These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Rapport de stage de M2 au LMD du 01 mars au 30 juin 2006  

E-print Network

sch´ema de convection de Kerry Emanuel Camille Risi Sous la direction de´e indroduits dans le sch´ema de convection de Kerry Emanuel, dans le sch´ema de nuage de Sandrine Bony et Kerry Emanuel, ainsi que dans le mod`ele unidimensionnel utilisant ces sch´emas. Ce rapport de stage pr´esente l

Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

2

Rapport signal-sur-bruit et bande passante : mise au point  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A widely diffused misconception is that reducing receiver filter bandwidth (BW) reduces noise levels in spectra and thus improves the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. We here try to simply explain why this is wrong in spectra (only true in the time domain). Reducing BW, which still is widely used, rather has disadvantages (for distorsions, noise, phasing...) and over-sampling often is convenient. The only, presently usually small, advantage is saving data storage space. Ways to improve spectral SNR rather are to increase the signal per unit BW, by reducing its bandwidth (influenced by T2 and shim) or to decrease noise per unit BW by reducing the various losses or temperature. Une ide fausse trs rpandue est que rduire la bande passante (BW) du rcepteur rduit le bruit et amliore donc le rapport signal-sur-bruit (S/B) du spectre. Nous essayons d'expliquer simplement ici que c'est inexact pour le spectre (vrai seulement dans le domaine temporel). Rduire BW au plus serr, ce qui est encore trs largement pratiqu, comporte plutt des inconvnients (distorsions, bruit, phasage...) et il y a souvent intrt, pour cela et d'autres raisons, sur-chantillonner. Le seul avantage, actuellement souvent faible, est d'pargner de la place de stockage des donnes. Ce sont d'autres paramtres qui permettent d'amliorer le S/B.

Jehenson, P.

1998-02-01

3

The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

I NOTICE in your number of 4th inst. an article relating to the Suez Canal (by Mr. Login, C.E., late of the Ganges Canal), and shall be glad if you will allow me to make a few observations with reference to it.

Edw. Rae

1869-01-01

4

ASTER Suez Canal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000.

Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands; mapping surface temperature of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

2000-01-01

5

Evolution du rapport C/N dans les feuilles et au cours de la dcomposition des litires  

E-print Network

, et quelques conifères : Pseudot.suga menzie.sü, Picea abies, Picea sitchen.sis, Tsuga heterophylla, Picea abies et Tsuga heterophylla), soit au lieu-dit le Bois-Robert, à quelques kilomètres au sud accusée se manifeste dans les reboisements de Picea abies et de Tsuga heterophylla par la présence d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

Gulf of Suez has excellent potential  

SciTech Connect

Egypt's re-emergence as an oil exporting country in the past several years was brought about by the drilling of fewer than 100 exploration wells in a small area of the Gulf of Suez. Now that Israel and Egypt are at peace and Egypt again controls this area, prospects for large, new discoveries in previously untested areas are excellent.

Abdine, S.

1981-07-01

7

The development of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides general background information relating to the physical characteristics and operations of the Suez Canal. In connection with the future development of the Canal, the research programme currently being undertaken by a British consortium is outlined, with particular reference to the traffic system presently operating.

J. D. Griffiths

1977-01-01

8

Rapport de Stage de 3me anne Rapport de Stage de Master  

E-print Network

Rapport de Stage de 3ème année Rapport de Stage de Master Propriétés optiques non-linéaires des surfaces : théorie et simulations numériques Auteur : Nicolas Tancogne-Dejean Maitre de stage : Valérie pour sa disponibilité remarquable, ses conseils avisés tout au long de ce stage et pour m'avoir permis

Botti, Silvana

9

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2011-10-01

10

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2013-10-01

11

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2012-10-01

12

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2010-10-01

13

La voie de la technocratie et de la rationalisation au sortir de la Premire Guerre mondiale : le rapport d'tienne Clmentel (1919)  

E-print Network

», Vingtième Siècle, 3, 1984, pp. 41-52 ; François Caron, « Le rapport Clémentel », Entreprises et histoire, 3, 1993 ; Pierre Rosanvallon, L'?tat en France, de 1789 à nos jours, Paris, Seuil, 1990, pp. 226

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

Salt Content and Water Budget of The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water body in the Suez Canal is a combination of waters from differ- ent sources. Hence, its exact hydrographic structure is very difficult to define. Three main water masses are identified along the Canal on account of their salinity values: Levantine water mass I, the Suez Bay water mass II, and the Bitter Lake water mass IV, in addition

SELIM A. MORCOS; GIRGIS F. SOLIMAN

2001-01-01

15

Forecasting the Suez Canal traffic: a neural network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Suez Canal is the most important man-made waterway in the world, rivaled perhaps only by the Panama Canal, little research has been done into forecasting its traffic flows. This paper uses both univariate ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) and Neural network models to forecast the maritime traffic flows in the Suez Canal which are expressed in tons. One

Mohamed M. Mostafa

2004-01-01

16

Longitudinal evolution of Suez rift structure, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional study of the structure of the Suez Rift has been carried out using field and subsurface data in an attempt to determine the role of transverse faults and the longitudinal evolution of the rift. As in most intracontinental rifts, the structure of the Gulf of Suez area is governed by normal faults and tilted blocks, whose crests constitute the main target of exploratory wells. The fault pattern consists of two major sets of trends: (1) longitudinal faults parallel with the rift axis and created in an extensional regime, trending east-northeast-west-southwest, and (2) transverse faults with north-south to north-northeast-south-southwest dominant trend. The transverse faults are inherited passive discontinuities, whereas most of the longitudinal faults were created during the Neogene in a purely extensional regime. Both sets were simultaneously active, producing a zigzag pattern and rhombic-shaped blocks. The transverse faults can show horizontal strike-slip components and act as relays between major normal faults.

Colletta, B.; Le Quellec, P.; Letouzey, J.; Moretti, I.

1988-01-01

17

77 FR 39689 - Application To Export Electric Energy; IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity...IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc. (GSEMNA) has applied...IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc., 1990 Oak Post...

2012-07-05

18

East Coast -Suez Canal 15 East Coast -Strait of Hormuz 24  

E-print Network

Bases Places Crossroads East Coast - Suez Canal 15 East Coast - Strait of Hormuz 24 East Coast deployed (Avg Last 90 Days) 8 Sep 14 ~190 ships #12;Bases Places Crossroads East Coast - Suez Canal 15 East

19

DISTRIBUTION OF SIPHONOPHORES IN THE REGIONS ADJACENT TO THE SUEZ AND PANAMA CANALS  

E-print Network

observed in the Red Sea. New records at both sides of the Suez Canal which could be considered indicative in the regions adjacent to the Suez Canal may be in the adjacent oceanic regions. Thirty species of siphonophores of the regions adjacent to the Suez Canal (eastern Mediterranean and the Red Sea), as well as for the regions

20

Sea-level Variation Along the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variation of sea level at 11 stations distributed along the Suez Canal was studied during the period from 1980 to 1986. The ranges of variation in daily mean sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik are about 60 and 120cm, respectively. The minimum range of daily variation is at Kantara (47cm).The fluctuations of the monthly mean sea level

F. M. Eid; S. H. Sharaf El-Din; K. A. Alam El-Din

1997-01-01

21

The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the theoretical maximum capacity in terms of standard ships. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

1977-01-01

22

CONCENTRATION OF NINE HEAVY METALS IN SUEZ CANAL WATERS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration of nine heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Co, Fe and Mn) in waters of the Suez Canal and in the nearby waters was measured seasonally during 1997 - 1998 in their dissolved (D) and particulate (P) forms. The results revealed that the northern part of the canal (at Port Said) recorded higher concentrations for most

EL SAMRA; ABD EL-AZIM

2005-01-01

23

Biology of penaeid prawns in the Suez Canal lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was made from January 1988 to March 1989 of the penaid prawns in the Great Bitter Lake and Lake Timsah located in the central part of the Suez Canal. Two species of Red Sea origin were investigated,Metapenaeus stebbingi andTrachypenaeus curvirostris; the former is by far the commoner. Both species displayed seasonal breeding over the period April to October,

A. A.-F. A. Gab-Alla; R. G. Hartnoll; A.-F. Ghobashy; S. Z. Mohammed

1990-01-01

24

Tide?surge interaction in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two?dimensional, nonlinear, vertically integrated model for the Gulf of Suez, Egypt, was used to simulate the interaction between tides and the surge heights resulting from a 15 m\\/s storm blowing from the northwestern direction for 24 hours. The results show that the predominant surges as well as the envelope of the tide plus surge curve are all negative throughout

M. A. Rady; T. S. Murty; J. O. Backhaus

1994-01-01

25

Numerical modeling of tides in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

A vertically integrated two?dimensional (2?D) and a five?layer three?dimensional (3?D) numerical models were developed to compute the tides in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The computational grid used to schematize the Gulf has a horizontal resolution of 3 3 km and consists of a lattice of 23 100 points in the 2?D model and five such lattices in

M. A. Rady; T. S. Murty; J. O. Backhaus

1994-01-01

26

A review of potential tsunami impacts to the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Destructive tsunamis in the eastern Mediterranean and Red seas, induced by earthquakes and/or volcanic activity, pose potential hazards to docked seaport shipping and fixed harbor infrastructure as well as to in-transit international shipping within the Suez Canal. Potential vulnerabilities of the Suez Canal to possible tsunami impacts are reviewed by reference to geological, historical, archaeoseismological, and anecdotal data. Tsunami catalogues and databases compiled by earlier researchers are perused to estimate potential return periods for tsunami events that could affect directly the Suez Canal and its closely associated operational infrastructures. Analysis of these various records indicates a centurial return period, or multiples thereof, for long-wave repetition that could generally affect the Nile Delta. It is estimated that tsunami waves 2 m high would have a breaking length about 5 km down Canal whereas a 10 m wave break would occur about 1 km into the Canal. Should a tsunami strike the eastern flanks of the Nile Delta, it would damage Egypt's maritime infrastructure and multi-national commercial vessels and military ships then using the Canal.

Finkl, C.; Pelinovsky, E.

2012-04-01

27

A modelling study on hydrodynamics and pollutant dispersion in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A considerable amount of international trade is transported in Egypt through the Suez Canal increasing public concern about hazardous safety. Through the canal, a relatively important flow of salt water enters the Mediterranean Sea, affecting its hydrologic deficit, and carrying algae and other non-swimmer species from the Red Sea. We are studying the hydrodynamics of the Suez Canal using both

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

28

Circulation and salinity distribution in the southern part of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of 14 hydrographic sections along the southern part of the Suez Canal bctwcen Suez Bay and Great Bitter Lake from April 1964 to April 1965 arc generally in agrccmcnt with previous sections taken 10 years before ( 1954-1955). A northward current prevailed from November to July and a southward current dominated from 15 August to 15 October, pushing the

Selina A. Morcos; S. N. MESSIEH

1973-01-01

29

Sea-level Variation Along the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The variation of sea level at 11 stations distributed along the Suez Canal was studied during the period from 1980 to 1986. The ranges of variation in daily mean sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik are about 60 and 120 cm, respectively. The minimum range of daily variation is at Kantara (47 cm). The fluctuations of the monthly mean sea level between the two ends of the Suez Canal vary from one season to another. From July to December, the sea level at Port Said is higher than that at Port Tawfik, with the maximum difference (105 cm) in September. During the rest of the year, the mean sea level at Port Tawfik is higher than that at Port Said, with the maximum difference (315 cm) in March. The long-term variations of the annual mean sea level at both Port Said and Port Tawfik for the period from 1923 to 1986 showed a positive trend. The sea level at Port Said increased by about 278 cm century -1while it increased by only 91 cm century -1at Port Tawfik. This indicates that the difference between sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik has decreased with time.

Eid, F. M.; Sharaf El-Din, S. H.; Alam El-Din, K. A.

1997-05-01

30

Dimensions of Quality of Antenatal Care Sservice at Suez, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The 5th millennium development goal aims at reducing maternal mortality by 75% by the year 2015. According to the World Health Organization, there was an estimated 358,000 maternal deaths globally in 2008. Developing countries accounted for 99% of these deaths of which three-fifths occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa. In primary health care (PHC), quality of antenatal care is fundamental and critically affects service continuity. Nevertheless, medical research ignores the issue and it is lacking scientific inquiry, particularly in Egypt. Aim of the Study: The aim of the following study is to assess the quality of antenatal care in urban Suez Governorate, Egypt. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional primary health care center (PHCC) based study conducted at five PHCC in urban Suez, Egypt. The total sample size collected from clients, physicians and medical records. Parameters assessed auditing of medical records, assessing provider and pregnant women satisfaction. Results: Nearly 97% of respondents were satisfied about the quality of antenatal care, while provider's satisfaction was 61% and for file, auditing was 76.5 5.6. Conclusion: The present study shows that client satisfaction, physicians satisfaction and auditing of medical record represent an idea about opportunities for improvement. PMID:25374861

Rahman El Gammal, Hanan Abbas Abdo Abdel

2014-01-01

31

Graben infilling in Gulf of Suez and Red Sea  

SciTech Connect

During the last 4 years, the French research group Genegass has completed geological and geophysical studies in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez. Neogene infilling of the basin is related with basement quality and volume of clastic supply, and inherited structural features are important to the development of Miocene rifting. The Neogene series may be divided into four major groups (Listed A-D), each limited by unconformities that seem to reflect the major stages of rifting. (A) The lowermost formations begin with a conglomerate and are followed by a variegated unit of sand and clay. In the Gulf of Suez, especially on the eastern bank, these formations are marine. Along the Red Sea, tilted blocks may be capped by stromatolites, and the valleys between them are the site of shale and evaporite sedimentation (lower Miocene). (B) The main extension phase results in an invasion of marine shales. The lower zones contain coarse clastics, and the high zones contain reefs and bioclastic limestone (late Burdigalian to early Serravallian). (C) The middle to late Miocene corresponds to a regional basinward tilting. Stromatolites coat the slopes, and conglomerate fans are found in the lower zones. Evaporite sedimentation dominates; anhydrite is found on the borders, and in the basin, thick halite is overlain by a clastic series. Basement shoulders are uplifted. (D) During the Pliocene and Pleistocene, the central part of the graben showed an important subsidence, and salt tectonism was active with diapirs and collapses.

Burollet, P.F.

1986-05-01

32

PCR Cartographie de l'espace parisien rapport final fvrier 2008 REMERCIEMENTS.......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-print Network

PCR Cartographie de l'espace parisien ­ rapport final ­ février 2008 1 SOMMAIRE REMERCIEMENTS.................................................................................................. 4 LA CARTOGRAPHIE DES DONNEES EN MILIEU URBAIN .................................................................................... 66 L'architecture des collèges parisiens au Moyen Age : l'apport de la cartographie et de la

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

An analysis and simulation of an experimental Suez Canal traffic control system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A SLAM model of Suez Canal traffic flow is reported in this paper. An experimental traffic control scheme is proposed, tested, and discussed. A method for analysis of multi-response-variable systems is discussed and illustrated.

Thomas D. Clark Jr.; Magdi M. Kabil; Moussa I. Moussa Mostafa

1983-01-01

34

Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

James, N.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

1988-02-01

35

Lateral variations of coda Q and attenuation of seismic waves in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gulf of Suez consists mainly of three tectonic provinces that are separated by two accommodation zones. The southern edge\\u000a of the gulf is bordered by NS faults which mark the transition between the shallow water, Suez Basin and the deep northern\\u000a Red Sea Basin. The sensitivity of coda Q measurements with respect to geological differences in the crust is demonstrated

Mamdouh A. Morsy; Sherif El Hady; Salah M. Mahmoud; Enayat Abdel Moneim Awad

36

Oil window in the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum in the Gulf of Suez is multisourced mainly by restricted marine Cretaceous to Eocene beds. The Campanian carbonates of the Sudr Formation and the Turonian shales of the Abu Qada Formation are high-quality sources. Other proven sources are carbonate and shale intervals within other sub-Miocene formations. Geothermal modeling calibrated by maturation measurements suggests that the organic-rich lower Miocene marls may not be mature enough to expel hydrocarbons north of the Morgan-Amal fields area but are mature to the south. This could be related mainly to a gradual increase in thermal gradient from north to south (20-55{degree}C/km). A few anomalies do exist, however. Thermal gradients are generally higher in areas where oil accumulated. The depth of peak generation ranges between 5,200 m to the north and 3,300 m to the south. The geographic variations in heat flow, maturation depths, and age of source rocks are not reflected in the timing of hydrocarbon migration. During the middle Miocene, a short-lived salinity crisis resulted in the deposition of massive thick evaporites that form the ultimate seal in the Gulf. The accompanying rapid burial of the underlying sub-Miocene potential source intervals caused them all to sequentially enter the oil window, within a very short time, soon after the evaporites accumulated. This timing was perfect for hydrocarbon preservation: after seal deposition and major disturbing regional tectonic events. The almost simultaneous migration from all the source beds resulted in mixed multisourced hydrocarbon accumulations.

Shahin, A.N. (Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co., Cairo (Egypt))

1988-08-01

37

Rapport de sondages et d'analyses et les carrires anciennes de trachyte  

E-print Network

Rapport de sondages et d'analyses Le Kilian et les carrières anciennes de trachyte dans la Chaîne'hypothèse que les gallo-romains ont exploité, au fond du cratère, un trachyte compact dont on ne trouve aujourd artisans du Moyen ?ge ont recherché un trachyte plus tendre dans les pentes hautes du cratère. Le Kilian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

Relationships Between Sediment Morphology and Oil Pollution Along the Suez Canal Beaches, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grain-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the

MOHAMED A. K. BARAKAT; THOURAYA M. SHIMY; YASSAR M. MOSTAFA

1996-01-01

39

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986-1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U 3O 8) represent the main items that contribute significantly to the collective dose within the Suez Canal area (Port-Said, Ismailia and Suez). The values of the annual collective dose due to transportation of all radionuclide materials was found to be at a maximum in Suez town and is equal to 5.04 10 -8 Man-Sv for the whole populations. If we only consider the workder at the harbour (estimated to be 50 persons), the value of the annual collective dose is about 3.33 10 -4 Man-Sv. These values are less than the exemption value of 1 Man-Sv recommended by the IAEA. For the accident case, the following pathways are considered by the code: ground-shine, direct inhalation, inhalation of resuspended material and cloud-shine. The total values of the estimated risks for each radionuclide material are presented in table form and, in addition, health effects (genetic effects, GE, and latent cancer fatality), LCF) are discussed. The calculated values of the radiological risks are very low for the three towns, showing that no radiation-induced early deaths are to be expected.

Sabek, M. G.; El-Shinawy, R. M. K.; Gomaa, M.

1997-03-01

40

New Records of Polychaetes from the South Part of Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faunistic analysis of benthic samples were obtained during a trip to the south part of Suez Canal, Egypt, during April, 2007, which revealed the presence of 82 polychaete species, 18 of them are considered as new records for the Egyptian waters. In order to achieve this study fouling components and sediments samples were collected by Van Veen grab (0.5 to

Faiza A. Abd-Elnaby

41

Physicochemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20 400\\/00 and over 400\\/00 in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50 70 cm fell to below 20 C in winter and rose to above 30

H. A. H. El-Serehy; M. A. Sleigh

1992-01-01

42

Marine radioactivity studies in the Suez Canal. A modelling study on radionuclide dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal and the Bitter Lakes. This effort is linked with increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. We apply a sequence of related modelling approaches, covering: (1) hydrodynamics, (2) transport of dissolved pollutants, (3) suspended

J. M Abril; M. M Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

43

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part I: Hydrodynamics and Transit Times  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal. This effort is linked with the increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. To follow the fate of radioactive wastes along this waterway, we had to solve the hydrodynamics of the water, governed mainly

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

44

The Suez Canal as a habitat and pathway for marine algae and seagrasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Suez Canal supports a diversified benthic algal flora; 133 species of benthic algae are now known from the Canal, as compared with only 24 in 1924. The vertical and horizontal distribution of algae is considered in relation to hydrographic factors. The algae display zonation and 3-4 algal belts are distinguished on the Canal banks on buoys and pier supports. Associated fauna include Balanus amphitrite and Brachidontes variabilis, together with various hydroids, sponges, ascidians, asteroids, ophiuroids and crustaceans. Merceriella enigmatica thrives well in brackish water habitats. The algal flora in the Bitter Lakes resembles that in the Red Sea. The number of Red Sea species decreases from Suez to Port Said in the littoral zone. On the other hand, bottom algae predominantly belong to Red Sea flora. Thirty of the species of algae found belong to the Indo-Pacific flora; half of these are new records to the Canal. Several of these Indo-Pacific algae have recently become established in the Eastern Mediterranean, whereas only two of the Mediterranean macro-algal flora (viz. Caulerpa prolifera and Halopteris scoparia) have been found in the Gulf of Suez. Two seagrasses, Halopia ovalis and Thalassia hemprichii, are recorded for the first time in the Canal. Only Halophila stipulacea has found its way into the Mediterranean via the Suez Canal, but none of the Mediterranean seagrasses is found either in the Canal or in the Red Sea.

Aleem, A. A.

45

Current motion and short-term deformations in the SuezSinai area from GPS observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze observations from eight GPS campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2005 on a network of 13 sites in the SuezSinai area, where separation between the African and the Arabian plates takes place. This is the key area to understand if and in which way Sinai behaves like a sub-plate of the African plate and the role played by

Federica Riguzzi; Grazia Pietrantonio; Antonio Piersanti; Salah M. Mahmoud

2006-01-01

46

From the politics of lying to the farce at Suez: What the US knew  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article seeks to establish, in a definitive manner, what the US knew about the Suez invasion plan of 1956.With the benefit of the CIA's U?2 reconnaissance plane, the US was able to pinpoint, as of mid?October, the existence of nearly three times the number of Mystre fighters in Israel than had previously been notified to Washington by the French

Charles G. Cogan

1998-01-01

47

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe-Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of metal contaminants introduced into the sediment from sources usually exists in relatively unstable chemical forms. A high proportion of the studied metals remained in the residual fraction. Most of remaining portion of metals was bound to ferromanganese oxides fraction. The low concentrations of metals in the exchangeable fraction indicated that the sediments of Suez Canal were relatively unpolluted.

Abd El-Azim, H.; El-Moselhy, Kh. M.

2005-06-01

48

Boundary layer structure observed by shipborne Doppler Sodar in the Suez canal zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryObservations of the boundary layer with a monostatic Sodar and other instrumentation were carried out in the Suez canal zone\\u000a in January and March 1979, from the Italian m.v.Salernum on its way to and from a GARP assignment. The Sodar was operated almost continuously throughout the passages. In addition\\u000a to the intensity records, an off-line Doppler analysis involving the use

G. Fiocco; G. Mastrantonio; A. Ricotta

1980-01-01

49

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using gamma spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed

M. S. El-Tahawy; M. A. Farouk; N. M. Ibrahiem; S. A. M. El-Mongey

1994-01-01

50

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 19861992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U3O8) represent the main items

M. G. Sabek; R. M. K. El-Shinawy; M. Gomaa

1997-01-01

51

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to FeMn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of

H. Abd El-Azim; Kh. M. El-Moselhy

2005-01-01

52

Petrology and geochemistry of the Tertiary Suez rift volcanism, Sinai, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tertiary basaltic rocks of Southwestern Sinai, situated along the Wadi Nukhul-Wadi Matullah-Wadi El Tayiba join, were selected to study the Gulf of Suez rift related-lavas and their geochemical and petrological relation with the rifting process. Whole rock samples were studied petrographically and analysed for major and trace elements. The samples from dykes, sills and flows from multiple magmatic events display a large variety in texture and in modal mineral compositions. They range from olivine dolerites and olivine-bearing basalts to vitrophyric, texturally heterogeneous basalts and crystal lithic tuffs. The transitional tholeiitic basalts display low compatible element concentrations and an enrichment of the whole spectrum of the incompatible elements. Major, trace and Rare Earth Element data suggest that the melts formed by 5% melting of mantle peridotite at the spinel-garnet transition zone (80-90 km depth), in the presence of 2-4% residual garnet. During the melt ascent, the fractionating phases were olivine, clinopyroxene and, to a lesser extent, plagioclase. Thermobarometric calculations indicate the presence of two crystallization levels beneath the Gulf of Suez rift: a shallower stage at 15-20 km and a deeper stage at depths of 25-30 km. The mantle source consists of streaks and blobs of enriched mantle, preserved in the geochemical signatures of these rocks. The enriched mantle sources melted preferentially compared to the surrounding ambient mantle and thus led to a preferential enrichment of the sources of the Gulf of Suez rift.

Shallaly, N. A.; Beier, C.; Haase, K. M.; Hammed, M. S.

2013-11-01

53

Transient deformations in the Suez-Sinai area from GPS observations  

E-print Network

We analyze data from four GPS campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2002 on a network of 11 sites in the Suez-Sinai, the area of collision between the African and the Arabian plates. This is the key area to understand how and in which way Sinai behaves like a sub-plate of the African plate and the role played between seismic and geodetic (long term) deformation release. Our analysis shows that, on average, the Suez-Sinai area motion (in terms of ITRF00 velocities) matches African plate motion (NNR-NUVEL-1A model). However, the baseline length variations show transient deformations in Sinai and across the Gulf of Suez, reaching up a maximum value of about 1.5 cm in five years. Since current geodynamical models do not predict significant tectonic deformation in this area, we worked under the hypothesis that a contribute may be due to post-seismic relaxation. Under this hypothesis, we compared the baselines length variations with the post-seismic relaxation field associated with five major local earthquakes occ...

Riguzzi, F; Pietrantonio, G; Mahmoud, S M

2005-01-01

54

Synrift sedimentation in the Gulf of Suez rift controlled by eustatic sea level variations  

SciTech Connect

Laterally persistent stratigraphic variations in the southern Gulf of Suez rift indicate that eustatic variations in sea level predominate over local tectonic effects in controlling Neogene basin-fill sedimentation. Low sea level allows extensive erosion of tilt-block crests and rift shoulders, sending clastic aprons into the intervening subbasins and allowing evaporite deposition. High sea level minimizes clastic input, allowing marls and shales to build up off structure and reefs to form on and around tilt blocks. Thus variations in sediment character indicate relative sea level. Early rifting events in the upper Oligocene are marked by deposition of continental red beds. Overlying lowest Miocene clastics and evaporites are cut by a lower Burdigalian unconformity, indicating a minor transgression in the Aquitanian. Above a disconformity, laterally varying clastics and evaporites suggest regression followed by intermittent shallow-water conditions. A higher unconformity is overlain by thick cyclic evaporites representing periodic flooding and drying of the rift, a result of sea level remaining close to the height of the Suez sill to the north. A major Messinian unconformity cuts the section, indicating major regression, and is overlain by largely clastic sediments of both continental and marine affinities, showing rapid sea level fluctuations. Regional synrift sedimentation has been controlled more by eustatic sea level change, modified by the Suez sill to the north, than by tectonic movements within the rift.

Perry, S.K.; Schamel, S.

1985-01-01

55

Evaluation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic species of Suez Gulf water along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries.  

PubMed

The Egyptian Red Sea environment especially along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries (Suez) is severely contaminated with organic compounds, as well as overfishing. This may be well contributory to recent serious declines in fish stocks. Fish embryos are also particularly vulnerable to oil exposure, even at extremely low concentrations of less than one part per billion. Consequently, even traces of oil pollution at levels often considered safe for wildlife can cause severe damage to fish. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in ten fish species of aquatic species by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compositions of PAHs determined in all samples were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAH pollutants in the studied region. The total content of these16 PAHs ranged from 399.616 up to 67,631.779ng/g wet weight. The data show that these values are considered to be alarmingly high enough to cause lethal toxicity effect by accumulation. All studied aquatic species samples are characterized by relatively high concentrations of the six-membered ring PAHs. The origin of PAHs in the collected samples is either petrogenic, biogenic, or mixed petrogenic and biogenic. PMID:24092254

Ali, Nabila A; Ahmed, Omayma E; Doheim, Mamdouh M

2014-02-01

56

Intern rapport; 2006 -02 Advies mistposten Schiphol  

E-print Network

Verwachtingen voor mist en lage stratus Eindredactie: Robert Mureau De Bilt, 2006 #12;Intern rapport; 2006-02 De Verwachtingen voor mist en lage stratus 7 april 2006 Mistpost Nieuw Vennep Onderdeel Project Mist Dit is het eerste onderdeel van het project: Verwachtingen voor mist en lage stratus, uit het programma Gevaarlijk

Stoffelen, Ad

57

Rapport d'information Horizon 2020  

E-print Network

Rapport d'information n o 1009 Horizon 2020 : l'Europepourla recherche, l'Europeparla recherche-cadre, expressément axé sur l'innovation en plus de la recherche, est rebaptisé «Horizon2020» afin de souligner son communautaires; la mise en synergie des moyens de recherchenationaux. Horizon2020 s

Pouyanne, Nicolas

58

Rapport de projet long informatique  

E-print Network

'est organisé celui-ci au sein de l'équipe. Nous présenterons ensuite le diagramme de Gantt tel qu'il a été diagramme de Gantt qui a été effectivement réalisé. La troisième partie a pour objectif de présenter l Gantt initial 4. Difficultés rencontrées dans la gestion du projet et solutions apportées 5. Diagramme

Braunstein, Cécile - Fachbereich 3

59

Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 18.3 and 10.8 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

2014-01-01

60

October field: The latest giant under development in Egypt's Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

October field, the third largest oil field in Egypt, produced 378 MMBO from its discovery in 1977 until January 1990. It is the northernmost giant oil field in the Gulf of Suez Rift basin. Twenty wells from five platforms in approximately 190 ft (58 m) of water currently drain over 3,238 ha. Recent successful field extensions demonstrate the viability of continuing exploration in this oil-rich area. This structurally trapped field is a complex of rotated fault blocks typical of rift basins worldwide. A northwest-trending normal fault with an approximate throw of 1,220 m has trapped an 335-m oil column on the upthrown eastern side. On the upthrown side, the Carboniferous through Oligocene prerift section dips gently to the northeast and is unconformably overlain by generally flat Miocene to Holocene clastics, carbonates, and evaporites. Severe multiple problems result from thick Miocene evaporites hampering seismic definition of the highly productive prerift section. These same evaporites serve as the ultimate seal in October field and throughout the Gulf of Suez. Although four layers are productive, approximately 95% of field reserves are within Carboniferous to Lower Cretaceous massive Nubia Sandstones. The remaining reserves are in more stratified Upper Cretaceous sandstones, basal Miocene rift-fill Nukhul Formation clastics, and a Lower Miocene clastic in the upper Rudeis Formation. Several distinct reservoir accumulations exist, with the deepest and most significant original oil-water contact at {minus}10,670 ft subsea. October field oil gravities range from 14 to 34{degree} API, with an initial solution GOR of 134 to 474 SCF/STB. The hydrocarbon source for all October field oil as well as most Gulf of Suez oil is believed to be the Campanian Brown Limestone Member of the Sudr Formation. Average reservoir parameters for the Nubia Formation are 16% porosity, 236 md permeability, 137 m net pay thickness, and 5,506 psi original reservoir pressure.

Lelek, J.J.; Abdine, A.S. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

61

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using ? spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed 0.6 and 18.0 Bq 1-1 for stream water.

El-Tahawy, M. S.; Farouk, M. A.; Ibrahiem, N. M.; El-Mongey, S. A. M.

1994-07-01

62

Depositional setting and hydrocarbon source potential of the Miocene Gulf of Suez syn-rift evaporites  

SciTech Connect

The Red Sea rift basin and its northern continuation, the Gulf of Suez, has experienced continuous deposition of marine evaporites throughout much of its development from the early Miocene to the Pliocene resulting in the accumulation of up to 5 km of evaporite strata in the rift. In this paper, the geologic history of these evaporites are discussed, along with their petroleum source rock potential. The authors hypothesize that rapid deposition of organic matter occurred during episodic storms and freshening events in which a less saline surface layer developed.

Richardson, M.; Arthur, M.A.; Quinn, J.S.; Whelan, J.K.; Katz, B.J. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett (USA))

1988-08-01

63

Counsellor communicative control and client-perceived rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between counsellor verbal control and client-perceived rapport during 12 initial interviews conducted by counsellor trainees was investigated. Minute-by-minute client ratings of rapport were collected and used as the dependent variable. Counsellor verbal behaviour was coded into Topic-Initiation, -Following, and -Reintroduction responses and these were analyzed for their relationship with rapport. Data indicated that there were significantly more Topic-Following

Christopher F. Sharpley; David A. Heyne

1993-01-01

64

Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-10-01

65

Internal structure and deformation of an accommodation zone in the northern part of the Suez rift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed structural study of the eastern (onshore) part of the Gharandal accommodation zone that separates the northern (SW-dipping) and central (NE-dipping) half grabens of the Suez rift helpeddecipher the internal structure and deformation of accommodation zones of continental rifts. This 60 km-wide zone is affected by pure normal faulting. The NE-dipping faults of the northern half graben extend southward into the accommodation zone where they interfinger with SW-dipping faults extending from the central half graben. These two sets of rift-parallel faults form several horsts and grabens in the accommodation zone. Areas dipping parallel to the northern or southern half grabens form several intermixing dip domains in the accommodation zone. Smaller-scale accommodation of dip between these dip domains proceeds by the development of rift-parallel folds (twist zones). In contrast to the southern accommodation zone of the Suez rift, the internal structure of the Gharandal accommodation zone is believed to be representative of accommodation zones in regions (a) unaffected by prerift structures lying at high angles to the rift; and (b) experiencing relatively small extension. Accommodation zones in areas having pre-rift structures lying at high angle to the rift have relatively narrow width and are characterized by transverse, strike-slip faults. Strike-slip movement on these faults is related to the torsional strain resulting from the opposite tilt directions and transport of fault blocks of adjacent half grabens.

Moustafa, Adel R.

1996-01-01

66

Structural evolution of the southern transfer zone of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a detailed study about the initiation and reactivations of Zeit-El Tor transfer zone, south Gulf of Suez rift, and its structural setting and tectonic evolution with respect to the Cretaceous-Cenozoic tectonic movements in North Egyptian margin. NE trending zone of opposed-dipping faults (22 km wide) has transferred the NE and SW rotations of the sub-basins in central and south Gulf of Suez rift, respectively. The evolution of this zone started by reactivation of the NE oriented late Neoproterozoic fractures that controlled the occurrence of Dokhan Volcanics in the rift shoulders. Later, the Syrian Arc contraction reactivated these fractures by a sinistral transpression during the Late Cretaceous-Eocene time. N64E extension of the Oligo-Miocene rift reactivated the NE fractures by a sinistral transtension. During this rifting, the NE trending faults forming the transfer zone were more active than the rift-bounding faults; the Upper Cretaceous reverse faults in the blocks lying between these NE trending faults were rotated; and drape-related reverse faults and the positive flower structures were formed. Tectonic inversion from contraction to extension controlled the distribution and thickness of the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene rocks.

