In this way, the intactness of the encoded quantum state plays the role of a wax seal in the digital world. Here I analyze the security of quantum string seal by studying the information disturbance tradeoff of a measurement. This information disturbance tradeoff analysis extends the earlier results of Bechmann-Pasquinucci et al. and Chau by concluding that all quantum string seals are insecure. Specifically, I find a way to obtain non-trivial available information on the string that escapes the verifier's detection with at least 50% chance.

  15. Dynamics of strings between walls

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2008-11-23

    Configurations of vortex-strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 BPS states. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex-strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string endpoints in the wall effective action. In the first method we obtain the effective Lagrangian explicitly and find the 90 degree scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1){sup N} gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well separated strings. This talk is based on the work [1].

  16. Bekenstein Entropy is String Entropy

    E-print Network

    Edi Halyo

    2009-06-22

    We argue that Bekenstein entropy can be interpreted as the entropy of an effective string with a rescaled tension. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we show that the Bekenstein entropy on the boundary CFT is given by the entropy of a string at the stretched horizon of the AdS black hole in the bulk. The gravitationally redshifted tension and energy of the string match those required to reproduce Bekenstein entropy.

  17. Classical theory of radiating strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  18. Physiological characteristics of single green rod photoreceptors from toad retina.

    PubMed

    Matthews, G

    1983-09-01

    The outer segment membrane current of single isolated green and red rods from toad retina was recorded with a suction electrode, and characteristics of the response to light were examined. The maximum response amplitude of green rods was smaller than that of red rods, but the density of dark current along the green rod outer segment was similar to previously reported values for red rods. Thus, the smaller maximum response is explained by the shorter outer segment of green rods (45 vs. 60 microns). The intensity-response relation was fitted by a Michaelis equation with half-saturating photon density corresponding to about 55 isomerizations per flash. The form of the green rod light response was similar to that of red rods: in both cases the kinetics were consistent with four first-order delay stages shaping the light response. The time-to-peak of the dim-flash response was usually about 1 sec for both green and red rods in the present experiments. The spectral sensitivity curve of green rods was fitted by the nomogram for a vitamin A1-based pigment with lambda max = 433 nm. The relation between steady light intensity and flash sensitivity of green rods obeyed the Weber-Fechner relation, and the average background intensity necessary to reduce sensitivity to half of its dark level corresponded to about 4 isomerizations sec-1. This is slightly lower than the value of about 8 isomerizations sec-1 reported for toad red rods by Baylor, Matthews & Yau (1980). Green rods were similar to red rods in all respects except spectral sensitivity. Thus, no evidence was found to support the assertion that green rods are 'cone-like'. PMID:6415267

  19. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  20. Lagrangian evolution of global strings

    E-print Network

    Yamaguchi, M; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2002-01-01

    We establish a method to trace Lagrangian evolution of global string network consisting of a complex scalar field in terms of numerical calculation of field equations in three dimensional Eulerian meshes. We apply our method to cosmological evolution of global strings and evaluate energy density, peculiar velocity, Lorentz factor, formation rate of loops, and emission rate of Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons. We confirm the scaling behavior with number of long strings per horizon volume smaller than the case of local strings by a factor of $\\sim$ 10.

  1. Evolution of cosmic string networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Turok, Neil

    1989-01-01

    Results on cosmic strings are summarized including: (1) the application of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to cosmic string evolution; (2) a simple one scale model for the long strings which has a great deal of predictive power; (3) results from large scale numerical simulations; and (4) a discussion of the observational consequences of our results. An upper bound on G mu of approximately 10(-7) emerges from the millisecond pulsar gravity wave bound. How numerical uncertainties affect this are discussed. Any changes which weaken the bound would probably also give the long strings the dominant role in producing observational consequences.

  2. The effective theory of strings

    E-print Network

    Dorothea Bahns; Katarzyna Rejzner; Jochen Zahn

    2013-11-26

    We show that the Nambu-Goto string, and its higher dimensional generalizations, can be quantized, in the sense of an effective theory, in any dimension of the target space. The crucial point is to consider expansions around classical string configurations. We are using tools from perturbative algebraic quantum field theory, quantum field theory on curved spacetimes, and the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism. Our model has some similarities with the L\\"uscher-Weisz string, but we allow for arbitrary classical background string configurations and keep the diffeomorphism invariance.

  3. Magnetosphere of a spinning string

    E-print Network

    George Chapline; James Barbieri

    2012-01-02

    In this note we observe that the exact Maxwell-Einstein equations in the background metric of a spinning string can be solved analytically. This allows us to construct an analytical model for the magnetosphere which is approximately force free near to the spinning string. As in the case of a Kerr black hole in the presence of an external magnetic field the spinning string will acquire an electric charge which depends on the vorticity carried by the spinning string. The self-generated magnetic field and currents strongly resemble the current and magnetic field structure of the jets associated with active galaxies as they emerge from the galactic center.

  4. String duality and novel theories without gravity

    E-print Network

    Kachru, Shamit

    1998-01-01

    97/66 String Duality and Novel Theories without Gravity 1strings stay light, yielding an interacting theory without gravity.string theory have led to the discovery of many new interacting theories without gravity.

  5. Spontaneous bilateral rod fracture of malleable penile prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yonguc, Tarik; Arslan, Burak; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Degirmenci, Tansu; Polat, Salih; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical failure with a malleable penile prosthesis is very rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reporting on a bilateral AMS 650 rod mechanical failure. We present a 50-year-old man with organic erectile dysfunction who experienced bilateral AMS 650 rod fracture after 14 years. The rod fracture of the left side was confirmed via X-ray preoperatively. The surgical exploration revealed a fracture of both rods. After the removal of both rods, we implanted a new malleable device during the same session. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient was satisfied with his prosthesis. PMID:25408816

  6. Rebirth of a control rod at the Phenix power plant

    SciTech Connect

    De Carvalho, Corinne; Vignau, Bernard; Masson, Marc

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlines the operations involved in cleaning the control rod for the complementary shutdown system in the Phenix Power Plant, the French sodium-cooled fast reactor. The Phenix reactor is controlled by six control rods and a complementary shutdown system. The latter comprises a control rod and a mechanism maintaining the rod in position by means of an electromagnet. The electromagnet is continuously supplied with power and holds the rod control assembly in position by magnetisation on a plane circular surface made from pure iron. The bearing capacity of the mechanism on the rod was initially 80 daN with a rod weight of 26.3 daN. This deteriorated progressively over time. The bearing surface of the rod and the electromagnet became contaminated with a deposit of sodium oxides and metallic particles, thus creating an air gap. This reached a figure of 36 daN in 2005 and was deemed not to be sufficient to prevent the rod from dropping at the wrong time during reactor operation. The Power Plant thus decided to replace the rod mechanism in the reactor in an initial phase, followed by the control rod itself. As the Phenix Power Plant had no spare control rods left, they initiated a 'salvage' plan, over two stages, for the rod removed from the reactor and placed in the fuel storage drum: - Inspection of the bearing surface of the rod by means of a borescope to check whether the rod could be salvaged, - A cleaning operation on the bearing face and checks on the bearing capacity of the rod. The operation is subject to very stringent requirements: the rod must not be taken out of the sodium to ensure that it can be reused in the reactor. The operation must thus take place in the fuel storage drum where there are no facilities for such an operation and where operating conditions are very hostile: high temperatures (the sodium in the fuel storage drum is at a temperature of 150 deg. C, high dose rate (3 mGy/h on the bearing surface) and the bearing surface is submerged under a metre of sodium. 4 poles will have been required for this operation: - a pole for draining the rod and uncovering the bearing surface, - a borescope pole, - a pole for cleaning the bearing surface, - a pole for inspecting the bearing surface. The operation resulted in a very satisfactory bearing capacity of approx. 80 daN. This paper also examines the history of contamination of the control rod and the rod mechanism. It outlines the hypotheses for the source of this contamination and the measures taken to counteract this problem. (authors)

  7. Nuclear thermionic converter. [tungsten-thorium oxide rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Mondt, J. F. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    Efficient nuclear reactor thermionic converter units are described which can be constructed at low cost and assembled in a reactor which requires a minimum of fuel. Each converter unit utilizes an emitter rod with a fluted exterior, several fuel passages located in the bulges that are formed in the rod between the flutes, and a collector receiving passage formed through the center of the rod. An array of rods is closely packed in an interfitting arrangement, with the bulges of the rods received in the recesses formed between the bulges of other rods, thereby closely packing the nuclear fuel. The rods are constructed of a mixture of tungsten and thorium oxide to provide high power output, high efficiency, high strength, and good machinability.

  8. Time-dependent changes of rod influence on hue perception.

    PubMed

    Knight, Roger; Buck, Steven L

    2002-06-01

    Hue-naming was used in conjunction with a probe-flash procedure to determine the time-course of rod-mediated effects on hue appearance across the spectrum. Two types of rod influence on hue are distinguishable on the basis of differences in both spectral specificity and time course of effect: (1) a "faster" rod influence enhances green relative to red and (2) a "slower" rod influence enhances short-wavelength red relative to green and blue relative to yellow. The results show that there are separable rod hue biases that operate over different time courses and that the overall rod influence on hue appearance depends importantly on the temporal properties of the stimuli, presumably because rods interact in different ways with different portions of the neural pathways that mediate human color vision. PMID:12079793

  9. M-strings, monopole strings, and modular forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, Stefan; Iqbal, Amer; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2015-09-01

    We study relations between M-strings (one-dimensional intersections of M2-branes and M5-branes) in six dimensions and m-strings (magnetically charged monopole strings) in five dimensions. For specific configurations, we propose that the counting functions of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) bound states of M-strings capture the elliptic genus of the moduli space of m-strings. We check this proposal for the known cases, the Taub-NUT and Atiyah-Hitchin spaces, for which we find complete agreement. We further analyze the modular properties of the M-string free energies and find that they do not transform covariantly under S L (2 ,Z ). However, for a given number of M-strings, we show that there exists a unique combination of unrefined genus-zero free energies that transforms as a Jacobi form under a congruence subgroup of S L (2 ,Z ). These combinations correspond to summing over different numbers of M5-branes and make sense only if the distances between them are all equal. We explain that this is a necessary condition for the m-string moduli space to be factorizable into relative and center-of-mass parts.

  10. CYP1A induction and blue sac disease in early life stages of white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) exposed to oil sands.

    PubMed

    Colavecchia, Maria V; Hodson, Peter V; Parrott, Joanne L

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of natural oil sands on the early developmental stages of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) and to determine whether biochemical responses in this species were similar to native fish caught in the Athabasca Oil Sands area. Early life stage (ELS) sediment toxicity tests were conducted using controls, reference sediments, natural oil sands, and industrially contaminated (wastewater pond) sediments collected from sites along the Athabasca River, Alberta (Canada). Eggs and larvae were observed for mortality, hatching, deformities, growth, and cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) activity using immunohistochemistry. E-Nat-, S-Nat-, and wastewater pond sediment-exposed groups showed significant premature hatching, reduced growth, and exposure-dependent increases in ELS mortality and larval malformations relative to controls. The most common larval deformities included edemas (pericardial, yolk sac, and subepidermal), hemorrhages, and spinal defects. Juveniles exposed to oil sands and wastewater pond sediments (96 h) demonstrated significantly increased 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity (30- to 50-fold) as compared to controls. Reference sediment-exposed groups and water controls demonstrated reliable embryo and larval survival, minimal malformations, and negligible CYP1A staining. These observed signs of blue sac disease (ELS mortality, malformations, growth reductions, CYP1A activity induction) may produce deleterious reproductive effects in natural fish populations exposed to oil sands mixtures. PMID:16728374

  11. Dynamics of Gas-Fluidized Granular Rods

    E-print Network

    L. J. Daniels; Y. Park; T. C. Lubensky; D. J. Durian

    2008-11-17

    We study a quasi-two-dimensional monolayer of granular rods fluidized by a spatially and temporally homogeneous upflow of air. By tracking the position and orientation of the particles, we characterize the dynamics of the system with sufficient resolution to observe ballistic motion at the shortest time scales. Particle anisotropy gives rise to dynamical anisotropy and superdiffusive dynamics parallel to the rod's long axis, causing the parallel and perpendicular mean squared displacements to become diffusive on different timescales. The distributions of free times and free paths between collisions deviate from exponential behavior, underscoring the non-thermal character of the particle motion. The dynamics show evidence of rotational-translational coupling similar to that of an anisotropic Brownian particle. We model rotational-translation coupling in the single-particle dynamics with a modified Langevin model using non-thermal noise sources. This suggests a phenomenological approach to thinking about collections of self-propelling particles in terms of enhanced memory effects.

  12. On the Vortex Sound from Rotating Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yudin, E. Y.

    1947-01-01

    The motion of different bodies imersed in liquid or gaseous media is accompanied by characteristic sound which is excited by the formation of unstable surfaces of separation behind the body, usually disintegrating into a system of discrete vortices(such as the Karman vortex street due to the flow about an infintely long rod, etc.).In the noise from fans,pumps,and similar machtnery, vortexnQif3eI?Yequently predominates. The purpose of this work is to elucidate certain questions of the dependence ofthis sound upon the aerodynamic parameters and the tip speed of the rotating rods,or blades. Although scme material is given below,insufficientto calculate the first rough approximation to the solution of this question,such as the mechanics of vortex formation,never the less certain conclusions maybe found of practical application for the reduction of noise from rotating blades.

