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1

Le rapport au savoir scientifique d'enseignantes et d'enseignants du primaire  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nous avons procede a l'examen de problemes relatifs a l'education aux sciences via une approche a caractere epistemologique, contrairement a l'approche plus usuelle qui aborde les difficultes des apprenants a composer avec les connaissances dites scientifiques seulement d'un point de vue cognitif. La question de recherche que nous nous sommes posee a ete la suivante: Quel est le rapport au savoir scientifique d'enseignantes et d'enseignants du primaire? Pour repondre a cette question sur le plan methodologique, nous avons envisage l'etude du rapport au savoir scientifique d'enseignantes et d'enseignants dans un contexte relie a leur savoir et a leur expertise de tous les jours. Nos modalites de cueillette de donnees ont ete le recit ecrit et l'entrevue individuelle semi-structuree. Notre recherche a pris la forme d'une etude de cas multiples conduisant a l'etude des rapports epistemique, pratique et identitaire au savoir scientifique de dix enseignantes et enseignants d'ecoles populaires de Caracas, au Venezuela. Nos analyses nous ont amenee a affirmer que les sujets ont manifeste un rapport au savoir scientifique domine par la dependance et la soumission a l'egard des sciences ainsi que d'autres caracteristiques propres a une approche empirico-realiste. Cependant, dans un contexte relie a leur savoir-faire et a leur expertise, nous avons repere des traces de l'emergence d'une vision des sciences qui tient compte, entre autres, du caractere social de la production de ces dernieres, ce qui pourrait se qualifier comme faisant partie d'une tendance epistemologique du type socioconstructiviste. En plus, nos analyses nous amenent a suggerer que dans ce contexte les sujets auraient egalement initie une articulation entre leur savoir-faire et le savoir scientifique, ce qui les aurait amenes a vehiculer un rapport plus emancipatoire vis-a-vis les sciences. Cette articulation des savoirs permet egalement d'envisager des experiences educatives plus creatives, plus emancipatoires et plus en lien avec les visions contemporaines emergentes de la science, de son enseignement et de son apprentissage. Bien que de nombreuses recherches dans le domaine de l'education soulignent l'importance d'articuler les savoirs disciplinaires avec les savoirs d'experience, peu illustrent de maniere approfondie l'exercice de cette articulation. Notre recherche permet de penser a l'idee d'un rapport au savoir qui donne une veritable place a l'expertise publique des individus et non seulement a l'explication scientifique jugee la seule valable. Ainsi, au-dela des hierarchisations, chaque savoir aurait sa valeur et sa place, l'articulation des savoirs favorisant chez les sujets apprenants un plus grand interet pour l'apprentissage des sciences.

Plonczak, Irene

2

The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

I NOTICE in your number of 4th inst. an article relating to the Suez Canal (by Mr. Login, C.E., late of the Ganges Canal), and shall be glad if you will allow me to make a few observations with reference to it.

Edw. Rae

1869-01-01

3

Suez Canal Clearance Operation, Task Force 65.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides the documentation of the Suez Canal Clearance Operations NIMBUS STAR, NIMBUS MOON, and NIMROD SPAR undertaken by Task Force 65 during the period 11 April to 15 December 1974. Under the terms of two bilateral agreements between the Gov...

1975-01-01

4

The development of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides general background information relating to the physical characteristics and operations of the Suez Canal. In connection with the future development of the Canal, the research programme currently being undertaken by a British consortium is outlined, with particular reference to the traffic system presently operating.

J. D. Griffiths

1977-01-01

5

Gulf of Suez has excellent potential  

SciTech Connect

Egypt's re-emergence as an oil exporting country in the past several years was brought about by the drilling of fewer than 100 exploration wells in a small area of the Gulf of Suez. Now that Israel and Egypt are at peace and Egypt again controls this area, prospects for large, new discoveries in previously untested areas are excellent.

Abdine, S.

1981-07-01

6

Salt Content and Water Budget of The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water body in the Suez Canal is a combination of waters from differ- ent sources. Hence, its exact hydrographic structure is very difficult to define. Three main water masses are identified along the Canal on account of their salinity values: Levantine water mass I, the Suez Bay water mass II, and the Bitter Lake water mass IV, in addition

SELIM A. MORCOS; GIRGIS F. SOLIMAN

2001-01-01

7

Forecasting the Suez Canal traffic: a neural network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Suez Canal is the most important man-made waterway in the world, rivaled perhaps only by the Panama Canal, little research has been done into forecasting its traffic flows. This paper uses both univariate ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) and Neural network models to forecast the maritime traffic flows in the Suez Canal which are expressed in tons. One

Mohamed M. Mostafa

2004-01-01

8

Suez, A Future Sarajevo. The Significance of the Reopening of the Suez Canal to the Soviet Union and the Atlantic Alliance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper examines the reopening of the Suez Canal and its future influence on the political situation in the Middle East in the light of growing Soviet naval power and presence east of Suez together with western alternatives.

T. N. Bentley

1974-01-01

9

Longitudinal evolution of Suez rift structure, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional study of the structure of the Suez Rift has been carried out using field and subsurface data in an attempt to determine the role of transverse faults and the longitudinal evolution of the rift. As in most intracontinental rifts, the structure of the Gulf of Suez area is governed by normal faults and tilted blocks, whose crests constitute the main target of exploratory wells. The fault pattern consists of two major sets of trends: (1) longitudinal faults parallel with the rift axis and created in an extensional regime, trending east-northeast-west-southwest, and (2) transverse faults with north-south to north-northeast-south-southwest dominant trend. The transverse faults are inherited passive discontinuities, whereas most of the longitudinal faults were created during the Neogene in a purely extensional regime. Both sets were simultaneously active, producing a zigzag pattern and rhombic-shaped blocks. The transverse faults can show horizontal strike-slip components and act as relays between major normal faults.

Colletta, B.; Le Quellec, P.; Letouzey, J.; Moretti, I.

1988-01-01

10

Military Intervention: A Case Study of Britain's Use of Force in the 1956 Suez Crisis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Great Britain's management of the 1956 Suez crisis has been universally condemned and has raised fundamental questions concerning application of force in the nuclear age. Suez has also been described as a successful Soviet effort to expand Communist power...

J. A. Haig

1966-01-01

11

Developing Carbonate Platforms: Southern Gulf of Suez, Northern Red Sea.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ashrafi reef complex represents two small (approx. 8-10 x approx. 2 km) carbonate platforms and associated shoals located along the western side of the Jubal Strait at the Gulf of Suez's southern end. These features are developing in an active marine ...

H. H. Roberts S. P. Murray

1984-01-01

12

Sea-level Variation Along the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variation of sea level at 11 stations distributed along the Suez Canal was studied during the period from 1980 to 1986. The ranges of variation in daily mean sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik are about 60 and 120cm, respectively. The minimum range of daily variation is at Kantara (47cm).The fluctuations of the monthly mean sea level

F. M. Eid; S. H. Sharaf El-Din; K. A. Alam El-Din

1997-01-01

13

CONCENTRATION OF NINE HEAVY METALS IN SUEZ CANAL WATERS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration of nine heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Co, Fe and Mn) in waters of the Suez Canal and in the nearby waters was measured seasonally during 1997 - 1998 in their dissolved (D) and particulate (P) forms. The results revealed that the northern part of the canal (at Port Said) recorded higher concentrations for most

EL SAMRA; ABD EL-AZIM

2005-01-01

14

The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the ‘theoretical’ maximum capacity in terms of ‘standard ships’. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

1977-01-01

15

Biology of penaeid prawns in the Suez Canal lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was made from January 1988 to March 1989 of the penaid prawns in the Great Bitter Lake and Lake Timsah located in the central part of the Suez Canal. Two species of Red Sea origin were investigated,Metapenaeus stebbingi andTrachypenaeus curvirostris; the former is by far the commoner. Both species displayed seasonal breeding over the period April to October,

A. A.-F. A. Gab-Alla; R. G. Hartnoll; A.-F. Ghobashy; S. Z. Mohammed

1990-01-01

16

77 FR 39689 - Application To Export Electric Energy; IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc...utilities, Federal power marketing agencies, and other...Seymour, Director-Special Projects, IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc...Giuliani LLP, 2000 K Street NW.,...

2012-07-05

17

A review of potential tsunami impacts to the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Destructive tsunamis in the eastern Mediterranean and Red seas, induced by earthquakes and/or volcanic activity, pose potential hazards to docked seaport shipping and fixed harbor infrastructure as well as to in-transit international shipping within the Suez Canal. Potential vulnerabilities of the Suez Canal to possible tsunami impacts are reviewed by reference to geological, historical, archaeoseismological, and anecdotal data. Tsunami catalogues and databases compiled by earlier researchers are perused to estimate potential return periods for tsunami events that could affect directly the Suez Canal and its closely associated operational infrastructures. Analysis of these various records indicates a centurial return period, or multiples thereof, for long-wave repetition that could generally affect the Nile Delta. It is estimated that tsunami waves 2 m high would have a breaking length about 5 km down Canal whereas a 10 m wave break would occur about 1 km into the Canal. Should a tsunami strike the eastern flanks of the Nile Delta, it would damage Egypt's maritime infrastructure and multi-national commercial vessels and military ships then using the Canal.

Finkl, C.; Pelinovsky, E.

2012-04-01

18

Intentionally Building Rapport with Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developing rapport with students is important. Carson (1996) found that when alumni reflected on professors they had encountered 30 years ago, the quality most frequently associated with effective teachers was this: their attitude toward and relationship with students. In this article, the author shares the positive consequences of intentionally…

Starcher, Keith

2011-01-01

19

A modelling study on hydrodynamics and pollutant dispersion in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A considerable amount of international trade is transported in Egypt through the Suez Canal increasing public concern about hazardous safety. Through the canal, a relatively important flow of salt water enters the Mediterranean Sea, affecting its hydrologic deficit, and carrying algae and other non-swimmer species from the Red Sea. We are studying the hydrodynamics of the Suez Canal using both

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

20

Circulation and salinity distribution in the southern part of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of 14 hydrographic sections along the southern part of the Suez Canal bctwcen Suez Bay and Great Bitter Lake from April 1964 to April 1965 arc generally in agrccmcnt with previous sections taken 10 years before ( 1954-1955). A northward current prevailed from November to July and a southward current dominated from 15 August to 15 October, pushing the

Selina A. Morcos; S. N. MESSIEH

1973-01-01

21

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7 Section 69...General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of...

2009-10-01

22

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. 69.7 Section 69...General § 69.7 Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals. (a) All vessels intending to transit the Panama Canal, other than vessels of...

2010-10-01

23

An analysis and simulation of an experimental Suez Canal traffic control system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A SLAM model of Suez Canal traffic flow is reported in this paper. An experimental traffic control scheme is proposed, tested, and discussed. A method for analysis of multi-response-variable systems is discussed and illustrated.

Thomas D. Clark Jr.; Magdi M. Kabil; Moussa I. Moussa Mostafa

1983-01-01

24

Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

James, N.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

1988-02-01

25

Recommandations sur l'assistance au suicide  

Microsoft Academic Search

La Commission nationale d'éthique pour la médecine humaine (CNE-NEK) a émis des recommandations en rapport avec l'assistance au suicide. Selon elle, l'art. 115 CP, qui autorise l'assistance au suicide - à condition que ce geste ne soit pas motivé par un mobile égoïste - ne doit pas être modifié. Elle estime cependant nécessaire de prendre des mesures permettant de réglementer

Jean Martin; Georg Amstutz

26

Rapport d'événements indésirables pour une ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... cosmétiques. Les informations expliquant la procédure d'envoi d'un rapport figurent à la page Web illustrée sur la diapositive. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/biologicsbloodvaccines/internationalactivities

27

Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. In the upper unit, the reef crest is massive columnar Porites and less common Caulastrea framestone. The back-reef is a framestone of diverse faviids, mainly Montastrea Favites, and Tarbellastrea, and interbedded reef-flat rhodolite rudstones. The back-reef and reef-flat facies grade onshelf into Stylophora bafflestone biostromers and faviid bioherms. The reef front is a shallow to intermediate depth zone of numerous and diverse faviids, dominated by Montastrea and Acanthastrea framestones, bioclastic sands, and hardgrounds. Deeper zones are mostly small Acanthastrea mounds or rhodolite/bivalve rudstones with scattered faviids and Acanthastrea. Synsedimentary lithification, internal sedimentationm, and bioerosion prevail throughout. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

Noel, J.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

1988-01-01

28

Extensional tectonics and collapse structures in the Suez Rift (Egypt)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Suez Rift is a 300 km long and 50 to 80 km wide basin which cuts a granitic and metamorphic shield of Precambrian age, covered by sediments of Paleozoic to Paleogene age. The rift structure is dominated by tilted blocks bounded by NW-SE normal faults. The reconstruction of the paleostresses indicates a N 050 extension during the whole stage of rifting. Rifting began 24 My ago with dikes intrusions; main faulting and subsidence occurred during Early Miocene producing a 80 km wide basin (Clysmic Gulf). During Pliocene and Quaternary times, faulting is still active but subsidence is restricted to a narrower area (Present Gulf). On the Eastern margin of the gulf, two sets of fault trends are predominant: (1) N 140 to 150 E faults parallel to the gulf trend with pure dip-slip displacement; and (2) cross faults, oriented NOO to N 30 E that have a strike-slip component consistent with the N 050 E distensive stress regime. The mean dip cross fault is steeper (70 to 80 deg) than the dip of the faults parallel to the Gulf (30 to 70 deg). These two sets of fault define diamond shaped tilted block. The difference of mechanical behavior between the basement rocks and the overlying sedimentary cover caused structural disharmony and distinct fault geometries.

Chenet, P. Y.; Colletta, B.; Desforges, G.; Ousset, E.; Zaghloul, E. A.

29

New technology helps asset team identify overlooked reserves in Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

In a recent study of the July field in the central Gulf of Suez, a GUPCO asset team identified nearly 3.5 million barrels of overlooked oil with the aid of interactive interpretation software designed specifically for geologists. To tap these new reserves, the company drilled the first horizontal well in the Gulf of Suez. It tested at over 14,000 b/d of oil. Without the geological software to help clarify numerous problematical reservoir terminations and more accurately predict their shape, these reserves probably would have remained unexploited.

Cecil, C.; Day, R. [Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co., Cairo (Egypt); Valusek, J.E. [Landmark Graphics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01

30

Establishing rapport: the secret business tool to success  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapport is important in business. It can be described as a feeling you experience when you are with someone you intuitively like. And since so much of communication is non-verbal, rapport is often developed on more of a subconscious or subliminal level. There are many methods and ways to help establish and build rapport. Some of these are verbal, such

Wayne A. Hollman; Brian H. Kleiner

1997-01-01

31

The Northern Sea Route versus the Suez Canal: cases from bulk shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

The navigation distance via the Northern Sea Route (NSR) from a Northwest-European port to the Far East is approximately 40% shorter compared to the route via the Suez Canal. The shorter distance may facilitate more than a doubling of vessels’ operational energy efficiency performance. There is at present substantial uncertainty in schedule reliability via the NSR. Unless the schedule reliability

Halvor Schøyen; Svein Bråthen

2011-01-01

32

75 FR 57911 - Application To Export Electric Energy; GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc., 1990 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 1900, Houston, TX 77056 and Catherine P. McCarthy, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, 1101 New York Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20005. A final decision will be made on this application after the...

2010-09-23

33

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part I: Hydrodynamics and Transit Times  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal. This effort is linked with the increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. To follow the fate of radioactive wastes along this waterway, we had to solve the hydrodynamics of the water, governed mainly

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

34

Marine radioactivity studies in the Suez Canal. A modelling study on radionuclide dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal and the Bitter Lakes. This effort is linked with increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. We apply a sequence of related modelling approaches, covering: (1) hydrodynamics, (2) transport of dissolved pollutants, (3) suspended

J. M Abril; M. M Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

35

Physicochemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20 400\\/00 and over 400\\/00 in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50 70 cm fell to below 20 °C in winter and rose to above 30

H. A. H. El-Serehy; M. A. Sleigh

1992-01-01

36

New Records of Polychaetes from the South Part of Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faunistic analysis of benthic samples were obtained during a trip to the south part of Suez Canal, Egypt, during April, 2007, which revealed the presence of 82 polychaete species, 18 of them are considered as new records for the Egyptian waters. In order to achieve this study fouling components and sediments samples were collected by Van Veen grab (0.5 to

Faiza A. Abd-Elnaby

37

Relationships Between Sediment Morphology and Oil Pollution Along the Suez Canal Beaches, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grain-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that “medium sand” is the

MOHAMED A. K. BARAKAT; THOURAYA M. SHIMY; YASSAR M. MOSTAFA

1996-01-01

38

The Conflicts Between Tourist & Industrial Activities Along The Suez Gulf N-West Coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tourism development along Coast is mainly dependent on the natural environment as resource base. Coasts are endowed with special beauty, abundance of natural Resources and rich heritage. Suez Gulf west coast is one of the coasts that have special economic importance. It provides potential for establishing multiple activities: industry, harbor and tourism. According to the economic situation and the major

Ghada Farouk Hassan

39

Thermochronological investigation of the timing of rifting and rift segmentation in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tertiary Gulf of Suez rift system is one of the best-studied continental rift systems and has inspired many fundamental geodynamic models for continental rifting. However, our limited knowledge of how extensional strain is spatially and temporally distributed has made it difficult to adequately evaluate models for the dynamic evolution of this rift. A critical aspect of constraining the evolution

W. Bosworth; D. F. Stockli

2006-01-01

40

Observation of Au + Au --> Au + Au + rho(0) and Au + Au --> Au* + Au* + rho(0) with STAR  

SciTech Connect

We report the first observation of the reactions Au + Au {yields} Au + Au + {rho}{sup 0} and Au + Au {yields} Au* + Au* + {rho}{sup 0} with the STAR detector. The {rho} are produced at small perpendicular momentum, as expected if they couple coherently to both nuclei. We discuss models of vector meson production and the correlation with nuclear breakup, and present a fundamental test of quantum mechanics that is possible with the system.

Klein, Spencer; STAR Collaboration

2001-03-10

41

Now It's Personal: Antecedents and Outcomes of Rapport between Business Faculty and Their Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Rapport" refers to when two people "click." Although business education researchers have begun to study rapport, past research has principally focused on students' perceptions of rapport, whereas faculty's perceptions of rapport have never been studied or contrasted with those of students. Understanding this is critical as rapport between…

Granitz, Neil A.; Koernig, Stephen K.; Harich, Katrin R.

2009-01-01

42

Internet addiction's effect on likeability and rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet Paradox refers to findings that demonstrated that the increase in communications brought about by Internet usage actually had negative effects on user’s psychological well-being and social involvement. This study proposes that face-to-face contact promotes the development of rapport and thereby individuals that use the internet excessively will lack these necessary social skills. Specifically, we investigate whether, through use

Anthony Iacovelli; Stavros Valenti

2009-01-01

43

A study of Salmonella typhi isolated in Suez Canal area. Biotyping, phage typing and colicinogenic property.  

PubMed

In this work a total of 82 strains of Salmonella typhi were isolated from Egyptian patients diagnosed as quiry enteric fever. These cases were from Ismalia, Suez and port Said Areas. The strains fell in 16 phage types. Phage types N, 40, E1, and degraded Vi were the commonest phage type in Ismailia, while phage types degraded Vi and C1 were the commonest in Port Said. Phage types Di-N, degraded Vi, A and C1 were the commonest in Suez. Chemotyping of Salmonella typhi showed that the majority of the strains belonged to chemotype I (82%), and the rest belonged to chemotype II (18%). Colicin production was negative and all the strains were susceptible to the currently used antibiotics. PMID:2766444

Shoeb, S; Khalifa, I; el Daly, O; Heiba, A; Farmer, J; Brenner, F; el Batawi, Y

1989-01-01

44

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of metal contaminants introduced into the sediment from sources usually exists in relatively unstable chemical forms. A high proportion of the studied metals remained in the residual fraction. Most of remaining portion of metals was bound to ferromanganese oxides fraction. The low concentrations of metals in the exchangeable fraction indicated that the sediments of Suez Canal were relatively unpolluted.

Abd El-Azim, H.; El-Moselhy, Kh. M.

2005-06-01

45

Source parameters and ground motion of the Suez-Cairo shear zone earthquakes, Eastern Desert, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three felt earthquakes with local magnitudes 4.0 (June 29th, 2000), 4.2 (July 07th, 2005) and 3.7 (October 30th, 2007) occurred\\u000a to the southeast of Cairo along the Suez-Cairo shear zone. Being the most well recorded events by the Egyptian National Seismic\\u000a Network (ENSN) in this area, they provide us an excellent opportunity to study the tectonics, the stress field, the

K. M. Abou Elenean; Adel M. E. Mohamed; H. M. Hussein

2010-01-01

46

Boundary layer structure observed by shipborne Doppler Sodar in the Suez canal zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Observations of the boundary layer with a monostatic Sodar and other instrumentation were carried out in the Suez canal zone\\u000a in January and March 1979, from the Italian m.v.Salernum on its way to and from a GARP assignment. The Sodar was operated almost continuously throughout the passages. In addition\\u000a to the intensity records, an off-line Doppler analysis involving the use

G. Fiocco; G. Mastrantonio; A. Ricotta

1980-01-01

47

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986-1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U3O8) represent the main items that contribute significantly to the collective dose within the Suez Canal area (Port-Said, Ismailia and Suez). The values of the annual collective dose due to transportation of all radionuclide materials was found to be at a maximum in Suez town and is equal to 5.04 × 10-8 Man-Sv for the whole populations. If we only consider the worker at the harbour (estimated to be 50 persons), the value of the annual collective dose is about 3.33 × 10-4 Man-Sv. These values are less than the exemption value of 1 Man-Sv recommended by the IAEA. For the accident case, the following pathways are considered by the code: ground-shine, direct inhalation, inhalation of resuspended material and cloud-shine. The total values of the estimated risks for each radionuclide material are presented in table form and, in addition, health effects (genetic effects, GE, and latent cancer fatality, LCF) are discussed. The calculated values of the radiological risks are very low for the three towns, showing that no radiation-induced early deaths are to be expected.

Sabek, M. G.; El-Shinawy, R. M. K.; Gomaa, M.

1997-03-01

48

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using gamma spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed

M. S. El-Tahawy; M. A. Farouk; N. M. Ibrahiem; S. A. M. El-Mongey

1994-01-01

49

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe–Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of

H. Abd El-Azim; Kh. M. El-Moselhy

2005-01-01

50

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986–1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U3O8) represent the main items

M. G. Sabek; R. M. K. El-Shinawy; M. Gomaa

1997-01-01

51

Rapport in Negotiation: The Contribution of the Verbal Channel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the contribution of verbal behavior to the creation of rapport in negotiation, while methodologically addressing the issue of dependence between dyadic measures, which is inherent to the concept of rapport, with the Actor-Partner Interdependence model. The approach adopted is substantially different from that of past research,…

Bronstein, Ilan; Nelson, Noa; Livnat, Zohar; Ben-Ari, Rachel

2012-01-01

52

THE JELLYFISH AURELIA AURITA (CNIDARIA: SCYPHOMEDUSAE): ITS LIFE HISTORY STRATEGY, MIGRATION ACTIVITY AND ITS IMPACT ON THE ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITY OF SUEZ CANAL, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suez Canal is the main connecting link between the Red Sea in the south and the Mediterranean in the north. It crosses different lakes on its route from Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea to Port Suez on the Red Sea. Jellyfishes form a major part of the macro- plankton of the canal. The role of jellyfishes in general and

HAMED A. EL-SEREHY

53

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PETROLEUM COMPOSITION AND DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF PETROLEUM SOURCE ROCKS FROM THE GULF OF SUEZ AND THE WESTERN DESERT OF EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude oils from the Gulf of Suez and the North Western Desert of Egypt have been analyzed for geochemical biomarkers using GC and GC-MS techniques. The biomarker compositions of the crude oils have been used to differentiate crude oils of non-marine, normal marine and marine carbonate sources. The geochemical features of Zaafarana crude oil from the Gulf of Suez Basin

A. Mostafa; M. Sh. El-Gayar; A. O. Barakat

1998-01-01

54

October field: The latest giant under development in Egypt's Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

October field, the third largest oil field in Egypt, produced 378 MMBO from its discovery in 1977 until January 1990. It is the northernmost giant oil field in the Gulf of Suez Rift basin. Twenty wells from five platforms in approximately 190 ft (58 m) of water currently drain over 3,238 ha. Recent successful field extensions demonstrate the viability of continuing exploration in this oil-rich area. This structurally trapped field is a complex of rotated fault blocks typical of rift basins worldwide. A northwest-trending normal fault with an approximate throw of 1,220 m has trapped an 335-m oil column on the upthrown eastern side. On the upthrown side, the Carboniferous through Oligocene prerift section dips gently to the northeast and is unconformably overlain by generally flat Miocene to Holocene clastics, carbonates, and evaporites. Severe multiple problems result from thick Miocene evaporites hampering seismic definition of the highly productive prerift section. These same evaporites serve as the ultimate seal in October field and throughout the Gulf of Suez. Although four layers are productive, approximately 95% of field reserves are within Carboniferous to Lower Cretaceous massive Nubia Sandstones. The remaining reserves are in more stratified Upper Cretaceous sandstones, basal Miocene rift-fill Nukhul Formation clastics, and a Lower Miocene clastic in the upper Rudeis Formation. Several distinct reservoir accumulations exist, with the deepest and most significant original oil-water contact at {minus}10,670 ft subsea. October field oil gravities range from 14 to 34{degree} API, with an initial solution GOR of 134 to 474 SCF/STB. The hydrocarbon source for all October field oil as well as most Gulf of Suez oil is believed to be the Campanian Brown Limestone Member of the Sudr Formation. Average reservoir parameters for the Nubia Formation are 16% porosity, 236 md permeability, 137 m net pay thickness, and 5,506 psi original reservoir pressure.

Lelek, J.J.; Abdine, A.S. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

55

Uplift and subsidence of the Suez rift: Constraints from fission-track analysis and sediment backstripping  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Suez is a Neogene rift that has evolved as one arm of the Sinai triple junction. The basement uplifts flanking the rift are larger than can be explained by uniform lithospheric extension. The timing of the regional heating required by the uplift has important implications for hydrocarbon maturation for the Gulf of Suez and rifts in general. The local geology indicates that the uplift did not predate rifting. Therefore, a regional subsidence and two-dimensional backstripping of the rift sediments were undertaken in conjunction with fission track analyses of the basement uplift. The initial rift deposits (Nukhul Formation) indicate slow extension during the earliest Miocene. The extension rate increased at the beginning of the deposition of the Rudeis Formation at approximately 19 Ma as the Gulf of Suez entered its main phase of rifting. By the end of the deposition of the Kareem Formation (approximately 14-15 Ma), most of the Africa-Arabia separation had transferred to the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform. In order to determine the onset of the rift flank uplift relative to the rift history, 55 apatite fission track analyses were performed on samples from the basement of the eastern desert, on the western side of the rift. Apatite fission tracks record the thermal history of the samples for temperatures up to 125{degree}c. Apparent ages range from 382 to 11 Ma representing samples that have undergone various degrees of track annealing. Track length distributions clearly show the fading of tracks acquired prior to uplift in more deeply buried samples and the accumulation of long unannealed tracks subsequent to unroofing. The pattern of the track length vs. age distribution indicates that major uplift began simultaneously with the main phase of rifting at 19-20 Ma.

Steckler, M.S.; Omar, G.I.; Buck, W.R. (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, NY (USA))

1988-08-01

56

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using ? spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed 0.6 and 18.0 Bq 1-1 for stream water.

El-Tahawy, M. S.; Farouk, M. A.; Ibrahiem, N. M.; El-Mongey, S. A. M.

1994-07-01

57

Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-10-01

58

Scale deposition in surface and subsurface production equipment in the Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Some of the Gulf of Suez oil fields (El-Morgan, July, and Shoab Ali) have been waterflooded with gulf seawater. Compatibility tests have indicated probable deposition of scale in surface and subsurface production equipment. This paper outlines the physical and theoretical prediction for downhole scale deposition in Gulf of Suez oil wells. It also describes field experience with CaSO/sub 4/ scale removal from the wells and their formations in view of field results of the implemented programs. Scale inhibition programs carried out to control downhole scale deposition by using the formation squeeze technique, along with the field results obtained from the squeezetreated wells, are described. A new improvement in the squeeze treatment technique has been introduced as highmolecular-weight polyacrylamide polymer solutions were incorporated to stage the scale inhibitor squeeze batch to prolong the treatment lifetime. Field results are presented, along with conclusions and recommendations that can be applied to similar problems, especially when wells of highly productive sandstone formations are to be inhibited.

El-Hattab, M.I.

1985-09-01

59

Reproductive Periodicities of Indo-Pacific Invertebrates in the Gulf of Suez. Ii. The Echinoid Echinometra Mathaei (De Blainville).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seasonal reproductive changes in several populations of the echinoid Echinometra mathaei near both the head and mouth of the Gulf of Suez were followed for more than a year. Well-defined reproductive periodicities occurred near the head of the Gulf; gamet...

J. S. Pearse

1969-01-01

60

An Organic Geochemical Characterization of Crude Oils from El Hamd and Bakr Oilfields in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven crude oil samples were collected from wells of the El Hamd and Bakr oil fields located in the central Gulf of Suez and their chemical composition, API gravity, sulfur content, and asphaltene content were determined. Nickel and vanadium contents were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Saturated paraffinic hydrocarbon fractions were subjected to gas chromatography in order to investigate carbon

S. Faramawy; A. El-Naggar; M. El-Nady; S. El-Sabagh; F. Harb; A. Salem

2012-01-01

61

Distance, Trade, and Income – The 1967 to 1975 Closing of the Suez Canal as a Natural Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The negative effect of distance on bilateral trade is one of the most robust findings in international trade. However, the underlying causes of this negative relationship are less well understood. This paper exploits a temporary shock to distance, the closing of the Suez canal in 1967 and its reopening in 1975, to examine the effect of distance on trade and

James Feyrer

2009-01-01

62

DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF DIATOMS IN THE BOTTOM SEDIMENTS OF THE SUEZ CANAL LAKES AND ADJACENT AREAS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diatom assemblages in the bottom sediments of Timsah Lake and adjacent sites, including the Great Bitter Lake, the northern part of the Gulf of Suez and the Mediterranean Sea at the entrance of the northern canal, have been recovered and studied in detail. A total of 394 species and varieties belonging to 96 genera were identified. Of these, 263

Abdelfattah A. Zalat

2002-01-01

63

Genetic differentiation among populations of Minona ileanae (Platyhelminthes: Proseriata) from the Red Sea and the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phenomenon of Lessepsian migration has stimulated the interest of biologists ever since the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, concerning, in particular, the possible effects of migrants on Mediterranean autochthonous communities. So far, most attention has been devoted to macrofaunal taxa – yet, the nature of the sandy shores of the Canal may constitute an ideal habitat for

Tiziana Lai; Marco Curini-Galletti; Marco Casu

2008-01-01

64

Why is the mediterranean more readily colonized than the Red Sea, by organisms using the Suez Canal as a passageway?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the opening of the Suez Canal, more than 120 Red Sea species colonized the eastern Mediterranean, whereas less than 10 Mediterranean species colonized the Red Sea. For most of the species involved in this colonization, the mode of dispersal from the source to the colonized area is through free-drifting propagules. In order to examine whether the current regime of

Z. Agur; U. N. Safriel

1981-01-01

65

Maturation, fecundity and seasonality of reproduction of two commercially valuable cuttlefish, Sepia pharaonis and S. dollfusi, in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis (maximum 250mm mantle length, ML) and S. dollfusi (maximum 150mm ML) are widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific from the Red Sea to Japan and Australia. They are the primary fishery in the Suez Canal and the most valuable commercial cephalopods in the northern Indian Ocean. However, their reproductive biology, essential for fishery management, is poorly known.

Howaida R Gabr; Roger T Hanlon; Mahmoud H Hanafy; Salah G El-Etreby

1998-01-01

66

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY\\/07\\/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal; S. A. Al-Gamal; F. A. Abdel-Hay; H. M. Zahar

2000-01-01

67

Inventing space in the age of Empire: planning experiments and achievements along Suez Canal in Egypt (1859–1956)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new French research project concerning the planning and architectural history of the Suez canal cities in Egypt during the age of Empire. Begun in January 2008, this research has been addressing two first topics: religious architecture and port cities as cosmopolitan locales.