Abd-Allah, Ali M. A.; Abdel Aal, Mohamed H.; El-Said, Mohamed M.; Abd El-Naby, Ahmed

2014-08-01

67

Scale deposition in surface and subsurface production equipment in the Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Some of the Gulf of Suez oil fields (El-Morgan, July, and Shoab Ali) have been waterflooded with gulf seawater. Compatibility tests have indicated probable deposition of scale in surface and subsurface production equipment. This paper outlines the physical and theoretical prediction for downhole scale deposition in Gulf of Suez oil wells. It also describes field experience with CaSO/sub 4/ scale removal from the wells and their formations in view of field results of the implemented programs. Scale inhibition programs carried out to control downhole scale deposition by using the formation squeeze technique, along with the field results obtained from the squeezetreated wells, are described. A new improvement in the squeeze treatment technique has been introduced as highmolecular-weight polyacrylamide polymer solutions were incorporated to stage the scale inhibitor squeeze batch to prolong the treatment lifetime. Field results are presented, along with conclusions and recommendations that can be applied to similar problems, especially when wells of highly productive sandstone formations are to be inhibited.

El-Hattab, M.I.

1985-09-01

68

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part I: Hydrodynamics and Transit Times  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY/07/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal. This effort is linked with the increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. To follow the fate of radioactive wastes along this waterway, we had to solve the hydrodynamics of the water, governed mainly by tides, atmospheric forcing and the drift currents produced by horizontal salinity gradients and by differences in mean sea level (MSL) at the two entrances of the Canal. The hydrodynamics has been studied using both 1-D and 2-D modelling approaches, and a reasonable calibration has been possible from the data set prepared with the collaboration of the Suez Canal Authority. Dispersion of conservative pollutants has been preliminarily studied by using a 1-D-Gaussian approach. Thus, we are computing the path of the plumes and the time evolution of concentrations for different scenarios of discharges and under different seasonal conditions. The transit times can vary enormously during the year, ranging from a few days to several months, depending on the differences in MSL at the two entrances of the Canal.

Abril, J. M.; Abdel-Aal, M. M.

2000-04-01

69

Maturation, fecundity and seasonality of reproduction of two commercially valuable cuttlefish, Sepia pharaonis and S. dollfusi, in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis (maximum 250mm mantle length, ML) and S. dollfusi (maximum 150mm ML) are widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific from the Red Sea to Japan and Australia. They are the primary fishery in the Suez Canal and the most valuable commercial cephalopods in the northern Indian Ocean. However, their reproductive biology, essential for fishery management, is poorly known.

Howaida R Gabr; Roger T Hanlon; Mahmoud H Hanafy; Salah G El-Etreby

1998-01-01

70

Inventing space in the age of Empire: planning experiments and achievements along Suez Canal in Egypt (18591956)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new French research project concerning the planning and architectural history of the Suez canal cities in Egypt during the age of Empire. Begun in January 2008, this research has been addressing two first topics: religious architecture and port cities as cosmopolitan locales.

Cline Frmaux; Mercedes Volait

2009-01-01

71

DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF DIATOMS IN THE BOTTOM SEDIMENTS OF THE SUEZ CANAL LAKES AND ADJACENT AREAS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diatom assemblages in the bottom sediments of Timsah Lake and adjacent sites, including the Great Bitter Lake, the northern part of the Gulf of Suez and the Mediterranean Sea at the entrance of the northern canal, have been recovered and studied in detail. A total of 394 species and varieties belonging to 96 genera were identified. Of these, 263

Abdelfattah A. Zalat

2002-01-01

72

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY\\/07\\/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal; S. A. Al-Gamal; F. A. Abdel-Hay; H. M. Zahar

2000-01-01

73

Distance, Trade, and Income The 1967 to 1975 Closing of the Suez Canal as a Natural Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The negative effect of distance on bilateral trade is one of the most robust findings in international trade. However, the underlying causes of this negative relationship are less well understood. This paper exploits a temporary shock to distance, the closing of the Suez canal in 1967 and its reopening in 1975, to examine the effect of distance on trade and

James Feyrer

2009-01-01

74

Why is the mediterranean more readily colonized than the Red Sea, by organisms using the Suez Canal as a passageway?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the opening of the Suez Canal, more than 120 Red Sea species colonized the eastern Mediterranean, whereas less than 10 Mediterranean species colonized the Red Sea. For most of the species involved in this colonization, the mode of dispersal from the source to the colonized area is through free-drifting propagules. In order to examine whether the current regime of

Z. Agur; U. N. Safriel

1981-01-01

75

Genetic differentiation among populations of Minona ileanae (Platyhelminthes: Proseriata) from the Red Sea and the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phenomenon of Lessepsian migration has stimulated the interest of biologists ever since the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, concerning, in particular, the possible effects of migrants on Mediterranean autochthonous communities. So far, most attention has been devoted to macrofaunal taxa yet, the nature of the sandy shores of the Canal may constitute an ideal habitat for

Tiziana Lai; Marco Curini-Galletti; Marco Casu

2008-01-01

76

An assessment of heavy-metal contamination in surface sediments of the Suez Gulf using geoaccumulation indexes and statistical analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An assessment of marine pollution due to metals was made in the Suez Gulf based on surface costal sediment collected from 18 locations along the Gulf. The samples were dried and acid-digested, and the metal contents (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (airacetylene) with deuterium background correction. An

A. Khaled; A. El Nemr; A. El Sikaily

2006-01-01

77

Self-Actualization of Teachers and Teacher-Student Rapport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study to determine possible relationships between selected teacher characteristics and self-actualization of home economics teachers (Personal Orientation Inventory) and to measure teacher-student rapport (Student Estimate of Teacher Concern) found no significant difference in teacher-student rapport between two groups of teachers differing in

Zimmerman, Karen W.; Scruggs, M. Marguerite

1978-01-01

78

Les transports en Chine en 2050 : rapport final  

Microsoft Academic Search

En 1960, le Japon tait un pays en dveloppement plus pauvre que l'Argentine. Ce rappel est issu du rapport BRIC publi par Goldman Sachs en 2003 et ralis par Wilson et Purushothaman qui s'interroge sur le dveloppement de quatre grandes conomies mergentes : le Brsil, la Russie, l'Inde et la Chine. Les auteurs de ce mme rapport, utilisant des

Dominique Bouf; Pierre-Yves Pguy; Stphanie Souche; Jean-Louis Routhier; Nicolas Ovtracht

2006-01-01

79

Rapport in Negotiation: The Contribution of the Verbal Channel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the contribution of verbal behavior to the creation of rapport in negotiation, while methodologically addressing the issue of dependence between dyadic measures, which is inherent to the concept of rapport, with the Actor-Partner Interdependence model. The approach adopted is substantially different from that of past research,

Bronstein, Ilan; Nelson, Noa; Livnat, Zohar; Ben-Ari, Rachel

2012-01-01

80

Establishing Rapport: Personal Interaction and Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper offers insightful methods to increase student learning by considering the relationship between students and teachers. The author provides numerous examples drawn from the educational literature along with specific recommendations for improving rapport with students. Some examples include conveying interest in and support of students, establishing a personal connection, using humor, taking on a mentoring role rather than a purely teaching role, encouraging contact outside of class, having some informal or less-structured parts of a class period, and being fair with grading and criticism. These are but a few of the many helpful examples in this thought-provoking paper.

Fleming, Neil; The IDEA Center (Individual Development & Educational Assessment)

81

Oligocene lacustrine tuff facies, Abu Treifeya, Cairo-Suez Road, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field investigations in the Abu Treifeya area, Cairo-Suez District, revealed the presence of Oligocene lacustrine volcaniclastic deposits of lacustrine sequences associated with an Oligocene rift regime. The present study represents a new record of lacustrine zeolite deposits associated with saponite clay minerals contained within reworked clastic vitric tuffs. The different lithofacies associations of these clastic sequences are identified and described: volcaniclastic sedimentary facies represent episodic volcaniclastic reworking, redistribution and redeposition in a lacustrine environment and these deposits are subdivided into proximal and medial facies. Zeolite and smectite minerals are mainly found as authigenic crystals formed in vugs or crusts due to the reaction of volcanic glasses with saline-alkaline water or as alteration products of feldspars. The presence of abundant smectite (saponite) may be attributed to a warm climate, with alternating humid and dry conditions characterised by the existence of kaolinite. Reddish iron-rich paleosols record periods of non-deposition intercalated with the volcaniclastic tuff sequence.

Abdel-Motelib, Ali; Kabesh, Mona; El Manawi, Abdel Hamid; Said, Amir

2015-02-01

82

Penetrating evaporites - new information from old seismic data in Suez Rift, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Structures in the prerift sediments, Gulf of Suez, are of primary interest for petroleum exploration. However, the overlying thick blanket of Miocene synrift evaporites severely limits resolution of deep structures in seismic reflection lines. A technique for maximizing accuracy of prerift maps and sections is illustrated by examples from the south-central Gulf of Suez. Preliminary structural maps of prerift units are generated from limited well data, good seismically derived maps of the base evaporite, and fragmentary deep seismic data. Through rigorous application of conventional cross section balancing techniques and geometric rules for listric normal fault-block rotation, trial cross sections are constructed. Construction of trial cross sections relies heavily on the following information from seismic lines: (1) thickness variations of synrift fill; (2) sequence boundaries representing unconformities over buried tilt blocks; (3) dip domains faintly visible beneath Miocene evaporites; and (4) faulting in Miocene sediments in response to deeper normal faults. The integration of well data allows control of seismic interpretation and of depth to prerift rocks. The sections are refined through iteration and are then used in conjunction with areal balancing methods to correct the structure maps. The subsequent serialization of balanced sections results in an internally consistent, geometrically constrained, three-dimensional picture of the basin which best fits all the available data. Important information on prerift structures which results from this technique includes location of normal faults and the magnitude of their throw, attitude of deep tilt blocks, and location of tilt-block terminations. Using this methodology, old prospects can be refined and new plays and prospects generated. These can then be tested by local detailed seismic work or by the drill.

Perry, S.K.; Gawarecki, S.L.; Schamel, S.

1987-05-01

83

Non-native fishes in the Mediterranean from the Red Sea, by way of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 caused a migration generally from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean, rarely the opposite\\u000a direction, and 63 lessepsian fish species penetrated into the Mediterranean by way of this canal. These species usually spread\\u000a northward and most of them can establish wide populations in this area, but some of them can not be

Sinan Mavruk; Dursun Avsar

2008-01-01

84

Controls on erosional retreat of the uplifted rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez and northern Red Sea  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea rigts are currently bordered by large asymmetric uplifts that are undergoing erosion. We find that the amount and timing of erosion vary systematically along the strike of the margin and have been controlled by variations in the perift stratigraphy. The perfit strata are compsoed of cliff-forming Eocene-Cretaceous carbonates overlaying the easily eroded Cretaceous-Cambrian 'Nubian' sandstone. This lithologic succession promotes scarp retreat of the sedimentary section, follwed by dissection of the underlying basement. The perift section thins from over 2000 m at the northern end of the rift to less htan 400 m at its junction with the Red Sea. Thus, at the northern part of the Gulf of Suez, the Nubian sandstone is minimally exposed, and the carbonates form a scarp at the rift border fault. Farther south, undercuttin of hte carbonates by erosion of the sandstion has resulted in scarp retreat. The escarpment cuts diagonally away from the border fault andis over 100 km inland from the border fault at the southernmost Gulf of Suez. The amount of retreat varies inversely with the sediment thickness. Exposure and erosion of basement are initiated by the retreate of the escarpment, and the depth of erosion, as indicated by fission track ages, increases with distance from the escarpment. These observations are explained by a model in which erosion along the Gulf of Suez is initiated as rift flank uplift becomes sufficiently large ot expose the friable sandstones. Undercutting the escarpment and exhumation of basement has been propagating northward and westward for at least 20 m.y. The average rate of scarp retreat has been 6 km/m.y. and the along-strike propagation of the erosion has been 12 km/m.y. The diachronous erosion of the rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of uplift and of erosion. Both thermochronometric and stratigraphic data primarily indicate the timing of erosion, which may differ significantly form the timing of the uplift that initiates it. They must be interpreted carefully to avoid erroneous conclusions about rift tectonics.

Steckler, Michael S.; Omar, Gomaa I.

1994-01-01

85

An ecological examination of rapport using a dyadic puzzle task.  

PubMed

Previous studies have indicated that situational context impacts the rapport experience (e.g., F. J. Bernieri, J. S. Gillis, J. M. Davis, & J. E. Grahe, 1996; N. M. Puccinelli, L. Tickle-Degnen, & R. Rosenthal, 2003). The authors designed the present study to further document the behavioral and experiential predictors of dyadic rapport and to evaluate dyadic rapport experiences when contributions were required from both interactants. Participants (N = 60) were paired into dyads and instructed to complete children's puzzles. However, the dyadic members were restricted in how they could accomplish this task: Only one interactant was allowed to work on the puzzle and had to do so blindfolded, while the second interactant gave instructions. Results suggested that less attribution of responsibility to the worker and the instructor's experience of enjoyment and frustration were indicative of higher rapport. Other characteristics of dyads reporting higher dyadic rapport included difficulty completing the task and more communicative behavior. The results provide important information for the understanding of the dyadic experience of rapport. PMID:18225829

Grahe, Jon E; Sherman, Ryne A

2007-10-01

86

Facies and sequence stratigraphy of some Miocene sediments in the Cairo-Suez District, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shallow-water siliciclastics and carbonates of the Miocene sediments in the Cairo-Suez District, Egypt represent an epiric ramp. The facies are characterized by stacked high-frequency cycles with restricted ramp to shoal margin sequences. Based on an extensive micro- and biofacies documentation, six lithofacies associations were defined and their respective depositional environments were interpreted. A sequence-stratigraphic analysis was carried out by integrating lithostratigraphic marker beds, facies relationships, stratigraphic cycles, and biostratigraphy. The investigated sections were subdivided into three third-order sequences, named S1, S2 and S3. S1, is interpreted to correspond to the Late Burdigalian stage (18-16.38 My), S2 corresponds to the Late Burdigalian-Early Langhian stage (16.38-14.78 My), and S3 represents the Late Langhain-Early Serravallian stage (14.78-13.66 My). Each of the three sequences was further subdivided into fourth order cycle sets and fifth-order cycles.

Tawfik, Mohamed; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset; Mowafi, Ahmed; Al-Malky, Mazen

2015-01-01

87

Timing of structural development of oil traps in Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

To date, more than 40 oil fields with an estimated 25billion bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. These oil accumulations are present both in the pre-graben and graben-fill cycles which are separated by Oligocene tectonic phase, hitherto considered to be responsible for differentiation and formation of oil traps. In the present study, the structural development of many oil traps is related to intra-Rudeis tectonic phase of late early Miocene age. Presence of an a

Chowdhary, L.R.; Shaheen, S.

1988-01-01

88

Physico-chemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20-40 and over 40 in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50-70 cm fell to below 20 C in winter and rose to above 30 C in summer; oxygen concentration at the same depth ranged between 6-10 mg l -1 and the pH was 81-83, and at mid-day this water was supersaturated with oxygen through 6-8 months of the year. The main chemical nutrients reached their highest levels in winter (December-February) and their lowest levels in summer (May-August), silicate varying between 1-7 ? M, phosphate between 01 and 08 ? M and nitrate between 4-10 ? M; nitrite varied in a more complex manner, usually between 025 and 04 ? M. The atomic ratio of N/P was generally well above the Redfield ratio level, except for a few months in midwinter. These nutrient concentrations are high in comparison with those of unpolluted seas of the region, but are typical of the more eutrophic coastal waters in most parts of the world.

El-Serehy, H. A. H.; Sleigh, M. A.

1992-02-01

89

Carbonate depositional environments and reservoir properties of the Miocene rocks, east Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Miocene carbonate rocks in six surface sections on the eastern side of the Gulf of Suez were carefully studied in the field, petrographically examined, and mineralogically analyzed using SEM and x-ray microanalysis for all elements. In general, reservoir quality of the Miocene carbonates was poor because of original composition and texture. Three different types of porosity were distinguished in the studied Miocene carbonates: primary (intergranular and moldic), secondary (leached), and fracture. Much of the porosity in the Miocene reservoirs is secondary; however, sometimes this secondary porosity may be reduced by compaction and/or precipitation of evaporites in fractures and pores. The authors conclude that the primary porosity of the carbonate rocks in the reef complex was eliminated by lithification and cementation; only secondary porosity remained. This secondary porosity developed in all environments (supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal), but the best porosity developed in the subtidal facies. This high porosity occurs because the dolomites in the subtidal facies are coarser and free from anhydrite cement, whereas in supratidal and intertidal facies the dolomites are finer and their porosity is plugged by secondary anhydrite cement.

Bakarat, M.A.K.; Kholief, M.M.

1988-08-01

90

L'atteinte vsicale au cours de la neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen  

PubMed Central

La neurofibromatose de type 1 ou maladie de Von Recklinghausen est une maladie gntique autosomique dominante en rapport avec des mutations dans le gne suppresseur de tumeur NF1. L'atteinte uro-gnitale au cours de cette maladie est rare et moins de 80 cas ont t rapports ce jour dans la littrature mondiale. Les auteurs rapportent un nouveau cas d'atteinte vsicale dcouverte fortuitement au cours du suivi d'une patiente atteinte de la maladie de Von Recklinghausen. A travers cette observation et une revue de la littrature les auteurs discutent galement les difficults diagnostiques, thrapeutiques ainsi que les modalits de suivi dans cette maladie. PMID:25328590

Benazzouz, Mohamed Hicham; Hajjad, Tilila; Essatara, Younes; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

2014-01-01

91

Rapport Building in Language Instruction: A Microanalysis of the Multiple Resources in Teacher Talk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current guidelines on teacher--student rapport, while providing helpful suggestions, fail to address the question of how rapport building can be achieved in contextualised classroom interaction in which a balance needs to be reached between rapport and instructional tasks. Using discourse analysis informed by a conversation analytic approach and

Nguyen, Hanh thi

2007-01-01

92

Marine molluscs as biomonitors for heavy metal levels in the Gulf of Suez, Red Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Levels of the heavy metals Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Iron (Fe) and Manganese (Mn) were determined in coastal water, sediments and soft tissues of the gastropod limpet, Patella caerulea, and the bivalve, Barbatus barbatus, from seven different stations in the western coast of the Gulf of Suez. The concentrations of heavy metals in water ranged between 3.37-4.78, 18.83-21.46, 2.75-3.17, 0.22-0.27, 0.99-1.21, 2.69-3.65, 3.75-4.56 ?g L - 1 and 23.82-32.78 mg g - 1 for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Mn and Fe, respectively. The corresponding concentration values in the sediments were 8.65-12.16, 51.78-58.06, 36.52-42.15, 3.23-3.98, 9.03-12.75, 34.31-49.63, 3.28-4.56 and 64.20-70.22 ?g g - 1 for Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Mn and Fe, respectively. The highest accumulated metals were Fe, Zn and Mn in both P. caerulea and B. barbatus, while the lowest one was Cd. The accumulation of metals was more pronounced in P. caerulea than B. barbatus. The highest concentrations of all metals in water, sediments and mollusca were recorded at Adabiya harbour north of the Gulf, while the lowest concentrations were recorded at Gabal El-Zeit and Hurghada. Land based activities and ships awaiting berth are the main source of metal pollution in the northern part of the Gulf.

Hamed, Mohamed A.; Emara, Ahmed M.

2006-05-01

93

GC estimation of organic hydrocarbons that threaten shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt.  

PubMed

Soil and groundwater contamination is one of the important environmental problems at petroleum-related sites, which causes critical environmental and health defects. Severe petroleum hydrocarbon contamination from coastal refinery plant was detected in a shallow Quaternary sandy aquifer is bordered by Gulf in the Northwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The overall objective of this investigation is to estimate the organic hydrocarbons in shallow sandy aquifers, released from continuous major point-source of pollution over a long period of time (91years ago). This oil refinery contamination resulted mainly in the improper disposal of hydrocarbons and produced water releases caused by equipment failures, vandalism, and accidents that caused direct groundwater pollution or discharge into the gulf. In order to determine the fate of hydrocarbons, detailed field investigations were made to provide intensive deep profile information. Eight composite randomly sediment samples from a test plot were selected for demonstration. The tested plot was 50m long??50m wide??70cm deep. Sediment samples were collected using an American auger around the point 29 57' 33? N and 32 30' 40? E in 2012 and covered an area of 2,500m(2) which represents nearly 1/15 of total plant area (the total area of the plant is approximately 3.250km(2)). The detected total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were 2.44, 2.62, 4.54, 4.78, 2.83, 3.22, 2.56, and 3.13wt%, respectively. TPH was calculated by differences in weight and subjected to gas chromatography (GC). Hydrocarbons were analyzed on Hewlett-Packard (HP-7890 plus) gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID). The percentage of paraffine of the investigated TPH samples was 7.33, 7.24, 7.58, 8.25, 10.25, 9.89, 14.77, and 17.53wt%, respectively. PMID:25052330

Zawrah, M F; Ebiad, M A; Rashad, A M; El-Sayed, E; Snousy, Moustafa Gamal; Tantawy, M A

2014-11-01

94

Ecological Study on Community of Exotic Invasive Seaweed Caulerpa prolifera in Suez Canal and its Associated Macro Invertebrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Caulerpa prolifera (Forsskal) Lamouroux, a green alga, widespread in tropical and subtropical seas is now invading species to the Suez Canal during last recent years after 2000; it is widely spread, colonizing its western sandy shore at shallow waters of 1-2 m depth. It has the potential to supplant native vegetation, thereby altering the structure and function of the subtidal marine landscape, supplant seagrass H. stipulacea. According to the present study, based on biometric parameters, the frequency of occurrence, abundance and density analyses, the seaweed C. prolifera is more frequent, abundant and dense in Suez Canal than the seagrass H. stipulacea, which is very rare. Instead C. prolifera forming extended dense meadows with percentage cover nearly 100% m-2 at many sites. This mainly happened; due to the competitive success of C. prolifera which seems to be related to its big size, high density, rapid growth, high efficiency in dim light conditions, high tolerance to severe nutrient limitation and salinity and temperature fluctuations and to the production of toxic secondary metabolites. The presence of these toxic secondary metabolites explains why C. prolifera is avoided by many of macro invertebrates as a habitat or feeding grounds.

Gab-Alla, Ali A.-F. A.

95

Spatial distribution of radioisotopes in the coast of Suez Gulf, southwestern Sinai and the impact of hot springs.  

PubMed

This work describes the concentrations of radioisotopes in soil, sediment, wild plants and groundwater in southwestern Sinai. The study area extends from Suez to Abu Rudies along the eastern part of the Suez Gulf. It included two hot springs: Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun. No dependence of ?Cs concentrations on any of the measured sand characteristics was found, including calcium carbonate. The enrichment of ?Ra in Hammam Faraoun hot spring was the most prominent feature. The ?Ra concentration in hot springs of Ayun Musa and Hammam Faraoun were 68 and 2377 Bq kg? for sediments, 3.5 and 54.0 Bq kg? for wild plants and 205 and 1945 mBq l? for the groundwater, respectively. In addition, ?Ra activity concentration in local sand in the area of Hammam Faraoun was ?14 times that of Ayun Musa. On the other hand, the Th concentrations were comparable in the two hot springs, while ?Cs concentrations were relatively higher in Ayun Musa. The characteristics and radioelements studies support possible suggestions that the waters in the two hot springs have different contributions of sea and groundwaters crossing different geological layers where the water-rock interaction takes place. PMID:21148168

Ramadan, Kh A; Seddeek, M K; Elnimr, T; Sharshar, T; Badran, H M

2011-06-01

96

Assessment of PAHs in water and fish tissues from Great Bitter and El Temsah lakes, Suez Canal, as chemical markers of pollution sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea water and fish tissue samples were collected from nine sampling stations from the Great Bitter and El Temsah lakes in the Suez Canal and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The compositions of PAH determined in the dissolved fraction of sea water were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAH pollution

Tarek O. Said; Nadia A. El Agroudy

2006-01-01

97

Counselor verbal mode, problem relevant communication, and client rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

80 interviews with secondary school clients were analyzed to determine effects of 4 modes of counselor verbal behavior upon client problem relevant communication in 4 major problem areas and upon client experience of rapport. Results generate the conclusions that: (1) counselor verbal mode significantly affects client problem relevant communication ratio, (2) interaction between verbal mode and client problem focus significantly

Nathaniel J. Pallone; Peter P. Grande

1965-01-01

98

Coordinated movement and rapport in teacher-student interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

High school students in 19 teaching dyads were measured for their degree of interpersonal coordination and rapport. Two types of movement coordination were identified and rated by a group of untrained judges: the degree of perceivedmovement synchrony, and the extent ofbehavior matching. Ratings of movement synchrony in true interactions were significantly greater than similar ratings in pseudo interaction control clips

Frank J. Bernieri

1988-01-01

99

Redaction de rapports scientifiques (avec LATEX) Mathieu Ribatet  

E-print Network

PC, c'est normal puisque vous venez juste d'installer la base permettant de "compiler" des documents rapport, il est donc primordial de s'y prendre longtemps `a l'avance. De mani`ere g´en´erale il faut

Ribatet, Mathieu

100

Application of well log analysis for source rock evaluation in the Duwi Formation, Southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several models were developed to use the conventional wireline logs for evaluating the thermal maturity of the source rock and calculating the total organic carbon (TOC) content. Application of these models for the Duwi Formation, southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt, is the main purpose of this paper. Gamma ray, density, sonic, resistivity and neutron are the commonly used wireline logs to identify and quantify source rock. The results, which compared with the results obtained from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis show that cautions must be taken into consideration when applied these models because most of the models are empirical and their validation takes place under certain conditions. It can be concluded that the Duwi Formation represents very good source rock capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbon of oil-prone type II. The kerogen is waxy sapropel related to marine plankton deposited under reduced condition.

El Sharawy, Mohamed S.; Gaafar, Gamal R.

2012-05-01

101

--Systmes d'exploitation temps-rel --RAPPORT DE RECHERCHE  

E-print Network

'installation et d'utilisation de Cléopatre Maryline SILLY, Audrey MARCHAND et Thibault GARCIA Laboratoire d 12 58 12 ­ http://www.sciences.univ-nantes.fr/lina/ #12;Maryline SILLY, Audrey MARCHAND et Thibault.sciences.univ-nantes.fr/lina/Vie/RR/rapports.html © Octobre 2004 by Maryline SILLY, Audrey MARCHAND et Thibault GARCIA #12;Guide d'installation et d

Marchand, Audrey

102

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, supplement au nl 1, Tome 15, novembre 198* page C8-113  

E-print Network

with res- pect to the volume of enthalpy of formation of one defect on the cold- compression isotherm derivative with respect to the volume of enthalpy (h ) of formation of one defect on the cold corrélation linéaire entre la dérivée logarithmique par rapport au volume de l'enthalpie de formation d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

103

Distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediment of Temsah lake, Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Temsah is one of the main wetlands in the Suez Canal region, and the main source for fish for the area. The lake is the end-point of several wastewater effluents. In the present study, residues of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were monitored in the sediment of the

Pietro Tundo; Stefano Raccanelli; Laila A. Reda; Mohamed Tawic Ahmed

2004-01-01

104

Marine integrons containing novel integrase genes, attachment sites, attI, and associated gene cassettes in polluted sediments from Suez and Tokyo Bays  

PubMed Central

In order to understand the structure and biological significance of integrons and associated gene cassettes in marine polluted sediments, metagenomic DNAs were extracted from sites at Suez and Tokyo Bays. PCR amplicons containing new integrase genes, intI, linked with novel gene cassettes, were recovered and had sizes from 1.8 to 2.5?kb. This approach uncovered, for the first time, the structure and diversity of both marine integron attachment site, attI, and the first gene cassette, the most efficiently expressed integron-associated gene cassette. The recovered 13 and 20 intI phylotypes, from Suez and Tokyo Bay samples, respectively, showed a highly divergence, suggesting a difference in integron composition between the sampling sites. Some intI phylotypes showed similarity with that from Geobacter metallireducens, belonging to Deltaproteobacteria, the dominant class in both sampling sites, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Thirty distinct families of putative attI site, as determined by the presence of an attI-like simple site, were recovered. A total of 146 and 68 gene cassettes represented Suez and Tokyo Bay unsaturated cassette pools, respectively. Gene cassettes, including a first cassette, from both sampling sites encoded two novel families of glyoxalase/bleomycin antibiotic-resistance protein. Gene cassettes from Suez Bay encoded proteins similar to haloacid dehalogenases, protein disulfide isomerases and death-on-curing and plasmid maintenance system killer proteins. First gene cassettes from Tokyo Bay encoded a xenobiotic-degrading protein, cardiolipin synthetase, esterase and WD40-like ? propeller protein. Many of the first gene cassettes encoded proteins with no ascribable function but some of them were duplicated and possessed signal functional sites, suggesting efficient adaptive functions to their bacterial sources. Thus, each sampling site had a specific profile of integrons and cassette types consistent with the hypothesis that the environment shapes the genome. PMID:21248857

Elsaied, Hosam; Stokes, Hatch W; Kitamura, Keiko; Kurusu, Yasurou; Kamagata, Yoichi; Maruyama, Akihiko

2011-01-01

105

Modulation of stress related protein genes in the bass (Epinephelus guaza) caught from the Gulf of Suez, the Red Sea, Egypt.  

PubMed

Impact of chemical pollution on expression of stress protein genes in the bass Epinephelus guaga collected from several locations including Suez Oil Production Port (Floating port), Atakah Fishing Port, Adabiya Port and Tawfik Port in Suez Governorate, Egypt, was investigated. In the current study, levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water and fish samples collected from Suez Gulf were assessed. In addition, gills and liver tissues of caught bass fish were used to address the interaction between pollution status and the expression of stress-related genes (Hsp70a, Hsp70b, Hsp47, MT and CYP1A). Our analysis demonstrated that levels of PAHs in Floating and Tawfik ports were higher than those found in the Atakah Fishing Port and the Adabiya Port. In addition, MDA and PC contents were significantly higher in gills and liver tissues collected from Floating and Tawfik ports than those collected from Adabiya and Atakah ports. In correlation to the above results, all fish collected from the Floating and Tawfik ports presented a significant increase in Hsp-, MT- and CYP1A-mRNAs. On the other hand, fish samples collected from the Atakah Fishing and Adabiya ports showed no induction of the stress-related genes transcription in such tissues. In conclusion, the current research demonstrates that remarkable increase in PAH contaminants levels in Floating and Tawfik ports are correlated with the levels stress protein-related genes transcription in E. guaga gills and liver tissues. PMID:23849466

Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh; Khalil, Wagdy K B

2013-10-01

106

Student Views of Instructor-Student Rapport in the College Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building upon past research on the positive learning outcomes associated with rapport building in the classroom, this study examines the specific behaviors instructors utilize in college classrooms to build rapport with undergraduate students. Participants (N = 230) answered open-ended survey questions about their instructors'

Webb, Nathan G.; Barrett, Laura Obrycki

2014-01-01

107

Kinematics of the oblique faults in the east central Gulf of Suez Rift, Wadi Araba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Oligo-Miocene Gulf of Suez rift is characterized by four fault trends; a rift-parallel trend, two trends oblique to the rift trend and a cross trend. The rift-parallel trend strikes 310o to 340o and is referred to as the Clysmic trend. The two trends, which are oblique to the Clysmic trend, strike 350o to 030o and 280o to 310o; the first has been referred to as the north-oblique (N-oblique), and the second as the northwest-oblique (NW-oblique). The cross trend includes faults nearly orthogonal to the Clysmic trend i.e. they strike between 050o and 075o. Image interpretation and detailed field mapping and structural studies at a scale of 1: 20,000 of the Wadi Araba area in southwest Sinai Peninsula indicate e Clysmic faults are mostly normal showing major dip-slip movements. The oblique faults were found to be younger than the Clysmic faults and that the N-oblique faults are characterized by major sinistral strike-slip movement, while the NW-oblique faults are characterized by major dextral strike-slip movement. Cross cutting relationship, geometry and palaeostress analysis indicate that the oblique faults are conjugate Riedel shears originated due to NE to NNE extension related to the Aqaba-Levant transform that has been active since the Middle Miocene.

Abdeen, Mamdouh; Abdelmaksoud, Ashraf

2014-05-01

108

Research Publications in Medical Journals (1992-2013) by Family Medicine Authors - Suez Canal University-Egypt  

PubMed Central

Background: Research in family medicine (FM) provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. Objective: To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. Materials and Methods: All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Results: Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles), followed by Patient category (n = 42). All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%). Conclusions: The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended.

Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed A.; Ismail, Mosleh A.; Nour-Eldein, Hebatallah

2014-01-01

109

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY/07/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in the canal waters limited the use of some field data. During experiments, water levels, velocities, wind and other physical parameters were recorded to supply appropriate information for the modelling work. From this data set, the hydrodynamics of the studied area has been reasonably described. We apply a 1-D-Gaussian and 2-D modelling approaches to predict the position and the spatial shape of the plume. The use of different formulations for dispersion coefficients is studied. These dispersion coefficients are then applied in a 2-D-hydrodynamic and dispersion model for the Bitter Lake to investigate different scenarios of accidental discharges.

Abril, J. M.; Abdel-Aal, M. M.; Al-Gamal, S. A.; Abdel-Hay, F. A.; Zahar, H. M.

2000-04-01

110

Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Contamination in Water, Sediment and Fish of Temsah Lake, Suez Canal, Egypt  

E-print Network

The nature, origin and distribution of the listed reference US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority pollutants; 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in water, sediment and fish of Temsah Lake (Suez Canal, Egypt) using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compositions of PAHs determined in all samples were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAHs pollution in the studied region. Qualitative and quantitative distribution of PAHs detected in all investigated samples have followed no particular pattern, but rather irregular. Quantitative determination of PAHs show that their concentration ranged from 52.463393g/L, 585.9-8592.8g/L and 1696.44785.7g/L for water, sediment and fish samples, respectively. Data show that these values are considered to be alarmingly high and the studied areas have values high enough to cause lethal toxicity effect to the surrounding environment and consequently to the human health. All samples are characterized by low concentration of low molecular weight PAHs compared to high molecular weight PAHs. Sediment and fish samples are characterized by relatively high concentration of six membered rings PAHs. The origin of PAHs in collected samples is either petrogenic, biogenic or mixed petrogenic and biogenic. Key words: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; water, sediment, fish, pollution and Temsah Lake.