  13. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  14. Swirling in a Vibrated Monolayer of Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Vijay; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Menon, Narayanan

    2006-03-01

    We report observations of the spatiotemporal behaviour of a vertically vibrated horizontal monolayer of copper rods (aspect ratio 5) etched to a rolling-pin-like shape. The spatial organization of the rods resembles a highly-defected nematic state with large, coherently moving swirls. We measure spatiotemporal correlations of the single-particle and collective velocities, and study the structure and dynamics of the system as a function of density and vibration amplitude. We analyze the observed patterns in the light of theories of orientational ordering, dynamics, and topological defects in systems of driven particles. We make comparisons to related but different experiments, as well as to our earlier measurements on similar particles with higher aspect ratio. J. Toner, Y. Tu and S. Ramaswamy, Ann. Phys. 318 (2005) 170. D.L. Blair, T. Neicu, and A. Kudrolli, Phys. Rev. E 67, 031303 (2003). V. Narayan, N. Menon and S. Ramaswamy, J. Stat. Mech. (2005) in press; cond-mat/0510082.

  15. Development of powder-forged connecting rods

    SciTech Connect

    Imahashi, K.; Tsumuki, C.; Nagare, I.

    1984-01-01

    In comparison with conventional hot forging process, powder forging process has much advantage such as good dimensional accuracy, minimum scattering of weight, etc. In spite of much advantage, the powder forged parts have not been mass-produced except for relatively simple shape parts because of technical and economic problems such as low productivity. Solving these problems, powder forging process was applied to connecting rods which required fatigue strength and minimum scattering of weight, and which were complex in shape. As a result, for the first time in the world, mass-production of powder forged connecting rods was carried out, and its properties are as follows: (1) Sufficient fatigue strength; (2) Minimum scattering of weight; and (3) Good dimensional accuracy.

  16. Morphoelastic Rods and Birods: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, Alain

    2015-03-01

    In many engineered or biological structures long thin elastic filaments are bundled together. Due to heating expansion, growth, or remodelling, the reference configuration of each filament can evolve independently and become incompatible with respect to its neighbours leading to internal stresses, deformations and, possibly, instabilities. A simple example of these structures is the bi-metallic strip first described by Timoshenko in 1925. To capture these phenomena in space and for large deformations, we have developed a general theory of growing elastic rods and birods. The theory provides a natural framework to consider the shape and dynamics of a single or multiple elastic rods with evolving reference configuration. In this talk, I will present the general theory and apply it to a number of interesting situations commonly found in engineering and biology. I will also describe new analytical methods to determine the shape and stability of growing birods. This work is done in collaboration with Thomas Lessinnes and Derek Moulton.

  17. String Theory at LHC Using Jet Production From String Regge Excitations vs String Balls

    E-print Network

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2015-08-26

    If we find extra dimensions in the second run of the LHC in the $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV, then the string mass scale $M_s$ can be $\\sim$ TeV and we should produce QCD jets in $2 \\rightarrow 2$ partonic collisions via string Regge excitations at the LHC. QCD jets can also be produced from string balls via thermal radiation at Hagedorn temperature. In this paper we study jet production from string Regge excitations vs string balls in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV at LHC and make a comparison with the standard model QCD jets. We find that high $p_T$ jet production from string Regge excitations can be larger than that from string balls and from standard model QCD jets. We also find resonances in the jet production cross section in string Regge excitation scenario which is absent in the other two scenarios. Hence TeV scale high $p_T$ jets can be a good signature to study string Regge excitations in the $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV at the LHC.

  18. Threading plasmonic nanoparticle strings with light.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Lars O; Valev, Ventsislav K; Tserkezis, Christos; Barnard, Jonathan S; Kasera, Setu; Scherman, Oren A; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials find increasing application in communications, renewable energies, electronics and sensing. Because of its unsurpassed speed and highly tuneable interaction with matter, using light to guide the self-assembly of nanomaterials can open up novel technological frontiers. However, large-scale light-induced assembly remains challenging. Here we demonstrate an efficient route to nano-assembly through plasmon-induced laser threading of gold nanoparticle strings, producing conducting threads 12±2?nm wide. This precision is achieved because the nanoparticles are first chemically assembled into chains with rigidly controlled separations of 0.9?nm primed for re-sculpting. Laser-induced threading occurs on a large scale in water, tracked via a new optical resonance in the near-infrared corresponding to a hybrid chain/rod-like charge transfer plasmon. The nano-thread width depends on the chain mode resonances, the nanoparticle size, the chain length and the peak laser power, enabling nanometre-scale tuning of the optical and conducting properties of such nanomaterials. PMID:25065385

  19. Threading plasmonic nanoparticle strings with light

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Lars O.; Valev, Ventsislav K.; Tserkezis, Christos; Barnard, Jonathan S.; Kasera, Setu; Scherman, Oren A.; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials find increasing application in communications, renewable energies, electronics and sensing. Because of its unsurpassed speed and highly tuneable interaction with matter, using light to guide the self-assembly of nanomaterials can open up novel technological frontiers. However, large-scale light-induced assembly remains challenging. Here we demonstrate an efficient route to nano-assembly through plasmon-induced laser threading of gold nanoparticle strings, producing conducting threads 12±2?nm wide. This precision is achieved because the nanoparticles are first chemically assembled into chains with rigidly controlled separations of 0.9?nm primed for re-sculpting. Laser-induced threading occurs on a large scale in water, tracked via a new optical resonance in the near-infrared corresponding to a hybrid chain/rod-like charge transfer plasmon. The nano-thread width depends on the chain mode resonances, the nanoparticle size, the chain length and the peak laser power, enabling nanometre-scale tuning of the optical and conducting properties of such nanomaterials. PMID:25065385

  20. On the perfect hexagonal packing of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2006-04-01

    In most cases the hexagonal packing of fibrous structures or rods extremizes the energy of interaction between strands. If the strands are not straight, then it is still possible to form a perfect hexatic bundle. Conditions under which the perfect hexagonal packing of curved tubular structures may exist are formulated. Particular attention is given to closed or cycled arrangements of the rods like in the DNA toroids and spools. The closure or return constraints of the bundle result in an allowable group of automorphisms of the cross-sectional hexagonal lattice. The structure of this group is explored. Examples of open helical-like and closed toroidal-like bundles are presented. An expression for the elastic energy of a perfectly packed bundle of thin elastic rods is derived. The energy accounts for both the bending and torsional stiffnesses of the rods. It is shown that equilibria of the bundle correspond to solutions of a variational problem formulated for the curve representing the axis of the bundle. The functional involves a function of the squared curvature under the constraints on the total torsion and the length. The Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained in terms of curvature and torsion and due to the existence of the first integrals the problem is reduced to the quadrature. The three-dimensional shape of the bundle may be readily reconstructed by integration of the Ilyukhin-type equations in special cylindrical coordinates. The results are of universal nature and are applicable to various fibrous structures, in particular, to intramolecular liquid crystals formed by DNA condensed in toroids or packed inside the viral capsids. International Workshop on Biopolymers: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Mechanics of DNA, RNA and Proteins, 30.05.2005-3.06.2005, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy.

  1. String Theory at LHC Using Supersymmetry Production From String Balls

    E-print Network

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2015-08-27

    If extra dimensions are found in the second run of LHC in the $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV then the string scale can be $\\sim$ TeV, and we should produce string balls at LHC. In this paper we study supersymmetry (squark and gluino) production from string balls at LHC in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV and compare that with the parton fusion results using pQCD. We find significant squark and gluino production from string balls at LHC which is comparable to parton fusion pQCD results. Hence, in the absence of black hole production at LHC, an enhancement in supersymmetry production can be a signature of TeV scale string physics at LHC.

  2. Incorporation of squalene into rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.K.; Fliesler, S.J. )

    1990-08-15

    We have reported previously that squalene is the major radiolabeled nonsaponifiable lipid product derived from ({sup 3}H)acetate in short term incubations of frog retinas. In the present study, we demonstrate that newly synthesized squalene is incorporated into rod outer segments under similar in vitro conditions. We show further that squalene is an endogenous constituent of frog rod outer segment membranes; its concentration is approximately 9.5 nmol/mumol of phospholipid or about 9% of the level of cholesterol. Pulse-chase experiments with radiolabeled precursors revealed no metabolism of outer segment squalene to sterols in up to 20 h of chase. Taken together with our previous absolute rate studies, these results suggest that most, if not all, of the squalene synthesized by the frog retina is transported to rod outer segments. Synthesis of protein is not required for squalene transport since puromycin had no effect on squalene incorporation into outer segments. Conversely, inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis with mevinolin had no effect on the incorporation of opsin into the outer segment. These latter results support the conclusion that the de novo synthesis and subsequent intracellular trafficking of opsin and isoprenoid lipids destined for the outer segment occur via independent mechanisms.

  3. Nonsingular global string compactifications

    PubMed

    Gregory

    2000-03-20

    We consider an exotic "compactification" of spacetime in which there are two infinite extra dimensions, using a global string instead of a domain wall. By having a negative cosmological constant we prove the existence of a nonsingular static solution using a dynamical systems argument. A nonsingular solution also exists in the absence of a cosmological constant with a time-dependent metric. We compare and contrast this solution with the Randall-Sundrum universe and the Cohen-Kaplan spacetime and consider the options of using such a model as a realistic resolution of the hierarchy problem. PMID:11017270

  4. New Ambitwistor String Theories

    E-print Network

    Casali, Eduardo; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Roehrig, Kai A

    2015-01-01

    We describe new ambitwistor string theories that give rise to the recent amplitude formulae for Einstein-Yang-Mills, (Dirac)-Born-Infeld, Galileons and others introduced by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In the case of the Einstein-Yang-Mills amplitudes, an important role is played by a novel worldsheet conformal field theory that provides the appropriate colour factors precisely without the spurious multitrace terms of earlier models that had to be ignored by hand. This is needed to obtain the correct multitrace terms that arise when Yang-Mills is coupled to gravity.

  5. Nucleus from String Theory

    E-print Network

    Koji Hashimoto; Takeshi Morita

    2011-05-24

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass number (A) dependence r A^{1/3} for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multi-baryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1) x A^{1/3} [fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  6. New Ambitwistor String Theories

    E-print Network

    Eduardo Casali; Yvonne Geyer; Lionel Mason; Ricardo Monteiro; Kai A. Roehrig

    2015-10-12

    We describe new ambitwistor string theories that give rise to the recent amplitude formulae for Einstein-Yang-Mills, (Dirac)-Born-Infeld, Galileons and others introduced by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In the case of the Einstein-Yang-Mills amplitudes, an important role is played by a novel worldsheet conformal field theory that provides the appropriate colour factors precisely without the spurious multitrace terms of earlier models that had to be ignored by hand. This is needed to obtain the correct multitrace terms that arise when Yang-Mills is coupled to gravity.

  7. New ambitwistor string theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, Eduardo; Geyer, Yvonne; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Roehrig, Kai A.

    2015-11-01

    We describe new ambitwistor string theories that give rise to the recent amplitude formulae for Einstein-Yang-Mills, (Dirac)-Born-Infeld, Galileons and others introduced by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In the case of the Einstein-Yang-Mills amplitudes, an important role is played by a novel worldsheet conformal field theory that provides the appropriate colour factors precisely without the spurious multitrace terms of earlier models that had to be ignored by hand. This is needed to obtain the correct multitrace terms that arise when Yang-Mills is coupled to gravity.

  8. Sequestering in String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; McAllister, Liam; Sundrum, Raman

    2007-04-04

    We study sequestering, a prerequisite for flavor-blind supersymmetry breaking in several high-scale mediation mechanisms, in compactifications of type IIB string theory. We find that although sequestering is typically absent in unwarped backgrounds, strongly warped compactifications do readily sequester. The AdS/CFT dual description in terms of conformal sequestering plays an important role in our analysis, and we establish how sequestering works both on the gravity side and on the gauge theory side. We pay special attention to subtle compactification effects that can disrupt sequestering. Our result is a step toward realizing an appealing pattern of soft terms in a KKLT compactification.

  9. Twist Field as Three String Interaction Vertex in Light Cone String Field Theory

    E-print Network

    Isao Kishimoto; Sanefumi Moriyama; Shunsuke Teraguchi

    2007-03-22

    It has been suggested that matrix string theory and light-cone string field theory are closely related. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the twist field, which represents string interactions in matrix string theory, and the three-string interaction vertex in light-cone string field theory carefully. We find that the three-string interaction vertex can reproduce some of the most important OPEs satisfied by the twist field.

  10. Radially stabilized inflating cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, Florian; Schneider, Robert

    2015-03-01

    In general relativity, local cosmic strings are well known to produce a static, locally flat spacetime with a wedge removed. If the tension exceeds a critical value, the deficit angle becomes larger than 2 ? , leading to a compact exterior that ends in a conical singularity. In this paper, we investigate dynamical solutions for cosmic strings with super-critical tensions. To this end, we model the string as a cylindrical shell of finite and stabilized transverse width and show that there is a marginally super-critical regime in which the stabilization can be achieved by physically reasonable matter. We show numerically that the static deficit angle solution is unstable for super-critical string tensions. Instead, the geometry starts expanding in the axial direction at an asymptotically constant rate, and a horizon is formed in the exterior spacetime, which has the shape of a growing cigar. We are able to find the analytic form of the attractor solution describing the interior of the cosmic string. In particular, this enables us to analytically derive the relation between the string tension and the axial expansion rate. Furthermore, we show that the exterior conical singularity can be avoided for dynamical solutions. Our results might be relevant for theories with two extra dimensions, modeling our Universe as a cosmic string with a three-dimensional axis. We derive the corresponding Friedmann equation, relating the on-brane Hubble parameter to the string tension or, equivalently, brane cosmological constant.

