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1

The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

I NOTICE in your number of 4th inst. an article relating to the Suez Canal (by Mr. Login, C.E., late of the Ganges Canal), and shall be glad if you will allow me to make a few observations with reference to it.

Edw. Rae

1869-01-01

2

ASTER Suez Canal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000.

Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands; mapping surface temperature of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

2000-01-01

3

Gulf of Suez has excellent potential  

SciTech Connect

Egypt's re-emergence as an oil exporting country in the past several years was brought about by the drilling of fewer than 100 exploration wells in a small area of the Gulf of Suez. Now that Israel and Egypt are at peace and Egypt again controls this area, prospects for large, new discoveries in previously untested areas are excellent.

Abdine, S.

1981-07-01

4

Suez Canal Clearance Operation, Task Force 65.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides the documentation of the Suez Canal Clearance Operations NIMBUS STAR, NIMBUS MOON, and NIMROD SPAR undertaken by Task Force 65 during the period 11 April to 15 December 1974. Under the terms of two bilateral agreements between the Gov...

1975-01-01

5

The development of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides general background information relating to the physical characteristics and operations of the Suez Canal. In connection with the future development of the Canal, the research programme currently being undertaken by a British consortium is outlined, with particular reference to the traffic system presently operating.

J. D. Griffiths

1977-01-01

6

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2009-10-01

7

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2010-10-01

8

46 CFR 69.7 - Vessels transiting the Panama and Suez Canals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...All vessels intending to transit the Suez Canal must be measured and certificated under the Arab Republic of Egypt Suez Canal Authority Rules of Navigation, part IV. (c) Panama Canal and Suez Canal tonnage certificates are in...

2013-10-01

9

Longitudinal evolution of the Suez rift structure (Egypt)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional study of the structure of the Suez Rift has been carried out using field and subsurface data in an attempt to determine the role of transverse faults and the longitudinal evolution of the rift. As in most intracontinental rifts, the structure of the Gulf of Suez area is governed by normal faults and tilted blocks, whose crests constitute

B. Colletta; P. Le Quellec; J. Letouzey; I. Moretti

1988-01-01

10

Forecasting the Suez Canal traffic: a neural network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Suez Canal is the most important man-made waterway in the world, rivaled perhaps only by the Panama Canal, little research has been done into forecasting its traffic flows. This paper uses both univariate ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) and Neural network models to forecast the maritime traffic flows in the Suez Canal which are expressed in tons. One

Mohamed M. Mostafa

2004-01-01

11

Salt Content and Water Budget of The Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water body in the Suez Canal is a combination of waters from differ- ent sources. Hence, its exact hydrographic structure is very difficult to define. Three main water masses are identified along the Canal on account of their salinity values: Levantine water mass I, the Suez Bay water mass II, and the Bitter Lake water mass IV, in addition

SELIM A. MORCOS; GIRGIS F. SOLIMAN

2001-01-01

12

Suez, A Future Sarajevo. The Significance of the Reopening of the Suez Canal to the Soviet Union and the Atlantic Alliance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper examines the reopening of the Suez Canal and its future influence on the political situation in the Middle East in the light of growing Soviet naval power and presence east of Suez together with western alternatives.

T. N. Bentley

1974-01-01

13

Longitudinal evolution of Suez rift structure, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional study of the structure of the Suez Rift has been carried out using field and subsurface data in an attempt to determine the role of transverse faults and the longitudinal evolution of the rift. As in most intracontinental rifts, the structure of the Gulf of Suez area is governed by normal faults and tilted blocks, whose crests constitute the main target of exploratory wells. The fault pattern consists of two major sets of trends: (1) longitudinal faults parallel with the rift axis and created in an extensional regime, trending east-northeast-west-southwest, and (2) transverse faults with north-south to north-northeast-south-southwest dominant trend. The transverse faults are inherited passive discontinuities, whereas most of the longitudinal faults were created during the Neogene in a purely extensional regime. Both sets were simultaneously active, producing a zigzag pattern and rhombic-shaped blocks. The transverse faults can show horizontal strike-slip components and act as relays between major normal faults.

Colletta, B.; Le Quellec, P.; Letouzey, J.; Moretti, I.

1988-01-01

14

Military Intervention: A Case Study of Britain's Use of Force in the 1956 Suez Crisis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Great Britain's management of the 1956 Suez crisis has been universally condemned and has raised fundamental questions concerning application of force in the nuclear age. Suez has also been described as a successful Soviet effort to expand Communist power...

J. A. Haig

1966-01-01

15

The maximum shipping capacity of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the determination of the maximum shipping capacity of the Suez canal. Initially, some assumptions are made in order to calculate the ‘theoretical’ maximum capacity in terms of ‘standard ships’. This last term defines ships which transit the Canal at a given speed and at a given time interval from the vessel ahead and astern. Data has been

J. D. Griffiths; Emtissal M. Hassan

1977-01-01

16

Sea-level Variation Along the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variation of sea level at 11 stations distributed along the Suez Canal was studied during the period from 1980 to 1986. The ranges of variation in daily mean sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik are about 60 and 120cm, respectively. The minimum range of daily variation is at Kantara (47cm).The fluctuations of the monthly mean sea level

F. M. Eid; S. H. Sharaf El-Din; K. A. Alam El-Din

1997-01-01

17

Biology of penaeid prawns in the Suez Canal lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was made from January 1988 to March 1989 of the penaid prawns in the Great Bitter Lake and Lake Timsah located in the central part of the Suez Canal. Two species of Red Sea origin were investigated,Metapenaeus stebbingi andTrachypenaeus curvirostris; the former is by far the commoner. Both species displayed seasonal breeding over the period April to October,

A. A.-F. A. Gab-Alla; R. G. Hartnoll; A.-F. Ghobashy; S. Z. Mohammed

1990-01-01

18

CONCENTRATION OF NINE HEAVY METALS IN SUEZ CANAL WATERS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration of nine heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Co, Fe and Mn) in waters of the Suez Canal and in the nearby waters was measured seasonally during 1997 - 1998 in their dissolved (D) and particulate (P) forms. The results revealed that the northern part of the canal (at Port Said) recorded higher concentrations for most

EL SAMRA; ABD EL-AZIM

2005-01-01

19

Intentionally Building Rapport with Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developing rapport with students is important. Carson (1996) found that when alumni reflected on professors they had encountered 30 years ago, the quality most frequently associated with effective teachers was this: their attitude toward and relationship with students. In this article, the author shares the positive consequences of intentionally…

Starcher, Keith

2011-01-01

20

A review of potential tsunami impacts to the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Destructive tsunamis in the eastern Mediterranean and Red seas, induced by earthquakes and/or volcanic activity, pose potential hazards to docked seaport shipping and fixed harbor infrastructure as well as to in-transit international shipping within the Suez Canal. Potential vulnerabilities of the Suez Canal to possible tsunami impacts are reviewed by reference to geological, historical, archaeoseismological, and anecdotal data. Tsunami catalogues and databases compiled by earlier researchers are perused to estimate potential return periods for tsunami events that could affect directly the Suez Canal and its closely associated operational infrastructures. Analysis of these various records indicates a centurial return period, or multiples thereof, for long-wave repetition that could generally affect the Nile Delta. It is estimated that tsunami waves 2 m high would have a breaking length about 5 km down Canal whereas a 10 m wave break would occur about 1 km into the Canal. Should a tsunami strike the eastern flanks of the Nile Delta, it would damage Egypt's maritime infrastructure and multi-national commercial vessels and military ships then using the Canal.

Finkl, C.; Pelinovsky, E.

2012-04-01

21

Circulation and salinity distribution in the southern part of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of 14 hydrographic sections along the southern part of the Suez Canal bctwcen Suez Bay and Great Bitter Lake from April 1964 to April 1965 arc generally in agrccmcnt with previous sections taken 10 years before ( 1954-1955). A northward current prevailed from November to July and a southward current dominated from 15 August to 15 October, pushing the

Selina A. Morcos; S. N. MESSIEH

1973-01-01

22

A modelling study on hydrodynamics and pollutant dispersion in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A considerable amount of international trade is transported in Egypt through the Suez Canal increasing public concern about hazardous safety. Through the canal, a relatively important flow of salt water enters the Mediterranean Sea, affecting its hydrologic deficit, and carrying algae and other non-swimmer species from the Red Sea. We are studying the hydrodynamics of the Suez Canal using both

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

23

Sea-level Variation Along the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The variation of sea level at 11 stations distributed along the Suez Canal was studied during the period from 1980 to 1986. The ranges of variation in daily mean sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik are about 60 and 120 cm, respectively. The minimum range of daily variation is at Kantara (47 cm). The fluctuations of the monthly mean sea level between the two ends of the Suez Canal vary from one season to another. From July to December, the sea level at Port Said is higher than that at Port Tawfik, with the maximum difference (10·5 cm) in September. During the rest of the year, the mean sea level at Port Tawfik is higher than that at Port Said, with the maximum difference (31·5 cm) in March. The long-term variations of the annual mean sea level at both Port Said and Port Tawfik for the period from 1923 to 1986 showed a positive trend. The sea level at Port Said increased by about 27·8 cm century -1while it increased by only 9·1 cm century -1at Port Tawfik. This indicates that the difference between sea level at Port Said and Port Tawfik has decreased with time.

Eid, F. M.; Sharaf El-Din, S. H.; Alam El-Din, K. A.

1997-05-01

24

An analysis and simulation of an experimental Suez Canal traffic control system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A SLAM model of Suez Canal traffic flow is reported in this paper. An experimental traffic control scheme is proposed, tested, and discussed. A method for analysis of multi-response-variable systems is discussed and illustrated.

Thomas D. Clark Jr.; Magdi M. Kabil; Moussa I. Moussa Mostafa

1983-01-01

25

75 FR 57911 - Application To Export Electric Energy; GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...power marketer using existing international transmission facilities...utilities, Federal power marketing agencies and other entities...United States. The existing international transmission facilities to...Cunningham, GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing NA, Inc., 1990 Post...

2010-09-23

26

Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

James, N.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

1988-02-01

27

EATCO--Suez Petrochemicals Complex Natural Gas to Polyolefins Project (GTP), Suez, Egypt. Volume 2. Technical Information. Final Report. (Public Version).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

UOP LLC conducted this report, which was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report examines the feasibility of Suez Petrochemicals Complex Gas to Polyolefin Project in Egypt. This volume of the report contains information on the Technica...

2000-01-01

28

EATCO-Suez Petrochemical Complex Natural Gas to Polyolefins Project (GTP), Suez, Egypt. Volume 1. Project Information Memorandum. Final Report. (Public Version).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

UOP LLC conducted this report, which was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report examines the feasibility of Suez Petrochemicals Complex Gas to Polyolefin Project in Egypt. This volume of the report contains information on the Technica...

2000-01-01

29

Professor-Student Rapport Scale Predicts Student Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapport traditionally has been measured in therapy or in other one-on-one relationships such as with roommates. As yet, no scale is available to measure professor-student rapport. In this study, 51 undergraduates created items to measure professor-student rapport, and subsequently, 195 different college students rated their agreement with items…

Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.; Pugh, James L.

2010-01-01

30

Miocene platform-margin reefs, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

Jebel Abu Shaar is a completely dolomitized carbonate platform atop a crystalline basement horst on the western side of the Gulf of Suez. Margins of the platform, where not removed by synsedimentary faulting, are formed by well-developed coral reefs. The massive reef carbonates consistently illustrate two stages of growth: a basal paucispecific unit of branching coral bafflestone, mostly Stylophora and a thicker upper unit of diverse coral framestone, dominated by faviids. In the upper unit, the reef crest is massive columnar Porites and less common Caulastrea framestone. The back-reef is a framestone of diverse faviids, mainly Montastrea Favites, and Tarbellastrea, and interbedded reef-flat rhodolite rudstones. The back-reef and reef-flat facies grade onshelf into Stylophora bafflestone biostromers and faviid bioherms. The reef front is a shallow to intermediate depth zone of numerous and diverse faviids, dominated by Montastrea and Acanthastrea framestones, bioclastic sands, and hardgrounds. Deeper zones are mostly small Acanthastrea mounds or rhodolite/bivalve rudstones with scattered faviids and Acanthastrea. Synsedimentary lithification, internal sedimentationm, and bioerosion prevail throughout. A deep-water, slope-parallel biostrome of ahermatypic corals, dominated by Dendrophyllia and containing numerous Balanophyllia and Madracis, is present 10 km north of Abu Shaar. Corals are well cemented by numerous rinds of marine cement which is overlain by geopetal internal sediment containing planktonic foraminifers and pteropods.

Noel, J.P.; Rosen, B.; Coniglio, M.

1988-01-01

31

La biotechnologie est-elle vraiment en perte de vitesse au Québec et si oui, quelles en sont les raisons?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ce rapport dresse un portrait comparatif des entreprises qui développent des biotechnologies au Québec et au Canada entre 1999 et 2005. Outre l’évolution des caractéristiques, le rapport examine entre autres les taux de survie et de croissance de ces entreprises jusqu’en 2009. L’étude couvre ainsi deux périodes de crise, soit celle du resserrement du crédit de 2001 à la suite

Catherine Beaudry; Joël Levasseur

2012-01-01

32

Physicians build less rapport with obese patients  

PubMed Central

Objective Physicians’ negative attitudes towards patients with obesity are well documented. Whether or how these beliefs may affect patient-physician communication is unknown. We aimed to describe the relationship between patient BMI and physician communication behaviors (biomedical, psychosocial/lifestyle, and rapport building) during typical outpatient primary care visits. Design and Methods Using audio-recorded outpatient encounters from 39 urban PCPs and 208 of their patients, we examined the frequency of communication behaviors using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. The independent variable was measured patient BMI and dependent variables were communication behaviors by the PCP within the biomedical, psychosocial/lifestyle, and rapport building domains. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using multilevel Poisson regression models to evaluate the association between BMI and physician communication. Results PCPs demonstrated less emotional rapport with overweight and obese patients (IRR 0.65, 95%CI 0.48–0.88, p=0.01; IRR 0.69, 95%CI 0.58–0.82, p<0.01, respectively) than for normal weight patients. We found no differences in PCPs’ biomedical or psychosocial/lifestyle communication by patient BMI. Conclusions Our findings raise the concern that low levels of emotional rapport in primary care visits with overweight and obese patients may weaken the patient-physician relationship, diminish patients’ adherence to recommendations, and decrease the effectiveness of behavior change counseling.