Hager R. Ali; Sh. El-gendy; Samia El- Ezbewy; Galal H. El-gemaee; Y. M. Moustafa; M. I. Roushdy

2006-01-01

111

Definition of soil characteristics and ground response at the northwestern part of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The area of interest represents the industrial part of Ain El-Sokhna new port, located in the northwestern part of the seismically active Gulf of Suez zone. The main objective of the current study is to estimate the site characteristics of the area of interest in terms of the fundamental frequency and the corresponding peak amplitude using noise measurements. The microtremor measurements were performed at 44 sites distributed over the study area in order to calculate the horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratio. The standard spectral ratio (SSR) is used in addition to the numerical modelling of horizontal shear (SH) waves in soil at selected sites in order to have a comparison with the H/V spectral ratio. The required 1D soil models for the numerical modelling of SH-waves were derived from 220 P-wave shallow seismic refraction profiles in addition to 30 SH-wave profiles. Maps of the fundamental frequency (f0) and its corresponding H/V peak amplitude (A0) were provided, and a range of site conditions in the area were shown. The amplification factor results derived from the SSR technique are very similar to those derived from the H/V spectral ratio. In most cases, the H/V spectral ratio proved to be suitable for calculating the fundamental resonance. Results were found to be compatible with the surface geology of the area of interest.

Adel, M. E. Mohamed; Deif, A.; El-Hadidy, S.; Moustafa Sayed, S. R.; El Werr, A.

2008-12-01

112

L'inscurit en le-de-France Rapport final : enqute victimation & sentiment  

E-print Network

Juin 2011 L'insécurité en ?le-de-France Rapport final : enquête « victimation & sentiment d'insécurité » de 2009 #12;#12;L'insécurité en ?le-de-France Rapport final : enquête « victimation & sentiment d & sentiment d'insécurité en ?le-de-France » de 2009 ­ Rapport final #12;3 IAU îdF ­ Enquête « victimation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

113

Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and reservoir quality of the sandstones of the Kareem Formation, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Middle Miocene Kareem sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their diagenesis and provenance and their impact on reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Zeit Bay Oil Field, and the East Zeit Oil Field represent the Lower Kareem (Rahmi Member) and the Upper Kareem (Shagar Member), were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rahmi sandstones have an average framework composition of Q95F3.4R1.6, and 90% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Upper Shagar sandstones are only slightly less quartzose with an average framework composition of Q76F21R3 and 82% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. The Kareem sandstones are mostly quartzarenite with subordinate subarkose and arkose. Petrographical and geochemical data of sandstones indicate that they were derived from granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks and deposited in a passive continental margin of a syn rift basin. The sandstones of the Kareem Formation show upward decrease in maturity. Petrographic study revealed that dolomite is the dominant cement and generally occurs as fine to medium rhombs pore occluding phase and locally as a grain replacive phase. Authigenic quartz occurs as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Authigenic anhydrites typically occur as poikilotopic rhombs or elongate laths infilling pores but also as vein filling cement. The kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene rocks. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and carbonate dissolution greatly enhance the petrophysical properties of many sandstone samples.

Zaid, Samir M.

2013-09-01

114

Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and geochemistry of Rudies sandstone (Lower Miocene), Warda Field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lower Miocene Rudies sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southeastern part, Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their provenance and diagenesis and their impact in reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Warda field, representing the Lower and Middle Rudies, were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rudies sandstones have an average framework composition of Q85F7.2R7.8, and 83% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Middle Rudies sandstones are only slightly more quartzose with an average framework composition of Q90F7R3 and 86% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. Rudies sandstones are mostly quartz arenite with subordinate subarkose and sublithic arenites and their bulk-rock geochemistry support the petrographic results. The modal analysis data of studied samples suggest influence of granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks. The geochemical data interpretation on the basis of discriminate function diagrams reveal the source material was deposited on a passive margin. Textural attributes possibly suggest long-distance transport of grains from the source region and indicates a cratonic or a recycled source. Tectonic setting of Rudies Formation reveals that the lower Rudies sandstones are typically rift sandstone and their deposition constrained the beginning of the faulting, while the middle Rudies sandstones were transported from the far along the rift. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and carbonate dissolution greatly enhance the petrophysical properties of many sandstone samples.

Zaid, Samir M.

2012-05-01

115

Student?parent rapport and parent involvement in sex, birth control, and venereal disease education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite widespread support for more effective sex education by parents, frank discussion of sex between parent and child is generally acknowledged to be a rarity. This study asked 1819?year?olds who they felt should be responsible for instructing young people about sex, examined relationships between student?parent rapport and parental involvement in sex education, and evaluated the impact of rapport and discussion

Susan M. Bennett; Winifred B. Dickinson

1980-01-01

116

When Rapport Building Extends Beyond Affiliation: Communication Overaccommodation Toward Patients with Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Physician rapport with patients is described as a vital component of relationship-centered care, but rapport-building communication behaviors may exceed boundaries and instead indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. This paper addresses the types of communication behaviors and contexts for interpreting when rapport building extends beyond boundaries toward patients with disabilities. Methods: Videotaped interactions between third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 142) and standardized patient educators with physical disabilities were qualitatively analyzed. Results: Results suggest six primary themes of exceeding expected rapport boundaries, including baby talk (ie, exaggerated nonverbal gestures and we language to indicate you), kinesic movement (ie, stiff posture and awkward handshakes), vocalics (ie, volume or pitch that interfered with the flow of conversation), relationship assumptions (ie, communicating assumptions that relationships were grounded in care-receiving), emotional divergence from patient disclosure (ie, minimizing or embellishing disability), and inconsistency with patient emotional cues (ie, responding to negative or neutral disclosure by overly accentuating positive interpretation). Discussion: This study suggests that communication behaviors generally described as positive, rapport-building behaviors can pose negative implications when they exceed the expected quantity or duration, when they are inconsistent with patient verbal disclosure, or when verbal and nonverbal messages are inconsistent. Identified themes serve as examples to understand when rapport building exceeds beyond affiliation and instead appears to indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. Suggestions for interpreting communication behaviors within the context of patient disclosure and building capacity to distinguish attitudes and biases limiting communication are addressed. PMID:21841921

Duggan, Ashley P; Bradshaw, Ylisabyth S; Swergold, Natalie; Altman, Wayne

2011-01-01

117

Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Neogene Gulf of Suez and northern Red Sea rift: Depositional environment and hydrocarbon source potential of evaporites  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative basin analysis (backstripping) was carried out to examine the interplay between basin subsidence, tectonic events, sedimentation patterns and sea level changes in a young developing ocean basin and continental margin. Rifting and subsidence were initiated {approximately}25 Ma with the earliest sediments within the basin recording the transition from continental to marine depositional environments. Open marine sedimentation continued in the basin from early to middle Miocene times with a series of prograding siliciclastic fan-deltas developing at the rift-margins in response to major tectonic events and periods of lowered global sea level. Opening and major subsidence with the rift-basin was termination at {approximately}15.5 Ma as tensional plate motions were transferred from the Gulf of Suez to sinistral strike-slip movement on the Dead Sea transform fault system. Tectonic quiescence combined with lowered global sea level resulted in the deposition of up to 3 km of evaporites in the rift basin from middle to late Miocene times. The evaporite strata contain significant amounts of well-preserved organic carbon (OC). Rock-Eval and elemental pyrolysis analysis indicates that the kerogen in these OC-rich evaporite associated sediments constitutes good to excellent potential hydrocarbon source-rock. Gas chromatography studies show that free hydrocarbons derived from these sediments are indigenous and derived from organic carbon deposited and preserved in a highly reducing, anoxic, hypersaline environment. Thermal modeling and Rock-Eval pyrolysis analysis results indicate that although evaporite-associated OC is immature in the Gulf of Suez and northern Red Sea, OC-rich evaporite strata are buried within the oil window in the southern Red Sea.

Richardson, M.

1988-01-01

118

Eliciting maltreated and nonmaltreated children's transgression disclosures: narrative practice rapport building and a putative confession.  

PubMed

This study tested the effects of narrative practice rapport building (asking open-ended questions about a neutral event) and a putative confession (telling the child an adult "told me everything that happened and he wants you to tell the truth") on 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children's reports of an interaction with a stranger who asked them to keep toy breakage a secret (n=264). Only one third of children who received no interview manipulations disclosed breakage; in response to a putative confession, one half disclosed. Narrative practice rapport building did not affect the likelihood of disclosure. Maltreated children and nonmaltreated children responded similarly to the manipulations. Neither narrative practice rapport building nor a putative confession increased false reports. PMID:24467688

Lyon, Thomas D; Wandrey, Lindsay; Ahern, Elizabeth; Licht, Robyn; Sim, Megan P Y; Quas, Jodi A

2014-01-01

119

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (avril 2009)  

E-print Network

responsable scientifique et coordinateur de l'étude Stéphan Jacquet, INRA, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre) - Stéphan JACQUET (INRA : Boucle microbienne, Sondes bbe, Coordination, Corrections, Mise en forme et) - Frédéric RIMET (INRA : Phytoplancton) Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., F. Rimet, S. Cachera, C. Girel, M

Jacquet, Stéphan

120

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (avril 2010)  

E-print Network

responsable scientifique et coordinateur de l'étude : Stéphan Jacquet, INRA, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre-François HUMBERT (ENS Paris : Planktothrix rubescens, Toxines) - Stéphan JACQUET (INRA : Boucle microbienne, Sondes (INRA : Phytoplancton) Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., F. Rimet, C. Girel, M. Perga, G. Paolini, J

Jacquet, Stéphan

121

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (mai 2012)  

E-print Network

scientifique et coordinateur de l'étude : Stéphan Jacquet, INRA, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre, 75 Avenue de bord) - Jean GUILLARD (INRA : Poissons, Relecture) - Aurélie HEBERT (INRA : Chimie) - Stéphan JACQUET sur le peuplement piscicole Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., D. Barbet, S. Cachera, A. Caudron, M

Jacquet, Stéphan

122

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (avril 2008)  

E-print Network

responsable scientifique Stéphan Jacquet, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre, 75 Avenue de Corzent, 74203 Thonon : Planktothrix rubescens, Toxines) - Stéphan JACQUET (INRA : Boucle microbienne, Sondes bbe, Coordination zooplanctoniques Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., J.-C. Druart, M. Perga, C. Girel, G. Paolini, J. Lazzarotto, I

Jacquet, Stéphan

123

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (juin 2014)  

E-print Network

responsable scientifique et coordinateur de l'étude : Stéphan Jacquet, INRA, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre (INRA : Pêche) - Jean-Christophe HUSTACHE (INRA : Pêche) - Stéphan JACQUET (INRA : Ce qu'il faut retenir SAVOYE (INRA : Chimie) Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., D. Barbet, S. Cachera, M. Colon, L. Espinat, C

Jacquet, Stéphan

124

SUIVI SCIENTIFIQUE DU LAC DU BOURGET Rapport de suivi (avril 2011)  

E-print Network

responsable scientifique et coordinateur de l'étude : Stéphan Jacquet, INRA, Station d'Hydrobiologie Lacustre rivières, Tableau de bord) - Stéphan JACQUET (INRA : Picocyanobactéries, Sondes bbe, Coordination) - Benoit SOTTON (INRA : Annexe sur la relation P. rubescens ­ poissons) Citation du rapport Jacquet, S., F

Jacquet, Stéphan

125

FIRME INTENSIVE EN CAPITAL HUMAIN ET COORDINATION : VERS UNE REDFINITION DU RAPPORT ENTRE INTGRATION ET  

E-print Network

on human capital-intensive firms. We explain that coordination by this kind of firms is much more1 FIRME INTENSIVE EN CAPITAL HUMAIN ET COORDINATION : VERS UNE RED?FINITION DU RAPPORT ENTRE 23, L 22, L 23 Mots clés: Intégration, dé-intégration, coordination, capital humain, théorie de la

Boyer, Edmond

126

Parent-Child Rapport: An Important Factor in the Structuring of Educational Ambition in Rural America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explored the importance of parent-child rapport as it pertained to the child's career development in the context of rural Ontonagon County, Michigan. Questionnaires were self-administered to 201 high school seniors (100 boys and 101 girls) in the spring of 1974. Information was gathered on a wide range of topics dealing with the

Clay, Daniel C.

127

Skala 1:40 modelforsg, forsgsrapport 2 Afsluttende rapport under PSO2004-projektet FU4301  

E-print Network

4301 Morten Kramer og Thomas Lykke Andersen Januar, 2005 #12;#12;DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, forsøgsrapport 2 Morten Kramer og Thomas Lykke Andersen #12;#12;Forord Denne rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført

128

Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering

Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

2011-01-01

129

Managing Rapport in Lingua Franca Sales Negotiations: A Comparison of Professional and Aspiring Negotiators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents selective findings from a study that investigated how facework is used to achieve interpersonal goals in intercultural sales negotiations. The article reports on linguistic analyses of what Spencer-Oatey has termed ''rapport management'' which, in a negotiation context, is aimed primarily, but not exclusively, at building a

Planken, B.

2005-01-01

130

Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Psychometric Properties of the Brief Version  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The original Professor-Student Rapport Scale contained 34 items and predicted several single-item student outcomes. A high level of internal consistency encouraged the development of a shorter measure in order to address apparent redundancy. Our goals in the current study were to provide psychometric data for the brief version of the scale and to

Ryan, Rebecca

2014-01-01

131

Laboratoire d'Informatique Gaspard-Monge: rapport interne Collapses and watersheds in pseudomanifolds of arbitrary  

E-print Network

Laboratoire d'Informatique Gaspard-Monge: rapport interne Collapses and watersheds a definition of a watershed and of a collapse (i.e., a homotopic retraction) for maps defined on pseudomanifolds of arbitrary dimension. Then, we establish two important results linking watersheds and homotopy

Recanati, Catherine

132

Laboratoire d'Informatique Gaspard-Monge: rapport interne Collapses and watersheds in pseudomanifolds of arbitrary  

E-print Network

Laboratoire d'Informatique Gaspard-Monge: rapport interne Collapses and watersheds propose a definition of a watershed and of a collapse (i.e., a homotopic retraction) for maps defined on pseudomanifolds of arbitrary dimension. Then, we establish two important results linking watersheds and homotopy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

133

CONSERVATION GNTIQUE EN EUROPE EN RAPPORT AVEC L'LEVAGE DU FUTUR  

E-print Network

SESSION1 CONSERVATION G?N?TIQUE EN EUROPE EN RAPPORT AVEC L'?LEVAGE DU FUTUR Conservation of animal to preserve less productive breeds. Argu- ments for conservation cover emotional, cultural and scientific production. Costs and time require priorities for objectives, species and forms of conservation

Boyer, Edmond

134

Rapport de recherche interne : RR-1469-13 Reusable genomes : Welcome to the green genetic  

E-print Network

is an enhancement of genetic algorithms (GAs) and cased-based genetic algorithms to make genomes more reusableRapport de recherche interne : RR-1469-13 Reusable genomes : Welcome to the green genetic algorithm a genetic algorithm to generate these drawings. This paper focus on two main contributions which are ones

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

Physicians' Nonverbal Rapport Building and Patients' Talk About the Subjective Component of Illness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers how physicians' nonverbal communication is sometimes associated with patients' affective satisfaction. Examines the relationship between physicians' nonverbal rapport building and patients' disclosure of information related to the subjective component of illness. Considers implications for understanding the role of physicians' nonverbal

Duggan, Ashley P.; Parrott, Roxanne L.

2001-01-01

136

All k-bounded policies are equivalent for self-stabilization Rapport de Recherche LRI n  

E-print Network

All k-bounded policies are equivalent for self-stabilization Rapport de Recherche LRI n o 1455F Resume: xous reduisons le proleme de prouver l onvergene d9un lgorithme proiliste pour n9importe quelle not known in dvne nd my vry sustntilly from one exeution to the otherF por representing the environment in n

Johnen, Colette

137

Pritonites infectieuses en dialyse pritonale continue ambulatoire au CHU de Rabat: profil bactriologique sur trois ans  

PubMed Central

Introduction La pritonite infectieuse (PI) est une des complications les plus svres et les plus frquentes de la dialyse pritonale (DP). But: Dterminer le taux des PI et les germes en causes, et valuer lefficacit des protocoles thrapeutiques entrepris chez les patients traits par DP au CHU de Rabat. Mthodes Etude rtrospective effectue en Septembre 2009 chez tous les patients traits par DP continue ambulatoire (DPCA) au CHU de Rabat depuis louverture de lunit de DP en Juillet 2006. Ont t inclus dans cette tude, tous les patients ayant fait une pritonite. Pour tous nos patients, nous avons relev les donnes cliniques, biologiques et bactriologiques. Nous avons galement recherch les causes des pritonites, le dlai de survenue par rapport au dbut de la dialyse, et la dure moyenne de formation des patients. Rsultats Au cours de la priode de ltude, 28 pisodes de PI sont survenus chez 19 patients dont la moyenne dge est de 4616 (19-78) ans, avec une prdominance masculine (12 hommes/ 7 femmes). Le taux des PI dans notre unit de DP est de 21.07 mois-patients calcul par le RDPLF. Leur dlai de survenue par rapport au dbut de la dialyse au centre est de 7.9 8 (1-29) mois. Lors de ces PI, les bactries Gram ngatif (BGN) ont t retrouves dans 55% des cas, contre uniquement 45% pour les Gram positifs. Conclusion La PI est une complication grave et redoutable de la DP. Le taux de PI dans notre centre de DPCA est de 21m-p ce qui correspond au taux acceptable dfinie par les socits internationales. Les germes les plus responsables des PI dans notre centre sont les BGN et la contamination semble tre manu-porte se faisant essentiellement partir de la flore environnementale et cutane. PMID:22593777

Lioussfi, Zineb; Rhou, Hakima; Ezzaitouni, Fatima; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Bayahia, Rabea; Benamar, Loubna

2012-01-01

138

Accouchement de jumeaux conjoints de dcouverte fortuite au cours du travail au CHU de Dakar  

PubMed Central

L'objectif de cette tude tait de rapporter 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints, discuter de l'importance du diagnostic antnatal et de dcrire les particularits diagnostiques, thrapeutiques et volutives. Sur 45700 accouchements du 1er Fvrier 2009 au 31 Dcembre 2011, 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints ont t enregistrs, soit 1 cas pour 15000 accouchements. Ces cas ont t diagnostiqus au cours du travail au dcours d'une dystocie mcanique ou d'une csarienne ralise pour une autre indication. Il s'agissait d'un cas de jumeaux conjoints thoraco-omphalopages, un cas de diprosopes et un cas de dicphales. L'accouchement dans les trois cas tait fait par voie haute permettant d'extraire des mort-ns frais. Nous insistons sur l'intrt d'un diagnostic antnatal prcoce par le recours lchographie afin dviter les accidents mcaniques d'un accouchement qui ne saurait s'accomplir par voie basse. PMID:23133702

Guye, Mamour; Guye, Serigne Modou Kane; Guye, Mame Diarra Ndiaye; Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Diallo, Moussa; Ciss, Mamadou Lamine; Moreau, Jean Charles

2012-01-01

139

Palynology, palynofacies and petroleum potential of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Palynological, palynofacies and organic geochemical results of 46 samples retrieved from the Upper Cretaceous - Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt are presented. The two latter formations are not dated palynologically as their lithology is not promising for palynological yield. However the Matulla Formation is dated as Turonian-Santonian age, based on the combined evidence of pollen and dinocysts. Palynofacies analysis carried out under both transmitted and fluorescent microscopy indicated that both the Thebes and Brown Limestone formations are deposited under a distal suboxic-anoxic environment. On the other hand, the Turonian-Santonian Matulla Formation supported the existence of a marginal marine deposition under dysoxic-anoxic basin to proximal suboxic-anoxic shelf environments. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and TOC results indicated that most of the studied formations are thermally immature to marginally mature and have a good petroleum potential. They are organically-rich in both oil- and gas-prone kerogen Type-II and II/III, deposited under marine reducing conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion.

El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Abo Ghonaim, A. A.; Mostafa, A. R.; El Atfy, H.

2014-07-01

140

Geophysical Constraints on the Hydrogeologic and Structural Settings of the Gulf of Suez Rift-Related Basins: Case Study from the El Qaa Plain, Sinai, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater has been identified as one of the major freshwater sources that can potentially meet the growing demands of Egypt's population. Gravity data (from 381 ground gravity stations) were collected, processed, and analyzed together with the available aeromagnetic (800 line-km) data to investigate the hydrogeologic and structural settings, areal distribution, geometry, and water storage of the aquifers in El Qaa coastal plain in the southwest Sinai Peninsula, and to assess their longevity given projected extraction rates. Findings include (1) complete Bouguer anomaly and total magnetic intensity maps show two connected sub-basins separated by a narrow saddle with an average basin length of 43 km and an average width of 12 km; (2) two-dimensional modeling of both gravity and magnetic data indicates basin fill with a maximum thickness of 3.5 km; (3) using anomalous residual gravity, the volume of water in storage was estimated at 40-56 km3; and (4) progressive increases in extraction rates over time will deplete up to 40 % of the aquifers' volume in 200-230 years and will cause the water quality to deteriorate due to seawater intrusion in 45 years. Similar geophysical exploration campaigns, if conducted over the entire coastal plains of the Red Sea and the Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba, could assist in the development of sound and sustainable management schemes for the freshwater resources in these areas. The adopted techniques could pave the way toward the establishment of sustainable utilization schemes for a much larger suite of similar aquifers worldwide.

Ahmed, Mohamed; Sauck, William; Sultan, Mohamed; Yan, Eugene; Soliman, Farouk; Rashed, Mohamed

2013-11-01

141

Facteurs influenant l'initiation au traitement antirtroviral des personnes vivant avec le VIH dans les Centres de Traitement Agrs de Bamenda et de Bertoua au Cameroun  

PubMed Central

Introduction L'objectif de ce travail tait de dterminer les facteurs influenant l'initiation au traitement antirtroviral des personnes vivant avec le VIH (PVVIH) dans les centres de traitements agres (CTA) de Bamenda et de Bertoua au Cameroun. Mthodes Il s'agissait d'une tude transversale, analytique ralise de Janvier Avril 2011, dans les CTA de Bamenda et de Bertoua. Pour cette tude, nous avons obtenu une clairance thique. Rsultats Nous avons tudis 460 dossiers de patients sropositifs en phase d'initiation au traitement antirtroviral dans les CTA de Bamenda et de Bertoua, 53,9% et 46,1% respectivement. L ge mdian tait de 36 ans. La plupart des sropositifs Bertoua (41) avaient fait un dpistage volontaire du VIH par rapport ceux de Bamenda (22) (p= 0.008). Il y avait plus de VIH de type 1 et 2 dans le CTA de Bamenda (15) par rapport Bertoua (3) (p= 0.011). La majorit des patients tait class au stade clinique II Bamenda (54,0%) tandis qu Bertoua le stade clinique III tait prdominant (52,4%) (p = 0,000). Le taux mdian de CD4 tait de 133 cellules/mm3 dans le CTA de Bamenda et de 175 cellules/mm3 Bertoua (p = 0,008). La Zidovudine tait plus prescrit Bamenda et le Tnofovir Bertoua (p = 0,000). L Efavirenz tait plus prescrit Bertoua tandis que la Nvirapine l tait plus Bamenda (p = 0,000). Le Lopinavir/r tait plus prescrit Bamenda qu Bertoua (p = 0,017). Conclusion Il apparait urgent de standardiser la prise en charge des PVVIH dans les CTA du Cameroun. PMID:25184023

Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Voundi, Esther Voundi; Kalla, Ginette Claude Mireille; Emah, Irne; Angwafo, Fru; Muna, Walinjom

2014-01-01

142

Safety Net Patients with Diabetes Experience Less Rapport Building When Providers Demonstrate High Computer Use  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Limited research on how computer use influences physician-patient communication has yielded both positive and negative effects. Methods: This study aims to determine the effects of computer use on rapport building in diverse safety-net settings. Utilizing video recordings of patient encounters in both primary and specialty settings, we conducted an observational study at a large US public hospital with a basic electronic health records (EHR) system. Eligible patients included English and/or Spanish-speaking adults (?18 years old) with diabetes who receive primary and subspecialty care at five hospital clinics. We coded verbal communication behaviors using an adapted version of the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS, 2002). The primary outcome was rapport-building statements (such as reassurance, concern, empathy, or partnership statements) by patients and providers. The primary predictor was high concurrent computer use, categorized as encounters in which >15% of total statements (provider and patient) had concurrent provider computer use. Analysts also rated overall computer use using a 3-item observation instrument (total possible score 09), categorizing high use as score =4. We performed regression analysis using generalized estimating equations to account for clustering by providers, controlling for patient age and gender. Results: To date, we have coded 15 encounters among 15 English-speaking patients and 13 providers. Among patients, 53% were women. Although all encounters were in English, 29% preferred Spanish. Among providers, 62% were women; 62% PCPs. Patients were less likely to use any rapport building statements with providers who demonstrated high concurrent computer use (IRR = 0.989; 95% CI = 0.9771.000). Specifically, both providers and patients were less likely to use emotional rapport building statements (IRR = 0.968, 95% CI = 0.9410.996; IRR = 0.950, 95% CI = 0.9070.996, respectively). In addition, high overall computer use was associated with less positive rapport-building by providers and patients (IRR=0.961, 95% CI = 0.9540.968; IRR = 0.993, 95% CI = 0.9870.999, respectively). However, both providers (IRR = 1.173, 95% CI = 1.0841.268) and patients (IRR = 1.302, 95% CI = 1.1001.542) were more likely to offer personal remarks and social conversations during encounters with high overall computer use. Conclusions: Preliminary analyses suggest that high computer use may be associated with less overall rapport-building, but personal conversations or chit-chat occur more frequently. EHR use may influence patient-provider conversations towards more biomedically-oriented agendas. Future analyses will examine the relationship between computer use and other communication outcomes, such as biomedical and psychosocial statements. Although EHRs are promoted as tools to improve efficiency and safety, it is crucial to gain a better understanding of the how computer use alters patient-provider relationships and communication.

Barton, Jennifer; Schillinger, Dean; Yelin, Ed; Ratanawongsa, Neda

2014-01-01

143

The Community is Where the Rapport Is On Sense and Structure in the YouTube Community  

E-print Network

The Community is Where the Rapport Is ­ On Sense and Structure in the YouTube Community Dana Rotman University of Maryland preece@umd.edu ABSTRACT YouTube is a video sharing repository, enabling users to post, share and discuss videos. Its stated mission is to create "an online video community"; however, YouTube

Golbeck, Jennifer

144

MESURE DU RAPPORT DES SECTIONS EFFICACES DE FISSION PAR NEUTRONS THERMIQUES DE 239Pu ET DE L'URANIUM NATUREL  

E-print Network

101. MESURE DU RAPPORT DES SECTIONS EFFICACES DE FISSION PAR NEUTRONS THERMIQUES DE 239Pu ET DE L'URANIUM neutrons thermiques, de 239Pu et d'uranium naturel contenant respectivement Npu noyaux de 239Pu et Nu noyaux d'uranium naturel. On a, dans ces conditions : où o-pu est la section efficace moyenne de fission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Profil des diabtiques en hmodialyse chronique: tude multicentrique au Maroc  

PubMed Central

Introduction Le diabte reprsente la premire cause de mortalit par insuffisance rnale au Maroc. Sa prvalence selon l'Enqute Nationale sur la Population et la Sant Familiale de 2011 est de 3,3% [1]. Le but de ce travail est de dterminer la prvalence et dtudier le profil clinique des diabtiques en hmodialyse chronique au Maroc. Mthodes Il s'agit d'une tude transversale multicentrique incluant 2066 hmodialyss chroniques dans les 39 centres d'hmodialyse de quatre rgions marocaines. Rsultats La prvalence du diabte en hmodialyse est 21,6%. Lge moyen 5913,2 ans (26-87). Le sex-ratio est de 1,9. L'IMC moyen est de 24,5 4,4 kg/m2 (15-41). 42 patients sont porteurs d?une hpatite virale. La dure moyenne en HD est 39,3 67 mois. 57% des patients gardent une diurse rsiduelle versus 43% chez les non diabtiques. Par rapport ces derniers, nous avons not plus d'HTA (64% versus 45%), plus de complications cardiovasculaires (23% versus 12%), un ge plus avanc l'initiation de l'hmodialyse (55,5 versus 47 ans) et un taux de FAV proximales plus important. Conclusion La prvalence des diabtiques en hmodialyse est relativement leve au Maroc sans tenir compte des patients qui ne bnficient pas dpuration extra-rnale pour des raisons socio-conomiques. Le taux lev de mortalit est imputable au retard et/ou l'absence de la prise en charge nphrologique des diabtiques. Dans nos rgions o le systme sanitaire dispose de faible moyen, l'accent doit tre mis sur le dpistage prcoce de la nphropathie chez le diabtique. PMID:25374630

Kabbali, Nadia; Mikou, Souad; El Pardiya, Nada Tazi; El Bardai, Ghita; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Houssaini, Tarik Sqalli

2014-01-01

146

Rapport Technique  

E-print Network

scheduling [25, 28], facility location [3, 7, 26, 41], inventory [11, 17], finance. [15, 22 ... [13, 32, 35, 51], machine learning and statistics [10, 63, 62], and energy sys- .... the concept of solution in the minmax approach, since it selects a unique set.

duhamel

2014-07-16

147

RAPPORT: running scientific high-performance computing applications on the cloud.  

PubMed

Cloud computing infrastructure is now widely used in many domains, but one area where there has been more limited adoption is research computing, in particular for running scientific high-performance computing (HPC) software. The Robust Application Porting for HPC in the Cloud (RAPPORT) project took advantage of existing links between computing researchers and application scientists in the fields of bioinformatics, high-energy physics (HEP) and digital humanities, to investigate running a set of scientific HPC applications from these domains on cloud infrastructure. In this paper, we focus on the bioinformatics and HEP domains, describing the applications and target cloud platforms. We conclude that, while there are many factors that need consideration, there is no fundamental impediment to the use of cloud infrastructure for running many types of HPC applications and, in some cases, there is potential for researchers to benefit significantly from the flexibility offered by cloud platforms. PMID:23230157

Cohen, Jeremy; Filippis, Ioannis; Woodbridge, Mark; Bauer, Daniela; Hong, Neil Chue; Jackson, Mike; Butcher, Sarah; Colling, David; Darlington, John; Fuchs, Brian; Harvey, Matt

2013-01-28

148

Rapport de la mission GPS Nord-Chili d'avril 2010 Participants : Eduardo Maureira (DGF) ; Arthur Delorme (IPGP)  

E-print Network

dernière intervention (nov 2009). Installation : modem satellite configuré à distance par le fournisseur d : condition pour que le modem satellite puisse rester dans la pièce en été, le reste du matériel étant stocké.255.0.0 (?), gtw : 172.16.16.10 (?)). 1/4 modem satellite switch modem satellite #12;Rapport de la mission GPS Nord

Vigny, Christophe

149

Collective flow in Au + Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

1994-05-01

150

AU FEBRUARY 2012 Open House: The AU Ph. D.  

E-print Network

AU FEBRUARY 2012 1 OPEN house Open House: The AU Ph. D. House Magazine By Alejandra Zaragoza Scherman Page 2 The AU PhD House Activity Group By Zsuzsanna Sukosd Page 3 The AU PhD House Activity Group By Gitte Haahr-Andersen Page 6 The AU PhD World: Talent Development By Kristian Thorn Page 7/8 The Ph

151

@AuAg nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

2014-09-01

152

Au2HTML  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Au2HTML is a tool aimed at Webmasters and others who are interested in developing Webpage galleries. Its most useful feature allows the creation of thumbnails from images of varying file formats. Customizable thumbnail options include image size and the border style. Au2HTML also comes with an HTML editor and can be integrated with your FTP client to ease file transfers. The registration fee is $99. A demo version is available for no charge.

153

Financial Implications of the Downs Report on Canadian Academic and Research Libraries. (Repercussions Financieres du Rapport Downs sur les Bibliotheques d'Universite et de Recherche au Canada); The Downs Report in Perspective; (Le Rapport Downs).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report entitled "Resources of Canadian Academic and Research Libraries," by Robert B. Downs, (ED 019 095) was the subject of conference held in Montreal, in April 1968, sponsored by the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada and the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries. This document consists of two key papers on

Blackburn, Robert H.; Stuart-Stubbs, Basil

154

Electrogenerated chemiluminescence from Au nanoclusters.  

PubMed

Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of Au clusters is observed for the first time using triethyamine (TEA) as the coreactant. The potential application of ECL Au clusters in analytical chemistry is also demonstrated using Pb(2+) as an example. PMID:21165495

Fang, Yi-Min; Song, Jing; Li, Juan; Wang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Huang-Hao; Sun, Jian-Jun; Chen, Guo-Nan

2011-02-28

155

Synthesis of a Au44(SR)28 nanocluster: structure prediction and evolution from Au28(SR)20, Au36(SR)24 to Au44(SR)28.  

PubMed

We report the synthesis of a Au44(SR)28 nanocluster (SR = 4-tert-butylbenzenethiolate). Based on the structural rules learned from the known Au28(SR)20 and Au36(SR)24 structures, we propose a plausible structure for Au44(SR)28, which is predicted to comprise a six-interpenetrating cuboctahedral Au36 kernel protected by four dimeric staples and sixteen bridging thiolates, i.e. Au36[Au2(SR)3]4(SR)16. PMID:24189666

Zeng, Chenjie; Chen, Yuxiang; Li, Gao; Jin, Rongchao

2014-01-01

156

Diffusivity of Au in Pb  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation of Pb/sub 3/Au from dilute Pb(Au) alloys and the subsequent Ostwald ripening have been studied. The Au diffusivity which limits the precipitation from Pb(500 at. ppM Au) specimens is in good agreement with D/sub p//sup R and T/ = 45 exp((-20.8 kcal/mol)/RT). Precipitation from Pb(100 at. ppM Au) alloys and Ostwald ripening in the Pb(500 at. ppM Au) specimens appear to be governed by the high temperature Au tracer diffusivity, D/sub Au/ = .0041 exp((-9.35 kcal/mol)/RT), which is about 10/sup 3/ times greater than D/sub p//sup R and T/ at 75 to 112/sup 0/C, and is attributed to the motion of a Au interstitial defect. In the 100 ppM alloys the Au is incorporated most easily at the ends of the Pb/sub 3/Au crystals and a ribbon- or whisker-like morphology results. The particles which form at the grain boundaries in the 500 ppM Au alloy specimens are at least six times larger in volume than the matrix particles and ripen at their expense; the Ostwald ripening kinetics scale with ..sqrt..t rather than with t/sup 1/3/ as is usual. The Pb/sub 3/Au formed whiskers, blades, ribbons, or equiaxed particles depending upon the Au concentration and precipitation temperature. The precipitation and ripening kinetics were critically dependent on the morphology of the second phase.