  11. Beats on a vibrating string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, James H.

    1999-09-01

    I showed Derrick Boucher's acoustic demonstration of beats and interference to a colleague, and as we were talking I mentioned that the function generator could be hooked to mechanical wave drivers to obtain nice standing waves. Then it's possible to verify that law of vibrating strings. However, we kept coming back to the concept of beats. Could we "see" beats on strings?

  12. A Platonic Sextet for Strings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The use of traditional string figures by the Dr. Schaffer and Mr. Stern Dance Ensemble led to experimentation with polyhedral string constructions. This article presents a series of polyhedra made with six loops of three colors which sequence through all the Platonic Solids.

  13. The covariant perturbative string spectrum

    E-print Network

    Davide Forcella; Amihay Hanany; Jan Troost

    2011-03-08

    We provide generating functions for the perturbative massive string spectrum which are covariant with respect to the SO(9) little group, and which contain all the representation theoretic content of the spectrum. Generating functions for perturbative bosonic, Type II, Heterotic and Type I string theories are presented, and generalizations are discussed.

  14. Energy in a String Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  15. Experimenting with String Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    What follows are several investigations involving string musical instruments developed for and used in a "Science of Sound & Light" course. The experiments make use of a guitar, orchestral string instruments and data collection and graphing software. They are designed to provide students with concrete examples of how mathematical formulae, when…

  16. N-loop string amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelstam, S.

    1986-06-01

    Work on the derivation of an explicit perturbation series for string and superstring amplitudes is reviewed. The light-cone approach is emphasized, but some work on the Polyakov approach is also mentioned, and the two methods are compared. The calculation of the measure factor is outlined in the interacting-string picture. (LEW)

  17. Tadpole Resummations in String Theory

    E-print Network

    Noriaki Kitazawa

    2008-01-11

    While R-R tadpoles should be canceled for consistency, string models with broken supersymmetry generally have uncanceled NS-NS tadpoles. Their presence signals that the background does not solve the field equations, so that these models are in "wrong" vacua. In this letter we investigate, with reference to some prototype examples, whether the true values of physical quantities can be recovered resumming the NS-NS tadpoles, hence by an approach that is related to the analysis based on String Field Theory by open-closed duality. We show that, indeed, the positive classical vacuum energy of a Dp-brane of the bosonic string is exactly canceled by the negative contribution arising from tree-level tadpole resummation, in complete agreement with Sen's conjecture on open-string tachyon condensation and with the consequent analysis based on String Field Theory. We also show that the vanishing classical vacuum energy of the SO(8192) unoriented bosonic open-string theory does not receive any tree-level corrections from the tadpole resummation. This result is consistent with the fact that this (unstable) configuration is free from tadpoles of massless closed-string modes, although there is a tadpole of the closed string tachyon. The application of this method to superstring models with broken supersymmetry is also discussed.

  18. Subcritical string and large N QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2008-10-15

    We pursue the possibility of using subcritical string theory in 4 spacetime dimensions to establish a string dual for large N QCD. In particular we study the even G-parity sector of the 4 dimensional Neveu-Schwarz dual resonance model as the natural candidate for this string theory. Our point of view is that the open string dynamics given by this model will determine the appropriate subcritical closed string theory, a tree level background of which should describe the sum of planar multiloop open string diagrams. We examine the one-loop open string diagram, which contains information about the closed string spectrum at weak coupling. Higher loop open string diagrams will be needed to determine closed string interactions. We also analyze the field theory limit of the one-loop open string diagram and recover the correct running coupling behavior of the limiting gauge theory.

  19. Split string field theory II

    E-print Network

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-27

    We describe the ghost sector of cubic string field theory in terms of degrees of freedom on the two halves of a split string. In particular, we represent a class of pure ghost BRST operators as operators on the space of half-string functionals. These BRST operators were postulated by Rastelli, Sen, and Zwiebach to give a description of cubic string field theory in the closed string vacuum arising from condensation of a D25-brane in the original tachyonic theory. We find a class of solutions for the ghost equations of motion using the pure ghost BRST operators. We find a vanishing action for these solutions, and discuss possible interpretations of this result. The form of the solutions we find in the pure ghost theory suggests an analogous class of solutions in the original theory on the D25-brane with BRST operator Q_B coupling the matter and ghost sectors.

  20. Split string field theory I

    E-print Network

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-04

    We describe projection operators in the matter sector of Witten's cubic string field theory using modes on the right and left halves of the string. These projection operators represent a step towards an analytic solution of the equations of motion of the full string field theory, and can be used to construct Dp-brane solutions of the string field theory when the BRST operator Q is taken to be pure ghost, as suggested in the recent conjecture by Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We show that a family of solutions related to the sliver state are rank one projection operators on the appropriate space of half-string functionals, and we construct higher rank projection operators corresponding to configurations of multiple D-branes.

  1. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  2. String Theory and Water Waves

    E-print Network

    Ramakrishnan Iyer; Clifford V. Johnson; Jeffrey S. Pennington

    2010-02-05

    We uncover a remarkable role that an infinite hierarchy of non-linear differential equations plays in organizing and connecting certain {hat c}water wave hierarchy. We observe that there are several other string-like limits of the system, and conjecture that some of them are type IIA and IIB (A,D) minimal string backgrounds. We explain how these and several string-like special points arise and are connected. In some cases, the framework endows the theories with a non-perturbative definition for the first time. Notably, we discover that the Painleve IV equation plays a key role in organizing the string theory physics, joining its siblings, Painleve I and II, whose roles have previously been identified in this minimal string context.

  3. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word “data-mining” is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  4. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word "data-mining" is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  5. Cosmic string wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Silk, Joseph; Brandenberger, Robert; Turok, Neil

    1987-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto wakes left behind by horizon-sized pieces of cosmic string is investigated, and the effects of wakes on the large-scale structure of the universe are determined. Accretion of cold matter onto wakes, the effects of a long string on fluids with finite velocity dispersion or sound speeds, the interactions between loops and wakes, and the conditions for wakes to survive disruption by loops are discussed. It is concluded that the most important wakes are those which were formed at the time of equal matter and radiation density. This leads to sheetlike overdense regions of galaxies with a mean separation in agreement with the scale of the bubbles of de Lapparent, Geller, and Huchra (1986). However, for the value of G(mu) favored from galaxy formation considerations in a universe with cold dark matter, a wake accretes matter from a distance of only about 1.5 Mpc, which is much less than the distance between the wakes.

  6. NL2599 String theory String theories (Green et al., 1987, Davies & Brown, 1988; Polchinski, 1998;

    E-print Network

    Beck, Christian

    NL2599 String theory String theories (Green et al., 1987, Davies & Brown, 1988; Polchinski, 1998-like interactions in Feynman graphs are smoothed out in string theory. The quantization of bosonic strings yields that are so small that we don't notice them in daily life. But bosonic string theories have another problem

  7. From Quantum Mechanics to String Theory

    E-print Network

    From Quantum Mechanics to String Theory Relativity (why it makes sense) Quantum mechanics Quarks and the Strong Force Symmetry and Unification String Theory: a different kind of unification that is naturally solved by string theory Strings vibrating in a variety of ways give rise to particles of different

  8. From Quantum Mechanics to String Theory

    E-print Network

    From Quantum Mechanics to String Theory Relativity (why it makes sense) Quantum mechanics Quarks and the Strong Force Symmetry and Unification String Theory: a different kind of unification Friday, June 19, 2009 #12;String Theory Origins We introduced string theory as a possible solution to our

  9. Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons

    E-print Network

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2011-07-19

    Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

  10. String Formatting Considered Harmful for Novice Programmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Michael C.; Jadud, Matthew C.; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.

    2010-01-01

    In Java, "System.out.printf" and "String.format" consume a specialised kind of string commonly known as a format string. In our study of first-year students at the Ateneo de Manila University, we discovered that format strings present a substantial challenge for novice programmers. Focusing on their first laboratory we found that 8% of all the…

  11. Swarming and swirling in self-propelled polar granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Lumay, Geoffroy; Volfson, Dmitri; Tsimring, Lev

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the dynamics of ``self-propelled" polar rods experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, the polar motion was achieved by vibrating rods with asymmetric mass distribution. In the numerics, we postulate a driving force acting along the axis of the rod. We observe aggregation of rods at the boundaries because of the inability of rods to turn around and escape for high enough density under low noise conditions. As vibration strength and thus noise is increased, the aggregation reduces and a uniformly distributed state displaying local orientation order and swirls are observed. We observe greater than ?n density fluctuations which are in a qualitative agreement with the Toner-Tu model, but this agreement should not be over-emphasized since the model is directly applicable to a nematic regime. Our findings elucidate an important and interesting interplay between the shape and the directed motion in realistic self-propelled rods which affects the phenomenology of their collective dynamics.

  12. Dynamic, multiaxial impact response of confined and unconfined ceramic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Grady, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    A new configuration for impact testing was implemented which yielded time-resolved measurements of the dynamic response of materials undergoing multiaxial strain. With this`-Method, one end of an initially stationary rod (ie., right circular cylinder) of test material was subjected to planar impact with a flat-faced projectile. The test rod was either free (unconfined) or mounted within a close-fitting sleeve which provided lateral confinement. Velocity interferometer diagnostics monitored the axial (longitudinal) velocity of the rod free end, and the transverse (radial) velocity for one or more points on the periphery of the rod or confinement sleeve. Analysis of the resultant velocity records allowed assessment of material properties, such as wave speeds and compressive yield strength, without the requirement of intact recovery of the rod. Data were obtained for alumina (Coors AD-99.5) rods in a series of tests involving variations in confinement and peak impact stress.

  13. Electric field in the vicinity of long thin conducting rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezinkina, M. M.; Rezinkin, O. L.; Svetlichnaya, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the results of numerical and analytical calculations of distributions of potentials and electric fields in the vicinity of thin conducting rods that model the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods. We consider rods represented in the form of a uniformly charged filament, a conducting ellipsoid with a free charge on its surface, as well an ellipsoid or a cylinder in a uniform external electric field. The effect of parameters of conducting rods modeling the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods, as well as the region containing a space charge around the tip of the leader channel, on the distribution of potentials and field strengths are analyzed. The conditions for the propagation of the counter leader from the lightning rod are specified.

  14. String bit models for superstring

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, O.; Thorn, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    The authors extend the model of string as a polymer of string bits to the case of superstring. They mainly concentrate on type II-B superstring, with some discussion of the obstacles presented by not II-B superstring, together with possible strategies for surmounting them. As with previous work on bosonic string work within the light-cone gauge. The bit model possesses a good deal less symmetry than the continuous string theory. For one thing, the bit model is formulated as a Galilei invariant theory in (D {minus} 2) + 1 dimensional space-time. This means that Poincare invariance is reduced to the Galilei subgroup in D {minus} 2 space dimensions. Naturally the supersymmetry present in the bit model is likewise dramatically reduced. Continuous string can arise in the bit models with the formation of infinitely long polymers of string bits. Under the right circumstances (at the critical dimension) these polymers can behave as string moving in D dimensional space-time enjoying the full N = 2 Poincare supersymmetric dynamics of type II-B superstring.

  15. Dynamical evolution of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, F.R.

    1988-05-11

    The author have studied by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a network of cosmic strings, both in the radiation and matter era. Our basic conclusion is that a scaling solution exists, i.e., the string energy density evolves as t/sup -2/. This means that the process by which long strings dump their energy into closed loops (which can gravitationally radiate away) is efficient enough to prevent the string domination over other forms of energy. This conclusion does not depend on the initial string energy density, nor on the various numerical parameters. On the other hand, the generated spectrum of loop sizes does depend on the value of our numerical lower cutoff (i.e., the minimum length of loop we allow to be chopped off the network). Furthermore, the network evolution is very different from what was assumed before), namely the creation of a few horizon sized loops per horizon volume and per hubble time, which subsequently fragment into about 10 smaller daughter loops. Rather, many tiny loops are directly cut from the network of infinite strings, and it appears that the only fundamental scale (the horizon) has been lost. This is probably because a fundamental ingredient had been overlooked, namely the kinks. These kinks are created in pairs at each intercommutation, and very rapidly, the long strings appear to be very kinky. Thus the number of long strings per horizon is still of the order of a few, but their total length is fairly large. Furthermore, a large number of kinks favors the formation of small loops, and their sizes might well be governed by the kink density along the long strings. Finally, we computed the two-point correlation function of the loops and found significant differences from the work of Turok.