Gudzune, Kimberly A.; Beach, Mary Catherine; Roter, Debra L.; Cooper, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

33

New technology helps asset team identify overlooked reserves in Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

In a recent study of the July field in the central Gulf of Suez, a GUPCO asset team identified nearly 3.5 million barrels of overlooked oil with the aid of interactive interpretation software designed specifically for geologists. To tap these new reserves, the company drilled the first horizontal well in the Gulf of Suez. It tested at over 14,000 b/d of oil. Without the geological software to help clarify numerous problematical reservoir terminations and more accurately predict their shape, these reserves probably would have remained unexploited.

Cecil, C.; Day, R. [Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co., Cairo (Egypt); Valusek, J.E. [Landmark Graphics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-05-01

34

Marine radioactivity studies in the Suez Canal. A modelling study on radionuclide dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal and the Bitter Lakes. This effort is linked with increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. We apply a sequence of related modelling approaches, covering: (1) hydrodynamics, (2) transport of dissolved pollutants, (3) suspended

J. M Abril; M. M Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

35

New Records of Polychaetes from the South Part of Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faunistic analysis of benthic samples were obtained during a trip to the south part of Suez Canal, Egypt, during April, 2007, which revealed the presence of 82 polychaete species, 18 of them are considered as new records for the Egyptian waters. In order to achieve this study fouling components and sediments samples were collected by Van Veen grab (0.5 to

Faiza A. Abd-Elnaby

36

The Suez Canal as a habitat and pathway for marine algae and seagrasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Suez Canal supports a diversified benthic algal flora; 133 species of benthic algae are now known from the Canal, as compared with only 24 in 1924. The vertical and horizontal distribution of algae is considered in relation to hydrographic factors. The algae display zonation and 3-4 algal belts are distinguished on the Canal banks on buoys and pier supports. Associated fauna include Balanus amphitrite and Brachidontes variabilis, together with various hydroids, sponges, ascidians, asteroids, ophiuroids and crustaceans. Merceriella enigmatica thrives well in brackish water habitats. The algal flora in the Bitter Lakes resembles that in the Red Sea. The number of Red Sea species decreases from Suez to Port Said in the littoral zone. On the other hand, bottom algae predominantly belong to Red Sea flora. Thirty of the species of algae found belong to the Indo-Pacific flora; half of these are new records to the Canal. Several of these Indo-Pacific algae have recently become established in the Eastern Mediterranean, whereas only two of the Mediterranean macro-algal flora (viz. Caulerpa prolifera and Halopteris scoparia) have been found in the Gulf of Suez. Two seagrasses, Halopia ovalis and Thalassia hemprichii, are recorded for the first time in the Canal. Only Halophila stipulacea has found its way into the Mediterranean via the Suez Canal, but none of the Mediterranean seagrasses is found either in the Canal or in the Red Sea.

Aleem, A. A.

37

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part I: Hydrodynamics and Transit Times  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY\\/07\\/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal. This effort is linked with the increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. To follow the fate of radioactive wastes along this waterway, we had to solve the hydrodynamics of the water, governed mainly

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal

2000-01-01

38

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986-1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U 3O 8) represent the main items that contribute significantly to the collective dose within the Suez Canal area (Port-Said, Ismailia and Suez). The values of the annual collective dose due to transportation of all radionuclide materials was found to be at a maximum in Suez town and is equal to 5.04 × 10 -8 Man-Sv for the whole populations. If we only consider the workder at the harbour (estimated to be 50 persons), the value of the annual collective dose is about 3.33 × 10 -4 Man-Sv. These values are less than the exemption value of 1 Man-Sv recommended by the IAEA. For the accident case, the following pathways are considered by the code: ground-shine, direct inhalation, inhalation of resuspended material and cloud-shine. The total values of the estimated risks for each radionuclide material are presented in table form and, in addition, health effects (genetic effects, GE, and latent cancer fatality), LCF) are discussed. The calculated values of the radiological risks are very low for the three towns, showing that no radiation-induced early deaths are to be expected.

Sabek, M. G.; El-Shinawy, R. M. K.; Gomaa, M.

1997-03-01

39

Relationships Between Sediment Morphology and Oil Pollution Along the Suez Canal Beaches, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grain-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that “medium sand” is the

MOHAMED A. K. BARAKAT; THOURAYA M. SHIMY; YASSAR M. MOSTAFA

1996-01-01

40

Physicochemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20 400\\/00 and over 400\\/00 in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50 70 cm fell to below 20 °C in winter and rose to above 30

H. A. H. El-Serehy; M. A. Sleigh

1992-01-01

41

The Northern Sea Route versus the Suez Canal: cases from bulk shipping  

Microsoft Academic Search

The navigation distance via the Northern Sea Route (NSR) from a Northwest-European port to the Far East is approximately 40% shorter compared to the route via the Suez Canal. The shorter distance may facilitate more than a doubling of vessels’ operational energy efficiency performance. There is at present substantial uncertainty in schedule reliability via the NSR. Unless the schedule reliability

Halvor Schøyen; Svein Bråthen

2011-01-01

42

77 FR 39689 - Application To Export Electric Energy; IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...power marketer using existing international transmission facilities...utilities, Federal power marketing agencies, and other entities...United States. The existing international transmission facilities to...Projects, IPR-GDF SUEZ Energy Marketing North America, Inc.,...

2012-07-05

43

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe-Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of metal contaminants introduced into the sediment from sources usually exists in relatively unstable chemical forms. A high proportion of the studied metals remained in the residual fraction. Most of remaining portion of metals was bound to ferromanganese oxides fraction. The low concentrations of metals in the exchangeable fraction indicated that the sediments of Suez Canal were relatively unpolluted.

Abd El-Azim, H.; El-Moselhy, Kh. M.

2005-06-01

44

Ascidian introductions through the Suez Canal: The case study of an Indo-Pacific species.  

PubMed

Although marine biological invasions via the Suez Canal have been extensively documented, little is known about the introduction of non-indigenous ascidians (Chordata, Ascidiacea), a group containing particularly aggressive invasive species. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to study the introduction of the ascidian Herdmania momus into the Mediterranean Sea. We reviewed its taxonomy and global distribution, and analyzed how genetic variation is partitioned between sides of the Suez Canal. The taxonomic revision showed that H. momus currently has a wide Indo-Pacific distribution. Genetic data indicated two well-differentiated colonization histories across the eastern Mediterranean. Our findings suggest that the range expansion of H. momus has been greatly facilitated by the combined effect of human-mediated transport and the species' ability to adapt to different environments. The integrative approach presented here is critical to attain a holistic understanding of marine biological invasions, especially when studying groups with a poorly resolved taxonomy. PMID:22857711

Rius, Marc; Shenkar, Noa

2012-10-01

45

Dyad Rapport and the Accuracy of Its Judgment Across Situations: A Lens Model Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecology of rapport and its perception within 2 contexts (i.e., adversarial and cooperative) were examined from a Brunswikian perspective. A lens model analysis determined (a) which observable cues were indicative of rapport, (b) whether observer judgments covaried with such cues, and (c) whether observers could assess accurately the rapport between opposite-sex interactants. Whereas the manifestation of rapport was context specific,

Frank J. Bernieri; John S. Gillis; Janet M. Davis; Jon E. Grahe

1996-01-01

46

Establishing Rapport: Personal Interaction and Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper offers insightful methods to increase student learning by considering the relationship between students and teachers. The author provides numerous examples drawn from the educational literature along with specific recommendations for improving rapport with students. Some examples include conveying interest in and support of students, establishing a personal connection, using humor, taking on a mentoring role rather than a purely teaching role, encouraging contact outside of class, having some informal or less-structured parts of a class period, and being fair with grading and criticism. These are but a few of the many helpful examples in this thought-provoking paper.

Fleming, Neil; The IDEA Center (Individual Development & Educational Assessment)

47

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using gamma spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg-1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed

M. S. El-Tahawy; M. A. Farouk; N. M. Ibrahiem; S. A. M. El-Mongey

1994-01-01

48

Risk assessment during transport of radioactive materials through the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a study for risk assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials, during the period 1986–1992, through the Suez Canal of Egypt is given. The code RADTRAN-IV was used for this study. The results of the code, for a normal case, show that the transportation of low activity materials such as uranium (U3O8) represent the main items

M. G. Sabek; R. M. K. El-Shinawy; M. Gomaa

1997-01-01

49

Boundary layer structure observed by shipborne Doppler Sodar in the Suez canal zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Observations of the boundary layer with a monostatic Sodar and other instrumentation were carried out in the Suez canal zone\\u000a in January and March 1979, from the Italian m.v.Salernum on its way to and from a GARP assignment. The Sodar was operated almost continuously throughout the passages. In addition\\u000a to the intensity records, an off-line Doppler analysis involving the use

G. Fiocco; G. Mastrantonio; A. Ricotta

1980-01-01

50

Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe–Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of

H. Abd El-Azim; Kh. M. El-Moselhy

2005-01-01

51

Oil prospect of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt - a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four groups of rocks, having more than 0.5% of organic carbon are defined within the subsurface section of Rahmi area, Gulf of Suez. The deduced types of indigenous kerogen are: algal-amorphous, inertinite-woody, and herbaceous. The algal-amorphous kerogen of Rudeis\\/Nukhul Formations (Lower Miocene), Eocene and pre-Eocene rocks is recognized as being oil prone, that is having high capacity for generating oil.

M. H. Elzarka; A. R. Mostafa

1988-01-01

52

Evaluation of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic species of Suez Gulf water along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries.  

PubMed

The Egyptian Red Sea environment especially along El-Sokhna area to the Suez refineries (Suez) is severely contaminated with organic compounds, as well as overfishing. This may be well contributory to recent serious declines in fish stocks. Fish embryos are also particularly vulnerable to oil exposure, even at extremely low concentrations of less than one part per billion. Consequently, even traces of oil pollution at levels often considered safe for wildlife can cause severe damage to fish. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in ten fish species of aquatic species by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compositions of PAHs determined in all samples were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAH pollutants in the studied region. The total content of these16 PAHs ranged from 399.616 up to 67,631.779 ng/g wet weight. The data show that these values are considered to be alarmingly high enough to cause lethal toxicity effect by accumulation. All studied aquatic species samples are characterized by relatively high concentrations of the six-membered ring PAHs. The origin of PAHs in the collected samples is either petrogenic, biogenic, or mixed petrogenic and biogenic. PMID:24092254

Ali, Nabila A; Ahmed, Omayma E; Doheim, Mamdouh M

2014-02-01

53

Development of a Short Form of the Roommate Rapport Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated a short form of the Roommate Rapport Scale that would maintain the scale's reliability and eliminate potentially objectionable items using students (N=320) who resided in dormitories. Results showed the short form to be reliable and unidimensional. (ABL)

Carey, John C.; And Others

1988-01-01

54

Natural and artificial radionuclides in the Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentration of natural and artificial radionuclides in Suez Canal bottom sediments and stream water have been measured using ? spectrometers based on a hyper-pure Ge detector. The activity concentrations of 238U series, 232Th series and 40K did not exceed 16.0, 15.5 and 500.0 Bq kg?1 dry weight for sediments. The activity concentration of 238U series and 40K did not exceed 0.6 and 18.0 Bq 1?1 for stream water.

El-Tahawy, M. S.; Farouk, M. A.; Ibrahiem, N. M.; El-Mongey, S. A. M.

1994-07-01

55

Internal structure and deformation of an accommodation zone in the northern part of the Suez rift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed structural study of the eastern (onshore) part of the Gharandal accommodation zone that separates the northern (SW-dipping) and central (NE-dipping) half grabens of the Suez rift helpeddecipher the internal structure and deformation of accommodation zones of continental rifts. This 60 km-wide zone is affected by pure normal faulting. The NE-dipping faults of the northern half graben extend southward into the accommodation zone where they interfinger with SW-dipping faults extending from the central half graben. These two sets of rift-parallel faults form several horsts and grabens in the accommodation zone. Areas dipping parallel to the northern or southern half grabens form several intermixing dip domains in the accommodation zone. Smaller-scale accommodation of dip between these dip domains proceeds by the development of rift-parallel folds (twist zones). In contrast to the southern accommodation zone of the Suez rift, the internal structure of the Gharandal accommodation zone is believed to be representative of accommodation zones in regions (a) unaffected by prerift structures lying at high angles to the rift; and (b) experiencing relatively small extension. Accommodation zones in areas having pre-rift structures lying at high angle to the rift have relatively narrow width and are characterized by transverse, strike-slip faults. Strike-slip movement on these faults is related to the torsional strain resulting from the opposite tilt directions and transport of fault blocks of adjacent half grabens.

Moustafa, Adel R.

1996-01-01

56

Scale deposition in surface and subsurface production equipment in the Gulf of Suez  

SciTech Connect

Some of the Gulf of Suez oil fields (El-Morgan, July, and Shoab Ali) have been waterflooded with gulf seawater. Compatibility tests have indicated probable deposition of scale in surface and subsurface production equipment. This paper outlines the physical and theoretical prediction for downhole scale deposition in Gulf of Suez oil wells. It also describes field experience with CaSO/sub 4/ scale removal from the wells and their formations in view of field results of the implemented programs. Scale inhibition programs carried out to control downhole scale deposition by using the formation squeeze technique, along with the field results obtained from the squeezetreated wells, are described. A new improvement in the squeeze treatment technique has been introduced as highmolecular-weight polyacrylamide polymer solutions were incorporated to stage the scale inhibitor squeeze batch to prolong the treatment lifetime. Field results are presented, along with conclusions and recommendations that can be applied to similar problems, especially when wells of highly productive sandstone formations are to be inhibited.

El-Hattab, M.I.