Campbell, A.N.; Turnbull, D.

1985-01-01

157

pi-Xi correlations in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at STAR  

E-print Network

Qualitative comparison of source sizes from pi-Xi correlations analyses in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200G GeV and sqrt(s_NN)=62 GeV is presented. For the most central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV we report first quantitative results concerning size of the pi-Xi source and relative shift of the average emission points between pi and Xi showing that the homogeneity region of Xi source is smaller then that of pion and significantly shifted in the transverse direction.

Petr Chaloupka

2007-05-23

158

La tuberculose cutane: observation de six cas confirms au CHU Souro SANOU (CHUSS) de Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)  

PubMed Central

La localisation cutane de la maladie tuberculeuse demeure une forme rare et reprsente seulement 2,1% des localisations. L'objet de cette tude est de rapporter le profil pidmiologique, anatomoclinique et volutif des cas de tuberculose ganglio-cutane diagnostiqus dans un CHU au Burkina Faso. La frquence de la tuberculose cutane est trs faible au CHUSS. Six cas ont t diagnostiqus entre 2004 et 2010, soit une frquence de un cas par an. La dure dvolution des cas allait de deux jusqu dix ans avant leur diagnostic. Les lsions observes taient: trois scrofulodermes, trois gommes, une tuberculose testiculaire associe un mal de Pott, un cas de polyadnopathies et des cicatrices atropho-rtractiles dans la plupart des cas. Sur le plan anatomopathologique, des granulomes tuberculodes ont t mis en vidence dans tous les cas avec une forte raction tuberculinique l'IDR. Sous antituberculeux pendant six mois, lvolution a t bonne dans tous les cas mais au prix de squelles cutanes cicatricielles inesthtiques. Son ampleur reste peut-tre encore mconnue. Le renforcement du plateau technique du CHU et une bonne collaboration interdisciplinaire contribuerait un meilleur diagnostic et prise en charge de cette affection. PMID:24648863

Andonaba, Jean Baptiste; Barro-Traor, Fatou; Yamogo, Tn; Diallo, Boukary; Korsaga-Som, Nina; Traor, Adama

2013-01-01

159

/Au Back Contacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the fabrication and characterization of CdTe thin-film solar cells with Cu-free MoO3- x /Au back contacts. CdTe solar cells with sputtered CdTe absorbers of thicknesses from 0.5 to 1.75 ?m were fabricated on Pilkington SnO2:F/SnO2-coated soda-lime glasses coated with a 60- to 80-nm sputtered CdS layer. The MoO3- x /Au back contact layers were deposited by thermal evaporation. The incorporation of MoO3- x layer was found to improve the open circuit voltage ( V OC) but reduce the fill factor of the ultrathin CdTe cells. The V OC was found to increase as the CdTe thickness increased.

Paudel, Naba R.; Compaan, Alvin D.; Yan, Yanfa

2014-08-01

160

Facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de sant de Meyomessala au Cameroun  

PubMed Central

Introduction L'objectif de ce travail tait de dterminer les facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de sant de Meyomessala (Rgion du Sud) au Cameroun. Mthodes Il s'agissait d'une tude transversale, descriptive et analytique qui s'est droule de Fvrier Mai 2011. Pour cette tude, nous avons obtenu une clairance thique. Rsultats Lchantillon tait constitu de 315 participants dont 181 (57,46%) hommes et 134 (42,54%) femmes. Lge moyen tait de 24,58ans (extrme: 15-45ans). Quarante personnes (40) taient sropositifs, soit une prvalence de l'infection par le VIH de 12,7%. Cette prvalence augmentait significativement (p = 0) avec le nombre de partenaires occasionnels au cours des douze derniers mois, allant de 2,7% chez ceux n'ayant eu aucun partenaire occasionnel 21,25% chez ceux ayant plus de trois partenaires occasionnels (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; P = 0,03). le fait dtre g entre 20 et 24 ans (RC = 4,88; IC = 1,74-13,67; p = 0), avoir plus de trois partenaires sexuels au cours des douze derniers mois (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; p = 0,03), avoir les rapports sexuels avec les prostitus (RC = 2,86; IC = 1,42-5,76; p = 0), avoir eu le chlamydia (RC = 3,00; IC = 1,07-8,39; p = 0,04), avoir eu la syphilis (RC = 3,35; IC = 1,57-7,14; p = 0), avoir des avantages sociaux lors du premier rapport sexuel (RC = 2,57; IC = 1,03-6,43; p = 0,04) constituaient des potentiels facteurs de risque du VIH. Conclusion Il apparait urgent d'intensifier les campagnes de sensibilisation au risque d'infection par le VIH et les maladies sexuellement transmissibles dans le district de sant de Meyomessala PMID:25419299

Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kalla, Ginette Claude Mireille; Abessolo, Stphanie Abo'o; Angwafo, Fru; Muna, Walinjom

2014-01-01

161

Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems  

PubMed Central

Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed. PMID:24373347

2013-01-01

162

Rapport sur les travaux de premier Congres de l'Union Astronomique Internatioinale tenu Rome du 2 au 10 mai 1922  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fr.: Le papier decrire le travaux de Congres de l'UAI. Le raport etais presente a l'Academie Roumaine. Engl: The paper describes the works of the Congress of the IAU. The oral speech was given to the Romanian Academy.

N. Donitch

1922-01-01

163

Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46 and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing.High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03872f

Dass, Amala; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Kothalawala, Nuwan

2013-11-01

164

The Effect of Expressive and Instrumental Touch on The Behavior States of Older Adults with Late-Stage Dementia of The Alzheimer's Type and Music Therapist's Perceived Rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy interventions utilizing two types of touchexpressive touch and instrumental touch, on the behavior states of older adults who have late-stage dementia of the Alzheimers type. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the music therapists perceived rapport when expressive and instrumental touches were used in

Melita Jean Belgrave

2006-01-01

165

Magnetoresistance of Au films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

2014-12-01

166

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Lambda and Lambda hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Balewski; S. Baumgart; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern De La Barca Snchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. De Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. M. Hoffman; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; J. Putschke; I. A. Qattan; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; D. Relyea; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto De Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. Van Der Kolk; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wu; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; V. I. Yurevich; M. Zawisza; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev; J. X. Zuo

2007-01-01

167

Biosynthesis and stabilization of Au and Au Ag alloy nanoparticles by fungus, Fusarium semitectum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crystallized and spherical-shaped Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles have been synthesized and stabilized using a fungus, F . semitectum in an aqueous system. Aqueous solutions of chloroaurate ions for Au and chloroaurate and Ag+ ions (1 : 1 ratio) for Au-Ag alloy were treated with an extracellular filtrate of F . semitectum biomass for the formation of Au nanoparticles (AuNP)

Balaji Dasaratrao Sawle; Basavaraja Salimath; Raghunandan Deshpande; Mahesh Dhondojirao Bedre; Belawadi Krishnamurthy Prabhakar; Abbaraju Venkataraman

2008-01-01

168

Fabrication and temperature-dependent magnetic properties of one-dimensional multilayer AuNiAuNiAu nanowires  

SciTech Connect

Multilayer AuNiAuNiAu nanowires with a controlled diameter of ?100 nm were synthesized by electrochemical deposition in porous alumina templates. The length of each Ni-segment was controlled up to ?230 nm, while the length of the Au segment sandwiched between two Ni segments was ?180 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra confirmed the formation of purely crystalline nanowires. The magnetic properties of the multilayer AuNiAuNiAu nanowires were investigated in the temperature range 2300 K. Room-temperature magnetic hysteresis confirmed the ferromagnetic nature of the nanowires. The plot of coercivity as a function of temperature (from 2 to 300 K) followed law applicable for ferromagnetic nanostructures. The magnetization tended to increase as the temperature decreased, following the modified Bloch's law similar to ferromagnetic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: (a) SEM image of AuNiAuNiAu nanowire with 230 nm Ni segment length and 180 nm Au sandwiched between Ni segments (b) Kneller's law (c) Bloch's law Display Omitted - Highlights: Electrochemical fabrication of AuNiAuNiAu nanowires in alumina templates. Formation of beadlike structure of Ni segments. Coercivity versus T follows Kneller's law for ferromagnetic materials. Magnetization as a function of temperature follows the modified Bloch's law.

Ishrat, S. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Maaz, K. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Lee, Kyu-Joon [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Myung-Hwa, E-mail: mhjung@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@skku.edu [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15

169

IMMIGRATION OF FISHES THROUGH THE SUEZ CANAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The number,of Red Sea fishes found in the eastern Mediterranean,amounts,to 36 species. Twelve immigrants, namely: Spratelloides delicatulus, Herklotsichthyspunctatus, Tylosurus choram, Sebas tapistes nuchalis, Epinephelus tauvina, Autisthesputa, Pelates quadrilineatus,Silago sihama, Rhon sicusstridens,Crenidenscrenidens,Rastrelligerkanagurta,Scomberomoruscommerson,were found in the last 12 yr. The southward migration, from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea is almost negligible. Only Liza aurata, Dicentrarchuspunctatus, and perhaps Carcharhinusplumbeus can be

Adam Bentuvia

170

Aide au logement et emploi  

Microsoft Academic Search

[fre] Parmi les allocataires du RMI sans conjoint ni enfant, ceux qui bnficient dune aide au logement reprennent plus souvent que les autres une activit. Ce rsultat peut surprendre. En effet, les bnficiaires dune aide disposent dun revenu global suprieur. De plus, laide au logement est fortement redistributive, et les gains retirs de la reprise dun emploi se trouvent rduits

Cdric Afsa

2001-01-01

171

Appel projets Expertise au profit du territoire Appel projets Expertise au profit du territoire 2012  

E-print Network

Appel à projets Expertise au profit du territoire 2012 Appel à projets Expertise au profit du territoire 2012 retour Appel à projets Expertise au profit du territoire 2012 Pour la troisième année consécutive, la Région lance son appel à projets "Expertise au profit du territoire". Ce dernier est

Di Girolami, Cristina

172

NIR-Sensitive Au-Au?S Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery  

E-print Network

Near IR (NIR) sensitive Au-Au?S nanoparticles were prepared by mixing HAuCl? and Na?S in aqueous solutions. An anti-tumor drug, cis-platin, was adsorbed onto Au-Au?S nanoparticle surface via the 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid ...

Ren, L.

173

LE CONTROLE CIVIL ET LE POUVOIR EXECUTIFAU JAPON Essai sur les rapports entre civils et militaires dans le Japon d'aprs guerre  

E-print Network

1 LE « CONTROLE CIVIL » ET LE POUVOIR EXECUTIFAU JAPON Essai sur les rapports entre civils et journalistes : « je suis un béotien en matière de sécurité. C'est l'essence même du contrôle civil ». Gaffe ou. Ichikawa n'avait pas pris la mesure de l'importance du principe de contrôle ou de prépondérance civile. Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

Symmetry energy from elliptic flow in 197Au + 197Au  

E-print Network

The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of neutron-rich systems at relativistic energies is proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the equation of state at supra-normal densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au + 197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model favor a moderately soft symmetry term with a density dependence of the potential term proportional to rho/rho_0^gamma with gamma = 0.9 +- 0.4.

P. Russotto; P. Z. Wu; M. Zoric; M. Chartier; Y. Leifels; R. C. Lemmon; Q. Li; J. Lukasik; A. Pagano; P. Pawlowski; W. Trautmann

2011-01-12

175

Global polarization measurement in Au plus Au collisions  

E-print Network

. Dash,15 M. Daugherity,42 M. M. de Moura,37 T. G. Dedovich,12 M. DePhillips,3 A. A. Derevschikov,32 L. Didenko,3 T. Dietel,14 P. Djawotho,17 S. M. Dogra,19 X. Dong,22 J. L. Drachenberg,41 J. E. Draper,6 F. Du,50 V. B. Dunin,12 J. C. Dunlop,3 M. R...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 76, 024915 (2007) Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions B. I. Abelev,9 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,45 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 Y. Bai,28 J. Balewski,17 O. Barannikova,9 L. S. Barnby,2 J...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.

2007-01-01

176

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

E-print Network

The system created in non central relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions carries large angular orbital momentum. Due to spin-orbital coupling, produced particles could be globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present results of a measurement of Lambda hyperon global polarization in Au+Au collisions at the center of mass energies 62 and 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed global polarization of Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurement. The obtained upper limit, |P_Lambda| < 0.01, is significantly below the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

Ilya Selyuzhenkov; for the STAR Collaboration

2006-05-26

177

Jet fragmentation in STAR going from p+p to Au+Au  

E-print Network

Jet fragmentation functions provide insight into jet structure and are expected to be modified by the nuclear medium in A+A collisions with respect to p+p reference measurements. If jet reconstruction is unbiased then a softening of the fragmentation functions is expected and should be observed in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In these proceedings we present measurements of fragmentation functions in p+p for charged particles for different jet finding algorithms; these measurements are understood and therefore can be used as a reference for comparison with Au+Au results. We report the effect of background and its fluctuations on jet reconstruction in Au+Au collisions, estimated by using the jet algorithms on simulated Pythia jets embedded in real Au+Au events. Finally, measurements of fragmentation functions for jets reconstructed in Au+Au events and their comparison to the p+p baseline are presented and discussed.

Elena Bruna; for the STAR Collaboration

2009-05-28

178

Biosynthesis and stabilization of Au and Au Ag alloy nanoparticles by fungus, Fusarium semitectum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystallized and spherical-shaped Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles have been synthesized and stabilized using a fungus, F . semitectum in an aqueous system. Aqueous solutions of chloroaurate ions for Au and chloroaurate and Ag+ ions (1 : 1 ratio) for Au-Ag alloy were treated with an extracellular filtrate of F . semitectum biomass for the formation of Au nanoparticles (AuNP) and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au-AgNP). Analysis of the feasibility of the biosynthesized nanoparticles and core-shell alloy nanoparticles from fungal strains is particularly significant. The resultant colloidal suspensions are highly stable for many weeks. The obtained Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles were characterized by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks using a UV-vis spectrophotometer, and the structure, morphology and size were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Possible optoelectronics and medical applications of these nanoparticles are envisaged.

Dasaratrao Sawle, Balaji; Salimath, Basavaraja; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Dhondojirao Bedre, Mahesh; Krishnamurthy Prabhakar, Belawadi; Venkataraman, Abbaraju

2008-09-01

179

Optical Spectroscopy of AU Mon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have carried out a series of spectroscopic observations of the Double Periodic Variable system AU Monocerotis since 2008. Most data were taken at the DuPont telescope in Las Campanas Observatory using the Echelle spectrograph. We present preliminary results of our spectroscopic analysis of AU Mon. With an orbital period of 11.1 days and long period of 417 days, AU Mon is a bright galactic system (V = 8.4) formed by a Be-type primary (gainer) and a G-type secondary (donor). We show Balmer and Helium line profiles in different phases of the orbital and long period as diagnostic of mass loss processes and dynamics of the rotating gas envelope.

Barra, D.; Mennickent, R. E.

2011-09-01

180

MgAuGa and MgAu2Ga: first representatives of the Mg-Au-Ga system.  

PubMed

MgAuGa (magnesium gold gallium), the first ternary representative of the Mg-Au-Ga system, crystallizes in the space group P62m and adopts the Fe2P structure type (Pearson symbol hP9). Various phases with the general composition AB2 have been reported in the surrounding binary systems, viz. Mg2Ga (hP18), MgGa2 (hP6; CaIn2 type), AuGa2 (cF12; CaF2 type), Au2Ga (oS24; Pd2As type) and Mg2Au (oP12; Co2Si type). In principle, MgAuGa can be obtained from each of them by partial replacement of the major element with the missing element. In fact, the structure of MgAuGa closely resembles hexagonal Mg2Ga through a direct group-subgroup relationship. MgAu2Ga (magnesium digold gallium) also crystallizes hexagonally in the space group P6(3)/mmc and is isotypic with Na3As. It adopts the structure of another binary compound, viz. Mg3Au (hP8), but shows an unexpected distribution of Mg, Au, and Ga among the atomic positions of the asymmetric unit. Both MgAuGa and MgAu2Ga can be described as formally anionic Au/Ga frameworks, with pseudo-hexagonal tunnels around Mg in MgAuGa or cages in MgAu2Ga. PMID:24705047

Smetana, Volodymyr; Corbett, John D; Miller, Gordon J

2014-04-01

181

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-print Network

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

182

UNDERGRADUATE law.uts.edu.au  

E-print Network

UTS:LAW UNDERGRADUATE COURSES GUIDE 2014 law.uts.edu.au THINK.CHANGE.DO #12;CONTACT US Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887) Ask a Question Online: ask.uts.edu.au law.uts.edu.au Why UTS Law? 01 Facilities and Services 02 Practical Experience at UTS: Law 04 Careers in Law 05 COURSE INFORMATION 06 Bachelor of Laws

University of Technology, Sydney

183

High Pt Suppression at Forward Rapidities in d+Au and Au+Au at Sqrt(s)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

We present centrality dependent charged hadron yields at several pseudorapidities from Au+Au collisions at Sqrt(s)=200GeV measured with BRAHMS spectrometers. Nuclear modification factors RAA and RCP for charged hadrons at forward angles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC will be discussed.

Catalin Ristea; for the BRAHMS Collaboration

2005-05-14

184

MESURE DE LA QUANTIT D'HERBE INGRE PAR UN RUMINANT EN LIBERT AU PATURAGE AU  

E-print Network

certain degré de corrélation entre la teneur en cellulose Weende (crude fiber) de la matière organique de'analyse le pourcentage de cellulose rapporté à cette même matière. Remarquons, à cette occasion, que la cellulose Weende fécale qui correspond à un poids donné de matière organique ingérée, par exemple 100 g

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Characterization and catalytic tests of Au\\/MFI prepared by sublimation of AuCl3 onto HMFI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au\\/MFI was prepared by sublimation of AuCl3 onto HMFI. The oxidation state of the gold in the as-synthesized sample is Au3+. Upon heating in He or O2, it transforms into gold metal and electron-deficient gold particles which agglomerate to larger Au particles. Reduction of Au3+ with CO to Au+ is accompanied by formation of an Au+(CO) complex. The carbonyl ligand

Zhi-Xian Gao; Qi Sun; Hai-Ying Chen; Xiang Wang; Wolfgang M. H. Sachtler

2001-01-01

186

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-08-02

187

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

E-print Network

The system created in non-central relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Due to spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN}=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed global polarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |P_{Lambda,anti-Lambda}| <= 0.02, is compared to the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev; I. Selyuzhenkov

2007-05-11

188

Les sepsis intra-abdominaux diffus post-operatoires: aspects pidmiologiques, diagnostiques et thrapeutiques au Service de Chirurgie Gnrale du CHU Aristide Le Dantec de Dakar  

PubMed Central

Les sepsis intra-abdominaux diffus postopratoires (SIADPO) ont encore une frquence alarmante. Ils mettent rapidement en cause l'intgrit des grandes fonctions. Le but de cette tude tait dvaluer leur prise en charge. Il s'agissait d'une tude rtrospective descriptive sur 10 ans (janvier 2000 dcembre 2009) portant sur 45 cas de SIADPO. Nous avons tudi les aspects pidmiologiques, diagnostiques, thrapeutiques et pronostiques. Il s'agissait de 45 cas dont 25 hommes et 20 femmes avec un sex-ratio de 1,25. Lge moyen des patients tait de 34 ans avec des extrmes de 20 et 70 ans. Le SIADPO survenait au dcours d'une intervention septique en urgence dans 68,8% des cas. Le dlai moyen de diagnostic tait de 10 jours. Les signes cliniques taient domins par les troubles du transit (80%), la douleur abdominale (77,7%), la fivre (66,7%), le mtorisme abdominal (33%). Une hyperleucocytose a t retrouve dans 60% des cas. Le liquide intra-abdominal tait polymicrobien. Tous les patients ont bnfici d'une laparotomie xipho-pubienne dans les 72 heures. Nous avons not 82,2% de pritonites secondaires notamment post-opratoires et 17,8% de pritonites persistantes. Les tiologies taient domines par le lchage de suture digestive ou gyncologique (66,7% des cas). La stomie digestive a t le geste le plus frquemment ralis (41%). La gurison est survenue chez 75,5%. La morbidit opratoire tait de 42% faite de suppuration paritale (10 cas), de fistule entrocutane (6 cas), dviscration (2 cas). La mortalit tait de 24,5% en rapport avec le retard diagnostique et les dfaillances multi-viscrales. Les interventions septiques en urgence sont les plus grandes pourvoyeuses de SIADPO. La mortalit reste encore leve en rapport avec la dfaillance viscrale. La prcocit du diagnostic et de la rintervention conditionnent ainsi le pronostic. PMID:25161748

Tour, Alpha Oumar; Ciss, Mamadou; Ka, Ibrahima; Dieng, Madieng; Konat, Ibrahima; Ka, Ousmane; Tour, Cheikh Tidiane

2014-01-01

189

Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces.  

PubMed

Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by ?-? stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the ?-? stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems. PMID:22127420

Menndez, Guillermo O; Corts, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Mndez De Leo, Lucila P; Williams, Federico J; Tognalli, Nicols G; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, Mara Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A; Salvarezza, Roberto C

2012-01-21

190

A comparative study of transition metal doped tubular gold cages:MatAu24(M=Au,Cu,Ag)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparative study of endohedral doping of Au24 tubular cage with transition metal M (M= Au, Cu, Ag) has been done using two different methodologies-the density functional theory (DFT) and semi empirical approach using the Gupta potential (GP). The GP predicts Au@Au24 to be the most stable while DFT predicts Cu@Au24 to be the most stable; the Au@Au24 and Ag@Au24 are found to be nearly isoenergetic. The Doping energy and HOMO-LUMO gap from DFT indicate that Cu@Au24-I is chemically most inert.

Sumali, Priyanka, Dharamvir, Keya

2013-02-01

191

Dielectron Mass Spectra from Au + Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV  

E-print Network

We report the STAR measurements of dielectron (e[superscript +]e[superscript ?]) production at midrapidity (|y[subscript ee]| < 1) in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV. The measurements are evaluated in ...

Stevens, Justin

192

Measurement of charged particle multiplicity distribution in Au + Au collisions up to 200 GeV  

E-print Network

Au+Au collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) herald a new era of opportunities for studying hadronic matter under conditions of high energy density and nucleon density. The theory of strong interactions, ...

Sarin, Pradeep, 1975-

2003-01-01

193

Translocation d'acides nucleiques au travers d'une bicouche lipidique : du nanopore au bacteriophage.  

E-print Network

??Ce travail porte sur l'tude exprimentale de deux mcanismes de translocations d'acides nucliques au travers d'une membrane lipidique : la translocation, force lectrophortiquement, d'oligomres au (more)

Chiaruttini, Nicolas

2010-01-01

194

L'astronomie au fminin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Qui dtient le record des dcouvertes de comtes ? Une femme. Qui a permis de comprendre comment est organise la population des toiles ? Une femme. Qui a dcouvert la loi permettant d'arpenter l'Univers, a trouv des phares dans l'espace, a compris le fonctionnement des forges stellaires et a boulevers notre vision de l'Univers ? Encore et toujours une femme... Pourtant, quand on doit citer un astronome -- historique -- au hasard, on pense le plus souvent -- des hommes : Ptolme, Galile, Copernic ou, plus prs de nous par exemple, Hubble. Certes, au cours des sicles, les femmes n'ont gure eu accs aux sciences en gnral et -- l'astronomie en particulier mais ce n'est pas une raison pour croire en l'absence totale de contributions dues au beau sexe ! C'est ce que dvoile ici l'auteur. Loin de toute forme de fminisme enrag, on suivra le parcours de quelques scientifiques importantes qui ont par hasard en commun une mme particularit : leur sexe.

Naz, Yal

2006-03-01

195

Di-jet correlation in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions from PHENIX  

E-print Network

PHENIX has measured the two particle azimuth correlation in Au + Au at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV. Jet shape and yield at the away side are found to be strongly modified at intermediate and low $p_T$. The modifications vary dramatically with $p_T$ and centrality. At high $p_T$, away side jet peak reappears but the yield is suppressed. Similar jet strength is found for Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions with similar number of participant nucleons.

Jiangyong Jia

2006-01-18

196

Coverage-dependent faceting of Au chains on Si(557)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structural and electronic phase diagrams of Au on Si(557) are established using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission. Five phases consisting of altogether seven facets are observed in the submonolayer regime. With increasing Au coverage one observes Si(111)77+Si(112) , Si(557)-Au, Si(111)52-Au+Si(335)-Au , Si(111)33-Au+Si(335)-Au , and Si(111)33-Au+Si(5511)-Au . The relative surface areas of the five phases and seven facets are determined accurately by depositing a Au wedge ranging from 0 to 0.7 monolayer and performing automatic pattern recognition on large-scale STM images. Angle-resolved photoemission spectra are decomposed into contributions from the five phases. The Fermi wave vectors and the band filling of various facets are identified. Using Si(557)-Au as reference we find a coverage of three Au chains per unit cell for the frequently studied Si(111)52-Au surface (instead of the widely used value of two Au chains). Likewise a coverage of two Au chains per unit cell is found for Si(553)-Au (instead of one Au chain), in agreement with x-ray diffraction. A structural model with three Au rows per unit cell is developed for Si(111)52-Au using density-functional-theory calculations.

Barke, I.; Zheng, F.; Bockenhauer, S.; Sell, K.; Oeynhausen, V. V.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Erwin, S. C.; Himpsel, F. J.

2009-04-01

197

Fe/Au Multilayers: Structure and Magnetoresistance  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the magnetoresistance (MR) in two sets of Fe/Au multilayers, with varying (1) Fe layer thickness, t{sub Fe} = 3-10 nm, and (2) Au layer thickness t{sub Au} = 5-15 nm, grown on Si substrates by sputtering. The multilayer interface structure and magnetic properties were studied by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). The study was undertaken to understand the correlation between structure of these multilayers and their magneto-transport properties.

Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, D. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prajapat, C. L. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

2011-07-15

198

Composite AuNiO films  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work reports the investigation of AuNiO composite films, prepared by three different techniques: (i) all-sputtering, (ii) mixed sputtering and solgel, and (iii) all solgel. The AuNiO films were deposited by (i) reactive DC magnetron sputtering from Au and Ni targets in an Ar+O2 atmosphere, (ii) sputterdeposited nickel oxide films and gold nanoparticles deposited by the solgel and dip-coating methods,

F. F. Ferreira; P. S. Haddad; M. C. A. Fantini; G. E. S. Brito

2003-01-01

199

UNDERGRADUATE law.uts.edu.au  

E-print Network

UTS:LAW UNDERGRADUATE COURSES GUIDE 2014 law.uts.edu.au ThINk.ChANGE.DO NeW DegreeS for2014 #12;contact us Tel: 1300 asK uts (1300 275 887) Ask a Question Online: ask.uts.edu.au law.uts.edu.au Why uts Law? 01 Facilities and services 02 Practical Experience at uts: Law 04 careers in Law 05 coursE in

University of Technology, Sydney

200

Electrodeposited Au/FeAu Nanowires with Controlled Porosity S. Lucatero,a  

E-print Network

Electrodeposited Au/FeAu Nanowires with Controlled Porosity S. Lucatero,a W. H. Fowle,b and E. J-free electrolyte. Control of porosity and composition was achieved via modulation in pulsed time and applied current density. Nanowires with decreased porosity were observed upon increasing time of the AuFe alloy

Sridhar, Srinivas

201

Heterostructured CIGS-Au nanoparticles: from Au-CIGS side-by-side structure to Au-core\\/CIGS-shell configuration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterostructured Au-Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) nanoparticles (nps) with Au-CIGS side-by-side and Au-core\\/CIGS-shell configurations have been synthesized in a controllable manner using seed mediated growth. Detailed microstructure analysis reveals that (112) planes in the tetragonal chalcopyrite CIGS serve as the predominant termination surfaces during single phase CIGS nanoparticle growth. Preferential nucleation of Au on such planes determines the Au-CIGS side-by-side

Yeming Xu; Quan Li

2011-01-01

202

22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...departure from the home country, a host family placement...the au pair and the host family prior to the...from his or her home country. Such agreement...family unless the host family has interviewed...from his or her home country. (f) Au...

2010-04-01

203

Observations of Jovian Electrons at 1 AU  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has recently been suggested that electrons of Jovian origin are responsible for the 'quiet time increases' in the > 3-MeV electron intensity observed at I AU. Using data from the California Institute of Technology electron\\/isotope spectrometers on Imp 7 and 8, we have studied the temporal behavior of quiet time electrons at I AU over the period October 1972

R. A. Mewaldt; E. C. Stone; R. E. Vogt

1976-01-01

204

Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by ?-? stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the ?-? stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by ?-? stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the ?-? stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11039j

Menndez, Guillermo O.; Corts, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Mndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicols G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, Mara Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

2012-01-01

205

Violence et normes : le conflit notionnel dans les rapports familiaux L'on a coutume d'admettre que la famille se prsente comme la cellule vitale de la  

E-print Network

1 Violence et normes : le conflit notionnel dans les rapports familiaux L'on a coutume d la forme de conflits, ou, ce que l'on est légitime de qualifier en droit de « violences »2 . Deux , définit les contours de la violence familiale, et prévoit des règles de sanction, lorsque les individus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

New intermetallics YbAu2In4 and Yb2Au3In5.  

PubMed

The intermetallic compounds YbAu(2)In(4) and Yb(2)Au(3)In(5) were obtained as single crystals in high yield from reactions run in liquid indium. Single crystal X-ray diffraction data of YbAu(2)In(4) showed that it crystallizes as a new structure type in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/m and lattice constants a = 7.6536(19) , b = 4.5424(11) , c = 9.591(2) and ? = 107.838(4). The YbAu(2)In(4) compound is composed of a complex [Au(2)In(4)](3-) polyanionic network in which the rare-earth ions are embedded. Yb(2)Au(3)In(5) crystallizes in the polar space group Cmc2(1) with the Y(2)Rh(3)Sn(5) type structure and lattice constants a = 4.5351(9) , b = 26.824(5) , and c = 7.4641(15) . The gold and indium atoms define a complex three-dimensional [Au(3)In(5)] network with a broad range of Au-In (2.751(2) -3.0518(16) ) and In-In (3.062(3) -3.3024(19) ) distances. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of YbAu(2)In(4) revealed a transition at 25 K. Below the transition, the susceptibility of YbAu(2)In(4) follows Curie-Weiss behavior with an effective paramagnetic moment of 0.79 ?(B)/Yb. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Yb(2)Au(3)In(5) show a mixed valent ytterbium and the magnetic moment within the linear region (<100 K) of 1.95 ?(B)/Yb. Heat capacity data for YbAu(2)In(4) and Yb(2)Au(3)In(5) give Debye temperatures of 185 and 153 K, respectively. PMID:20961134

Sebastian, C Peter; Salvador, James; Martin, Joshua B; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

2010-11-15

207

Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d plus Au, and Au plus Au collisions at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

S. M. Dogra,18 X. Dong,22 J. L. Drachenberg,41 J. E. Draper,5 F. Du,51 J. C. Dunlop,3 M. R. Dutta Mazumdar,46 W. R. Edwards,22 L. G. Efimov,12 E. Elhalhuli,2 M. Elnimr,49 V. Emelianov,26 J. Engelage,4 G. Eppley,36 B. Erazmus,40 M. Estienne,17 L...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 79, 034909 (2009) Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d + Au, and Au + Au collisions at the STAR detector B. I. Abelev,9 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,46 B. D. Anderson,19 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderson de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

2009-01-01

208

Rapport sur l'tat du patrimoine astronomique dans les observatoires franais de la fin du XIX sicle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Suite au colloque sur la sauvegarde du patrimoine astronomique organis par le MAEE et la SAF, sous l'gide de l'UNESCO, qui a conduit l'adoption de la Dclaration de Paris, les directeurs d'observatoires institutionnels qui taient absents du colloque ont ressenti le besoin de discuter de ces conclusions prises en leur nom. L'initiative d'organiser une runion des directeurs des Observatoires des Sciences de l'Univers (OSU) ce sujet le 30 janvier 2012 a t prise par Franois Vernotte, directeur de l'Observatoire de Besanon. Le prsent compte-rendu de visite rsulte d'une initiative spontane d'Emmanuel Pcontal, astronome responsable du Patrimoine l'observatoire de Lyon, et d'Evelyne Damm, membre de la Commission Nationale de classement des Monuments Historiques (CNMH) et lue la communaut d'agglomration des Portes de l'Essonne o est sis l'observatoire de Camille Flammarion.

Damm, E.; Pcontal, E.

2012-12-01

209

Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster  

SciTech Connect

40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Walter, Michael [University of Freiburg, Germany

2011-01-01

210

Catalytic role of Au in Ni\\/Au contact on GaN(0001)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the structural behavior of the Ni\\/Au contact on GaN(0001) and found the catalytic role of Au during annealing, using in situ x-ray scattering. The oxidation kinetics of Ni during annealing in air was greatly affected by the presence of Au. The accelerated GaN decomposition and Ni nitride formation during annealing in N2 also provide evidence of the catalytic

C. C. Kim; J. K. Kim; J.-L. Lee; J. H. Je; M. S. Yi; D. Y. Noh; Y. Hwu; P. Ruterana

2001-01-01

211

Charged hadron results from Au+Au at 19.6 GeV  

E-print Network

Results from a one day $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 19.6$ GeV Au+Au test run at RHIC using the STAR detector are presented. The quality of these results from only 175,000 triggered events demonstrates some of STAR's physics capabilities for the upcoming beam energy scan at RHIC. From these 19.6 GeV Au+Au collisions, we have analyzed the transverse mass spectra of $\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, and $\\bar{p}$ at midrapidity and $m_T - m_0$ $results published by NA49, NA44, WA98, and CERES.

D. Cebra; for the STAR Collaboration

2009-03-26

212

Solvation of Au+ versus Au0 in aqueous solution: electronic structure governs solvation shell patterns.  