  16. The Coherence Time of Quantum Rod Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunyu; Zhao, Cuilan; Xiao, Jinglin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum systems are usually very fragile and external fields will break the quantum coherence for information storing. Here we study the properties of coherence time (CT) of a quantum rod (QR) qubit by the Pekar type variational (PTV) method. Our numerical results show that the CT will increase with increasing QR's transverse and longitudinal effective confinement lengths (TLECLs), whereas it is a decreasing function of the ellipsoidal aspect ratio (EAR) and polaron radius (PR). Consequently, we can improve the CT by (i) increasing the TLECLs; (ii) decreasing the EAR and PR.

  17. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  18. The statistical mechanics of inhomogeneous hard rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderlick, T.K.; Davis, H.T. ); Percus, J.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The exact statistical mechanical solution to the problem of an equilibrium inhomogeneous classical one-dimensional mixture of hard rods is presented. From the solution, thermodynamic properties, density profiles, and correlation functions of hard rod fluids confined to small regions (micropores) can be calculated. The theory is applied to investigate microstructure, pore pressures, and pore adsorption selectivity of micropores in equilibrium with binary hard rod mixtures. A prescription is suggested for generalizing the one-dimensional results to higher dimensions.

  19. Light Responses in Rods of Vitamin A–Deprived Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Solessio, Eduardo; Umino, Yumiko; Cameron, David A.; Loew, Ellis; Engbretson, Gustav A.; Knox, Barry E.; Barlow, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of free opsin by mutations in rhodopsin or insufficiencies in the visual cycle can lead to retinal degeneration. Free opsin activates phototransduction; however, the link between constitutive activation and retinal degeneration is unclear. In this study, the photoresponses of Xenopus rods rendered constitutively active by vitamin A deprivation were examined. Unlike their mammalian counterparts, Xenopus rods do not degenerate. Contrasting phototransduction in vitamin A–deprived Xenopus rods with phototransduction in constitutively active mammalian rods may provide new understanding of the mechanisms that lead to retinal degeneration. Methods The photocurrents of Xenopus tadpole rods were measured with suction electrode recordings, and guanylate cyclase activity was measured with the IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) jump technique. The amount of rhodopsin in rods was determined by microspectrophotometry. Results The vitamin A–deprived rod outer segments were 60% to 70% the length and diameter of the rods in age-matched animals. Approximately 90% of its opsin content was in the free or unbound form. Analogous to bleaching adaptation, the photoresponses were desensitized (10- to 20-fold) and faster. Unlike bleaching adaptation, the vitamin A–deprived rods maintained near normal saturating (dark) current densities by developing abnormally high rates of cGMP synthesis. Their rate of cGMP synthesis in the dark (15 seconds?1) was twofold greater than the maximum levels attainable by control rods (~7 seconds?1). Conclusions Preserving circulating current density and response range appears to be an important goal for rod homeostasis. However, the compensatory changes associated with vitamin A deprivation in Xenopus rods come at the high metabolic cost of a 15-fold increase in basal ATP consumption. PMID:19407019

  20. Failure of expansion joint tie rods -- Impact on bellows integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accomodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Often, tie rods are employed to limit the range of axial deflection. Additional restraint against excessive displacement can be provided by the surrounding pipe and associated supports. This paper presents a methodology that was employed to estimate the consequences of tie rod failure. Of particular interest is whether tie rod failure can lead to sufficient displacement as to cause bellows rupture.

  1. Failure of expansion joint tie rods -- Impact on bellows integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.

    1992-12-31

    Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accomodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Often, tie rods are employed to limit the range of axial deflection. Additional restraint against excessive displacement can be provided by the surrounding pipe and associated supports. This paper presents a methodology that was employed to estimate the consequences of tie rod failure. Of particular interest is whether tie rod failure can lead to sufficient displacement as to cause bellows rupture.

  2. Homotopy Classification of Bosonic String Field Theory

    E-print Network

    Korbinian Muenster; Ivo Sachs

    2012-08-28

    We prove the decomposition theorem for the loop homotopy algebra of quantum closed string field theory and use it to show that closed string field theory is unique up to gauge transformations on a given string background and given S-matrix. For the theory of open and closed strings we use results in open-closed homotopy algebra to show that the space of inequivalent open string field theories is isomorphic to the space of classical closed string backgrounds. As a further application of the open-closed homotopy algebra we show that string field theory is background independent and locally unique in a very precise sense. Finally we discuss topological string theory in the framework of homotopy algebras and find a generalized correspondence between closed strings and open string field theories.

  3. Chronic toxicity of un-ionized ammonia to early life-stages of endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) compared to the surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Waddell, B.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-contaminated groundwater enters the Upper Colorado River from beneath the abandoned Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Pile near Moab, Utah. This reach of the Upper Colorado River was designated as critical habitat for four endangered fish species because it is one of the few existing areas with known spawning and rearing habitats. Un-ionized ammonia (NH3) concentrations frequently exceed 1.00 mg/L in backwaters adjacent to the tailings pile, which exceeds the Utah 30-d average chronic water quality criterion for un-ionized ammonia (0.07 mg/L NH3; temperature 20??C; pH 8.2) by a factor of more than 10. However, there is little published information regarding the sensitivity of endangered fishes to ammonia. We conducted 28-d static renewal studies with post-swim-up larvae to determine the relative sensitivity of Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), and the standard surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to NH3. Chronic values (ChVs) for mortality and growth were determined as the geometric mean of the no observed effect concentration and the lowest observed effect concentration based on analysis of variance. The ChVs for growth of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.40, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. The ChVs for mortality of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.70, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. Therefore, the ChVs for mortality and growth were similar for fathead minnow and razorback sucker; however, the ChV for growth was lower than the ChV for mortality for Colorado pikeminnow. Maximum likelihood regression was used to calculate 28-d lethal concentrations (LCx) for each species. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for fathead minnow were 0.69, 0.42, and 0.13 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for Colorado pikeminnow were 0.76, 0.61, and 0.38 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for razorback sucker were 0.54, 0.38, and 0.25 mg/L NH3, respectively. The fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker are relatively similar in sensitivity and rank at the 35th, 49th, and 31st percentiles, respectively, of the theoretical chronic fish sensitivity distributions for NH3. The existing water quality criteria for NH3, if met by remediation activities at the Moab site, would be protective of these endangered fishes even if fish sensitivity is based on the conservative LC1 value. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  4. Exposure of fish to biologically treated bleached-kraft effluent; 1: Biochemical, physiological and pathological assessment of Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) and longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus)

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepper-Sams, P.J.; Owens, J.W. ); Swanson, S.M. ); Marchant, T. . Dept. of Biology); Schryer, R. )

    1994-09-01

    A suite of biochemical, physiological, and pathological measures was used to assess possible effects of exposure to bleached-kraft mill effluent (BKME) on wild longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus=LS) and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni=MW) in the Wapiti/Smoke River system, as compared to similar populations in a reference river system without BKME inputs. Individual fish body burden data were examined for correlations between chemical exposure and biological response. General incidence of gross pathology and histopathology showed no relationship with exposure to BKME, and no neoplastic or preneoplastic lesions were observed in either exposed or reference fish. The few significant differences observed in LS blood parameters were not correlated with exposure to BKME and appeared to reflect habitat gradients. Liver somatic indexes were higher for female BKME-exposed LS, but were not significantly different in male LS nor in MW. Some differences in circulating sex steroid levels were observed in LS exposed to BKME (but not in MW, the species with higher contaminant body burdens). Steroid profile differences may have been related to natural differences in duration of spawning periods in the two fish populations. Other measures of reproductive capacity (relative gonad size, fecundity, young-of-the-year) showed no reductions in exposed fish. The detoxification enzyme cytochrome P4501A was induced in both species, with greater induction in MW than in LS. MW P4501A induction correlated well with some BKME exposure measures, but not with liver or gonad weights, pathology, reproductive capacity, or population-level parameters. Increased liver size and apparent differences in sex steroid profiles in LS did not translate to other health effects or population-level effects. Thus, exposure to this biologically treated BKME produced one consistent biochemical marker of exposure in the two fish species that was not associated with any adverse effects on fish health.

  5. Assessing reproductive and endocrine parameters in male largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) along a contaminant gradient in the lower Columbia River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Olivier, H.M.; Draugelis-Dale, R. O.; Eilts, B.E.; Torres, L.; Patiño, R.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Goodbred, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p?-DDE), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are stable, bioaccumulative, and widely found in the environment, wildlife, and the human population. To explore the hypothesis that reproduction in male fish is associated with environmental exposures in the lower Columbia River (LCR), reproductive and endocrine parameters were studied in male resident, non-anadromous largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus) (LSS) in the same habitats as anadromous salmonids having conservation status. Testes, thyroid tissue and plasma collected in 2010 from Longview (LV), Columbia City (CC), and Skamania (SK; reference) were studied. Sperm morphologies and thyrocyte heights were measured by light microscopy, sperm motilities by computer-assisted sperm motion analysis, sperm adenosine triphosphate (ATP) with luciferase, and plasma vitellogenin (VTG), thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) by immunoassay. Sperm apoptosis, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear DNA fragmentation, and reproductive stage were measured by flow cytometry. Sperm quality parameters (except counts) and VTG were significantly different among sites, with correlations between VTG and 7 sperm parameters. Thyrocyte heights, T4, T3, gonadosomatic index and Fulton's condition factor differed among sites, but not significantly. Sperm quality was significantly lower and VTG higher where liver contaminants and water estrogen equivalents were highest (LV site). Total PCBs (specifically PCB-138, -146, -151, -170, -174, -177, -180, -183, -187, -194, and -206) and total PBDEs (specifically BDE-47, -100, -153, and -154) were negatively correlated with sperm motility. PCB-206 and BDE-154 were positively correlated with DNA fragmentation, and pentachloroanisole and VTG were positively correlated with sperm apoptosis and negatively correlated with ATP. BDE-99 was positively correlated with sperm counts and motility; T4 was negatively correlated with counts and positively correlated with motility, thus indicating possible androgenic mechanisms and thyroid endocrine disruption. Male LSS proved to be an informative model for studying reproductive and endocrine biomarkers in the LCR.

  6. Assessing reproductive and endocrine parameters in male largescale suckers (Catostomus macrocheilus) along a contaminant gradient in the lower Columbia River, USA.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, J A; Olivier, H M; Draugelis-Dale, R O; Eilts, B E; Torres, L; Patiño, R; Nilsen, E; Goodbred, S L

    2014-06-15

    Persistent organochlorine pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are stable, bioaccumulative, and widely found in the environment, wildlife, and the human population. To explore the hypothesis that reproduction in male fish is associated with environmental exposures in the lower Columbia River (LCR), reproductive and endocrine parameters were studied in male resident, non-anadromous largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus) (LSS) in the same habitats as anadromous salmonids having conservation status. Testes, thyroid tissue and plasma collected in 2010 from Longview (LV), Columbia City (CC), and Skamania (SK; reference) were studied. Sperm morphologies and thyrocyte heights were measured by light microscopy, sperm motilities by computer-assisted sperm motion analysis, sperm adenosine triphosphate (ATP) with luciferase, and plasma vitellogenin (VTG), thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) by immunoassay. Sperm apoptosis, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear DNA fragmentation, and reproductive stage were measured by flow cytometry. Sperm quality parameters (except counts) and VTG were significantly different among sites, with correlations between VTG and 7 sperm parameters. Thyrocyte heights, T4, T3, gonadosomatic index and Fulton's condition factor differed among sites, but not significantly. Sperm quality was significantly lower and VTG higher where liver contaminants and water estrogen equivalents were highest (LV site). Total PCBs (specifically PCB-138, -146, -151, -170, -174, -177, -180, -183, -187, -194, and -206) and total PBDEs (specifically BDE-47, -100, -153, and -154) were negatively correlated with sperm motility. PCB-206 and BDE-154 were positively correlated with DNA fragmentation, and pentachloroanisole and VTG were positively correlated with sperm apoptosis and negatively correlated with ATP. BDE-99 was positively correlated with sperm counts and motility; T4 was negatively correlated with counts and positively correlated with motility, thus indicating possible androgenic mechanisms and thyroid endocrine disruption. Male LSS proved to be an informative model for studying reproductive and endocrine biomarkers in the LCR. PMID:24182618

  7. Nonassociative Gravity in String Theory?

    E-print Network

    Ralph Blumenhagen; Erik Plauschinn

    2010-11-26

    In an on-shell conformal field theory approach, we find indications of a three-bracket structure for target space coordinates in general closed string backgrounds. This generalizes the appearance of noncommutative gauge theories for open strings in two-form backgrounds to a putative noncommutative/nonassociative gravity theory for closed strings probing curved backgrounds with non-vanishing three-form flux. Several aspects and consequences of the three-bracket structure are discussed and a new type of generalized uncertainty principle is proposed.

  8. String theory, gravity and experiment

    E-print Network

    Thibault Damour; Marc Lilley

    2008-02-28

    The aim of these lectures is to give an introduction to several topics which lie at the intersection of string theory, gravity theory and gravity phenomenology. One successively reviews: (i) the "membrane" approach to the dissipative dynamics of classical black holes, (ii) the current experimental tests of gravity, and their theoretical interpretation, (iii) some aspects of the string-inspired phenomenology of the gravitational sector, and (iv) some possibilities for observing string-related signals in cosmology (including a discussion of gravitational wave signals from cosmic superstrings).