1985-09-01

57

Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-10-01

58

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part I: Hydrodynamics and Transit Times  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY/07/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal. This effort is linked with the increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. To follow the fate of radioactive wastes along this waterway, we had to solve the hydrodynamics of the water, governed mainly by tides, atmospheric forcing and the drift currents produced by horizontal salinity gradients and by differences in mean sea level (MSL) at the two entrances of the Canal. The hydrodynamics has been studied using both 1-D and 2-D modelling approaches, and a reasonable calibration has been possible from the data set prepared with the collaboration of the Suez Canal Authority. Dispersion of conservative pollutants has been preliminarily studied by using a 1-D-Gaussian approach. Thus, we are computing the path of the plumes and the time evolution of concentrations for different scenarios of discharges and under different seasonal conditions. The transit times can vary enormously during the year, ranging from a few days to several months, depending on the differences in MSL at the two entrances of the Canal.

Abril, J. M.; Abdel-Aal, M. M.

2000-04-01

59

Structural evolution of the southern transfer zone of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a detailed study about the initiation and reactivations of Zeit-El Tor transfer zone, south Gulf of Suez rift, and its structural setting and tectonic evolution with respect to the Cretaceous-Cenozoic tectonic movements in North Egyptian margin. NE trending zone of opposed-dipping faults (22 km wide) has transferred the NE and SW rotations of the sub-basins in central and south Gulf of Suez rift, respectively. The evolution of this zone started by reactivation of the NE oriented late Neoproterozoic fractures that controlled the occurrence of Dokhan Volcanics in the rift shoulders. Later, the Syrian Arc contraction reactivated these fractures by a sinistral transpression during the Late Cretaceous-Eocene time. N64°E extension of the Oligo-Miocene rift reactivated the NE fractures by a sinistral transtension. During this rifting, the NE trending faults forming the transfer zone were more active than the rift-bounding faults; the Upper Cretaceous reverse faults in the blocks lying between these NE trending faults were rotated; and drape-related reverse faults and the positive flower structures were formed. Tectonic inversion from contraction to extension controlled the distribution and thickness of the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene rocks.

Abd-Allah, Ali M. A.; Abdel Aal, Mohamed H.; El-Said, Mohamed M.; Abd El-Naby, Ahmed

2014-08-01

60

Red to Mediterranean Sea bioinvasion: natural drift through the Suez Canal, or anthropogenic transport?  

PubMed

The biota of the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea has experienced dramatic changes in the last decades, in part as a result of the massive invasion of Red Sea species. The mechanism generally hypothesized for the 'Red-to-Med' invasion is that of natural dispersal through the Suez Canal. To date, however, this hypothesis has not been tested. This study examines the mode of invasion, using as a model the mussel Brachidontes pharaonis, an acclaimed 'Lessepsian migrant' that thrives along the eastern Mediterranean coast. Our findings reveal two distinct lineages of haplotypes, and five possible explanations are discussed for this observation. We show that the genetic exchange among the Mediterranean, Gulf of Suez and the northern Red Sea is sufficiently large to counteract the build up of sequential genetic structure. Nevertheless, these basins are rich in unique haplotypes of unknown origin. We propose that it is historic secondary contact, an ongoing anthropogenic transport or both processes, that participate in driving the population dynamics of B. pharaonis in the Mediterranean and northern Red Sea. PMID:15245405

Shefer, Sigal; Abelson, Avigdor; Mokady, Ofer; Geffen, Eli

2004-08-01

61

Insatisfaction au travail : sortir de l'exception française  

Microsoft Academic Search

Les travailleurs français sont plus insatisfaits de leur emploi que leurs pairs européens, et ils sont parmi les plus stressés au monde. Le constat semble d’autant plus paradoxal que, selon de nombreux indicateurs, les conditions de travail sont en apparence favorables aux salariés : par rapport aux autres Européens, les Français travaillent moins d’heures, sont moins souvent mobilisés le week-end,

Etienne Wasmer

2012-01-01

62

Inventing space in the age of Empire: planning experiments and achievements along Suez Canal in Egypt (1859–1956)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new French research project concerning the planning and architectural history of the Suez canal cities in Egypt during the age of Empire. Begun in January 2008, this research has been addressing two first topics: religious architecture and port cities as cosmopolitan locales.

Céline Frémaux; Mercedes Volait

2009-01-01

63

Distance, Trade, and Income – The 1967 to 1975 Closing of the Suez Canal as a Natural Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The negative effect of distance on bilateral trade is one of the most robust findings in international trade. However, the underlying causes of this negative relationship are less well understood. This paper exploits a temporary shock to distance, the closing of the Suez canal in 1967 and its reopening in 1975, to examine the effect of distance on trade and

James Feyrer

2009-01-01

64

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY\\/07\\/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in

J. M. Abril; M. M. Abdel-Aal; S. A. Al-Gamal; F. A. Abdel-Hay; H. M. Zahar

2000-01-01

65

DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF DIATOMS IN THE BOTTOM SEDIMENTS OF THE SUEZ CANAL LAKES AND ADJACENT AREAS, EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diatom assemblages in the bottom sediments of Timsah Lake and adjacent sites, including the Great Bitter Lake, the northern part of the Gulf of Suez and the Mediterranean Sea at the entrance of the northern canal, have been recovered and studied in detail. A total of 394 species and varieties belonging to 96 genera were identified. Of these, 263

Abdelfattah A. Zalat

2002-01-01

66

Genetic differentiation among populations of Minona ileanae (Platyhelminthes: Proseriata) from the Red Sea and the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phenomenon of Lessepsian migration has stimulated the interest of biologists ever since the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, concerning, in particular, the possible effects of migrants on Mediterranean autochthonous communities. So far, most attention has been devoted to macrofaunal taxa – yet, the nature of the sandy shores of the Canal may constitute an ideal habitat for

Tiziana Lai; Marco Curini-Galletti; Marco Casu

2008-01-01

67

Why is the mediterranean more readily colonized than the Red Sea, by organisms using the Suez Canal as a passageway?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the opening of the Suez Canal, more than 120 Red Sea species colonized the eastern Mediterranean, whereas less than 10 Mediterranean species colonized the Red Sea. For most of the species involved in this colonization, the mode of dispersal from the source to the colonized area is through free-drifting propagules. In order to examine whether the current regime of

Z. Agur; U. N. Safriel

1981-01-01

68

Maturation, fecundity and seasonality of reproduction of two commercially valuable cuttlefish, Sepia pharaonis and S. dollfusi, in the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis (maximum 250mm mantle length, ML) and S. dollfusi (maximum 150mm ML) are widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific from the Red Sea to Japan and Australia. They are the primary fishery in the Suez Canal and the most valuable commercial cephalopods in the northern Indian Ocean. However, their reproductive biology, essential for fishery management, is poorly known.

Howaida R Gabr; Roger T Hanlon; Mahmoud H Hanafy; Salah G El-Etreby

1998-01-01

69

Evaporitic and biosiliceous cyclic sedimentation in the Miocene of the Gulf of Suez—Depositional and diagenetic aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Middle to Late Miocene evaporite-bearing formations which outcrop along the Gebel Zeit and Gems highs in the southwestern Gulf of Suez (Egypt), consist of thick calcium sulphate beds rhythmically interbedded with marlstones, siltstones and claystones containing various amounts of biogenic silica, as well as pure diatomites.The calcium sulphate beds are composed mainly of gypsum and anhydrite. Subaqueous crustallisation in

J. M. Rouchy; D. Noël; A. M. A. Wali; M. A. M. Aref

1995-01-01

70

Thermal history of the eastern margin of the Gulf of Suez, I. reconstruction from borehole temperature and organic maturity measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gulf of Suez is a Tertiary continental rift associated with prominent flank uplift. Despite numerous studies which focused mainly on the western and central parts of the graben, the thermo-mechanics controlling the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Suez is still enigmatic. We have integrated borehole temperatures and organic maturity measurements in the eastern margin of the Gulf of Suez, in order to study rift-related paleothermometry and the present-day thermal regime. The data obtained suggest that the present thermal regime represents the maximum heat flow and temperatures for the sedimentary section in the basin. Furthermore, lateral distributions of geothermal gradient and heat flow in the Gulf of Suez do not correlate, mainly because of extensive variability in lithology and thermal conductivity. Rift-related heat flow increases systematically and subparallel to the rift axis, from about 60 mW/m 2 in the Darag subbasin in the north to about 80 mW/m 2 in the Ras Garra area in the south. Both values are higher than 45 mW/m 2, the average heat flow assumed for the pre-rift stage and the characteristic level for the present-day heat flow away from the rift. The north to south increase in heat flow probably reflects the southward increase of extension as well as lateral transfer of heat flow from the Red Sea. This latter conclusion is supported by the fact that heat flow in the southern Gulf of Suez recorded by the paleothermometric reconstructions and borehole temperature data is somewhat higher than that estimated by model calculations for the extension derived from structural and subsidence reconstruction.

Feinstein, S.; Kohn, B. P.; Steckler, M. S.; Eyal, M.

1996-12-01

71

Risk factors of falls among elderly living in Urban Suez - Egypt  

PubMed Central

Introduction Falling is one of the most common geriatric syndromes threatening the independence of older persons. Falls result from a complex and interactive mix of biological or medical, behavioral and environmental factors, many of which are preventable. Studying these diverse risk factors would aid early detection and management of them at the primary care level. Methods This is a cross sectional study about risk factors of falls was conducted to 340 elders in Urban Suez. Those are all patients over 60 who attended two family practice centers in Urban Suez. Results When asked about falling during the past 12 months, 205 elders recalled at least one incident of falling. Of them, 36% had their falls outdoors and 24% mentioned that stairs was the most prevalent site for indoor falls. Falls were also reported more among dependant than independent elderly. Using univariate regression analysis, almost all tested risk factors were significantly associated with falls in the studied population. These risk factors include: living alone, having chronic diseases, using medications, having a physical deficit, being in active, and having a high nutritional risk. However, the multivariate regression analysis proved that the strongest risk factors are low level of physical activity with OR 0.6 and P value 0.03, using a cane or walker (OR 1.69 and P value 0.001) and Impairment of daily living activities (OR 1.7 and P value 0.001). Conclusion Although falls is a serious problem among elderly with many consequences, it has many preventable risk factors. Health care providers should advice people to remain active and more research is needed in such an important area of Family Practice.

Kamel, Mohammed Hany; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed; Ismail, Sally El-Sayed

2013-01-01

72

Peak Alert Time and Rapport between Residence Hall Roommates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined whether peak alert time is related to compatibility for college roommates. Data from 66 male pairs and from 55 female pairs of roommates revealed that pairs who were similar on self-reported peak circadian alertness had higher levels of rapport. (Author/NB)

Carey, John C.; And Others

1988-01-01

73

Non-native fishes in the Mediterranean from the Red Sea, by way of the Suez Canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 caused a migration generally from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean, rarely the opposite\\u000a direction, and 63 lessepsian fish species penetrated into the Mediterranean by way of this canal. These species usually spread\\u000a northward and most of them can establish wide populations in this area, but some of them can not be

Sinan Mavruk; Dursun Avsar

2008-01-01

74

Organic tracers in sediments from the coastal zone of Ras Abu el-Darag, Gulf of Suez  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment samples from the coastal zone of the Gulf of Suez contain a variety of organic compounds from anthropogenic and natural\\u000a sources. A total of 12 surface samples of bottom sediments were collected with an Ekman grab sampler along an off-shore transect\\u000a south of Ras Abu el-Darag. The samples were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1 v\\/v)

Ahmed I. Rushdi; Tarek A. T. A. Kassim; Bernd R. T. Simoneit

2009-01-01

75

Contribution of gravity and magnetic data in delineating the subsurface structure of Hammam Faroun area, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hammam Faroun has a particular importance due to its geothermal activity which constitutes the main geothermal resource\\u000a of Egypt. The area is located on the Sinai Peninsula, a subplate bounded by two seismically active structural zones along\\u000a the Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba. High-resolution ground-based gravity and magnetic data are available for the entire Hammam\\u000a Faroun area,

Essam Aboud; El Sayed Selim; Ahmed El Bishlawy

2011-01-01

76

Dinoflagellates from the Miocene Rudeis and Kareem formations borehole GS78-1, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Miocene Rudeis and the Kareem formations encountered in the Neogene part of the GS-78-1 borehole, Gulf of Suez produced diverse assemblages of dinoflagellate cysts, spores and pollen. The Early Miocene (Burdigalian) age assigned to the Rudeis Formation and the Early-?Middle Miocene (Langhian–Serravallian) age postulated for the Kareem formation is based on the presence of dinoflagellate cysts. These offer a

Salah Y. El Beialy; Ali S. Ali

2002-01-01

77

Timing of structural development of oil traps in Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

To date, more than 40 oil fields with an estimated 25billion bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. These oil accumulations are present both in the pre-graben and graben-fill cycles which are separated by Oligocene tectonic phase, hitherto considered to be responsible for differentiation and formation of oil traps. In the present study, the structural development of many oil traps is related to intra-Rudeis tectonic phase of late early Miocene age. Presence of an a

Chowdhary, L.R.; Shaheen, S.

1988-01-01

78

Physico-chemical conditions for plankton in Lake Timsah, a saline lake on the Suez Canal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Timsah receives high salinity water from the Suez Canal, mainly from the south, and freshwater from a Nile canal and other sources, producing a salinity stratification with surface salinities of 20-40‰ and over 40‰ in deeper water. Water temperature at a depth of 50-70 cm fell to below 20 °C in winter and rose to above 30 °C in summer; oxygen concentration at the same depth ranged between 6-10 mg l -1 and the pH was 8·1-8·3, and at mid-day this water was supersaturated with oxygen through 6-8 months of the year. The main chemical nutrients reached their highest levels in winter (December-February) and their lowest levels in summer (May-August), silicate varying between 1-7 ? M, phosphate between 0·1 and 0·8 ? M and nitrate between 4-10 ? M; nitrite varied in a more complex manner, usually between 0·25 and 0·4 ? M. The atomic ratio of N/P was generally well above the Redfield ratio level, except for a few months in midwinter. These nutrient concentrations are high in comparison with those of unpolluted seas of the region, but are typical of the more eutrophic coastal waters in most parts of the world.