PubMed

The solvation behavior of Au(+) and Au(0) in liquid water under ambient conditions has been studied using ab initio molecular dynamics. The Au(+) aqua ion forms a rigid and well-defined quasi-linear structure in the sense of ligand field theory, where two water molecules are tightly bound to the gold cation through oxygen atoms ("cationic solvation"). Yet, transient charge accumulation in the direction perpendicular to the O-Au(+)-O linear core structure leads occasionally to the formation of a short Au(+)-H contact within the distance range of the first solvation shell, which is typical of "anionic solvation". Upon adding an electron to Au(+), the resulting solvation pattern of Au(0)(aq) has nothing in common with that of Au(+)(aq). Quite surprisingly we discover that the first solvation shell of Au(0)(aq) consists of a single water molecule and features both "anionic" and "cationic" solvation patterns depending on fluctuation and polarization effects. Thus, charging/decharging of metals dissolved in water, M(0)? M(+) + e(-), as occurring e.g. during elementary electrochemical steps, is expected to change dramatically their solvation behavior in the sense of re-solvation processes. PMID:22116389

Camellone, Matteo Farnesi; Marx, Dominik

2012-01-14

213

Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-print Network

We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.79 +/- 0.24 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (sys.) +/- 0.10 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.49 +/- 0.1 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (sys.) +/- 0.06 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2015-01-21

214

Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-print Network

We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.79 +/- 0.24 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (sys.) +/- 0.10 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.49 +/- 0.1 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (sys.) +/- 0.06 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-12-12

215

Au Boulot! First-Year French  

E-print Network

Au boulot! is a two-year college French program consisting of: two textbooks, one for each year; four workbooks, one for each semester; four cassette sets to accompany the four workbooks; and a reference grammar, to be ...

Dinneen, David A.; Christiansen, Hope; Kernen, Madeleine; Pensec, Herve

1995-01-01

216

swinburne.edu.au VET in Schools  

E-print Network

­ Civil, Mechanical, Robotics & Mechatronics, or Electrical Advanced Diploma of Electronicsswinburne.edu.au VET in Schools Certificate II in Engineering Studies (Mechatronics) Course code engineering as a career. The course includes project-based learning, related to the engineering

Liley, David

217

Comparison of the space-time extent of the emission source in d +Au and Au + Au collisions at ?{sNN} = 200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two-pion interferometry measurements in d +Au and Au +Au collisions at ?{sNN} = 200 GeV are used to extract and compare the Gaussian source radii Rout, Rside and Rlong, which characterize the space-time extent of the emission sources. The comparisons, which are performed as a function of collision centrality and the mean transverse momentum for pion pairs, indicate strikingly similar patterns for the d + Au and Au + Au systems. They also indicate a linear dependence of Rside on the initial transverse geometric size R bar , as well as a smaller freeze-out size for the d + Au system. These patterns point to the important role of final-state re-scattering effects in the reaction dynamics of d + Au collisions.

Ajitanand, N. N.

2014-11-01

218

LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the crystal structure and electronic bands of LaAu2 and CeAu2 surface intermetallic compounds grown by high-temperature deposition on Au(111). By scanning-tunneling microscopy we study the formation of different alloy phases as a function of growth temperature and lanthanide coverage. We determine the specific growth conditions to achieve monolayers and bilayers of LaAu2 and CeAu2 with high crystalline quality. Due to lattice mismatch with the underlying Au substrate, both LaAu2 and CeAu2 exhibit long-range moir patterns, which can serve as templates for further nanostructure growth. By angle-resolved photoemission we map the two-dimensional band structure of these surface alloys, discussing the nature of the different spectral features in the light of first-principles calculations.

Ormaza, M.; Fernndez, L.; Lafuente, S.; Corso, M.; Schiller, F.; Xu, B.; Diakhate, M.; Verstraete, M. J.; Ortega, J. E.

2013-09-01

219

XANES of the AuL III edge in gold metal and in two compounds AuCN and AuCl 3  

Microsoft Academic Search

The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of the AuLIII edge in gold metal and in its two compounds AuCN and AuCl3 have been recorded. The observed chemical shifts of the edge and the fine structure peaks in the compounds are discussed.\\u000a It is observed that the energy shifts ?E of the AuLIII due to chemical effects in aurous cyanide

Arvind Agarwal; M. K. Singh; A. N. Vishnoi

2010-01-01

220

Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR  

SciTech Connect

Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freezeout temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d + Au, and peripheral Au + Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au + Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au + Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

STAR Coll

2009-04-11

221

Coverage-Dependent Faceting of Au Chains on Si(557)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structural and electronic phase diagram of Au on Si(557) is established using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES). Five phases consisting of altogether seven facets are observed in the sub-monolayer regime. Four of them consist of two coexisting structures. In order of increasing Au coverage the five phases are: Si(111)7x7 + Si(112), Si(557)1x2-Au, Si(111)5x2-Au + Si(335)-Au, Si(111)?3x?3-Au + Si(335)-Au, and Si(111)?3x?3-Au + Si(5 5 11)-Au. The relative surface areas of the five phases and seven facets are determined accurately by depositing a Au wedge ranging from 0 to 0.8 monolayer and performing automatic pattern recognition on large-scale STM images. Angle-resolved photoemission spectra are decomposed into contributions from the five phases. The Fermi wave vectors of various facets are identified. Using Si(557)1x2-Au as reference we find a coverage of 3 Au chains per unit cell for the frequently-studied Si(111)5x2-Au surface (instead of the widely-used value of 2 Au chains). The impact of this finding on structural models is discussed.

Himpsel, F. J.; Barke, I.; Zheng, F.; Bockenhauer, S.; Sell, K.; Oeynhausen, V. V.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.

2009-03-01

222

Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV  

E-print Network

Balance functions have been measured for charged-particle pairs, identified charged-pion pairs, and identified charged-kaon pairs in Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at [square root]?sNN=200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy ...

Balewski, Jan T.

223

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+ Au and Au?+?Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta pT [rho tau] of charged particles associated with intermediate- to high-pT [rho tau] trigger particles (2.5Au and Au?+?Au collisions at ...

Balewski, Jan T.

224

The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

2013-04-01

225

?? Correlation Function in Au + Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV  

E-print Network

We present ?? correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200??GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednick-Lyuboshitz analytical model has ...

Adamczyk, L.

226

Influence of Citric and Ascorbic Acids on Electrodeposited Au/FeAu Multilayer Nanowires  

E-print Network

Influence of Citric and Ascorbic Acids on Electrodeposited Au/FeAu Multilayer Nanowires S. Lucatero and current efficiency behavior when citric acid, ascorbic acid, or a combination of both is present reaction partial current densities isr in the citric acid electrolyte generated local alkaline conditions

Sridhar, Srinivas

227

Resistive switching characteristics of Au/P-doped NiO/Au segmented nanowires synthesized by electrochemical deposition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we detail the synthesis and characteristics of Au/NiO/Au segmented nanowire-based resistive switching memory devices. The fabrication of the memory devices involves the step-by-step electrodeposition of Au-Ni-Au into an anodic aluminum oxide template followed by the thermal oxidation process to make NiO. The unipolar resistive change is observed in Au/NiO/Au nanowires exhibiting a set voltage of 0.6 V and a reset voltage of 1 V with a current compliance of 10 mA. Au diffused Au into NiO during the thermal oxidation lowers the resistance of NiO and the forming voltage. The change in the switching behavior from unipolar to bipolar is achieved by doping approximately 3 at. % phosphorous in the interface of NiO and a Au electrode.

Lee, Saeeun; Kim, Donguk; Eom, Hyeonjin; Kim, Woo-byoung; Yoo, Bongyoung

2014-02-01

228

Electron-stimulated cesium atom desorption from the Cs/CsAu/Au/W system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on a continuation of the investigation of electron-stimulated Cs-atom desorption from a tungsten surface on which cesium and gold films had been adsorbed at T = 300 K. Earlier studies revealed that Cs atoms start to desorb only after more than one monolayer of gold and more than one monolayer of cesium had been deposited on the tungsten surface. In this case, a coating consisting of a gold adlayer on tungsten, a CsAu compound possessing semiconducting properties, and a cesium monolayer capping CsAu (Cs/CsAu/Au/W) is formed on the tungsten surface at 300 K. The yield of atoms from this system exhibits a resonant dependence on the incident electron energy E e , with an appearance threshold of 57 eV and a maximum at 64 eV. In this case, Cs atoms desorb in two channels, with one of them involving Cs desorption out of the cesium monolayer, and the other, from the CsAu monolayer. The Cs yield at E e = 64 eV has been investigated in both desorption channels, with an additional cesium coating deposited on the already formed Cs/CsAu/Au/W layered system, as well as of the effect annealing produces on the yield and energy distributions of Cs atoms. It has been demonstrated that Cs atoms evaporated at 300 K on a layered coating with a cesium monolayer atop the CsAu layer on tungsten capped with a gold adlayer, rather than reflected from the cesium monolayer or adsorbing on it, penetrate through the cesium monolayer into the bulk of CsAu even with one CsAu layer present. The desorption yield does not vary with increasing cesium concentration at 300 K, but falls off gradually at 160 K. Annealing within the temperature range 320 K ? T H ? 400 K destroys the cesium monolayer and the one-layer CsAu coating, but the multilayer CsAu compound does not break up in this temperature range even after evaporation of the cesium monolayer. It is shown that Cs atoms escape from the multilayer CsAu compound primarily out of the top CsAu layer.

Ageev, V. N.; Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Potekhina, N. D.

2010-09-01

229

Odd-Even Pattern Observed in Polyaniline/(Au0 Au8) Composites  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically predicted effect of odd-even pattern of electron pairing on behavior of gold clusters in polyaniline/AuN (N = 0 to 8) has been confirmed experimentally. In these composites the atomic Au clusters with even number of atoms exhibit higher catalytic activity for electrochemical oxidation of n-propanol in 1 M NaOH than the odd-number atoms clusters. Also, infrared spectroscopy shows that even numbered PANI/AuN composites affect the N-H stretching vibration more strongly than the corresponding odd numbered ones. This behavior matches the theoretically predicted variations of HOMO-LUMO gap energy and the stability of the atomic Au clusters. It also agrees with the earlier experimental work in which the UPS spectra of isolated, mass-selected Au clusters have been reported.

Jonke, Alex P.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Janata, Jiri

2012-01-12

230

Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

2002-12-09

231

Electrochemistry of Os(2,2'-bpy)2ClPyCH2NHCOPh tethered to Au electrodes by S-Au and C-Au junctions.  

PubMed

Osmium pyridine-bipyridine redox centers have been tethered to Au electrodes by chemical modification through Au-S and Au-C bonds respectively. 4-Mercapto benzoic acid and the reduction product of the aryl diazonium salt of 4-amino benzoic acid were reacted on Au surfaces, with further post-functionalization by chemical reaction of the osmium complex amino-pyridine derivative with the surface carboxylates. The resulting modified Au surfaces were characterized by polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), resonant raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. PMID:21359311

Ricci, A M; Tognalli, N; de la Llave, E; Vericat, C; Mndez De Leo, Lucila P; Williams, Federico J; Scherlis, D; Salvarezza, R; Calvo, E J

2011-03-28

232

Facile Syntheses of Monodisperse Ultra-Small Au Clusters  

SciTech Connect

During our effort to synthesize the tetrahedral Au20 cluster, we found a facile synthetic route to prepare monodisperse suspensions of ultra-small Au clusters AuN (N<12) using diphosphine ligands. In our monophasic and single-pot synthesis, a Au precursor ClAu(I)PPh3 and a bidentate phosphine ligand P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 (Ph = phenyl) are dissolved in an organic solvent. Au(I) is reduced slowly by a borane-tert-butylamine complex to form Au clusters coordinated by the diphosphine ligand. The Au clusters are characterized by both high resolution mass spectrometry and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the mean cluster size obtained depends on the chain length M of the ligand. In particular, a single monodispersed Au11 cluster is obtained with the P(Ph)2(CH2)3P(Ph)2 ligand, whereas P(Ph)2(CH2)MP(Ph)2 ligands with M = 5 and 6 yield Au10 and Au8 clusters. The simplicity of our synthetic method makes it suitable for large-scale production of nearly monodisperse ultrasmall Au clusters. It is suggested that diphosphines provide a set of flexible ligands to allow size-controlled synthesis of Au nanoparticles.

Bertino, Massimo F.; Sun, Zhong-Ming; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Lai S.

2006-11-02

233

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from STAR  

E-print Network

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta \\pt{} of charged particles associated with intermediate to high-\\pt{} trigger particles ($2.5 < \\pt < 10$ \\GeVc) in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\snn=200$ GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher $\\pt \\gtrsim 2.5$ \\GeVc, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+Au and Au+Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle $\\pt < 2$ \\GeVc, a large enhancement of the near- ($\\dphi \\sim 0$) and away-side ($\\dphi \\sim \\pi$) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au+Au collisions compared to d+Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at $\\dphi \\sim \\pi$ in central Au+Au collisions.

STAR Collaboration; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; Daniel Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

2010-04-14

234

African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development. Report and Recommendations = Colloque regional africain la telematique au service du developpement. Rapport et recommandations (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 3-7, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development was organized in view of the special educational and communication needs of Africa in a time of accelerating change and development of information technologies. The symposium brought together more than 150 African specialists, and over 40 participants from other regions and development

International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

235

Electronic structure of dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanocluster  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have carried out optical and X-ray photoemission studies of the dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters. The dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters are prepared by the chemical reduction of Au ions loaded within the dendrimer templates. Photoluminescence spectrum of the dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters with diameter of about 1.0 nm shows the visible luminescence centered at about 2.8 eV. In addition, we have measured the nanocluster-size dependent photoemission spectra in the valence-band region. From line shape analysis of Au 4f X-ray photoemission spectra, Au 4f core-level spectra of the dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters reflect the size dependent chemical-states. From these results, we discuss electronic structures and chemical states of the dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters.

Imamura, M.; Miyashita, T.; Tanaka, A.; Yasuda, H.; Negishi, Y.; Tsukuda, T.

2007-07-01

236

Desulfurization of Thiophene on Au/TiC(001): Au?C Interactions and Charge Polarization  

SciTech Connect

Photoemission and first-principles DF calculations were used to study the interaction of thiophene with TiC(001) and Au/TiC(001) surfaces. The adsorption strength of thiophene on TiC(001) is weak, and the molecule desorbs at temperatures below 200 K. The molecule binds to Ti centers of TiC(001) through its sulfur atom with negligible structural perturbations. In spite of the very poor desulfurization performance of TiC(001) or Au(111), a Au/TiC(001) system displays a hydrodesulfurization activity higher than that of conventional Ni/MoS{sub x} catalysts. The Au?TiC(001) interactions induce a polarization of electron density around Au which substantially increases the chemical reactivity of this metal. Au nanoparticles drastically increase the hydrodesulfurization activity of TiC(001) by enhancing the bonding energy of thiophene and by helping in the dissociation of H{sub 2} to produce the hydrogen necessary for the hydrogenolysis of C-S bonds and the removal of sulfur. H{sub 2} spontaneously dissociates on small two-dimensional clusters of gold in contact with TiC(001). On these systems, the adsorption energy of thiophene is 0.45-0.65 eV larger than that on TiC(001) or Au(111). Thiophene binds in a ?5 configuration with a large elongation ({approx}0.2 {angstrom}) of the C-S bonds.

Rodriguez, J.; Liu, P; Takahashi, Y; Nakamura, K; Vines, F; Illas, F

2009-01-01

237

Plasmonic Fano resonance and dip of Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka  

PubMed Central

This study theoretically investigates Fano resonances and dips of an Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka that is excited by a nearby electric dipole. An analytical solution of dyadic Green's functions is used to analyze the radiative and nonradiative power spectra of a radial dipole in the proximity of a nanomatryoshka. From these spectra, the plasmon modes and Fano resonances that accompany the Fano dips are identified. In addition, the scattering and absorption spectra of a nanomatryoshka that is illuminated by a plane wave are investigated to confirm these modes and Fano dips. Our results reveal that a Fano dip splits each of the dipole and quadrupole modes into bonding and anti-bonding modes. The Fano dip and resonance result from the destructive interference of the plasmon modes of the Au shell and the Au core. The Fano factors that are obtained from the nonradiative power spectra of the Au shell and the Au core of a nanomatryoshka are in accordance with those obtained from the absorption cross section spectra. Moreover, these Fano factors increase as the plasmonic coupling of the Au shell with the core increases for both dipole and quadrupole modes. PMID:24206789

2013-01-01

238

EXAFS studies of the AuCl 3 doped polyacetylene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ionic state of the dopant molecule in the AuCl3 doped polyacetylene (PA) film is investigated by the polarized Extended X-ray Absorption of Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements at T=300K and 77K. The results indicate that the AuCl3 is doped in a form of AuCl2? in the PA film with some Au clusters formed probably at the surface of the film.

J. M. Lee; E CHOI; S LEE

1999-01-01

239

d+Au Collisions at STAR  

E-print Network

STAR has measured forward pi^0 production in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 GeV. The p+p yield generally agrees with NLO pQCD calculations. The d+Au yield is strongly suppressed at =4.0, well below shadowing expectations. Exploratory measurements of azimuthal correlations between forward pi^0 and mid-rapidity charged hadrons show a recoil peak in p+p that is suppressed in d+Au at low pion energy. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a saturation picture of the low-x gluon structure of heavy nuclei. Future measurements to elucidate the dynamics underlying these observations are also described.

C. A. Gagliardi; for the STAR Collaboration

2006-07-08

240

Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

2003-10-06

241

Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV  

E-print Network

The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with ...

Balewski, Jan T.

242

Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV p + p and Central Au + Au Collisions  

E-print Network

Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au + Au and p + p collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200??GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population ...

Stevens, Justin

243

Beam Energy Dependence of Moments of the Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au + Au Collisions at RHIC  

E-print Network

We report the first measurements of the momentsmean (M), variance (?[superscript 2]), skewness (S), and kurtosis (?)of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au + Au collisions at seven energies, ...

Balewski, Jan T.

244

Au(I)/Au(III)-catalyzed Sonogashira-type reactions of functionalized terminal alkynes with arylboronic acids under mild conditions  

PubMed Central

Summary A straightforward, efficient, and reliable redox catalyst system for the Au(I)/Au(III)-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction of functionalized terminal alkynes with arylboronic acids under mild conditions has been developed. PMID:21804876

Qian, Deyun

2011-01-01

245

Net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV  

E-print Network

We present the results of charged particle fluctuations measurements in Au+Au collisions at rootS(NN)=130 GeV using the STAR detector. Dynamical fluctuations measurements are presented for inclusive charged particle multiplicities as well...

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, AK; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Majumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Elage, JE; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Ganti, MS; Gutierrez, TD; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, R.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, SM; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kolleger, T.; Konstantmov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Lindenbatim, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, E.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Ma, YG; Maestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mangotra, LK; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, LJ; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Singaraju, RN; Simon, F.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suite, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trivedi, MD; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasiliev, AN; Vasiliev, M.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, W.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, HY; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, J.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

2003-01-01

246

Virus-templated Au and AuPt coreshell nanowires and their electrocatalytic activities for fuel cell applications  

E-print Network

A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between ...

Lee, Youjin

247

Au-catalyzed reaction of propargylic sulfides and dithioacetals.  

PubMed

Propargylic sulfides and dithioacetals are found to undergo similar transformations as propargylic carboxylates when catalyzed by AuCl or AuCl3, affording indene derivatives through pentannulation of aromatic rings. The reaction presumably involves Au carbene as the reactive intermediate. PMID:17288372

Peng, Lingling; Zhang, Xiu; Zhang, Shiwei; Wang, Jianbo

2007-02-16

248

Mesure des missions gazeuses au stockage de lisier porcin  

E-print Network

Mesure des émissions gazeuses au stockage de lisier porcin Sandrine ESPAGNOL (1), Laurence LOYON (2 technique de Delphine Loiseau (1) et Frédéric Guyomard (1) Mesure des émissions gazeuses au stockage de carbone (CO2) au stockage de lisiers porcins, et mesurer les variations temporelles et spatiales des

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

Au nanorice assemble electrolytically into mesostars.  

PubMed

Star-shaped mesotructures are formed when an aqueous suspension of Au nanorice particles, which consist of prolate hematite cores and a thin Au shell, is subjected to an electric current. The nanorice particles assemble to form hyperbranched micrometer-scale mesostars. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of nanoparticle assembly into larger ordered structures under the influence of an electrochemical process (H(2)O electrolysis). The assembly is accompanied by significant modifications in the morphology, dimensions, chemical composition, crystallographic structure, and optical properties of the constituent nanoparticles. PMID:19236060

Bardhan, Rizia; Neumann, Oara; Mirin, Nikolay; Wang, Hui; Halas, Naomi J

2009-02-24

250

Fabrication of segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires: insights in the quality of Co/Au junctions.  

PubMed

Electrodeposition is a versatile method, which enables the fabrication of a variety of wire-like nanoarchitectures such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanotubes. By means of template-assisted electrodeposition, segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires are grown in anodic aluminum oxide templates from two different electrolytes. To tailor the properties of the cobalt segments, several electrochemical conditions are studied as a function of current density, pulse deposition, and pH. The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties are accordingly investigated. Changes in the deposition conditions affect the cobalt electrocrystallization process directly. Cobalt tends to crystallize mainly in the hexagonal close-packed structure, which is the reason cobalt might not accommodate satisfactorily on the face-centered cubic Au surface or vice versa. We demonstrate that by modifying the electrolyte and the applied current densities, changes in the texture and the crystalline structure of cobalt lead to a good quality connection between dissimilar segments. In particular, lowering the bath pH, or using pulse plating at a high overpotential, produces polycrystalline fcc Co and thus well-connected Co/Au bimetallic junctions with smooth interface. These are crucial factors to be carefully considered taking into account that nanowires are potential building blocks in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:25025496

Jang, Bumjin; Pellicer, Eva; Guerrero, Miguel; Chen, Xiangzhong; Choi, Hongsoo; Nelson, Bradley J; Sort, Jordi; Pan, Salvador

2014-08-27

251

Dendritic Au/Pt and Au/PtCu nanowires with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation.  

PubMed

The high-yield synthesis of dendritic Au/Pt and Au/PtCu nanowires is achieved through an effective heterogeneous, epitaxial growth strategy conducted in the water-phase to grow dendritic Pt and PtCu nanoshells on Au nanowires. The synthesized products exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation. PMID:24771557

Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

2014-08-27

252

Measuring the Optical Absorption Cross Sections of Au-Ag Nanocages and Au Nanorods by Photoacoustic Imaging  

E-print Network

Measuring the Optical Absorption Cross Sections of Au-Ag Nanocages and Au Nanorods by Photoacoustic and Au nanorods. The method is based on photoacoustic (PA) imaging, where the detected signal is directly to extinction obtained from experimental and theoretical approaches agreed well, demonstrating the potential use

Wang, Lihong

253

Highly efficient electrogenerated chemiluminescence of Au38 nanoclusters.  

PubMed

An investigation of mechanisms for the near-infrared (NIR) electrogenerated chemiluminescence/electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Au38(SC2H4Ph)24 (Au38, SC2H4Ph = 2-phenylethanethiol) nanoclusters both in annihilation and coreactant paths is reported. Essentially, no ECL emission was produced in the annihilation route over the potential range of the accessible redox states of Au38, because of the short lifetime and/or low reactivity of the electrogenerated Au38 intermediates necessary for ECL. Highly efficient light emission with a nominal peak wavelength of 930 nm in the NIR region was observed in the anodic region upon addition of tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) as the coreactant. The ECL mechanisms were elucidated by means of ECL-potential curves and spooling ECL spectroscopy. It was discovered that the Au38(+*) (and also Au38(3+*)) were electrogenerated as the major excited species in the light emission processes. Benzoyl peroxide was also used as a coreactant in the cathodic potential range from which benzoate radicals, with a high oxidizing power, were formed. These radicals accepted electrons from the electrogenerated Au38(2-) HOMO, resulting in the Au38(-*) excited state that emitted light at 930 nm. The photoluminescence of the various Au38 charge states, namely, Au38(2-), Au38(-), Au38(0), Au38(+), Au38(2+), and Au38(4+), electrogenerated in situ, indicated no significant difference in the emission peak wavelength. This information allowed a careful mapping of the relevant ECL mechanisms. It was found that the ECL efficiency could reach an efficiency of 3.5 times as high as that of the Ru(bpy)3(2+)/TPrA system. PMID:25088234

Hesari, Mahdi; Workentin, Mark Steven; Ding, Zhifeng

2014-08-26

254

Improved Au/Zn/Au ohmic contacts for p-type InP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, an innovated Si 3N 4 as an out-diffusion barrier layer to Au/Zn/Au contact system for p-type InP has been proposed. Before the contacts were annealed, Si 3N 4 layer was deposited on the Au(200)/Zn(700)/Au(200), then the Si 3N 4 was removed by HF and a 2000A layer of pure gold was deposited to facilitate wire bonding. The specific contact resistance dropped to a minimum value of 610 -7 ? cm2 (for an acceptor concentration of about 310 18 cm -3) and the contact became perfectly Ohmic. Besides, Si 3N 4 layer is an excellent passivation layer and antireflection coating in InP/InGaAs/InP (p-i-n) photodiodes.

Zhang, Kefeng; Tang, Hengjing; Wu, Xiaoli; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xue; Gong, Haimei

2008-02-01

255

Dispersion and STM Characterization of Au-CdSe Nanohybrids on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the dispersion and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterization of isolated Au-CdSe nanohybrids on atomically flat Au(111) through surface modifications. The top terminal groups of spacer molecules self-assembled on the surface are found critical for locking the nanohybrids into a well-separated state. The STM results indicate that both thiol and carboxylic terminals are effective in this aspect by making strong interaction with the Au portions of the nanohybrids. An argon ion sputtering technique is also proposed to clean up organic contaminants on the surface for improved STM imaging of individual Au-CdSe nanohybrids. These observations help to enrich technical approaches to dispersing individual nanostructures on the surface and provide opportunities to explore their local electroluminescent and energy transfer properties at the nanoscale.

Gao, Bo; Kuang, Yan-min; Liao, Yuan; Dong, Zhen-chao

2012-04-01

256

AuAg Nanosheets Assembled from Ultrathin AuAg Nanowires.  

PubMed

Assembly of noble metal nanocrystals into free-standing two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with a regular shape is still a challenge. Here we report the preparation of a novel 2D AuAg nanosheet with length of 1.50 0.30 ?m, width of 510 160 nm, and thickness of ?100 nm via the assembly of ultrathin AuAg nanowires in the presence of the triblock copolymer Pluronic P123. The self-assembly of P123 and the fusion behavior of the nanowires during the assembly process are the key reasons for the formation of AuAg nanosheets in P123. Furthermore, the obtained AuAg nanosheet@P123 is used as the active material in a memory device that exhibits the write-once-read-many-times memory behavior. PMID:25597345

Hong, Xun; Tan, Chaoliang; Liu, Juqing; Yang, Jian; Wu, Xue-Jun; Fan, Zhanxi; Luo, Zhimin; Chen, Junze; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Hua

2015-02-01

257

Infra-red spectroscopy of size selected Au25, Au38 and Au144 ligand protected gold clusters.  

PubMed

Through the discovery of ligand protected metal clusters with cores of a precise number of atoms, the exploration of the third dimension of the periodic table for fundamental research and also for applications has become less remote. So far, the exact number of metal atoms in the core has been determined unambiguously only using mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Gold clusters protected by 2-phenylethanethiol ligands, for instance, show distinct magic numbers that correspond to either electronic or geometric shell closings. For efficient control of their synthesis simple-to-use in situ spectroscopies are required. In the specific case of Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 clusters (1) we found a distinct shift of the aromatic C-H stretching band from 3030-3100 cm(-1) to below 3000 cm(-1) whose origin is discussed as an electronic interaction of the aromatic rings of the ligands with each other or with the gold core. This IR-feature is specific for Au25; the spectra of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 (2) and Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60 (3) clusters do not show this distinct shift and their IR-spectra in the C-H stretching regime are similar to that of the bare ligand. This significant change in the IR spectrum of Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 is not only of fundamental interest but also allows for in situ determination of the purity and monodispersity of the sample using FTIR spectroscopy during synthesis. PMID:23788003

Farrag, Mostafa; Tschurl, Martin; Dass, Amala; Heiz, Ulrich

2013-08-14

258

Hadron Spectra and QGP Hadronization in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transverse mass spectra of Omega hyperons and phi mesons measured\\u000arecently by STAR Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV are\\u000adescribed within a hydrodynamic model of the quark gluon plasma expansion and\\u000ahadronization. The flow parameters at the plasma hadronization extracted by\\u000afitting these data are used to predict the transverse mass spectra of J\\/psi and

K. A. Bugaeva; M. Gazdzicki; M. I. Gorenstein

2002-01-01

259

Pion Interferometry of (sNN) = 130 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two-pion correlation functions in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV have been measured by the STAR (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) detector. The source size extracted by fitting the correlations grows with event multiplicity and decreases with transverse momentum. Anomalously large sizes or emission durations, which have been suggested as signals of quark-gluon plasma formation and rehadronization, are not observed.

C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; C. Allgower; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; H. Bichsel; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; R. Bossingham; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; R. V. Cadman; H. Caines; M. Caldern de La Barca Snchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; S. Chattopadhyay; M. L. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; D. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; M. Guedon; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hmmler; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. S. Konstantinov; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; R. Lednick; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; D. Lynn; R. Majka; S. Margetis; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; J. Mitchell; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; E. Potrebenikova; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; S. Radomski; G. Rai; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; J. Sandweiss; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; K. Schweda; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; A. Schttauf; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. Vanyashin; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; S. A. Voloshin; F. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; T. Wenaus; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; A. Yokosawa; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovsk; W. M. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; A. N. Zubarev

2001-01-01

260

Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at &surd;sNN = 130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values

K. H. Ackermann; N. Adams; C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; S. Ahmad; C. Allgower; J. Amsbaugh; M. Anderson; E. Anderssen; H. Arnesen; L. Arnold; G. S. Averichev; A. Baldwin; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; M. Beddo; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; S. Bennett; J. Bercovitz; J. Berger; W. Betts; H. Bichsel; F. Bieser; L. C. Bland; M. Bloomer; C. O. Blyth; J. Boehm; B. E. Bonner; D. Bonnet; R. Bossingham; M. Botlo; A. Boucham; N. Bouillo; S. Bouvier; K. Bradley; F. P. Brady; E. S. Braithwaite; W. Braithwaite; A. Brandin; R. L. Brown; G. Brugalette; C. Byrd; H. Caines; M. Caldern de La Barca Snchez; A. Cardenas; L. Carr; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; B. Caylor; D. Cebra; S. Chatopadhyay; M. L. Chen; W. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; J. Chrin; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; C. Consiglio; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; V. I. Danilov; D. Dayton; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; M. Dialinas; H. Diaz; P. A. Deyoung; L. Didenko; D. Dimassimo; J. Dioguardi; W. Dominik; C. Drancourt; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; T. Eggert; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; A. Etkin; P. Fachini; C. Feliciano; D. Ferenc; M. I. Ferguson; H. Fessler; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; I. Flores; K. J. Foley; D. Fritz; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; M. Gazdzicki; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; C. Gojak; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; M. Grau; D. Greiner; L. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; D. Grosnick; J. Gross; G. Guilloux; E. Gushin; J. Hall; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; G. Harper; J. W. Harris; P. He; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; D. Hill; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; M. Howe; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hmmler; W. Hunt; J. Hunter; G. J. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; S. Jacobson; R. Jared; P. Jensen; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. P. Kenney; A. Khodinov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; G. Koehler; A. S. Konstantinov; V. Kormilitsyne; L. Kotchenda; I. Kotov; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; T. Krupien; P. Kuczewski; C. Kuhn; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; W. J. Leonhardt; V. M. Leontiev; P. Leszczynski; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; Z. Li; C.-J. Liaw; J. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; V. Lindenstruth; P. J. Lindstrom; M. A. Lisa; H. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; D. Lopiano; W. A. Love; J. R. Lutz; D. Lynn; L. Madansky; R. Maier; R. Majka; A. Maliszewski; S. Margetis; K. Marks; R. Marstaller; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; E. A. Matyushevski; C. McParland; T. S. McShane; J. Meier; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; P. Middlekamp; N. Mikhalin; B. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; B. Minor; J. Mitchell; E. Mogavero; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; R. Morse; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; T. Ngo; M. Nguyen; T. Nguyen; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; T. Noggle; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; T. Nussbaum; J. Nystrand; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; C. A. Ogilvie; K. Olchanski; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. A. Ososkov; G. Ott; D. Padrazo; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; M. Pentia; V. Perevotchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; S. Pirogov; E. Platner; J. Pluta; I. Polk; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Puskar-Pasewicz; G. Rai; J. Rasson; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; R. E. Renfordt; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; J. Riso; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; D. Roehrich; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; R. Sanchez; Z. Sandler; J. Sandweiss; P. Sappenfield; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Scheblien; R. Scheetz; R. Schlueter; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; M. Schulz; A. Schttauf; J. Sedlmeir; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; J. Seyboth; P. Seyboth; R. Seymour; E. I. Shakaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; Y. Shi; S. S. Shimanskii; D. Shuman; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; L. P. Smykov; R. Snellings; K. Solberg; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; N. Stone; R. Stone; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; T. J. Symons; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; A. Tarchini; J. Tarzian; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; A. Szanto de Toledo; S. Tonse; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Vakula; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen

2001-01-01

261

Comparative toxicity study of Ag, Au, and AgAu bimetallic nanoparticles on Daphnia magna  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparative assessment of the 48-h acute toxicity of aqueous nanoparticles synthesized using the same methodology, including\\u000a Au, Ag, and AgAu bimetallic nanoparticles, was conducted to determine their ecological effect in freshwater environments\\u000a through the use of Daphnia magna, using their mortality as a toxicological endpoint. D. magna are one of the standard organisms used for ecotoxicity studies due to

Ting Li; Brian Albee; Matti Alemayehu; Rocio Diaz; Leigha Ingham; Shawn Kamal; Maritza Rodriguez; Sandra Whaley Bishnoi

2010-01-01

262

Global polarization and parity violation study in Au+Au collisions  

E-print Network

We present results on the parity violation effects and global system polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 62 GeV obtained with the STAR detector at RHIC. The parity violation effects are studied by three particle azimuthal correlations of charged particles. The global polarization of the system is examined by measuring the polarization of strange hyperons with respect to the collision reaction plane.

Ilya Selyuzhenkov; for the STAR Collaboration

2005-10-25

263

?? Correlation Function in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200??GeV.  