  9. String Theory, Unification and Supersymmetry

    E-print Network

    Michael Dine

    2002-10-17

    One cannot yet point to any firm string prediction. While many approximate string ground states are known with interesting properties, we do not have any argument that one or another describes what we observe around us, and for reasons which appear fundamental we do not know how to systematically determine even any rough quantitative properties. I argue here that we should examine large classes of string ground states, trying to determine whether features such as low energy supersymmetry, the pattern of supersymmetry breaking, the presence of axions, large dimensions, or others might be generic.

  10. Radio broadcasts from superconducting strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Sabancilar, Eray; Steer, Danièle A.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-08-01

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  11. Worldsheet Geometries of Ambitwistor String

    E-print Network

    Kantaro Ohmori

    2015-06-12

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  12. Radio bursts from superconducting strings

    E-print Network

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-01-30

    We show that radio bursts from cusps on superconducting strings are linearly polarized, thus, providing a signature that can be used to distinguish them from astrophysical sources. We write the event rate of string-generated radio transients in terms of observational variables, namely, the event duration and flux. Assuming a canonical set of observational parameters, we find that the burst event rate can be quite reasonable, e.g., order ten a year for Grand Unified strings with 100 TeV currents, and a lack of observed radio bursts can potentially place strong constraints on particle physics models.

  13. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-print Network

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  14. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  15. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  16. Boosted black string bombs

    E-print Network

    Joao G. Rosa

    2013-02-11

    We study the formation of superradiant bound states for massive scalar fields in five-dimensional rotating black string geometries with a non-vanishing Kaluza-Klein momentum along the compact direction. Even though all Kaluza-Klein modes may form bound states in this geometry, in realistic extra-dimensional models and astrophysical black holes only the zero-mode is sufficiently light for superradiant instabilities to develop, provided the field has a small but non-vanishing mass, as for example for axion-like particles. We use analytical and numerical methods to show that, although the Kaluza-Klein momentum decreases the upper bound on the field mass for an instability to develop, it may enhance its maximum growth rate by more than 50%, thus boosting the black hole bomb mechanism. We discuss the possible observational consequences of this result and its potential as an astrophysical probe of non-trivial extra-dimensional compactifications.

  17. Boosted black string bombs

    E-print Network

    Rosa, Joao G

    2012-01-01

    We study the formation of superradiant bound states for massive scalar fields in five-dimensional rotating black string geometries with a non-vanishing Kaluza-Klein momentum along the compact direction. Even though all Kaluza-Klein modes may form bound states in this geometry, in realistic extra-dimensional models and astrophysical black holes only the zero-mode is sufficiently light for superradiant instabilities to develop, provided the field has a small but non-vanishing mass, as for example for axion-like particles. We use analytical and numerical methods to show that, although the Kaluza-Klein momentum decreases the upper bound on the field mass for an instability to develop, it may enhance its maximum growth rate by more than 50%, thus boosting the black hole bomb mechanism. We discuss the possible observational consequences of this result and its potential as an astrophysical probe of non-trivial extra-dimensional compactifications.

  18. Wormholes in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, A. ); Hawking, S.W. )

    1991-12-15

    We discuss the wormhole effective interactions in string theory, thought of as a sum over two-dimensional field theories on different world sheets. The effective interactions are calculated in the dilute wormhole approximation,'' initially by considering the Green's functions on higher-genus Riemann surfaces, and then by calculating the effect of a complete basis of wave functions on scattering amplitudes for a surface with a boundary. The sum over wormholes is equivalent to having a world sheet of trivial topology and summing over different space-time and matter-field backgrounds. To leading order these consist of the massless fluctuations, since the tachyon cancels out when a sum is done over different spin structures going through the wormhole. In this way we recover quantized general relativity as an effective theory, from a sum over field theories on higher-genus Riemann surfaces.

  19. Estimating topological entropy from the motion of stirring rods

    E-print Network

    Sarah E. Tumasz; Jean-Luc Thiffeault

    2012-08-03

    Stirring a two-dimensional viscous fluid with rods is often an effective way to mix. The topological features of periodic rod motions give a lower bound on the topological entropy of the induced flow map, since material lines must `catch' on the rods. But how good is this lower bound? We present examples from numerical simulations and speculate on what affects the 'gap' between the lower bound and the measured topological entropy. The key is the sign of the rod motion's action on first homology of the orientation double cover of the punctured disk.

  20. Alignment of Two-Dimensional Rods under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel K.; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    1997-03-01

    Langmuir monolayers of NBD-stearic acid were observed in the coexistence region between two dimensional (2D) liquid and crystalline phases using Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The solid phase domains were rod-shaped (aspect ratio of about 10) due to highly anisotropic molecular interactions. In a 2D shear flow the rods were observed to tumble in the 2D version of a Jeffery orbit - the rotational velocity slowed dramatically as the rods approached alignment with the flow direction. This resulted in a non-zero value of the nematic order parameter under shear, even for very dilute rod concentrations.

  1. Transient elastic impact response of slender graphite rods

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, I.

    2007-12-15

    Graphite rods are manufactured by extruding the mixture of calcined petroleum coke and coal tar pitch into the desired shape and baking the cooled specimens at about 800{sup o}C. Cracking can occur in rods during the manufacturing process. It is useful to be able to detect the presence of such cracks in the rods prior to their being machined and put into use as electrodes or cathodes or thermal insulator. In an effort to develop a nondestructive testing approach to evaluation of the rods, transient elastic impact was determined for slender rods. Theory for solid, slender rods provided an important starting point for this work. Subsequently, numerical models were developed and simulation was used to determine the response of rods containing cracks. Experiments on graphite rods with and without cracks were conducted and the internal condition determined from the recorded signals. The rods were then cut lengthwise to reveal the internal condition and verify the predicted results. In all cases the knowledge gained from simulation allowed for the presence of cracks to be detected.

  2. Optical distortion and birefringence in a heated trigonal crystal rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greninger, Charles E.

    1999-05-01

    Analytic expressions for the optical distortion and the fractional polarization purity loss when a perfectly plane, perfectly linearly polarized moderate power laser beam traverses a heated, rectangular trigonal class 3m, 32, or 3¯m crystal rod are given. The expressions are in terms of the crystal physical parameters of the rod, as well as the local stresses and strains that are developed in the rod by heating from the beam. When the crystal temperature variation is symmetric in the rod's transverse coordinates, these expressions become analytic in the temperature variation and two simple temperature integrals. An example with a symmetric temperature variation in a lithium niobate crystal is given.

  3. Charting the Landscape of Supercritical String Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hellerman, Simeon; Swanson, Ian

    2007-10-26

    Special solutions of string theory in supercritical dimensions can interpolate in time between theories with different numbers of spacetime dimensions and different amounts of world sheet supersymmetry. These solutions connect supercritical string theories to the more familiar string duality web in ten dimensions and provide a precise link between supersymmetric and purely bosonic string theories. Dimension quenching and c duality appear to be natural concepts in string theory, giving rise to large networks of interconnected theories.

  4. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, R.; Davis, A.C.; Brandenberger, R.

    1988-10-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  5. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Davis, Anne-Christine; Brandenberger, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  6. Perturbations from strings don't look like strings!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A systematic analysis is challenging popular ideas about perturbation from cosmic strings. One way in which the picture has changed is reviewed. It is concluded that, while the scaling properties of cosmic strings figure significantly in the analysis, care must be taken when thinking in terms of single time snapshots. The process of seeding density perturbations is not fundamentally localized in time, and this fact can wash out many of the details which appear in a single snapshot.

  7. String cosmology — Large-field inflation in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This is a short review of string cosmology. We wish to connect string-scale physics as closely as possible to observables accessible to current or near-future experiments. Our possible best hope to do so is a description of inflation in string theory. The energy scale of inflation can be as high as that of Grand Unification (GUT). If this is the case, this is the closest we can possibly get in energy scales to string-scale physics. Hence, GUT-scale inflation may be our best candidate phenomenon to preserve traces of string-scale dynamics. Our chance to look for such traces is the primordial gravitational wave, or tensor mode signal produced during inflation. For GUT-scale inflation this is strong enough to be potentially visible as a B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Moreover, a GUT-scale inflation model has a trans-Planckian excursion of the inflaton scalar field during the observable amount of inflation. Such large-field models of inflation have a clear need for symmetry protection against quantum corrections. This makes them ideal candidates for a description in a candidate fundamental theory like string theory. At the same time the need of large-field inflation models for UV completion makes them particularly susceptible to preserve imprints of their string-scale dynamics in the inflationary observables, the spectral index ns and the fractional tensor mode power r. Hence, we will focus this review on axion monodromy inflation as a mechanism of large-field inflation in string theory.

  8. The closed string tadpole in open string field theory

    E-print Network

    Ian Ellwood

    2008-04-07

    We compute a class of gauge invariant observables for marginal solutions and the tachyon vacuum. In each case we find that the observables are related in a simple way to the closed-string tadpole on a disk with appropriate boundary conditions. We give a sketch of an argument that this result should hold in general using the BRST invariance of the closed string two-point function. Finally, we discuss the analogous set of invariants in the Berkovits superstring field theory.

  9. fMRI of the rod scotoma elucidates cortical rod pathways and implications for lesion measurements

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Are silencing, ectopic shifts, and receptive field (RF) scaling in cortical scotoma projection zones (SPZs) the result of long-term reorganization (plasticity) or short-term adaptation? Electrophysiological studies of SPZs after retinal lesions in animal models remain controversial, because they are unable to conclusively answer this question because of limitations of the methodology. Here, we used functional MRI (fMRI) visual field mapping through population RF (pRF) modeling with moving bar stimuli under photopic and scotopic conditions to measure the effects of the rod scotoma in human early visual cortex. As a naturally occurring central scotoma, it has a large cortical representation, is free of traumatic lesion complications, is completely reversible, and has not reorganized under normal conditions (but can as seen in rod monochromats). We found that the pRFs overlapping the SPZ in V1, V2, V3, hV4, and VO-1 generally (i) reduced their blood oxygen level-dependent signal coherence and (ii) shifted their pRFs more eccentric but (iii) scaled their pRF sizes in variable ways. Thus, silencing, ectopic shifts, and pRF scaling in SPZs are not unique identifiers of cortical reorganization; rather, they can be the expected result of short-term adaptation. However, are there differences between rod and cone signals in V1, V2, V3, hV4, and VO-1? We did not find differences for all five maps in more peripheral eccentricities outside of rod scotoma influence in coherence, eccentricity representation, or pRF size. Thus, rod and cone signals seem to be processed similarly in cortex. PMID:25848028

  10. Topics in String Theory and Quantum Gravity

    E-print Network

    L. Alvarez-Gaume; M. A. Vazquez-Mozo

    1992-12-01

    These are the lecture notes for the Les Houches Summer School on Quantum Gravity held in July 1992. The notes present some general critical assessment of other (non-string) approaches to quantum gravity, and a selected set of topics concerning what we have learned so far about the subject from string theory. Since these lectures are long (133 A4 pages), we include in this abstract the table of contents, which should help the user of the bulletin board in deciding whether to latex and print the full file. 1-FIELD THEORETICAL APPROACH TO QUANTUM GRAVITY: Linearized gravity; Supergravity; Kaluza-Klein theories; Quantum field theory and classical gravity; Euclidean approach to Quantum Gravity; Canonical quantization of gravity; Gravitational Instantons. 2-CONSISTENCY CONDITIONS: ANOMALIES: Generalities about anomalies; Spinors in 2n dimensions; When can we expect to find anomalies?; The Atiyah-Singer Index Theorem and the computation of anomalies; Examples: Green-Schwarz cancellation mechanism and Witten's SU(2) global anomaly. 3-STRING THEORY I. BOSONIC STRING: Bosonic string; Conformal Field Theory; Quantization of the bosonic string; Interaction in string theory and the characterization of the moduli space; Bosonic strings with background fields. Stringy corrections to Einstein equations; Toroidal compactifications. $R$-duality; Operator formalism 4-STRING THEORY II. FERMIONIC STRINGS: Fermionic String; Heterotic String; Strings at finite temperature; Is string theory finite? 5-OTHER DEVELOPMENTS AND CONCLUSIONS: String ``Phenomenology''; Black Holes and Related Subjects

  11. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potiens, A. J.; Dellamano, J. C.; Vicente, R.; Raele, M. P.; Wetter, N. U.; Landulfo, E.

    2014-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated.

  12. Application of polyimide actuator rod seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watermann, A. W.; Gay, B. F.; Robinson, E. D.; Srinath, S. K.; Nelson, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Development of polyimide two-stage hydraulic actuator rod seals for application in high-performance aircraft was accomplished. The significant portion of the effort was concentrated on optimization of the chevron and K-section second-stage seal geometries to satisfy the requirements for operation at 450 K (350 F) with dynamic pressure loads varying between 200 psig steady-state and 1500 psig impulse cycling. Particular significance was placed on reducing seal gland dimension by efficiently utilizing the fatigue allowables of polyimide materials. Other objectives included investigation of pressure balancing techniques for first-stage polyimide rod seals for 4000 psig 450 K(350 F) environment and fabrication of a modular retainer for the two-stage combination. Seals were fabricated in 0.0254 m (1.0in.) and 0.0635 m (2.5in.) sizes and tested for structural integrity, frictional resistance, and endurance life. Test results showed that carefully designed second stages using polyimides could be made to satisfy the dynamic return pressure requirements of applications in high-performance aircraft. High wear under full system pressure indicated that further research is necessary to obtain an acceptable first-stage design. The modular retainer was successfully tested and showed potential for new actuator applications.