El-Serehy, H. A. H.; Sleigh, M. A.

1992-02-01

79

French Space Program. Report to Cospar Programme Spatial Francais. Rapport au Cospar.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A report is presented on French space activities over the period mid-1975 to mid-1976. These activities cover the following main fields: extrasolar system astronomy, solar physics, solar system, lunar rocks, ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, aeronom...

1976-01-01

80

Ecological Study on Community of Exotic Invasive Seaweed Caulerpa prolifera in Suez Canal and its Associated Macro Invertebrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Caulerpa prolifera (Forsskal) Lamouroux, a green alga, widespread in tropical and subtropical seas is now invading species to the Suez Canal during last recent years after 2000; it is widely spread, colonizing its western sandy shore at shallow waters of 1-2 m depth. It has the potential to supplant native vegetation, thereby altering the structure and function of the subtidal marine landscape, supplant seagrass H. stipulacea. According to the present study, based on biometric parameters, the frequency of occurrence, abundance and density analyses, the seaweed C. prolifera is more frequent, abundant and dense in Suez Canal than the seagrass H. stipulacea, which is very rare. Instead C. prolifera forming extended dense meadows with percentage cover nearly 100% m-2 at many sites. This mainly happened; due to the competitive success of C. prolifera which seems to be related to its big size, high density, rapid growth, high efficiency in dim light conditions, high tolerance to severe nutrient limitation and salinity and temperature fluctuations and to the production of toxic secondary metabolites. The presence of these toxic secondary metabolites explains why C. prolifera is avoided by many of macro invertebrates as a habitat or feeding grounds.

Gab-Alla, Ali A.-F. A.

81

Assessment of PAHs in water and fish tissues from Great Bitter and El Temsah lakes, Suez Canal, as chemical markers of pollution sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea water and fish tissue samples were collected from nine sampling stations from the Great Bitter and El Temsah lakes in the Suez Canal and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The compositions of PAH determined in the dissolved fraction of sea water were measured in order to use them as chemical markers for identifying different sources of PAH pollution

Tarek O. Said; Nadia A. El Agroudy

2006-01-01

82

Spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning selective: Elimination des corrections necessaires a la determination du rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dans le but d'ameliorer la precision avec laquelle le rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene peut etre determine, un spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning a ete construit pour provoquer l'ionisation selective de l'hydrogene moleculaire et de l'hydrure de deuterium a partir d'un melange gazeux. L'utilisation d'atomes dans des etats d'excitation metastable s'est averee une solution adequate pour reponde a cette attente. L'emploi de l'helium, a l'interieur d'une source d'atomes metastables construit specifiquement pour ce travail, ne permet pas d'obtenir un spectre de masse compose uniquement des deux molecules d'interet. L'ionisation de ces dernieres provient de deux processus distincts, soient l'ionisation Penning et l'ionisation par bombardement electronique. Contrairement a l'helium, il a ete demontre que le neon metastable est un candidat ideal pour produire l'ionisation selective de type Penning. Le nombre d'ions produits est directement proportionnel au courant de la decharge electrique et de la pression d'operation de la source d'atomes metastables. Ces resultats demontrent le potentiel d'un tel spectrometre de masse pour ameliorer la precision a laquelle le rapport isotopique peut etre determine comparativement aux autres techniques existantes.

Letarte, Sylvain

83

Application of well log analysis for source rock evaluation in the Duwi Formation, Southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several models were developed to use the conventional wireline logs for evaluating the thermal maturity of the source rock and calculating the total organic carbon (TOC) content. Application of these models for the Duwi Formation, southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt, is the main purpose of this paper. Gamma ray, density, sonic, resistivity and neutron are the commonly used wireline logs to identify and quantify source rock. The results, which compared with the results obtained from the Rock-Eval pyrolysis show that cautions must be taken into consideration when applied these models because most of the models are empirical and their validation takes place under certain conditions. It can be concluded that the Duwi Formation represents very good source rock capable of generating a significant amount of hydrocarbon of oil-prone type II. The kerogen is waxy sapropel related to marine plankton deposited under reduced condition.

El Sharawy, Mohamed S.; Gaafar, Gamal R.

2012-05-01

84

Student?parent rapport and parent involvement in sex, birth control, and venereal disease education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite widespread support for more effective sex education by parents, frank discussion of sex between parent and child is generally acknowledged to be a rarity. This study asked 18–19?year?olds who they felt should be responsible for instructing young people about sex, examined relationships between student?parent rapport and parental involvement in sex education, and evaluated the impact of rapport and discussion

Susan M. Bennett; Winifred B. Dickinson

1980-01-01

85

Café au Lait Macule  

MedlinePLUS

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86

Oligocene Miocene formation of the Haifa basin: Qishon Sirhan rifting coeval with the Red Sea Suez rift system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During mid-Oligocene to early-Miocene times the northeastern Afro-Arabian plate underwent changes, from continental breakup along the Red Sea in the south, to continental collision with Eurasia in the north and formation of the N-S trending Dead Sea fault plate boundary. Concurrent uplift and erosion of the entire Levant area led to an incomplete sedimentary record, obscuring reconstructions of the transition between the two tectonic regimes. New well data, obtained on the continental shelf of the central Levant margin (Qishon Yam 1), revealed a uniquely undisturbed sedimentary sequence which covers this time period. Evaporitic facies found in this well have only one comparable location in the entire eastern Mediterranean area (onland and offshore) over the same time frame — the Red Sea-Suez rift system. Analysis of 4150 km of multi and single-channel seismic profiles, offshore central Levant, shows that the sequence was deposited in a narrow basin, restricted to the continental shelf. This basin (the Haifa Basin) evolved as a half graben along the NW trending Carmel fault, which at present is one of the main branches of the Dead Sea fault. Re-evaluation of geological data onland, in view of the new findings offshore, indicates that the Haifa basin is the northwestern-most of a larger series of basins, comprising a failed rift along the Qishon-Sirhan NW-SE trend. This failed rift evolved spatially parallel to the Red Sea-Suez rift system, and at the same time frame. The Carmel fault would therefore seem to be related to processes occurring several million years earlier than previously thought, before the formation of the Dead Sea fault. The development of a series of basins in conjunction with a young spreading center is a known phenomenon in other regions worldwide; however this is the only known example from across the Arabian plate.

Schattner, U.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Reshef, M.; Bar-Am, G.; Lazar, M.

2006-06-01

87

When Rapport Building Extends Beyond Affiliation: Communication Overaccommodation Toward Patients with Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Physician rapport with patients is described as a vital component of relationship-centered care, but rapport-building communication behaviors may exceed boundaries and instead indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. This paper addresses the types of communication behaviors and contexts for interpreting when rapport building extends beyond boundaries toward patients with disabilities. Methods: Videotaped interactions between third- and fourth-year medical students (N = 142) and standardized patient educators with physical disabilities were qualitatively analyzed. Results: Results suggest six primary themes of exceeding expected rapport boundaries, including baby talk (ie, exaggerated nonverbal gestures and “we” language to indicate “you”), kinesic movement (ie, stiff posture and awkward handshakes), vocalics (ie, volume or pitch that interfered with the flow of conversation), relationship assumptions (ie, communicating assumptions that relationships were grounded in care-receiving), emotional divergence from patient disclosure (ie, minimizing or embellishing disability), and inconsistency with patient emotional cues (ie, responding to negative or neutral disclosure by overly accentuating positive interpretation). Discussion: This study suggests that communication behaviors generally described as positive, rapport-building behaviors can pose negative implications when they exceed the expected quantity or duration, when they are inconsistent with patient verbal disclosure, or when verbal and nonverbal messages are inconsistent. Identified themes serve as examples to understand when rapport building exceeds beyond affiliation and instead appears to indicate patronizing behavior toward patients with disabilities. Suggestions for interpreting communication behaviors within the context of patient disclosure and building capacity to distinguish attitudes and biases limiting communication are addressed.

Duggan, Ashley P; Bradshaw, Ylisabyth S; Swergold, Natalie; Altman, Wayne

2011-01-01

88

Distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediment of Temsah lake, Suez Canal, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake Temsah is one of the main wetlands in the Suez Canal region, and the main source for fish for the area. The lake is the end-point of several wastewater effluents. In the present study, residues of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were monitored in the sediment of the

Pietro Tundo; Stefano Raccanelli; Laila A. Reda; Mohamed Tawic Ahmed

2004-01-01

89

Eliciting Maltreated and Nonmaltreated Children's Transgression Disclosures: Narrative Practice Rapport Building and a Putative Confession.  

PubMed

This study tested the effects of narrative practice rapport building (asking open-ended questions about a neutral event) and a putative confession (telling the child an adult "told me everything that happened and he wants you to tell the truth") on 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children's reports of an interaction with a stranger who asked them to keep toy breakage a secret (n = 264). Only one third of children who received no interview manipulations disclosed breakage; in response to a putative confession, one half disclosed. Narrative practice rapport building did not affect the likelihood of disclosure. Maltreated children and nonmaltreated children responded similarly to the manipulations. Neither narrative practice rapport building nor a putative confession increased false reports. PMID:24467688

Lyon, Thomas D; Wandrey, Lindsay; Ahern, Elizabeth; Licht, Robyn; Sim, Megan P Y; Quas, Jodi A

2014-07-01

90

L’interconnexion entre la sécurité des communautés et les programmes de Démobilisation, Désarmement et Réintégration (DDR) : une étude de terrain au Congo Oriental (RDC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ce compte-rendu est le résultat d'une enquête de 11 semaines sur le terrain dans l‘Est de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC) entre septembre et décembre 2009. Le but de ce rapport est d'analyser les relations entre les questions de sécurité au sein des différentes communautés et le contexte des programmes de Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration (DDR) - en nous

R. C. Willems; H. Rouw

2010-01-01

91

Maastrichtian-Early Eocene litho-biostratigraphy and palægeography of the northern Gulf of Suez region, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Maastrichtian-Lower Eocene sediments on both sides of the northern Gulf of Suez can be subdivided into eight formal formations (including one group) and one informal formation that are described in detail. These lithostratigraphic units reflect three different environmental regimes of deposition or non-deposition. The first regime is characterised by uplift and erosion or non-deposition resulting mostly from the uplift of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba structure, a branch of the Syrian Arc Foldbelt. The shallow water carbonate platform and slope deposits of the Late Campanian-Maastrichtian St Anthony Formation and the Paleocene-Lower Eocene Southern Galala and Garra Formations represent the second regime and are found north and south of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba High. The third regime is represented by basinal chalks, marls and shales of the Maastrichtian Sudr Formation and of the Paleocene-Eocene Dakhla, Tarawan and Esna Formations, the Dakhla/Tarawan/Esna informal formation and the Thebes Group. The distribution and lateral interfingering of the above mentioned environmental regimes reflect different vertical movements, changing basin morphology, sea level changes and progradation of shallow water sediments and is illustrated on 11 palæogeographic maps.

Scheibner, C.; Marzouk, A. M.; Kuss, J.

2001-02-01

92

Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY/07/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in the canal waters limited the use of some field data. During experiments, water levels, velocities, wind and other physical parameters were recorded to supply appropriate information for the modelling work. From this data set, the hydrodynamics of the studied area has been reasonably described. We apply a 1-D-Gaussian and 2-D modelling approaches to predict the position and the spatial shape of the plume. The use of different formulations for dispersion coefficients is studied. These dispersion coefficients are then applied in a 2-D-hydrodynamic and dispersion model for the Bitter Lake to investigate different scenarios of accidental discharges.

Abril, J. M.; Abdel-Aal, M. M.; Al-Gamal, S. A.; Abdel-Hay, F. A.; Zahar, H. M.

2000-04-01

93

Organic tracers in sediments from the coastal zone of Ras Abu el-Darag, Gulf of Suez  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment samples from the coastal zone of the Gulf of Suez contain a variety of organic compounds from anthropogenic and natural sources. A total of 12 surface samples of bottom sediments were collected with an Ekman grab sampler along an off-shore transect south of Ras Abu el-Darag. The samples were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1 v/v) after drying and sieving through 250 ?m mesh. The extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to characterize the chemical composition and sources of the organic components. Marine with minor terrestrial biota were the major natural sources of organic tracers and included n-alkanoic acids, sterols and saccharides (5.7-76.7%). Anthropogenic sources, from petroleum related activities, detergent usage for spill cleaning and littering, are indicated by the presence of n-alkanes with carbon preference index ?1.0, hopanes, steranes, unresolved complex mixture of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl nitriles, alkamides and plasticizers. Their total relative concentrations ranged from 23.3 to 97.3% of the total extracts. Petroleum residues from natural seepage may also be part of these hydrocarbons. The levels of anthropogenic inputs decrease from about 94% in coastal zone sediments to about 20% in sediments from the reef front.

Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Kassim, Tarek A. T. A.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

2009-10-01

94

Kinematics of the oblique faults in the east central Gulf of Suez Rift, Wadi Araba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Oligo-Miocene Gulf of Suez rift is characterized by four fault trends; a rift-parallel trend, two trends oblique to the rift trend and a cross trend. The rift-parallel trend strikes 310o to 340o and is referred to as the Clysmic trend. The two trends, which are oblique to the Clysmic trend, strike 350o to 030o and 280o to 310o; the first has been referred to as the north-oblique (N-oblique), and the second as the northwest-oblique (NW-oblique). The cross trend includes faults nearly orthogonal to the Clysmic trend i.e. they strike between 050o and 075o. Image interpretation and detailed field mapping and structural studies at a scale of 1: 20,000 of the Wadi Araba area in southwest Sinai Peninsula indicate e Clysmic faults are mostly normal showing major dip-slip movements. The oblique faults were found to be younger than the Clysmic faults and that the N-oblique faults are characterized by major sinistral strike-slip movement, while the NW-oblique faults are characterized by major dextral strike-slip movement. Cross cutting relationship, geometry and palaeostress analysis indicate that the oblique faults are conjugate Riedel shears originated due to NE to NNE extension related to the Aqaba-Levant transform that has been active since the Middle Miocene.