PubMed

We present ?? correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200??GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednick-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ?? correlation function and interaction parameters for dihyperon searches are discussed. PMID:25635541

Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

2015-01-16

264

Net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at (sNN )=130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of charged particle fluctuations measurements in Au+Au collisions at (sNN )=130 GeV using the STAR detector. Dynamical fluctuations measurements are presented for inclusive charged particle multiplicities as well as for identified charged pions, kaons, and protons. The net charge dynamical fluctuations are found to be large and negative providing clear evidence that positive and negative charged

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bhardwaj; P. Bhaskar; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de La Barca Snchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; M. S. Ganti; T. D. Gutierrez; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; V. Grigoriev; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; M. Guedon; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kolleger; A. S. Konstantinov; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednick; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; M. J. Mora-Corral; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rai; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. J. Ruan; V. Rykov; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; K. Schweda; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; R. N. Singaraju; F. Simon; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; M. D. Trivedi; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. N. Vasiliev; M. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. A. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovsk; H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; J. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2003-01-01

265

????? correlations in central Au+Au collisions at VsNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report charged particle pair correlation analyses in the space of ?? (azimuth) and ?? (pseudorapidity), for central Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV in the STAR detector. The analysis involves unlike-sign charged pairs and like-sign charged pairs, which are transformed into charge-dependent (CD) signals and charge-independent (CI) signals. We present detailed parametrizations of the data. A model featuring dense gluonic

J. Adams; Y. Bai; F. Benedosso; M. A. J. Botje; J. Castillo; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; M. J. Russcher; R. J. M. Snellings; N. van der Kolk; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. Bland; C. Blyth; S.-L. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Snchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; J. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; H. Choi; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; M. Cosentino; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Daugherity; M. Moura; T. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. Ganti; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; Y. Gorbunov; H. Gos; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; K. Guimaraes; Y. Guo; N. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; B. Haag; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; M. Horner; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Khodyrev; B. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; S. Klein; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. LaPointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. Ray; S. Razin; J. Reinnarth; D. Relyea; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. Symons; A. Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; A. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; G. Van Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; J. Watson; J. Webb; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Q. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; V. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev; J. Zuo

2007-01-01

266

Proton-? correlations in central Au+Au collisions at VsNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on p-?,p-? ,p -?, and p -? correlation functions constructed in central Au-Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The proton and lambda source size is inferred from the p-? and p -? correlation functions. It is found to be smaller than the pion source size also measured by the STAR experiment at smaller

Y. Bai; M. A. J. Botje; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; M. J. Russcher; R. J. M. Snellings; N. van der Kolk; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; V. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. Bland; C. Blyth; S.-L. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; J. Bouchet; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Snchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; J. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; H. Choi; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; M. Cosentino; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Daugherity; M. Moura; T. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; A. Dubey; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fornazier; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. Ganti; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; H. Gos; O. Grachov; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. Harris; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; M. Horner; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; M. Jedynak; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Khodyrev; B. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; J. Klay; S. Klein; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; K. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kutuev; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Q. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; S. Nayak; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. Ray; S. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; J. Reinnarth; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; K. Shestermanov; S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. Symons; A. Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; A. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; G. Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. Wang; H. Ward; J. Watson; J. Webb; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; I. K. Yoo; V. Yurevich; I. Zborovsky; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. Zhang; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev; J. Zuo

2006-01-01

267

business.uts.edu.au inistration  

E-print Network

of any successful business. We believe that ethics and courage are essential business tools. We believebusiness.uts.edu.au UTS: BUSINESS EM BA ExEcutivE M astEr of BusinEss adM inistration 2012 #12;Aspacewherecreativity isencouragedandall ideasarewelcome. UTS Business School will soon be home to Sydney's newest

University of Technology, Sydney

268

The fast diffusion of Au IN Pb  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A treatment of the phenomenon of fast diffusion in lead is presented. The model used is based upon the fast diffusion of free solute interstitials. The very large negative enhancement coefficients found in the Pb-(Au, Ag) systems is explained by the formation of first and second order clusters of vacancies and substitutional solute atoms.

Mclellan, R. B.; Ko, C.; Brotzen, F. R.

1990-01-01

269

Scholarships swinburne.edu.au/scholarships  

E-print Network

Scholarships 2015 swinburne.edu.au/scholarships #12;2 Reach your full potential and achieve your goals Swinburne scholarships for students in 2015. Whether you dream of making a difference, there is an opportunity to make your goals a reality. Swinburne scholarships are for students who want to reach their full

Liley, David

270

Scholarships swinburne.edu.au/scholarships  

E-print Network

Scholarships 2013 swinburne.edu.au/scholarships #12;2 Reach your full potential and achieve your goals. Swinburne scholarships for students commencing in 2013. Whether you dream of making a difference, there is an opportunity to make your goals a reality. Swinburne scholarships are for all students who want to reach

Liley, David

271

Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?  

SciTech Connect

The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

2008-09-04

272

LE PROTOTYPAGE COMME ALTERNATIVE AU MAQUETTAGE  

E-print Network

LE PROTOTYPAGE COMME ALTERNATIVE AU MAQUETTAGE DANS LE CAS DE PROJETS SOLAP Travail pratique de JMap SOLAP pouvait remplacer avantageusement le maquettage dans le but d'augmenter l'efficacité de communication et d'apprentissage Capacité de révéler l'expression des besoins latents Evolutivité possible vers

273

Au\\/Ag nanostructures on PMMA surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanoholes distributed in PMMA surfaces were obtained, as well as nanostructures of Au or of Ag on these films. The PMMA films were prepared by dilution in chloroform and spin-coating at 3500 rpm rotation speed for a time of 10 s in environment conditions. Conform to AFM, the diameter and depth of the nanoholes formed on the films had presented

P. C. A. Brito; T. X. R. Souza; R. F. Gomes; N. S. Ferreira; M. A. Macdo

274

Cyclotrimerization of arylalkynes on Au(111).  

PubMed

Surface-assisted cyclotrimerization of arylalkynes was studied on Au(111) by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Upon thermal activation, cyclotrimerization of 1,3,5-tris-(4-ethynylphenyl)benzene proceeds readily and with high selectivity, and results in two-dimensional covalently bonded polyphenylene nanostructures exhibiting a honeycomb topology. PMID:25110877

Liu, Jia; Ruffieux, Pascal; Feng, Xinliang; Mllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman

2014-10-01

275

Faces of Port-au-Prince  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This photo was taken by USGS seismologist Susan Hough two months after the magnitude-7 earthquake struck Port-au-Prince on Jan. 12, 2010. Dr. Hough traveled to Haiti with USGS colleagues Doug Given, Mark Meremonte, and J. Zebulon Maharrey to install seismometers, which monitor the earth's movement a...

2010-04-07

276

annual report curtin.edu.au  

E-print Network

curtin annual report 2007 curtin.edu.au #12;curtin annual report 2007 #12;Statement of Compliance 1 to Parliament the Annual Report of Curtin University of Technology for the year ending 31 December 2007. The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006

277

Di-Hadron Correlations with Identified Leading Hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at STAR  

E-print Network

The STAR collaboration presents new two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of quark recombination. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the \\emph{ridge region}, is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Snchez, M Caldern de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

2014-01-01

278

Di-Hadron Correlations with Identified Leading Hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at STAR  

E-print Network

The STAR collaboration presents new two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of quark recombination. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the \\emph{ridge region}, is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

STAR Collaboration; N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; R. Esha; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamad; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; L. Wen; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2014-10-13

279

Excitonic luminescence of ZnSe single crystals doped with Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photoluminescence spectra of ZnSe single crystals doped with Au during a long high-temperature treatment of as-grown crystals in Zn+Au or Se+Au melts are investigated in the temperature range from 83 to 300K. The Au-doping from Zn+Au melt leads to the formation of both simple defects (Aui donors and AuZn acceptors) and acceptor associates (AuZnAui). The edge luminescence is attributed to

N. D. Nedeoglo; A. N. Avdonin; G. N. Ivanova; D. D. Nedeoglo; G. V. Kolibaba; V. P. Sirkeli

2005-01-01

280

Gas binding to Au13, Au12Pd, and Au11Pd2 nanoclusters in the context of catalytic oxidation and reduction reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of Au13, Au12Pd, and Au11Pd2 nanoclusters to bind species typically found in the oxidation and reduction of small hydrocarbon has been investigated by means of atom centered density functional theory calculations. Binding energies of CO2, H2, CO, O2, CH4, H2O, ?O, ?H, ?CHO, ?CO2H, and ?OH have been calculated. For pure gold nanoclusters, CO2, H2, and CH4 were

Brad A. Wells; Alan L. Chaffee

2008-01-01

281

Gas binding to Au13, Au12Pd, and Au11Pd2 nanoclusters in the context of catalytic oxidation and reduction reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of Au13, Au12Pd, and Au11Pd2 nanoclusters to bind species typically found in the oxidation and reduction of small hydrocarbon has been investigated by means of atom centered density functional theory calculations. Binding energies of CO2, H2, CO, O2, CH4, H2O, .O, .H, .CHO, .CO2H, and .OH have been calculated. For pure gold nanoclusters, CO2, H2, and CH4 were

Brad A. Wells; Alan L. Chaffee

2008-01-01

282

Polymers effects on synthesis of AuNPs, and Au/Ag nanoalloys: indirectly generated AuNPs and versatile sensing applications including anti-leukemic agent.  

PubMed

Polymers either serve as shielding or capping agents to restrict the nanoparticle size. This study demonstrates the polymer depositions and their effects in synthesis and sharp stabilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to develop gold/silver nanoalloys (Au/Ag nanoalloys). Effects of different polymers are tested to justify their role in synthesis and stability of phloroglucinol (PG) coated AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloys. Cationic and anionic i.e. [Polydiallyldimethylammonium](+) (PDDA), [Polyethyleneimine](+) (PEI), [Polystyrene sulfonate](2-) (PSS) and neutral polymer Polychlorotriflouroethylene (PCTFE) produce praiseworthy stable AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloy. To prove polymer effects characterization protocols including UV-vis, Fluorescence (PL), IR and AFM imaging are performed to fully investigate the mechanism and size characteristics of these nanoparticles/nanoalloys. In this study sharp size controlling/sheilding effects were observed particularly with cationic polymers simply through the favorable electrostatic interactions with the terminal ends of PG Potent/significant detection of doxorubicin (DOX, an antileukemic agent) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between PEI shielded AuNPs (AuNPEI) and DOX was achieved upto 10 pM level, while PDDA protected AuNPs facilitated the detection of ascorbic acid based on fluorescence enhancement effects in wide range (10-200 nM) and with detection limit of 200 pM. Similarly sensing performance of PEI stabilized Au/Ag nanoalloys on addition of halides (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) is evaluated through red shifted SPR along with continuous increase in absorbance and also through AFM. Moreover the addition of halide ions also helped the regeneration of AuNPs by taking away silver from the Au/Ag nanoalloys enabling their detections upto subnanomolar levels. PMID:24121208

Jahan, Shanaz; Mansoor, Farrukh; Kanwal, Shamsa

2014-03-15

283

Growth of Long Range Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlations with Centrality in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forward-backward multiplicity correlation strengths have been measured with the STAR detector for Au+Au and p+p collisions at sNN=200GeV. Strong short- and long-range correlations (LRC) are seen in central Au+Au collisions. The magnitude of these correlations decrease with decreasing centrality until only short-range correlations are observed in peripheral Au+Au collisions. Both the dual parton model (DPM) and the color glass condensate

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de La Barca Snchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; L. C. de Silva; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; M. Kopytine; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; C. Kuhn; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. Levine; N. Li; C. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. Redwine; R. Reed; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; X.-H. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; V. N. Tram; A. L. Trattner; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; J. X. Zuo

2009-01-01

284

Photosynthetic Electron Transport System Promotes Synthesis of Au-Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

In this communication, a novel, green, efficient and economically viable light mediated protocol for generation of Au-nanoparticles using most vital organelle, chloroplasts, of the plant system is portrayed. Thylakoids/chloroplasts isolated from Potamogeton nodosus (an aquatic plant) and Spinacia oleracea (a terrestrial plant) turned Au3+ solutions purple in presence of light of 600 mol m?2 s?1 photon flux density (PFD) and the purple coloration intensified with time. UV-Vis spectra of these purple colored solutions showed absorption peak at ?545 nm which is known to arise due to surface plasmon oscillations specific to Au-nanoparticles. However, thylakoids/chloroplasts did not alter color of Au3+ solutions in dark. These results clearly demonstrated that photosynthetic electron transport can reduce Au3+ to Au0 which nucleate to form Au-nanoparticles in presence of light. Transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that Au-nanoparticles generated by light driven photosynthetic electron transport system of thylakoids/chloroplasts were in range of 520 nm. Selected area electron diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction indicated crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. Energy dispersive X-ray confirmed that these nanoparticles were composed of Au. To confirm the potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in generation of Au-nanoparticles, thylakoids/chloroplasts were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles in presence of light of PFD ranging from 60 to 600 mol m?2 s?1. The capacity of thylakoids/chloroplasts to generate Au-nanoparticles increased remarkably with increase in PFD, which further clearly demonstrated potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in reduction of Au3+ to Au0 to form nanoparticles. The light driven donation of electrons to metal ions by thylakoids/chloroplasts can be exploited for large scale production of nanoparticles. PMID:23976990

Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P.

2013-01-01

285

Facile oxidation of NHC-Au(I) to NHC-Au(III) complexes by CsBr3.  

PubMed

CsBr3 was investigated as a new and convenient oxidant for NHC-Au(I) complexes (NHC = imidazo[1,5-a]pyridin-3-ylidene) for the preparation of the respective Au(III) complexes. The Au(I) complexes were synthesized by the silver salt method using [(NHC)2Ag]PF6 and (tht)AuBr. Unexpectedly, the reactions yielded both neutral (NHC)AuBr and ionic [(NHC)2Au]PF6, depending on the N-substituent of the NHC ligand. Oxidation with CsBr3 gave the complexes (NHC)AuBr3 and [(NHC)2AuBr2]PF6 in high yields and purity, which proves the suitability of this reagent. The complexes were further characterised by X-ray diffraction and electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy. The Au(I) complexes exhibit a dual emission attributable to intraligand fluorescence and phosphorescence at both room temperature and 77 K. Upon irradiation with polychromatic light (? > 305 nm), the Au(III) complexes are cleanly photo-reduced to the Au(I) congener. PMID:24777298

Kriechbaum, Margit; Otte, Daniela; List, Manuela; Monkowius, Uwe

2014-06-21

286

Virus-templated Au and Au/Pt Core/shell Nanowires and Their Electrocatalytic Activitives for Fuel Cell Applications.  

PubMed

A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between Au binding M13 phage and Au ions in aqueous solution, Au NWs with uniform diameter were synthesized at room temperature with yields greater than 98 % without the need for size selection. The diameters of Au NWs were controlled from 10 nm to 50 nm. The Au NWs were found to be active for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO molecules for all sizes, where the activity was highly dependent on the surface facets of Au NWs. This low-temperature high yield method of preparing Au NWs was further extended to the synthesis of Au/Pt core/shell NWs with controlled coverage of Pt shell layers. Electro-catalytic studies of ethanol oxidation with different Pt loading showed enhanced activity relative to a commercial supported Pt catalyst, indicative of the dual functionality of Pt for the ethanol oxidation and Au for the anti-poisoning component of Pt. These new one-dimensional noble metal NWs with controlled compositions could facilitate the design of new alloy materials with tunable properties. PMID:24910712

Lee, Youjin; Kim, Junhyung; Yun, Dong Soo; Nam, Yoon Sung; Shao-Horn, Yang; Belcher, Angela M

2012-08-01

287

Ejection of Au and Si nanocrystals from Au implanted Si(1 0 0) by MeV heavy ion irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Si(1 0 0) substrates implanted with 32 keV Au- ions, were irradiated with 3 MeV Au3+ ions at an angle of 60. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on sputtered particles collected on catcher grids revealed the presence of Au and Si nanocrystals. The size distribution of collected Au nanocrystals exhibited inverse power law dependence with a decay exponent of 2. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of irradiated sample showed the presence of surface craters along with hillocks. The formation of Au and Si nanocrystals in MeV ion irradiated Au doped amorphous Si layer can be attributed to the localized melting due to thermal spike phase of atomic displacement cascades produced by MeV Au ion impacts.

Mohapatra, S.

2013-10-01

288

Rhombohedrally distorted ?-Au(5-x)Zn(8+y) phases in the Au-Zn system.  

PubMed

The region of the Au-Zn phase diagram encompassing ?-brass-type phases has been studied experimentally from 45 to 85 atom % Zn. The ? phases were obtained directly from the pure elements by heating to 680 C in evacuated silica tubes, followed by annealing at 300 C. Powder X-ray and single-crystal diffraction studies show that ?-"Au(5)Zn(8)" phases adopt a rhombohedrally distorted Cr(5)Al(8) structure type rather than the cubic Cu(5)Zn(8) type. The refined compositions from two single crystals extracted from the Zn- and Au-rich loadings are Au(4.27(3))Zn(8.26(3))?(0.47) (I) and Au(4.58(3))Zn(8.12(3))?(0.3) (II), respectively (? = vacancy). These (I and II) refinements indicated both nonstatistical mixing of Au and Zn atoms as well as partially ordered vacancy distributions. The structures of these ? phases were solved in the acentric space group R3m (No. 160, Z = 6), and the observed lattice parameters from powder patterns were found to be a = 13.1029(6) and 13.1345(8) and c = 8.0410(4) and 8.1103(6) for crystals I and II, respectively. According to single-crystal refinements, the vacancies were found on the outer tetrahedron (OT) and octahedron (OH) of the 26-atom cluster. Single-crystal structural refinement clearly showed that the vacancy content per unit cell increases with increasing Zn, or valence-electron concentration. Electronic structure calculations, using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method with the atomic-sphere approximation (TB-LMTO-ASA) method, indicated the presence of a well-pronounced pseudogap at the Fermi level for "Au(5)Zn(8)" as the representative composition, an outcome that is consistent with the Hume-Rothery interpretation of ? brass. PMID:23323925

Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; Miller, Gordon J

2013-02-01

289

Rhombohedrally Distorted ?-Au5-xZn8+y Phases in the Au-Zn System  

SciTech Connect

The region of the AuZn phase diagram encompassing ?-brass-type phases has been studied experimentally from 45 to 85 atom % Zn. The ? phases were obtained directly from the pure elements by heating to 680 C in evacuated silica tubes, followed by annealing at 300 C. Powder X-ray and single-crystal diffraction studies show that ?-Au5Zn8 phases adopt a rhombohedrally distorted Cr5Al8 structure type rather than the cubic Cu5Zn8 type. The refined compositions from two single crystals extracted from the Zn- and Au-rich loadings are Au4.27(3)Zn8.26(3)?0.47 (I) and Au4.58(3)Zn8.12(3)?0.3 (II), respectively (? = vacancy). These (I and II) refinements indicated both nonstatistical mixing of Au and Zn atoms as well as partially ordered vacancy distributions. The structures of these ? phases were solved in the acentric space group R3m (No. 160, Z = 6), and the observed lattice parameters from powder patterns were found to be a = 13.1029(6) and 13.1345(8) and c = 8.0410(4) and 8.1103(6) for crystals I and II, respectively. According to single-crystal refinements, the vacancies were found on the outer tetrahedron (OT) and octahedron (OH) of the 26-atom cluster. Single-crystal structural refinement clearly showed that the vacancy content per unit cell increases with increasing Zn, or valence-electron concentration. Electronic structure calculations, using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method with the atomic-sphere approximation (TB-LMTO-ASA) method, indicated the presence of a well-pronounced pseudogap at the Fermi level for Au5Zn8 as the representative composition, an outcome that is consistent with the HumeRothery interpretation of ? brass.

Thimmaiah, Srinivasa [Ames Laboratory; Miller, Gordon J. [Ames Laboratory

2013-01-16

290

Three views of two giant streams: Aligned observations at 1 AU, 4.6 AU, and 5.9 AU  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A close radial alignment of the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) and Pioneers 10 and 11 spacecraft in 1974 allows a nearly unambiguous, empirical study of the radial evolution of the interaction regions of two contrasting weak and strong, giant streams. The study confirms the main aspects of the standard model of corotating interaction regions: an expanding and strengthening pair of forward-reverse shocks sandwich a stream interface. It adds the follwoing concepts: stream group speed--the speed at the stream interface tends to remain constant with distance; corotating stream complexes--interaction regions can include features like noncompressive density enhancements and streamer belts; secondary interfaces--a possible precursor to the reverse shock; and emerging stream interfaces--one emerged between 1 AU and 4.6 AU. The study uses the conservation specific entropy to correlate features between spacecraft.

Siscoe, George; Intriligator, Devrie

1993-01-01

291

Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consists of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of late Proterozoic age. The main granitic pluton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian shield. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alteration/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers. A model has been constructed to illustrate the changes in the primary rock texture and structure with sequential diagenetic processes, taking into consideration the fracture distribution and their opening affinities as related to their depths.

Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

1988-02-01

292

Basement reservoir in Zeit Bay oil field, Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Fractured basement, one of the most important reservoirs of Zeit Bay field, contains nearly one-third of oil in place of the field. The flow rates per well vary from 700 to 9,000 BOPD. Due to its well-established production potential, 60% of the wells for the development of the field were drilled down to basement. The Zeit Bay basement consist of granitic rocks of pegmatitic to coarse porphyritic texture and has equal proportions of alkali feldspars. Dykes of various compositions are present, traversing the granite at different intervals. Dykes include aplite, microsyenite, diabase and lamprophyre. The last two pertain to the post-granitic dykes of later Proterozoic age. The main granitic luton is related to one of the final stages of the tectonic-magmatic cycle of the Arabo-Nubian sheild. The Zeit Bay area was a significant paleohigh until the Miocene, hence its structural picture is very complicated due to the impact of different tectonic movements from the late Precambrian to Cenozoic. The resulting structural elements were carefully investigated and statistically analyzed to decipher the influence of various tectonic events. The presence of high porosity in some intervals and low porosity in others could be tied to the presence of new fractures and the nature of cementing minerals. The relation of mineralized fractures and their depths lead to zonation of porous layers in the granitic pluton. Diagenetic processes on the granitic body and the alternation/resedimentation of the diagenetic products controlled the magnitude and amplitude of the porosity layers.

Zahran, I.; Askary, S.

1988-01-01

293

An optimization planning technique for Suez Canal Network in Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a proposed optimization technique POT for predicting the peak load demand and planning of transmission line systems. Many of traditional methods have been presented for long-term load forecasting of electrical power systems. But, the results of these methods are approximated. Therefore, the artificial neural network (ANN) technique for long-term peak load forecasting is modified and discussed as

A. A. Abou El-Ela; A. A. El-Zeftawy; S. M. Allam; Gasir M. Atta

2010-01-01

294

Photoemission study of Au on a-Si:H  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a high-resolution photoemission study of Au evaporated on rf-sputtered a-Si:H at room temperature. Three regions of coverage can be classified according to the behavior of the valence-band and core-level spectra: an unreacted region with an equivalent thickness of 2 , followed by an intermixed Au/a-Si overlayer (~9 ), and a dual-phase region at higher coverage. Au adatoms are dispersed in the unreacted region. They subsequently cluster in the intermixed region, where they attach to Si atoms that are not hydrogen bonded, suggesting that the intermixed Si is mainly from those that have dangling bonds. In the dual-phase region, two sets of Au 4f core levels evolve with higher binding energy, one from Au intermixed with Si, and the lower one exhibiting pure gold character. The interface eventually ends up with the sequence: a-Si:H(sub.)+(pure Au mixed with intermixed Au/Si)+(vac). This is unlike the case of Au on c-Si, which has a pure gold layer sandwiched by intermixed Au/Si complexes along the surface normal. Traces of silicon atoms on top of composite surfaces appear even at the highest coverage, 205 , of the gold deposit. The applicability of the four models previously used for the Au/c-Si interface is also briefly discussed.

Pi, Tun-Wen; Yang, A.-B.; Olson, C. G.; Lynch, D. W.

1990-11-01

295

Possible triplet superconductivity in Nb/Au/CoFe trilayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have fabricated the Nb/Au and Nb/CoFe bilayer and Nb/Au/CoFe trilayer samples and investigated their T_c's by systematically varying d_Nb, d_CoFe, and d_Au. These samples were deposited on the oxidized Si substrates using DC magnetron sputtering system and the superconducting critical temperature Tc of the samples were measured electrically using standard DC and AC 4-point method. The SN bilayer system showed well-known exponential-like dependence of Tc on d_Au, while the SF bilayer system displayed oscillatory dependence of Tc on d_CoFe, as expected from the SF proximity effect theory. On the other hand, with fixed d_Nb and d_CoFe, the Tc of SNF trilayers as a function of d_Au increased rapidly for d_Au < 10 nm and then approached a saturated value near d_Au = 200 nm. The T_c's of these trilayer systems are higher than a theory based on conventional singlet superconductivity can predict. Moreover, we observed small oscillatory Tc behavior in the trilayer system when d_Au is varied in the range of 30 nm < d_Au < 90 nm. In order to explain our unexpected data, we propose the possibility of triplet superconductivity created inside Au layer.

Kim, Jinho; Doh, Yong-Joo; Chang, Jaewan; Char, Kookrin

2004-03-01

296

Recent STAR Results from U+U and Au+Au Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unlike Au or Pb nuclei which are more spherical, the uranium nuclei have a relatively large deformation on average. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei provides the feasibility to study how the initial geometry of the nuclei affects the azimuthal distributions of produced particles. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand the initial condition for particle production at mid-rapidity in heavy ion collisions as well as path length dependence of jet quenching and quarkonium in-medium effects. In this proceedings, the two- and four- particle cumulant, v2{2} and v2{4}, from U+U collisions at = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeter is used to subdivide the 0-1% centrality bin into even finer centralities. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The observed v2{2} slope results were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the presented results on the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions.

Wang, Hui; Star Collaboration

2014-09-01

297

Facile preparation of SERS-active nanostructured Au spheres by simple reduction of AuCl4- ions with EDOT.  

PubMed

Uniform submicron-scale Au spheres with an average dimension of 574 nm were facilely prepared from the redox reaction between HAuCl4 and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. HAuCl4 precursor readily polymerized to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and metallic Au spheres simultaneously formed within a short period of time. The Au spheres are consisted of two slightly different types of spherical particles based on their surface textures. Major raspberry-like Au spheres are formed through the assembly of very tiny Au nanoparticles, while minor rosette-like Au spheres are formed through the dense packing of Au nanoplates. Both Au spheres are pure metallic face-centered cubic Au based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The resultant Au spheres are adequate for application to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) due to their rough surfaces and nanogaps on the surfaces. Both methylene blue and crystal violet molecules were detectable at concentrations as low as 10(-7) M. PMID:24461856

Hong, Jin-Yeon; Huh, Seong

2014-03-15

298

Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation  

PubMed Central

A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultravioletvisible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies. PMID:23452438

2013-01-01

299

Microcanonical Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Au Nanoclusters  

E-print Network

In this paper, we study nanoparticles with constituent atoms ranging from dozens to hundreds of them. These types of particles display structural and magnetic properties that strongly depend on the number of constituents N. The metal clusters are important due their interesting properties when compared to bulk materials; hence they have potential technological applications. Specifically, we study the Au nanoclusters through classical molecular dynamics simulations; we analyze the total and potential energy as a function of time. Likewise, we study the geometrical structures of Au Nanocluster corresponding to the lowest energy states at 0 K. We consider the method of microcanonical ensemble, and we carry out computer simulations by operating the XMD software package and the atomistic configuration viewer AtomEye.

H., Karina L D Barturen; Rojas, Justo T

2010-01-01

300

Reliability of Au-Ge and Au-Si Eutectic Solder Alloys for High-Temperature Electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-temperature electronics will facilitate deeper drilling, accessing harder-to-reach fossil fuels in oil and gas industry. A key requirement is reliability under harsh conditions for a minimum continuous operating time of 500 h at 300C. Eutectic solder alloys are generally favored due to their excellent fatigue resistance. Performance of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys at 300C up to 500 h has been evaluated. Nanoindentation results confirm the loss of strength of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys during thermal aging at 300C, as a result of grain coarsening. However, the pace at which the Au-Ge eutectic alloy loses its strength is much slower when compared with Au-Si eutectic alloy. The interfacial reactions between these eutectic solder alloys and the underbump metallization (UBM), i.e., electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) UBM and Cu/Au UBM, have been extensively studied. Spalling of Au3Cu intermetallic compound is observed at the interface between Au-Ge eutectic solder and the Cu/Au UBM, when aged at 300C for 500 h, while the consumption of ENIG UBM is nominal. Unlike the Au-Si solder joint, hot ball shear testing at high temperature confirmed that the Au-Ge joint on ENIG UBM, when aged at 300C for 500 h, could still comply with the minimum qualifying bump shear strength based on the UBM dimension used in this work. Thus, it has been determined that, among these two binary eutectic alloys, Au-Ge eutectic alloy could fulfill the minimum requirement specified by the oil and gas exploration industry.

Chidambaram, Vivek; Yeung, Ho Beng; Shan, Gao

2012-08-01

301

health.uts.edu.au Postgraduate  

E-print Network

health.uts.edu.au Postgraduate CoUrSeS 2013 UTS: health services m anaGem ent #12;2 ConTenTS SnApShoT of UTS: heAlTh 2276 students 562 postgraduate coursework students 63 higher degree research students 137 by the UTS student body. heAlTh ServiCeS MAnAGeMenT 05 Master of health Services Management and planning 06

University of Technology, Sydney

302

The 550 AU Mission: A Critical Discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the science rationale, goals and requirements for a mission\\u000aaimed at using the gravitational lensing from the Sun as a way of achieving\\u000ahigh angular resolution and high signal amplification. We find that such a\\u000amission concept is plagued by several practical problems. Most severe are the\\u000aeffects due to the plasma in the solar atmosphere which

Slava G. Turyshev; B. G. Andersson

2002-01-01

303

law.uts.edu.au Postgraduate  

E-print Network

law.uts.edu.au Postgraduate Courses 2014 uTs:law #12;#12;02 AboutUTS:Law 03 LawAdvisoryBoard 04 UTSDoctor 12 JurisDoctor MasterofBusinessAdministration 14 MasterofLaws 16 CommunicationsLaw 18 IntellectualProperty 20 DisputeResolution 22 PracticalLegalTraining 24 LegalStudies 26 AustralianLaw 28 Higher

University of Technology, Sydney

304

LA MORT COMMUNE au duch de Bretagne  

E-print Network

LA MORT COMMUNE au duché de Bretagne à la fin du Moyen ?ge * La mort représente assurément un ... Il demeure que la mort s'impose toujours à l'historien démographe comme à celui des représentations aujourd'hui remises sur le boisseau5 . ? proprement parler, la mort commune n'a pourtant pas d

Boyer, Edmond

305

Dendrimer-mediated growth of very flat ultrathin Au films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Si wafers covered with a native oxide were used as substrates for growth of 12.5 nm of evaporated Au (Au/SiO x), and self-assembly of a dendrimer monolayer followed by the same thickness of Au (Au/dendrimer/SiO x). This paper presents evidence for very significant improvements in Au film quality when grown on a self-assembled monolayer of amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers (generation G8) on SiO x. An increase in surface hardness from 1.7 to 3 GPa, a decrease in surface roughness from about 1.2 to 0.4 nm and better adhesion are shown with a combination of XPS, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), AFM, and nanoindentation. The improvement in film quality may be explained by penetration of the deposited Au into the dendrimer adlayer. This interpenetration is confirmed by AFM profilometry and XPS analysis.

Rar, A.; Zhou, J. N.; Liu, W. J.; Barnard, J. A.; Bennett, A.; Street, S. C.

2001-05-01

306

Lateral spreading of Au contacts on InP  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The contact spreading phenomenon observed when small area Au contacts on InP are annealed at temperatures above about 400 C was investigated. It was found that the rapid lateral expansion of the contact metallization which consumes large quantities of InP during growth is closely related to the third stage in the series of solid state reactions that occur between InP and Au, i.e., to the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition. Detailed descriptions are presented of both the spreading process and the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition along with arguments that the two processes are manifestations of the same basic phenomenon.

Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

1990-01-01

307

Au??(SAdm)?? nanomolecules: X-ray crystal structure, theoretical analysis, adaptability of adamantane ligands to form Au??(SAdm)?? and Au??(SAdm)??, and its relation to Au??(SR)??.  

PubMed

Here we present the crystal structure, experimental and theoretical characterization of a Au24(SAdm)16 nanomolecule. The composition was verified by X-ray crystallography and mass spectrometry, and its optical and electronic properties were investigated via experiments and first-principles calculations. Most importantly, the focus of this work is to demonstrate how the use of bulky thiolate ligands, such as adamantanethiol, versus the commonly studied phenylethanethiolate ligands leads to a great structural flexibility, where the metal core changes its shape from five-fold to crystalline-like motifs and can adapt to the formation of Au(241)(SAdm)16, namely, Au23(SAdm)16, Au24(SAdm)16, and Au25(SAdm)16. The basis for the construction of a thermodynamic phase diagram of Au nanomolecules in terms of ligands and solvent features is also outlined. PMID:25308728

Crasto, David; Barcaro, Giovanni; Stener, Mauro; Sementa, Luca; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dass, Amala

2014-10-22

308

Hybrid Pt/Au Nanowires: Synthesis and Electronic Structure  

SciTech Connect

This letter reports the synthesis of a new type of noble metal/noble metal hybrid (Pt/Au hybrid nanowires) via galvanic replacement reaction between Pt nanowires and AuCl3. The width of nanowire component is about 2.3 {+-} 0.2 nm wide, and the diameter of Au component is about 4.5 nm {+-} 0.8 nm. More interestingly, by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique, charge transfer upon hybrids formation was observed, that d-charge depletion occurred at the Pt site, accompanied by d-charge gain at the Au site. The reported methodology to synthesize Pt/Au hybrid nanowires and study of electronic structure of Pt/Au hybrids will be of great importance in catalysis and materials science.

Teng,X.; Han, W.; Wang, Q.; Li, L.; Frenkel, A.; Yang, J.

2008-01-01

309

Conductive Au nanowires regulated by silk fibroin nanofibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conductive Au-biopolymer composites have promising applications in tissue engineering such as nerve tissue regeneration. In this study, silk fibroin nanofibers were formed in aqueous solution by regulating silk self-assembly process and then used as template for Au nanowire fabrication. We performed the synthesis of Au seeds by repeating the seeding cycles for several times in order to increase the density of Au seeds on the nanofibers. After electroless plating, densely decorated Au seeds grew into irregularly shaped particles following silk nanofiber to fill the gaps between particles and finally form uniform continuous nanowires. The conductive property of the Au-silk fibroin nanowires was studied with current-voltage ( I-V) measurement. A typical ohmic behavior was observed, which highlighted their potential applications in nerve tissue regeneration.