  13. 78 FR 76815 - Steel Threaded Rod From India: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...rod is certain threaded rod, bar, or studs, of carbon quality steel, having a solid...addition, the steel threaded rod, bar, or studs subject to this investigation are non-headed...rod is certain threaded rod, bar, or studs, of carbon quality steel, having a...

  14. Unravelling Strings at the LHC

    E-print Network

    Gordon L. Kane; Piyush Kumar; Jing Shao

    2007-09-26

    We construct LHC signature footprints for four semi-realistic string/$M$ theory vacua with an MSSM visible sector. We find that they all give rise to limited regions in LHC signature space, and are qualitatively different from each other for understandable reasons. We also propose a technique in which correlations of LHC signatures can be effectively used to distinguish among these string theory vacua. We expect the technique to be useful for more general string vacua. We argue that further systematic analysis with this approach will allow LHC data to disfavor or exclude major ``corners'' of string/$M$ theory and favor others. The technique can be used with limited integrated luminosity and improved.

  15. The Duel: Strings versus Loops

    E-print Network

    Ruediger Vaas

    2004-03-24

    Physicists in search of the foundation of the world: how tiny objects can create matter, energy and even space and time - and possibly countless other universes. -- This article is meant as an introduction into quantum geometry (loop quantum gravity) and string theory, written for the general audience. Partly, this article is also a conference report and review, based on the "Strings Meet Loops" conference at the Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Golm/Germany, in October 2003. -- Keywords: quantum geometry, loop quantum gravity, string theory, string cosmology, spin networks, spin foams, anthropic principle, theory of everything, Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Bojowald, Michael Douglas, Jerzy Lewandowski, Hermann Nicolai, Robert Oeckl, Fernando Quevedo, Carlo Rovelli, Amitabha Sen, Lee Smolin, Leonard Susskind.

  16. String and Sticky Tape Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate the fundamentals of one dimensional kinematics such as Newton's third law of motion, and collision between bodies, using simple materials of marbles, strings, sticky tape, drinking straws, and rubber bands. (GA)

  17. Gauge invariance of string fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Thomas; Peskin, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    We identify the gauge invariances of the linearized field theory of strings which give rise to the Yang-Mills and general coordinate invariance of this theory. We construct a kinetic energy term for string fields which is invariant to these gauge symmetries. By gauge-fixing, we derive from this action the expressions for the free string action, in particular gauges found by Kaku and Kikkawa and by Siegel. The structure of Stueckelberg auxilliary fields required to make the gauge-invariant action local is rather intricate; to clarify this structure, we develop a theory of differential forms on the space of strings. We conclude with some remarks on the origin of the dilaton and the appearance in the superstring of local supersymmetry.

  18. Bosonic String and String Field Theory: a solution using the holomorphic representation

    E-print Network

    C. G. Bollini; M. C. Rocca

    2009-08-20

    In this paper we show that the holomorphic representation is appropriate for description in a consistent way string and string field theories, when the considered number of component fields of the string field is finite. A new Lagrangian for the closed string is obtained and shown to be equivalent to Nambu-Goto's Lagrangian. We give the notion of anti-string, evaluate the propagator for the string field, and calculate the convolution of two of them.

  19. Geometric precipices in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Watson, Scott

    2008-03-15

    We consider the effects of graviton multiplet fields on transitions between string gas phases. Focusing on the dilaton field, we show that it may obstruct transitions between different thermodynamic phases of the string gas, because the sign of its dimensionally reduced, T-duality invariant, part is conserved when the energy density of the Universe is positive. Thus, many interesting solutions for which this sign is positive end up in a future curvature singularity. Because of this, some of the thermodynamic phases of the usual gravitating string gases behave like superselection sectors. For example, a past-regular Hagedorn phase and an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) phase dominated by string momentum modes cannot be smoothly connected in the framework of string cosmology with positive sources. The singularity separates them like a geometric precipice in the moduli space, preventing the dynamics of the theory from bridging across. Sources which simultaneously violate the positivity of energy and null energy condition (NEC) could modify these conclusions. We provide a quantitative measure of positivity of energy and NEC violations that would be necessary for such transitions. These effects must dominate the Universe at the moment of transition, altering the standard gas pictures. At present, it is not known how to construct such sources from first principles in string theory.

  20. Towards a nonsupersymmetric string phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Dienes, Keith R.; Mavroudi, Eirini

    2015-06-01

    Over the past three decades, considerable effort has been devoted to studying the rich and diverse phenomenologies of heterotic strings exhibiting spacetime supersymmetry. Unfortunately, during this same period, there has been relatively little work studying the phenomenologies associated with their nonsupersymmetric counterparts. The primary reason for this relative lack of attention is the fact that strings without spacetime supersymmetry are generally unstable, exhibiting large one-loop dilaton tadpoles. In this paper, we demonstrate that this hurdle can be overcome in a class of tachyon-free four-dimensional string models realized through coordinate-dependent compactifications. Moreover, as we shall see, it is possible to construct models in this class whose low-lying states resemble the Standard Model (or even potential unified extensions thereof)—all without any light superpartners, and indeed without supersymmetry at any energy scale. The existence of such models thus opens the door to general studies of nonsupersymmetric string phenomenology, and in this paper we proceed to discuss a variety of theoretical and phenomenological issues associated with such nonsupersymmetric strings. On the theoretical side, we discuss the finiteness properties of such strings, the general characteristics of their mass spectra, the magnitude and behavior of their one-loop cosmological constants, and their interpolation properties. By contrast, on the phenomenological side, the properties we discuss are more model-specific and include their construction techniques, their natural energy scales, their particle and charge assignments, and the magnitudes of their associated Yukawa couplings and scalar masses.

  1. Quantum string seal is insecure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    A quantum string seal encodes the value of a (bit) string as a quantum state in such a way that everyone can extract a non-negligible amount of available information on the string by a suitable measurement. Moreover, such measurement must disturb the quantum state and is likely to be detected by an authorized verifier. In this way, the intactness of the encoded quantum state plays the role of a wax seal in the digital world. Here we analyze the security of quantum string seal by studying the information disturbance trade-off of a measurement. This information disturbance trade-off analysis extends the earlier results of Bechamann-Pasquinucci, D’Ariano, and Macchiavello [Int. J. Quant. Inform. 3, 435 (2005)] and Chau [Phys. Lett. A 354, 31 (2006)] by concluding that all quantum string seals are insecure. Specifically, we find a way to obtain nontrivial available information on the string that escapes the verifier’s detection with at least 50% chance.

  2. Strategy Access Rods: A Hands-On Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthing, Bernadette; Laster, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Describes Strategy Access Rods (SARs), balsa-wood, prism-like or rectangular rods on which a one-sentence reading strategy phrase in the first person is printed. Notes SARs serve as a visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile reminder of the strategies available to developing readers. Discusses use of SARs for word recognition and comprehension.…

  3. Constraints in applied mathematics Rods, membranes, and cuckoos

    E-print Network

    Planqué, Bob

    Constraints in applied mathematics Rods, membranes, and cuckoos #12;Graphics on the cover mathematics Rods, membranes, and cuckoos Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de graad van Doctor aan de 19 1.5. Lipid membranes 22 1.6. Defence strategies against cuckoo parasitism 30 Chapter 2. Self

  4. VIEW OF WEST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WEST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ROD MOTOR DRIVES (B AND C), DRUMS, AND CLUTCHES, IN A THREE-TIERED RACK IN THE PDP ROOM AT LEVEL +27?, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  5. VIEW OF EAST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ROD MOTOR DRIVES (B AND C), DRUMS, AND CLUTCHES, IN A THREE-TIERED RACK IN THE PDP ROOM AT LEVEL +27?, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  6. Dynamic analysis of loads and stresses in connecting rods

    E-print Network

    Fatemi, Ali

    . DOI: 10.1243/09544062JMES105 Abstract: Automobile internal combustion engine connecting rod is a high stress analysis 1 INTRODUCTION Automobile internal combustion engine connecting rod is a high volume of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA

  7. Phase diagram of colloid-rod system and Xuhui Xiao

    E-print Network

    Phase diagram of colloid-rod system S. K. Laia and Xuhui Xiao Department of Physics, Complex colloidal hard spheres and colloidal rods in its solid and liquid phases. Given these free energy density,2 ad- vanced such a semigrand ensemble theory to study the phase-separation behavior of colloidal

  8. Photoreceptor evolution: ancient 'cones' turn out to be rods.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J

    2015-02-16

    Vertebrate rod photoreceptors are thought to have evolved from cone photoreceptors only after the divergence of the jawed and jawless fishes, but this idea is questioned by new evidence that the short 'cones' of jawless sea lampreys are physiologically equivalent to rods. PMID:25689909

  9. 75 FR 21658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...731-TA-961 (Final) (Second Remand)] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago AGENCY: United States...Investigation No. 731-TA-961 concerning carbon and certain alloy steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Trinidad and...

  10. 77 FR 59892 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...Administration [A-201-830] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative...1\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico: Affirmative...2\\ See Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico:...

  11. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wold, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported on: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  12. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...Administration [A-533-808] Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods from India would likely...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods (``wire...

  13. Substitute safety rods: Physics design and NTG calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, N.P.

    1991-07-01

    Under certain assumed accident conditions, an SRS reactor may loose most of its bulk moderator while maintaining flow to fuel assemblies. If this occurs immediately after operation at power, components normally dependent on convective heat transfer to the moderator will heat up with the possibility of melting that component. One component at risk is the safety rod. Tests have shown that the current cadmium safety rod, which contains aluminum as well as cadmium, can fail at temperatures only slightly in excess of 500 deg C. Computations indicate that such temperatures can be reached with operating powers well below the 50% power limit now imposed by other accident scenarios. Safety rod melting would thus establish a new lower operating limit. A substitute safety rod that could tolerate much higher temperatures would eliminate this limit. This memorandum details the physics characteristics of a suitable replacement rod. 7 refs.

  14. Inertial Range Scaling in Rotations of Long Rods in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Shima; Voth, Greg A.

    2014-01-01

    We derive a scaling relationship for the mean square rotation rate of rods with lengths in the inertial range in turbulence: ?p.ip>.i??l-4/3. We present experimental measurements of the rotational statistics of neutrally buoyant rods with lengths 2.8rod lengths, the correlation time of the Lagrangian autocorrelation of the rotation rate scales as the turnover time of the eddies of the size of the rod. Measuring rotational dynamics of single long rods provides a new way to access the spatial structure of the flow at different length scales.

  15. Structure and Growth of Rod-Shaped Mn Ultrafine Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Osamu; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saito, Yoshio; Kaito, Chihiro

    2003-09-01

    The structure of rod-shaped Mn ultrafine particles was elucidated by electron microscopy. Mn ultrafine particles have characteristic tristetrahedron (?-Mn), rhombic dodecahedron (?-Mn) and rod-shape crystal habits. It was found that the rod-shaped particle resulted from the parallel coalescence of ?-Mn particles with the size of 50 nm. Detailed analysis of the defects seen in large rod-shaped particles with the width of 100 nm indicated a mixture of ?- and ?-phases. A size effect on the phase transition from ? to ? was observed throughout the rod-shaped crystal structure. The structure and growth of Mn particles were discussed based on the outline of the smoke and the temperature distribution in the smoke.

  16. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  17. Random geometric graph description of connectedness percolation in rod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Avik P.; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    The problem of continuum percolation in dispersions of rods is reformulated in terms of weighted random geometric graphs. Nodes (or sites or vertices) in the graph represent spatial locations occupied by the centers of the rods. The probability that an edge (or link) connects any randomly selected pair of nodes depends upon the rod volume fraction as well as the distribution over their sizes and shapes, and also upon quantities that characterize their state of dispersion (such as the orientational distribution function). We employ the observation that contributions from closed loops of connected rods are negligible in the limit of large aspect ratios to obtain percolation thresholds that are fully equivalent to those calculated within the second-virial approximation of the connectedness Ornstein-Zernike equation. Our formulation can account for effects due to interactions between the rods, and many-body features can be partially addressed by suitable choices for the edge probabilities.

  18. Evaluation of the finite element fuel rod analysis code (FRANCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Feltus, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Knowledge of temperature distribution in a nuclear fuel rod is required to predict the behavior of fuel elements during operating conditions. The thermal and mechanical properties and performance characteristics are strongly dependent on the temperature, which can vary greatly inside the fuel rod. A detailed model of fuel rod behavior can be described by various numerical methods, including the finite element approach. The finite element method has been successfully used in many engineering applications, including nuclear piping and reactor component analysis. However, fuel pin analysis has traditionally been carried out with finite difference codes, with the exception of Electric Power Research Institute`s FREY code, which was developed for mainframe execution. This report describes FRANCO, a finite element fuel rod analysis code capable of computing temperature disrtibution and mechanical deformation of a single light water reactor fuel rod.