Céline Frémaux; Mercedes Volait

2009-01-01

68

An assessment of heavy-metal contamination in surface sediments of the Suez Gulf using geoaccumulation indexes and statistical analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An assessment of marine pollution due to metals was made in the Suez Gulf based on surface costal sediment collected from 18 locations along the Gulf. The samples were dried and acid-digested, and the metal contents (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (air–acetylene) with deuterium background correction. An

A. Khaled; A. El Nemr; A. El Sikaily

2006-01-01

69

Risk factors of falls among elderly living in Urban Suez - Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction Falling is one of the most common geriatric syndromes threatening the independence of older persons. Falls result from a complex and interactive mix of biological or medical, behavioral and environmental factors, many of which are preventable. Studying these diverse risk factors would aid early detection and management of them at the primary care level. Methods This is a cross sectional study about risk factors of falls was conducted to 340 elders in Urban Suez. Those are all patients over 60 who attended two family practice centers in Urban Suez. Results When asked about falling during the past 12 months, 205 elders recalled at least one incident of falling. Of them, 36% had their falls outdoors and 24% mentioned that stairs was the most prevalent site for indoor falls. Falls were also reported more among dependant than independent elderly. Using univariate regression analysis, almost all tested risk factors were significantly associated with falls in the studied population. These risk factors include: living alone, having chronic diseases, using medications, having a physical deficit, being in active, and having a high nutritional risk. However, the multivariate regression analysis proved that the strongest risk factors are low level of physical activity with OR 0.6 and P value 0.03, using a cane or walker (OR 1.69 and P value 0.001) and Impairment of daily living activities (OR 1.7 and P value 0.001). Conclusion Although falls is a serious problem among elderly with many consequences, it has many preventable risk factors. Health care providers should advice people to remain active and more research is needed in such an important area of Family Practice.

Kamel, Mohammed Hany; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed; Ismail, Sally El-Sayed

2013-01-01

70

Sequence stratigraphy and high-frequency cycles: New aspects for a quantitative evaluation of the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new development in the application of sequence stratigraphic concepts in marine as well as continental basins is the recognition of high-frequency cyclic patterns in rock successions in the subsurface. Studies of six wells from the northern, central, and southern parts of the Gulf of Suez show the presence of well-preserved, high-frequency cycles with periodicities similar to the orbitally forced

S. D. Nio; C. S. Yang; N. Tewfik; M. Darwish; H. Jonkman

1993-01-01

71

Inherited Discontinuities and Neogene Structure: The Gulf of Suez and the Northwestern Edge of the Red Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gulf of Suez and the northern Red Sea rifts are the result of intracontinental deformation during Neogene times. The initiation and the development of the rift are controlled by (i) four main trends of faults: N140 degrees --N150 degrees; NS to N20 degrees; sub E--W; and N40 degrees --60 degrees; (ii) a zigzag faulting pattern; (iii) two main tectonic

J. J. Jarrige; P. Ott D'Estevou; P. F. Burollet; J.-P. Thiriet; J. C. Icart; J. P. Richert; P. Sehans; C. Montenat; P. Prat

1986-01-01

72

Non-native fishes in the Mediterranean from the Red Sea, by way of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 caused a migration generally from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean, rarely the opposite\\u000a direction, and 63 lessepsian fish species penetrated into the Mediterranean by way of this canal. These species usually spread\\u000a northward and most of them can establish wide populations in this area, but some of them can not be

Sinan Mavruk; Dursun Avsar

2008-01-01

73

The Stitches Stayed: Creating Rapport around Women's Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Establishing rapport between researcher and participants when conducting ethnography is essential to the successful outcome of the research. However, when participants are unwilling to engage, a different approach must be adopted. This article is an examination of the appropriation of a situated learning model during fieldwork with a group of…

Wall, Mary Clementine; Stasz, Bird

2010-01-01

74

Evaporite accumulation during the Messinian Salinity Crisis: The Suez Rift case  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mediterranean Basin may have not always been connected to the Atlantic Ocean. During the Messinian Salinity Crisis (5.96-5.33 Myr), the Mediterranean Sea reduced progressively its connection with the global Ocean by a complex combination of tectonic and glacio-eustatic processes. During this period, deep erosion occurred on the margin and on the continent. Furthermore, a large quantity of evaporites was deposited in the basins (>1500 m). The way by which the evaporites accumulated in the various sub-basins has not been precisely determined. Here we demonstrate by quantitative analysis that a combination of several Mediterranean sea-level drawdown events associated with limited Atlantic sea inflow and continuous river discharge can explain the quantity of evaporites in the Mediterranean Basins and the observation of an intermediate lowstand at ~500 m. Using a paleogeographical reconstruction and a numerical model, we show that the evaporites of the Gulf of Suez (GoS) are a consequence of the threshold which disconnected the GoS/Red Sea from the Eastern Mediterranean at the end of the Miocene.

Gargani, Julien; Moretti, Isabelle; Letouzey, Jean

2008-01-01

75

Timing of structural development of oil traps in Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

To date, more than 40 oil fields with an estimated 25billion bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. These oil accumulations are present both in the pre-graben and graben-fill cycles which are separated by Oligocene tectonic phase, hitherto considered to be responsible for differentiation and formation of oil traps. In the present study, the structural development of many oil traps is related to intra-Rudeis tectonic phase of late early Miocene age. Presence of an a

Chowdhary, L.R.; Shaheen, S.

1988-01-01

76

Physico-chemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20 40‰ and over 40‰ in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50 70 cm fell to below 20 °C in winter and rose to above 30 °C in summer; oxygen concentration at the same depth ranged between 6 10 mg l-1 and the pH was 8·1 8·3, and at mid-day this water was supersaturated with oxygen through 6 8 months of the year. The main chemical nutrients reached their highest levels in winter (December February) and their lowest levels in summer (May August), silicate varying between 1 7 ?M, phosphate between 0·1 and 0·8 ?M and nitrate between 4 10 ?M; nitrite varied in a more complex manner, usually between 0·25 and 0·4 ?M. The atomic ratio of N/P was generally well above the Redfield ratio level, except for a few months in midwinter. These nutrient concentrations are high in comparison with those of unpolluted seas of the region, but are typical of the more eutrophic coastal waters in most parts of the world.

El-Serehy, H. A. H.; Sleigh, M. A.

1992-02-01

77

Syn-rift carbonate depositional patterns: Miocene, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

The Suez rift, initiated in the Miocene, consists of asymmetric fault blocks, separated by transfer zones. Syn-rift Miocene carbonates developed on highs; the intricate relations are illustrated at Gebel Gharamul and Esh El Mellaha. Gebel Gharamul is a rollover, cut by antithetic faults, located on a transfer zone. Small coralgal rimmed shelves initially developed over the eroded footwall nick of an early western antithetic. Steepening depositional dips reflect increasing graben subsidence. Subsequently, the main easterly antithetic regionally lowered the rollover, promoting stacked coral rimmed shelf sequences with increasing dip filling the graben, with the back reef onlapping the main rollover crest. Simultaneously, a low-angle flexure (2/sup 0/-3/sup 0/) developed along the northern rollover margin. Low-angle (5/sup 0/) biostromal rimmed shelves, exhibiting sigmoidal clinoforms rapidly accreted laterally, as reflected in flat-based sequences. Depositional pattern eventually merged over the rollover to produce laterally complex rimmed shelf sequences. Esh El Mellaha is a footwall to a major extensional fault. In a southerly extensional cusp (20 km), the fault throw decreases from kilometers to flexural (2-3/sup 0/) displacement. Coralgal rimmed shelves and escarpment fringing reefs mantle the footwall. Initial, thick, and most laterally extensive sequences develop over the flexure. Accretion is primarily subvertical, reflecting continuous flexural subsidence. Where the fault cusp has less than a 30/sup 0/ inclination, carbonate sequences exhibiting oblique and oblique sigmoid clinoforms (40/sup 0/) prograded over and heeled the fault during periods of fault inactivity. With a fault plane inclination over 40/sup 0/, slope progradation was precluded and thin vertically accreting escarpment sequences developed.

Hurst, J.M.

1987-05-01

78

Etude du rapport 131 I hématie\\/ 131 I plasma et du rapport de conversion 131 I organique plasmatique\\/ 131 I plasmatique en vue de leur application a l'etude de la fonction thyroidienne chez les colombides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Le rapport 131I Hématies\\/131I Plasma et le rapport de conversion, employés chez les Mammifères comme tests de l'activité thyroïdienne, sont utilisables également pour deux espèces de Colombidés: le Pigeon domestique et le Pigeon Ramier.

F. Lachiver; F. Poivilliers-de la Queriere

1959-01-01

79

French Space Program. Report to Cospar Programme Spatial Francais. Rapport au Cospar.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A report is presented on French space activities over the period mid-1975 to mid-1976. These activities cover the following main fields: extrasolar system astronomy, solar physics, solar system, lunar rocks, ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, aeronom...

1976-01-01

80

Entre Reproduction et Mobilisation: les Rapports de Genre EN Formation Continue EN France et AU Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

REPRODUCTION OR MOBILISATION? GENDER PROPORTIONS IN CONTINUING EDUCATION IN FRANCE AND CANADA - Initial education provisions for women have evolved greatly over the past 40 years. But what about their situation within adult education and training? This article, comparing Canada and France, shows that, while it is well known that more women than men participate in adult education, their greater presence in professional training courses is a new development. The analysis highlights certain particular findings, such as the growing demand for continuing education in Canada and the increased rate of participation by full-time employees in France. In both countries, a number of social factors continue to influence women's participation.

Fourner, Christine; Béret, Pierre; Doray, Pierre; Bélanger, Paul

2009-01-01

81

Spatial distribution of radioisotopes in the coast of Suez Gulf, southwestern Sinai and the impact of hot springs.  

PubMed

This work describes the concentrations of radioisotopes in soil, sediment, wild plants and groundwater in southwestern Sinai. The study area extends from Suez to Abu Rudies along the eastern part of the Suez Gulf. It included two hot springs: Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun. No dependence of ¹³?Cs concentrations on any of the measured sand characteristics was found, including calcium carbonate. The enrichment of ²²?Ra in Hammam Faraoun hot spring was the most prominent feature. The ²²?Ra concentration in hot springs of Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun were 68 and 2377 Bq kg?¹ for sediments, 3.5 and 54.0 Bq kg?¹ for wild plants and 205 and 1945 mBq l?¹ for the groundwater, respectively. In addition, ²²?Ra activity concentration in local sand in the area of Hammam Faraoun was ?14 times that of Ayun Musa. On the other hand, the ²³²Th concentrations were comparable in the two hot springs, while ¹³?Cs concentrations were relatively higher in Ayun Musa. The characteristics and radioelements studies support possible suggestions that the waters in the two hot springs have different contributions of sea and groundwaters crossing different geological layers where the water-rock interaction takes place. PMID:21148168

Ramadan, Kh A; Seddeek, M K; Elnimr, T; Sharshar, T; Badran, H M

2010-12-08

82

Ecological Study on Community of Exotic Invasive Seaweed Caulerpa prolifera in Suez Canal and its Associated Macro Invertebrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Caulerpa prolifera (Forsskal) Lamouroux, a green alga, widespread in tropical and subtropical seas is now invading species to the Suez Canal during last recent years after 2000; it is widely spread, colonizing its western sandy shore at shallow waters of 1-2 m depth. It has the potential to supplant native vegetation, thereby altering the structure and function of the subtidal marine landscape, supplant seagrass H. stipulacea. According to the present study, based on biometric parameters, the frequency of occurrence, abundance and density analyses, the seaweed C. prolifera is more frequent, abundant and dense in Suez Canal than the seagrass H. stipulacea, which is very rare. Instead C. prolifera forming extended dense meadows with percentage cover nearly 100% m-2 at many sites. This mainly happened; due to the competitive success of C. prolifera which seems to be related to its big size, high density, rapid growth, high efficiency in dim light conditions, high tolerance to severe nutrient limitation and salinity and temperature fluctuations and to the production of toxic secondary metabolites. The presence of these toxic secondary metabolites explains why C. prolifera is avoided by many of macro invertebrates as a habitat or feeding grounds.

Gab-Alla, Ali A.-F. A.

83

Multiphase flowmeter successfully measures three-phase flow at extremely high gas-volume fractions -- Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

A multiphase flowmeter (MPFM) installed in offshore Egypt has accurately measured three-phase flow in extremely gassy flow conditions. The meter is completely nonintrusive, with no moving parts, requires no flow mixing before measurement, and has no bypass loop to remove gas before multiphase measurement. Flow regimes observed during the field test of this meter ranged from severe slugging to annular flow caused by the dynamics of gas-lift gas in the production stream. Average gas-volume fraction ranged from 93 to 98% during tests conducted on seven wells. The meter was installed in the Gulf of Suez on a well protector platform in the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co. (Gupco) October field, and was placed in series with a test separator located on a nearby production platform. Wells were individually tested with flow conditions ranging from 1,300 to 4,700 B/D fluid, 2.4 to 3.9 MMscf/D of gas, and water cuts from 1 to 52%. The meter is capable of measuring water cuts up to 100%. Production was routed through both the MPFM and the test separator simultaneously as wells flowed with the assistance of gas-lift gas. The MPFM measured gas and liquid rates to within {+-} 10% of test-separator reference measurement flow rates, and accomplished this at gas-volume fractions from 93 to 96%. At higher gas-volume fractions up to 98%, accuracy deteriorated but the meter continued to provide repeatable results.

Leggett, R.B.; Borling, D.C. [Amoco Egypt Oil Co., Cairo (Egypt); Powers, B.S. [Amoco Sharjah Oil Co. (United Arab Emirates); Shehata, K. [Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co. (Egypt); Halvorsen, M. [Fluenta A/S (Norway); AboElenain, A. [Cross-Countries (Egypt)

1998-02-01

84

Significant structural reinterpretation of the giant October Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt using SCAT, isogon based sections and 3D seismic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The October field, a sub-salt giant in the extensional Gulf of Suez (Egypt) has been structurally reinterpreted for new reserve opportunities. Quantitative SCAT analyses of the wellbore dip data have been integrated with 3D seismic by using dip isogons to construct local structural sections. SCAT dip analysis was critical to the reinterpretation because SCAT revealed important structural information that previously

W. J. Sercombe; G. W. Smith; J. D. Morse

1996-01-01

85

Fault seal prediction of seismic-scale normal faults in porous sandstone: A case study from the eastern Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of normal faults in the Nubian Sandstone Sequence, from the eastern Gulf of Suez rift, has been conducted to investigate the relationship between the microstructure and petrophysical properties of cataclasites developed along seismic-scale faults (slip-surface cataclasites) and smaller displacement faults (deformation bands) found in their damage zones. The results help to quantify the uncertainty associated with predicting the

Christian Tueckmantel; Quentin J. Fisher; Rob J. Knipe; Henry Lickorish; Samir M. Khalil

2010-01-01

86

Café au Lait Macule  

MedlinePLUS

newsletter | contact Share | Café au Lait Macule A parent's guide for infants and babies A A A This image displays a newborn with ... area of pigment near the knee typical of café au lait macules. Overview A café au lait ...

87

Instructor-Student and Student-Student Rapport in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the relationships between instructors and their students, and between students, to determine their roles in building positive relationships and an overall positive classroom environment. Of particular interest was the examination of instructor rapport with students and rapport between students. Students (N = 232) reported on…

Frisby, Brandi N.; Martin, Matthew M.

2010-01-01

88

Le contrôle de projet face au contrôle de gestion, l'émergence d'une vision des coûts dans les systèmes de contrôle : les cas de VALEO et FARMAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comment définir le contrôle de projet par rapport au contrôle de gestion ? La définition du contrôle de gestion n'est elle même pas aisée. Premièrement, le champ paradigmatique de cette discipline est variable. Deuxièmement, la littérature complète en permanence les prérogatives de cette fonction. Troisièmement, l'organisation situe le contrôle de gestion (CG) de manière évolutive. Le contrôle de projet (CP)

Wilfrid Azan

1999-01-01

89

Low-angle normal faulting and isostatic response in the Gulf of Suez: Evidence from seismic interpretation and geometric reconstruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tectonic extension within continental crust creates a variety of major features best classed as extensional orogens. These features have come under increasing attention in recent years, with the welding of field observation and theoretical concepts. Most recent advances have come from the Basin and Range Province of the southwestern United States and from the North Sea. Application of these geometric and isostatic concepts, in combination with seismic interpretation, to the southern Gulf of Suez, an active extensional orogen, allows generation of detailed structural maps and geometrically balanced sections which suggest a regional structural model. Geometric models which should prove to be a valuable adjunct to numerical and thermal models for the rifting process are discussed.

Perry, S. K.; Schamel, S.

90

Strangers in sync: Achieving embodied rapport through shared movements  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the emergence of behavioral synchrony among strangers in the context of self-disclosure, and their path in predicting interaction quality. Specifically, we hypothesize that behavioral synchrony mediates the direct effect of self-disclosure on the development of embodied rapport. Same-sex stranger pairs (n=94) were randomly assigned to a videorecorded self-disclosure or control condition, and afterward each member rated their social interaction. Following the procedure used by Bernieri, Reznick, & Rosenthal (1988), two trained judges independently watched each video record and rated each pair interaction on behavioral synchrony. Bootstrapping analyses provide support for the hypothesized mediating effect of behavioral synchrony, which emerged as independent of the effects of self-other overlap and positive affect. The authors discuss implications of behavioral synchrony for relationship formation processes and the inevitable entwinement of behavior and judgments in light of embodied cognition.

Vacharkulksemsuk, Tanya; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

2011-01-01

91

Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays.  

PubMed

In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5?kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like ? propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the environment shapes the genome. PMID:21248857

Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

2011-01-20

92

Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays  

PubMed Central

In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5?kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like ? propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the environment shapes the genome.

Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

2011-01-01

93

Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5 kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the

Hosam Elsaied; Hatch W Stokes; Keiko Kitamura; Yasurou Kurusu; Yoichi Kamagata; Akihiko Maruyama

2011-01-01

94

Distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediment of Temsah lake, Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Temsah is one of the main wetlands in the Suez Canal region, and the main source for fish for the area. The lake is the end-point of several wastewater effluents. In the present study, residues of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were monitored in the sediment of the

Pietro Tundo; Stefano Raccanelli; Laila A. Reda; Mohamed Tawic Ahmed

2004-01-01

95

Reproductive strategy of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria Scyphomedusae) in the Suez Canal and its migration between the Red Sea and Mediterranean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The life history of the common jellyfish A. aurita (Linnaeus) in the Suez Canal was investigated by monthly sampling over a 28 month period from September 2006 to December 2008. Young medusae of 2–3 cm diameter appeared during February\\/March. Growth was rapid. Some specimens of this cohort reached 16 cm and spawned by March\\/May and then decreased in size or

Hamed A. El-Serehy; Khaled A. Al-Rasheid

2011-01-01

96

Fission-track analysis of basement apatites at the western margin of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt: evidence for synchroneity of uplift and subsidence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fifty-six apatite fission-track ages and 52 horizontal confined track-length measurements are reported from Precambrian crystalline rocks along the western margin of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Ages fall in the range of ca. 11-385 m.y. and older ages often occur within very close geographic proximity to younger ones, indicating non-uniform uplift. The wide range in ages is accompanied by a systematic variation in the distribution of horizontal confined fission track lengths. On the basis of apatite fission track ages and their length distributions, data fall into three distinct groups. Group I: ages ranging from 43 to 385 m.y. Length distributions are all positively skewed and with decreasing age become progressively broader with shorter mean track length. Group II: ages ranging from 23 to 31 m.y. Length distributions are negatively skewed with either a distinct tail or a small peak of short tracks. Group III: ages ranging from 11 to 20.5 m.y. Length distributions are al unimodal, narrow, negatively skewed and have the longest mean lengths among samples studied. Apatite ages from groups I and II are interpreted as ``mixed ages'' as a result of cooling during uplift from different levels within the apatite partial track annealing zone. Ages from Group III are interpreted as ``cooling ages'' due to uplift from the apatite total track annealing zone with minor partial annealing. Correcting the ages of the two oldest samples in this group for track-length reduction yields ages of 21 +/- 2.2 and 23 +/- 1.5 m.y. It is proposed that the onset of rift-flank uplift in the Gulf of Suez-northern Red Sea area occurred between 21 and 23 m.y. ago. Fission-track analysis in combination with subsidence data from the Gulf of Suez basin, indicate that commencement of basement uplift postdate the start of rifting and is interpreted as evidence for passive rifting at the Gulf of Suez. Furthermore, this uplift is contemporaneous with, and is directly related to, the process of extension and subsidence at the Gulf of Suez.

Omar, Gomaa I.; Steckler, Michael S.; Buck, W. Roger; Kohn, Barry P.

1989-09-01

97

Organic tracers in sediments from the coastal zone of Ras Abu el-Darag, Gulf of Suez  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment samples from the coastal zone of the Gulf of Suez contain a variety of organic compounds from anthropogenic and natural sources. A total of 12 surface samples of bottom sediments were collected with an Ekman grab sampler along an off-shore transect south of Ras Abu el-Darag. The samples were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1 v/v) after drying and sieving through 250 ?m mesh. The extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to characterize the chemical composition and sources of the organic components. Marine with minor terrestrial biota were the major natural sources of organic tracers and included n-alkanoic acids, sterols and saccharides (5.7-76.7%). Anthropogenic sources, from petroleum related activities, detergent usage for spill cleaning and littering, are indicated by the presence of n-alkanes with carbon preference index ?1.0, hopanes, steranes, unresolved complex mixture of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl nitriles, alkamides and plasticizers. Their total relative concentrations ranged from 23.3 to 97.3% of the total extracts. Petroleum residues from natural seepage may also be part of these hydrocarbons. The levels of anthropogenic inputs decrease from about 94% in coastal zone sediments to about 20% in sediments from the reef front.

Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Kassim, Tarek A. T. A.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

2009-10-01

98

Accouchement de jumeaux conjoints de d?couverte fortuite au cours du travail au CHU de Dakar  

PubMed Central

L'objectif de cette étude était de rapporter 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints, discuter de l'importance du diagnostic anténatal et de décrire les particularités diagnostiques, thérapeutiques et évolutives. Sur 45700 accouchements du 1er Février 2009 au 31 Décembre 2011, 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints ont été enregistrés, soit 1 cas pour 15000 accouchements. Ces cas ont été diagnostiqués au cours du travail au décours d'une dystocie mécanique ou d'une césarienne réalisée pour une autre indication. Il s'agissait d'un cas de jumeaux conjoints thoraco-omphalopages, un cas de diprosopes et un cas de dicéphales. L'accouchement dans les trois cas était fait par voie haute permettant d'extraire des mort-nés frais. Nous insistons sur l'intérêt d'un diagnostic anténatal précoce par le recours à l’échographie afin d’éviter les accidents mécaniques d'un accouchement qui ne saurait s'accomplir par voie basse.

Gueye, Mamour; Gueye, Serigne Modou Kane; Gueye, Mame Diarra Ndiaye; Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Diallo, Moussa; Cisse, Mamadou Lamine; Moreau, Jean Charles

2012-01-01

99

Collective flow in Au + Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

1994-05-01

100

Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and geochemistry of Rudies sandstone (Lower Miocene), Warda Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lower Miocene Rudies sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southeastern part, Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their provenance and diagenesis and their impact in reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Warda field, representing the Lower and Middle Rudies, were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rudies sandstones have an average framework composition of Q85F7.2R7.8, and 83% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Middle Rudies sandstones are only slightly more quartzose with an average framework composition of Q90F7R3 and 86% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. Rudies sandstones are mostly quartz arenite with subordinate subarkose and sublithic arenites and their bulk-rock geochemistry support the petrographic results. The modal analysis data of studied samples suggest influence of granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks. The geochemical data interpretation on the basis of discriminate function diagrams reveal the source material was deposited on a passive margin. Textural attributes possibly suggest long-distance transport of grains from the source region and indicates a cratonic or a recycled source. Tectonic setting of Rudies Formation reveals that the lower Rudies sandstones are typically rift sandstone and their deposition constrained the beginning of the faulting, while the middle Rudies sandstones were transported from the far along the rift.Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and carbonate dissolution greatly enhance the petrophysical properties of many sandstone samples.

Zaid, Samir M.

2012-05-01

101

Low-Temperature Au--Au Bonding Using Nanoporous Au--Ag Sheets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we proposed low-temperature Au--Au bonding using nanoporous Au--Ag sheets, fabricated by dealloying a Au--Ag sheet in HNO3 solution, as a joint layer. The influence of the annealing temperature on the pore structure and chemical properties of the sheets was investigated. The chemical composition of the sheet was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the strength of Au--Au bonding with the nanoporous sheet increased. A sheet treated with liquid N2 was also tested; the strength of the Au--Au bond increased as a result of this low-temperature treatment.

Mimatsu, Hayata; Mizuno, Jun; Kasahara, Takashi; Saito, Mikiko; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Shoji, Shuichi

2013-05-01

102

Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering…

Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

2011-01-01

103

Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering…

Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

2011-01-01

104

The judgment of rapport: A cross-cultural comparison between Americans and Greeks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpersonal perception was examined cross-culturally by having samples of Greek and American subjects view and judge the level of rapport throughout the same series of 50 dyadic interactions recorded in America. The overall pattern of results showed that: (a) the judgment policies and accuracy of the Greek and American samples were remarkably similar; (b) both groups fell far short of

Frank Bernieri; John S. Gillis

1995-01-01

105

Student Self-Assessment and Student Ratings of Teacher Rapport in Secondary Student Course Ratings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study involved administering two rating forms (student self-rating on commitment and student rating of teacher rapport) to approximately 1,400 secondary students taught by 12 different teachers at two different high school Latter-day Saint (LDS) released time seminaries along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Seminaries and Institutes of Religion…

Roe, John Wilford

2010-01-01

106

Reconsidering rapport with urban teachers: negotiating shifting boundaries and legitimizing support  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses Lincoln's [2010. ‘What a long, strange trip it's been … ’: Twenty-five years of qualitative and new paradigm research. Qualitative Inquiry 16, no. 1: 3–9] call for greater attention to the question of rapport in qualitative research through a reflexive examination of researcher–participant relationships in two qualitative studies with urban teachers. In these projects, one a series

Carol R. Rinke; Lynnette Mawhinney

2012-01-01

107

Au2HTML  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Au2HTML is a tool aimed at Webmasters and others who are interested in developing Webpage galleries. Its most useful feature allows the creation of thumbnails from images of varying file formats. Customizable thumbnail options include image size and the border style. Au2HTML also comes with an HTML editor and can be integrated with your FTP client to ease file transfers. The registration fee is $99. A demo version is available for no charge.

108

Rapport in Conflict Resolution: Accounting for How Face-to-Face Contact Fosters Mutual Cooperation in Mixed-Motive Conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose that face-to-face contact fosters the development of rapport and thereby helps negotiators coordinate on mutually beneficial settlements in mixed-motive conflicts. Specifically, we investigate whether, in a cooperative climate, negotiators' visual access to each other's nonverbal behavior fosters a dyadic state of rapport that facilitates mutual cooperation. Experiment 1 manipulated whether negotiators stood face-to-face or side-by-side (unable to see

Aimee L. Drolet; Michael W. Morris

2000-01-01

109

P?ritonites infectieuses en dialyse p?riton?ale continue ambulatoire au CHU de Rabat: profil bact?riologique sur trois ans  

PubMed Central

Introduction La péritonite infectieuse (PI) est une des complications les plus sévères et les plus fréquentes de la dialyse péritonéale (DP). But: Déterminer le taux des PI et les germes en causes, et évaluer l’efficacité des protocoles thérapeutiques entrepris chez les patients traités par DP au CHU de Rabat. Méthodes Etude rétrospective effectuée en Septembre 2009 chez tous les patients traités par DP continue ambulatoire (DPCA) au CHU de Rabat depuis l’ouverture de l’unité de DP en Juillet 2006. Ont été inclus dans cette étude, tous les patients ayant fait une péritonite. Pour tous nos patients, nous avons relevé les données cliniques, biologiques et bactériologiques. Nous avons également recherché les causes des péritonites, le délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse, et la durée moyenne de formation des patients. Résultats Au cours de la période de l’étude, 28 épisodes de PI sont survenus chez 19 patients dont la moyenne d’âge est de 46±16 (19-78) ans, avec une prédominance masculine (12 hommes/ 7 femmes). Le taux des PI dans notre unité de DP est de 21.07 mois-patients calculé par le RDPLF. Leur délai de survenue par rapport au début de la dialyse au centre est de 7.9 ±8 (1-29) mois. Lors de ces PI, les bactéries à Gram négatif (BGN) ont été retrouvées dans 55% des cas, contre uniquement 45% pour les Gram positifs. Conclusion La PI est une complication grave et redoutable de la DP. Le taux de PI dans notre centre de DPCA est de 21m-p ce qui correspond au taux acceptable définie par les sociétés internationales. Les germes les plus responsables des PI dans notre centre sont les BGN et la contamination semble être manu-portée se faisant essentiellement à partir de la flore environnementale et cutanée.

Lioussfi, Zineb; Rhou, Hakima; Ezzaitouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea; Benamar, Loubna

2012-01-01

110

Chemical and photophysical properties of AuI, AuII, AuIII, and AuI-dimer complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various AuI, AuII, AuIII, and AuI-dimer complexes were probed using density-functional theory (DFT), specifically the B3PW91 hybrid functional, and relativistic effective core potentials. The research aimed to investigate the photophysical properties of gold complexes, and inspect the factors that influence the geometry and bonding properties of gold compounds. The results illustrate that the geometry of AuI complexes (ground-state singlet) is very sensitive to the electronic nature of the ligands: ?-donors give a two-coordinate, linear shape; however, ?-acceptors yield a three-coordinate, trigonal planar geometry. Doublet AuIIL3 complexes distort to a T-shape coordination geometry, and are thus ground state models of the corresponding AuIL3 triplet excitons. The disproportionation of AuIIL3 to AuIL3 and AuIIIL3 complexes is endothermic for all ligands investigated, suggesting that these complexes, neglected by experimentalists, are interesting subjects for study and may display unique photochemical properties. For dimeric AuI complexes, the optimized triplet exciton shows a Jahn Teller distortion around only one of the gold centers. Furthermore, the Au Au distance is reduced in the dimer excited state versus the ground state, which should yield interesting Stokes’ shifts.

Barakat, Khaldoon; Cundari, Thomas R.

2005-04-01

111

Electrochemistry of Au(II) and Au(III) pincer complexes: determination of the Au(II)-Au(II) bond energy.  

PubMed

The bond energy of the unsupported Au-Au bond in the Au(ii) dimer [(C(?)N(?)C)Au]2 and the difference between Au(III)-OH and Au(III)-H bond enthalpies have been determined experimentally by electrochemical methods, with Au-OH and Au-H complexes showing unexpected differences in their reduction pathways, supported by DFT modelling. PMID:24051607

Dann, Thomas; Ro?ca, Drago?-Adrian; Wright, Joseph A; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Bochmann, Manfred

2013-10-01

112

Point of View: Questions From the Edge: Using Informal Surveys to Build Rapport With Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Astronomy helps us answer the ultimate question of human existence," and "Astronomy helps us understand the meaning of our own existence." These thoughts caught the attention of one professor who wondered what students thought about the meaning of their existence. The results of surveying students on this and two other questions have supplied information that is not only interesting in its own right for insights into student interests, but has also provided opportunities to foster rapport with students through discussions related to their responses.

Hedin, Eric

2007-01-01

113

"Straight Up": Enhancing Rapport and Therapeutic Alliance with Previously-Detained Youth in the Delivery of Mental Health Services.  

PubMed

A strong therapeutic alliance has been shown to improve mental health treatment outcomes in adults, but this topic has not been fully explored with youth. Adolescents, particularly justice-involved youth, stand to benefit greatly from an improved treatment experience. One quality which can improve treatment is mental health providers' interpersonal skills when attempting to build a therapeutic rapport with adolescent clients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 youth who screened positive for mental health concerns while in juvenile detention. Four themes were identified as important to improving the therapeutic alliance: Empathy, client-directed care, sequencing, and positive rapport. Suggestions for strengthening a therapeutic alliance are provided. PMID:23775240

Brown, James R; Holloway, Evan D; Akakpo, Tohoro F; Aalsma, Matthew C

2013-06-18

114

Significant structural reinterpretation of the giant October Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt using SCAT, isogon based sections and 3D seismic  

SciTech Connect

The October field, a sub-salt giant in the extensional Gulf of Suez (Egypt) has been structurally reinterpreted for new reserve opportunities. Quantitative SCAT analyses of the wellbore dip data have been integrated with 3D seismic by using dip isogons to construct local structural sections. SCAT dip analysis was critical to the reinterpretation because SCAT revealed important structural information that previously was unresolvable using conventional tadpole plots. In gross aspect, the October Field is a homocline that trends NW-SE, dips to the NE, and is closed on the SW (updip) by the major Clysmic Normal Fault. SCAT accurately calculated the overall trend of the field, but also identified important structural anomalies near the Clysmic fault and in the northwest and southeast plunge ends. In the northwest plunge end, SCAT has identified new, south dipping blocks that are transitional to the structurally-higher North October field. The southeast plunge end has been reinterpreted with correct azimuthal trends and new fault-block prospects. These new SCAT results have successfully improved the 3D seismic interpretation by providing a foundation of accurate in-situ structural control in an area of poor-to-fair seismic quality below the Miocene salt package.