Abdeen, Mamdouh; Abdelmaksoud, Ashraf

2014-05-01

95

Q-values for P and S waves in Southern Sinai and Southern Gulf of Suez Region, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality factor Q has been estimated using spectral amplitudes of P and S waves from earthquakes recorded by the seismic network of the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) in southern Sinai and southern Gulf of Suez region. The earthquakes recorded at nine stations - DHA, NUB, TR1, TR2, KAT, SH2, GRB, HRG and SFG have been used in this study. The spectral amplitude ratios have been calculated between 2 - 20 Hz and single station spectral ratio method has been applied for this purpose. The results show that the quality factors for both P and S waves (Qp and Qs) increase as a function of frequency according to law the Q = Q0fn. By averaging the estimated Q- Value obtained at all stations we calculated the average attenuation laws: Qp = (13.15± 0.76) f0.95± 0.19 and Qs = (20.05± 0.79) f1.03±0.04 for P and S waves respectively. These relations are useful for the estimation of source parameters of earthquakes and simulation of earthquake strong ground motions. The QS /QP ratio for KAT station is less than 1 at lower frequencies, whereas at HRG and SH2 stations QS /QP ratio is are greater than 1.

Mohamed, Gad-Elkareem A.

2014-05-01

96

The Hf–Au system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hf–Au system has been reinvestigated by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. The existence of the seven intermetallic phases, previously reported, Hf2Au, HfAu, Hf7Au10, HfAu2, HfAu3, HfAu4 and HfAu5 was confirmed. We specify here their type of formation. For the equiatomic compound, we have shown the presence of a martensitic transformation and of allotropic

M Lomello-Tafin; Ph Galez; P Feschotte; J. L Jorda

2000-01-01

97

Le fonctionnement des dispositifs de formation professionnelle - tome 1 - rapport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au bout de six mois d’une vaste série d’auditions et de déplacements qui lui ont permis d’explorer l’ensemble de son champ d’investigation, la mission commune d’information sur le fonctionnement des dispositifs de formation professionnelle dresse le tableau relativement pessimiste d’un système marqué par la complexité, les cloisonnements et les corporatismes : les trois maux de la formation professionnelle. Ces maux

Bernard Seillier

2007-01-01

98

Humor, Rapport, and Uncomfortable Moments in Interactions with Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined uncomfortable moments that damaged rapport during group interactions between college students in training to become speech-language pathologists and adults with traumatic brain injury. The students worked as staff in a community-based program affiliated with a university training program that functioned as a recreational gathering…

Kovarsky, Dana; Schiemer, Christine; Murray, Allison

2011-01-01

99

Student Self-Assessment and Student Ratings of Teacher Rapport in Secondary Student Course Ratings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study involved administering two rating forms (student self-rating on commitment and student rating of teacher rapport) to approximately 1,400 secondary students taught by 12 different teachers at two different high school Latter-day Saint (LDS) released time seminaries along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Seminaries and Institutes of Religion…

Roe, John Wilford

2010-01-01

100

Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

2012-01-01

101

Managing Rapport in Lingua Franca Sales Negotiations: A Comparison of Professional and Aspiring Negotiators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents selective findings from a study that investigated how facework is used to achieve interpersonal goals in intercultural sales negotiations. The article reports on linguistic analyses of what Spencer-Oatey has termed ''rapport management'' which, in a negotiation context, is aimed primarily, but not exclusively, at building a…

Planken, B.

2005-01-01

102

Physicians' Nonverbal Rapport Building and Patients' Talk About the Subjective Component of Illness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers how physicians' nonverbal communication is sometimes associated with patients' affective satisfaction. Examines the relationship between physicians' nonverbal rapport building and patients' disclosure of information related to the subjective component of illness. Considers implications for understanding the role of physicians' nonverbal…

Duggan, Ashley P.; Parrott, Roxanne L.

2001-01-01

103

Preservice Music Teachers' and Therapists' Nonverbal Behaviors and Their Relationship to Perceived Rapport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the two studies reported in the article was to determine whether or not a relationship exists between preservice music therapists' and teachers' nonverbal behaviors and their perceived rapport. In study 1, evaluators (N = 56) viewed a stimulus tape consisting of 15 45-second segments of 15 preservice music therapists leading songs…

Darrow, Alice-Ann; Johnson, Christopher

2009-01-01

104

Thermal history of the eastern Gulf of Suez, II. Reconstruction from apatite fission track and {40Ar }/{39Ar } K-feldspar measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Apatite fission track (AFT) measurements from Miocene graben-fill sediments of the eastern Gulf of Suez in three deep boreholes (Belayim 113 M-2/6, Ras Garra M-1 and Alma-2) yield a wide range of ages (from 125 to 320 Ma) and mean track-lengths (˜10.1-12.7 ?m). This range is similar to that recorded from Precambrian crystalline basement flanking the graben which is the major source for the rift fill. Since the AFT ages exceed the age of the host strata, which are presently at their highest post-depositional temperatures, the rift-related thermal regime is one of only moderate heating. Downhole AFT data in the Belayim 113 M-2/6 borehole attest to a higher rift temperature than in the Ras Garra M-1 borehole, some 85 km to the south, where little or no thermal overprinting is evident. These findings are consistent with previously reported bottom hole temperatures and vitrinite reflectance data in the study area. Despite the higher syn-rift thermal regime indicated for Belayim 113 M-2/6, apatite provenance ages in Ras Garra M-1 are considerably younger. Thus, the AFT data in the Ras Garra M-1 area do not record significant rift-related thermal effects, but rather, they mainly retain a pre-rift provenance signature which reflects the order and depth of erosion at the uplifted flanks. The younger AFT ages in Ras Garra M-1, despite the weaker rift-related thermal effect, suggest a deeper level proportional to an additional ˜5-10°C of exhumation of the uplifted crystalline basement southwards along the eastern rift flank by Mid-Miocene time. This result is consistent with earlier findings which indicate both increased extension and heat flow southwards in the Gulf of Suez, and earlier exhumation of the rift flank. Immediately preceding extension and opening of the Gulf of Suez, the most deeply exhumed basement rocks presently exposed on the rift flanks were heated to temperatures ?110°C (total annealing of apatite), but <˜170°-200°C as constrained by {40Ar }/{39Ar } data and non-resetting of zircon FT clocks in sinai, {40Ar }/{39Ar } data from granite penetrated in graben drilling at ˜3.89 km further corroborates pre-rift palaeotemperatures <˜170°C for crystalline basement underlying the Gulf of Suez.

Kohn, B. P.; Feinstein, S.; Foster, D. A.; Steckler, M. S.; Eyal, M.

1997-12-01

105

Accouchement de jumeaux conjoints de d?couverte fortuite au cours du travail au CHU de Dakar  

PubMed Central

L'objectif de cette étude était de rapporter 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints, discuter de l'importance du diagnostic anténatal et de décrire les particularités diagnostiques, thérapeutiques et évolutives. Sur 45700 accouchements du 1er Février 2009 au 31 Décembre 2011, 3 cas de jumeaux conjoints ont été enregistrés, soit 1 cas pour 15000 accouchements. Ces cas ont été diagnostiqués au cours du travail au décours d'une dystocie mécanique ou d'une césarienne réalisée pour une autre indication. Il s'agissait d'un cas de jumeaux conjoints thoraco-omphalopages, un cas de diprosopes et un cas de dicéphales. L'accouchement dans les trois cas était fait par voie haute permettant d'extraire des mort-nés frais. Nous insistons sur l'intérêt d'un diagnostic anténatal précoce par le recours à l’échographie afin d’éviter les accidents mécaniques d'un accouchement qui ne saurait s'accomplir par voie basse.

Gueye, Mamour; Gueye, Serigne Modou Kane; Gueye, Mame Diarra Ndiaye; Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Diallo, Moussa; Cisse, Mamadou Lamine; Moreau, Jean Charles

2012-01-01

106

Facies and depositional environment of the Holocene evaporites in the Ras Shukeir area, Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Holocene evaporite sequence in the Ras Shukeir area conformably overlies marine shell banks and cross-bedded to graded-bedded beach sands and gravels. The evaporite sequence is represented by gypsum-anhydrite layers that are interbedded with mudstone layers. Field and petrographic investigations of the evaporite deposits revealed two facies types, laminated evaporite facies (primary) and nodular to enterolithic anhydrite facies (diagenetic). The laminated evaporite facies is subdivided, from the bottom to top, into regular laminated evaporite, chevron gypsum-algal micrite laminations and wavy algal laminated evaporite. Based on their textures and fabrics, the regular and wavy laminated evaporite facies are interpreted as primary deposits in a coastal lagoon and salina environment. The chevron gypsum-algal micrite facies formed by the growth of chevron gypsum at the sediment-water interface within a shallow subtidal lagoonal environment that was characterized by extensive benthic algal mats. The nodular to enterolithic anhydrite facies is secondary and formed diagenetically within a siliciclastic supratidal sediment. Some of the laminated evaporite facies have been diagenetically altered in a supratidal sabkha environment as evidenced by the following: (1) the partial formation of nodular evaporite instead of laminated evaporite; (2) disruption of gypsum laminations by plant roots and rootlets as well as by precipitation of lenticular gypsum on the root wall; and (3) partial dissolution of halite laminae and the formation of wavy anhydrite laminae. Consequently, the Holocene evaporites in the Ras Shukeir area were deposited in a shallow semi-closed to closed basin that was separated from the Gulf of Suez trough. Changing sea level led to progradation of the evaporite facies from subtidal to intertidal lagoon and salina to a supratidal sabkha.

Aref, M. A. M.; Attia, O. E. A.; Wali, A. M. A.

1997-05-01

107

Association of catalase gene polymorphisms with catalase activity and susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus in the Suez Canal area, Egypt.  

PubMed

The present study evaluated the relationship of genetic variants in both promoter (-262?C/T) and in exonic (389?C/T) regions of the catalase (CAT) gene to CAT activity and risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Suez Canal-area patients. CAT gene polymorphisms were assessed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CAT activity was measured by using a spectrophotometer. We compared the frequencies of CAT 389 C/T and -262?C/T polymorphic variants between SLE patients (n?=?103) and healthy controls (n?=?103). CAT 389?C/T is associated with SLE susceptibility, with the T allele being significantly more frequent among SLE patients than healthy controls. There was no association, however, between CAT activity and genotypes of 389?C/T. We did not observe significant differences in the prevalence of CAT -262?C/T polymorphic variants in SLE patients and controls, however, we found that patients with the CAT -262 CT and TT genotypes had low CAT activity, and these genotypes showed a significant association with thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and the presence of anti-snRNP in SLE patients. In conclusion, the present study supports the notion of in vivo oxidative stress in SLE as indicated by the decrease in CAT activity. The allelic variations in the CAT gene -262 are more likely to affect the expression or the function of the enzyme. Since CAT may be pathogenetically linked to SLE, and owing to its free-radical origin, it appears reasonable to target lipid peroxidation by dietary and/or pharmacological antioxidants. PMID:22736749

Ghaly, M S; Ghattas, M H; Labib, S M

2012-10-01

108

The Zr-Au system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Zr-Au system has been reinvestigated by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Our main result concerns the discovery of two new intermetallics: Zr3Au2 and ZrAu. The existence of the Au-rich phases, ZrAu4, ZrAu3, ZrAu2 and Zr7Au10, was confirmed and we clarified their type of formation. The stability regions of Zr3Au, Zr2Au and the two

M. Lomello-Tafin; P. Galez; J. C. Gachon; P. Feschotte; J. L. Jorda

1997-01-01

109

Rapport sur la faisabilité d'un impôt sur le capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ce rapport vise à clarifier les enjeux conceptuels et quantitatifs que poserait l'introduction d'un impôt généralisé sur le capital. L'hypothèse de travail consiste à supprimer des impôts jugés économiquement néfastes pour les remplacer par un impôt sur le capital. Une telle réforme fiscale pourrait avoir un effet libératoire sur la recherche de profits et diminuer les ressources consacrées aujourd'hui à

Antoine Bozio; Fabien Dell; Thomas Piketty

2005-01-01

110

Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among Egyptian mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivers grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region using RAPD markers.  

PubMed

DNA-based RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) markers have been used extensively to study genetic diversity and relationships in a number of fruit crops. In this study, 10 (7 commercial mango cultivars and 3 accessions) mango genotypes traditionally grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region of Egypt, were selected to assess genetic diversity and relatedness. Total genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to RAPD analysis using 30 arbitrary 10-mer primers. Of these, eleven primers were selected which gave 92 clear and bright fragments. A total of 72 polymorphic RAPD bands were detected out of 92 bands, generating 78% polymorphisms. The mean PIC values scores for all loci were of 0.85. This reflects a high level of discriminatory power of a marker and most of these primers produced unique band pattern for each cultivar. A dendrogram based on Nei's Genetic distance co-efficient implied a moderate degree of genetic diversity among the cultivars used for experimentation, with some differences. The hybrid which had derived from cultivar as female parent was placed together. In the cluster, the cultivars and accessions formed separate groups according to bearing habit and type of embryo and the members in each group were very closely linked. Cluster analysis clearly showed two main groups, the first consisting of indigenous to the Delta of Egypt cultivars and the second consisting of indigenous to the Suez Canal and Sinai region. From the analysis of results, it appears the majority of mango cultivars originated from a local mango genepool and were domesticated later. The results indicated the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and management of mango germplasm for breeding purposes. PMID:24783778

Mansour, Hassan; Mekki, Laila E; Hussein, Mohammed A

2014-01-01

111

Au2HTML  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Au2HTML is a tool aimed at Webmasters and others who are interested in developing Webpage galleries. Its most useful feature allows the creation of thumbnails from images of varying file formats. Customizable thumbnail options include image size and the border style. Au2HTML also comes with an HTML editor and can be integrated with your FTP client to ease file transfers. The registration fee is $99. A demo version is available for no charge.