  19. Influence of convection on rod spacing of eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, R.; Chandrasekhar, S.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional numerical model to study the influence of convection on the rod-like microstructure of an eutectic system. This model is based on a central finite difference approach. By applying it, the average concentration near the solid/liquid interface of a growing rod-like eutectic was determined for eutectic compositions C(e) of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.10. Following Jackson and Hunt (1966), the average interfacial composition was converted to a change of undercooling at the interface and, finally, to spacing between the rods. The change in rod spacing with increasing intensity of convection was calculated assuming the eutectic grows at minimum interfacial undercooling. It was confirmed that an increase in convection should coarsen the microstructure (i.e., the rod spacing increases with increasing intensity of stirring).

  20. Pil1 cytoplasmic rods contain bundles of crosslinked tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kabeche, Ruth; Howard, Louisa; Moseley, James B

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeletal polymers are organized into a wide variety of higher-order structures in cells. The yeast BAR domain protein Pil1 self-assembles into tubules in vitro, and forms linear polymers at cortical eisosomes in cells. In the fission yeast S. pombe, over-expressed Pil1 forms thick rods that detach from the plasma membrane. In this study, we used thin-section electron microscopy to determine the ultrastructure of these cytoplasmic Pil1 rods. We found that cytoplasmic rods contained crosslinked Pil1 tubules that displayed regular, hexagonal spacing. These bundles were stained by filipin, a sterol-binding fluorescent dye, suggesting that they contained lipids. Cytoplasmic Pil1 rods were present but less abundant in sle1? and fhn1? mutant cells. We also found that endogenous Pil1 formed thick rods under saturated growth conditions. Taken together, our findings suggest the presence of cellular mechanisms that assemble Pil1 tubules into higher-order structures.

  1. Rod-shaped Nuclei at Extreme Spin and Isospin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, P W; Itagaki, N; Meng, J

    2015-07-10

    The anomalous rod shape in carbon isotopes has been investigated in the framework of the cranking covariant density functional theory, and two mechanisms to stabilize such a novel shape with respect to the bending motion, extreme spin, and isospin are simultaneously discussed for the first time in a self-consistent and microscopic way. By adding valence neutrons and rotating the system, we have found the mechanism stabilizing the rod shape; i.e., the ? orbitals (parallel to the symmetry axis) of the valence neutrons, important for the rod shape, are lowered by the rotation due to the Coriolis term. The spin and isospin effects enhance the stability of the rod-shaped configuration. This provides a strong hint that a rod shape could be realized in nuclei towards extreme spin and isospin. PMID:26207464

  2. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bilibin, Konstantin (North Hollywood, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  3. Thermal stress in a trigonal crystal rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greninger, Charles E.; Rodriguez, Sergio E.

    1999-03-01

    The thermally induced stresses and strains in a freely supported long trigonal crystal rectangular rod are presented. Careful grouping of the stress, strain relationships casts the equations into the form of the usual logarithmic potential solution with new coefficients that are simple functions of the stiffness matrix elements. Then a logarithmic potential solution is used to find analytic expressions for the particular stresses. Addition of two ordinary isothermal stress fields allows the particular stresses to be corrected so that (a) the surface stresses average to zero on each lateral boundary and (b) the plane strain condition is removed and the average longitudinal stress and its moments are zero. A method to zero the residual surface stress is mentioned and numerical test cases and an example are given.

  4. Handedness and self assembly of chiral rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrati, Efi

    2014-03-01

    When handed building blocks, such as twisted fusilli, self-assemble the resulting assembled object is typically also handed (as are its physical response properties). This phenomenon plays a central role in fields raging from biological self-assembly to optimizing the design of optical meta-materials. Despite the importance of this problem, predicting the relation between the handedness of the constituents of an assembled object and its overall handedness has remained an elusive goal even for the simplest of cases. At the heart of this problem lies the difficulty of quantifying the handedness of even a single building block. In this talk I will show how a recent orientation-dependent interpretation of handedness as a relation between directions and rotations sidesteps most of the difficulties associated with the quantification of handedness and resolves an existing puzzle regarding the self-assembly of handed colloidal rods.

  5. An Exact Bosonization Rule for c=1 Noncritical String Theory

    E-print Network

    N. Ishibashi; A. Yamaguchi

    2007-08-28

    We construct a string field theory for c=1 noncritical strings using the loop variables as the string field. We show how one can express the nonrelativistic free fermions which describes the theory, in terms of these string fields.

  6. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  7. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  8. 78 FR 33103 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ...Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad...steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Brazil and the antidumping duty orders on wire rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova,...

  9. 78 FR 63450 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad...steel wire rod (``wire rod'') from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad...antidumping duty orders on wire rod from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova,...

  10. Quantum stabilization of cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2015-07-01

    In the standard model, stabilization of a classically unstable cosmic string may occur through the quantum fluctuations of a heavy fermion doublet. We review numerical results from a semiclassical expansion in a reduced version of the standard model. In this expansion, the leading quantum corrections emerge at one loop level for many internal degrees of freedom. The resulting vacuum polarization energy and the binding energies of occupied fermion energy levels are of the same order, and must therefore be treated on equal footing. Populating these bound states lowers the total energy compared to the same number of free fermions and assigns a charge to the string. Charged strings are already stabilized for a fermion mass only somewhat larger than the top quark mass. Though obtained in a reduced version, these results suggest that neither extraordinarily large fermion masses nor unrealistic couplings are required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Furthermore, we also review results for a quantum stabilization mechanism that prevents closed Nielsen-Olesen-type strings from collapsing.

  11. A categorified supergroup for string theory A categorified supergroup for string theory

    E-print Network

    Baez, John

    A categorified supergroup for string theory A categorified supergroup for string theory John Huerta supergroup for string theory A weak 2-group is a category G with invertible morphisms, equipped object x has a specified weak inverse x: x x = 1 = x x. #12;A categorified supergroup for string theory

  12. Local cosmic string and C-field

    E-print Network

    F. Rahaman; R. Mondal; M. Kalam

    2006-01-03

    We investigate a local cosmic string with a phenomenological energy momentum tensor as prescribed by Vilenkin, in presence of C-field . The solutions of full nonlinear Einstein's equations for exterior and interior regions of such a string are presented.

  13. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  14. Kahler stabilized, modular invariant heterotic string models

    E-print Network

    Gaillard, Mary K.

    2008-01-01

    In e?ective super- gravity from string theory, the chiralString Theory,” RU-90- 47, Presented at the Cargese Workshop on Random Surfaces, Quantum Gravitystring theory is its great promise as a consis- tent theory of quantum gravity.

  15. Black Strings Ending on Horizons

    E-print Network

    Nidal Haddad

    2012-11-17

    We construct an approximate static gravitational solution of the Einstein equations, with negative cosmological constant, describing a test black string stretching from the boundary of the Schwarzschild-AdS_5 black brane toward the horizon. The construction builds on a derivative expansion method, assuming that the black brane metric changes slowly along the black string direction. We provide a solution up to second order in derivatives and it implies, in particular, that the black string must shrink to zero size at the horizon of the black brane. In the near horizon region of the black brane, where the two horizons intersect, we provide an exact solution of a cone that describes two intersecting horizons at different temperatures. Moreover, we show that this solution equally describes a thin and long black droplet.

  16. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ? of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ?. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer. PMID:26100908

  17. Quantum Stabilization of Cosmic Strings

    E-print Network

    Weigel, H; Graham, N

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model, stabilization of a classically unstable cosmic string may occur through the quantum fluctuations of a heavy fermion doublet. We review numerical results from a semiclassical expansion in a reduced version of the standard model. In this expansion the leading quantum corrections emerge at one loop level for many internal degrees of freedom. The resulting vacuum polarization energy and the binding energy of occupied fermion energy levels are of the same order, and must therefore be treated on equal footing. Populating these bound states lowers the total energy compared to the same number of free fermions. Charged strings are already stabilized for a fermion mass only somewhat larger than the top quark mass. Though obtained in a reduced version these results suggest that neither extraordinarily large fermion masses nor unrealistic couplings are required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Furthermore we also review results for a quantum stabilization mechanism that prevents close...

  18. Cooperative Strings and Glassy Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Thomas Salez; Justin Salez; Kari Dalnoki-Veress; Elie Raphaël; James A. Forrest

    2015-06-11

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length $\\xi$ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to $\\xi$. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows to quantify the temperature-dependent thickness $h_{\\textrm{m}}$ of the interfacial mobile layer.

  19. Twenty-five questions for string theorists

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, Pierre; Kane, G.L.; Lykken, Joseph D.; Nelson, Brent D.; /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-09-01

    In an effort to promote communication between the formal and phenomenological branches of the high-energy theory community, we provide a description of some important issues in supersymmetric and string phenomenology. We describe each within the context of string constructions, illustrating them with specific examples where applicable. Each topic culminates in a set of questions that we believe are amenable to direct consideration by string theorists, and whose answers we think could help connect string theory and phenomenology.

  20. String Interactions in c=1 Matrix Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Verlinde, Erik; Yee, Jung-Tay

    2004-03-01

    We study string interactions in the fermionic formulation of the c = 1 matrix model. We give a precise nonperturbative description of the rolling tachyon state in the matrix model, and discuss S-matrix elements of the c = 1 string. As a first step to study string interactions, we compute the interaction of two decaying D0-branes in terms of free fermions. This computation is compared with the string theory cylinder diagram using the rolling tachyon ZZ boundary states.

  1. End-of-life nondestructive examination of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorscak, D.A.; Campbell, W.R.; Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    In-bundle and out-of-bundle (single rod) nondestructive examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were performed. In-bundle examinations included visual examination and measurement of rod bow, rod-to-rod gaps, and rod removal forces. Out-of-bundle examinations included rod visuals and measurement of fuel rod length, diameter and ovality, cladding oxide and crud thickness, support grid induced cladding wear mark depth and volume, and fuel rod free hanging bow. The out-of-bundle examination also included ultrasonic inspection for cladding defects, neutron radiography for pellet integrity and plenum gap measurements, and gamma scans for instack axial gap screening and binary fuel stack length measurements. The measurements confirmed design predictions of fuel rod performance and provided evidence of excellent fuel rod performance for operation of Light Water Breeder Reactor to 29,047 effective full power hours (EFPH).

  2. In vivo imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Doble, Nathan; Choi, Stacey S.; Codona, Johanan L.; Christou, Julian; Enoch, Jay M.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Although single cone receptors have been imaged in the living human eye, there has been no observation of rods in vivo. Using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope and post processing, evidence of rod mosaic was observed at 5° and 10° eccentricities in the horizontal, temporal retina. For 4 normal human subjects, small structures were observed in between the larger cones, and were observed repeatedly at the same locations on different days and with varying wavelengths. Image analysis gave spacings that agree well with rod measurements from histological data. PMID:21209677

  3. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

    1988-07-28

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

  4. 26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing the racks for the nine horizontal control rods (HCRs) that would be inserted or withdrawn from the pile to control the rate of reaction. In this case, it is the 105-F Reactor in February 1945. The view is looking away from the pile, which is out of the picture on the left. Several of the cooling water hose reels for the rods can be seen at the end of the racks near the wall. D-8323 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  5. System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module

    DOEpatents

    Matchett, Richard L. (Bethel Park, PA); Roof, David R. (North Huntingdon, PA); Kikta, Thomas J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wilczynski, Rosemarie (McKees Rocks, PA); Nilsen, Roy J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bacvinskas, William S. (Bethel Park, PA); Fodor, George (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

  6. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-09-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough concentration. The preparation of the stable liquid crystalline solution of CdSe nanorods is described, as well as the large-scale alignment of the nanorods by taking advantage of the long-range orientational correlation in the liquid crystals. In addition, we investigated the phase diagram of the nanorod solution, as a step toward understanding the possible role of the long-range attractive interaction between the nanorods in the formation of lyotropic liquid crystals.

  7. String Theory Where are we now?

    E-print Network

    Yoneya, T

    2000-01-01

    This is a brief overview on the current status of string theory for non-specialists. The purpose is to give an aspect on the nature of string theory as a unified theory of all interactions including quantum gravity and to discuss future perspectives. Particular emphases are put on the mysteries why string theory contains gravity and why it resolves the ultraviolet problems.

  8. On Energy Conservation in Lund String Fragmentation

    E-print Network

    Patrik Eden

    2000-04-14

    I discuss a Monte Carlo algorithm for hadronization in the Lund string fragmentation picture, which conserves energy and momentum exactly as is proposed by the model. An embryo to this Monte Carlo is used to calculate the total decay density of a string. This is found to reach its predicted asymptotic behaviour already at a string energy of about six hadron masses.

  9. String Duality and Novel Theories without Gravity

    E-print Network

    Shamit Kachru

    1998-01-15

    We describe some of the novel 6d quantum field theories which have been discovered in studies of string duality. The role these theories (and their 4d descendants) may play in alleviating the vacuum degeneracy problem in string theory is reviewed. The DLCQ of these field theories is presented as one concrete way of formulating them, independent of string theory.

  10. Reminiscence on the Birth of String Theory

    E-print Network

    Joel A. Shapiro

    2007-12-19

    These are my personal impressions of the environment in which string theory was born, and what the important developments affecting my work were during the hadronic string era, 1968-1974. I discuss my motivations and concerns at the time, particularly in my work on loop amplitudes and on closed strings.

  11. Transverse structure of the QCD string

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Harvey B.