Sercombe, W.J.; Smith, G.W. (Amoco Exploration and Production, Houston, TX (United States)); Morse, J.D. (Computational Geology, Boulder, CO (United States))

1996-01-01

115

Small Au/SAM/Au junctions by EB lithography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecule is attractive as an active region of an electron device because of its inherent small thickness (~1-2 nm) between each electrode. We reported processes to fabricate small Au/SAM/Au junctions by using electron beam lithography. As a SAM molecule, we used benzene-1,4-dithiol on Au. To obtain an atomically flat Au electrode without deformation of shape, lower deposition rate, lower sample temperature, and adequate annealing temperature were required. By using a SiO2 pattern as a shadow mask, twice oblique evaporations made small Au/SAM/Au junctions. A minimum feature size of slit of a SiO2 pattern was 160 nm by using electron beam lithography. Si substrate isolated by SiO2 works as a gate electrode of three terminal devices by the Au/SAM/Au junctions. Observed current-voltage characteristics between the drain and the source showed nonlinear characteristics and weak modulation by gate bias was observed. The processes to improve device characteristics are also discussed.

Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Sasao, Kazuki; Azuma, Yasuo; Kaneda, Naotaka; Majima, Yutaka

2003-07-01

116

AU Peace Support Operations: Insufficient for Success (Darfur Case Study).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The history of peacekeeping in Africa dates back to 1956 when the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) was deployed to resolve the Suez Canal crisis. Since then, a number of peacekeeping operations have been mounted in the continent, some succeeding and ...

A. Muganga

2007-01-01

117

Au-B-Tb (098)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Part 1'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Au-B-Th (098)'.

Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

118

Energy Levels of Au195  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy levels of Au195 were studied by observation of conversion electrons following the (p,2n) reaction on Pt196, and by measurement of the energy spectrum and angular distribution of tritons from the Au197(p,t) reaction. Many new energy levels are reported, and several new I-pi assignments are made by combining information from the two experiments.

L. H. Goldman; B. L. Cohen; R. A. Moyer; R. C. Diehl

1970-01-01

119

Winning Their Hearts. Members Speak Out: In performances, How do You Establish Rapport between Your Choir and Young Audiences?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author discusses techniques on how to establish rapport between the choir and young audiences. According to him, one of the choir's most important assets just might be something he calls access-ability. One of Webster's definitions of "access "is" permission, liberty, or ability to enter, approach, or communicate with." When it comes to…

Montague, Matthew G.

2005-01-01

120

Pion Interferometry in AU+AU Collisions at the AGS  

SciTech Connect

Two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations have been studied using the BNL-E866 Forward Spectrometer in 11.6 A {center_dot} GeV/c Au + Au collisions. The data were analyzed using three-dimensional correlation parameterizations to study transverse momentum-dependent source parameters. The freeze-out time and the duration of emission were derived from the source radii parameters.

Lee, J. H.

1999-01-09

121

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Lambda and Lambda¯ hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Balewski; S. Baumgart; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón De La Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. De Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. M. Hoffman; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; I. A. Qattan; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; D. Relyea; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto De Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. Van Der Kolk; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wu; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; V. I. Yurevich; M. Zawisza; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev; J. X. Zuo

2007-01-01

122

Fluid dynamical predictions for Au+Au collisions at AGS  

SciTech Connect

Signatures of collective effects are studied in the Quark Gluon String Model and in the Fluid Dynamical Model for Au [plus] Au collisions at 11.6 A GeV. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of measurables on the QGP formation in the EOS is pointed out, although the max. total amount of pure QGP formed is only 4 fm[sup 3] in these reactions. In QGSM the lifetime and extent of latent energy in strings is studied.

Bravina, L.; Csernai, L.P. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics); Levai, P. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics); Strottmam, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01

123

Fluid dynamical predictions for Au+Au collisions at AGS  

SciTech Connect

Signatures of collective effects are studied in the Quark Gluon String Model and in the Fluid Dynamical Model for Au {plus} Au collisions at 11.6 A GeV. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of measurables on the QGP formation in the EOS is pointed out, although the max. total amount of pure QGP formed is only 4 fm{sup 3} in these reactions. In QGSM the lifetime and extent of latent energy in strings is studied.

Bravina, L.; Csernai, L.P. [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics; Levai, P. [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics]|[Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics; Strottmam, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-02-01

124

The 198Au ?half-life in the metal Au?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the ?--decay of 198Au in a Au metallic environment the half-life was observed to be longer by 0.4±0.7% at room temperature ( T = 293K) and by 4.0±0.7% when the metal was cooled to T = 12K, both compared to the literature value of T 1/2 = 2.6943±0.0008d.

Spillane, T.; Raiola, F.; Zeng, F.; Becker, H. W.; Gialanella, L.; Kettner, K. U.; Kunze, R.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Schürmann, D.; Strieder, F.

2007-02-01

125

Aide au logement et emploi  

Microsoft Academic Search

[fre] Parmi les allocataires du RMI sans conjoint ni enfant, ceux qui bénéficient d’une aide au logement reprennent plus souvent que les autres une activité. Ce résultat peut surprendre. En effet, les bénéficiaires d’une aide disposent d’un revenu global supérieur. De plus, l’aide au logement est fortement redistributive, et les gains retirés de la reprise d’un emploi se trouvent réduits

Cédric Afsa

2001-01-01

126

« Ces lois qui brouillent les races ». Enseignement, ségrégation et égalité en Alabama et au Tennessee (1865-1899)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé:Le présent article examine l'intervention des assemblées législatives de l'Alabama et du Tennessee en matière d'enseignement, de l'Émanicipation jusqu'au début du XXe siècle. L'objectif est d'exposer le processus par lequel les élus de ces États sudistes munirent les remparts de la ségrégation de balistes destructeurs d'égalité des chances. En précisant l'acception du rapport entre la ségrégation et l'égalité, l'article révèle

Nelson Ouellet

2010-01-01

127

Transverse velocity scaling in 197Au+197Au fragmentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Invariant transverse-velocity spectra of intermediate-mass fragments were measured with the 4? multidetector system INDRA for collisions of 197Au on 197Au at incident energies between 40 and 150 MeV per nucleon. Their scaling properties as a function of incident energy and atomic number Z are used to distinguish and characterize the emissions in (i) peripheral collisions at the projectile and target rapidities, and in (ii) central and (iii) peripheral collisions near midrapidity. The importance of dynamical effects is evident in all three cases and their origin is discussed.

?ukasik, J.; Hudan, S.; Lavaud, F.; Turzó, K.; Auger, G.; Bacri, Ch. O.; Begemann-Blaich, M. L.; Bellaize, N.; Bittiger, R.; Bocage, F.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bouriquet, B.; Buchet, Ph.; Charvet, J. L.; Chbihi, A.; Dayras, R.; Doré, D.; Durand, D.; Frankland, J. D.; Galichet, E.; Gourio, D.; Guinet, D.; Hurst, B.; Lautesse, P.; Laville, J. L.; Leduc, C.; Le Fèvre, A.; Legrain, R.; Lopez, O.; Lynen, U.; Müller, W. F.; Nalpas, L.; Orth, H.; Plagnol, E.; Rosato, E.; Saija, A.; Sfienti, C.; Schwarz, C.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; T?b?caru, G.; Tamain, B.; Trautmann, W.; Trzci?ski, A.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Volant, C.; Zwiegli?ski, B.; Botvina, A. S.

2002-12-01

128

Collective expansion in central Au+Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy spectra for intermediate mass fragments produced in central Au+Au collisions at E/A=100MeV indicate a collective expansion at breakup. For the first time, values for this collective expansion energy per nucleon are extracted independently for each charge. Typically, these values are one-third to one-half of the incident kinetic energy per nucleon in the c.m. system, but they decrease with Zf, suggesting that all fragments do not participate equally in the collective expansion.

Hsi, W. C.; Kunde, G. J.; Pochodzalla, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Begemann-Blaich, M. L.; Bowman, D. R.; Charity, R. J.; Cosmo, F.; Ferrero, A.; Gelbke, C. K.; Glasmacher, T.; Hofmann, T.; Imme, G.; Iori, I.; Hubele, J.; Kempter, J.; Kreutz, P.; Kunze, W. D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lisa, M. A.; Lynen, U.; Mang, M.; Moroni, A.; Müller, W. F.; Neumann, M.; Ocker, B.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Raciti, G.; Rosenberger, F.; Sann, H.; Scardaoni, R.; Schüttauf, A.; Schwarz, C.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Sobotka, L. G.; Stuttge, L.; Tomasevic, S.; Trautmann, W.; Tucholski, A.; Williams, C.; Wörner, A.; Zwieglinski, B.

1994-12-01

129

Electronic properties of Au-graphene contacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of Au grains on graphene conduction and doping are investigated. To obtain a clean Au-graphene contact, Au grains are deposited over graphene before any chemical processing. The bulk and the effective contact resistance versus gate voltage demonstrate that Au grains cause p-doping in graphene. The Fermi level shift is in disagreement with published first-principles calculations, with larger than predicted separation between the graphene and the topmost Au layer. The differential resistance versus bias voltage display anomalies at zero bias and at higher voltages, the latter likely caused by inelastic tunneling across the Au-graphene interface.

Malec, C. E.; Davidovi?, D.

2011-07-01

130

Shape coexistence in 187Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

The level structure of odd-proton 187Au was studied using the 172Yb(19F,4n) reaction. Gamma-gamma coincidence, angular distributions and gamma-gamma-time measurements were used to establish the energies, spins, parities, and lifetimes for the states in the decay scheme of 187Au. Both prolate and oblate structures have been established. The prolate bands are built on the pih9\\/2 (alpha=+\\/-(1\\/2) and the pii13\\/2 (alpha=(1\\/2) particle

J. K. Johansson; D. G. Popescu; D. D. Rajnauth; J. C. Waddington; M. P. Carpenter; L. H. Courtney; V. P. Janzen; A. J. Larabee; Z. M. Liu; L. L. Riedinger

1989-01-01

131

Facile syntheses of monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters.  

PubMed

During our effort to synthesize the tetrahedral Au20 cluster, we found a facile synthetic route to prepare monodisperse suspensions of ultrasmall Au clusters AuN (N < 12) using diphosphine ligands. In our monophasic and single-pot synthesis, a Au precursor ClAu(I)PPh3 (Ph = phenyl) and a bidentate phosphine ligand P(Ph)2(CH2)(M)P(Ph)2 are dissolved in an organic solvent. Au(I) is reduced slowly by a borane-tert-butylamine complex to form Au clusters coordinated by the diphosphine ligand. The Au clusters are characterized by both high-resolution mass spectrometry and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the mean cluster size obtained depends on the chain length M of the ligand. In particular, a single monodispersed Au11 cluster is obtained with the P(Ph)2(CH2)3P(Ph)2 ligand, whereas P(Ph)2(CH2)(M)P(Ph)2 ligands with M = 5 and 6 yield Au10 and Au8 clusters. The simplicity of our synthetic method makes it suitable for large-scale production of nearly monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters. It is suggested that diphosphines provide a set of flexible ligands to allow size-controlled synthesis of Au nanoparticles. PMID:17064088

Bertino, Massimo F; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2006-11-01

132

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-08-02

133

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of ? and ?¯ hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The observed global polarization of ? and ?¯ hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |P?,?¯|?0.02, is compared with the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.

2007-08-01

134

Variations des taux d'ecdystéroïdes au cours du développement de Bombyx mori ; rapport entre ces variations et les phases de croissance et de morphogenèse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary During the development ofBombyx mori (monovoltin race) ecdysteroid levels were determined in oocytes, eggs, and haemolymph of larvae, and in the haemolymph of pupae. In haemolymph, the only RIA reactive materials are ecdysone and ecdysterone. In oocytes and eggs, other ecdysteroids are also detected. During larval instars, the ecdysteroid levels are low whereas they are very high during morphogenetic

M. Coulon; B. Calvez; M. De Rggi; J. M. Legay; M. Hirn

1979-01-01

135

Activities Report in Spatial Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Physicochemistry and Theoretical Physics Applied in Space Environments Rapport d'Activite du 1 Janvier 1981 au 1 Avril 1982.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experimental techniques and methods used to measure dynamic frontiers and phenomena are described including the ISOPROBE experiment for the AUREOL/ARCAD 3 satellite and the mutual impedance sonde for diagnosing cold plasmas being prepared for the Swedish ...

1982-01-01

136

Surveillance des comportements face au VIH\\/sida chez les hommes ayant des rapports sexuels avec des hommes — Suisse, 1992–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  \\u000a Surveillance of HIV\\/AIDS — related behaviors among men who have sex with men — Switzerland, 1992–2004\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective:  To update (1992–2004, Switzerland) trends in behaviors and opinions relative to HIV prevention among men who have sex with\\u000a men.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods:  A cross sectional survey, repeated five times since 1992, among readers of the gay press and members of gay associations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results:  An increase was

H. Balthasar; A. Jeannin; F. Dubois-Arber

2007-01-01

137

High resolution photoelectron imaging of Au2(-).  

PubMed

We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au2(-) using a newly built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron images are obtained for the ground state detachment transition of Au2(-) at various photon energies (442.80-670.18 nm) at a resolution of 3 cm(-1) for low energy electrons. Franck-Condon simulations yield the vibrational temperature of Au2(-) and the high resolution data yield accurate spectroscopic constants for the ground states of Au2 and Au2(-). The electron affinity of Au2 is measured to be 1.9393 ± 0.0006 eV. A more precise value for the Au2(-) dissociation energy is also obtained as 1.937 ± 0.005 eV. PMID:23676041

León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-05-14

138

Le tourisme durable au Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depuis plusieurs années, le tourisme joue un rôle très important pour le Vietnam. Grâce à la nouvelle politique des autorités, le tourisme se développe de plus en plus, il représente maintenant 40% de l'économie du pays. Pourtant, le gouvernement n'a pas une stratégie spécifique et réfléchie afin d'engager le Vietnam dans une politique touristique qui convienne véritablement au pays. Il

Dinh Pho Tran

2009-01-01

139

Syndromes myélodysplasiques: Mise au point  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé:  Les syndromes myélodysplasiques sont des affections hématologiques clonales dont la fréquence est croissante au-delà de 60\\u000a ans. Leur physiopathologie est complexe, associant une hyperapoptose des cellules médullaires et une instabilité génétique,\\u000a conduisant à une évolution fréquente vers une leucémie aigüe myéloblastique. (LAM) Plusieurs sous-groupes sont reconnus dans\\u000a les classifications FAB et OMS, et dans la classification pronostique IPSS, caractérisés par

C. Gardin; P. Fenaux

2006-01-01

140

L'astronomie au féminin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Qui détient le record des découvertes de comètes ? Une femme. Qui a permis de comprendre comment est organisée la population des étoiles ? Une femme. Qui a découvert la loi permettant d'arpenter l'Univers, a trouvé des phares dans l'espace, a compris le fonctionnement des forges stellaires et a bouleversé notre vision de l'Univers ? Encore et toujours une femme... Pourtant, quand on doit citer un astronome -- historique -- au hasard, on pense le plus souvent -- des hommes : Ptolémée, Galilée, Copernic ou, plus près de nous par exemple, Hubble. Certes, au cours des siècles, les femmes n'ont guère eu accès aux sciences en général et -- l'astronomie en particulier mais ce n'est pas une raison pour croire en l'absence totale de contributions dues au beau sexe ! C'est ce que dévoile ici l'auteur. Loin de toute forme de féminisme enragé, on suivra le parcours de quelques scientifiques importantes qui ont par hasard en commun une même particularité : leur sexe.

Nazé, Yaël

2006-03-01

141

Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the STAR detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identified charged-particle spectra of pi±, K±, p, and pmacr at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE\\/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón De La Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; C. De Silva; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jin; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; C. Kuhn; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Reed; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; V. Rykov; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; X.-H. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; A. L. Trattner; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; J. X. Zuo

2009-01-01

142

High-pT Tomography of d+Au and Au+Au at SPS, RHIC, and LHC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interplay of nuclear effects on the pT>2 GeV inclusive hadron spectra in d+Au and Au+Au reactions at (sNN)=17, 200, and 5500GeV is compared to leading order perturbative QCD calculations for elementary p+p (p ¯+p) collisions. The competition between nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and jet energy loss due to medium-induced gluon radiation is predicted to lead to a striking energy

Ivan Vitev; Miklos Gyulassy

2002-01-01

143

Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces.  

PubMed

Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by ?-? stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the ?-? stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems. PMID:22127420

Menéndez, Guillermo O; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P; Williams, Federico J; Tognalli, Nicolás G; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A; Salvarezza, Roberto C

2011-11-29

144

Some recent results in Au+Au collisions at AGS  

SciTech Connect

Many interesting results have been obtained for Au + Au reactions at AGS. The basic information about the reaction dynamics comes from the hadronic distribution. and this article reviews the recent progress of these distributions in details. The proton rapidity distribution shows significantly increased stopping compared to lighter systems, implying the formation of a state of high baryon density. Unlike reactions at this energy induced by lighter heavy ions, at low {ital m{sub t} - m{sub 0}} the proton invariant spectra deviate from a single exponential shape and become fear,. while pion spectra are found to rise in this region, with the {pi}{sup -} spectra rising faster than the {pi}{sup +} spectra. The inverse slope parameter increases faster for particles of larger mass as the number of participants in the reaction increases, an indication of increased effect of radial expansion in central collision. Anti-proton Needs have been measured recently, and unfortunately a comparison among current results from different experiments indicates discrepancy.

Chen, Z.

1996-12-31

145

Morphologically Controlled Synthesis of au Nanocrystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, a convenient and efficient procedure to control the morphologies of Au nanocrystals has been reported. The Au nanospheres are generated in polyvinyl-pyrrolidone/ethanol glycol system through a thermal chemical method. However, by adding a small amount of K2CO3 which influences the growth rate of various facets during the crystal growth, Au nanoplates with broad surface plasmon resonance band in 500-800 nm can be obtained.

Su, Fenfang; Pan, Likun; Zheng, Yan; Sun, Zhuo

146

Fe/Au Multilayers: Structure and Magnetoresistance  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the magnetoresistance (MR) in two sets of Fe/Au multilayers, with varying (1) Fe layer thickness, t{sub Fe} = 3-10 nm, and (2) Au layer thickness t{sub Au} = 5-15 nm, grown on Si substrates by sputtering. The multilayer interface structure and magnetic properties were studied by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). The study was undertaken to understand the correlation between structure of these multilayers and their magneto-transport properties.

Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, D. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prajapat, C. L. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

2011-07-15

147

Interplanetary dust between 1 and 5 AU  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of data from the Meteoroid Detection Experiment (MDE) and the Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) aboard Pioneer 10 and 11 have led to contradictory conclusions. While the MDE indicates a significant particle environment in the outer solar system (out to at least 5 AU), the IPP sees no zodiacal light (therefore implying no small particles) past 3.3 AU. These two results are reconciled by noting that the spectral index p (relating particle radius and particle concentration) is not a constant in the solar system but changes from less than 2 near 1 AU to more than 2.5 at 5 AU for particles in the range of 10 microns.

Stanley, J.E. (Virginia, University, Charlottesville, Va.); Singer, S.F. (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.)

1979-02-01

148

You Got It, So When Do You Flaunt It?Building Rapport, Intersectionality, and the Strategic Deployment of Gender in the Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building on existing literature and disparate field experiences, this article forwards a thesis that status group memberships such as gender are not destiny for building access and rapport during fieldwork. Rather, the female researcher is an active participant in how she is perceived and received by informants, capable of negotiating socially constructed scripts that dominate the field setting to her

Julie Mazzei; Erin E. OBrien

2009-01-01

149

Two-phase synthesis of small thiolate-protected au15 and au18 nanoclusters.  

PubMed

A one-pot two-phase method for the direct synthesis of small Au (Au15 and Au18 ) nanoclusters (NCs) of high purity is developed. A mild reductant is combined with two equilibria (i.e., equilibrium partition and aggregation-dissociation equilibrium) to provide a constant reaction environment for the formation of monodisperse small Au NCs. The pH sensitivity of the aggregation-dissociation equilibrium is used to tailor the cluster size. PMID:23447552

Yao, Qiaofeng; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Xun; Yu, Yue; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

2013-02-28

150

The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au  

SciTech Connect

The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K. (UWO)

2004-04-20

151

Anisotropic flow nu2 in Au + Au collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Using the RQMD model, transverse momentum dependence of the anisotropic flow v{sub 2} for {pi}, K, nucleon, {phi}, and {lambda}, are studied for Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Both hydrodynamic hadron-mass hiragracy (hhmh) at low p{sub T} region and particle type dependence (baryon versus meson) at the intermediate p{sub T} region are reproduced with the model calculations although the model underpredicted the overall values of v{sub 2} by a factor of 2-3. As expected, when the rescatterings are turned off, all v{sub 2} becomes zero. The failure of the hadronic model in predicting the absolute values of hadron v{sub 2} clearly demonstrate the need of early dense partonic interaction in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. At the intermediate p{sub T}, the hadron type dependence cold also be explained by the vacume hadronic cross sections within the frame of the model. The measurements of collective motion of hadrons from high-energy nuclear collisions can provide information on the dynamical equation of state information of the system [1, 2, 3]. Specifically, the strange and multi-strange hadron flow results have demonstrated the partonic collectivity [5] and the heavy-flavor flow will test the hypothesis of early thermalization in such collisions [4]. At RHIC, the measurements [6, 7] of elliptic flow v{sub 2} and nuclear modification factor r{sub AA} has lead to the conclusion that hadrons were formed via the coalescence/recombination of massive quarks [8, 9, 10]. This finding is directly related to the key issue in high-energy nuclear collisions such as deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration. In addition, it also touched the important problem of hadronization process in high-energy collisions. Therefore a systematic study with different approaches becomes necessary. In this report, using a hadronic transport model UrQMD(v2.2)/RQMD(v2.4) [11, 12], we study the v{sub 2} of {pi}, K, p, {phi}, and {Lambda} from Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV. Properties of centrality dependent and freeze-out time dependent will be discussed. We try to answer some specific questions like how much the observed features can be reproduced by the hadronic model and why. In this approach, the vacumme cross sections are used for strong interactions. Unlike the treatment in most hydrodynamic calculations, the transition from strong interaction and free-steaming is determined by the local density and gradual. As we will discuss in the paper, the shortcoming of this method is lack of the partonic interactions which is important for the early dynamics in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions [13]. In order to take care of both partonic and hadronic interactions in high-energy nuclear collisions, a combination of hydrodynamic model for early stage (the perfect fluid stage) and hadronic transport model for later stage and freeze-out has been tried [14, 15].

Lu, Y.; Bleicher, M.; Liu, F.; Kiu, Z.; Sorensen, P.; Stocker,H.; Xu, N.; Zhu, X.

2005-08-20

152

Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts.  

PubMed

Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect of Au in promoting TiO(2) photocatalysts. Electron localization efficiency of Au was even higher for Au-promoted Hombikat calcined at 400 degrees C, explained by enlargement of the anatase particle size and the associated, relatively larger fraction of anatase particles in direct contact with Au. PMID:19421529

Carneiro, Joana T; Savenije, Tom J; Mul, Guido

2009-02-23

153

Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages  

SciTech Connect

Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31

154

Electric field induced surface modification of Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the interfacial force microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample.

T. M. Mayer; J. E. Houston; G. E. Franklin; A. A. Erchak; T. A. Michalske

1999-01-01

155

Structure of the thiolated au130 cluster.  

PubMed

The structure of the recently discovered Au130-thiolate and -dithiolate clusters is explored in a combined experiment-theory approach. Rapid electron diffraction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables atomic-resolution imaging of the gold core and the comparison with density functional theory (DFT)-optimized realistic structure models. The results are consistent with a 105-atom truncated-decahedral core protected by 25 short staple motifs, incorporating disulfide bridges linking the dithiolate ligands. The optimized structure also accounts, via time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) simulation, for the distinctive optical absorption spectrum, and rationalizes the special stability underlying the selective formation of the Au130 cluster in high yield. The structure is distinct from, yet shares some features with, each of the known Au102 and Au144/Au146 systems. PMID:24004091

Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Bahena, Daniel; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Conroy, Cecil V; Ahuja, Tarushee; Bach, Stephan B H; Ponce, Arturo; Wang, Gangli; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Whetten, Robert L

2013-09-30

156

MP2 study on adsorption of hydrated Na+ and Au+ cations on the Au(111) surface.  

PubMed

The interactions of Na+ and Au+ cations with an Au(111) surface in the presence and absence of water molecules were investigated using Au18 and Au22 cluster models and the MP2 method with a triple-zeta valence basis set. The interactions between Na+ ions and the Au(111) surface were found to be primarily electrostatic, contrary to the much stronger Au+-Au(111) interactions that were dominated by orbital contributions. The largest CP-corrected MP2 adsorption energies were -156.9 kJ/mol for Na+ and -478.7 kJ/mol for Au+. When hydrated, Na+ prefers to be completely surrounded by water molecules rather than adsorbed to the surface, whereas Au+ remains adsorbed to the surface as water molecules bond with each other and with the Au surface. CP correction did not change the relative adsorption energy trends of Na+ or Au+ ions, but it had an effect on the interaction energy trends of the hydrated cations because of the weak water-surface and water-water interactions. PMID:17181241

Karttunen, Antti J; Pakkanen, Tapani A

2006-12-28

157

Stabilization of Au at edges of bimetallic PdAu nanocrystallites.  

PubMed

Density functional calculations were performed to study the distribution of Au atoms in bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles. A series of Pd(79-n)Au(n) clusters of truncated octahedral shape with different content of Au ranging from n = 1 to 60 was used to model such bimetallic nanosystems. Segregation of Au to the particle surface is found to be thermodynamically favorable. The most stable sites for Au substitution are located at the edges of the PdAu nanoclusters. The stabilization at the edges is rationalized by their higher flexibility for surface relaxation which minimizes the strain induced by larger atomic radius of Au as compared to Pd. This stabilization of Au at the edges indicates the possibility to synthesize PdAu particles with Pd atoms located mainly on the facets, and edges "decorated" by Au atoms. Such nanocrystallites are expected to exhibit peculiar catalytic properties and, being thermodynamically stable, should be prone to retaining their initial shape under catalytic conditions. PMID:20445912

Yudanov, Ilya V; Neyman, Konstantin M

2010-03-26

158

Connected Au network in annealed Ni/Au thin films on p-GaN  

SciTech Connect

We report the formation of a connected Au network in annealed Ni/Au thin films on p-GaN, which was studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. As the Ni was oxidized into NiO upon annealing at 530 deg. C in air, the Au layer was transformed to an interconnected network with an increased thickness. During annealing, Ni atoms diffuse out onto the Au through defects to form NiO, while Au atoms replace the Ni positions. The Au network grows downward until it reaches the p-GaN substrate, and NiO columns fill the space between the Au network.

Lee, S. P.; Jang, H. W.; Noh, D. Y.; Kang, H. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Photon Science Technology, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-11-12

159

Initial state effects on J/psi production at RHIC energy: from d+Au to Au+Au  

SciTech Connect

We present a calculation of the cold nuclear matter effect on inclusive production of J/{Psi} in d+A and A+A collisions in the framework of the gluon saturation/CGC approach. Our model is based on the observation that the leading production mechanism involves odd number of inelastic interactions with the nuclei. Our numerical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data in the case of d+Au collisions. However, in Au+Au collisions the cold nuclear matter effect is not suffcient to describe the data.

Kharzeev, D.; Nardi, M.; Levin, E.; Tuchin, K.

2011-04-01

160

Initial state effects on J/? production at RHIC energy: from d+Au to Au+Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a calculation of the cold nuclear matter effect on inclusive production of J/? in d+A and A+A collisions in the framework of the gluon saturation/CGC approach. Our model is based on the observation that the leading production mechanism involves odd number of inelastic interactions with the nuclei. Our numerical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data in the case of d+Au collisions. However, in Au+Au collisions the cold nuclear matter effect is not suffcient to describe the data.

Nardi, M.; Kharzeev, D.; Levin, E.; Tuchin, K.

2011-04-01

161

Interdiffusion and resistivity of Cu\\/Au, Cu\\/Co, Co\\/Au, and Cu\\/Co\\/Au thin films at 25-550 °C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interdiffusion and resistivity of Cu\\/Au, Cu\\/Co, Co\\/Au, and Cu\\/Co\\/Au thin-film structures were studied, at temperatures ranging from 25 to 550 °C, using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Auger analysis, and four-point probe resistance measurements. Intermetallic phase formation was studied by x-ray diffraction and changes in microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Interdiffusion of Cu and Au in the Cu\\/Au structure

Peter Madakson; Joyce C. Liu

1990-01-01

162

Synthesis of Au microwires by selective oxidation of Au-W thin-film composition spreads  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the stress-induced growth of Au microwires out of a surrounding Au-W matrix by selective oxidation, in view of a possible application as ‘micro-Velcro’. The Au wires are extruded due to the high compressive stress in the tungsten oxide formed by oxidation of elemental W. The samples were fabricated as a thin-film materials library using combinatorial sputter deposition followed by thermal oxidation. Sizes and shapes of the Au microwires were investigated as a function of the W to Au ratio. The coherence length and stress state of the Au microwires were related to their shape and plastic deformation. Depending on the composition of the Au-W precursor, the oxidized samples showed regions with differently shaped Au microwires. The Au48W52 composition yielded wires with the maximum length to diameter ratio due to the high compressive stress in the tungsten oxide matrix. The values of wire length (35 ?m) and diameter (2 ?m) achieved at the Au48W52 composition are suitable for micro-Velcro applications.

Hamann, Sven; Brunken, Hayo; Salomon, Steffen; Meyer, Robert; Savan, Alan; Ludwig, Alfred

2013-02-01

163

Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually.

Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

2013-02-01

164

High-p(T) Tomography of d+Au and Au+Au at SPS, RHIC, and LHC.  

PubMed

The interplay of nuclear effects on the p(T)>2 GeV inclusive hadron spectra in d+Au and Au+Au reactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=17, 200, and 5500 GeV is compared to leading order perturbative QCD calculations for elementary p+p (p+p) collisions. The competition between nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and jet energy loss due to medium-induced gluon radiation is predicted to lead to a striking energy dependence of the nuclear suppression/enhancement pattern in A+A reactions. We show that future d+Au data can be used to disentangle the initial and final state effects. PMID:12484877

Vitev, Ivan; Gyulassy, Miklos

2002-12-05

165

Effect of an Au underlayer on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Au/Co/Au(111) sandwich films  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used spin-wave Brillouin scattering to study perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Au/Co/Au(111) sandwiched films with varying thicknesses of Au-underlayers. By using 5-monolayer (ML)-thick Co films, the transition of spin-wave frequency between out-of-plane and in-plane magnetizations can be observed by varying the in-plane field. They find that the field-dependence of the spin-wave energy is explained by a calculation including both the first-order (second power) and the second-order uniaxial perpendicular anisotropies depending on the Au-underlayer. They observe saturation of the anisotropy at 5 ML of Au-underlayer thickness, which corresponds to the saturation of in-plane lattice expansion of Co on that Au-underlayer. The contribution of interface anisotropy is evaluated from the Co-thickness dependence of the anisotropy observed. They also have observed a field-dependent broadening of the spin-wave Brillouin spectra at a critical field between out-of-plane and in-plane magnetizations, which they attribute to a distribution of the first-order anisotropy.

Murayama, Akihiro; Hyomi, Kyoko; Eickmann, J.; Falco, C.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1998-07-01

166

Accretion Structure in AU Mon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AU Mon is a long period (11.113 days) Algol binary system with a stable accretion disk that can be seen in the double-peaked emission in the H-alpha line. We present new modeling of the accretion structures in this system. We have reexamined archival UV data from the IUE telescope spanning 15 years and we have also analyzed H-alpha data from the KPNO 0.9m Coude Feed Telescope as well as high resolution echelle spectra from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. We use these data to self-consistently model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk using the Shellspec program. The generated synthetic emission profiles are subtracted from the observed spectra for several lines of interest including H-alpha, H-beta, H-gamma, and the Si-IV doublet. The resulting difference profiles allow us to conduct tomography in order to characterize the gas stream and other accretion features of the system. The wide wavelength coverage of our data permits investigation of gas flows occurring at a variety of temperatures.