112

Magnetic ordering and hybridisation in YbAuCu{4}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on a ^{170}Yb Mössabauer spectroscopy investigation of the low temperature magnetic properties of the cubic heavy electron material YbAuCu4. In the antiferromagnetically ordered phase (T_N=1 K), we measure a 20 % reduction of the Yb^{+3} saturated spontaneous moment with respect to that of the crystal field ?_7 ground state and we evidence a sizeable anisotropy of the interionic magnetic interaction. We interpret these features in terms of 4f electron - conduction electron hybridisation, which accounts for the heavy electron properties. The energy scale k_BT_0 of hybridisation is estimated to be 0.3 K. The Mössbauer spectra in the ordered and paramagnetic phases show inhomogeneous line broadenings which are interpreted as arising from a distribution of local strains along the <~ngle111rangle crystal axes, of mean magneto-elastic energy 0.2 0.4 K. Nous présentons une étude par spectroscopie Mössbauer sur ^{170}Yb des propriétés à basse température du composé cubique à électrons lourds YbAuCu4. Dans la phase antiferromagnétique (T_N=1 K), nous mesurons une réduction de 20 % du moment spontané à saturation de Yb^{+3} par rapport au moment de l'état fondamental ?_7 de champ cristallin, et nous mettons en évidence une anisotropie notable de l'interaction magnétique entre les ions. Nous interprétons ce comportement en termes d'hybridation entre les électrons 4f et les électrons de conduction, qui rend compte des propriétés de type électron lourd. L'échelle d'énergie k_BT_0 de l'hybridation est estimée de l'ordre de 0,3 K. Les spectres Mössbauer dans les phases ordonnée et paramagnétique présentent des élargissements de raie inhomogènes qui sont interprétés en termes de distribution de contraintes locales suivant les axes <111> du cristal, d'énergie magnéto-élastique moyenne 0,2 0,4 K.

Bonville, P.; Canaud, B.; Hammann, J.; Hodges, J. A.; Imbert, P.; Jéhanno, G.; Severing, A.; Fisk, Z.

1992-04-01

113

Point of View: Questions From the Edge: Using Informal Surveys to Build Rapport With Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Astronomy helps us answer the ultimate question of human existence," and "Astronomy helps us understand the meaning of our own existence." These thoughts caught the attention of one professor who wondered what students thought about the meaning of their existence. The results of surveying students on this and two other questions have supplied information that is not only interesting in its own right for insights into student interests, but has also provided opportunities to foster rapport with students through discussions related to their responses.

Hedin, Eric

2007-01-01

114

"Straight up": enhancing rapport and therapeutic alliance with previously-detained youth in the delivery of mental health services.  

PubMed

A strong therapeutic alliance has been shown to improve mental health treatment outcomes in adults, but this topic has not been fully explored with youth. Adolescents, particularly justice-involved youth, stand to benefit greatly from an improved treatment experience. One quality which can improve treatment is mental health providers' interpersonal skills when attempting to build a therapeutic rapport with adolescent clients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 youth who screened positive for mental health concerns while in juvenile detention. Four themes were identified as important to improving the therapeutic alliance: Empathy, client-directed care, sequencing, and positive rapport. Suggestions for strengthening a therapeutic alliance are provided. PMID:23775240

Brown, James R; Holloway, Evan D; Akakpo, Tohoro F; Aalsma, Matthew C

2014-02-01

115

Growth Modes of Epitaxial Au/Co/Au Sandwiches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study investigated the optimum growth conditions of epitaxial Gold/Cobalt/Gold (Au/Co/Au) sandwiches with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The thermally induced evolution of sandwich morphology, which determines its magnetic properties, wa...

A. Wawro L. T. Baczewski P. Pankowski M. Kisielewski I. Sveklo

2002-01-01

116

Water on Au sputtered films.  

PubMed

Transient changes in the contact angle, ?? ? 10°, of water on gold (Au) reveal reversible wetting of near hydrophobic Au films. The recovery time is temperature dependent. Surface flatness is investigated using AFM and profilometery. PMID:24992893

Canning, J; Tzoumis, N; Beattie, J K; Gibson, B C; Ilagan, E

2014-07-17

117

Arthropathie destructrice des ?paules au cours d'une acrom?galie  

PubMed Central

L'acromégalie est une maladie endocrinienne rare, en rapport avec une hypersécrétion d'hormone de croissance. Elle a des conséquences rhumatologiques: l'arthropathie périphérique, l'atteinte rachidienne et les syndromes canalaires. L'atteinte articulaire accompagne une acromégalie active, sa survenue après un traitement radical et une rémission complète est rare. Nous présentons le cas d'une patiente de 70 ans ayant un antécédent d'acromégalie sur adénome hypophysaire il y a 25 ans, traitée chirurgicalement et déclarée en rémission complète, a développé une arthropathie destructrice des deux épaules. Le but de notre observation est de mettre le point sur la possibilité d'une atteinte articulaire au cours de l'acromégalie et de son retentissement fonctionnelle.

Akasbi, Nessrine; Tahiri, Latifa; Lyhyaoui, Ouafae; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Sqalli Houssaini, Ghita; Elmrini, Abdelmajid; Ajdi, Farida; Taoufik, Harzy

2011-01-01

118

The Use of the Teacher Perceiver Interview to Select Vocational Agriculture Teachers Who Develop Positive Rapport with Their Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author describes his study using the Teacher Perceiver Interview (TPI), concluding that this method can be used by interviewers to select vocational agriculture teachers with positive teacher-pupil rapport. He also identifies questions within the TPI that were most predictive. (MF)

Simmons, James E.

1978-01-01

119

Winning Their Hearts. Members Speak Out: In performances, How do You Establish Rapport between Your Choir and Young Audiences?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author discusses techniques on how to establish rapport between the choir and young audiences. According to him, one of the choir's most important assets just might be something he calls access-ability. One of Webster's definitions of "access "is" permission, liberty, or ability to enter, approach, or communicate with." When it comes to…

Montague, Matthew G.

2005-01-01

120

Application of quality circles in junior high\\/middle schools: Job satisfaction, rapport among teachers, community support and community pressures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to analyze staff perceptions of job satisfaction, rapport among teachers, community support of education and community pressures in junior high\\/middle schools using Quality Circles as compared to other schools using a different strategy as part of their shared decision-making model. Schools were identified by the school system implementing the strategy. A group of ten

Eduardo Raul Rivas

1989-01-01

121

Palynology, palynofacies and petroleum potential of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Palynological, palynofacies and organic geochemical results of 46 samples retrieved from the Upper Cretaceous - Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt are presented. The two latter formations are not dated palynologically as their lithology is not promising for palynological yield. However the Matulla Formation is dated as Turonian-Santonian age, based on the combined evidence of pollen and dinocysts. Palynofacies analysis carried out under both transmitted and fluorescent microscopy indicated that both the Thebes and Brown Limestone formations are deposited under a distal suboxic-anoxic environment. On the other hand, the Turonian-Santonian Matulla Formation supported the existence of a marginal marine deposition under dysoxic-anoxic basin to proximal suboxic-anoxic shelf environments. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and TOC results indicated that most of the studied formations are thermally immature to marginally mature and have a good petroleum potential. They are organically-rich in both oil- and gas-prone kerogen Type-II and II/III, deposited under marine reducing conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion.

El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Abo Ghonaim, A. A.; Mostafa, A. R.; El Atfy, H.

2014-07-01

122

Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems.  

PubMed

Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins' luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed. PMID:24373347

Kalachyova, Yevgeniya; Lyutakov, Oleksiy; Solovyev, Andrey; Slepi?ka, Petr; Svor?ík, Vaclav

2013-01-01

123

Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins' luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed.

Kalachyova, Yevgeniya; Lyutakov, Oleksiy; Solovyev, Andrey; Slepi?ka, Petr; Švor?ík, Vaclav

2013-12-01

124

Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems  

PubMed Central

Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins’ luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed.

2013-01-01

125

Structural geology and 4D evolution of a half-graben: New digital outcrop modelling techniques applied to the Nukhul half-graben, Suez rift, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

LIDAR-based digital outcrop mapping, in conjunction with a new surface modelling approach specifically designed to deal with outcrop datasets, is used to examine the evolution of a half-graben scale normal fault array in the Suez rift. Syn-rift deposition in the Nukhul half-graben was controlled by the graben-bounding Nukhul fault. The fault can be divided into four segments based on the strike of the fault, the morphology of hangingwall strata, and the variation in throw along strike. The segments of the fault became geometrically linked within the first 2.5 m.y. of rifting, as evidenced by the presence of early syn-rift Abu Zenima Formation strata at the segment linkage points. Fault-perpendicular folds in the hangingwall related to along-strike variations in throw associated with precursor fault segments persist for a further 1.8 m.y. after linkage of the segments, suggesting that the fault remains kinematically segmented. We suggest this occurs because of sudden changes in fault strike at the segment linkage points that inhibit earthquake rupture propagation, or because displacement is geometrically inhibited at fault linkage points where the orientation of the intersection line of the segments is significantly different from the orientation of the slip vector on the fault system. Length/throw plots and throw contour patterns for minor faults show that some faults initiated in pre-rift strata, whereas late east-striking faults initiated in the syn-rift basin fill. The late initiating faults are spatially associated with the east-striking Baba-Markha fault, which was active throughout the rift history, but developed as a transfer fault between major block-bounding fault systems around 6-7 Ma after rift initiation.

Wilson, Paul; Hodgetts, David; Rarity, Franklin; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Sharp, Ian R.

2009-03-01

126

Geophysical Constraints on the Hydrogeologic and Structural Settings of the Gulf of Suez Rift-Related Basins: Case Study from the El Qaa Plain, Sinai, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater has been identified as one of the major freshwater sources that can potentially meet the growing demands of Egypt's population. Gravity data (from 381 ground gravity stations) were collected, processed, and analyzed together with the available aeromagnetic (800 line-km) data to investigate the hydrogeologic and structural settings, areal distribution, geometry, and water storage of the aquifers in El Qaa coastal plain in the southwest Sinai Peninsula, and to assess their longevity given projected extraction rates. Findings include (1) complete Bouguer anomaly and total magnetic intensity maps show two connected sub-basins separated by a narrow saddle with an average basin length of 43 km and an average width of 12 km; (2) two-dimensional modeling of both gravity and magnetic data indicates basin fill with a maximum thickness of 3.5 km; (3) using anomalous residual gravity, the volume of water in storage was estimated at 40-56 km3; and (4) progressive increases in extraction rates over time will deplete up to 40 % of the aquifers' volume in 200-230 years and will cause the water quality to deteriorate due to seawater intrusion in 45 years. Similar geophysical exploration campaigns, if conducted over the entire coastal plains of the Red Sea and the Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba, could assist in the development of sound and sustainable management schemes for the freshwater resources in these areas. The adopted techniques could pave the way toward the establishment of sustainable utilization schemes for a much larger suite of similar aquifers worldwide.

Ahmed, Mohamed; Sauck, William; Sultan, Mohamed; Yan, Eugene; Soliman, Farouk; Rashed, Mohamed

2013-11-01

127

Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au + Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The inclusive light fragment (Z<=7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented as a function of multiplicity. Moving from central to peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted, within errors, by a single ? exponent independently of the bombarding energy except for the data at 250A MeV. In addition, the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments, for a given beam energy, shifts towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distribution are also reported. The universal features observed in the present Au + Au data are consistent with previous experimental findings in the Au + C multifragmentation reaction at 1A GeV.

Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Ritter, H. G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wienold, T.; Wolf, K. L.

2000-04-01

128

Photoelectrochemical studies of DNA-tagged biomolecules on Au and Au/Ni/Au multilayer nanowires  

PubMed Central

The use of nanowires (NWs) for labeling, sensing, and sorting is the basis of detecting biomolecules attached on NWs by optical and magnetic properties. In spite of many advantages, the use of biomolecules-attached NWs sensing by photoelectrochemical (PEC) study is almost non-existent. In this article, the PEC study of dye-attached single-stranded DNA on Au NWs and Au-Ni-Au multilayer NWs prepared by pulse electrodeposition are investigated. Owing to quantum-quenching effect, the multilayer Au NWs exhibit low optical absorbance when compared with Au NWs. The tagged Au NWs show good fluorescence (emission) at 570 nm, indicating significant improvement in the reflectivity. Optimum results obtained for tagged Au NWs attached on functionalized carbon electrodes and its PEC behavior is also presented. A twofold enhancement in photocurrent is observed with an average dark current of 10 ?A for Au NWs coated on functionalized sensing electrode. The importance of these PEC and optical studies provides an inexpensive and facile processing platform for Au NWs that may be suitable for biolabeling applications.

2011-01-01

129

Electrochemical control of stability and restructuring dynamics in Au-Ag-Au and Au-Cu-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions.  

PubMed

Metallic atom-scale junctions (ASJs) are interesting fundamentally because they support ballistic transport, characterized by conduction quantized in units of G(0) = 2e(2)/h. They are also of potential practical interest since ASJ conductance is extraordinarily sensitive to molecular adsorption. Monometallic Au ASJs were previously fabricated electrochemically using an I(-)/I(3)(-) medium and a unique open working electrode configuration to produce slow electrodeposition or electrodissolution, resulting in reproducible ASJs with limiting conductance <5 G(0). Here, bimetallic Au-Cu-Au and Au-Ag-Au ASJ structures are obtained by electrochemical deposition/dissolution of Cu and Ag in K(2)SO(4) supporting electrolyte. The ASJs are fabricated in Si(3)N(4)-protected Au nanogaps obtained by focused ion beam milling, a protocol which yields repeatable and reproducible Au-Cu-Au or Au-Ag-Au ASJs without damaging the Au nanogap substrates. While Au-Ag-Au ASJs are relatively stable (hours) at open circuit potential in the supporting electrolyte, Au-Cu-Au ASJs exhibit spontaneous restructuring dynamics, characterized by monotonic, stepwise decreases in conductance under the same conditions. However, the Au-Cu-Au ASJs can be stabilized by applying sufficiently negative potentials. Hydrogen adsorption and shifts in the Fermi level are possible reasons for the enhanced stability of Au-Cu-Au structures at large negative overpotentials. In light of these observations, it is possible to integrate ASJs in microfluidic devices as renewable, nanostructured sensing elements for chemical detection. PMID:20394406

Shi, Ping; Bohn, Paul W

2010-05-25

130

Ferromagnetism in Au4v.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In a search for an explanation of the anomalies observed in low-temperature magnetic-susceptibility data, on Au-V alloys, it was found that the compound Au4V becomes ferromagnetic at 43K. This is only the third ferromagnetic intermetallic compound known t...