    2010-11-15

    The characterization of the transverse structure of the QCD string is discussed. We formulate a conjecture as to how the stress-energy tensor of the underlying gauge theory couples to the string degrees of freedom. A consequence of the conjecture is that the energy density and the longitudinal-stress operators measure the distribution of the transverse position of the string, to leading order in the string fluctuations, whereas the transverse-stress operator does not. We interpret recent numerical measurements of the transverse size of the confining string and show that the difference of the energy and longitudinal-stress operators is a particularly natural probe at next-to-leading order. Second, we derive the constraints imposed by open-closed string duality on the transverse structure of the string. We show that a total of three independent ''gravitational'' form factors characterize the transverse profile of the closed string, and obtain the interpretation of recent effective string theory calculations: the square radius of a closed string of length {beta} defined from the slope of its gravitational form factor, is given by (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log({beta}/4r{sub 0}) in d space dimensions. This is to be compared with the well-known result that the width of the open string at midpoint grows as (d-1/2{pi}{sigma})log(r/r{sub 0}). We also obtain predictions for transition form factors among closed-string states.

  12. Vacuumless cosmic strings in Einstein Cartan theory

    E-print Network

    F. Rahaman; B. C. Bhui; A Ghosh; R. Mondal

    2006-10-20

    The gravitational fields of vacuumless global and gauge strings have been investigated in the context of Einstein Cartan theory under the weak field assumption of the field equations. It has been shown that global string and gauge string can have only repulsive gravitational effect on a test particle.

  13. Noncommutative Geometry, Matrices and String Theory

    E-print Network

    Karczmarek, Joanna

    Noncommutative Geometry, Matrices and String Theory Joanna L Karczmarek A Dissertation Presented in the context of string theory and field theories. The first chapter contains a brief introduction to noncommutative geometry, surveying relevant topics in string theory and exploring the connections between

  14. Ambitwistor String Theory in the Operator Formalism

    E-print Network

    Reid-Edwards, R A

    2015-01-01

    After a brief overview of the operator formalism for conventional string theory, an operator formalism for ambitwistor string theory is presented. It is shown how tree level supergravity scattering amplitudes are recovered in this formalism. More general applications of this formalism to loop amplitudes and the construction of an ambitwistor string field theory are briefly discussed.

  15. String Theory at Snowmass Michael Dine

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    String Theory at Snowmass Michael Dine Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Dated: September 23, 2002) This is the summary talk for the String Theory interested in string theory, quantum gravity, and related issues met to discuss the questions: which future

  16. "'1 January, 1986 Notes on String Theory

    E-print Network

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    "'1 January, 1986 ~ EFI 85-99 Notes on String Theory and Two Dimensional Conformal Field Theory string: super Riemann surlaces, superconformal quantum field theory in two dimensions, the superconformal of the Workshop on Unified String Theories, Inslitule for Theoretical Physics, Santa Barbara, July 29 - August 16

  17. On off-shell bosonic string amplitudes

    E-print Network

    Cappiello, L; Pettorino, R; Pezzella, F

    1998-01-01

    We give a simple prescription for computing, in the framework of the bosonic string theory, off-shell one-loop amplitudes with any number of external massless particles, both for the open and for the closed string. We discuss their properties and, in particular, for the two-string one-loop amplitudes we show their being transverse.

  18. On off-shell bosonic string amplitudes

    E-print Network

    L. Cappiello; R. Marotta; R. Pettorino; F. Pezzella

    1998-06-30

    We give a simple prescription for computing, in the framework of the bosonic string theory, off-shell one-loop amplitudes with any number of external massless particles, both for the open and for the closed string. We discuss their properties and, in particular, for the two-string one-loop amplitudes we show their being transverse.

  19. Information Spreading in Interacting String Field Theory

    E-print Network

    D. A. Lowe; L. Susskind; J. Uglum

    1994-02-24

    The commutator of string fields is considered in the context of light cone string field theory. It is shown that the commutator is in general non--vanishing outside the string light cone. This could have profound implications for our understanding of the localization of information in quantum gravity.

  20. The Physics of "String Passing through Ice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2011-01-01

    One of the oldest yet interesting experiments related to heat and thermodynamics is placing a string on a block of ice and hanging two masses from the ends of the string. Sometime later, it is discovered that the string has passed through the ice without cutting it in half. A simple explanation of this effect is that the pressure caused by the…

  1. The Picture Brightens (Slightly) for String Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2010-01-01

    It may not be the best of times for the school's string and orchestra programs, but things certainly are looking up. This article focuses on a recent report which cites the numerous positives, including an increase in the number of districts offering strings classes, a greater variety in the racial mix of strings students, and a less drastic…

  2. The vacuum interaction of magnetic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M. )

    1991-03-01

    The author investigates the interaction of two parallel magnetic strings which is due to the perturbation of the vacuum state of a scalar massive field. The Green function with one string is studied in detail and the influence of the second string is found in perturbation theory. The Casimir is expressed in terms of Bessel functions.

  3. String theory and matrix models

    E-print Network

    Yoneya, T

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the double-scaled 1D matrix model is equivalent to the c=1 string theory with tachyon condensation. There remain however puzzles that are to be clarified in order to utilize this connection for our quest towards possible non-perturbative formulation of string theory. We discuss some of the issues that are related to the space-time interpretation of matrix models, in particular, the questions of leg poles, causality, and black hole background. Finally, a speculation about a possible connection of a deformed matrix model with the idea of Dirichret brane is presented.

  4. Combinatorics, observables, and String Theory

    E-print Network

    Andrea Gregori

    2011-03-14

    We investigate the most general phase space of configurations, consisting of all possible ways of assigning elementary attributes, ``energies'', to elementary positions, ``cells''. We discuss how this space possesses structures that can be approximated by a quantum-relativistic physical scenario. In particular, we discuss how the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle and a universe with a three-dimensional space arise, and what kind of mechanics rules it. String Theory shows up as a complete representation of this structure in terms of time-dependent fields and particles. Within this context, owing to the uniqueness of the underlying mathematical structure it represents, one can also prove the uniqueness of string theory.

  5. Force-extension curves for broken-rod macromolecules: Dramatic effects of different probing methods for two and three rods

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, A. V.; Maltseva, D. V.; Ivanov, V. A.; Klushin, L. I.; Skvortsov, A. M.

    2015-04-28

    We study force-extension curves of a single semiflexible chain consisting of several rigid rods connected by flexible spacers. The atomic force microscopy and laser optical or magnetic tweezers apparatus stretching these rod-coil macromolecules are discussed. In addition, the stretching by external isotropic force is analyzed. The main attention is focused on computer simulation and analytical results. We demonstrate that the force-extension curves for rod-coil chains composed of two or three rods of equal length differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively in different probe methods. These curves have an anomalous shape for a chain of two rods. End-to-end distributions of rod-coil chains are calculated by Monte Carlo method and compared with analytical equations. The influence of the spacer’s length on the force-extension curves in different probe methods is analyzed. The results can be useful for interpreting experiments on the stretching of rod-coil block-copolymers.

  6. Dopamine modulation of rod pathway signaling by suppression of GABAC feedback to rod-driven depolarizing bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J; Côté, Patrice D; Tremblay, François

    2015-09-01

    Reducing signal gain in the highly sensitive rod pathway prevents saturation as background light levels increase, allowing the dark-adapted retina to encode stimuli over a range of background luminances. Dopamine release is increased during light adaptation and is generally accepted to suppress rod signaling in light-adapted retinas. However, recent research has suggested that dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, could additionally produce a sensitization of the rod pathway in dim light conditions via gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type C receptors. Here, we evaluated the overall activity of the depolarizing bipolar cell (DBC) population in vivo to ensure the integrity of long-distance network interactions by quantifying the b-wave of the electroretinogram in mice. We showed that dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, reduced the amplitude and sensitivity of rod-driven DBCs during light adaptation by suppressing GABA type A receptor-mediated serial inhibition onto rod DBC GABA type C receptors. Block of D1 receptors did not suppress rod-driven DBC sensitivity when GABAA -mediated serial inhibition was blocked by gabazine, suggesting that the reduction in rod-driven DBC sensitivity in the absence of D1 receptors was due to disinhibition of serial inhibitory GABAergic circuitry rather than a direct facilitatory effect on GABA release onto rod-driven DBC GABA type C receptors. Finally, the large population of GABAergic A17 wide-field amacrine cells known to maintain reciprocal inhibition with rod DBCs could be excluded from the proposed disinhibitory circuit after treatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine. PMID:26080286

  7. 9. Detail of gears and connection rod to sluice gate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of gears and connection rod to sluice gate - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. An Elastic Rod Model and its Hamiltonian Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celledoni, E.; Säfström, N.

    2009-09-01

    We consider a well known elastic rod model and reformulate it as an Hamiltonian partial differential equation. We discuss work in progress on applying different geometric numerical integration methods for this problem.

  9. 39. Detail view of No. 2 Furnace iron runner; rod ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Detail view of No. 2 Furnace iron runner; rod or poker at right was used to unplug iron notch. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Detection of single photons by rod photoreceptors Jrgen Reingrubera

    E-print Network

    Holcman, David

    of the single-photon response together with intrinsic background fluctuations in toad and mouse rods. Combining compartment, similar to the value for toad, which is unexpected due to the much smaller diameter. A larger

  11. Efficiency of Hysteresis Rods in Small Spacecraft Attitude Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Farrahi, Assal; Sanz-Andrés, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    A semiempirical method for predicting the damping efficiency of hysteresis rods on-board small satellites is presented. It is based on the evaluation of dissipating energy variation of different ferromagnetic materials for two different rod shapes: thin film and circular cross-section rods, as a function of their elongation. Based on this formulation, an optimum design considering the size of hysteresis rods, their cross section shape, and layout has been proposed. Finally, the formulation developed was applied to the case of four existing small satellites, whose corresponding in-flight data are published. A good agreement between the estimated rotational speed decay time and the in-flight data has been observed. PMID:24501579

  12. Combustion of solid carbon rods in zero and normal gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, C. M.; Kohl, F. J.; Miller, R. A.; Stearns, C. A.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of carbon combustion, spectroscopic carbon rods were resistance ignited and burned in an oxygen environment in normal and zero gravity. Direct mass spectrometric sampling was used in the normal gravity tests to obtain concentration profiles of CO2, CO, and O2 as a function of distance from the carbon surface. The experimental concentrations were compared to those predicted by a stagnant film model. Zero gravity droptower tests were conducted in order to assess the effect of convection on the normal gravity combustion process. The ratio of flame diameter to rod diameter as a function of time for oxygen pressures of 5, 10, 15, and 20 psia was obtained for three different diameter rods. It was found that this ratio was inversely proportional to both the oxygen pressure and the rod diameter.

  13. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLDDOWN RODS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLD-DOWN RODS, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  14. 28. VIEW OF OCTAGONAL SPREAD FOOTING AND HOLDDOWN RODS 1929, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF OCTAGONAL SPREAD FOOTING AND HOLD-DOWN RODS 1929, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  15. Dynamic Loading of Polycrystalline Shape Memory Alloy Rods

    E-print Network

    in a cylindrical SMA rod in- duced by an impact loading is considered. Some applications of this model problem) based on the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator. A model problem featuring a fixed impact stress load

  16. 13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, parallel motion links and steam chest. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  17. Cosmic string scaling in flat space

    SciTech Connect

    Vanchurin, Vitaly; Olum, Ken; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2005-09-15

    We investigate the evolution of infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network in flat space. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. These results suggest that small-scale structure will also scale in an expanding universe, even in the absence of gravitational damping.

  18. Charting the landscape of supercritical string theory

    E-print Network

    Simeon Hellerman; Ian Swanson

    2007-05-08

    Special solutions of string theory in supercritical dimensions can interpolate in time between theories with different numbers of spacetime dimensions (via dimension quenching) and different amounts of worldsheet supersymmetry (via c-duality). These solutions connect supercritical string theories to the more familiar string duality web in ten dimensions, and provide a precise link between supersymmetric and purely bosonic string theories. Dimension quenching and c-duality appear to be natural concepts in string theory, giving rise to large networks of interconnected theories. We describe some of these networks in detail and discuss general consistency constraints on the types of transitions that arise in this framework.

  19. Fundamental Plasmid Strings and Black Rings

    E-print Network

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Iglesias, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    We construct excited states of fundamental strings that admit a semiclassical description as rotating circular loops of string. We identify them with the supergravity solutions for rotating dipole rings. The identification involves a precise match of the mass, radius and angular momentum of the two systems. Moreover, the degeneracy of the string state reproduces the parametric dependence of the entropy in the supergravity description. When the solutions possess two macroscopic angular momenta, they are better described as toroidal configurations (tubular loops) instead of loops of string. We argue that the decay of the string state can be interpreted as superradiant emission of quanta from the ergoregion of the rotating ring.

  20. Fundamental Plasmid Strings and Black Rings

    E-print Network

    Jose J. Blanco-Pillado; Roberto Emparan; Alberto Iglesias

    2008-01-09

    We construct excited states of fundamental strings that admit a semiclassical description as rotating circular loops of string. We identify them with the supergravity solutions for rotating dipole rings. The identification involves a precise match of the mass, radius and angular momentum of the two systems. Moreover, the degeneracy of the string state reproduces the parametric dependence of the entropy in the supergravity description. When the solutions possess two macroscopic angular momenta, they are better described as toroidal configurations (tubular loops) instead of loops of string. We argue that the decay of the string state can be interpreted as superradiant emission of quanta from the ergoregion of the rotating ring.