Atwood-Stone, Corey; Miller, B.; Richards, M.; Budaj, J.

2010-01-01

167

Comparative efficiencies of photothermal destruction of malignant cells using antibody-coated silica@Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three Au-based nanomaterials (silica@Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods) were evaluated for their comparative photothermal efficiencies at killing three types of malignant cells (A549 lung cancer cells, HeLa cervix cancer cells and TCC bladder cancer cells) using a CW NIR laser. Photodestructive efficiency was evaluated as a function of the number of nanoparticles required to destroy the cancer cells under 808 nm laser wavelength at fixed laser power. Of the three nanomaterials, silica@Au nanoshells needed the minimum number of particles to produce effective photodestruction, whereas Au nanorods needed the largest number of particles. Together with the calculated photothermal conversion efficiency, the photothermal efficiency rankings are silica@Au nanoshells > hollow Au/Ag nanospheres > Au nanorods. Additionally, we found that HeLa cells seem to present better heat tolerance than the other two cancer cell lines.

Cheng, Fong-Yu; Chen, Chen-Tai; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

2009-10-01

168

Results from the PHOBOS Experiment on Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

PHOBOS is one of four experiments studying the Au-Au interactions at RHIC. The data collected during the first few weeks after the RHIC start-up, using the initial configuration of the PHOBOS detector, were sufficient to obtain the first physics results for the most central collisions of Au nuclei at the center of mass energy of 56 and 130 AGeV. The

K. Wozniak; B. B. Back; M. D. Baker; D. S. Barton; S. Basilev; R. Baum; R. R. Betts; A. Bia; R. Bindel; W. Bogucki; A. Budzanowski; W. Busza; A. Carroll; M. Ceglia; Y.-H. Chang; A. E. Chen; T. Coghen; C. Conner; W. Czyz; B. Dabrowski; M. P. Decowski; M. Despet; P. Fita; J. Fitch; M. Friedl; R. Ganz; E. Garcia-Solis; N. George; J. Godlewski; C. Gomes; E. Griesmayer; K. Gulbrandsen; S. Gushue; J. Halik; C. Halliwell; P. Haridas; A. Hayes; G. A. Heintzelman; C. Henderson; R. Hollis; R. Ho; B. Holzman; E. Johnson; J. Kane; J. Katzy; W. Kita; J. Kotu; H. Kraner; W. Kucewicz; P. Kulinich; M. Lemler; J. Ligocki; W. T. Lin; S. Manly; D. McLeod; J. Micha; A. Mignerey; J. Mulmenstadt; M. Neal; R. Nouicer; A. Olszewski; R. Pak; M. Patel; H. Pernegger; M. Plesko; C. Reed; L. P. Remsberg; M. Reuter; C. Roland; G. Roland; D. Ross; L. Rosenberg; J. Ryan; A. Sanzgiri; P. Sarin; P. Sawicki; J. Scaduto; J. Shea; J. Sinacore; W. Skulski; S. G. Steadman; G. S. F. Stephans; P. Steinberg; A. Straczek; M. Stodulski; M. Strek; Z. Stopa; A. Sukhanov; K. Surowiecka; J.-L. Tang; R. Teng; A. Trzupek; C. Vale; G. J. van Nieuwenhuizen; R. Verdier; B. Wadsworth; F. L. H. Wolfs; B. Wosiek; A. H. Wuosmaa; B. Wys; K. Zalewski

2001-01-01

169

Initial Eccentricity in Deformed 197Au+197Au and 238U+238U Collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte-Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the non-sphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced due to deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi; Xu, Nu

2010-07-07

170

Characterization and Electrical Properties of Individual Au–NiO–Au Heterojunction Nanowires  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-definition metal-oxide-metal (MOM) heterojunction nanowires in the Au-NiO-Au system have been synthesized using a template-based method. These nanowires are 70 nm in diameter and in total length, with a 100 to 300 nm wide NiO segment sandwiched between the Au nanowires axially. Detailed electron-microscopy characterization studies of these nanowires show that the oxide segment is primarily cubic NiO and nanocrystalline,

Jason S. Tresback; Alexander L. Vasiliev; Nitin P. Padture; Si-Young Park; Paul R. Berger

2007-01-01

171

Structural simulation of super-cooled liquid Au–Cu, Au–Ag alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure and thermodynamics of liquid Au–Cu and Au–Ag alloys have been simulated using molecular dynamics method based upon the EAM interatomic potential to reveal influence of the mismatch in atomic size on the glass-forming ability. Under the cooling rate in the range of 4×1012 to 1×1011 K\\/s, the system undergoes the liquid, super-cooled liquid and solid state. Liquid Au and

Li Wang; Yanning Zhang; Hua Yang; Ying Chen

2003-01-01

172

22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Sponsors shall provide the au pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior...shall receive not less than twenty-four hours of child development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be...

2013-04-01

173

XUV photoabsorption of laser generated Au vapour  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photoabsorption by atomic Au in the 5p and 4f excitation region has been studied using the dual laser plasma (DLP) technique. The observed features are dominated by two prominent Fano-type resonance lines which can be attributed to 5p to 5d and 4f to 5d transitions of valence excited 5d96s2(2D52\\/) Au followed by autoionization. The experimental results are compared to spectra

U. Koble; J. T. Costello; J. P. Mosnier; E. T. Kennedy; M. Martins

1995-01-01

174

Interplanetary magnetic clouds at 1 AU  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic clouds are defined as regions;with a radial dimension roughly-equal0.25 AU (at 1 AU) in which the magnetic field strength is high and the magnetic field direction changes appreciably by means of rotation of one component of B> nearly parallel to a plane. The magnetic field geometry in such a magnetic cloud is consistent with that of a magnetic loop,

L. W. Klein; L. F. Burlaga

1982-01-01

175

Dislocation damping in Cu3Au alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dislocation damping has been measured for Cu3Au alloys with a variety of long-range-order parameters over the temperature range room temperature to 423 K. It is found that the Cu and Au atoms on the incorrect sublattices can pin down the dislocation with an interaction energy of about -0·01 eV. A phenomenological model for the highly ordered alloy is presented in

K. Miura; K. Shimano; T. Yokoyama

1981-01-01

176

Advances in the catalysis of Au nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gold catalysts have recently been attracting rapidly growing interests due to their potential applicabilities to many reactions of both industrial and environmental importance. This article reviews the latest advances in the catalysis research on Au. For low-temperature CO oxidation mechanistic arguments are summarized, focusing on Au\\/TiO2 together with the effect of preparation conditions and pretreatments. The quantum size effect is

Masatake Haruta; Masakazu Daté

2001-01-01

177

Solvation of Au+ versus Au0 in aqueous solution: electronic structure governs solvation shell patterns.  

PubMed

The solvation behavior of Au(+) and Au(0) in liquid water under ambient conditions has been studied using ab initio molecular dynamics. The Au(+) aqua ion forms a rigid and well-defined quasi-linear structure in the sense of ligand field theory, where two water molecules are tightly bound to the gold cation through oxygen atoms ("cationic solvation"). Yet, transient charge accumulation in the direction perpendicular to the O-Au(+)-O linear core structure leads occasionally to the formation of a short Au(+)-H contact within the distance range of the first solvation shell, which is typical of "anionic solvation". Upon adding an electron to Au(+), the resulting solvation pattern of Au(0)(aq) has nothing in common with that of Au(+)(aq). Quite surprisingly we discover that the first solvation shell of Au(0)(aq) consists of a single water molecule and features both "anionic" and "cationic" solvation patterns depending on fluctuation and polarization effects. Thus, charging/decharging of metals dissolved in water, M(0)? M(+) + e(-), as occurring e.g. during elementary electrochemical steps, is expected to change dramatically their solvation behavior in the sense of re-solvation processes. PMID:22116389

Camellone, Matteo Farnesi; Marx, Dominik

2011-11-24

178

The microstructure of eutectic Au-Sn solder bumps on Cu\\/electroless Ni\\/Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we studied the initial microstructure and microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder bumps on Cu\\/electroless\\u000a Ni\\/Au. The solder bumps were 150–160 m in diameter and 45–50 m tall, reflowed on Cu\\/electroless Ni\\/Au, and then aged at 200°C\\u000a for up to 365 days. In addition, Au-Ni-Sn-alloys were made and analyzed to help identify the phases that appear at

H. G. Song; J. P. Ahn

2001-01-01

179

Sclerometric study of galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mechanisms of wear in galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings have been studied using the methods of sclerometry and atomic force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the scratch test at a small load can be used for a comparative analysis of the resistance of metal coatings to abrasive wear. It is established that a developed surface relief related to the formation of grain agglomerates provides for a higher wear resistance of AuCo coatings as compared to that of smooth AuNi films, which is explained by dissipation of the elastic energy of the contact interaction of the sclerometric indenter with the sample surface.

Shugurov, A. R.; Panin, A. V.; Shesterikov, E. V.

2011-03-01

180

Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4%) Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order ?0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass ?30 GeV/c2.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, N. S.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Szeliga, B.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.

2007-07-01

181

Bipolar resistive switching of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au heterostructure nanowires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arrays of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm were characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy, which was used to probe the electrical behavior of single nanowires still included in the array. A bipolar switching of the single Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires is demonstrated and is attributed to the choice of an asymmetric couple of electrode materials and, possibly, to a non-uniform Ni oxidation profile inside the NiOx segments. An analysis of the conduction mechanism in a single nanowire is presented to further support this conclusion.

Brivio, S.; Perego, D.; Tallarida, G.; Bestetti, M.; Franz, S.; Spiga, S.

2013-10-01

182

The Effect of Expressive and Instrumental Touch on The Behavior States of Older Adults with Late-Stage Dementia of The Alzheimer's Type and Music Therapist's Perceived Rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy interventions utilizing two types of touch—expressive touch and instrumental touch, on the behavior states of older adults who have late-stage dementia of the Alzheimer’s type. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the music therapist’s perceived rapport when expressive and instrumental touches were used in

Melita Jean Belgrave

2006-01-01

183

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+ Au and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta pT of charged particles associated with intermediate- to high-pT trigger particles (2.5Au and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher pT≳2.5 GeV\\/c, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+ Au and Au + Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet

M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. de Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L.-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; M. J. Horner; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. Levine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2010-01-01

184

Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR  

SciTech Connect

Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freezeout temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d + Au, and peripheral Au + Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au + Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au + Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

STAR Coll

2009-04-11

185

Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the STAR detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identified charged-particle spectra of ?±, K±, p, and pmacr at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness, and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged-particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm3 for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au+Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters because of the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freeze-out temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au+Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

2009-03-01

186

Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the STAR detector  

SciTech Connect

Identified charged-particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness, and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged-particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sup 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au+Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters because of the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freeze-out temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au+Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India)] (and others)

2009-03-15

187

On the structure of the Au18(SR)14 cluster.  

PubMed

First principles calculations are used for a systematic search of the lowest-energy (most-stable) structure of the recently synthesized Au(18)(SR)(14) cluster. A comparison of the calculated optical absorption and electronic circular dichroism spectra, which are highly sensitive to the cluster structure and chirality, with the experimental spectra of the glutathione-protected gold cluster, Au(18)(SG)(14), is used to discriminate between low-energy isomers of the Au(18)(SR)(14) (R = CH(3)) cluster. From the good agreement between calculated and measured spectra, it is predicted that the structure of the Au(18)(SR)(14) cluster consists of a prolate Au(8) core covered with two dimer (SR-Au-SR-Au-SR) and two trimer (SR-Au-SR-Au-SR-Au-SR) motifs. These results provide additional evidence on the existence of longer trimer motifs as protecting units of small thiolated gold clusters. PMID:22323014

Tlahuice, Alfredo; Garzón, Ignacio L

2012-02-09

188

phi meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the STAR measurement of phi meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the phi spectra and yields are obtained at mid-rapidity for five centrality bins in Au + Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p + p collisions. It is found that the phi

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bhardwaj; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. C. D. Sanchez; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. D. Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; M. Guedon; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Y. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. K. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Y. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; E. Meissner; Y. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; M. J. Mora-Corral; D. A. Morozov; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; A. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rai; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. J. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; R. N. Singaraju; F. Simon; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; R. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. S. de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; A. M. VanderMolen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; B. Yuting; Y. V. Zanevski; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. P. Zhaomin; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; J. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

189

Transient field fluctuations effects in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fluctuations of strong color electric fields (SCF) on the baryon production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200A GeV is studied in the framework of the HIJING/BB v2.0 model. It is shown that the dynamics of the production process deviates considerably from calculations based on Schwinger-like estimates for homogeneous and constant color fields. An increase of the string tension from {kappa}{sub 0}=1 GeV/fm, to in medium mean values of 1.5 to 2.0 GeV/fm and 2.0 to 3.0 GeV/fm for d+Au and Au+Au, respectively, results in a consistent description of the observed nuclear modification factors R{sub dAu} and R{sub AuAu} [that relates (d)Au+Au and p+p collisions], and point to the relevance of fluctuations of transient color fields. The differences between nuclear modification factors R{sub AuAu} and R{sub CP} (that relates central and peripheral collisions) are also discussed. The measurement of multistrange (anti)hyperons ({xi},{omega}) yields would provide a crucial test of the importance of SCF fluctuations at RHIC energies.

Topor Pop, V.; Barrette, J.; Gale, C.; Jeon, S. [McGill University, Montreal, Canada, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Gyulassy, M. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bellwied, R. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

2007-01-15

190

Interfacial Reactions Between Sn-Zn Alloys and Au Substrate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interfacial reactions of Sn- xZn/Au couples aged at 160°C were investigated. When the Zn content was 3 wt.%, binary Au-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and ternary Au-Sn-Zn phase were formed at the interface. Both binary Au-Sn and Au-Zn and ternary Au-Sn-Zn IMCs were formed at the Sn-5Zn/Au interface. When the Zn content was 7 wt.%, Sn- xZn/Au couples were completely transformed into an Au-Zn system. Based on ln d = nln t + ln k, where d is IMC thickness, t is aging time, and n is the growth exponent, the n value of Sn- xZn/Au ( x < 5 wt.%) couples was between 0.25 and 0.33. Sn- xZn/Au ( x = 7 wt.% to 15 wt.%) couples also had similar results when the aging times were 144 h. The n value of the Sn-50Zn/Au couple was 0.5, and the reaction mechanism was diffusion controlled. The n value for the Sn-90Zn/Au couple was 0.19. The results indicated that adding Zn to Sn-Zn alloys would change the reaction system from the Au-Sn system into the Au-Zn system.

Yen, Yee-wen; Lin, Ming-chih; Lin, Cheng-kuan; Chen, Wan-ching

2012-12-01

191

LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the crystal structure and electronic bands of LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111). By scanning-tunneling microscopy we study the formation of different alloy phases as a function of growth temperature and lanthanide coverage. We determine the specific growth conditions to achieve monolayers and bilayers of LaAu2 and CeAu2 with high crystalline quality. Due to lattice mismatch with the underlying Au substrate, both LaAu2 and CeAu2 exhibit long-range moiré patterns, which can serve as templates for further nanostructure growth. By angle-resolved photoemission we map the two-dimensional band structure of these surface alloys, discussing the nature of the different spectral features in the light of first-principles calculations.

Ormaza, M.; Fernández, L.; Lafuente, S.; Corso, M.; Schiller, F.; Xu, B.; Diakhate, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Ortega, J. E.

2013-09-01

192

High pT hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

High pT hadrons produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC probe nuclear matter at extreme conditions of high energy density. Experimental measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=130, 200 GeV establish the existence of strong medium effects on hadron production well into the perturbative regime.

Filimonov, K.

2002-12-20

193

Low-Q2 Partons in p-p and Au-Au Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We describe correlations of low-Q2 parton fragments on transverse rapidity yt and angles ({eta},{phi}) from p-p and Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s) = 130 and 200 AGeV. Evolution of correlations on yt from p-p to more-central Au-Au collisions shows evidence for parton dissipation. Cuts on yt isolate angular correlations on ({eta},{phi}) for low-Q2 partons which reveal a large asymmetry about the jet thrust axis in p-p collisions favoring the azimuth direction. Evolution of angular correlations with increasing Au-Au centrality reveals a rotation of the asymmetry to favor pseudorapidity. Angular correlations of transverse momentum pt in Au-Au collisions access temperature/velocity structure resulting from low-Q2 parton scattering pt autocorrelations on ({eta},{phi}), obtained from the scale dependence of fluctuations, reveal a complex parton dissipation process in heavy ion collisions which includes the possibility of collective bulk-medium recoil in response to parton stopping.

Trainor, Thomas A. [CENPA 354290, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2006-04-11

194

EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.  

SciTech Connect

Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

TRAINOR,T.A.; (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

2004-03-15

195

Temperature Measurements for ^197Au+^197Au and ^129Xe+^natCu Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Impact parameter selected temperatures are measured with excited state populations method and compared with isotope ratios method for the ^197Au+^197Au reaction at 35 MeV/A and ^129Xe+^natCu reaction at 30 MeV/A with the high resolution Multics array and Miniball detectors. The temperatures for both systems show a slightly impact parameter dependence.

Huang, M. J.; Lynch, W. G.; Xi, H.; Tsang, M. B.; Dinius, J. D.; Gaff, S. J.; Gelbke, C. K.; Glasmacher, T.; Kunde, G. J.; Martin, L.; Montoya, C. P.; Colonna, N.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, M. L.; Mastinu, P. F.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Petruzzelli, F.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Milazzo, P. M.; Rui, R.; Vannini, G.; Ferrero, A.

1996-10-01

196

The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

2013-04-01

197

Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts  

SciTech Connect

One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy; Su, Dangshen [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Wang, Di [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2010-01-01

198

Microstructure of Precipitated Au Nanoclusters in TiO  

SciTech Connect

Gold nanoclusters dispersed in single crystal TiO2 (110) have been formed by 2 MeV Au2+ implantation to an ion fluence of 11017 cm-2 at 300 K and 975 K followed by annealing at 1275 K for 10 hours. The morphological features, size, crystallographic orientation of the Au nanoclusters with respect to the TiO2 matrix, and the interface structure between the Au nanoclusters and TiO2 have been investigated using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), electron diffractions, and high angle annular dark-filed (HAADF) imaging in an aberration corrected dedicated scanning TEM (STEM). STEM-HAADF image directly reveals that Au atoms are in the substitutional Ti atomic columns in the TiO2 lattice prior to nucleation of Au lattice. Atomic structural model of interface between Au and TiO2 was established based on HRTEM and image simulations. The precipitated Au clusters show typical (111) twins. Au clusters are facetted along Au{l_brace}112{r_brace}, Au{l_brace}111{r_brace}, and Au{l_brace}22 0{r_brace} planes. Two types of orientation relationship can be identified, Au {l_angle}110{r_angle}//TiO2[001] and Au{l_brace}111{r_brace}//TiO2(200), and Au {l_angle}110{r_angle}//TiO2[001] and Au{l_brace}111{r_brace}//TiO2(110). These orientation relationships as well as the {l_brace}111{r_brace} twining feature in Au clusters are similarly observed for Au clusters grown on stoichiometric TiO2(110) free surface, indicating that the presently established orientation corresponds to the lowest interfacial energy for Au contacted with TiO2. This is essential for understanding the catalytic properties of Au supported on TiO2.

Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Yanwen; Shutthanandan, V; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Duscher, Gerd

2004-06-15

199

Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

2002-12-09

200

Interaction of HNCO with Au(111) surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface chemistry of isocyanic acid, HNCO, and its dissociation product, NCO, was studied on clean, O-dosed and Ar ion bombarded Au(111) surfaces. The techniques used are high resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The structure of Ar ion etched surface is explored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). HNCO adsorbs molecularly on Au(111) surface at 100 K yielding strong losses at 1390, 2270 and 3230 cm? 1. The weakly adsorbed HNCO desorbs in two peaks characterized by Tp = 130 and 145 K. The dissociation of the chemisorbed HNCO occurs at 150 K to give NCO species characterized by a vibration at 2185 cm? 1. The dissociation process is facilitated by the presence of preadsorbed O and by defect sites on Au(111) produced by Ar ion bombardment. In the latter case the loss feature of NCO appeared at 2130 cm? 1. Isocyanate on Au(111) surface was found to be more stable than on the single crystal surfaces of Pt-group metals. Results are compared with those obtained on supported Au catalysts.

Farkas, A. P.; Berkó, A.; Solymosi, F.

2012-08-01

201

Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (?±, K±, p, p¯) produced in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to pT=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to pT=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate pT region, between 2 and 5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon-to-meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The pT-dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ruži?ka, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slune?ka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.

2013-08-01

202

197Au Mössbauer spectroscopic study on the three-dimensional halogen bridged mixed valence complexes M2Au2X6 (M = K, Rb; X = Br, I)  

Microsoft Academic Search

M2Au2X6 (M = K, Rb; X = Br, I) are halogen bridged three-dimensional Au mixed valence complexes. We investigated the Au valence states in these complexes by means of 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy, and discussed the charge transfer interaction between the AuI and AuIII ions.

N. Kojima; A. Tanaka; H. Sakai; Yu. Maeda

1993-01-01

203

Molecular dynamics study of interfacial bonding strength of self-assembled monolayer-coated Au-epoxy and Au-Au systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interfacial adhesion between metals and organic polymers plays a crucial role in the mechanical properties and reliability performance of multiplayer thin film structures. To improve their interfacial bonding strength and so the reliability, the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) method is considered as an effective means. The present study is devoted to studying the effects of SAM coating on the interfacial bonding strength of the Au-epoxy and the Au-Au bonding structures through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Three different types of functionalized alkanethiol SAMs (SH(CH 2) nX, X = CH 3, OH, NH 2) chemisorbed onto two different Au crystal planes, i.e., (1 0 0) and (1 1 1), are considered. The study starts from the characterization of the interfacial bonding strength of both the SAM-coated Au-epoxy and Au-Au systems, followed by the investigation of the dependence of the interfacial bonding strength on the chain lengths and tail groups of the n-alkanethiolates. A comparative study of the effects of the crystal orientation of Au substrate on the bonding strength is reported, and the elastic moduli of these SAMs through uniaxial tensile simulation are also examined. The calculated results are compared with the published experimental data, and also with each other to identify the optimal SAM candidate. Results show that the interfacial bonding strength of the SAM-coated Au-epoxy and Au-Au systems exhibits a strong dependency on the crystal orientation of Au substrate and also on the chain length of the monolayer where it tends to increase with an increasing SAM chain length. In specific, the interfacial bonding strength of the SH(CH 2) nCH 3 SAM-coated Au-Au joint would reach a maximal value at the chain length n = 8 while that of the SAM/epoxy interface in the SH(CH 2) nCH 3 SAM-coated Au-epoxy system attains a minimal value at n = 4 and becomes the maximum at n = 10, regardless of the crystal orientation of the Au substrates. Besides, the Au substrate with (1 1 1) crystal orientation would outperform the Au(1 0 0) substrate in the SAM/epoxy interfacial bonding strength of the SAM-coated Au-epoxy system while there is a totally opposite result for that of the SAM-coated Au-Au joint.

Cheng, Hsien-Chie; Hsu, Yu-Chen; Wu, Chun-Hung; Chen, Wen-Hwa

2011-08-01

204

Photochemically and electrochemically triggered Au nanoparticles "sponges".  

PubMed

Stimuli-triggered wettability of surfaces and controlled uptake and release of substrates by "smart" materials are essential for drug delivery and microfluidic control. A composite "sponge" consisting of bis-aniline-bridged Au nanoparticles (NPs), functionalized with photoisomerizable nitrospiropyran/nitromerocyanine that includes selective imprinted molecular recognition sites for N,N'-bis(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (PVS) was electropolymerized on a Au electrode. The system is triggered by photonic and/or electrical signals to yield four different states exhibiting variable binding/release capacities for PVS and controlled wettability of the surface. The electrical/optical uptake and release of PVS to and from the Au NPs "sponge", respectively, is followed by CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, acting as an auxiliary photonic label. PMID:21480594

Balogh, Dora; Tel-Vered, Ran; Freeman, Ronit; Willner, Itamar

2011-04-11

205

Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

2009-05-01

206

Au111-based nanotemplates by gd alloying.  

PubMed

A new class of nanostructured templates is obtained by submitting Au111 films to high-temperature vapor deposition of Gd in ultrahigh vacuum. In a low coverage regime, Gd atoms are embedded in the topmost Au layer, inducing a structural transformation of the herringbone reconstruction to create a network of trigons. At higher dose, the reactive deposition of Gd leads to the formation of an atomically perfect GdAu2 surface compound characterized by a long-range periodic Moire pattern. Both the trigon and Moire lattices are highly ordered nanostructures, which turned out to be robust templates to grow metal nanodots. As a test example, Co was deposited at room temperature, forming uniform dots that faithfully arrange by following the underlying trigons or Moire periodicity. For the latter, one can achieve nanodot arrays that exhibit record areal density. PMID:20146459

Corso, Martina; Fernández, Laura; Schiller, Frederik; Ortega, José Enrique

2010-03-23

207

First-principles study of the adsorption of Au atoms and Au2 and Au4 clusters on FeO/Pt(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adsorption of Au atoms and Au2 and Au4 clusters on Pt(111)-supported bilayer FeO film were studied using first-principles density functional theory. For atom adsorption on the FeO/Pt(111) coincidence lattice, two types of adsorption were found, in agreement with previous studies. One is that the Au atom binds with one Fe cation lifted from underneath to the top of the oxygen layer (flipped adsorption), and the other is that the Au atom adsorbs directly on the oxygen layer (direct adsorption). Flipped adsorption was found to be energetically most favored in all domains of the Moiré superstructure, while direct adsorption was either metastable or unstable. The charge of the Au adatom is negative for the flipped adsorption and positive for the direct adsorption. For the Au2 and Au4 clusters, the global most stable adsorption configurations on the FeO/Pt(111) were explored, and the results indicated that one-dimensional (dimer) or two-dimensional (Au4) upright configurations of direct adsorption were energetically preferred over the flat or three-dimensional ones throughout the Moiré superstructure. Moreover, it was found that the configurations of Au2 dimers and Au4 clusters on FeO/Pt(111) is tightly related to the interfacial interaction including two effects: the direction-dependent reactivity of a planar Au cluster and the interfacial electrostatic interaction between the Au clusters and the FeO/Pt(111) support. The role of relativistic effects in the configuration of Au clusters and the interaction with FeO/Pt(111) were illustrated. The evolution of small Au cluster configuration on FeO/Pt(111) was discussed.

Ouyang, Runhai; Li, Wei-Xue

2011-10-01

208

Single nucleon transfer reactions near Coulomb barrier on 197 Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Single neutron transfer reactions on 197Au induced by 12C and 16O at near Coulomb barrier energies have been studied using radiochemical and off-line gamma-ray spectrometric techniques. High spin yield fraction (HSF = ?m\\/(?m+?g)) for 196m,gAu and formation cross section ratio (?198\\/?196) of 198Au and 196Au have been determined for both 197Au+12C and 197Au+16O reactions at different excitation energies near the

T. Datta; S. P. Dange; H. Naik

2005-01-01

209

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+ Au and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta pT of charged particles associated with intermediate- to high-pT trigger particles (2.5Au and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher pT?2.5 GeV/c, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+ Au and Au + Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle pT<2 GeV/c, a large enhancement of the near- (??~0) and away-side (??~?) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au + Au collisions compared to d+ Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at ??~? in central Au + Au collisions.

Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.

2010-08-01

210

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+ Au and Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

SciTech Connect

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta p{sub T} of charged particles associated with intermediate- to high-p{sub T} trigger particles (2.5Au and Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher p{sub T} > or approx. 2.5 GeV/c, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+ Au and Au + Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle p{sub T}<2 GeV/c, a large enhancement of the near- ({Delta}{phi}{approx}0) and away-side ({Delta}{phi}{approx}{pi}) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au + Au collisions compared to d+ Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at {Delta}{phi}{approx}{pi} in central Au + Au collisions.

Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Horner, M. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-08-15

211

Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: A first principles study  

SciTech Connect

Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}Al and Au{sub 5}Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with Al, Au, AuAl, Au{sub 3}Al, and Au{sub 20}Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site.

Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2009-06-21

212

Production of ? mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ? meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ? production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of ?0 and ? in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.

2011-10-01

213

Facile Syntheses of Monodisperse Ultra-Small Au Clusters  

SciTech Connect

During our effort to synthesize the tetrahedral Au20 cluster, we found a facile synthetic route to prepare monodisperse suspensions of ultra-small Au clusters AuN (N<12) using diphosphine ligands. In our monophasic and single-pot synthesis, a Au precursor ClAu(I)PPh3 and a bidentate phosphine ligand P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 (Ph = phenyl) are dissolved in an organic solvent. Au(I) is reduced slowly by a borane-tert-butylamine complex to form Au clusters coordinated by the diphosphine ligand. The Au clusters are characterized by both high resolution mass spectrometry and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the mean cluster size obtained depends on the chain length M of the ligand. In particular, a single monodispersed Au11 cluster is obtained with the P(Ph)2(CH2)3P(Ph)2 ligand, whereas P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 ligands with M = 5 and 6 yield Au10 and Au8 clusters. The simplicity of our synthetic method makes it suitable for large-scale production of nearly monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters. It is suggested that diphosphines provide a set of flexible ligands to allow size-controlled synthesis of Au nanoparticles.

Bertino, Massimo F.; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Lai S.

2006-11-02

214

Infra-red spectroscopy of size selected Au25, Au38 and Au144 ligand protected gold clusters.  

PubMed

Through the discovery of ligand protected metal clusters with cores of a precise number of atoms, the exploration of the third dimension of the periodic table for fundamental research and also for applications has become less remote. So far, the exact number of metal atoms in the core has been determined unambiguously only using mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Gold clusters protected by 2-phenylethanethiol ligands, for instance, show distinct magic numbers that correspond to either electronic or geometric shell closings. For efficient control of their synthesis simple-to-use in situ spectroscopies are required. In the specific case of Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 clusters (1) we found a distinct shift of the aromatic C-H stretching band from 3030-3100 cm(-1) to below 3000 cm(-1) whose origin is discussed as an electronic interaction of the aromatic rings of the ligands with each other or with the gold core. This IR-feature is specific for Au25; the spectra of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 (2) and Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 (3) clusters do not show this distinct shift and their IR-spectra in the C-H stretching regime are similar to that of the bare ligand. This significant change in the IR spectrum of Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 is not only of fundamental interest but also allows for in situ determination of the purity and monodispersity of the sample using FTIR spectroscopy during synthesis. PMID:23788003

Farrag, Mostafa; Tschurl, Martin; Dass, Amala; Heiz, Ulrich

2013-08-14

215

Probing the buried C60/Au(111) interface with atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To characterize the C60/Au(111) interface, we send Au atoms ``diving'' through the C60 layer and observe their behavior at the interface. Our observations show that the interfacial diffusion of gold atoms and the nucleation of small Au islands at the interface are strongly dependent on the local C60-Au(111) bonding which varies from one domain to another. The contrast-disordered domain consisting of a large fraction of molecules bonded to Au vacancies has a special structure at the interface allowing Au atoms to be inserted beneath the bright-looking molecules while the dim molecules present a much stronger resistance to the diffusing Au atoms. This leads to the formation of isolated Au islands with discrete sizes, with the smallest island just about 1 nm across.

Tang, Lin; Xie, Yangchun; Guo, Quanmin

2012-06-01

216

Energy levels for Au-170 (Gold-170)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume C `Tables of Excitations of Proton- and Neutron-rich Unstable Nuclei' of Volume 19 `Nuclear States from Charged Particle Reactions' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides energy levels for atomic nuclei of the isotope Au-170 (gold, atomic number Z = 79, mass number A = 170).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

217

Specific Heat of Au4v.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The specific heat of Au4V has been measured from 1.5 to 60 degrees K. An anomaly was observed near 50 degrees K. The electronic specific heat and the Debye temperature were calculated, and the magnetic entropy was crudely estimated. (Author)

H. L. Luo L. Creveling J. P. Maita

1968-01-01

218

Les politiques monétaires au sein du SME  

Microsoft Academic Search

[fre] Les politiques monétaires au sein du SME, . par Patrick Jacq, Eric Jondeau, Frank Sédillot. . . Les contraintes imposées par le SME et les perspectives de l 'union européenne ont permis une convergence spectaculaire des taux d'intérêt de l'ensemble des pays membres. Cette convergence a été en grande partie asymétrique, l'Allemagne jouant pour la plupart des pays le

Frank Sédillot; Eric Jondeau; Patrick Jacq

1993-01-01

219

Shape Coexistence in sup 185 Au.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The beta -decay of sup 185 Hg -> sup 185 Au has been studied following on-line mass separation at UNISOR/HHIRF. Transitions with strong E0 components were observed feeding the h/sub 9/2/ and h/sub 11/2/ bands and are interpreted as resulting from the coup...