L. Creveling H. L. Luo G. S. Knapp

1967-01-01

131

Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46 and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing.High resolution ESI mass spectrometry of the ``22 kDa'' nanocluster reveals the presence of a mixture containing Au103(SR)45, Au104(SR)45, Au104(SR)46, and Au105(SR)46 nanoclusters, where R = -CH2CH2Ph. MALDI TOF MS data confirm the purity of the sample and a UV-vis spectrum shows minor features. Au102(SC6H5COOH)44, whose XRD crystal structure was recently reported, is not observed. This is due to ligand effects, because the 102 : 44 composition is produced using aromatic ligands. However, the 103-, 104- and 105-atom nanoclusters, protected by -SCH2CH2Ph and -SC6H13 ligands, are at or near 58 electron shell closing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03872f

Dass, Amala; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Kothalawala, Nuwan

2013-11-01

132

Electrodeposition of Au-Cd alloy nanostructures on Au(111).  

PubMed

This report concerns an in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of the initial stages in the formation of a Au-Cd alloy on the Au(111) herringbone reconstruction. Although Au-Cd nanoclusters of alloy have been observed in sulfate electrolyte by this group, alloy "nanowires" were observed to form preferentially in the hcp regions between the sets of "soliton" walls of the reconstruction only in the presence of chloride. The nanowires were formed at -0.55 V versus 3 M Ag/AgCl, corresponding to Cd underpotential deposition (upd). Upd is electrodeposition at a potential prior to that needed to deposit the bulk element. PMID:12553837

Lay, Marcus D; Stickney, John L

2003-02-01

133

My?lome multiple survenant au cours d'une Fi?vre M?diterran?enne Familiale  

PubMed Central

L'objectif de ce travail est de rapporter une observation particulière de myélome multiple survenant au cours d'une maladie périodique. Il s'agit d'un patient tunisien de 53 ans suivi depuis le jeune âge pour maladie périodique dont le diagnostic était confirmé par l’étude génétique montrant l'homozygotie pour la mutation M694V du gène MEFV, fut admis pour exploration d'une douleur avec tuméfaction fessière droite récente. Les explorations biologiques et radiologiques ont permis de retenir le diagnostic d'un myélome multiple de type IgA à chaînes légères kappa stade III B, associé à une volumineuse localisation plasmocytaire très agressive de l'aile iliaque droite envahissant les structures musculaires avoisinantes. Notre observation, qui à notre connaissance est la deuxième signalant une telle association, se distingue par sa survenue brutale, sa progression rapide et le caractère très agressif de l'hémopathie.

Salem, Bouomrani; Afef, Farah; Nadia, Bouassida; Nabil, Ayadi; Zouhir, Bahloul; Maher, Beji

2013-01-01

134

From (Au5Sn + AuSn) physical mixture to phase pure AuSn and Au5Sn intermetallic nanocrystals with tailored morphology: digestive ripening assisted approach.  

PubMed

Here we present digestive ripening facilitated interatomic diffusion for the phase controlled synthesis of homogeneous intermetallic nanocrystals of Au-Sn system. Au and Sn metal nanoparticles synthesized by a solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method are employed as precursors for the fabrication of AuSn and Au5Sn which are Au-rich Au-Sn intermetallic nanocrystals. By optimizing the stoichiometry of Au and Sn in the reaction mixture, and by employing growth directing agents, the formation of phase pure intermetallic AuSn and Au5Sn nanocrystals could be realized. The as-prepared Au and Sn colloidal nanoparticles and the resulting intermetallic nanocrystals are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and STEM-EDS), and optical spectroscopy. The results obtained here demonstrate the potential of solution chemistry which allows synthesizing phase pure Au-Sn intermetallics with tailored morphology. PMID:24797383

Arora, Neha; Jagirdar, Balaji R

2014-06-21

135

A production in Au-Au collisions at the AGS  

SciTech Connect

The results of a measurement of production in Au-Au collisions at 11.6 A GeV/c by Experiment 891 at the Brookhaven AGS are presented. The measurements cover the rapidity region of 2.0 to 3.2 and transverse momenta of 0.0 to 1.4 GeV/c. The results are compared with similar measurements of Si-Si interactions and the predictions of ARC and RQMD models.

Saulys, A.C.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J. [and others

1996-12-31

136

Fluid dynamical predictions for Au+Au collisions at AGS  

SciTech Connect

Signatures of collective effects are studied in the Quark Gluon String Model and in the Fluid Dynamical Model for Au {plus} Au collisions at 11.6 A GeV. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of measurables on the QGP formation in the EOS is pointed out, although the max. total amount of pure QGP formed is only 4 fm{sup 3} in these reactions. In QGSM the lifetime and extent of latent energy in strings is studied.

Bravina, L.; Csernai, L.P. [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics; Levai, P. [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics]|[Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics; Strottmam, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-02-01

137

Fluid dynamical predictions for Au+Au collisions at AGS  

SciTech Connect

Signatures of collective effects are studied in the Quark Gluon String Model and in the Fluid Dynamical Model for Au [plus] Au collisions at 11.6 A GeV. In the fluid dynamical model the dependence of measurables on the QGP formation in the EOS is pointed out, although the max. total amount of pure QGP formed is only 4 fm[sup 3] in these reactions. In QGSM the lifetime and extent of latent energy in strings is studied.

Bravina, L.; Csernai, L.P. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics); Levai, P. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics); Strottmam, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01

138

Elliptic flow parameter in Au+Au and p+Au collisions at top RHIC energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new issue of parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE 2.1 is utilized investigating the charged particle elliptic flow parameter v2 in Au+Au and p+Au collisions at top RHIC energy. If the transverse momenta px and py of particles from string fragmentation are randomly sampled on the circumference of an ellipse instead of circle originally the PHENIX charged particle v2(?) and v2(pT) data in the 20-40% and 40-50% central Au+Au collisions at ? {sNN} = 200 GeV are fairly reproduced by the PACIAE 2.1 calculations, respectively. In addition, the charged particle v2(?) and v2(pT) in the p+Au collisions at ? {sNN} = 200 GeV are predicted. It turned out that the charged particle elliptic flow parameter v2 may reach a measurable value of 0.04 in the above p+Au collisions.

Zhou, Dai-Mei; Cai, Xu; Cheng, Yun; Yan, Yu-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Sa, Ben-Hao

2014-04-01

139

Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts  

PubMed Central

Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

2014-01-01

140

Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts.  

PubMed

Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

2014-01-01

141

Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

2014-05-01

142

Surveillance des comportements face au VIH\\/sida chez les hommes ayant des rapports sexuels avec des hommes — Suisse, 1992–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  \\u000a Surveillance of HIV\\/AIDS — related behaviors among men who have sex with men — Switzerland, 1992–2004\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective:  To update (1992–2004, Switzerland) trends in behaviors and opinions relative to HIV prevention among men who have sex with\\u000a men.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods:  A cross sectional survey, repeated five times since 1992, among readers of the gay press and members of gay associations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results:  An increase was

H. Balthasar; A. Jeannin; F. Dubois-Arber

2007-01-01

143

Neutral pion production in Au + Au collisions at RHIC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New results from the 2010 RHIC low energy program show a substantial suppression of neutral pions in central Au + Au collisions at both ?{sNN}=39 and 62.4 GeV c.m.s. energies. At high pT the 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV data follow the same suppression pattern. On the other hand, otherwise successful pQCD predictions do not describe the 39 GeV data. These observations indicate that initial state effects may play a dominant role at smaller c.m.s. energies and at lower pT. The azimuthal dependence of the nuclear modification factor RAA is strongly correlated with the (approximately elliptical) geometry of the overlap region. The dependence of RAA on the reaction plane, determined up to pT=20 GeV/c from 2007 high-luminosity ?{sNN}=200 GeV Au + Au data provides great selectivity among theories, and favours the ASW scenario with AdS/CFT correspondence over the pQCD-based models.

Vértesi, Róbert

2013-08-01

144

Photoneutron cross sections for Au  

SciTech Connect

Photoneutron cross sections were measured for Au in the entire energy range of the ({gamma},n) channel based on a direct neutron-counting technique with quasimonochromatic {gamma} rays produced in inverse Compton-scattering of laser photons with relativistic electrons. We present results of the measurement in comparison with the past data.

Itoh, O.; Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Kondo, T.; Kamata, M. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto 8-9-1, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Harada, H.; Kitatani, F. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Goko, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Nair, C. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lui, Y.-W. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

2011-10-28

145

Analyse s?rologique de la toxoplasmose pergravidique: ?valuation des risques et perspectives du d?pistage pr?natal au centre hospitalier universitaire de Bobo Dioulasso au Burkina Faso  

PubMed Central

Introduction La présente étude rapporte les données sérologiques de 306 sérums collectés chez des parturientes au CHU de Bobo Dioulasso et analysés rétrospectivement au CHU de Reims en 2011. Le but était de déterminer le statut sérologique de ces parturientes et d'en déduire la conduite à tenir. Méthodes La recherche des IgG et des IgM anti toxoplasmiques était systématique. Les techniques d'agglutination haute sensibilisée et celle d'Immunocapture M ont servi à la recherche respective des anticorps spécifiques IgG et des IgM. Résultats Sur 306 sérums analysés, 95 (31%) avaient des IgG positifs et aucun n'avait des IgM. Deux cent onze (211) sérums (69%) des sérums n'avaient ni IgG, ni IgM. Conclusion Nos résultats montrent que 31% des femmes en dehors d'une immunodépression sous jacente, possèdent une immunité résiduelle vis à vis de Toxoplasma gondii et n'ont pas la nécessité d'avoir une surveillance sérologique pendant la grossesse. Cependant, 69% (211) des parturientes sont à risque d'une séroconversion, et devraient bénéficier de conseils hygiéno diététiques, associés à une surveillance sérologique durant la grossesse. Ces résultats montrent l'intérêt de mettre en place des mesures de prévention contre la toxoplasmose congénitale, étant l'une des affections materno - foetales les plus fréquentes par la mise en place d'un diagnostic prénatal de la toxoplasmose en routine dans notre hôpital.

Bamba, Sanata; Some, Der Adolphe; Chemla, Cathy; Geers, Regine; Guiguemde, Tinga Robert; Villena, Isabelle

2012-01-01

146

MgAuGa and MgAu2Ga: first representatives of the Mg-Au-Ga system.  

PubMed

MgAuGa (magnesium gold gallium), the first ternary representative of the Mg-Au-Ga system, crystallizes in the space group P62m and adopts the Fe2P structure type (Pearson symbol hP9). Various phases with the general composition AB2 have been reported in the surrounding binary systems, viz. Mg2Ga (hP18), MgGa2 (hP6; CaIn2 type), AuGa2 (cF12; CaF2 type), Au2Ga (oS24; Pd2As type) and Mg2Au (oP12; Co2Si type). In principle, MgAuGa can be obtained from each of them by partial replacement of the major element with the missing element. In fact, the structure of MgAuGa closely resembles hexagonal Mg2Ga through a direct group-subgroup relationship. MgAu2Ga (magnesium digold gallium) also crystallizes hexagonally in the space group P6(3)/mmc and is isotypic with Na3As. It adopts the structure of another binary compound, viz. Mg3Au (hP8), but shows an unexpected distribution of Mg, Au, and Ga among the atomic positions of the asymmetric unit. Both MgAuGa and MgAu2Ga can be described as formally anionic Au/Ga frameworks, with pseudo-hexagonal tunnels around Mg in MgAuGa or cages in MgAu2Ga. PMID:24705047

Smetana, Volodymyr; Corbett, John D; Miller, Gordon J

2014-04-01

147

Biosynthesis and stabilization of Au and Au Ag alloy nanoparticles by fungus, Fusarium semitectum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystallized and spherical-shaped Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles have been synthesized and stabilized using a fungus, F . semitectum in an aqueous system. Aqueous solutions of chloroaurate ions for Au and chloroaurate and Ag+ ions (1 : 1 ratio) for Au-Ag alloy were treated with an extracellular filtrate of F . semitectum biomass for the formation of Au nanoparticles (AuNP) and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles (Au-AgNP). Analysis of the feasibility of the biosynthesized nanoparticles and core-shell alloy nanoparticles from fungal strains is particularly significant. The resultant colloidal suspensions are highly stable for many weeks. The obtained Au and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles were characterized by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks using a UV-vis spectrophotometer, and the structure, morphology and size were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Possible optoelectronics and medical applications of these nanoparticles are envisaged.

Dasaratrao Sawle, Balaji; Salimath, Basavaraja; Deshpande, Raghunandan; Dhondojirao Bedre, Mahesh; Krishnamurthy Prabhakar, Belawadi; Venkataraman, Abbaraju

2008-09-01

148

Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au+Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The inclusive light fragment (Z<=7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented and discussed. For peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted by a single ? exponent independently of the bombarding energy in the range 250-1200 A MeV. In addition to this universal feature, we observe that the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments shift towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distributions and correlations among different moments are reported. Finally, the THe,DT thermometer has been constructed for central and peripheral collisions using the double yield ratios of He and D, T projectile fragments. The measured nuclear temperatures are in agreement with experimental findings in other fragmentation reactions. .

Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J. M.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wolf, K. L.