Dong, Bo-Ju; Lu, Qiang

2014-03-01

310

Structural and electronic properties of AuIr nanoalloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lowest-energy structures of binary (AuIr) n , (AuIr3) s , and (Au3Ir) s clusters, with n = 2-20, and s = 5, modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, were obtained by using a genetic-symbiotic algorithm. These structures were further relaxed within the density functional theory to obtain the most stable structures for each composition. Segregation is observed in all the AuIr clusters, where the Ir atoms occupy the cluster core and the Au atoms are situated on the cluster surface. On the other hand, there is experimental evidence that the (AuIr) n nanoalloys could have an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation. In order to study this phenomenon, we also performed first-principles density functional calculations of the CO and O2 adsorption on these bimetallic nanoclusters, considering three different compositions and a fixed cluster size of 20 atoms.

Jimnez-Daz, Laura M.; Prez, Luis A.

2013-01-01

311

Controlled shape modification of embedded Au nanoparticles by 3 MeV Au2+-ion irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shape modification of embedded Au nanoparticles by 3 MeV Au2+-ion irradiation has been studied by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The ion irradiation on spherical Au nanoparticles shallowly-embedded in SiO2 caused a well-controlled transformation of shape to ellipsoidal. Satellite nanoparticles of smaller sizes were found to nucleate around the ellipsoids. Rapid growth of the ellipsoidal nanoparticles was observed as the applied fluence increased from 3 1015 to 7 1015 ions cm-2. The XTEM study also revealed the crystallinity of the ellipsoids formed by MeV ion irradiation. Reduction in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak intensity in the optical absorption spectrum indicates partial dissolution of the spherical nanoparticles by ion irradiation. We have thus obtained a unique near-surface structure of ellipsoidal nanoparticles. The results are discussed in terms of effects of ion energy deposition and inverse Ostwald ripening.

Datta, D. P.; Takeda, Y.; Amekura, H.; Sasase, M.; Kishimoto, N.

2014-08-01

312

science.uts.edu.au think.change.do  

E-print Network

science.uts.edu.au think.change.do UTS: Science UndeRgRadUatecoURSeSgUide2014 #12;contactUS Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887) Email: science@uts.edu.au science.uts.edu.au contentS Why Science at UTS? 01 World Class Facilities 02 Careers in Science and Mathematics 04 UTS: Science Courses 05 Bache

University of Technology, Sydney

313

TUDE AU MICROSCOPE LECTRONIQUE A BALAYAGE DE L'PITHLIUM  

E-print Network

?TUDE AU MICROSCOPE ?LECTRONIQUE A BALAYAGE DE L'?PITH?LIUM DE L'INTESTIN GR?LE DU PORC Michèle feuille (leaf-shaped : 1), l'étude au microscope à balayage donne une vue en relief de la surface présence de zones d'extrusion que l'on retrouve fréquemment au microscope électronique à balayage. De plus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplement au n018, Tome 51, 15 septembre 1990  

E-print Network

, argon flow) and the distance between the target and the nozzle torch are varied to determine variable, définie par rapport à la sortie de la tuyère de la torche. Fig. 1 - Dispositif expérimental: 1

Boyer, Edmond

315

Information Literacy Program ANU Library anulib.anu.edu.au/training  

E-print Network

Information Literacy Program ANU Library anulib.anu.edu.au/training ilp@anu.edu.au TeX Introduction 2013 #12; #12;Introduction to LATEX Graduate Information Literacy Program grad.ilp@anu.edu.au 1 What

316

Layer growth in Au-Pb/In solder joints  

SciTech Connect

The solid state reaction between a Pb-In solder alloy and thin film Au has been investigated at ten aging temperatures ranging from 70 to 170/sup 0/C. Also, bulk Au-solder samples were aged at 150/sup 0/C for metallographic analysis. No significant difference was found between the aging behavior of thin and bulk Au specimens. A thin single phase layer of Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ was found adjacent to Au while a thick two-phase layer of AuIn/sub 2/ and Pb was found between Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ and solder. The Pb phase was shown to have considerable mobility and able to ripen at room temperature. Peculiar planar interface instabilities and voids in the Au-Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ interface were found. The total layer thickness was found to vary linearly with aging time, indicating an interface-controlled reaction. An activation energy of 14,000 calories per mole was found by regression analysis of the kinetic data.

Yost, F.G.; Ganyard, F.P.; Karnowsky, M.M.

1986-01-01

317

Preparation and optical absorption spectra of Au{sub core}Pt{sub shell} and Pt{sub core}Au{sub shell} colloidal nanoparticles in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Bimetallic gold and platinum particles of the Pt-Au and Au-Pt core-shell type are prepared using hydrogen reduction and radiolysis techniques. The optical absorption spectra are recorded and compared to various Au-Pt particles described in the literature. Au{sub core}Pt{sub shell} particles catalyze the hydrogen reduction of silver ions to yield trimetallic particles.

Henglein, A.

2000-03-16

318

Growth of Long Range Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlations with Centrality in Au plus Au Collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

Forward-backward multiplicity correlation strengths have been measured with the STAR detector for Au+Au and p+p collisions at ?sNN=200??GeV. Strong short- and long-range correlations (LRC) are seen in central Au+Au collisions. ...

Walker, Matthew H.

319

Measurements of direct photons in Au+Au collisions with PHENIX  

E-print Network

The PHENIX experiment has published direct photon yields and elliptic flow coefficients $v_2$ from Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies. These results have sparked much theoretical discussion. The measured yields and flow parameters are difficult to reconcile in current model calculations of thermal radiation based on hydrodynamic time evolution of the collision volume. Our latest analyses which use high statistics data from the 2007 and 2010 runs allow the determination of direct photon yields with finer granularity in centrality and photon momentum and down to $p_T$ as low as 0.4 GeV/$c$. We will summarize the current status and present new results from PHENIX.

Benjamin Bannier

2014-04-11

320

An atomistic view of the interfacial structures of AuRh and AuPd nanorods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi-epitaxial, strained interface between bulk miscible metals. By comparing the two systems, including molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to gain insights into the factors that may have influenced their structure and chemical ordering, which cannot be explained by the key structural and energetic parameters of either system in isolation, thus demonstrating the advantage of taking a comparative approach to the characterization of complex binary systems. This work highlights the importance of achieving a fundamental understanding of reaction kinetics in realizing the atomically controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts.In this work we address the challenge of furthering our understanding of the driving forces responsible for the metal-metal interactions in industrially relevant bimetallic nanocatalysts, by taking a comparative approach to the atomic scale characterization of two core-shell nanorod systems (AuPd and AuRh). Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show the existence of a randomly mixed alloy layer some 4-5 atomic layers thick between completely bulk immiscible Au and Rh, which facilitates fully epitaxial overgrowth for the first few atomic layers. In marked contrast in AuPd nanorods, we find atomically sharp segregation resulting in a quasi-epitaxial, strained interface between bulk miscible metals. By comparing the two systems, including molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to gain insights into the factors that may have influenced their structure and chemical ordering, which cannot be explained by the key structural and energetic parameters of either system in isolation, thus demonstrating the advantage of taking a comparative approach to the characterization of complex binary systems. This work highlights the importance of achieving a fundamental understanding of reaction kinetics in realizing the atomically controlled synthesis of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional STEM images, details of molecular dynamics simulation, and descriptions of sample synthesis. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02560h

Chantry, Ruth L.; Atanasov, Ivailo; Siriwatcharapiboon, Wilai; Khanal, Bishnu P.; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Horswell, Sarah L.; Johnston, Roy L.; Li, Z. Y.

2013-07-01

321

Single identified hadron spectra from sNN=130GeV Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse momentum spectra and yields of hadrons are measured by the PHENIX\\u000acollaboration in Au + Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic\\u000aHeavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The time-of-flight resolution allows identification\\u000aof pions to transverse momenta of 2 GeV\\/c and protons and antiprotons to 4\\u000aGeV\\/c. The yield of pions rises approximately linearly with the number

K. Adcox; S. Adler; N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. Awes; K. Barish; P. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. Bellaiche; S. Belyaev; M. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. Brooks; D. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. Chang; L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. Cole; D. dEnterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. Enyo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. Fields; S. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-. Gustafsson; J. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. Hansen; H. Hara; E. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. Hemmick; J. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. Hill; D. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. Jacak; W. Jang; J. Jia; B. Johnson; S. Johnson; K. Joo; S. Kametani; J. Kang; M. Kann; S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. Kim; H. Kim; S. Kim; Y. Kim; W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. Lee; M. Leitch; X. Li; Z. Li; D. Lim; M. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. Makdisi; V. Manko; Y. Mao; S. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; T. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. Mischke; G. Mishra; J. Mitchell; A. Mohanty; D. Morrison; J. Moss; F. Mhlbacher; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. Nagle; Y. Nakada; B. Nandi; J. Newby; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; A. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. OBrien; C. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. Ojha; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. sterman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; A. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; S. Pate; T. Peitzmann; A. Petridis; C. Pinkenburg; R. Pisani; P. Pitukhin; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. Purschke; I. Ravinovich; K. Read; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; M. Rosati; A. Rose; S. Ryu; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; T. Sangster; R. Santo; H. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; T. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina; Y. Shin; I. Sibiriak; D. Silvermyr; K. Sim; J. Simon-Gillo; C. Singh; V. Singh; M. Sivertz; A. Soldatov; R. Soltz; S. Sorensen; P. Stankus; N. Starinsky; P. Steinberg; E. Stenlund; A. Ster; S. Stoll; M. Sugioka; T. Sugitate; J. Sullivan; Y. Sumi; Z. Sun; M. Suzuki; E. Takagui; A. Taketani; M. Tamai; K. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; E. Taniguchi; M. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; T. Thomas; W. Tian; J. Tojo; H. Torii; R. Towell; I. Tserruya; H. Tsuruoka; A. Tsvetkov; S. Tuli; H. Tydesj; N. Tyurin; T. Ushiroda; H. van Hecke; C. Velissaris; J. Velkovska; M. Velkovsky; A. Vinogradov; M. Volkov; A. Vorobyov; E. Vznuzdaev; H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; S. White; C. Witzig; F. Wohn; C. Woody; W. Xie; K. Yagi; S. Yokkaichi; G. Young; I. Yushmanov; W. Zajc; Z. Zhang; S. Zhou

2004-01-01

322

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v_1), elliptic flow\\u000a(v_2), and the fourth harmonic (v_4) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution\\u000aof particles from Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV are summarized and\\u000acompared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results\\u000afor identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model.\\u000aDifferent anisotropic

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. de Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Guerts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Langacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

323

Proton and Pion Production Relative to the Reaction Plane in Au + Au Collisions at AGS Energies  

E-print Network

Results are presented of an analysis of proton and charged pion azimuthal distributions measured with respect to the reaction plane in Au + Au collisions at a beam momentum of about 11 AGeV/c. The azimuthal anisotropy is studied as a function of particle rapidity and transverse momentum for different centralities of the collisions. The triple differential (in rapidity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal angle) distributions are reconstructed. A comparison of the results with a previous analysis of charged particle and transverse energy flow as well as with model predictions is presented.

J. Barrette

1997-07-06

324

Statement of Retraction:. "measurement of the Casimir Interaction Between a au Sphere and au Gratings"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article was published as a part of the conference proceedings for the Eighth Alexander Friedmann International Seminar on Gravitation and Cosmology and Satellite Symposium on the Casimir Effect, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 30 May-3 June 2011. In the article I described results of the force obtained in the Casimir regime between a Au coated sphere and a Au grating. The making of the grating required extensive development from my collaborators. The article was published without the proper authorship from the research groups involved. Against this background I thus retract my article and apologize for the damage I have caused.

Decca, Ricardo S.

325

Femtoscopic results in Au + Au and p + p from PHENIX at RHIC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultra-relativistic gold-gold and proton-proton collisions are investigated in the experiments of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In the last several years large amount of results were revealed about the matter created in these collisions. The latest PHENIX results for femtoscopy and correlations are reviewed in this paper. Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons in 200 GeV Au + Au collisions and of charged pions in 200 GeV p + p collisions are shown. They are both compatible with previous measurements of charged pions in gold-gold collisions, with respect to transverse mass or number of participants scaling.

Csand, M.

2011-12-01

326

Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

2009-05-14

327

Pion interferometry in Au + Au collisions at ?Snn = 200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at\\u000a?sNN = 200 GeV using\\u000athe STAR detector at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We extract the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss radii and study\\u000atheir multiplicity, transverse momentum, and azimuthal angle dependence. The Gaussianness of the correlation\\u000afunction is studied. Estimates of the geometrical and dynamical structure of the freeze-out

J. Adams; M. A. J. Botje; O. Grebenyuk; A. Mischke; T. Peitzmann; R. J. M. Snellings; B. Yuting; S. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. Bhati; V. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. Bland; C. Blyth; B. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. Cadman; X. Cai; H. Caines; M. Snchez; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Coffin; T. Cormier; J. Cramer; H. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Moura; A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. Dogra; W. Dong; X. Dong; J. Draper; F. Du; A. Dubey; V. Dunin; J. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. Edwards; L. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. Gagliardi; J. Gans; M. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; D. Grosnick; S. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. Gutierrez; T. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. Harris; M. Heinz; T. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. Hoffmann; H. Huang; S. Huang; E. Hughes; T. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. Jones; E. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. Kislov; J. Klay; S. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kutuev; A. Kuznetsov; M. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. Lindenbaum; M. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. Llope; H. Long; R. Longacre; M. Noriega; W. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. Ma; J. Ma; Y. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. Matis; Yu. Matulenko; C. McClain; T. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Miller; N. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. Moore; D. Morozov; M. Munhoz; B. Nandi; S. Nayak; T. Nayak; J. Nelson; P. Netrakanti; V. Nikitin; L. Nogach; S. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Panitkin; A. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. Petrov; S. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. Ray; S. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. Ritter; J. Roberts; O. Rogachevskiy; J. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; P. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Shen; K. Shestermanov; S. Shimanskiy; E Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. Tribble; O. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Buren; M. Leeuwen; A. Molen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. Vigdor; Y. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. Wang; H. Ward; J. Watson; J. Webb; R. Wells; G. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Jr.; H. Wieman; S. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. Zhang; Z. Zhang; P. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. Zubarev

2005-01-01

328

Synthesis and Characterization of Multimetallic Pd/Au and Pd/Au/FePt Core/Shell Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Core/shell nanoparticles of Pd/Au and Pd/Au/FePt were synthesized with palladium (5 nm diameter), a gold shell (1-2 nm), and a FePt shell (2 nm). The synthetic control allowed the Pd/Au catalytic properties to be tuned by the shell thickness. The synthesis provides an indication for future development of multicomponent nanoparticles for advanced catalytic applications.

Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Shouheng [Brown University; Mazumder, Vismadeb [Brown University; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

2010-01-01

329

Communication au colloque "De l'impolitesse la violence verbale" La vrit au risque de la violence  

E-print Network

Communication au colloque "De l'impolitesse à la violence verbale" La vérité au risque de la violence Remarques sur la stylistique du rap en français1 HAMMOU Karim, SHADYC-EHESS (Marseille) K. Hammou ­ « La vérité au risque de la violence. Remarques sur l'esthétique du rap en français. » 1 halshs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

Phytosynthesis of Au, Ag and AuAg bimetallic nanoparticles using aqueous extract and dried leaf of Anacardium occidentale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Present study reports a green chemistry approach for the biosynthesis of Au, Ag, AuAg alloy and Au coreAg shell nanoparticles using the aqueous extract and dried powder of Anacardium occidentale leaf. The effects of quantity of extract\\/powder, temperature and pH on the formation of nanoparticles are studied. The nanoparticles are characterized using UVvis and FTIR spectroscopies, XRD, HRTEM and SAED

D. S. Sheny; Joseph Mathew; Daizy Philip

2011-01-01

331

Prediction of nonradical au(0)-containing precursors in nanoparticle growth processes.  

PubMed

This density functional theory (DFT) investigation examines the formation of nonradical Au(0) species from the reduction of Au(I) species. The Au(I) complexes of interest are AuCl2(-), AuBr2(-), AuI2(-), AuClPH3, and AuCl(H)SCH3((-)), which are precursors for gold nanoparticle and cluster formation. Reaction of two of the Au(I) species with a hydride results in ejection of two of the ligands and formation of Au2 with two ligands still attached. AuX2(-) (where X = Cl, Br, or I) reactions eject two halides and form Au2X2(2-). AuClL((-)) (where L = PH3, HSCH3, or SCH3(-)) reactions can eject either chloride, HCl, PH3, HSCH3, or SCH3(-) and form Au(0)L2(q-) or Au(0)ClL(q-) (q = 0, 1, 2). The Au2Cl2(2-) complex can further react with AuCl2(-), which forms Au3Cl3(2-) and a chloride anion. The new Au3Cl3(2-) species can then react with AuCl2(-) or Au2Cl2(2-) or with another Au3Cl3(2-). Larger clusters can be formed from these precursors. In this work, reactions in both methanol and benzene solvents are considered as models for one-phase and two-phase gold nanoparticle growth processes. Overall, this investigation shows how Au(0)-containing species can be formed without assuming the formation of Au(0) atoms (radical species). PMID:25580885

Barngrover, Brian M; Manges, Timothy J; Aikens, Christine M

2015-02-01

332

AuGa2 on focused Ga ion beam-fabricated Au nanorod array for trace detection of melamine cyanurate in milk solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au nanorod arrays were fabricated using a focused gallium (Ga) ion beam (fibAu_NRs) with various levels of Ga ion energy. The formation of AuGa2 on fibAu_NRs was controlled by adjusting the level of Ga ion energy and subsequent heat treatment in order to increase the effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The SERS enhancement factor of the substrates was evaluated using crystal violet as a molecular test probe. The results show that low-density AuGa2 formation on fibAu_NRs increases the SERS effect, which is likely due to the interjunction charge transfer between Au and AuGa2. An optimized AuGa2 on fibAu_NRs was applied to the trace detection of melamine cyanurate in milk solution with high measured sensitivity.

Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Haochih Liu, Bernard; Chieh Yu, Li

2015-01-01

333

Evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at s=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present first measurements of the evolution of the differential transverse momentum correlation function, C, with collision centrality in Au + Au interactions at s=200 GeV. This observable exhibits a strong dependence on collision centrality that is qualitatively similar to that of number correlations previously reported. We use the observed longitudinal broadening of the near-side peak of C with increasing centrality to estimate the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density, ?/s, of the matter formed in central Au + Au interactions. We obtain an upper limit estimate of ?/s that suggests that the produced medium has a small viscosity per unit entropy.

STAR Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Beavis, D. R.; Behera, N. K.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Caldern de La Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Knospe, A. G.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Souza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.

2011-10-01

334

Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.  

PubMed

We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur. PMID:17026027

Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

2006-09-29

335

Full jet reconstruction in 200 GeV p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions by STAR  

E-print Network

Measurements of inclusive hadron suppression and di-hadron azimuthal correlations have provided important insights into jet quenching in hot QCD matter. However, they do not provide access to the energy of the hard scattering and are limited in their sensitivity since they can be affected by biases toward hard fragmentation and small energy loss. Full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions enables a complete study of the modification of jet structure due to energy loss, but is challenging due to the high multiplicity environment. Study of jet production and properties in d+Au and p+p collisions provides important baseline measurement for jet studies in heavy-ion collisions. We report measurements of fully reconstructed jets in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200 \\mathrm{GeV}$ from the STAR experiment at RHIC. Measurement of initial state nuclear effects in d+Au collisions utilizing di-jet azimuthal correlations is presented together with similar measurement in p+p collisions. Inclusive jet $\\pt$ spectra and fragmentation functions in p+p and central Au+Au collisions are reported, with subsequent studies of jet nuclear modification factor, jet energy profile and modifications in the fragmentation function due to jet quenching.

Jan Kapitan; for the STAR Collaboration

2009-09-16

336

Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and AuAg nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag

Daizy Philip

2009-01-01

337

Au Chalet du LacAu Chalet du Lac Samedi 23 septembre 1995  

E-print Network

dans le bois de Vincennes, au Chalet du Lac de Saint- Mandé, un dancing à l'ancienne, avec parquet ciré foulard bariolé, un arbre à planter avant la Sainte-Catherine. Il y eut même de la musique... et Colette

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Systematic studies of the centrality dependence of soft photon production in Au + Au collision with PHENIX  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the earliest days of Heavy Ion Physics thermal soft photon radiation emitted during the reaction had been theorized as a smoking gun signal for formation of a quark-gluon plasma and as a tool to characterize its properties. In recent years the existence of excess photon radiation in heavy ion collisions over the expectation from initial hard interactions has been confirmed at both RHIC and LHC energies by PHENIX and ALICE respectively. There the radiation has been found to exhibit elliptic flow v2 well above what can currently be reconciled with a picture of early emission from a plasma phase. During the 2007 and 2010 Au + Au runs PHENIX has measured a high purity sample of soft photons down to pT > 0.4 GeV / c using an external conversion method. We present recent systematic studies by PHENIX from that sample on the centrality dependence of the soft photon yield, and elliptic and triangular flow v2 and v3 in Au + Au collisions which fill in the experimental picture and enable discrimination of competing soft photon production scenarios.

Bannier, Benjamin

2014-11-01

339

"Au Revoir" to Film Illiteracy: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of "Au Revior Les Enfants."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the power of film and films as teaching tools. Describes how the 1987 French film "Au Revior Les Enfants" can serve these purposes. Discusses its historical context, and ways to show the film in class. Lists numerous topics (on important film themes, and on technical aspects of film) for student projects. (SR)

Corbitt, J. Catherine

1998-01-01

340

Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

Leyva,44 L. C. De Silva,51 R. R. Debbe,3 T. G. Dedovich,18 A. A. Derevschikov,33 R. Derradi de Souza,7 L. Didenko,3 P. Djawotho,43 S. M. Dogra,17 X. Dong,22 J. L. Drachenberg,43 J. E. Draper,5 J. C. Dunlop,3 M. R. Dutta Mazumdar,48 L. G. Efimov,18 E...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 82, 024905 (2010) Balance functions from Au + Au, d + Au, and p + p collisions at ?sN N = 200 GeV M. M. Aggarwal,31 Z. Ahammed,22 A. V. Alakhverdyants,18 I. Alekseev,16 J. Alford,19 B. D. Anderson,19 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S...

Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; De Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

2010-01-01

341

PRAMPLIFICATEUR DE CHARGE A FAIBLE BRUIT POUR DTECTEUR AU GERMANIUM  

E-print Network

114 PR?AMPLIFICATEUR DE CHARGE A FAIBLE BRUIT POUR D?TECTEUR AU GERMANIUM Par J. DESCHAMPS, J. C de champ refroidi, associé à un détecteur gamma au germanium. Abstract. 2014 Results on a very low noise charge sensitive preamplifier using a cooled field effect transistor for a germanium lithium drift

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Thermodynamics of hydrogen in fcc Pd-Au alloys.  

PubMed

Hydrogen isotherms have been measured for a series of solid solution Pd-Au alloys in the temperature range from 393 to 523 K. Standard partial thermodynamic parameters at infinite dilution of H, DeltaH(H) degrees, and DeltaS(H) degrees, have been determined from these equilibrium data; both standard values for H(2) absorption become more negative with increase of atom fraction Au, X(Au). An interesting result is that the dilute phase isotherms at 423 and 523 K are all very similar for alloys with X(Au) = 0.15 to about 0.30 although their DeltaH(H) degrees and DeltaS(H) degrees differ. This is due to a compensating effect of the two thermodynamic parameters leading to (partial partial differentialDeltaG(H)/partial partial differentialr) = RT(partial partial differential ln p(1/2)/partial partial differentialr) approximately constant for the alloys from X(Au) approximately 0.15 to 0.30 at low r where r = H-to-metal atom ratio. Calorimetric enthalpies and isotherms at 303 K have been determined for a series of Pd-Au alloys over a range of H contents including, for some of the low Au content alloys, the plateau regions. These calorimetric data are the most complete reported for the Pd-Au-H system. PMID:20408574

Luo, S; Wang, D; Flanagan, Ted B

2010-05-13

343

Biosynthesis of Au nanoparticles using olive leaf extract  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various shapes (triangle, hexagonal, and spherical) using hot water olive leaf extracts as reducing agent is reported. The size and the shape of Au nanoparticles are modulated by varying the ratio of metal salt and extract in the reaction medium. Only 20min were required for the conversion into gold nanoparticles at room

Mostafa M. H. Khalil; Eman H. Ismail; Fatma El-Magdoub

344

QUT Digital Repository: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/  

E-print Network

Vision Yuee Liu Microsoft QUT eResearch Centre Queensland University of Technology Brisbane, Australia yuee.liu@qut.edu.au Binh Pham Microsoft QUT eResearch Centre Queensland University of Technology Brisbane, Australia b.pham@qut.edu.au Jinglan Zhang Microsoft QUT eResearch Centre Queensland University

Roe, Paul

345

Surface segregation of Ag Cu Au trimetallic clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Segregation phenomena of Ag-Cu-Au trimetallic clusters with icosahedral structure are investigated by using a Monte Carlo method based on the second-moment approximation of the tight-binding (TB-SMA) potentials. We predict that the Ag atoms segregate to the surface of the Ag-Cu-Au trimetallic icosahedral clusters. The Ag concentrations in the surface layer of the clusters are about 11-29 at.% higher than the overall Ag concentration in all the cases studied. The simulation results also indicate that the Au atoms are mainly distributed in the middle shell and the Cu atoms are located in the center for the 147-, 309-, 561- and 923-atom clusters at 300 K. The segregation phenomena of the Ag, Au and Cu atoms in the Ag-Cu-Au trimetallic clusters are mainly due to the different surface energies of the Ag, Au and Cu atoms. It is found that the size and composition have little effect on the segregation phenomena of Ag, Au and Cu atoms in the Ag-Cu-Au trimetallic cluster.

Cheng, Daojian; Liu, Xin; Cao, Dapeng; Wang, Wenchuan; Huang, Shiping

2007-11-01

346

Asservissement par PID Application du PWM au pont en H  

E-print Network

Plan Asservissement par PID PWM Ponts en H Application du PWM au pont en H Bibliographie Asservissement par PID, PWM et Ponts en H Siwar, Cédric, Samuel Télécom Paristech 4 mars 2011 Siwar, Cédric, Samuel ROSE 1 / 33 4 mars 2011 #12;Plan Asservissement par PID PWM Ponts en H Application du PWM au pont

Tardieu, Samuel

347

Production of ? mesons in Au+Au collisions at 11.7A GeV?c  

E-print Network

We report on a measurement of ?-meson production in Au+Au collisions at a beam momentum of 11.7A GeV?c by experiment 917 at the alternating gradient synchroton. The measurement covers the midrapidity region 1.2

Dunlop, James C.

348

{phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

2004-06-01

349

Neutral pion production in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

The results of midrapidity (0Au+Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. ...

Walker, M.

350

Directed Flow of Identified Particles in Au+Au Collisions at ?SNN=200??GeV at RHIC  

E-print Network

STARs measurements of directed flow (v[subscript 1]) around midrapidity for ?[superscript ], K[superscript ], K[subscript S][superscript 0], p, and p? in Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV are presented. A ...

Balewski, Jan T.

351

Third harmonic flow of charged particles in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200GeV  

E-print Network

We report measurements of the third harmonic coefficient of the azimuthal anisotropy, v[subscript 3], known as triangular flow. The analysis is for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200 GeV, based ...

Betancourt, M. J.

352

Beam-Energy Dependence of the Directed Flow of Protons, Antiprotons, and Pions in Au+Au Collisions  

E-print Network

Rapidity-odd directed flow (v[subscript 1]) measurements for charged pions, protons, and antiprotons near midrapidity (y = 0) are reported in ?s[subscript NN] = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV Au+Au collisions ...

Stevens, Justin

353

Charged meson rapidity distributions in central Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

in central Au.0135Au collisions at AGS [12] and Pb.0135Pb re- actions at SPS [13]. This is reminiscent of the hydrody- namical expansion model proposed by Landau [1]. In the initial state, colliding nuclei are highly Lorentz contracted along the beam...

Sanders, Stephen J.

2005-04-29

354

Identified particle transverse momentum distributions from AU + AU collisions at 62.4 GeV per nucleon pair  

E-print Network

Transverse momentum (PT) distributions for pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons have been measured near mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62.4 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider ...

Henderson, Conor, 1977-

2005-01-01

355

Identified Particle v2(pt,y) for 200-GeV AuAu S. J. Sanders, U. Kansas  

E-print Network

Identified Particle v2(pt,y) for 200-GeV AuAu S. J. Sanders, U. Kansas (for the BRAHMS. University of Bucharest, Romania 11. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA11. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA 12. University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo, Norway12. University of Oslo

356

LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 48 L'ORDINATEUR AU LABORATOIRE L'ORDINATEUR AU LABORATOIRE  

E-print Network

conductance de la solution est proportionnelle au nombre d'ions produits, donc au degré d'avancement de la démarche expérimentale. Ultérieurement, le logiciel sera adapté aux compatibles PC ainsi que l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Anisotropic flow in AuAu and CuCu at 62 GeV and 200 GeV  

E-print Network

We present STAR's measurements of directed flow (v_1) and elliptic flow (v_2) for charged hadrons in AuAu collisions at 62 and 200 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity, p_t and centrality. v_2 results in CuCu collisions at 200 GeV are also presented.

Gang Wang

2005-10-21

358

The Observable of Lambda Polarity Caused by Source Global Angular Momentum Localizing in Peripheral Au-Au Collision at RHIC  

E-print Network

An observable to measure the polarity of lambda that caused by source global angular momentum in peripheral AU-AU collision at RHIC is proposed.This observable's capacity of measurement is tested by Monte Carlo method.And the main factors that influence the observable are also researched.This observable will give an effective proof of the formation of deconfined matter.

X. Sun; Z. Yang

2005-07-29

359

Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.  

PubMed

We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions. PMID:12935009

Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednick, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovsk, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zo?nierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

2003-08-15

360

Charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV per nucleon pair  

E-print Network

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) collides Au ions at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon pair, which produces the most energetic collisions yet seen in the laboratory. RHIC has also collided proton ...

Kane, Jay Lawrence

2005-01-01

361

Reconstructions of Au films on Pd(110)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of thermally activated changes in Au films, 1-10 monolayers thick, on Pd(110). The films are stable against bulk dissolution until ~500 K, based upon Auger electron spectroscopy. For Au coverages below 1.5 monolayers, only a (11) overlayer structure is observed with low-energy electron diffraction over the entire temperature range studied (130-800 K). At coverages above 1.0 monolayers and after annealing to temperatures above 300 K, a (1z) diffraction pattern develops. With increasing coverage the value of z increases continuously from 2 to 3, reaching z=3 at 4 monolayers. We propose that the diffraction pattern reflects a coverage-dependent mixture of small domains of (12) and (13) reconstruction, with the (12) favored at low coverage and the (13) favored at high coverage. This model is rationalized in terms of the film's coverage-dependent morphology, which can be described as Stranski-Krastanov with a critical thickness of 2 monolayers.

Schmitz, P. J.; Leung, W.-Y.; Kang, H. C.; Thiel, P. A.

1991-04-01

362

The 550-au Mission: a critical discussion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the science rationale, goals and requirements for a mission aimed at using the gravitational lensing from the Sun as a way of achieving high angular resolution and high signal amplification. We find that such a mission concept is compromised by several practical problems. Most severe are the effects due to the plasma in the solar atmosphere which cause refraction and scattering of the propagating rays. These effects either limit the frequencies that can be observed to those above ~1 THz, or they move the optical point outwards beyond the vacuum value of >=550 au. (Thus for observing frequency of 300 GHz the optical point is moved outwards to ~ 680 au.) Density fluctuations in the inner solar atmosphere will further cause random pathlength differences for different rays. The corrections for the radiation from the Sun itself will also be a major challenge at any wavelength used, but could be mitigated with coronographic techniques. Given reasonable constraints on the spacecraft (particularly in terms of size and propulsion), source selection as well as severe navigational constraints further add to the difficulties for a potential mission. Nevertheless, unbiased surveys of small-scale structure on the sky at short wavelengths might be the most promising application of such a mission.

Turyshev, S. G.; Andersson, B.-G.

2003-05-01

363

Synthesis and X-ray structures of silver and gold guanidinate-like complexes. A Au(II) complex with a 2.47 AuAu distance  

E-print Network

Synthesis and X-ray structures of silver and gold guanidinate-like complexes. A Au(II) complex], and the dinuclear gold(II), [Au2(hpp)2Cl2], (hpp = 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) guani- dinate-like bases are reported and show a silver­silver distance of 2.8614(6) ? and a gold­gold distance of 2

Abdou, Hanan E.

364

Metastable phase formation in the Au-Si system via ultrafast nanocalorimetry  

E-print Network

aspects of Au-Si stem from the nature of the supercooled (Au-Si)L liquid. It is an extremely fragile techniques. The liquid can be supercooled to very low temperatures for both Au-rich (DT $ 95 K) and Si are used for advanced devices,3,6,7 are currently grown using nanometer-size liquid (Au-Si)L eutectic

Allen, Leslie H.

365

Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.  

PubMed

Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed. PMID:16241721

Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednick, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zo?nierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

2005-10-01

366

Distributions of Charged Hadrons Associated with High Transverse Momentum Particles in pp and Au+Au Collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Charged hadrons in 0.154GeV\\/c are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. The associated multiplicity and p? magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p? distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Boucham; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern de La Barca Snchez; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednick; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; M. J. Mora-Corral; D. A. Morozov; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rai; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. J. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; R. N. Singaraju; F. Simon; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; R. Varma; I. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; B. Yuting; Y. V. Zanevski; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. P. Zhaomin; Z. P. Zizong; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; J. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

367

Comparison of the space-time extent of the emission source in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}=200$ GeV  

E-print Network

Two-pion interferometry measurements in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}=200$ GeV are used to extract and compare the Gaussian source radii R$_{{\\rm out}}$, R$_{{\\rm side}}$, and R$_{{\\rm long}}$, which characterize the space-time extent of the emission sources. The comparisons, which are performed as a function of collision centrality and the mean transverse momentum for pion pairs, indicate strikingly similar patterns for the $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au systems. They also indicate a linear dependence of R$_{{\\rm side}}$ on the initial transverse geometric size $\\bar{R}$, as well as a smaller freeze-out size for the $d$$+$Au system. These patterns point to the important role of final-state rescattering effects in the reaction dynamics of $d$$+$Au collisions.

Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Black, D; Blau, D S; Bok, J; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csand, M; Csrg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hasegawa, S; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, E; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kihara, K; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H -J; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, ; Kistenev, E; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kofarago, M; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Krl, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Lika, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mike, P; Miki, K; Miller, A J; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozaki, H; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Rui?ka, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R

2014-01-01

368

Comparison of the space-time extent of the emission source in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV  

E-print Network

Two-pion interferometry measurements in $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}=200$ GeV are used to extract and compare the Gaussian source radii R$_{{\\rm out}}$, R$_{{\\rm side}}$, and R$_{{\\rm long}}$, which characterize the space-time extent of the emission sources. The comparisons, which are performed as a function of collision centrality and the mean transverse momentum for pion pairs, indicate strikingly similar patterns for the $d$$+$Au and Au$+$Au systems. They also indicate a linear dependence of R$_{{\\rm side}}$ on the initial transverse geometric size $\\bar{R}$, as well as a smaller freeze-out size for the $d$$+$Au system. These patterns point to the important role of final-state rescattering effects in the reaction dynamics of $d$$+$Au collisions.

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; Y. Aramaki; H. Asano; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; D. Black; D. S. Blau; J. Bok; J. S. Bok; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; C. -H. Chen; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csand; T. Csrg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; L. D'Orazio; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; H. Guragain; H. -. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; E. P. Hartouni; S. Hasegawa; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; Y. Imazu; M. Inaba; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; D. Ivanishchev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; S. J. Jeon; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; E. Joo; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. Kihara; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; H. -J. Kim; M. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; . Kiss; E. Kistenev; J. Klatsky; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; M. Kofarago; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Krl; A. Kravitz; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; S. H. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Lika; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mike; K. Miki; A. J. Miller; A. Milov; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; T. V. Moukhanova; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; C. Nattrass; P. K. Netrakanti; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; T. Niida; R. Nouicer; N. Novitzky; A. S. Nyanin; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; J. D. Orjuela Koop; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; H. Ozaki; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; L. Patel; M. Patel; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; D. V. Perepelitsa; G. D. N. Perera; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; J. Perry; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. Pinson; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; K. Reygers; D. Reynolds; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; N. Riveli; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; Z. Rowan; J. G. Rubin; P. Rukoyatkin; P. Rui?ka; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi

2014-04-21

369

Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.  

PubMed

Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium. PMID:15287555

Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

2004-06-01

370

Does the fireball found in AuAu collisions at RHIC resemble plasma?  

E-print Network

General properties of the hot and dense hadron matter (fireball) discovered in AuAu collisions with pSNN = 130 and 200 GeV at RHIC are compared with these for ideal electromagnetic plasma. None of them was found to be in contrary to those of the plasma typical signs distinguishing its from other aggregate states of the matter. The author notes that modern experimental data about the fireball properties are limited to make their comprehensive comparison with plasma signatures. The author also points out the directions needed to be studied to answer question whether the hadron matter observed in the RHIC experiments is a color analogue of the electromagnetic plasma or not.

R. Ya. Zulkarneev

2007-06-07

371

200 A GeV Au + Au collisions serve a nearly perfect quark-gluon liquid.  

PubMed

A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity (?/s)(QGP) of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T(c) < T ? 2T(c) from the centrality dependence of the eccentricity-scaled elliptic flow v2/? measured in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Coupling viscous fluid dynamics for the QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au + Au collisions that v2/? is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN(ch)/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity ?. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4?(?/s)(QGP) < 2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of ? used to normalize the measured v2. PMID:21668145

Song, Huichao; Bass, Steffen A; Heinz, Ulrich; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Shen, Chun

2011-05-13

372

Charmonium dynamics in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The formation and suppression dynamics of J/{psi},{chi}{sub c}, and {psi}{sup '} mesons is studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach for Au+Au reactions at the top energy currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) of {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Two prominent models, which have been discussed for more than a decade, are incorporated, i.e., the hadronic comover absorption and reformation model as well as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) threshold scenario, and compared with available experimental data. Our studies demonstrate that both scenarios, which are compatible with experimental observation at SPS energies, fail severely at RHIC energies. This combined analysis, together with the underestimation of charm elliptic flow, proves that the dynamics of c,c quarks are dominated by partonic interactions in the strong QGP and can be neither modeled by hadronic interactions nor described appropriately by color screening alone.

Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Stoecker, H. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-10-15

373

Propagation of Fluctuations in Au+Au Collisions at FAIR energy  

E-print Network

Event by event fluctuations of particle multiplicities and their ratios are considered to be sensitive probes to the exotic phenomena in high energy heavy ion collisions like phase transtion or the occurence of critical point. These phenomena might take place at different time after the collision based on fulfilling the required conditions at a particular time. Fluctuations are therefore expected to show non-monotonic behaviour at the of time of occurence of these phenomena. Experimentally, fluctuations are measured at freezeout. In this work, using the hybrid version of the UrQMD event generator, we have investigated the propagation of fluctuations of particle multiplicities, their ratios and the ratio of total positive and negative charges in AuAu collisions at E_{lab} Two commonly used experimental measures i.e., {\\sigma^2}/mean and {\

S. Ahmad; M. Farooq; S. Bashir; H. jahan; N. Ahmad; S. Chattopadhyay

2014-08-21

374

Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.  

PubMed

We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:20050692

Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

2010-02-10

375

Proton-? correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on p-?,p-?,p-?, and p-? correlation functions constructed in central Au-Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The proton and lambda source size is inferred from the p-? and p-? correlation functions. It is found to be smaller than the pion source size also measured by the STAR experiment at smaller transverse masses, in agreement with a scenario of a strong universal collective flow. The p-? and p-? correlation functions, which are measured for the first time, exhibit a large anticorrelation. Annihilation channels and/or a negative real part of the spin-averaged scattering length must be included in the final-state interactions calculation to reproduce the measured correlation function.

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Badyal, S. K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B. I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatia, V. S.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, C. O.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Snchez, M. Caldern De La Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, H. A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A. K.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fornazier, K. S. F.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M. S.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Q. J.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J. N.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, S. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J. G.; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.

2006-12-01

376

Calibrating the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter for the Analysis of Au+Au Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment (PHENIX), located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is designed to examine direct probes from proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) is being calibrated for a measurement of transverse energy in the forward region, 3.1<|?|<3.8, using RHIC Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV. The MPC consists of 196 towers in the north station and 220 towers in the south. The gain of each tower will be calibrated using an iterative process based on the 0? peak formed from the photon pairs into which they decay. This poster will focus on the methods we use for the reconstruction of 0?, such as data cuts, background generation and data isolation.

Ben-Benjamin, Jonathan

2009-10-01

377

Beam Energy Dependence of Dielectron Production in Au+Au Collisions from STAR at RHIC  

E-print Network

We present the energy-dependent study of dielectron production in 0-80% minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ energies of 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV in STAR. Invariant mass ($M_{ee}$) and transverse momentum ($p_T$) differential measurements of dielectron yields are compared to cocktail simulations of known hadronic sources and semi-leptonic charmed decays. The enhancement (excess yield) prominent in the Low-Mass Region (LMR) over the cocktail at all energies, is further compared to calculations of $\\rho$ in-medium modifications. Within statistical and systematic uncertainties, we find that the model consistently describes this enhancement from SPS up to top RHIC energies in its $M_{ee}$- as well as $p_T$-dependence. Dielectron measurements drive the statistics for the future BES Phase-II program, which promises to improve our understanding of the LMR enhancement's trend with total baryon densities.

Patrick Huck; for the STAR Collaboration

2014-09-19

378

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au plus Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV  

E-print Network

,19 W. J. Dong,8 X. Dong,36 J. E. Draper,7 F. Du,48 A. K. Dubey,15 V. B. Dunin,12 J. C. Dunlop,4 M. R. Dutta Mazumdar,43 V. Eckardt,23 W. R. Edwards,21 L. G. Efimov,12 V. Emelianov,25 J. Engelage,6 G. Eppley,34 B. Erazmus,38 M. Estienne,38 P. Fachini...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 72, 014904 (2005) Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at?sNN = 200GeV J. Adams,3 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,43 J. Amonett,20 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 S. K. Badyal,19 Y. Bai,27 J. Balewski,17 O...

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Guerts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Langacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, AMV; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; Braem, A.; Davenport, M.; Cataldo, GD; Bari, DD; Martinengo, P.; Nappi, E.; Paic, G.; Posa, E.; Puiz, F.; Schyns, E.; Star Collaboration; STAR-RICH Collaboration.

2005-01-01

379

Pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

. Cheng,41 M. Cherney,10 A. Chikanian,48 W. Christie,4 J. P. Coffin,18 T. M. Cormier,46 J. G. Cramer,45 H. J. Crawford,6 D. Das,43 S. Das,43 M. M. de Moura,35 A. A. Derevschikov,31 L. Didenko,4 T. Dietel,14 S. M. Dogra,19 W. J. Dong,8 X. Dong,36 J. E...PHYSICAL REVIEW C 71, 044906 (2005) Pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at?sNN = 200GeV J. Adams,3 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,43 J. Amonett,20 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 S. K. Badyal,19 Y. Bai,27 J. Balewski,17 O...

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Noriega, ML; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

2005-01-01

380

Strangelet search in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

E-print Network

. Daugherity,42 M. M. de Moura,37 T. G. Dedovich,12 M. DePhillips,3 A. A. Derevschikov,32 L. Didenko,3 T. Dietel,14 P. Djawotho,17 S. M. Dogra,19 X. Dong,22 J. L. Drachenberg,41 J. E. Draper,6 F. Du,50 V. B. Dunin,12 J. C. Dunlop,3 M. R. Dutta Mazumdar,45 V...RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 76, 011901(R) (2007) Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at?sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,9 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,45 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 Y. Bai,28 J. Balewski,17 O...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D. D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, N. S.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Szeliga, B.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.

2007-01-01

381

A terrestrial planet in a ~1-AU orbit around one member of a ?15-AU binary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using gravitational microlensing, we detected a cold terrestrial planet orbiting one member of a binary star system. The planet has low mass (twice Earths) and lies projected at ~0.8 astronomical units (AU) from its host star, about the distance between Earth and the Sun. However, the planets temperature is much lower, <60 Kelvin, because the host star is only 0.10 to 0.15 solar masses and therefore more than 400 times less luminous than the Sun. The host itself orbits a slightly more massive companion with projected separation of 10 to 15 AU. This detection is consistent with such systems being very common. Straightforward modification of current microlensing search strategies could increase sensitivity to planets in binary systems. With more detections, such binary-star planetary systems could constrain models of planet formation and evolution.

Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Shin, I.-G.; Porritt, I.; Skowron, J.; Han, C.; Yee, J. C.; Koz?owski, S.; Choi, J.-Y.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, ?.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mrz, P.; Szyma?ski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszy?ski, I.; Pietrzy?ski, G.; Gaudi, B. S.; Christie, G. W.; Drummond, J.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Tan, T.-G.; Albrow, M.; DePoy, D. L.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Lee, C.-U.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Larsen, P.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.

2014-07-01

382

Homoepitaxial electrodeposition on reconstructed and unreconstructed Au(100): An in-situ STM study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study of homoepitaxial electrodeposition on reconstructed and unreconstructed Au(100) surfaces is presented. The growth behavior has been investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy for Au(100) in contact with 0.1 M H2SO4 + 5 ?M K[AuCl4]. It is shown that the initial surface structure is decisive for the emerging Au structures, giving rise to clearly different surface morphologies for electro-crystallization of Au on the unreconstructed and on the reconstructed Au(100) surface. A layer-by-layer growth is observed at more positive potentials for unreconstructed Au(100). The electrodeposition proceeds initially by the formation of Au islands followed by island coalescence due to the high mobility of surface atoms. Monatomic recessed stripes are formed as a result of the coalescence of deposited Au islands. At more negative potentials, the growth of Au proceeds strongly anisotropic on the reconstructed surface by the formation of reconstructed elongated islands.

Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo

2015-01-01

383

Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size 15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

Philip, Daizy

2009-07-01

384

Neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of midrapidity (0Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. The neutral pions are reconstructed from photons measured either by the STAR Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter or by the Time Projection Chamber via tracking of conversion electron-positron pairs. Our measurements are compared to previously published ? and ?0 results. The nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA of ?0 are also presented as a function of pT. In the most central Au+Au collisions, the binary collision scaled ?0 yield at high pT is suppressed by a factor of about 5 compared to the expectation from the yield of p+p collisions. Such a large suppression is in agreement with previous observations for light quark mesons and is consistent with the scenario that partons suffer considerable energy loss in the dense medium formed in central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Snchez, M. Caldern De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, L. C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Nieuwenhuizen, G. Van; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

2009-10-01

385

Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

1984-01-01

386

Observable consequences of formation of Au anions from deposition of Au atoms on ultrathin oxide films.  

PubMed

Charging of metal atoms or clusters on oxide surfaces has important consequences on their chemical and physical properties. Recently it is has been shown that negatively charged gold atoms and clusters form spontaneously from neutral Au atoms deposited on ultrathin MgO films. The formation of anions on the surface remains difficult to prove experimentally. Also theoretically, the discrimination between neutral and charged adsorbed species is not straightforward. In this paper we perform an accurate analysis of the observable consequences of the formation of Au anions on an oxide surface. To this end we consider the following properties: spin distribution, density of states, Bader charges, substrate relaxation, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images, work function changes, CO vibrational frequency, electric field effects, and core level shifts. Most of these properties are accessible experimentally, at least in principle. Taken individually, these properties do not necessarily provide conclusive evidence about the charged nature of the adsorbate. Taken together, they offer a complete and unambiguous characterization of the formation of Au anions. PMID:17935429

Giordano, Livia; Martinez, Umberto; Sicolo, Sabrina; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

2007-10-14

387

Electromagnetic and strong contributions to dAu soft coherent inelastic diffraction at RHIC  

E-print Network

We estimate electromagnetic (ultra-peripheral) and strong contributions to dAu soft coherent inelastic diffraction at RHIC, dAu \\to X Au. We show that the electromagnetic contribution is the dominant one and that the corresponding cross section is sizable, \\sigma^{dAu \\to XAu}_{\\rm e.m.}=214 mb, which constitutes 10% of the total dAu inelastic cross section.

V. Guzey; M. Strikman

2008-04-26

388

FT-ICR/MS and ab initio study of polynuclear Au and Au-Cu clusters in aqueous fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geochemistry and transport of aqueous transition metals such as copper and gold in the Earth's crust is still poorly known. FT-ICR mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations can provide fundamental insight on a molecular-scale level into the structure, stability and abundance of relevant Cu and Au species. We have measured high temperature ion cluster mass spectra of aqueous gold and copper chloride solutions using a custom-modified FT-ICR mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. In pure dilute aqueous AuCl3 solutions (1-25mM), Au(III) is present as an ion complex [AuCl2]+ and is hydrated with up to four water molecules, with the trihydrate [AuCl2]+(H2O)3 being the most stable species. In addition, several polynuclear ion clusters were observed, e.g. the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, including the hydrated forms [Au2Cl5]+(H2O) and [Au2Cl5]+(H2O)2. In more concentrated AuCl3 solutions (100mM, pH=2.3) the protonated Zundel cation [H5O2]+, [H7O3]+ and Eigen cation [H9O4]+ were detected, suggesting that protonated water clusters are equally relevant species in crustal fluids. We also measured mass spectra of binary solutions of aqueous transition metals, i.e. CuCl2/AuCl3 (5mM) and detected mixed Au(III)/Cu(II)-chloro clusters up to the tetranuclear [AuCu3Cl8]+ ion and their hydrated forms. The ab initio component of this study was designed to deliver additional insight into the structure of individual transition metal clusters as well as to the relative stability of each species, both unhydrated and in the presence of water molecules. Ab initio calculations were first conducted using MP2 theory and results thereof were then applied as starting points for subsequent couple-cluster CCSD(T) theory calculations. For the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, for example, the MP2 global minimum is a planar structure (see Figure; A) with an Au-Au bond distance of 3.435, while the second isomer (see Figure; B) has an Au-Au bond distance of 3.588 and is around 3.5 kJ/mol higher in energy. Theoretical [Au2Cl5]+ ion cluster geometries are then used to compute higher temperature heat capacity data that may be used to predict fundamental thermodynamic properties of transition metal-charged aqueous systems at elevated temperatures. Results from such mass spectrometric and ab initio studies would allow modeling of gold and copper speciation in crustal fluids and assist in understanding prenucleation processes in metal halides in nature.

Lemke, K.; Tse, K.; Sadjadi, A.

2011-12-01

389

Electrical properties of Au/n-InP and Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the electrical characteristics of Au/n-InP and Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. It has been seen that the Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures showed a good rectifying behavior compared to the conventional Au/n-InP Schottky structure. Calculations showed that the Schottky barrier height and ideality factor of Au/n-InP Schottky structure is 0.57 eV (I-V), 0.71 eV (C-V) and 1.45, respectively. It is observed that the Schottky barrier height value increases to 0.66 eV (I-V), 0.82 eV (C-V) and ideality factor decreases to 1.32 for Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structure. From the above observations, it is clear that the modification of interfacial potential barrier of Au/InP are achieved using a thin PVA organic interlayer.

Umapathi, A.; Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Reddy, K. Ravindranatha; Reddy, V. Rajagopal

2013-06-01

390

From Superatomic Au25(SR)18- to Superatomic M@Au24(SR)18q Core-shell Clusters.  

SciTech Connect

Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} belongs to a new type of superatom that features an icosahedral Au{sub 13} core-shell structure and a protective layer of six RS(Au-SR){sub 2} motifs. This superatom has a magic number of 8 free electrons that fully fill the 1s and 1p levels of the electron-shell model. By applying this superatom concept to the core-substitution chemistry of Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -}, we first scanned the periodic table for the potential core atom M by applying a simple rule derived from the 8-electron count and then optimized the selected candidates by density functional theory calculations to create many series of M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} core-shell nanoclusters. We found that 16 elements from groups 1, 2, and 10-14 of the periodic table can maintain both electronic and geometric structures of the original Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} magic cluster, indicating that the electron-counting rule based on the superatom concept is powerful in predicting viable M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} clusters. Our work opens up a promising area for experimental exploration.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2009-01-01

391

From superatomic Au25(SR)18(-) to superatomic M@Au24(SR)18(q) core-shell clusters.  

PubMed

Au(25)(SR)(18)(-) belongs to a new type of superatom that features an icosahedral Au(13) core-shell structure and a protective layer of six RS(Au-SR)(2) motifs. This superatom has a magic number of 8 free electrons that fully fill the 1s and 1p levels of the electron-shell model. By applying this superatom concept to the core-substitution chemistry of Au(25)(SR)(18)(-), we first scanned the periodic table for the potential core atom M by applying a simple rule derived from the 8-electron count and then optimized the selected candidates by density functional theory calculations to create many series of M@Au(24)(SR)(18)(q) core-shell nanoclusters. We found that 16 elements from groups 1, 2, and 10-14 of the periodic table can maintain both electronic and geometric structures of the original Au(25)(SR)(18)(-) magic cluster, indicating that the electron-counting rule based on the superatom concept is powerful in predicting viable M@Au(24)(SR)(18)(q) clusters. Our work opens up a promising area for experimental exploration. PMID:19236016

Jiang, De-en; Dai, Sheng

2009-04-01

392

Oxidation of nanoscale Au-In alloy particles as a possible route toward stable Au-based catalysts.  

PubMed

The oxidation of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles comprising a noble and a nonnoble metal is expected to cause the formation of a single-component surface oxide of the nonnoble metal, surrounding a core enriched with the noble metal. Studying the room temperature oxidation of Au-In nanoparticles, we show that this simple picture does not apply to an important class of bimetallic alloys, in which the oxidation proceeds via predominant oxygen diffusion. Instead of a crystalline In2O3 shell, such oxidation leads to an amorphous shell of mixed Au-In oxide that remains stable to high temperatures and whose surface layer is enriched with Au. The Au-rich mixed oxide is capable of adsorbing both CO and O2 and converting them to CO2, which desorbs near room temperature. The oxidation of Au-In alloys to a mixed Au-In oxide shows significant promise as a viable approach toward Au-based oxidation catalysts, which do not require any complex synthesis processes and resist deactivation up to at least 300 C. PMID:23754412

Sutter, Eli A; Tong, Xiao; Jungjohann, Katherine; Sutter, Peter W

2013-06-25

393

Transverse-momentum spectra in Au plus Au and d plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV and the pseudorapidity dependence of high-p(T) suppression  

E-print Network

We present spectra of charged hadrons from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at roots(NN)=200 GeV measured with the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC. The spectra for different collision centralities are compared to spectra from p+(p) ...

Ito, H.; Murray, Michael J.; Neumann, B.; Norris, J.; Sanders, Stephen J.

2003-08-01

394

Rb deposition on alkanethiolate monolayers on Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of many devices utilizing alkali metal (AM) atoms is dependent upon properties of organic thin films used to line the inner walls of the glass vessel in which the system is contained. In this study, two alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers on Au, 1-dodecanethiolate and 1-octanethiolate, are employed as model systems to investigate alkali metal atom-thin film interactions. Before and after Rb deposition, the alkanethiolate surface is analyzed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), including angle-resolved XPS and XPS with an applied dc bias. Following Rb deposition, a shift of the C1s core-level to higher binding energy was observed; additionally, with continued Rb deposition, the atomic percent of Rb on the surface was found to saturate. The importance of these observations with regard to atomic magnetometers and the light induced atomic desorption effect are discussed.

Hibberd, A. M.; Thorman, R. M.; Wnuk, J. D.; Bernasek, S. L.

2012-07-01

395

Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H? emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H?, H?, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R ?, thickness of 5.2 R ?, density of 1.0 10-13 g cm-3, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4 10-9 M ? yr-1. We show H? Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the H? profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Jn; Peters, Geraldine J.

2012-12-01

396

Visible light photoactivity of TiO2 loaded with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TiO2 modified with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles have been prepared using a water-in-oil microemulsion system (water/AOT/cyclohexane) followed by calcination step. The effect of metal ratio, reducing agent type (NaBH4 or N2H4), TiO2 matrix type (P-25, ST-01, TiO-5, TiO2 nanotubes or TiO2 obtained by TIP hydrolysis) as well as calcination temperature (from 350 to 650 C) were systematically investigated. Obtained photocatalysts were characterized by UV-vis diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), BET surface area measurements, scanning transmission microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Photocatalytic activity under visible light (? > 420 nm) has been estimated in phenol degradation reaction in aqueous phase. The results showed that phenol degradation rate under visible light in the presence of TiO2 loaded with Au/Pt nanoparticles differed from 0.7 to 2.2 ?mol dm-3 min-1 for samples prepared using different reducing agent. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) favors formation of smaller Au/Pt nanoparticles and higher amount gold in Au/Pt is in the form of electronegative species (Au?-) resulted in higher photoactivity. TiO2 obtained by TIP hydrolysis in microemulsion system seems to be the best support for Au/Pt nanoparticles from all among investigated matrix. It was also observed that enhancement of calcination temperature from 450 to 650 C resulted in rapid drop of Au/Pt-TiO2 photoactivity under visible light due to surface area shrinkage, crystal structure change and probably change in Au/Pt nanoparticles morphology.

Go??biewska, Anna; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Zieli?ska-Jurek, Anna; Zaleska, Adriana

2014-10-01

397

Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO2(110)  

SciTech Connect

The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

S Tenney; W He; J Ratliff; D Mullins; D Chen

2011-12-31

398

Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.  

PubMed

Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium. PMID:12633419

Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednick, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovsk, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

2003-02-28

399

Identified particle production, azimuthal anisotropy, and interferometry measurements in Au+Au collisions at [sqrt]sNN=9.2 GeV  

E-print Network

We present the first measurements of identified hadron production, azimuthal anisotropy, and pion interferometry from Au+Au collisions below the nominal injection energy at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) ...

Surrow, Bernd

400

Jet-Hadron Correlations in sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV p+p and Central Au+Au Collisions  

E-print Network

Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\text{NN}}} = 200 \\text{GeV}$ in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased towards jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum ($p_{\\text{T}}^{\\text{assoc}}$) and enhanced at low $p_{\\text{T}}^{\\text{assoc}}$ in 0-20% central Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-02-25

401

Observation of D[superscript 0] Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au + Au Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV  

E-print Network

We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D[superscript 0]) production via the hadronic decay channel (D[superscript 0] ? K[superscript ?] + ?[superscript +]) in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN] =200??GeV ...

Stevens, Justin

402

Event-plane-dependent dihadron correlations with harmonic v[subscript n] subtraction in Au + Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV  

E-print Network

STAR measurements of dihadron azimuthal correlations (??) are reported in midcentral (2060%) Au?+?Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV as a function of the trigger particle's azimuthal angle relative to the event ...

Balewski, Jan T.

403

Freeze-out dynamics via charged kaon femtoscopy in ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV central Au?+?Au collisions  

E-print Network

We present measurements of three-dimensional correlation functions of like-sign, low-transverse-momentum kaon pairs from ?s[subscript NN] = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions. A Cartesian surface-spherical harmonic decomposition ...

Betancourt, M. J.

404

Rapidity dependence of antiproton-to-proton ratios in Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV  

E-print Network

Measurements, with the BRAHMS detector, of the antiproton-to-proton ratio at midrapidities and forward rapidities, are presented for Au + Au reactions at roots(NN) = 130 GeV, and for three different collision centralities. ...

Sanders, Stephen J.

2001-09-10

405

Disappearance of back-to-back high p {sub T} hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at = {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes already observed in elementary collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au + Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li (Wayne State U.), Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; et al.

2002-10-25

406

Core/shell Au/MnO nanoparticles prepared through controlled oxidation of AuMn as an electrocatalyst for sensitive H2O2 detection.  

PubMed

Monodisperse 5?nm AuMn nanoparticles were synthesized by hydride reduction of manganese acetylacetonate in the presence of Au nanoparticles. The alloy was formed through fast Mn diffusion into the Au structure. The AuMn nanoparticles were converted to Au-MnO composite particles through air annealing at 170?C. These Au-MnO particles, especially the core/shell Au/MnO nanoparticles, were active for the electrochemical reduction of H2 O2 , with a detection limit reaching 8?nM. This highly sensitive electrochemical sensor based on the Au/MnO nanoparticles was used to monitor H2 O2 concentrations released from living cells, from which tumorigenic cells were discovered to release higher levels of H2 O2 than the non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:25155180

Zhu, Huiyuan; Sigdel, Aruna; Zhang, Sen; Su, Dong; Xi, Zheng; Li, Qing; Sun, Shouheng

2014-11-10

407

DNA nanocages swallow gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form AuNP@DNA cage core-shell structures.  

PubMed

DNA offers excellent programming properties to nanomaterials syntheses. Host-guest interaction between DNA nanostructures and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) is of particular interest because the resulting complexes would possess both programming properties intrinsic to DNA and physical properties associated with inorganic NPs, such as plasmonic and magnetic features. Here, we report a class of core-shell complexes (AuNP@DNA cages): hard gold NPs (AuNPs) are encapsulated in geometrically well-defined soft DNA nanocages. The AuNP guest can be further controllably released from the host (DNA nanocages), pointing to potential applications in surface engineering of inorganic NPs and cargo delivery of DNA nanocages. PMID:24410162

Zhang, Chuan; Li, Xiang; Tian, Cheng; Yu, Guimei; Li, Yulin; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

2014-02-25

408

Magnetism and morphology of Co nanocluster superlattices on GdAu2/Au(111)-(13 13 )  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a comprehensive study of the magnetism and morphology of an ultrahigh density array of Co nanoclusters self-assembled on the single atomic layer GdAu2 on Au(111) template surface. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements, we reveal a significant enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy for noncoalesced single atomic layer nanoclusters compared to Co/Au(111). For coverages well beyond the onset of coalescence, we observe room-temperature in-plane magnetic remanence.

Cavallin, A.; Fernndez, L.; Ilyn, M.; Magaa, A.; Ormaza, M.; Matena, M.; Vitali, L.; Ortega, J. E.; Grazioli, C.; Ohresser, P.; Rusponi, S.; Brune, H.; Schiller, F.

2014-12-01

409

Macroporous Au materials prepared from colloidal crystals as templates.  

PubMed

In this paper, we reported the preparation of macroporous Au materials using organic colloidal crystals as templates and their catalytic activity for electroless copper deposition. The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(St-MMA-AA)) copolymer colloids were deposited in an orderly manner onto the silicon surface, together with the infiltration of the Au nanoparticles into the interspaces of the colloids. The formed hybrid colloidal crystal subsequently was sintered at approximately 550 degrees C to remove the organic components fully to obtain a macroporous Au framework with three-dimensional ordered porous structure. The pore diameter was around 310 nm and almost monodisperse. It was demonstrated that the macroporous Au materials exhibit catalytic activity and can induce electroless copper deposition. PMID:15450462

Cong, Hailin; Cao, Weixiao

2004-10-15

410

Thermodynamic properties of liquid AuBiSn alloys  

PubMed Central

The thermodynamic properties of the liquid ternary AuBiSn alloys were determined using an electromotive force (EMF) method with an eutectic mixture of (KCl+LiCl) as liquid electrolyte. The cell arrangement was: W, Sn ( l ) / KCl LiCl SnCl 2 / Au Bi Sn ( l ) , W. The measurements were carried out over the temperature range from 723K to 973K. The compositions investigated were situated on three different cross-sections with a constant ratio of Au:Bi=2:1, 1:1, and 1:2. The partial Gibbs free energies of Sn in liquid AuBiSn alloys were determined as a function of concentration and temperature. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at T=800K were calculated by the GibbsDuhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the RedlichKisterMuggianu polynomial.

Guo, Zhongnan; Yuan, Wenxia; Hindler, Michael; Mikula, Adolf

2012-01-01

411

Au/p-diamond ohmic contacts deposited by RF sputtering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ohmic contacts have been formed on diamond films using a monolayer Au. Au film was deposited by radio frequency sputtering. I- V measurements show the good ohmic behavior of the contacts in the as-deposited and annealed states and the specific contact resistivity obtained by circular transmission line model was 1.27 10 -3 and 5.43 10 -4 ? cm 2, respectively. Radio frequency sputtering makes an obvious interdiffusion between Au and diamond in the as-deposited contacts. Annealing the contact enhances the interdiffusion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and cross-sectional scan electron microscopy reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface due to the intermixing between Au and diamond. Surface native oxide of the diamond film was effectively removed by treating the substrate film in boiling aqua regia solution.

Zhen, C. M.; Wang, X. Q.; Wu, X. C.; Liu, C. X.; Hou, D. L.

2008-12-01

412

Adding two active silver atoms on au25 nanoparticle.  

PubMed

Alloy nanoparticles with atomic monodispersity is of importance for some fundamental research (e.g., the investigation of active sites). However, the controlled preparation of alloy nanoparticles with atomic monodispersity has long been a major challenge. Herein, for the first time a unique method, antigalvanic reduction (AGR), is introduced to synthesize atomically monodisperse Au25Ag2(SC2H4Ph)18 in high yield (89%) within 2 min. Interestingly, the two silver atoms in Au25Ag2(SC2H4Ph)18 do not replace the gold atoms in the precursor particle Au25(SC2H4Ph)18 but collocate on Au25, which was supported by experimental and calculated results. Also, the two silver atoms are active to play roles in stabilizing the alloy nanoparticle, triggering the nanoparticle fluorescence and catalyzing the hydrolysis of 1,3-diphenylprop-2-ynyl acetate. PMID:25580617

Yao, Chuanhao; Chen, Jishi; Li, Man-Bo; Liu, Liren; Yang, Jinlong; Wu, Zhikun

2015-02-11

413

Synthesis and self-organization of Au nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monodisperse (diameter 10 nm) Au nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of AuCl3 at high temperatures, in commercial oleyl amine, in the presence of tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The oleyl amine molecule has multiple roles, acting as high-boiling-point solvent, capping agent and reducing agent. The Au nanocrystalline particles have been studied by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanoparticles can disperse well in non-polar solvents such as hexane, toluene and chloroform. The as-received Au nanoparticles, capped with the alkylamine-TOPO molecules, form two-dimensional superlattices via solvent evaporation. Moreover, they can be converted into a water-soluble derivative via a simple procedure based on the formation of a physisorbed layer of an ionic (cationic or anionic) surfactant around the capped surface. The charged particles can assemble in aqueous solution into three-dimensional structures via electrostatic interactions.

Pyrpassopoulos, S.; Niarchos, D.; Nounesis, G.; Boukos, N.; Zafiropoulou, I.; Tzitzios, V.

2007-12-01

414

Au-free Ohmic Contacts to Gallium Nitride and Graphene  

E-print Network

This work deals with Au-free contact metallization schemes for gallium nitride (GaN) and graphene semiconductors. Graphene and gallium nitride are promising materials that can potentially be integrated together in the near future for high frequency...

Ravikirthi, Pradhyumna

2014-08-10

415

Maintaining Cooperation in Noisy Environments Tsz-Chiu Au  

E-print Network

Maintaining Cooperation in Noisy Environments Tsz-Chiu Au Department of Computer Science University of Maryland College Park, Maryland, 20742 chiu@cs.umd.edu Dana Nau Department of Computer Science University

Au, Tsz-Chiu

416

Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correlations in the hadron distributions produced in relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied in the discrete wavelet expansion method. The analysis is performed in the space of pseudorapidity (vertical bar eta vertical bar <= 1) and azimuth (full 2 pi) in bins of transverse momentum (p(t)) from 0.14 <= p(t) <= 2.1 GeV\\/c. In peripheral Au+Au collisions a correlation structure ascribed

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon de la Barca Sanchez; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; M. M. de Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; G. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Y. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Y. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smimov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suite; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. S. de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Weiis; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yarevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

417

Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correlations in the hadron distributions produced in relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied in the discrete wavelet expansion method. The analysis is performed in the space of pseudorapidity (|eta|<=1) and azimuth(full 2pi) in bins of transverse momentum (pt) from 0.14<=pt<=2.1GeV\\/c. In peripheral Au+Au collisions a correlation structure ascribed to minijet fragmentation is observed. It evolves with collision centrality and pt in

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern Barca Snchez; J. Castillo; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopdhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; P. A. Zolnierczuk; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

418

Enhanced strange baryon production in Au+Au collisions compared to p+p at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the observed differences in production rates of strange and multistrange baryons in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV compared to p+p interactions at the same energy. The strange baryon yields in Au+Au collisions, when scaled down by the number of participating nucleons, are enhanced relative to those measured in p+p reactions. The enhancement observed increases with the strangeness

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. Bueltmann; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Caldern De La Barca Snchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. De Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi De Souza; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. G. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O.