E. F. Zganjar C. D. Papanicolopoulos J. L. Wood R. A. Braga R. W. Fink

1985-01-01

220

Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?  

SciTech Connect

The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

2008-09-04

221

Angle-resolved photoemission from Au(112)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The angular variations of the spectral positions of peaks in angle-resolved photoemission spectra for Au(112) due to bulk interband transitions have been calculated using a band model for gold which agrees with other optical data. The calculations agree with the experimental results published recently by Heimann et al.

Christensen, N. Egede

1981-08-01

222

Adsorption of 5-halouracils on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The immobilization of 5-halouracils on Au(111) has been studied by soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Multilayer and monolayer films of 5-chlorouracil were deposited on the Au(111) surface by evaporation in vacuum while films of 5-bromouracil were absorbed in two modes: from the gas phase under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and from solution. The photoemission spectra of C, N and O 1s, Br 3d and Cl 2p as well as the absorption spectra at the N and O K-edges were measured for monolayers of 5-halouracil films and the nature of the bonding with the Au(111) surface has been determined. From the angular dependence of the NEXAFS spectra at the O and K-edges, we conclude that these 5-halouracils are lying nearly parallel to the Au(111) surface. Distinct chemical states and surface adsorption geometry of the 5-BrU molecules for monolayer coverage prepared in two different ways have been found.

Plekan, O.; Feyer, V.; Tsud, N.; Vondrá?ek, M.; Cháb, V.; Matolín, V.; Prince, K. C.

2012-02-01

223

Selective laser melting (SLM) of gold (Au)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Different metals have been processed using laser-based solid freeform fabrication (SFF) processes but very little work has been published on the selective laser melting (SLM) of gold (Au). The purpose of this paper is to check the properties of gold powder and identify suitable processing parameters for SLM of 24 carat gold powder. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A full factorial

Mushtaq Khan; Phill Dickens

2012-01-01

224

An octachlorostyrene electrochemical immunosensor: double amplification strategies with immobilization of nano-Au and Au nanoparticle labels.  

PubMed

Anti-octachlorostyrene (OCS) antibody was derived from an immune rabbit preparation. An OCS immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing the anti-OCS antibody on a glassy carbon electrode coated with chitosan and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, ?5 nm, represented as AuNP05). Large-sized AuNPs (?90 nm, represented as AuNP90) were used as the electrochemical label. The AuNP90-labeled OCS competes with the target OCS for the limited antibody molecules immobilized on the sensor surface. The amount of bound AuNP90 is inversely proportional to the OCS concentration. OCS was quantified based on the bound AuNP90 which was detected by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), i.e. the AuNP90 was firstly electrooxidized in 0.1 M HCl to produce AuCl4(-), then the reduction current of AuCl4(-) was detected. The immobilized AuNP05 increases the loading of anti-OCS antibody. Both the immobilized AuNP05 and the label AuNP90 amplify the sensor response. The proposed electrochemical immunosensor exhibits high selectivity, good storage stability, and high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 500 nM (R(2) = 0.971) and a detection limit of 0.4 nM. PMID:24098882

Li, Jiezhen; Chen, Lan; Huang, Chen'an; Zhou, Liping; Yuan, Lijuan; Shi, Lei; Li, Dan; Cai, Qingyun

2013-10-15

225

High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-06-01

226

Optical studies on thermally surface plasmon tuned Au, Ag and Au:Ag nanocomposite polymer films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au, Ag and Au:Ag-PVA nanocomposite polymer films were prepared through simple, cost effective way. Various sizes of metal nanoparticles and bimetal nanoparticles were prepared through polyol method through thermal annealing. Polyvinyl alcohol polymer is used as a reducing and capping agent. Prepared films are different in color due to the presence of different kind and size of nanoparticles. Optical absorption studies reveal the characteristic surface plasmon absorption of Au, Ag are at 532 and 410 nm. The spectra of Au:Ag films show absorption centered at different wavelengths depending upon the concentration. Thermal annealing of films increased the size, alloy and bimetallic nature of the nanoparticles. Optical absorption nanocomposite film was analyzed using the Mie theory.

Karthikeyan, B.

2012-10-01

227

Magnetic disorder in nanostructured Fe7Au93 films and Fe14Au86 powders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thin films and powders of dilute Fe-Au alloys have been produced by DC-magnetron sputtering and high-energy milling, respectively. Energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy gives Fe7Au93 for the films and Fe14Au86 for the powders. The film, with a thickness below 200 nm measured by atomic force microscopy, was deposited onto a Si(100) substrate. X-ray diffraction reveals a major presence of fcc-Au peaks masking the bcc-Fe phase. The (1 0-300 K) DC-susceptibility (H = 100-1000 Oe) shows a clear cusp in the films in contrast to the powders, with a reentrant spin glass-like behavior.

Alba Venero, D.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Alonso, J.; Svalov, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

2010-01-01

228

Improved Au/Zn/Au ohmic contacts for p-type InP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, an innovated Si3N4 as an out-diffusion barrier layer to Au/Zn/Au contact system for p-type InP has been proposed. Before the contacts were annealed, Si3N4 layer was deposited on the Au(200Å)/Zn(700Å)/Au(200Å), then the Si3N4 was removed by HF and a 2000A layer of pure gold was deposited to facilitate wire bonding. The specific contact resistance dropped to a minimum value of 6×10-7 ? • cm2 (for an acceptor concentration of about 3×1018 cm-3) and the contact became perfectly Ohmic. Besides, Si3N4 layer is an excellent passivation layer and antireflection coating in InP/InGaAs/InP (p-i-n) photodiodes.

Zhang, Kefeng; Tang, Hengjing; Wu, Xiaoli; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xue; Gong, Haimei

2008-03-01

229

Hadron Spectra and QGP Hadronization in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transverse mass spectra of Omega hyperons and phi mesons measured\\u000arecently by STAR Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV are\\u000adescribed within a hydrodynamic model of the quark gluon plasma expansion and\\u000ahadronization. The flow parameters at the plasma hadronization extracted by\\u000afitting these data are used to predict the transverse mass spectra of J\\/psi and

K. A. Bugaeva; M. Gazdzicki; M. I. Gorenstein

2002-01-01

230

Some thoughts on di-jet correlation in Au + Au collisions from PHENIX  

SciTech Connect

PHENIX has measured the two particle azimuth correlation in Au + Au at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV. Jet shape and yield at the away side are found to be strongly modified at intermediate and low pT, and the modifications vary dramatically with pT and centrality. At high pT, away side jet peak reappears but the yield is suppressed. We discuss the possible physics pictures leading to these complicated modifications.

Jia Jiangyong [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, NY 10533 (United States)

2006-07-11

231

La Dyssymétrie des Régimes Pluviaux au Nord et au sud des Alpes Suisses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé L'indice de similitude calculé entre une station alpine, Sion en Valais, et quelques localités situées de part et d'autre des Alpes met en évidence la dissemblance des régimes pluviaux des deux versants. Au Nord, les indices quasi normaux reflètent la distribution homogène des pluies en plages de grandes dimensions; au Sud, les indices trop faibles trahissent l'irrégularité des zones

Max Bouët

1951-01-01

232

Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4%) Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order =>0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón De La Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. De Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. G. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; N. Gupta; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. Hofman; R. Hollis; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; B. C. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; N. S. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; I. A. Qattan; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; D. Relyea; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto De Toledo; B. Szeliga; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. Van Der Kolk; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wu; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; V. I. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev; J. X. Zuo

2007-01-01

233

????? correlations in central Au+Au collisions at VsNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report charged particle pair correlation analyses in the space of ?? (azimuth) and ?? (pseudorapidity), for central Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV in the STAR detector. The analysis involves unlike-sign charged pairs and like-sign charged pairs, which are transformed into charge-dependent (CD) signals and charge-independent (CI) signals. We present detailed parametrizations of the data. A model featuring dense gluonic

J. Adams; Y. Bai; F. Benedosso; M. A. J. Botje; J. Castillo; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; M. J. Russcher; R. J. M. Snellings; N. van der Kolk; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. Bland; C. Blyth; S.-L. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; J. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; H. Choi; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; M. Cosentino; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Daugherity; M. Moura; T. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. Ganti; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; Y. Gorbunov; H. Gos; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; K. Guimaraes; Y. Guo; N. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; B. Haag; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; M. Horner; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Khodyrev; B. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; S. Klein; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. LaPointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. Ray; S. Razin; J. Reinnarth; D. Relyea; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. Symons; A. Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; A. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; J. Watson; J. Webb; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Q. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; V. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev; J. Zuo

2007-01-01

234

Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at &surd;sNN = 130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values

K. H. Ackermann; N. Adams; C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; S. Ahmad; C. Allgower; J. Amsbaugh; M. Anderson; E. Anderssen; H. Arnesen; L. Arnold; G. S. Averichev; A. Baldwin; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; M. Beddo; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; S. Bennett; J. Bercovitz; J. Berger; W. Betts; H. Bichsel; F. Bieser; L. C. Bland; M. Bloomer; C. O. Blyth; J. Boehm; B. E. Bonner; D. Bonnet; R. Bossingham; M. Botlo; A. Boucham; N. Bouillo; S. Bouvier; K. Bradley; F. P. Brady; E. S. Braithwaite; W. Braithwaite; A. Brandin; R. L. Brown; G. Brugalette; C. Byrd; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; L. Carr; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; B. Caylor; D. Cebra; S. Chatopadhyay; M. L. Chen; W. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; J. Chrin; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; C. Consiglio; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; V. I. Danilov; D. Dayton; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; M. Dialinas; H. Diaz; P. A. Deyoung; L. Didenko; D. Dimassimo; J. Dioguardi; W. Dominik; C. Drancourt; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; T. Eggert; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; A. Etkin; P. Fachini; C. Feliciano; D. Ferenc; M. I. Ferguson; H. Fessler; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; I. Flores; K. J. Foley; D. Fritz; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; M. Gazdzicki; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; C. Gojak; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; M. Grau; D. Greiner; L. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; D. Grosnick; J. Gross; G. Guilloux; E. Gushin; J. Hall; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; G. Harper; J. W. Harris; P. He; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; D. Hill; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; M. Howe; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; W. Hunt; J. Hunter; G. J. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; S. Jacobson; R. Jared; P. Jensen; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. P. Kenney; A. Khodinov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; G. Koehler; A. S. Konstantinov; V. Kormilitsyne; L. Kotchenda; I. Kotov; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; T. Krupien; P. Kuczewski; C. Kuhn; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; W. J. Leonhardt; V. M. Leontiev; P. Leszczynski; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; Z. Li; C.-J. Liaw; J. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; V. Lindenstruth; P. J. Lindstrom; M. A. Lisa; H. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; D. Lopiano; W. A. Love; J. R. Lutz; D. Lynn; L. Madansky; R. Maier; R. Majka; A. Maliszewski; S. Margetis; K. Marks; R. Marstaller; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; E. A. Matyushevski; C. McParland; T. S. McShane; J. Meier; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; P. Middlekamp; N. Mikhalin; B. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; B. Minor; J. Mitchell; E. Mogavero; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; R. Morse; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; T. Ngo; M. Nguyen; T. Nguyen; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; T. Noggle; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; T. Nussbaum; J. Nystrand; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; C. A. Ogilvie; K. Olchanski; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. A. Ososkov; G. Ott; D. Padrazo; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; M. Pentia; V. Perevotchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; S. Pirogov; E. Platner; J. Pluta; I. Polk; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Puskar-Pasewicz; G. Rai; J. Rasson; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; R. E. Renfordt; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; J. Riso; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; D. Roehrich; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; R. Sanchez; Z. Sandler; J. Sandweiss; P. Sappenfield; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Scheblien; R. Scheetz; R. Schlueter; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; M. Schulz; A. Schüttauf; J. Sedlmeir; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; J. Seyboth; P. Seyboth; R. Seymour; E. I. Shakaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; Y. Shi; S. S. Shimanskii; D. Shuman; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; L. P. Smykov; R. Snellings; K. Solberg; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; N. Stone; R. Stone; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; T. J. Symons; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; A. Tarchini; J. Tarzian; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; A. Szanto de Toledo; S. Tonse; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Vakula; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen

2001-01-01

235

Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-Relativistic AU+AU and Cu+Cu Collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of

B. B. Back; B. Alver; M. Ballintijn; M. Ballintijn; D. S. Barton; R. R. Betts; A. A. Bickley; R. Bindel; W. Busza; A. Carroll; Z. Chai; V. Chetluru; M. P. Decowski; E. Garcia; T. Gburek; N. George; K. Gulbrandsen; C. Halliwell; J. Hamblen; I. Harnarine; M. Hauer; C. Henderson; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; R. Holynski; B. Holzman; A. Iordanova; E. Johnson; J. L. Kane; N. Khan; P. Kulinich; C. M. Kuo; W. Li; W. T. Lin; C. Loizides; S. Manly; A. C. Mignerey; R. Nouicer; A. Olszewski; R. Pak; C. Reed; E. Richardson; C. Roland; G. Roland; J. Sagerer; H. Seals; I. Sedykh; C. E. Smith; M. A. Stankiewicz; P. Steinberg; G. S. F. Stephans; A. Sukhanov; A. Szostak; M. B. Tonjes; A. Trzupek; C. Vale; G. J. Vannieuwenhuizen; S. S. Vaurynovich; R. Verdier; G. I. Veres; P. Walters; E. Wenger; D. Willhelm; F. L. H. Wolfs; B. Wosiek; K. Wozniak; S. Wyngaardt; B. Wyslouch

2006-01-01

236

Sideward Flow in Au+Au Collisions between 2A and 8A GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au+Au collisions at beam energies of 2A, 4A, 6A, and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum and the first Fourier coefficient of azimuthal anisotropy v1. These measurements indicate a smooth variation of sideward flow as a

H. Liu; N. N. Ajitanand; J. Alexander; M. Anderson; D. Best; F. P. Brady; T. Case; W. Caskey; D. Cebra; J. Chance; B. Cole; K. Crowe; A. Das; J. Draper; M. Gilkes; S. Gushue; M. Heffner; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; L. Huo; M. Justice; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. Kintner; J. Klay; D. Krofcheck; R. Lacey; M. A. Lisa; Y. M. Liu; R. McGrath; Z. Milosevich; G. Odyniec; D. Olson; S. Y. Panitkin; N. Porile; G. Rai; H. G. Ritter; J. Romero; R. Scharenberg; L. S. Schroeder; B. Srivastava; N. T. B. Stone; T. J. M. Symons; S. Wang; J. Whitfield; T. Wienold; R. Witt; L. Wood; X. Yang; W. N. Zhang; Y. Zhang

2000-01-01

237

Dihadron azimuthal correlations in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Azimuthal angle (Deltavarphi) correlations are presented for a broad range of transverse momentum (0.4Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. With increasing pT, the away-side Deltavarphi distribution evolves from a broad and relatively flat shape to a concave shape, then to a convex shape. Comparisons with p+p data suggest

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y.-S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; H. Lim; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; H. Okada; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slunecka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomásek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V.-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; J. Velkovska; R. Vertesi; A. A. Vinogradov; M. Virius; V. Vrba; E. Vznuzdaev; M. Wagner

2008-01-01

238

Net Charge Fluctuations in Au+Au Interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from Au+ Au interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are

K. Adcox; S. S. Adler; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. H. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. G. Bellaiche; S. T. Belyaev; M. J. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. A. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. C. Chang; L. L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. K. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. S. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; D. G. D'Enterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. V. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. V. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. E. Fields; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. K. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. L. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. K. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; J. S. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. G. Hansen; H. Hara; E. P. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. K. Hemmick; J. M. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. C. Hill; D. S. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. S. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. V. Jacak; W. Y. Jang; J. Jia; B. M. Johnson; S. C. Johnson; K. S. Joo; S. Kametani; J. H. Kang; M. Kann; S. S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. J. Kim; H. J. Kim; S. Y. Kim; Y. G. Kim; W. W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. J. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. G. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; M. J. Leitch; X. H. Li; Z. Li; D. J. Lim; M. X. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. F. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. I. Makdisi; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; S. K. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. D. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. L. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. E. Mischke; G. C. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; J. M. Moss; F. Mühlbacher; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. L. Nagle; Y. Nakada; B. K. Nandi; J. Newby; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. Österman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; A. P. Palounek; V. S. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; S. F. Pate; T. Peitzmann; A. N. Petridis; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; P. Pitukhin; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. L. Purschke; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; M. Rosati; A. A. Rose; S. S. Ryu; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; T. C. Sangster; R. Santo; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. R. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina; Y. H. Shin; I. G. Sibiriak; D. Silvermyr; K. S. Sim; J. Simon-Gillo; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Sivertz; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; S. Sorensen; P. W. Stankus; N. Starinsky; P. Steinberg; E. Stenlund; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; M. Sugioka; T. Sugitate; J. P. Sullivan; Y. Sumi; Z. Sun; M. Suzuki; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; M. Tamai; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; E. Taniguchi; M. J. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; T. L. Thomas; W. Tian; J. Tojo; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; I. Tserruya; H. Tsuruoka; A. A. Tsvetkov; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; T. Ushiroda; H. W. van Hecke; C. Velissaris; J. Velkovska; M. Velkovsky; A. A. Vinogradov; M. A. Volkov; A. Vorobyov; E. Vznuzdaev; H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; S. N. White; C. Witzig; F. K. Wohn; C. L. Woody; W. Xie; K. Yagi; S. Yokkaichi; G. R. Young; I. E. Yushmanov; W. A. Zajc; Z. Zhang; S. Zhou

2002-01-01

239

Comparative toxicity study of Ag, Au, and Ag–Au bimetallic nanoparticles on Daphnia magna  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparative assessment of the 48-h acute toxicity of aqueous nanoparticles synthesized using the same methodology, including\\u000a Au, Ag, and Ag–Au bimetallic nanoparticles, was conducted to determine their ecological effect in freshwater environments\\u000a through the use of Daphnia magna, using their mortality as a toxicological endpoint. D. magna are one of the standard organisms used for ecotoxicity studies due to

Ting Li; Brian Albee; Matti Alemayehu; Rocio Diaz; Leigha Ingham; Shawn Kamal; Maritza Rodriguez; Sandra Whaley Bishnoi

2010-01-01

240

Proton-? correlations in central Au+Au collisions at VsNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on p-?,p-? ,p -?, and p -? correlation functions constructed in central Au-Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The proton and lambda source size is inferred from the p-? and p -? correlation functions. It is found to be smaller than the pion source size also measured by the STAR experiment at smaller

Y. Bai; M. A. J. Botje; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; M. J. Russcher; R. J. M. Snellings; N. van der Kolk; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; V. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. Bland; C. Blyth; S.-L. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; J. Bouchet; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; J. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; H. Choi; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; M. Cosentino; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Daugherity; M. Moura; T. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; A. Dubey; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fornazier; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. Ganti; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; H. Gos; O. Grachov; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. Harris; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; M. Horner; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; M. Jedynak; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Khodyrev; B. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; J. Klay; S. Klein; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; K. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kutuev; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Q. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; S. Nayak; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. Ray; S. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; J. Reinnarth; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; K. Shestermanov; S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. Symons; A. Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; A. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; G. Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. Wang; H. Ward; J. Watson; J. Webb; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; I. K. Yoo; V. Yurevich; I. Zborovsky; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. Zhang; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev; J. Zuo

2006-01-01

241

Results from experiment E917 for Au + Au collisions at the AGS.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of baryon stopping and its resulting energy deposition on the dynamics of Au + Au collisions at 6, 8 and 10.8 GeV/nucleon are explored with recent results from the AGS experiment E917. Current analyses of stopping, collective flow signals and HBT parameters are presented. Strangeness and anti-baryon production is examined using the yields of anti-lambdas and anti-protons.

Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; E917 Collaboration; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

1999-08-04

242

The sub-Coulomb197Au( t, d)198Au reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of a deformation of the triton due to a non- s part of the ground state wave function on triton induced reactions is investigated. For this purpose, a measurement of the absolute cross section of the197Au( t, d)198Au reaction below 7 MeV was performed and compared with a finite range DWBA calculation. Implications on reactions with tritons during the primordial nucleosynthesis are briefly discussed.

Thoma, M. H.; Huenges, E.; Morinaga, H.; Igarashi, M.; Ogawa, K.

1989-09-01

243

Comparative toxicity study of Ag, Au, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles on Daphnia magna.  

PubMed

A comparative assessment of the 48-h acute toxicity of aqueous nanoparticles synthesized using the same methodology, including Au, Ag, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles, was conducted to determine their ecological effect in freshwater environments through the use of Daphnia magna, using their mortality as a toxicological endpoint. D. magna are one of the standard organisms used for ecotoxicity studies due to their sensitivity to chemical toxicants. Particle suspensions used in toxicity testing were well-characterized through a combination of absorbance measurements, atomic force or electron microscopy, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering to determine composition, aggregation state, and particle size. The toxicity of all nanoparticles tested was found to be dose and composition dependent. The concentration of Au nanoparticles that killed 50% of the test organisms (LC(50)) ranged from 65-75 mg/L. In addition, three different sized Ag nanoparticles (diameters = 36, 52, and 66 nm) were studied to analyze the toxicological effects of particle size on D. magna; however, it was found that toxicity was not a function of size and ranged from 3-4 ?g/L for all three sets of Ag nanoparticles tested. This was possibly due to the large degree of aggregation when these nanoparticles were suspended in standard synthetic freshwater. Moreover, the LC(50) values for Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles were found to be between that of Ag and Au but much closer to that of Ag. The bimetallic particles containing 80% Ag and 20% Au were found to have a significantly lower toxicity to Daphnia (LC(50) of 15 ?g/L) compared to Ag nanoparticles, while the toxicity of the nanoparticles containing 20% Ag and 80% Au was greater than expected at 12 ?g/L. The comparison results confirm that Ag nanoparticles were much more toxic than Au nanoparticles, and that the introduction of gold into silver nanoparticles may lower their environmental impact by lowering the amount of Ag which is bioavailable. PMID:20577719

Li, Ting; Albee, Brian; Alemayehu, Matti; Diaz, Rocio; Ingham, Leigha; Kamal, Shawn; Rodriguez, Maritza; Bishnoi, Sandra Whaley

2010-06-26

244

Pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200GeV using the STAR detector at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We extract the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss radii and study their multiplicity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal angle dependence. The Gaussianness of the correlation function is studied. Estimates of the geometrical and dynamical structure of the freeze-out source are extracted

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón Sánchez; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. López Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto De Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

245

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v1), elliptic flow (v2), and the fourth harmonic (v4) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200GeV are summarized and compared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results for identified particles are presented and fit with a blast-wave model. Different anisotropic flow analysis methods are

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Guerts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Langacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev; A. Braem; M. Davenport; G. De Cataldo; D. Di Bari; P. Martinengo; E. Nappi; G. Paic; E. Posa; F. Puiz; E. Schyns

2005-01-01

246

Controlling Au Nanorod Dispersion in Thin Film Polymer Blends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dispersion of Au nanorods (Au NRs) in polymer thin films is studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. Here, we incorporate small volume fractions of polystyrene-functionalized Au NRs (?rod 0.05) into polystyrene (PS) thin films. By controlling the ratio of the brush length (N) to that of the matrix polymers (P), we can selectively obtain dispersed or aggregated Au NR structures in the PS-Au(N):PS(P) films. A dispersion map of these structures allows one to choose N and P to obtain either uniformly dispersed Au NRs or aggregates of closely packed, side-by-side aligned Au NRs. Furthermore, by blending poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO) into the PS films, we demonstrate that the Au nanorod morphology can be further tuned by reducing depletion-attraction forces and promoting miscibility of the Au NRs. These predictable structures ultimately give rise to tunable optical absorption in the films resulting from surface plasmon resonance coupling between the Au NRs. Finally, self-consistent field theoretic (SCFT) calculations for both the PS-Au(N):PS(P) and PS-Au(N):PS(P):PPO systems provide insight into the PS brush structure, and allow us to interpret morphology and optical property results in terms of wet and dry PS brush states.

Hore, Michael J. A.; Composto, Russell J.

2012-02-01

247

Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

2003-10-06

248

The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl4- and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

Chen, S.-H.; Wang, D.-C.; Chen, G.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.

2008-03-01

249

Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed

Mohammed H. Atwan; Charles L. B. Macdonald; Derek O. Northwood; Elod L. Gyenge

2006-01-01

250

Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons, and antiprotons are reported for roots(NN)=200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heary Ion Collider (RHIC). Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bhardwaj; P. Bhaskar; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. C. D. Sanchez; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. D. Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; M. S. Ganti; T. D. Gutierrez; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; V. Grigoriev; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; M. Guedon; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; A. S. Konstantinov; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. K. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Y. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Y. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; M. J. Mora-Corral; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rai; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. J. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; K. Schweda; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; R. N. Singaraju; F. Simon; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. S. de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; M. D. Trivedi; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; A. M. VanderMolen; A. N. Vasiliev; M. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. A. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; J. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2004-01-01

251

Centrality Dependence of Direct Photon Production in {radical}(S{sub NN})=200 GeV Au+Au Collisions  

SciTech Connect

The first measurement of direct photons in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au+Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities.

Adler, S.S.; Aidala, C.; Aronson, S.H.; Chujo, T.; David, G.; Desmond, E.J.; Ewell, L.; Franz, A.; Guryn, W.; Haggerty, J.S.; Harvey, M.; Johnson, B.M.; Kistenev, E.; Kroon, P.J.; Makdisi, Y.I.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Morrison, D.P.; O'Brien, E.; Pinkenburg, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [and others

2005-06-17

252

Relation between nanoscale Au particle structure and activity for CO oxidation on supported gold catalysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CO oxidation activity of Au\\/TiO2, Au\\/MgAl2O4, and Au\\/Al2O3 catalysts, all containing approximately 4 wt% Au, was compared with the detailed size and shape of the gold particles in these supported catalysts. Based on the indications that CO oxidation on Au catalysts requires low-coordinated Au atoms, the turnover frequency per Au atom located at the corners of the Au particles

Ton V. W. Janssens; Anna Carlsson; Anna Puig-Molina; Bjerne S. Clausen

2006-01-01

253

Mixed Valent Gold Oxides: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties of Rb 5Au 3O 2, Rb 7Au 5O 2, and Cs 7Au 5O 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

The title compounds Rb5Au3O2, Rb7Au5O2, and Cs7Au5O2 are the first examples of mixed valent phases containing gold in the oxidation states +1 and ?1. Their crystal structures (Rb5Au3O2, Pbam, a=736.4(1) pm, b=1430.8(2) pm, c=567.9(1) pm, Z=2, R(F)=0.053, 647 reflections; Rb7Au5O2, Immm, a=567.1(2) pm, b=930.1(1) pm, C=1659.4(3) pm, Z=2, R(F)=0.066, 409 reflections; Cs7Au5O2, Immm, a=599.4(1) pm, b=960.6(3) pm, c=1720.8(12) pm, Z=2,

Anja-Verena Mudring; Jürgen Nuss; Ulrich Wedig; Martin Jansen

2000-01-01

254

Probing the quenching of CdSe/ZnS qdots by Au, Au/Ag, and Au/Pd nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resonance energy transfer between CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (qdots) and three metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with different surface plasmon resonance (SPR) characteristics were studied. Gold, gold/silver and gold/palladium NPs were used as energy acceptors for qdots with donor emission at 570 nm. Due to the different spectral overlaps between the SPR signatures and qdot emission, varied energy transfer characteristics were observed. The energy transfer was quantified via the Stern-Volmer relationship, since in this study the energy transfer was collision based. The Au/Ag and Au/Pd NPs in particular showed high KSV values, while the Au NPs showed much lower energy transfer efficiency. Since the NPs used in this study were relatively large (d ˜ 15-20 nm), the experimental system was also influenced by the NP extinction coefficients of ?108 M-1 cm-1. To address this potential inner filter effect, the quenching profiles were normalized by SPR transmittance. The results are important to the field, as many of these classes of nanomaterials are being employed in energy transfer based studies, as well as in colorimetric sensing.

Han, Hyunjoo; Valle, Valerie; Maye, Mathew M.

2012-11-01

255

Surface effects on the radiation response of nanoporous Au foams  

SciTech Connect

We report on an experimental and simulation campaign aimed at exploring the radiation response of nanoporous Au (np-Au) foams. We find different defect accumulation behavior by varying radiation dose-rate in ion-irradiated np-Au foams. Stacking fault tetrahedra are formed when np-Au foams are irradiated at high dose-rate, but they do not seem to be formed in np-Au at low dose-rate irradiation. A model is proposed to explain the dose-rate dependent defect accumulation based on these results.

Fu, E. G.; Caro, M.; Wang, Y. Q.; Baldwin, K.; Caro, A. [Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bringa, E. [CONICET and Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Nastasi, M. [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 (United States)

2012-11-05

256

Enhanced spin pumping at yttrium iron garnet/Au interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Spin injection across the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au interface was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The spin mixing conductance was determined by comparing the Gilbert damping parameter {alpha} in YIG/Au and YIG/Au/Fe heterostructures. The main purpose of this study was to correlate the spin pumping efficiency with chemical modifications of the YIG film surface using in situ etching and deposition techniques. By means of Ar{sup +} ion beam etching, one is able to increase the spin mixing conductance at the YIG/Au interface by a factor of 5 compared to the untreated YIG/Au interface.

Burrowes, C.; Heinrich, B.; Kardasz, B.; Montoya, E. A.; Girt, E. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Dr., Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Sun Yiyan; Song, Young-Yeal; Wu Mingzhong [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2012-02-27

257

Nuclear modification factors of ? mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of ? meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. Results are presented on the ? invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor RAA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and RdA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1Au+Au collisions, the RAA of ? exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the ?0 and the ? in the intermediate pT range (2-5GeV/c), whereas, at higher pT, the ?, ?0, and ? show similar suppression. The baryon (proton and antiproton) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate pT is not observed for the ? meson despite the similar masses of the proton and the ?. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of valence quarks in the hadron rather than its mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality, and, for peripheral collisions, the RAA values for both particle species are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of Npart. The RdA of ? shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Borggren, N.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.

2011-02-01

258

Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Balance functions have been measured for charged-particle pairs, identified charged-pion pairs, and identified charged-kaon pairs in Au + Au, d + Au, and p + p collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using the STAR detector. These balance functions are presented in terms of relative pseudorapidity, Delta eta, relative rapidity, Delta y, relative

M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. C. D. Sanchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. D. Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. D. de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. D. Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L. X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C. H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Y. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; Bvks Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. S. De Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I. K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2010-01-01

259

Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Balance functions have been measured for charged-particle pairs, identified charged-pion pairs, and identified charged-kaon pairs in Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at sNN=200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using the STAR detector. These balance functions are presented in terms of relative pseudorapidity, Deltaeta, relative rapidity, Deltay, relative azimuthal angle, Deltavarphi, and invariant relative momentum, qinv. For charged-particle pairs,

M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. de Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L.-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. Levine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2010-01-01

260

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d plus Au and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta p(T) of charged particles associated with intermediate-to high-p(T) trigger particles (2.5 < p(T) < 10 GeV\\/c) in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher p(T) greater than or similar to 2.5 GeV\\/c, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d

M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. C. D. Sanchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. D. Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. D. de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. D. Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L. X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; M. J. Horner; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C. H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Y. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; Bvks Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. S. de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I. K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2010-01-01

261

Nuclear Modification Factors of phi Mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of {phi} meson production in the K{sup +}K{sup -} decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Results are presented on the {phi} invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R{sub dA} for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1 < p{sub T} < 7 GeV/c) and centrality. In central and midcentral Au+Au collisions, the R{sub AA} of {phi} exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the {pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} in the intermediate p{sub T} range (2-5 GeV/c), whereas, at higher p{sub T}, the {phi}, {pi}{sup 0}, and {eta} show similar suppression. The baryon (proton and antiproton) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p{sub T} is not observed for the {phi} meson despite the similar masses of the proton and the {phi}. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of valence quarks in the hadron rather than its mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality, and, for peripheral collisions, the R{sub AA} values for both particle species are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of N{sub part}. The R{sub dA} of {phi} shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

Adare, A. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; PHENIX, Collaboration [The

2011-01-01

262

CO oxidation on h-BN supported Au atom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanism of CO oxidation by O2 on Au atoms supported on the pristine and defected hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surface has been studied theoretically using density functional theory. It is found that O2 binds stronger than CO on an Au atom supported on the defect free h-BN surface and h-BN surface with nitrogen vacancy (VN@h-BN), but weaker than CO on a free Au atom or Au trapped by a boron vacancy (VB@h-BN). The excess of the positive or negative charge on Au can considerably change its catalytic properties and enhance activation of the adsorbed O2. Coadsorption of CO and O2 on Au, Au/VN@h-BN, and Au/VB@h-BN results in additional charge transfer to O2. Various pathways of the CO oxidation reaction by molecular oxygen are studied. We found two different pathways for CO oxidation: a two-step pathway where two CO2 molecules are formed independently, and a self-promotion pathway where oxidation of the first CO molecule is promoted by the second CO molecule. Interaction of Au with the defect-free and defected h-BN surface considerably affects the CO oxidation reaction pathways and barriers. Therefore, Au supported on the h-BN surface (pristine or defected) cannot be considered as pseudo-free atom and support effects have to be taken into account, even when the interaction of Au with the support is weak.

Gao, Min; Lyalin, Andrey; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

2013-01-01

263

Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

Švor?ík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; ?ezanka, P.; Slepi?ka, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubá?ek, T.; Siegel, J.

2010-03-01

264

Fabrication of a chitosan/glucose oxidase-poly(anilineboronic acid)-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode for biosensor and biofuel cell.  

PubMed

Enzyme immobilization is one of the key factors in constructing high-performance enzyme biosensors and biofuel cells (BFCs). Herein, we propose a new protocol for efficient immobilization of a glycoprotein enzyme based on the interaction of the 1, 2- or 1, 3-diols in the glycoprotein with a boronic acid functionalized monomer. Briefly, casting a mixture of glucose oxidase (GOx) and anilineboronic acid (ABA) followed by a NaAuCl(4) solution to an Au-plated Au electrode surface yielded a GOx-poly(ABA) (PABA)-gold nanoparticle (Au(nano)) bionanocomposite, and chitosan (CS) was then cast and air-dried. In the present protocol, the small-sized Au(nano) or Au subnanostructures can form near/on the enzyme molecule, which greatly promotes the electron transfer of enzymatic reaction and enhances the amperometric responses. The thus-prepared CS/GOx-PABA-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode worked well in the first-/second generation biosensing modes and as a bioanode in a monopolar biofuel cell, with analytical or cell-power performance superior to those of most analogues hitherto reported. PMID:22099959

Huang, Yi; Qin, Xiaoli; Li, Zou; Fu, Yingchun; Qin, Cong; Wu, Feng; Su, Zhaohong; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Hu, Jiming

2011-10-31

265

Watchfully checking rapport with the Primary Child Health Care nurses - a theoretical model from the perspective of parents of foreign origin  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, multicultural interaction within health care seems to be challenging and problematic. This is also true among Primary Child Health Care nurses (PCHC nurses) in the Swedish Primary Child Health Care services (PCHC services). Therefore, there was a need to investigate the parents' perspective in-depth. Aim The aim of the study was to construct a theoretical model that could promote further understanding of the variety of experiences of parents of foreign origin regarding their interaction with the PCHC nurses at PCHC services. Method The study used Grounded Theory Methodology. Twenty-one parents of foreign origin in contact with PCHC servicies were interviewed. Results In our study parents were watchfully checking rapport, i.e. if they could perceive sympathy and understanding from the PCHC nurses. This was done by checking the nurse's demeanour and signs of judgement. From these interviews we created a theoretical model illustrating the interactive process between parents and PCHC nurses. Conclusion We found it to be of utmost importance for parents to be certain that it was possible to establish rapport with the PCHC nurse. If not, disruptions in the child's attendance at PCHC services could result. PCHC nurses can use the theoretical model resulting from this study as a basis for understanding parents, avoiding a demeanour and judgements that may cause misunderstandings thus promoting high-quality interaction in PCHC services.

2010-01-01

266

A photoresponsive Au25 nanocluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An Au25 cluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates (S-Az) ([Au25(S-Az)18]-) was synthesized with the aim of producing a photoresponsive Au25 cluster. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum of the product revealed that [Au25(S-Az)18]- was synthesized in high purity. Optical absorption spectra of [Au25(S-Az)18]- obtained before and after photoirradiation suggest that the azobenzenes in the ligands of Au25(S-Az)18 isomerize with an efficiency of nearly 100%, both from the trans to cis conformation and from the cis to trans conformation. Furthermore, the redox potential and optical absorption of Au25(S-Az)18 were found to change reversibly due to photoisomerization of azobenzenes.An Au25 cluster protected by azobenzene derivative thiolates (S-Az) ([Au25(S-Az)18]-) was synthesized with the aim of producing a photoresponsive Au25 cluster. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum of the product revealed that [Au25(S-Az)18]- was synthesized in high purity. Optical absorption spectra of [Au25(S-Az)18]- obtained before and after photoirradiation suggest that the azobenzenes in the ligands of Au25(S-Az)18 isomerize with an efficiency of nearly 100%, both from the trans to cis conformation and from the cis to trans conformation. Furthermore, the redox potential and optical absorption of Au25(S-Az)18 were found to change reversibly due to photoisomerization of azobenzenes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental procedure and characterization of the products. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30830d

Negishi, Yuichi; Kamimura, Ukyo; Ide, Mao; Hirayama, Michiyo

2012-06-01

267

Ejection of Au and Si nanocrystals from Au implanted Si(1 0 0) by MeV heavy ion irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Si(1 0 0) substrates implanted with 32 keV Au? ions, were irradiated with 3 MeV Au3+ ions at an angle of 60°. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on sputtered particles collected on catcher grids revealed the presence of Au and Si nanocrystals. The size distribution of collected Au nanocrystals exhibited inverse power law dependence with a decay exponent of 2. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of irradiated sample showed the presence of surface craters along with hillocks. The formation of Au and Si nanocrystals in MeV ion irradiated Au doped amorphous Si layer can be attributed to the localized melting due to thermal spike phase of atomic displacement cascades produced by MeV Au ion impacts.

Mohapatra, S.

2013-10-01

268

The microstructure of eutectic Au-Sn and In-Sn solders on Au\\/Ti and Au\\/Ni metallizations during laser solder bonding process for optical fiber alignment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, two eutectic solders: 80Au20Sn and 52In48Sn were chosen for fiber bonding through laser soldering, and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray detector (EDX) was used to investigate the microstructures of at four interfaces between two solders and two metallizations: Au-Sn\\/(Au\\/Ti), Au-Sn\\/( Au\\/Ni), In-Sn\\/ (Au\\/Ti), In-Sn\\/(Au\\/Ni). Results show that as for the Au-Sn solder joint

Yan Bohan; Wang Chunqing; Zhang Wei

2006-01-01

269

The Microstructure of Eutectic Au-Sn and In-Sn Solders on Au\\/Ti and Au\\/Ni Metallizations during Laser Solder Bonding Process for Optical Fiber Alignment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, two eutectic solders: 80Au20Sn and 52In48Sn were chosen for fiber bonding through laser soldering, and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) was used to investigate the microstructures of at four interfaces between two solders and two metallizations: Au-Sn\\/(Au\\/Ti), Au-Sn\\/(Au\\/Ni), In-Sn\\/ (Au\\/Ti), In-Sn\\/(Au\\/Ni). Results show that as for the Au-Sn solder joint a

Bohan Yan; Chunqing Wang; Wei Zhang

2006-01-01

270

Ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters: Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the electrochemical and thermodynamic stability of Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44, R = CH3, C6H13, CH2CH2Ph, Ph, PhF, and PhCOOH, in order to examine ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters, Aum(SR)n. Aliphatic thiols, in general, have higher electrochemical and thermodynamic stability than aromatic thiols, and the -SCH2CH2Ph thiol is particularly appealing because of its high electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The stabilization of Aum by nSR for Aum(SR)n can be rationalized by the stabilization of an Au atom by an SR for the simple molecule AuSR, regardless of interligand interaction and system size and shape. Thiol moieties play a strong role in the electron oxidation and reduction of Aum(SR)n. Accounting for the characteristics of thiol ligands is essential for understanding the electronic and thermodynamic stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters.We have studied the electrochemical and thermodynamic stability of Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24, and Au102(SR)44, R = CH3, C6H13, CH2CH2Ph, Ph, PhF, and PhCOOH, in order to examine ligand effects on the stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters, Aum(SR)n. Aliphatic thiols, in general, have higher electrochemical and thermodynamic stability than aromatic thiols, and the -SCH2CH2Ph thiol is particularly appealing because of its high electrochemical and thermodynamic stability. The stabilization of Aum by nSR for Aum(SR)n can be rationalized by the stabilization of an Au atom by an SR for the simple molecule AuSR, regardless of interligand interaction and system size and shape. Thiol moieties play a strong role in the electron oxidation and reduction of Aum(SR)n. Accounting for the characteristics of thiol ligands is essential for understanding the electronic and thermodynamic stability of thiol-stabilized gold nanoclusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HOMO, LUMO, and HOMO-LUMO gaps; optimized geometries and radial distribution functions of r(Au-Au) for Au25(SR)18-, Au38(SR)24 and Au102(SR)44. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30501a

Jung, Jaehoon; Kang, Sunwoo; Han, Young-Kyu

2012-06-01

271

Electromagnetic dissociation of Au targets by Au beams in E862  

SciTech Connect

E862 is an experiment to measure Electromagnetic Dissociation (ED) of Au and Co targets by 9.89 GeV/nucleon beams from the AGS. ED occurs at impact parameters large enough so that no strong interaction occurs, but virtual photons are exchanged, resulting in the excitation of a giant resonance. The authors report the first observation of an ED cross section {sigma}{sub ED} larger than the total hadronic cross section for Au+Au of 6.1 barns. Results are given for both the single- and double-neutron removal processes and compared to calculations using both semiclassical and quantum methods, including effects from both E1 and E2 giant resonances. Predictions are extended to RHIC and LHC collider energies where ED will be a significant determinant of the quality of the stored beams.

Hill, J.C.; Ewell, L.A.; Libby, B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics] [and others

1997-09-01

272

Electrochemically Grown, Composite Au/CdS/Au Nanowires: Structural and Optical Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present growth, characterization, and optical response of solution-synthesized nanoplasmonic structures coupled with nonlinear dielectrics. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the templated electrochemical growth of 60-300 nm diameter, 200-5000 nm long composite Au-CdS-Au cylindrical nanostructures yield wurtzite CdS spanning small gaps between Au nanowires. The electrodeposited CdS exhibits an absorption band at ˜ 500 nm consistent with band edge absorption of crystalline CdS and broad defect band luminescence centered ˜ 625 nm. CdS exhibits sufficient quality to produce second harmonic generation stimulated with a pulsed, linearly polarized pump-light from a femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser. The effect of structure geometry and environment on optical response is investigated through variations in substrates, growth parameters and focused-ion-beam (FIB) shaping of nanostructures.

Brintlinger, Todd; Stroud, Rhonda; Long, James; Sherrill, Stefanie; Bok Lee, Sang; Simpkins, Blake

2013-03-01

273

PION INTERFEREMETRY FROM P+P TO AU+AU IN STAR.  

SciTech Connect

The geometric substructure of the particle-emitting source has been characterized via two-particle interferometry by the STAR collaboration for all energies and colliding systems at RHIC. We present systematic studies of charged pion interferometry. The collective nature of the source is revealed through the m{sub T} dependence of HBT radii for all particle types. Preliminary results suggest a scaling in the pion HBT radii with overall system size, as central Au+Au collisions are compared to peripheral collisions as well as with Cu+Cu and even with d+Au and p+p collisions, naively suggesting comparable flow strength in all systems. To probe this issue in greater detail, multidimensional correlation functions are studied using a spherical decomposition method. This allows clear identification of source anisotropy and, for the light systems, the presence of significant long-range non-femtoscopic correlations.

CHAJECKI, Z. (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

2005-08-15

274

Pion Interferometry from p+p to Au+Au in STAR  

SciTech Connect

The geometric substructure of the particle-emitting source has been characterized via two-particle interferometry by the STAR collaboration for all energies and colliding systems at RHIC. We present systematic studies of charged pion interferometry. The collective nature of the source is revealed through the mT dependence of HBT radii for all particle types. Preliminary results suggest a scaling in the pion HBT radii with overall system size, as central Au+Au collisions are compared to peripheral collisions as well as with Cu+Cu and even with d+Au and p+p collisions, naively suggesting comparable flow strength in all systems. To probe this issue in greater detail, multidimensional correlation functions are studied using a spherical decomposition method. This allows clear identification of source anisotropy and, for the light systems, the presence of significant long-range non-femtoscopic correlations.

Chajecki, Z. [Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2006-04-11

275

Nuclear magnetic resonance of oriented 196Au, 198Au, and 200Aum in Ni  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effective hyperfine splitting frequencies ?¯ of 196Au (I?=2-, T12=6.2 d), 198Au (I?=2-, T12=2.7 d), and 200Aum (I?=12-, T12=18.7 h) in nickel at a temperature of ~10 mK were measured with nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei to be 59.65(6) MHz, 60.06(5) MHz, and 99.1(3) MHz, respectively. All frequencies are considerably larger than those known from previous nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei measurements. Our results show that the noncontact contribution to the hyperfine field of AuNi is smaller than deduced before. The magnetic moment of 200Aum [configuration |(?112-)(?132+)>12-], | ? |=5.90(9)?N, fits well into the systematics of magnetic moments of 12- isomers in this mass region.

Hagn, E.; Zech, E.

1984-11-01

276

Spin transport in Au films: An investigation by spin pumping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thickness and temperature dependence of spin transport in Au has been investigated in multilayer films via the spin pumping effect. To study spin transport in Au, single layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au(001) and double layer GaAs/16Fe/(d)Au/12Fe/20Au(001) were investigated using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), where d = 20, 300, and the numerals preceding Fe and Au indicate the layer thickness in atomic layers (AL). FMR measurements were performed at frequencies ranging from 27.3 to 40.6 GHz and at temperatures ranging from 88 to 295 K. By measuring the total Gilbert damping in the 16Fe layer as a function of d and temperature for both single and double magnetic layer structures and by utilizing the spin diffusion equation, one is able to determine the spin mixing conductance, g??, at the Fe/Au interface, and the spin flip relaxation time, ?sf, in Au as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the momentum relaxation time, ?m, in Au was measured independently by means of electron transport measurements in a van der Pauw configuration. It has been found that the spin flip relaxation time, ?sf, in Au is dominated by phonon interactions.

Montoya, Eric; Kardasz, Bartek; Burrowes, Capucine; Huttema, Wendell; Girt, Erol; Heinrich, Bret

2012-04-01

277

Photoemission study of Au on a-Si:H  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a high-resolution photoemission study of Au evaporated on rf-sputtered a-Si:H at room temperature. Three regions of coverage can be classified according to the behavior of the valence-band and core-level spectra: an unreacted region with an equivalent thickness of 2 Å, followed by an intermixed Au/a-Si overlayer (~9 Å), and a dual-phase region at higher coverage. Au adatoms are dispersed in the unreacted region. They subsequently cluster in the intermixed region, where they attach to Si atoms that are not hydrogen bonded, suggesting that the intermixed Si is mainly from those that have dangling bonds. In the dual-phase region, two sets of Au 4f core levels evolve with higher binding energy, one from Au intermixed with Si, and the lower one exhibiting pure gold character. The interface eventually ends up with the sequence: a-Si:H(sub.)+(pure Au mixed with intermixed Au/Si)+(vac). This is unlike the case of Au on c-Si, which has a pure gold layer sandwiched by intermixed Au/Si complexes along the surface normal. Traces of silicon atoms on top of composite surfaces appear even at the highest coverage, 205 Å, of the gold deposit. The applicability of the four models previously used for the Au/c-Si interface is also briefly discussed.

Pi, Tun-Wen; Yang, A.-B.; Olson, C. G.; Lynch, D. W.

1990-11-01

278

Possible triplet superconductivity in Nb/Au/CoFe trilayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have fabricated the Nb/Au and Nb/CoFe bilayer and Nb/Au/CoFe trilayer samples and investigated their T_c's by systematically varying d_Nb, d_CoFe, and d_Au. These samples were deposited on the oxidized Si substrates using DC magnetron sputtering system and the superconducting critical temperature Tc of the samples were measured electrically using standard DC and AC 4-point method. The SN bilayer system showed well-known exponential-like dependence of Tc on d_Au, while the SF bilayer system displayed oscillatory dependence of Tc on d_CoFe, as expected from the SF proximity effect theory. On the other hand, with fixed d_Nb and d_CoFe, the Tc of SNF trilayers as a function of d_Au increased rapidly for d_Au < 10 nm and then approached a saturated value near d_Au = 200 nm. The T_c's of these trilayer systems are higher than a theory based on conventional singlet superconductivity can predict. Moreover, we observed small oscillatory Tc behavior in the trilayer system when d_Au is varied in the range of 30 nm < d_Au < 90 nm. In order to explain our unexpected data, we propose the possibility of triplet superconductivity created inside Au layer.

Kim, Jinho; Doh, Yong-Joo; Chang, Jaewan; Char, Kookrin

2004-03-01

279

Microstructure of Precipitated Au Nanoclusters in MgO  

SciTech Connect

Gold nanoclusters dispersed in single crystal MgO have been prepared by ion implantation at 975 K and subsequent annealing at 1275 K for 10 hours. The morphological features, size, and crystallographic orientation of the Au nanoclusters with respect to the MgO matrix, as well as the interface structure between the Au nanoclusters and MgO, have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. During annealing, the Au clusters nucleate coherently in the MgO lattice, leading to an epitaxial orientation relationship of[010]MgO//[010]Au and (200)MgO//(200)Au that is maintained for all the Au clusters. Above a critical size of {approx}5 to 8 nm, a coherent-semicoherent interface transition is observed for the Au clusters in MgO. This critical cluster size is larger than the critical size, {approx}3 nm, based on energetic consideration. This discrepancy is discussed with respect to the point and extended defect structures at the interface between the Au clusters and the MgO matrix. The Au clusters larger than this critical size exhibit faceting on the {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes and internal dislocations. It is further suggested that the density of quantum antidot should depend on the size of the Au clusters.

Wang, Chong M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Jiang, Weilin; Thomas, Larry E.; Weber, William J.

2003-05-15

280

Doping Golden Buckyballs: Cu@Au16- and Cu@Au17- Cluster Anions  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of the unique catalytic effects of gold nanoparticles on oxide substrates has stimulated a flurry of research into the structures and properties of free gold nanoclusters, which may hold the key to elucidating the catalytic mechanisms of supported gold clusters. One of the most remarkable results has been the discovery of planar gold cluster anions (Aun_) of up to twelve gold atoms and the 2D to 3D transition for clusters with n larger than 12. Among larger gold clusters, Au20 has been found to be a perfect tetrahedron. A more recent study of the structures of Aun_ cluster anions in the medium size range (n=15–19) has shown that clusters with n=16–18 possess unprecedented empty cage structures. In particular, the Au16_ cluster anion has an interesting tetrahedral structure with an inner diameter of about 5.5 0 and can be compared to the fullerenes (buckyballs). Although Au32 was first suggested to be a “24- carat golden fullerene”, subsequent studies showed that the Au32_ ion is in fact a low-symmetry compact 3D structure. Other larger gold cage clusters have also been proposed computationally, but none has been observed or is expected to be the global minimum. The cage structures of the cluster anions Au16_ and Au17_ have recently been confirmed by electron diffraction and thus they are the first experimentally confirmed and the smallest possible gold cages. The large empty space inside these cage clusters immediately suggested that they can be doped with a foreign atom to produce a new class of endohedral gold cages analogous to endohedral fullerenes.

Wang, Leiming; Bulusu, Satya; Zhai, Hua-jin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, Lai S.

2007-04-13

281

Growth of Long Range Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlations with Centrality in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forward-backward multiplicity correlation strengths have been measured with the STAR detector for Au+Au and p+p collisions at sNN=200GeV. Strong short- and long-range correlations (LRC) are seen in central Au+Au collisions. The magnitude of these correlations decrease with decreasing centrality until only short-range correlations are observed in peripheral Au+Au collisions. Both the dual parton model (DPM) and the color glass condensate

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; L. C. de Silva; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; M. Kopytine; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; C. Kuhn; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. Levine; N. Li; C. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. Redwine; R. Reed; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; X.-H. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; A. L. Trattner; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; J. X. Zuo

2009-01-01

282

Electron paramagnetic resonance of a Au-Au pair in heat-treated silicon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two previously unreported electron paramagnetic resonance centers of C2v symmetry, labeled Si-LAu1 and Si-LAu2, are observed in p-type gold-doped silicon after a heat treatment at 1250 °C. For one of them, Si-LAu2, complex resolved hyperfine structure reveals the presence of two equivalent Au atoms in the complex. No hyperfine structure is resolved for Si-LAu1 and the direct involvement of Au in it has not been established.

Williams, P. M.; Mason, P. W.; Watkins, G. D.

1996-05-01

283

Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

2009-05-14

284

Onset of nuclear vaporization in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

Multifragmentation has been measured for [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at [ital E]/[ital A]=100, 250, and 400 MeV. The mean fragment multiplicity increases monotonically with the charged particle multiplicity at [ital E]/[ital A]=100 MeV, but decreases for central collisions with incident energy, consistent with the onset of nuclear vaporization. Molecular dynamics calculations follow some trends but underpredict the observed fragment multiplicities. Including the statistical decay of excited residues improves the agreement for peripheral collisions but worsens it for central collisions.

Tsang, M.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Lynch, W.G.; Bowman, D.R.; Gelbke, C.K.; Lisa, M.A.; Peaslee, G.F. (Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)); Kunde, G.J.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Hofmann, T.; Hubele, J.; Kempter, J.; Kreutz, P.; Kunze, W.D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Mang, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Neumann, M.; Ocker, B.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rosenberger, F.; Sann, H.; Schuettauf, A.; Serfling, V.; Stroth, J.; Trautmann, W.; Tucholski, A.; Woerner, A.; Zude, E.; Zwieglinski, B. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany)); Aiello, S.; Imme, G.; Pappalardo, V.; Raciti, G. (Dipartimento di Fisica Universita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisicia Nucleare, Catania, 195127 Catania (Italy)); Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G. (Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)); Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Scardoni, R.; Ferr

1993-09-06

285

Energy and system size dependence of ? meson production in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of ? meson production (using the hadronic decay mode ??K+K?) by comparing the new results from Cu+Cu collisions and previously reported Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented in this Letter are from mid-rapidity (|y|0.5) for 0.4pT5 GeV\\/c. At a given beam energy, the

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; F. Benedosso; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. Codrington; R. Corliss; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; C. De Silva; T. G. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; C. Kuhn; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Millner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; V. Rykov; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; X.-H. Shi; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; A. L. Trattner; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; J. A. Vanfossen; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; W. T. Waggoner; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; J. X. Zuo

2009-01-01

286

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v_1), elliptic flow\\u000a(v_2), and the fourth harmonic (v_4) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution\\u000aof particles from Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV are summarized and\\u000acompared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results\\u000afor identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model.\\u000aDifferent anisotropic

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. de Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Guerts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Langacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

287

Analysis of Elliptical Flow in Au+Au Collisions at the Bevalac  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The azimuthal distribution of midrapidity particles is observed to have an ellipsoidal flow pattern at BEVALAC, AGS, and SPS energies. We present our latest analysis of the EOS data based on Fourier methods. The second harmonic coefficient, v_2, is presented as a function of rapidity, fragment mass and beam energy for the Z=1,2 isotopes from Au+Au collisions at incident energy from 0.25 to 1.2 GeV/nucleon. The data were taken at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac facility using the EOS Time Projection Chamber.

Partlan, Martin D.; Rai, G.

1998-10-01

288

Single identified hadron spectra from sNN=130GeV Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse momentum spectra and yields of hadrons are measured by the PHENIX\\u000acollaboration in Au + Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic\\u000aHeavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The time-of-flight resolution allows identification\\u000aof pions to transverse momenta of 2 GeV\\/c and protons and antiprotons to 4\\u000aGeV\\/c. The yield of pions rises approximately linearly with the number

K. Adcox; S. Adler; N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. Awes; K. Barish; P. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. Bellaiche; S. Belyaev; M. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. Brooks; D. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. Chang; L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. Cole; D. d’Enterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. En’yo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. Fields; S. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; J. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. Hansen; H. Hara; E. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. Hemmick; J. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. Hill; D. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. Jacak; W. Jang; J. Jia; B. Johnson; S. Johnson; K. Joo; S. Kametani; J. Kang; M. Kann; S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. Kim; H. Kim; S. Kim; Y. Kim; W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. Lee; M. Leitch; X. Li; Z. Li; D. Lim; M. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. Makdisi; V. Manko; Y. Mao; S. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; T. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. Mischke; G. Mishra; J. Mitchell; A. Mohanty; D. Morrison; J. Moss; F. Mühlbacher; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. Nagle; Y. Nakada; B. Nandi; J. Newby; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; A. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O’Brien; C. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. Ojha; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. Österman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; A. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; S. Pate; T. Peitzmann; A. Petridis; C. Pinkenburg; R. Pisani; P. Pitukhin; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. Purschke; I. Ravinovich; K. Read; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; M. Rosati; A. Rose; S. Ryu; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; T. Sangster; R. Santo; H. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; T. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina; Y. Shin; I. Sibiriak; D. Silvermyr; K. Sim; J. Simon-Gillo; C. Singh; V. Singh; M. Sivertz; A. Soldatov; R. Soltz; S. Sorensen; P. Stankus; N. Starinsky; P. Steinberg; E. Stenlund; A. Ster; S. Stoll; M. Sugioka; T. Sugitate; J. Sullivan; Y. Sumi; Z. Sun; M. Suzuki; E. Takagui; A. Taketani; M. Tamai; K. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; E. Taniguchi; M. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; T. Thomas; W. Tian; J. Tojo; H. Torii; R. Towell; I. Tserruya; H. Tsuruoka; A. Tsvetkov; S. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; T. Ushiroda; H. van Hecke; C. Velissaris; J. Velkovska; M. Velkovsky; A. Vinogradov; M. Volkov; A. Vorobyov; E. Vznuzdaev; H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; S. White; C. Witzig; F. Wohn; C. Woody; W. Xie; K. Yagi; S. Yokkaichi; G. Young; I. Yushmanov; W. Zajc; Z. Zhang; S. Zhou

2004-01-01

289

A study of non-statistical fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at BNL AGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of Quark-Gluon Plasma and/or Disoriented Chiral Condensate may give rise to non-statistical fluctuations of various distributions of charged and/or neutral particles (in rapidity/pseudo-rapidity, transverse momentum) on event-by-event basis. The event-by-event analysis of particle distributions can shed light into the reaction mechanism of high energy heavy ion collisions. The E895 experiment has made an extensive measurement of Au+Au collisions at BNL AGS. The fluctuation analysis for charged particles using power spectrum technique will be presented along with comparisons to model calculations on event-by-event basis.

Das, Arun

1998-10-01

290

Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions  

SciTech Connect

Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Tr?bert, E

2006-03-31

291

Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at {radical}sNN  

SciTech Connect

The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au + Au collisions at {radical}sNN = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization.

Adams, J.; Alder, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderonde la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Long, H.; et al.

2003-01-23

292

Structure, stability and catalytic activity of chemically synthesized Pt, Au, and Au-Pt nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Small (1-5 nm) metallic nanoparticles of Pt, Au, and Au/Pt of different nominal compositions in colloidal form were synthesized by a chemical reduction method using polymer (PVP) as protecting agent. Analytical techniques like HREM and UV-vis spectroscopy have been used to characterize the morphology and structural properties of these small particles. Theoretical simulations based on molecular dynamical have been used to interpret the experimental structural results and analyze the macroscopic properties like stability and catalytic selectivity of these nanoparticles based on the morphology and atomic distribution in the clusters. PMID:16004132

Esparza, R; Ascencio, J A; Rosas, G; Sánchez Ramírez, J F; Pal, U; Perez, R

2005-04-01

293

Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN = 130 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.

2001-01-01

294

Subthreshold K+ production in 1GeV/u 197Au + 197Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculate the K+-production cross section in 197Au+197Au collisions at 1 GeV/u in the framework of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD). The Skyrme potentials, with parameters chosen to generate the soft and hard nuclear equations of state, are used in the propagation of nucleons within QMD. Our calculations show that the kaons are produced from an earlier stage of the collisions and mainly through a two-step process. Theoretical predictions with the soft equation of state are in good agreement with the experimental data from SIS at GSI. The results for soft and hard equations of state differ by approximately a factor 2 to 3.

Huang, S. W.; Faessler, Amand; Li, G. Q.; Puri, Rajeev K.; Lehmann, E.; Khoa, Dao T.; Matin, M. A.

1993-01-01

295

Charged particle multiplicities in ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions.  

SciTech Connect

The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

2006-01-01

296

Magnetic and mechanical properties of rolled-up Au/Co/Au nanomembranes with multiple windings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rolled-up Au/Co/Au microtubes with up to three windings were fabricated by the combination of strain engineering, conventional photolithography, and electron beam deposition. First, magnetization properties of the initial 2D film arrays and the corresponding tube arrays were studied and strong influences of magnetostrictive and shape anisotropy are observed. Second, the mechanical deformation was examined by an instrumented indentation technique at the nanoscale and analyzed by contact mechanics theory. The loading curve fitting in the elastic regime by the Hertz model provides a first approximation of the nanomembrane radial elastic modulus of about 135 GPa.

Müller, C.; de Souza, G. B.; Mikowski, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Lepienski, C. M.; Mosca, D. H.

2011-08-01

297

Pion interferometry in Au + Au collisions at ?Snn = 200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at\\u000a?sNN = 200 GeV using\\u000athe STAR detector at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We extract the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss radii and study\\u000atheir multiplicity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal angle dependence. The Gaussianness of the correlation\\u000afunction is studied. Estimates of the geometrical and dynamical structure of the freeze-out

J. Adams; M. A. J. Botje; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; R. J. M. Snellings; B. Yuting; S. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; V. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. Bland; C. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Sánchez; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Moura; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; A. Dubey; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; J. Gans; M. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. Harris; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; J. Klay; S. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kutuev; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; S. Nayak; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. Ray; S. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; K. Shestermanov; S. Shimanskiy; E Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. Wang; H. Ward; J. Watson; J. Webb; R. Wells; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Z. Zhang; P. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev

2005-01-01

298

Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation  

PubMed Central

A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

2013-01-01

299

Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au CdTe and Ag/Au CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

2008-09-01

300

Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

2013-03-01

301

Reliability of Au-Ge and Au-Si Eutectic Solder Alloys for High-Temperature Electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-temperature electronics will facilitate deeper drilling, accessing harder-to-reach fossil fuels in oil and gas industry. A key requirement is reliability under harsh conditions for a minimum continuous operating time of 500 h at 300°C. Eutectic solder alloys are generally favored due to their excellent fatigue resistance. Performance of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys at 300°C up to 500 h has been evaluated. Nanoindentation results confirm the loss of strength of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys during thermal aging at 300°C, as a result of grain coarsening. However, the pace at which the Au-Ge eutectic alloy loses its strength is much slower when compared with Au-Si eutectic alloy. The interfacial reactions between these eutectic solder alloys and the underbump metallization (UBM), i.e., electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) UBM and Cu/Au UBM, have been extensively studied. Spalling of Au3Cu intermetallic compound is observed at the interface between Au-Ge eutectic solder and the Cu/Au UBM, when aged at 300°C for 500 h, while the consumption of ENIG UBM is nominal. Unlike the Au-Si solder joint, hot ball shear testing at high temperature confirmed that the Au-Ge joint on ENIG UBM, when aged at 300°C for 500 h, could still comply with the minimum qualifying bump shear strength based on the UBM dimension used in this work. Thus, it has been determined that, among these two binary eutectic alloys, Au-Ge eutectic alloy could fulfill the minimum requirement specified by the oil and gas exploration industry.

Chidambaram, Vivek; Yeung, Ho Beng; Shan, Gao

2012-08-01

302

Hybrid Pt/Au Nanowires: Synthesis and Electronic Structure  

SciTech Connect

This letter reports the synthesis of a new type of noble metal/noble metal hybrid (Pt/Au hybrid nanowires) via galvanic replacement reaction between Pt nanowires and AuCl3. The width of nanowire component is about 2.3 {+-} 0.2 nm wide, and the diameter of Au component is about 4.5 nm {+-} 0.8 nm. More interestingly, by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique, charge transfer upon hybrids formation was observed, that d-charge depletion occurred at the Pt site, accompanied by d-charge gain at the Au site. The reported methodology to synthesize Pt/Au hybrid nanowires and study of electronic structure of Pt/Au hybrids will be of great importance in catalysis and materials science.

Teng,X.; Han, W.; Wang, Q.; Li, L.; Frenkel, A.; Yang, J.

2008-01-01

303

Thermodynamic description of the Au–Ag–Pb ternary system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined with previous assessments of the Au–Ag, Ag–Pb and Au–Pb binary systems, thermodynamic description of the Au–Ag–Pb ternary system has been performed using the CALPHAD method and Thermo-calc® software package on the basis of the reported experimental information. The solution phases, including liquid and fcc_A1, are modeled as substitutional solutions, of which the excess Gibbs energies are expressed by the

J. Wang; F. G. Meng; M. H. Rong; L. B. Liu; Z. P. Jin

2010-01-01

304

Hydrogen Dissociation over Au Nanowires and the Fractional Conductance Quantum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dissociation of H2 molecules over stretched Au nanowires and its effect on the conductance are analyzed using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations and nonequilibrium Keldysh-Green function methods. Our DFT simulations reproduce the characteristic formation of Au monatomic chains with a conductance close to G0=2e2\\/h. These stretched Au nanowires are shown to be better catalysts

Pavel Jelínek; Rubén Pérez; José Ortega; Fernando Flores

2006-01-01

305

Hybrid Pt\\/Au Nanowires: Synthesis and Electronic Structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter reports the synthesis of a new type of noble metal\\/noble metal hybrid (Pt\\/Au hybrid nanowires) via galvanic replacement reaction between Pt nanowires and AuCl3. The width of nanowire component is about 2.3 {+-} 0.2 nm wide, and the diameter of Au component is about 4.5 nm {+-} 0.8 nm. More interestingly, by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique, charge

Xiaowei Teng; Weiqiang Han; Qi Wang; Long Li; Anatoly I. Frenkel; Judith C. Yang

2008-01-01

306

Au144-xPdx(SR)60 nanomolecules.  

PubMed

Au144-xPdx(SR)60 alloy nanomolecules were synthesized and characterized by ESI mass spectrometry to atomic precision. The number of Pd atoms can be varied by changing the incoming metal ratio and plateaus at 7 Pd atoms. Based on the proposed 3-shell structure of Au144(SR)60, we hypothesize that the Pd atoms are selectively incorporated into the central Au12 icosahedral core. PMID:24126802

Kothalawala, Nuwan; Kumara, Chanaka; Ferrando, Riccardo; Dass, Amala

2013-10-24

307

Rapid room temperature synthesis of electrocatalytically active Au nanostructures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a facile route for the one-pot room temperature synthesis of anisotropic Au nanostructures in aqueous solution in the absence of seeds or surfactants and their electrocatalytic activity. The Au nanostructures were synthesized using piperazine derivatives 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine and 1,4-Bis(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine as reducing agents. The Au nanostructures were characterized by spectral, transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements. The

Ashok Kumar Das; C. Retna Raj

2011-01-01

308

Hydrogen from formic acid decomposition over Pd and Au catalysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vapour phase decomposition of formic acid has been studied systematically over a range of catalysts: 1.0 and 10wt.% Pd\\/C, 0.8wt.% Au\\/C and 1.0wt.% Au\\/TiO2. The mean metal particle size of these materials was estimated by HRTEM and turnover frequencies were calculated using these data. The Au\\/C catalyst was the least active and the Pd\\/C catalysts were the most active for

Dmitri A. Bulushev; Sergey Beloshapkin; Julian R. H. Ross

2010-01-01

309

Transition probability studies in 175Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transition probabilities have been measured between the low-lying yrast states in 175Au by employing the recoil distance Doppler-shift method combined with the selective recoil-decay tagging technique. Reduced transition probabilities and magnitudes of transition quadrupole moments have been extracted from measured lifetimes allowing dramatic changes in nuclear structure within a low excitation-energy range to probed. The transition quadrupole moment data are discussed in terms of available systematics as a function of atomic number and aligned angular momentum.

Grahn, T.; Watkins, H.; Joss, D. T.; Page, R. D.; Carroll, R. J.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hackstein, M.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Köll, Th; Krücken, R.; Labiche, M.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N.; Maierbeck, P.; Nyman, M.; Nieminen, P.; O'Donnell, D.; Ollier, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, Th; Rahkila, P.; Revill, J. P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Rigby, S. V.; Sarén, J.; Sapple, P. J.; Scheck, M.; Scholey, C.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Venhart, M.

2013-03-01

310

IMMIGRATION OF FISHES THROUGH THE SUEZ CANAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The number,of Red Sea fishes found in the eastern Mediterranean,amounts,to 36 species. Twelve immigrants, namely: Spratelloides delicatulus, Herklotsichthyspunctatus, Tylosurus choram, Sebas­ tapistes nuchalis, Epinephelus tauvina, Autisthesputa, Pelates quadrilineatus,Silago sihama, Rhon­ sicusstridens,Crenidenscrenidens,Rastrelligerkanagurta,Scomberomoruscommerson,were found in the last 12 yr. The southward migration, from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea is almost negligible. Only Liza aurata, Dicentrarchuspunctatus, and perhaps Carcharhinusplumbeus can be

Adam Bentuvia

311

An atomistic view of the interfacial structures of AuRh and AuPd nanorods.  

PubMed

In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi-epitaxial, strained interface between bulk miscible metals. By comparing the two systems, including molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to gain insights into the factors that may have influenced their structure and chemical ordering, which cannot be explained by the key structural and energetic parameters of either system in isolation, thus demonstrating the advantage of taking a comparative approach to the characterization of complex binary systems. This work highlights the importance of achieving a fundamental understanding of reaction kinetics in realizing the atomically controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts. PMID:23832276

Chantry, Ruth L; Atanasov, Ivailo; Siriwatcharapiboon, Wilai; Khanal, Bishnu P; Zubarev, Eugene R; Horswell, Sarah L; Johnston, Roy L; Li, Z Y

2013-08-21

312

RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run  

SciTech Connect

Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2011-09-04

313

First observation of excited structures in neutron-deficient ^177Au and ^178Au isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excited structures in the neutron-deficient ^177Au and ^178Au nuclei were populated with the ^103Rh(^78Kr,2pxn) reaction at 365 MeV. The experiment was performed at the ATLAS facility using the GAMMASPHERE array in conjunction with the recoil-decay tagging technique. By combining the simplicity of the ?-decay spectroscopy, following mass selection, with the complexity of the in-beam ?-ray coincidence technique we were able to establish for the first time comprehensive level schemes for these nuclei. In ^177Au decoupled bands built upon the intruder i_13/2 and h_9/2 proton orbitals, as well as a strongly coupled band associated with the high-K h_11/2 proton configuration, were identified. A doubly decoupled band originating from the ?h_9/2øtimes?f_7/2 configuration was established in ^178Au. The structure of these bands, together with the systematic trend of deformation changes within the chain of odd-Z gold isotopes, will be discussed.

Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Alcorta, M.; Brown, L. T.; Davids, C. N.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Sonzogni, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhöver, I.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Fischer, S. M.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Nouicer, R.

1999-10-01

314

Charged-particle rapidity density in Au+Au collisions in a quark combination model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapidity/pseudorapidity densities for charged particles and their centrality, rapidity, and energy dependence in Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a quark combination model. Using a Gaussian-type rapidity distribution for constituent quarks as a result of Landau hydrodynamic evolution, the data at sNN=130,200 GeV at various centralities in full pseudorapidity range are well described, and the charged-particle multiplicities are reproduced as functions of the number of participants. The energy dependence of the shape of the dNch/d? distribution is also described at various collision energies sNN=200,130,62.4 GeV in central collisions with same value of parameters except 19.6 GeV. The calculated rapidity distributions and yields for the charged pions and kaons in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are compared with experimental data of the BRAHMS Collaboration.

Shao, Feng-Lan; Yao, Tao; Xie, Qu-Bing

2007-03-01

315

An Exploration of Catalytic Chemistry on Au/Ni(111)  

SciTech Connect

This project explored the catalytic oxidation chemistry that can be effected on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy. A Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is a Ni(111) surface on which less than 60% of the Ni atoms are replaced at random positions by Au atoms. The alloy is produced by vapor deposition of a small amount of Au onto Ni single crystals. The Au atoms do not result in an epitaxial Au overlayer or in the condensation of the Au into droplets. Instead, Au atoms displace and then replace Ni atoms on a Ni(111) surface, even though Au is immiscible in bulk Ni. The two dimensional structure of the clean Ni surface is preserved. This alloy is found to stabilize an adsorbed peroxo-like O2 species that is shown to be the critical reactant in the low temperature catalytic oxidation of CO and that is suspected to be the critical reactant in other oxidation reactions. This investigation revealed a new, practically important catalyst for CO oxidation that has since been patented.

Sylvia T. Ceyer

2011-12-09

316

Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au?? clusters.  

PubMed

Au??L?? (L = S(CH?)?Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au??L??? quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au??L??? was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au??L??/Au??L??? and the Au??L???/Au??L?? redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (k(ET)) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ?G° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log k(ET)vs.?G°) relationship. Comparison with the k(ET) obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au??L??/Au??L??? showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors. PMID:22772766

Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

2012-07-09

317

Au34-: A Fluxional Core-Shell Cluster  

SciTech Connect

Among the large Aun – clusters for n > 20, the photoelectron spectra of Au34 – exhibit the largest energy gap (0.94 eV) with well-resolved spectral features, making it a good candidate for structural consideration in conjunction with theoretical studies. Extensive structural searches at several levels of theory revealed that the low-lying isomers of Au34 – can be characterized as fluxional core-shell type structures with 4 or 3 inner atoms and 30 or 31 outer atoms, i.e., Au4@Au30 – and Au3@Au31 –, respectively. Detailed comparisons between theoretical and photoelectron results suggest that the most probable ground state structures of Au34 – are of the Au4@Au30 – type. The 30 outer atoms seem to be disordered or fluxional, giving rise to a number of low-lying isomers with very close energies and simulated photoelectron spectra. The fluxional nature of the outer layer in large gold clusters or nanoparticles may have important implications for their remarkable catalytic activities.

Gu, Xiao; Bulusu, Satya; Li, Xi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Li, Jun; Gong, Xingao G.; Wang, Lai S.

2007-06-14

318

Electron paramagnetic resonance in positively charged Au25 molecular nanoclusters.  

PubMed

In this study, we investigated the unpaired electrons and singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMO) of positively charged Au(25) molecular clusters using solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The EPR powder spectra of the positively charged (Au(25) (+)) and neutral (Au(25) (0)) species of Au(25) are discussed and compared. Our study demonstrates that Au(25) (+) is paramagnetic with a SOMO that is mostly localized about the central gold atom in the core of the molecule and possesses a strong p-type atomic character. The unpaired electron spin is demonstrated to strongly interact with the nuclear spins from other (197)Au nuclei in the core of Au(25) (+) molecules and the hyperfine tensor describing such interaction was extracted from the comparison of the EPR spectra with quantum mechanical simulations assuming an anisotropic structure of the core. Our simulations suggest that the core of Au(25) (+) molecular clusters is more distorted than in the corresponding neutral counterpart. They also confirm previous hypotheses suggesting that the icosahedral core of Au(25) (+) experiences contraction with decreasing temperature. PMID:23320681

Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash; Hesari, Mahdi; Workentin, Mark S; Fanchini, Giovanni

2013-01-14

319

Control of density and LSPR of Au nanoparticles on graphene.  

PubMed

In this study, we introduce the tunable density and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of plasmonic gold (Au) nanoparticles which were formed on monolayer graphene at room temperature, based on the difference of the reduction potential between graphene and the Au(3+) precursor. The size of the Au nanoparticles was ~40 nm, which is very desirable to provide an optical enhancement effect by LSPR in the full visible range. It is demonstrated that the density of the Au nanoparticles was modulated by the surface energy of the graphene on the substrate as well as the concentration of the Au(3+) precursor. Furthermore, the cycle number of the reduction process strongly affected the distribution of the nanoparticle size and their optical properties. The LSPR of the plasmonic Au nanoparticles was red-shifted from 560 to 620 nm and its full width at half maximum broadened as the Au(3+) precursor concentration was increased and the cyclic reduction process progressed. Based on the optical enhancement of the plasmonic Au nanoparticles and the extraordinary physical characteristics of graphene, the Au/graphene assembly may offer a promising optoelectronic platform for next-generation flexible optical electronics or biosensors. PMID:23743613

Lee, Seungwoo; Lee, Min hyung; Shin, Hyeon-jin; Choi, Dukyun

2013-06-07

320

Structure sensitive adsorption of DMSO on Au surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Using a variable temperature STM, the authors have observed the absorption of DMSO on Au(100) and Au(111) surfaces at temperatures below 215 K. For DMSO on Au(100), the molecules are trapped on the terraces at high points on the hex reconstruction giving rise to an ordered low coverage phase. Consistent with data from previous temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements, this phase coexists with a higher coverage striped phase formed when the DMSO molecules associate with each other. On Au(111), the DMSO molecules nucleate, order, and grow only from step edges; the steps are the only appropriately electropositive sites on this surface.

Ikemiya, N.; Gewirth, A.A.

2000-02-10

321

Hydrogen dissociation over Au nanowires and the fractional conductance quantum.  

PubMed

The dissociation of H2 molecules over stretched Au nanowires and its effect on the conductance are analyzed using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations and nonequilibrium Keldysh-Green function methods. Our DFT simulations reproduce the characteristic formation of Au monatomic chains with a conductance close to G0=2e2/h. These stretched Au nanowires are shown to be better catalysts for dissociation than Au surfaces. This is confirmed by the nanowire conductance evidence: while insensitive to molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen induces the appearance of fractional conductances (G approximately 0.5G0) as observed experimentally. PMID:16486868

Jelínek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Ortega, José; Flores, Fernando

2006-02-02

322

Optical Response of Nanostructured Ag/Au And Au/Ag Bilayer Thin Films Deposited by Ion Beam Sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Bilayer metal thin films of total thickness 15 to 20 nm, were deposited by ion beam sputtering at very low ion energy (150 eV-250 eV). The thickness of bottom metal layer was kept constant whereas the thickness of top metal layer were varied in both, Ag/Au and Au/Ag bilayer, cases. There is a red shift in the position of the SPR peak due to the presence of the top metal layer. In the case of Au/Ag the presence of Au causes a shift from 444 nm to 628 nm while in the case of Ag/Au the shift is from 564 to 686 nm due to the presence of the Ag layer on Au. The tunability of plasmon resonances is attributed to the process of plasmon hybridization.

Brahma, Rajeeb; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 046 (India)

2011-07-15

323

Building rapport in diversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Australia is a pluralist society in the Pacific Rim, but maintains its British heritage. International tourism is flourishing and increasing numbers of Australians are using leisure facilities including parks, museums and heritage sites. How can interpreters deal with the variations in culture, social class, education and aspiration amongst their clients? Are those with high cultural capital disenfranchised by interpretations aimed

Carmel Desmarchelier

324

Synthesis and Characterization of Multimetallic Pd/Au and Pd/Au/FePt Core/Shell Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Core/shell nanoparticles of Pd/Au and Pd/Au/FePt were synthesized with palladium (5 nm diameter), a gold shell (1-2 nm), and a FePt shell (2 nm). The synthetic control allowed the Pd/Au catalytic properties to be tuned by the shell thickness. The synthesis provides an indication for future development of multicomponent nanoparticles for advanced catalytic applications.

Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Shouheng [Brown University; Mazumder, Vismadeb [Brown University; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

2010-01-01

325

NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Probing the Dissipation Mechanism in Ternary Reactions of 197Au+197Au by Mean Free Path of Nucleons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

the collision of very heavy nuclei 197Au+197Au at 15 A MeV has been studied within the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. A class of ternary events satisfying nearly complete balance of mass numbers is selected. The experimental mass distributions for the system 197Au+197Au ternary fission fragments, the heaviest (A1), the intermediate (A2) and the lightest (A3), are reproduced well. The mean free path of nucleons in the reaction system is studied and the shorter mean free path is responsible for the ternary fission with three mass comparable fragments, in which the two-body dissipation mechanism plays a dominant role.

Tian, Jun-Long; Li, Xian; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xi-Zhen; Li, Zhu-Xia

2009-08-01

326

Strangeness Enhancement in Cu-Cu and Au-Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report new STAR measurements of midrapidity yields for the ?, ?¯, KS0, ?-, ?¯+, ?-, ?¯+ particles in Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=200GeV, and midrapidity yields for the ?, ?¯, KS0 particles in Au+Au at sNN=200GeV. We show that, at a given number of participating nucleons, the production of strange hadrons is higher in Cu+Cu collisions than in Au+Au collisions at the same center-of-mass energy. We find that aspects of the enhancement factors for all particles can be described by a parametrization based on the fraction of participants that undergo multiple collisions.

Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schaub, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Desouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.

2012-02-01

327

Evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at s=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present first measurements of the evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function, C, with collision centrality in Au + Au interactions at s=200 GeV. This observable exhibits a strong dependence on collision centrality that is qualitatively similar to that of number correlations previously reported. We use the observed longitudinal broadening of the near-side peak of C with increasing centrality to estimate the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density, ?/s, of the matter formed in central Au + Au interactions. We obtain an upper limit estimate of ?/s that suggests that the produced medium has a small viscosity per unit entropy.

STAR Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Knospe, A. G.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Souza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.

2011-10-01

328

Correlation of magnetism and structure for ultra thin Au/Co/Au films: Evidence for magnetoelastic effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spin-reorientation transition of thin Au/Co/Au films, grown in-situ on W(110), is studied in XMCD and EXAFS experiments. At 300 K, for in-situ grown Co on a Au(111) film, the dominant easy magnetization direction was found to be in the surface plane, for the uncapped Co/Au bilayers. This is a novel observation, in terms of easy magnetization direction for low thickness Co on Au. After capping with Au, a sizeable out-of-plane magnetization is observed below a thickness of four atomic Co layers. When the spin-reorientation transition occurs because of Au capping, a 5 Å thin Co layer undergoes structural changes of lattice parameters ?a/a = -1.2 % and ?c/c = +6.6 %. The observation of structural changes which accompany the spin reorientation transition, contradicts previous work on Co/Au(111), and allows to quantify the magnetoelastic energy contribution, connected with the presence of the Co/Au interface.

Sakamaki, M.; Konishi, T.; Fujikawa, T.; Persson, A.; Andersson, C.; Karis, O.; Arvanitis, D.; Rossner, H.; Holub-Krappe, E.

2009-11-01

329

Energy Loss and Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. The nuclear modification factor RAA relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'Yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kano; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y.-S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; H. Lim; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; H. Okada; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slunecka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomásek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V.-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; J. Velkovska; R. Vertesi; A. A. Vinogradov; M. Virius; V. Vrba; E. Vznuzdaev

2007-01-01

330

Strangeness Enhancement in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at \\\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report new STAR measurements of mid-rapidity yields for the $\\\\Lambda$, $\\\\bar{\\\\Lambda}$, $K^{0}_{S}$, $\\\\Xi^{-}$, $\\\\bar{\\\\Xi}^{+}$, $\\\\Omega^{-}$, $\\\\bar{\\\\Omega}^{+}$ particles in Cu+Cu collisions at \\\\sNN{200}, and mid-rapidity yields for the $\\\\Lambda$, $\\\\bar{\\\\Lambda}$, $K^{0}_{S}$ particles in Au+Au at \\\\sNN{200}. We show that at a given number of participating nucleons, the production of strange hadrons is higher in Cu+Cu collisions than in Au+Au collisions

H. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; D. R. Beavis; N. K. Behera; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L. X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. G. Jones; C. Jena; F. Jin; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; A. G. Knospe; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; T. K. Nayak; P. K. Netrakanti; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen; Jr; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I. K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

2011-01-01

331

Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions at ? sNN = 200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons,\\u000aprotons and antiprotons are reported for sqrt{s_NN}=200 GeV pp and Au+Au\\u000acollisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent\\u000awithin |y|<0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity\\u000ainterval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and\\u000aperipheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bhardwaj; P. Bhaskar; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; J. E. Draper; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Fachini; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. Filimonov; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; M. S. Ganti; T. D. Gutierrez; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; V. Grigoriev; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; M. Guedon; S. M. Guertin; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; A. S. Konstantinov; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis

2004-01-01

332

PHENIX Results for J/{psi} Transverse Momentum and Rapidity Dependence in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions  

SciTech Connect

The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured J/{psi} production in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at forward (1.2 < |y| < 2.2) and mid (|y| < 0.35) rapidities. The most recent results for the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of J/{psi} production are presented and compared with PHENIX baseline p + p measurements and selected theoretical calculations. We find that the J/{psi} production is significantly more suppressed, as compared to p + p, at forward rapidity than at mid rapidity in central Au+Au collisions.

Glenn, A. M. [University of Colorado; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Batsouli, Sotiria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; Young, Glenn R [ORNL; Zhang, Chun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); PHENIX, Collaboration [The

2007-01-01

333

PtAu bimetallic heteronanostructures made by post-synthesis modification of Pt-on-Au nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bimetallic PtAu heteronanostructures have been synthesized from Pt-on-Au nanoparticles, which were made from platinum acetylacetonate\\u000a and gold nanoparticles. Using the Pt-on-Au nanoparticles as precursors, Ptsurface rich PtAu bimetallic heteronanostructures\\u000a can be produced through controlled thermal treatments, as confirmed by field emission high-resolution transmission electron\\u000a microscopy (HR-TEM) and elemental mapping using a high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope\\u000a (HAADF-STEM). Oxidation

Zhenmeng Peng; Hong Yang

2009-01-01

334

CO oxidation on h-BN supported Au atom.  

PubMed

The mechanism of CO oxidation by O(2) on Au atoms supported on the pristine and defected hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surface has been studied theoretically using density functional theory. It is found that O(2) binds stronger than CO on an Au atom supported on the defect free h-BN surface and h-BN surface with nitrogen vacancy (V(N)@h-BN), but weaker than CO on a free Au atom or Au trapped by a boron vacancy (V(B)@h-BN). The excess of the positive or negative charge on Au can considerably change its catalytic properties and enhance activation of the adsorbed O(2). Coadsorption of CO and O(2) on Au, Au/V(N)@h-BN, and Au/V(B)@h-BN results in additional charge transfer to O(2). Various pathways of the CO oxidation reaction by molecular oxygen are studied. We found two different pathways for CO oxidation: a two-step pathway where two CO(2) molecules are formed independently, and a self-promotion pathway where oxidation of the first CO molecule is promoted by the second CO molecule. Interaction of Au with the defect-free and defected h-BN surface considerably affects the CO oxidation reaction pathways and barriers. Therefore, Au supported on the h-BN surface (pristine or defected) cannot be considered as pseudo-free atom and support effects have to be taken into account, even when the interaction of Au with the support is weak. PMID:23343287

Gao, Min; Lyalin, Andrey; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

2013-01-21

335

High transverse momentum {eta} meson production in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx_equal}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The {eta} mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, R{sub dAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest p{sub T} broadening (''Cronin enhancement''). In central Au+Au reactions, the {eta} yields are significantly suppressed, with R{sub AuAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of p{sub T} for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-p{sub T} world average of R{sub {eta}/{pi}{sup 0}}{approx_equal}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s{sub NN}){approx_equal}3-1800 GeV) as well as, for high scaled momentum x{sub p}, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-p{sub T} {eta} production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

Adler, S. S.; Aronson, S. H.; Chujo, T.; David, G.; Desmond, E. J.; Drees, K. A.; Ewell, L.; Franz, A.; Guryn, W.; Haggerty, J. S.; Harvey, M.; Johnson, B. M.; Kistenev, E.; Kroon, P. J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitchell, J. T.; Morrison, D. P.; O'Brien, E.; Pinkenburg, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] (and others)

2007-02-15

336

Transparent, conductive gold nanowire networks assembled from soluble Au thiocyanate.  

PubMed

Extremely long gold nanowires spontaneously assemble in a water-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution of Au(SCN)4(-). The Au nanowires were crystalline, exhibited a very high aspect ratio, and, importantly, were produced without co-addition of reducing agents. Transparent conductive films were formed by surface deposition of the nanowires and plasma treatment. PMID:23945825

Morag, Ahiud; Ezersky, Vladimir; Froumin, Natalya; Mogiliansky, Dimitry; Jelinek, Raz

2013-08-27

337

AuAg alloy nanomolecules with 38 metal atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au38-nAgn(SCH2CH2Ph)24 alloy nanomolecules were synthesized, purified and characterized by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. Similar to 25 and unlike 144 metal atom count AuAg alloy nanomolecules, incorporation of Ag atoms here results in loss or smearing out of distinct UV-vis features. We propose that the short and long staples contain Au atoms, while the inner core consists of both Au and Ag atoms.Au38-nAgn(SCH2CH2Ph)24 alloy nanomolecules were synthesized, purified and characterized by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. Similar to 25 and unlike 144 metal atom count AuAg alloy nanomolecules, incorporation of Ag atoms here results in loss or smearing out of distinct UV-vis features. We propose that the short and long staples contain Au atoms, while the inner core consists of both Au and Ag atoms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11781a

Kumara, Chanaka; Dass, Amala

2012-06-01

338

Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints  

SciTech Connect

Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

Song, Ho Geon

2002-05-31

339

Depth distributions of Au recoil atoms in silicon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The depth distributions of Au recoil atoms in Si have been investigated for Ar, Kr, and Xe ions implantation in 25 30 nm of an Au-Si system. The profiles were measured by means of RBS and radioactive techniques. The experimental results were compared with theoretical Gras-Marti analytical expressions and Monte-Carlo simulated depth distributions.

Paprocki, K.; Brylowska, I.; Syszko, W.

1988-08-01

340

Au(111) and Pt(111) surface phase behavior.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We describe our recent x-ray-scattering studies of the structure and phases of the clean Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces. Below 0.65 of their respective bulk melting temperatures, the Au(111) surface has a well-ordered chevron reconstruction and the Pt(111) ...

A. R. Sandy S. G. J. Mochrie D. M. Zehner G. Gruebel K. G. Huang

1992-01-01

341

X-ray reflectivity studies of Au surfaces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We briefly review the results of x-ray scattering studies of the Au(001) surface between 300 K and the bulk melting temperature Tm = 1337 K. The specular reflectivities of the Au(001), (110), and (111) surfaces obtained at 300 K are compared. 12 refs., 5 ...

D. L. Abernathy S. G. J. Mochrie A. R. Sandy D. Gibbs G. Gruebel

1991-01-01

342

X-ray reflectivity studies of Au surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We briefly review the results of x-ray scattering studies of the Au(001) surface between 300 K and the bulk melting temperature Tm = 1337 K. The specular reflectivities of the Au(001), (110), and (111) surfaces obtained at 300 K are compared. 12 refs., 5 figs.

Abernathy, D.L.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Sandy, A.R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Gibbs, D.; Gruebel, G.; Huang, K.G.; Ocko, B.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Zehner, D.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-01-01

343

Atomistic modeling of Au-Ag nanoparticle formation  

SciTech Connect

Atomistic modeling of the formation process of Au-Ag nanoparticles is performed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith method for alloys for the energetic. Silver segregation to the surface, surface structure and orientation, and weak Au-Ag interactions are identified as the main features driving the formation process.

Negreiros, F. R.; Soares, E. A.; Carvalho, V. E. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postale 702, Belo Horizonte, 30123-970 Minas Gerais (Brazil); Bozzolo, G. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, Cleveland, Ohio 44142 (United States) and NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)

2007-12-15

344

Testing the exponential decay law of gold 198Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A long time scale experimental testing of the exponential decay law of gold, 198Au, is presented. The experiment has been processed by using a contemporary digital spectrum analyzer. Within the limits of the experimental errors no deviation from the exponential decay law of 198Au has been observed.

Novkovi?, D.; Nadderd, L.; Kandi?, A.; Vukanac, I.; Duraševi?, M.; Jordanov, D.

2006-10-01

345

Predicting the 1AU arrival times of coronal mass ejections  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe an empirical model to predict the 1-AU arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This model is based on an effective interplanetary (IP) acceleration described by Gopalswamy et al. [2000b] that the CMEs are subject to, as they propagate from the Sun to 1 AU. We have improved this model (1) by minimizing the projection effects (using data from

Nat Gopalswamy; Alejandro Lara; Seiji Yashiro; Mike L. Kaiser

2001-01-01

346

African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development. Report and Recommendations = Colloque regional africain la telematique au service du developpement. Rapport et recommandations (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 3-7, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development was organized in view of the special educational and communication needs of Africa in a time of accelerating change and development of information technologies. The symposium brought together more than 150 African specialists, and over 40 participants from other regions and development…

International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

347

Champ de Pression Engendre Par le Mouvement Chaotique de Tourbillons au Voisinage d'Une Paroi. Rapport Final (Pressure Field Developed by the Random Movement of the Vortices Near a Wall).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The behavior of a linear ensemble of vortices, in a two dimensional non rotating fluid near a wall is modeled. The experimental results are presented and discussed. The initial motion of the vortices are characterized by Fourier transformation, by phase a...

L. Collorec D. Juve

1991-01-01

348

Growth and magnetic properties of epitaxial Au/Fe/Au and Ag/Fe/Au films on ?-Al2O3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanoscale Fe(1 1 0) layers have been fabricated on ?-Al2O3 using DC magnetron sputtering with Au(1 1 1) or Ag(1 1 1) as a buffer layer. Atomic force microscopy shows that Au(1 1 1) grows as a continuous layer and Ag(1 1 1) grows as nanoislands of irregular shapes and sizes. Magneto-optic Kerr effect shows that a 12 nm Fe(1 1 0) layer deposited on Au(1 1 1) at 295 K and on Ag(1 1 1) at 640 K is ferromagnetic at room temperature. In-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed for the Fe(1 1 0) layer on Au(1 1 1). The layer thickness, the surface coverage and the magnetization of the films have been determined by polarized neutron reflectometry.

Krishnamurthy, V. V.; Te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Srinath, S.; Mani, Prakash; Mankey, G. J.

2005-02-01

349

Facile, Large Scale Synthesis of Dodecanethiol Stabilized Au38 Clusters  

PubMed Central

It has long been a major challenge to achieve synthetic control over size and monodispersity of gold thiolate nanoclusters. Among the reported Aun thiolate clusters, Au38 has been shown to be particularly stable, but was only obtained as a minor product in previous syntheses. In this work, we report a bulk solution synthetic method that permits large scale, facile synthesis of truly monodisperse Au38 nanoclusters. This new method explores a two-phase ligand exchange process utilizing glutathione-capped Aun clusters as the starting material. The ligand exchange process with neat dodecanethiols causes gold core etching and secondary growth of clusters, and eventually leads to monodisperse Au38 clusters in high purity, which eliminates nontrivial postsynthetic separation steps. This method can be readily scaled up to synthesize Au38(SC12H25)24 in large quantities, and thus makes the approach and Au38 nanoclusters of broad utility.

Qian, Huifeng; Zhu, Manzhou; Andersen, Ulla N.; Jin, Rongchao

2009-01-01

350

Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts  

SciTech Connect

Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry.

Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

1999-12-06

351

High-spin level scheme of {sup 183}Au  

SciTech Connect

High-spin states in {sup 183}Au have been studied experimentally using the {sup 159}Tb({sup 29}Si,5n){sup 183}Au reaction at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Three- or higherfold {gamma}-ray coincidences have been measured using the detector array of GASP. The level scheme of {sup 183}Au was revised and extended. A rotational band proposed as the unfavored signature branch of the {pi}i{sub 13/2} band has been observed for {sup 183}Au. Interaction properties between the two negative-signature bands of the {pi}h{sub 9/2}-{pi}f{sub 7/2} system have been discussed for the light odd-A Au nuclei.

Song, L.T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou, X.H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Guo, Y. X.; Lei, X.G.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); De Angelis, G.; Marginean, N.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Axiotis, M.; Rusu, C.; Martinez, T. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

2005-01-01

352

High Transverse Momentum {eta} Meson Production in p+p,d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}R{sub NN}=200 GeV. The eta mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, RdAu(p{sub T}){approx}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest pT broadening ('Cronin enhancement'). In central Au+Au reactions, the eta yields are significantly suppressed, with RAuAu(p{sub T}){approx}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of pT for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-pT world average of R{sub {eta}}/{pi}{sup 0}{approx}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies {radical}R{sub NN}{approx}3-1800 GeV as well as, for high scaled momentum xp, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}R=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-pT eta production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

Adler, S. S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Batsouli, Sotiria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Plasil, F [ORNL; Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; Young, Glenn R [ORNL; Zhang, Chun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); PHENIX, Collaboration [The

2007-01-01

353

Electron supersurface scattering on polycrystalline Au.  

PubMed

Supersurface electron scattering, i.e., electron energy losses and associated deflections in vacuum above the surface of a medium, is shown to contribute significantly to electron spectra. We have obtained experimental verification (in absolute units) of theoretical predictions that the angular distribution of the supersurface backscattering probability exhibits strong oscillations which are anticorrelated with the generalized Ramsauer-Townsend minima in the backscattering probability. We have investigated 500-eV electron backscattering from an Au surface for an incidence angle of 70° and scattering angles between 37° and 165°. After removing the contribution of supersurface scattering from the experimental data, the resulting angular and energy distribution agrees with the Landau-Goudsmit-Saunderson (LGS) theory, which was proposed about 60 years ago, while the raw data are anticorrelated with LGS theory. This result implies that supersurface scattering is an essential phenomenon for quantitative understanding of electron spectra. PMID:23473176

Werner, Wolfgang S M; Novák, Mihály; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Zemek, Josef; Jiricek, Petr

2013-02-22

354

Electron Supersurface Scattering On Polycrystalline Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supersurface electron scattering, i.e., electron energy losses and associated deflections in vacuum above the surface of a medium, is shown to contribute significantly to electron spectra. We have obtained experimental verification (in absolute units) of theoretical predictions that the angular distribution of the supersurface backscattering probability exhibits strong oscillations which are anticorrelated with the generalized Ramsauer-Townsend minima in the backscattering probability. We have investigated 500-eV electron backscattering from an Au surface for an incidence angle of 70° and scattering angles between 37° and 165°. After removing the contribution of supersurface scattering from the experimental data, the resulting angular and energy distribution agrees with the Landau-Goudsmit-Saunderson (LGS) theory, which was proposed about 60 years ago, while the raw data are anticorrelated with LGS theory. This result implies that supersurface scattering is an essential phenomenon for quantitative understanding of electron spectra.

Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Novák, Mihály; Salvat–Pujol, Francesc; Zemek, Josef; Jiricek, Petr

2013-02-01

355

Charged particle multiplicity in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at relativistic energies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au + Au collisions at p sNN= 19.6, 130, and 200 GeV and Cu+Cucollisions at p sNN= 22.4, and 200 GeV have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at mid-rapidity have also been measured. Pseudo-rapidity distributions of charged particles

B. B. Back; M. D. Baker; D. S. Barton; R. R. Betts; R. Bindel; A. Budzanowski; W. Busza; A. Carroll; J. Corbo; M. P. Decowski; E. Garcia; N. George; K. Gulbrandsen; S. Gushue; C. Halliwell; J. Hamblen; G. A. Heintzelman; C. Henderson; D. Hicks; D. J. Hofman; R. Hollis; R. Ho; B. Holzman; A. Iordanova; E. Johnson; J. L. Kane; J. Katzy; N. Khan; W. Kucewicz; P. Kulinich; C. M. Kuo; W. T. Lin; S. Manly; D. McLeod; A. C. Mignerey; J. Mulmenstadt; R. Nouicer; A. Olszewski; R. Pak; H. Pernegger; M. Rafelski; M. Rbeiz; C. Reed; L. P. Remsberg; M. Reuter; C. Roland; G. Roland; L. Rosenberg; J. Sagerer; P. Sarin; P. Sawicki; W. Skulski; S. G. Steadman; P. Steinberg; G. S. F. Stephans; M. Stodulski; A. Sukhanov; J.-L. Tang; R. Teng; A. Trzupek; C. Vale; G. Veres; G. J. van Nieuwenhuizen; R. Verdier; B. Wadsworth; F. L. H. Wolfs; B. Wosiek; K. Wozniak; A. H. Wuosmaa; B. Wys

356

Sideward flow in Au+Au collisions between 2A and 8A GeV  

SciTech Connect

Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at beam energies of 2A, 4A, 6A, and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum

Liu, H.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.; Draper, J.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Huo, L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Schroeder, L.S.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wang, S.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Yang, X.; Zhang, W.N.; Zhang, Y.; E895 Collaboration

2000-04-05

357

Charmonium dynamics in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The formation and suppression dynamics of J/{psi},{chi}{sub c}, and {psi}{sup '} mesons is studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach for Au+Au reactions at the top energy currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) of {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Two prominent models, which have been discussed for more than a decade, are incorporated, i.e., the hadronic comover absorption and reformation model as well as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) threshold scenario, and compared with available experimental data. Our studies demonstrate that both scenarios, which are compatible with experimental observation at SPS energies, fail severely at RHIC energies. This combined analysis, together with the underestimation of charm elliptic flow, proves that the dynamics of c,c quarks are dominated by partonic interactions in the strong QGP and can be neither modeled by hadronic interactions nor described appropriately by color screening alone.

Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Stoecker, H. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-10-15

358

200 A GeV Au + Au collisions serve a nearly perfect quark-gluon liquid.  

PubMed

A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity (?/s)(QGP) of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T(c) < T ? 2T(c) from the centrality dependence of the eccentricity-scaled elliptic flow v2/? measured in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Coupling viscous fluid dynamics for the QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions that v2/? is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN(ch)/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity ?. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4?(?/s)(QGP) < 2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of ? used to normalize the measured v2. PMID:21668145

Song, Huichao; Bass, Steffen A; Heinz, Ulrich; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Shen, Chun

2011-05-09

359

Antilambda Production in Au+Au Collisions at 11.7A GeV/c  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results for antilambda and antiproton production in Au+Au collisions at 11.7 A GeV/c including spectra and extracted invariant yields for both species in central and peripheral collisions in the rapidity range 1.0

Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chi, C. Y.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cumming, J. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Fung, S. Y.; Ganz, R.; Garcia, E.; Gillitzer, A.; Heintzelman, G.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kwon, Y.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Moulson, M.; Nanal, V.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Pak, R.; Ruangma, A.; Russ, D. E.; Seto, R.; Stanskas, P. J.; Stephans, G. S.; Wang, H.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Xiang, H.; Xu, G. H.; Yao, H. B.; Zou, C. M.

2001-12-01

360

Vibrations of Au?? and FeAu?? nanoparticles and the limits of the Debye temperature concept.  

PubMed

We present first-principles calculations of the vibrational density of states (VDOS), the specific heat and the mean-squared displacement of the five lowest-energy isomers of Au(13) and of two low-energy FeAu(12) nanoparticles. We find that the vibrational contributions to the Helmholtz energy do not affect the energy ordering of the isomers. As expected, for nanoparticles the vibrational density of states differs dramatically from the function proposed by the Debye model. We demonstrate that, for the nanoclusters we studied, the alternative calculations of the 'Debye temperature' yield significantly inconsistent results. We conclude that T(D) obtained from a particular thermodynamic property is neither applicable for deriving conclusions about other thermodynamic properties nor correlated with atomic bond strengths. Instead, in order to describe the temperature dependence of a nanoparticle's mean-squared displacement and its specific-heat capacity, what is necessary is its discrete phonon spectrum. PMID:22354075

Shafai, Ghazal; Ortigoza, Marisol Alcántara; Rahman, Talat S

2012-02-21

361

Study of Kaon Isospin Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at STAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent theoretical studies have suggested that in heavy ion collisions the formation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) may result from the restoration and subsequent re-breaking of chiral symmetry. Searches for DCC have so far focused on the pion sector with little attention given to the Kaon sector. Recently however, Kapusta has suggested the observation of enhanced production of ? and \\overline? at s_NN = 17 GeV, in Pb+Pb collisions, can in part be explained by the production of many small strange DCC regions. Gavin and Kapusta have additionally shown that strange DCCs production may induce anomalous fluctuations of the Kaon total isospin. We present a statistical analysis of Kaon isospin fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at 130- and 200-GeV measured with the STAR apparatus. The analysis is based on the ?_dyn fluctuation measure which correlates the production of neutral and charged kaons.

Rose, Andrew

2002-10-01

362

Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H? emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H?, H?, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R ?, thickness of 5.2 R ?, density of 1.0 × 10-13 g cm-3, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4 × 10-9 M ? yr-1. We show H? Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the H? profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Ján; Peters, Geraldine J.

2012-12-01

363

Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size ˜15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

Philip, Daizy

2009-07-01

364

Tunneling characteristics of Au-alkanedithiol-Au junctions formed via nanotransfer printing (nTP).  

PubMed

Construction of permanent metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions, though technically challenging, is desirable for both fundamental investigations and applications of molecule-based electronics. In this study, we employed the nanotransfer printing (nTP) technique using perfluoropolyether (PFPE) stamps to print Au thin films onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanedithiol formed on Au thin films. We show that the resulting MMM junctions form permanent and symmetrical tunnel junctions, without the need for an additional protection layer between the top metal electrode and the molecular layer. This type of junction makes it possible for direct investigations into the electrical properties of the molecules and the metal-molecule interfaces. Dependence of transport properties on the length of the alkane molecules and the area of the printed Au electrodes has been examined systematically. From the analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the Simmons model, the height of tunneling barrier associated with the molecule (alkane) has been determined to be 3.5 ± 0.2 eV, while the analysis yielded an upper bound of 2.4 eV for the counterpart at the interface (thiol). The former is consistent with the theoretical value of ~3.5-5.0 eV. The measured I-V curves show scaling with respect to the printed Au electrode area with lateral dimensions ranging from 80 nm to 7 ?m. These results demonstrate that PFPE-assisted nTP is a promising technique for producing potentially scalable and permanent MMM junctions. They also demonstrate that MMM structures (produced by the unique PFPE-assisted nTP) constitute a reliable test bed for exploring molecule-based electronics. PMID:22720785

Niskala, Jeremy R; Rice, William C; Bruce, Robert C; Merkel, Timothy J; Tsui, Frank; You, Wei

2012-07-12

365

The 198Au ? - half-life in the metal Au revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The half-life of the ? - -decay of 198Au has been measured for room temperature and 12K. The resulting values of T 1/2 (RT) = 2.684±0.004 d and T 1/2 (12K) = 2.687±0.005 d agree well within statistical uncertainties. Evidence for the temperature dependence of the half-life was not observed.

Fortak, K.; Kunz, R.; Gialanella, L.; Becker, H.-W.; Meijer, J.; Strieder, F.

2010-11-01

366

{phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

2004-06-01

367

Effect of P lasma Treatment of Au\\/Ni\\/Cu b ond pads on Process Windows of Au Wire Bonding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wire bondability of Au\\/Ni\\/Cu bond pads with different Au plating schemes, including electrolytic and immersion plates, are evaluated after plasma treatment. The plasma cleaning conditions, such as cleaning power and time, are optimized bas ed on the process window and wire pull strength measurements for different bond pad temperatures. Difference in the efficiency of plasma treatment in improving the

Yu Hin Chan; Deming Liu; Kee Liu; Yiu Ming Cheung; Ming Wai Ng

368

Effect of plasma treatment of Au-Ni-Cu bond pads on process windows of Au wire bonding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wire bondability of Au-Ni-Cu bond pads with different Au plating schemes, including electrolytic and immersion plates, are evaluated after plasma treatment. The plasma cleaning conditions, such as cleaning power and time, are optimized based on the process window and wire pull strength measurements for different bond pad temperatures. Difference in the efficiency of plasma treatment in improving the wire

Yu Hin Chan; Jang-Kyo Kim; Deming Liu; P. C. K. Liu; Yiu-Ming Cheung; Ming Wai Ng

2005-01-01

369

Elevated Temperature Creep Properties of Conventional 50Au-50Cu and 47Au 50Cu-3Ni Braze Alloys.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The elevated temperature creep properties of the 50Au-50Cu wt% and 47Au-50Cu-3Ni braze alloys have been evaluated over the temperature range 250-850 C. At elevated temperatures, i.e., 450-850 C, both alloys were tested in the annealed condition (2 hrs. 75...

Stephens Schmale

2000-01-01

370

Electronic and resonance Raman spectra of [Au2(CS3)2]2-. Spectroscopic properties of a "short" Au(I)-Au(I) bond.  

PubMed

The anion [Au2(CS3)2]2- has an unusually short Au-Au distance (2.80 A) for a binuclear Au(I) complex. We report detailed Raman studies of the nBu4N+ salt of this complex, including FT-Raman of the solid and UV/vis resonance Raman of dimethyl sulfoxide solutions. All five totally symmetric vibrations of the anion have been located and assigned. A band at delta nu = 125 cm-1 is assigned to nu (Au2). The visible-region electronic absorption bands (384 (epsilon 30,680) and 472 nm (epsilon 610 M-1 cm-1)) are attributable to CS3(2-) localized transitions, as confirmed by the dominance of nu sym(C-Sexo) (delta nu = 951 cm-1) in RR spectra measured in this region. An absorption band at 314 nm (22,250 M-1 cm-1) is assigned as the metal-metal 1(d sigma*-->p sigma) transition, largely because nu sym(C-Sexo) is not strongly enhanced in RR involving this band. Observation of the expected strong resonance enhancement of nu (Au2) was precluded as a result of masking by intense solvent Rayleigh scattering in the UV. PMID:11196834

Cheng, E C; Leung, K H; Miskowski, V M; Yam, V W; Phillips, D L

371

Influence of contacts on charge collection in an Au/CdTe/Au detector: A Simulation  

SciTech Connect

We report our simulations on the influence of contacts on charge collection in semi-insulating (CdZn)Te with Au contacts under radiation flux, employing simultaneous solutions of the drift-diffusion and Poisson equations. The type of the space charge and the distribution of the electric field in the Au/(CdZn)Te/Au structure at high fluxes reflect the combined influence of charge generated by band bending at the electrodes, and from photogenerated carriers trapped at deep levels. We show that the space charge originating from the latter approaches dominance at high fluxes while the influence of the contacts becomes negligible. The ratio of trapping and collection times at low fluxes strongly depends on band bending, due mainly to a change in the occupation of deep levels by injection or depletion from the contacts. Such dependence is weak at high fluxes; in this case, the space charge due to trapped carriers prevails over that formed due to band bending. These phenomena can cause the formation an electric-field minimum within the device (the pinch point), the position of which is influenced by the nature of the contacts. The field minimum can completely disappear or develop into a dead layer as band bending changes.

Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; KUBAT, J.; BELAS, E.; HOSCHL, P.; MORAVEC, P.; AND Praus, P.

2010-12-01

372

Jet structure of baryon excess in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Two particle correlations between identified meson and baryon trigger particles with 2.5Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. In noncentral Au+Au collisions, the probability of finding a hadron near in azimuthal angle to the trigger particles is almost identical for mesons and baryons and significantly higher than in p+p collisions. The associated yields for trigger baryons decrease in the most central collisions, consistent with some baryon production by thermal recombination in addition to hard scattering.

Adler, S.S.; Aronson, S.H.; Chujo, T.; David, G.; Desmond, E.J.; Drees, K.A.; Ewell, L.; Franz, A.; Guryn, W.; Haggerty, J.S.; Harvey, M.; Johnson, B.M.; Kistenev, E.; Kroon, P.J.; Makdisi, Y.I.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Morrison, D.P.; O'Brien, E.; Pinkenburg, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [and others

2005-05-01

373

EQCM study of the [Au(III)Cl4](-)-[Au(I)Cl2](-)-Au(0) redox system in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate room-temperature ionic liquid.  

PubMed

The electrochemical behavior of the [Au(III)Cl(4)](-)-[Au(I)Cl(2)](-)-Au(0) redox system in room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIBF(4)) has been investigated quantitatively using an in situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) technique based on a Pt film-coated quartz crystal electrode (Pt-QCE). A series of two-electron (2e) and one-electron (1e) reductions of the [Au(III)Cl(4)](-) to [Au(I)Cl(2)](-) and [Au(I)Cl(2)](-) to Au metal were recognized at the Pt surface. Besides, the disproportionation reaction of [Au(I)Cl(2)](-) (i.e., the 2e-reduction product of [Au(III)Cl(4)](-)) to [Au(III)Cl(4)](-) and Au metal was also observed. Electro-dissolution of the Au deposited on the Pt electrode through a 1e-oxidation reaction in the presence of chloride ions was also confirmed using the Pt-QCE based EQCM technique. A 2e-oxidation reaction of [Au(I)Cl(2)](-) (i.e., the dissolved product) to [Au(III)Cl(4)](-) along with the oxidation of Cl(-) ion on the Pt surface was also realized at high anodic potential. The results demonstrate that in situ EQCM technique is applicable and powerful in elucidating electrochemical surface phenomena accompanying a mass change in RTIL. PMID:20163082

Oyama, Taku; Yamaguchi, Shuichiro; Rahman, Mohammad Rezaur; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo; Oyama, Noboru

2010-06-01

374

Les migrations en Basse Casamance (Sénégal): Projet d'une recherche multidisciplinaire sur les facteurs socio-économiques favorisant la migration en Basse Casamance et sur ses conséquences pour les lieux d'origine : rapport final  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deux des limitations majeurs des études sur les migration en Afrique Noire sont leur orientation axée vers l'analyse des caractéristiques et motivations individuelles des migrants et la négligence de l'évaluation des conséquences sur les lieux de départ. Ce rapport, résultat d'une recherche menée en 1974 et 1975 par des chercheurs de l'Afrika-Studiecentrum dans quatre villages de Basse Casamance (Sénégal) vise

Jonge de K; Klei van der J; H. A. Meilink; R. Storm

1978-01-01

375

Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ?G° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ?G°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ?G° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ?G°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on metallic clusters. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 14 of vol. 4 (2012). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale].

Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

2012-08-01

376

Rapport sur l'état du patrimoine astronomique dans les observatoires français de la fin du XIXè siècle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Suite au colloque sur la sauvegarde du patrimoine astronomique organisé par le MAEE et la SAF, sous l'égide de l'UNESCO, qui a conduit à l'adoption de la Déclaration de Paris, les directeurs d'observatoires institutionnels qui étaient absents du colloque ont ressenti le besoin de discuter de ces conclusions prises en leur nom. L'initiative d'organiser une réunion des directeurs des Observatoires des Sciences de l'Univers (OSU) à ce sujet le 30 janvier 2012 a été prise par François Vernotte, directeur de l'Observatoire de Besançon. Le présent compte-rendu de visite résulte d'une initiative spontanée d'Emmanuel Pécontal, astronome responsable du Patrimoine à l'observatoire de Lyon, et d'Evelyne Damm, membre de la Commission Nationale de classement des Monuments Historiques (CNMH) et élue à la communauté d'agglomération des Portes de l'Essonne oû est sis l'observatoire de Camille Flammarion.

Damm, E.; Pécontal, E.

2012-12-01

377

Exfoliation restacking route to Au nanoparticle-clay nanohybrids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel gold-pillared aluminosilicate (Au-PILC) were synthesized with positively charged gold nanoparticles capped by mercaptoammonium and exfoliated silicate layers. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH4 reduction of AuCl4- in the presence of N,N,N-Trimethyl (11-mercaptoundecyl)ammonium (HS(CH2)11NMe3+) protecting ligand in an aqueous solution, and purified by dialysis. The resulting positively charged and water-soluble gold nanoparticles were hybridized with exfoliated silicate sheets by electrostatic interaction. The formation of Au clay hybrids could be easily confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction with the increased basal spacing of clay upon insertion of Au nanoparticles. TEM image clearly revealed that the Au particles with an average size of 4 nm maintain their structure even after intercalation. The Au nanoparticles supported by clay matrix were found to be thermally more stable, suggesting that the Au nanoparticles were homogeneously protected with clay nanoplates. The present synthetic route could be further applicable to various hybrid systems between metal nanoparticles and clays.

Paek, Seung-Min; Jang, Jae-Up; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Choy, Jin-Ho

2006-05-01

378

Tailoring the FeRh magnetostructural response with Au diffusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Factors which contribute to magnetostructural transition control have been demonstrated by study of the effects of Au incorporation on the magnetic and structural character of CsCl-structured equiatomic FeRh thin films. Sputtered films were capped with 2 nm of Au deposited at 873 K and at 323 K and subsequently characterized with magnetometry and synchrotron-based structural probes. Diffusion of Au into the FeRh film layer at 873 K is confirmed by a reduction in the Au capping layer thickness relative to the film capped at 323 K. The impact of Au diffusion on the FeRh magnetostructural character is noted by a decrease in the onset of the transition temperature, a thermally broadened first-order transition and an increased sensitivity of the transition to applied magnetic field. Additionally, magnetization data indicate that Au diffusion causes retention of the ferromagnetic phase well below the normal magnetostructural transition temperature. These results are attributed to a multiphase FeRh film layer created by thermally driven Au diffusion.

Loving, M.; de Vries, M. A.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Le Graët, C.; Liu, X.; Fan, R.; Langridge, S.; Heiman, D.; Marrows, C. H.; Lewis, L. H.

2012-08-01

379

FAB mass spectrometry of Au25(SR)18 nanoparticles.  

PubMed

The molecular ion of the nanoparticle Au 25(SCH 2CH 2Ph) 18 (A 25(SR) 18) is observed at 7394 Da in fast atom bombardment (FAB, Xe atoms) ionization mass spectrometry using a 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol matrix. A distinctive pattern of positive fragment ions is evident in the mass interval 5225-7394 Da, where peaks are seen for successive mass losses equivalent to R 2S entities. Because the Au 25(SCH 2CH 2Ph) 18 nanoparticle structure is crystallographically known to consist of a centered Au 13 icosahedral core surrounded by six Au 2(SR) 3 semirings, the R 2S loses are proposed to represent serial rearrangements and decompositions of the semiring structures. Mass losses equivalent to R 2S 2 and R 2 entities also appear at the lower end of this mass interval. The most intense spectral peak, at m/ z = 5246 Da, is assigned to the fragment Au 25S 10, from which all of the CH 2CH 2Ph organic units have been cleaved but from which no gold atoms have been lost. A different pattern of fragmentation is observed at lower masses, producing ions corresponding to serial losses of one gold atom and varied numbers of sulfur atoms, which continues down to a Au 9S 2 fragment. FAB mass spectra of the Au nanoparticle are much easier to interpret than laser desorption/ionization spectra, but they show more extensive fragmentation than do electrospray and low laser pulse intensity MALDI spectra. The loss of R 2S fragmentation in FAB is distinctive and unlike that seen in the other ionization modes. The FAB spectrum for the nanoparticle Au 25(S(CH 2) 9CH 3) 18 is also reported; its fragmentation parallels that for Au 25(SCH 2CH 2Ph) 18, implying that this nanoparticle has the same surprising stellated (staples) structure. PMID:18707129

Dass, Amala; Dubay, George R; Fields-Zinna, Christina A; Murray, Royce W

2008-08-16

380

Pulse Plating Enhanced Au-Co Nanocomposite Coatings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This investigation described the development of a technique to produce Au-Co nanostructured composite coatings with improved hardness. Pulse power has been used with the traditional Au electroplating solution to synthesize multilayer nanocomposite coatings. The phase structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Mechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results indicate that the hardness was increased to 3.15 ± 0.05 GPa, compared to 2.70 ± 0.07 GPa of that produced by the direct current Au coatings. The hardening mechanisms have also been discussed.

Ju, Ying; Wang, Yuxin; Wen, Yi; Gao, Wei

2013-07-01

381

Mass Spectrometric Determination of the Dissociation Energies of LaAu, CeAu, PrAu, and NdAu and Predicted Stability of Gaseous Monoaurides of Electropositive Metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Knudsen-cell mass spectrometric method has been used to study the exchange reactions LnAu(g)+Au(g)&dblbnd;Ln(g)+Au2(g), where Ln stands for a lanthanide metal. For Ln&dblbnd;C, the third-law and second-law enthalphies ?H0° in kilocalories per mole were obtained as 23.4 ± 0.4 and 22.5 ± 1.2, respectively. The third-law enthalphies, in kilocalories per mole, for Ln&dblbnd;La, Pr, and Nd resulted in 29.6 ±

K. A. Gingerich; H. C. Finkbeiner

1970-01-01

382

The growth and enhanced catalytic performance of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes.Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization and catalytic performance measurement of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanostructures, TEM image of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites after four cycles of the Suzuki coupling reaction, TEM and high-resolution images of a single Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrite, and XRD pattern of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites, UV-vis spectrum of Au@Pd nanodendrites in the range 200-400 nm, references. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32849f

Wang, Haihua; Sun, Zhenhua; Yang, Yi; Su, Dangsheng

2012-12-01

383

Preparation and structure of a single Au atom on the TiO2(110) surface: control of the Au-metal oxide surface interaction.  

PubMed

Three-dimensional Au structures on bare and organic-compound-modified TiO2(110) surfaces were interrogated by Au L3-edge polarization dependent total reflection fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (PTRF-XAFS) spectroscopy. On the bare TiO2(110) surface, icosahedral Au55 nanoclusters were the main product found. When the surfaces were modified with ortho or meso mercaptobenzoic acid (o-MBA or m-MBA), Au was atomically dispersed. Sulfur atoms in the o- and m- MBA formed strong covalent bonds with Au to produce stable Au-MBA (o- and m- forms) surface complexes. On the other hand, only oxygen atoms on the surface did not make a strong enough interaction to stabilize the Au species. We discuss how the Au species formed on the modified TiO2(110) surface and the possibility to control the Au structure by the surface modification method. PMID:24015582

Asakura, Kiyotaka; Takakusagi, Satoru; Ariga, Hiroko; Chun, Wang-Jae; Suzuki, Shushi; Koike, Yuichiro; Uehara, Hiromitsu; Miyazaki, Kotaro; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

2013-01-01

384

FT-ICR/MS and ab initio study of polynuclear Au and Au-Cu clusters in aqueous fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geochemistry and transport of aqueous transition metals such as copper and gold in the Earth's crust is still poorly known. FT-ICR mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations can provide fundamental insight on a molecular-scale level into the structure, stability and abundance of relevant Cu and Au species. We have measured high temperature ion cluster mass spectra of aqueous gold and copper chloride solutions using a custom-modified FT-ICR mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. In pure dilute aqueous AuCl3 solutions (1-25mM), Au(III) is present as an ion complex [AuCl2]+ and is hydrated with up to four water molecules, with the trihydrate [AuCl2]+(H2O)3 being the most stable species. In addition, several polynuclear ion clusters were observed, e.g. the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, including the hydrated forms [Au2Cl5]+(H2O) and [Au2Cl5]+(H2O)2. In more concentrated AuCl3 solutions (100mM, pH=2.3) the protonated Zundel cation [H5O2]+, [H7O3]+ and Eigen cation [H9O4]+ were detected, suggesting that protonated water clusters are equally relevant species in crustal fluids. We also measured mass spectra of binary solutions of aqueous transition metals, i.e. CuCl2/AuCl3 (5mM) and detected mixed Au(III)/Cu(II)-chloro clusters up to the tetranuclear [AuCu3Cl8]+ ion and their hydrated forms. The ab initio component of this study was designed to deliver additional insight into the structure of individual transition metal clusters as well as to the relative stability of each species, both unhydrated and in the presence of water molecules. Ab initio calculations were first conducted using MP2 theory and results thereof were then applied as starting points for subsequent couple-cluster CCSD(T) theory calculations. For the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, for example, the MP2 global minimum is a planar structure (see Figure; A) with an Au-Au bond distance of 3.435Å, while the second isomer (see Figure; B) has an Au-Au bond distance of 3.588Å and is around 3.5 kJ/mol higher in energy. Theoretical [Au2Cl5]+ ion cluster geometries are then used to compute higher temperature heat capacity data that may be used to predict fundamental thermodynamic properties of transition metal-charged aqueous systems at elevated temperatures. Results from such mass spectrometric and ab initio studies would allow modeling of gold and copper speciation in crustal fluids and assist in understanding prenucleation processes in metal halides in nature.

Lemke, K.; Tse, K.; Sadjadi, A.

2011-12-01

385

From Superatomic Au25(SR)18- to Superatomic M@Au24(SR)18q Core-shell Clusters.  

SciTech Connect

Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} belongs to a new type of superatom that features an icosahedral Au{sub 13} core-shell structure and a protective layer of six RS(Au-SR){sub 2} motifs. This superatom has a magic number of 8 free electrons that fully fill the 1s and 1p levels of the electron-shell model. By applying this superatom concept to the core-substitution chemistry of Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -}, we first scanned the periodic table for the potential core atom M by applying a simple rule derived from the 8-electron count and then optimized the selected candidates by density functional theory calculations to create many series of M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} core-shell nanoclusters. We found that 16 elements from groups 1, 2, and 10-14 of the periodic table can maintain both electronic and geometric structures of the original Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} magic cluster, indicating that the electron-counting rule based on the superatom concept is powerful in predicting viable M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} clusters. Our work opens up a promising area for experimental exploration.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2009-01-01

386

Effects of Au layer thickness and number of bilayers on the properties of Au/ZnO multilayers  

SciTech Connect

Multilayered films of Au/ZnO were prepared by physical vapor deposition. Varying the Au thickness, t{sub Au}, and the number of bilayers, n, allowed us to investigate the role of these parameters on the sample structural and electronic properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments, have been combined to UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy to characterize the multilayers in the as-prepared state and after annealing. In the as-prepared state, the strong Au and ZnO lattice interaction leads to ZnO epitaxy on Au. Gold appears either as continuous layers or in form of nanoparticles. ZnO experiences a structural transformation from wurztite to rock salt monitored by the Au morphology. Annealing at 500 deg. C destroys the lattice matching. The electronic and optical properties of the systems are understood in line with the Au morphology and ZnO structural state.

Cespedes, Eva; Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049 (Spain); Babonneau, David [Institut Prime, UPR 3346 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, Boulevard M. et P. Curie, F-86962 Futuroscope (France); Sousa Meneses, Domingos de [Centre Conditions Extremes et Materiaux, Haute Temperature et Irradiation, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Fonda, Emiliano; Lyon, Olivier [Synchrotron-SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Briand, Emrick [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UMR 7588 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Traverse, Agnes [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, Batiment 349, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91405 Orsay cedex (France)

2011-05-01

387

Synthesis of a Au/silica/polymer trilayer composite and the corresponding hollow polymer microsphere with a movable Au core.  

PubMed

Gold/silica/poly(N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide) (Au/SiO2/polyMBAAm) trilayer composite materials were prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAAm) in the presence of Au/SiO2 particles as seeds, in which the seeds were prepared by a combination of gold-complexing and silane coupling agent with a further modified Stöber method. The polymerization of MBAAm was performed in neat acetonitrile with 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as an initiator to encapsulate the Au/SiO2 seeds driven by the hydrogen-bonding interaction between the hydroxyl group on the surface of the seeds and the amide unit of polyMBAAm without modification of the Au/SiO2 surface in the absence of any stabilizer or surfactant. Hollow polyMBAAm microspheres with movable Au cores were further developed by the selective removal of the middle silica layer with hydrofluoric acid. The resultant trilayer Au/SiO2/polyMBAAm composite and hollow polyMBAAm microspheres with movable Au cores were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The diffusion of chemicals across the polyMBAAm shell was investigated by a catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride as a reductant. PMID:18166067

Liu, Guangyu; Ji, Hongfen; Yang, Xinlin; Wang, Yongmei

2008-01-01

388

Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO2(110)  

SciTech Connect

The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

S Tenney; W He; J Ratliff; D Mullins; D Chen

2011-12-31

389

Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO(2)(110)  

SciTech Connect

The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

Chen, D. A. [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Ratliff, J. S. [University of South Carolina, Columbia; He, Wei [University of South Carolina; Tenney, Samuel [University of South Carolina

2011-01-01

390

Synthesis of high purity Au nanobelts via the one-dimensional self-assembly of triangular Au nanoplates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High purity (~88%) gold nanobelts have been synthesized in the water/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/n-pentanol system created to realize the selective-adsorption of PVP on Au which directs Au to grow in belt form via the one-dimensional (1D) self-assembly of triangular Au nanoplates. These nanobelts present uniform thickness and lateral dimension, large aspect ratio up to 160, unique 60° angle end structure, and double-peak plasmon resonance property. The PVP directed 1D self-assembly method demonstrated here may provide a general route for the shape-selective synthesis of the other 1D functional nanostructures.

Zhang, Jianhui; Liu, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhenlin; Ming, Naiben

2007-09-01