2001-11-01

149

Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-08-02

150

Spectroscopy of Au n, Au 20O and Au 20O II gold cluster: structure identification from IR spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report a systematic theoretical investigation of the vibrational spectra of bare gold clusters Au n (from n=3 to n=20) and oxidized gold clusters Au 200, Au 200 II. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and SBK basis set (for the effective core potential with relativistic correction) was used to calculate the structure and vibrational frequencies of gold clusters. A weak correlation between pattern of Au n spectrum (10-200 cm -1 range) and their structure was found. Calculated IR spectra of Au 200 and Au 200 II complexes are strong depend from the their structure and types of 0-Au bonds and can be used for the identification of the structures of oxidized gold clusters.

Pichugina, Dariya A.; Kuz'menko, Nikolai E.; Shestakov, Alexander F.

2006-12-01

151

d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

Sickles, Anne M.

2014-06-01

152

Acetylene Hydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogenation of acetylene has been investigated on Au\\/TiO2, Pd\\/TiO2 and Au-Pd\\/TiO2 catalysts at high acetylene conversion levels. The Au\\/TiO2 catalyst (avg. particle size: 4.6 nm) synthesized by the temperature-programmed reduction-oxidation of an Au-phosphine complex on TiO2 showed a remarkably high selectivity to ethylene formation even at 100% acetylene conversion. Au\\/TiO2 prepared by the conventional incipient wet impregnation method (avg. particle

T. V. Choudhary; C. Sivadinarayana; A. K. Datye; D. Kumar; D. W. Goodman

2003-01-01

153

High resolution photoelectron imaging of Au2-  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au2- using a newly built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron images are obtained for the ground state detachment transition of Au2- at various photon energies (442.80-670.18 nm) at a resolution of 3 cm-1 for low energy electrons. Franck-Condon simulations yield the vibrational temperature of Au2- and the high resolution data yield accurate spectroscopic constants for the ground states of Au2 and Au2-. The electron affinity of Au2 is measured to be 1.9393 +/- 0.0006 eV. A more precise value for the Au2- dissociation energy is also obtained as 1.937 +/- 0.005 eV.

León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-05-01

154

High resolution photoelectron imaging of Au2(-).  

PubMed

We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au2(-) using a newly built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron images are obtained for the ground state detachment transition of Au2(-) at various photon energies (442.80-670.18 nm) at a resolution of 3 cm(-1) for low energy electrons. Franck-Condon simulations yield the vibrational temperature of Au2(-) and the high resolution data yield accurate spectroscopic constants for the ground states of Au2 and Au2(-). The electron affinity of Au2 is measured to be 1.9393 ± 0.0006 eV. A more precise value for the Au2(-) dissociation energy is also obtained as 1.937 ± 0.005 eV. PMID:23676041

León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-05-14

155

New Strategies To Combat Long-Term Unemployment in Belgium, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Synthesis Report = Nouvelles strategies de lutte contre le chomage de longue duree en Belgigue, au Danemark, et au Royaume-Uni. Rapport de synthese.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This synthesis report provides information to policy makers, practitioners, and researchers on the new strategies and measures adopted in Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom to combat long-term unemployment. It begins with a summary of strategies and measures adopted in each of the three countries. Each country report highlights the following…

Geers, Frederik; And Others

156

Identified charge hadron spectra and ratios in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at = 200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PHENIX has recently reported [1] measurements of identified charged hadron spectra and ratios in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at = 200 GeV. Identified hadrons are an important probe of both hot and cold nuclear matter. The intermediate pT region, 2-5 GeV/c, is of particular interest. In Au+Au collisions, the production of mesons is suppressed in this pT region relative to that in p+p collisions, while the production of baryons is nearly unmodified. On the other hand, in d+Au collisions, the meson production exhibits a slight enhancement in this pT region while the baryon production exhibits a much stronger enhancement. In these proceedings, the pT spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons ?±, K±, p, and bar p in 5 different centrality classes for each collision species will be discussed.

Belmont, Ron

2014-05-01

157

Fe/Au Multilayers: Structure and Magnetoresistance  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the magnetoresistance (MR) in two sets of Fe/Au multilayers, with varying (1) Fe layer thickness, t{sub Fe} = 3-10 nm, and (2) Au layer thickness t{sub Au} = 5-15 nm, grown on Si substrates by sputtering. The multilayer interface structure and magnetic properties were studied by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). The study was undertaken to understand the correlation between structure of these multilayers and their magneto-transport properties.

Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal; Bhattacharya, D. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Prajapat, C. L. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

2011-07-15

158

Light scattering calculations from Au and Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the importance of the optical properties of Au and Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles, in this article we focus our attention on the light scattering properties of such systems and on a relative comparison. In particular, we report theoretical results of angle-dependent light scattering intensity and scattering efficiency for Au and Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles increasing the Au particle radius from 30 to 130 nm, and for Au/SiO2 core/shell particles changing the core-to-shell sizes ratio. Finally, a comparison between the scattering efficiency of the Au and Au/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles is drawn. The results of this work can be used in the design of tunable efficiency light scattering devices (biological and molecular sensors, solar cells).

Ruffino, F.; Pugliara, A.; Carria, E.; Bongiorno, C.; Grimaldi, M. G.

2013-01-01

159

Interplanetary dust between 1 and 5 AU  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses of data from the Meteoroid Detection Experiment (MDE) and the Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) aboard Pioneer 10 and 11 have led to contradictory conclusions. While the MDE indicates a significant particle environment in the outer solar system (out to at least 5 AU), the IPP sees no zodiacal light (therefore implying no small particles) past 3.3 AU. These two results are reconciled by noting that the spectral index p (relating particle radius and particle concentration) is not a constant in the solar system but changes from less than 2 near 1 AU to more than 2.5 at 5 AU for particles in the range of 10 microns.

Stanley, J. E.; Singer, S. F.; Alvarez, J. M.

1979-01-01

160

Cooperative self-assembly of Au atoms and C60 on Au(110) surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new cooperative self-assembly process where C60 molecules adsorbed on Au(110)-(1×2) surfaces induce mass transport of Au surface atoms to form a (1×5) interfacial reconstruction is presented. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that the underlying Au atomic arrangement is modified, maximizing the number of C60 molecules bonded to the Au ridges in a distorted (6×5) hexagonal overlayer.

Gimzewski, J. K.; Modesti, S.; Schlittler, R. R.

1994-02-01

161

Molecular dynamics study of Co-Au and Ag-Au bimetallic atomic chain formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report molecular dynamics calculations on the evolution of Co-Au and Ag-Au alloy nanowires stretched along the [100], [110] and [111] crystallographic directions. The strong tendency of chain formation has been found for Ag-Au alloy. On the contrary the Co-Au alloy presents a different breaking pattern. In particular, we have found the formation of tetramer alloy nanowires. Finally, we present the mechanical properties of alloy nanocontacts.

Klavsyuk, A. L.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Gainullin, I. K.; Saletsky, A. M.

2012-10-01

162

Kinematic Correlation of the Ternary Fission for the System 197Au + 197Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collisions of very heavy nuclei 197Au + 197Au at the energy of 15A MeV has been studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The experimental mass distributions of ternary fission fragments for the system 197Au + 197 Au are reproduced well. The direct and sequential ternary fission modes are studied by the time dependent snapshots of typical ternary events. The analysis of deviation from Viola systematics indicates the nonstatistical feature of the ternary fission in these reactions.

Tian, Junlong; Li, Xian; Yan, Shiwei; Wu, Xizhen; Li, Zhuxia

163

Potential induced structural transformations of the Au(100) and Au(111) surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work has concentrated on the use of emersed Au(111) films evaporated on cleaved mica, analogous to the Ag(111) films used in other GID studies. We have studied these Au(111) films using the dame LEEDUHV apparatus as in our previous studies of Au(111) crystals, and supplemented these with GID (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction) analysis of emersed Au(111) films with thru-air transfer

P. N. Ross Jr.

1987-01-01

164

Potential induced structural transformations of the Au(100) and Au(111) surfaces. [Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work has concentrated on the use of emersed Au(111) films evaporated on cleaved mica, analogous to the Ag(111) films used in other GID studies. We have studied these Au(111) films using the dame LEEDUHV apparatus as in our previous studies of Au(111) crystals, and supplemented these with GID (grazing incidence x-ray diffraction) analysis of emersed Au(111) films with thru-air transfer

P. N. Jr

1987-01-01

165

Vibrationally resolved photoelectron imaging of gold hydride cluster anions: AuH- and Au2H-  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photoelectron spectra and angular distributions in photodetachment of gold hydride anions AuH- and Au2H- have been obtained using photoelectron velocity-map imaging. Both the images exhibit vibrationally resolved ground state transitions. The adiabatic electron affinities of AuH and Au2H are measured to be 0.758(20) and 3.437(3) eV, respectively. Franck-Condon analyses of the AuH spectra determined that the equilibrium bond length of the ground state of AuH- is 1.597(6) A?´. The photoelectron images of Au2H- show a vibrational progression of 148(4) cm-1 assigned to the Au-Au stretching mode at the ground state. Ab initio calculation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. For the ground state of Au2H, a new bent Au-Au-H structure with the angle of 131° is suggested. Moreover, energy-dependent photoelectron anisotropy parameters are also reported and discussed.

Wu, Xia; Qin, Zhengbo; Xie, Hua; Cong, Ran; Wu, Xiaohu; Tang, Zichao; Fan, Hongjun

2010-07-01

166

Potential Induced Structural Transformations of the Au(100) and Au(111) Surfaces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Work has concentrated on the use of emersed Au(111) films evaporated on cleaved mica, analogous to the Ag(111) films used in other GID studies. We have studied these Au(111) films using the dame LEEDUHV apparatus as in our previous studies of Au(111) crys...

P. N. Ross

1987-01-01

167

Superconductivity in Au-Cr-Au and Ag-Pd-Ag Epitaxial Metal Film Sandwiches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Thin layers (1-2 nm) of Cr and Pd have been grown in Epitaxial Metal Film Sandwiches (EMFS) with Au or Ag, respectively. Half of the Au-Cr-Au samples and one Ag-Pd-Ag sample were superconductors. Cr grows in an fcc structure and Pd is in a stretched latti...

M. B. Brodsky H. C. Hamaker

1982-01-01

168

Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages  

SciTech Connect

Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31

169

Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts.  

PubMed

Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect of Au in promoting TiO(2) photocatalysts. Electron localization efficiency of Au was even higher for Au-promoted Hombikat calcined at 400 degrees C, explained by enlargement of the anatase particle size and the associated, relatively larger fraction of anatase particles in direct contact with Au. PMID:19421529

Carneiro, Joana T; Savenije, Tom J; Mul, Guido

2009-04-21

170

The Ternary System Au Ni Sn  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phase relations in the Au-Ni-Sn system have been examined by powder X-ray diffraction, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and thermal analysis. The range of homogeneity of the various phases, tie-lines, and tie-triangles are presented for an isothermal section of the phase diagram at 400°C. Au and Ni can scarcely be mutually exchanged in most of the phases, but a continuous range of solid solubility seemingly occurs between AuSn (?) and Ni 3Sn 2(?). The maximum variation in the Sn content for this phase is found to be ca. 5 at%, for mole fractions between nNi/( nAu+ nNi) = 0.7 and 1.0. The only genuine ternary phase in the system, labeled A, takes the virtually stoichiometric composition AuNi 2Sn 4and exists at 400°C.

Neumann, Alexandra; Kjekshus, A.; Røst, E.

1996-05-01

171

Production of omega mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; C.-H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa Del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; L. D'Orazio; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y.-J. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers

2011-01-01

172

Engineered fabrication of ordered arrays of Au-NiO-Au nanowires.  

PubMed

In the present paper, a novel method to fabricate ordered arrays of Au/NiO/Au nanowires is described, with the aim of filling the gap between the fundamental study of the electrical properties of scattered single nanowires and the engineered fabrication of nanowire arrays. This approach mainly consists of the following steps: (a) electrodeposition of Au/Ni/Au nanowires into an ordered porous anodic aluminum oxide template; (b) mechanical polishing of the sample to expose the gold tips of Au/Ni/Au nanowires to the template surface; (c) in situ annealing of the Au/Ni/Au nanowires without removing the template. The resulting structure consists in an ordered array of Au/NiO/Au nanowires slightly protruding out of a flat aluminum oxide template. Unlike current approaches, with the described method it is not necessary to remove the template in order to oxidize the middle metal, thus allowing the availability of an entire set of metal/oxide/metal nanowires ordered in a two-dimensional matrix and where single heterojunctions can be accessed individually. PMID:23291391

Perego, Daniele; Franz, Silvia; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Cattaneo, Laura; Brivio, Stefano; Tallarida, Grazia; Spiga, Sabina

2013-02-01

173

IUE spectra of flares on AU Mic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some IUE spectra were obtained in August 1980 through a substantial part of the optical cycle of the BY Draconis-type, spotted M dwarf star, AU Mic. No modulation of the ultraviolet emission line fluxes in antiphase with the optical curve is detected. Simultaneous optical photometry of AU Mic shows remarkably poor correlation of optical flare strength and ultraviolet emission-line enhancements. The flares detected on AU Mic show considerable variety in the degree of enhancement in the various emission lines and optical continuum.

Butler, C. J.; ion lines and optical continuum.

1986-01-01

174

Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster  

SciTech Connect

40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Walter, Michael [University of Freiburg, Germany

2011-01-01

175

Effect of an Au underlayer on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Au/Co/Au(111) sandwich films  

SciTech Connect

The authors have used spin-wave Brillouin scattering to study perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Au/Co/Au(111) sandwiched films with varying thicknesses of Au-underlayers. By using 5-monolayer (ML)-thick Co films, the transition of spin-wave frequency between out-of-plane and in-plane magnetizations can be observed by varying the in-plane field. They find that the field-dependence of the spin-wave energy is explained by a calculation including both the first-order (second power) and the second-order uniaxial perpendicular anisotropies depending on the Au-underlayer. They observe saturation of the anisotropy at 5 ML of Au-underlayer thickness, which corresponds to the saturation of in-plane lattice expansion of Co on that Au-underlayer. The contribution of interface anisotropy is evaluated from the Co-thickness dependence of the anisotropy observed. They also have observed a field-dependent broadening of the spin-wave Brillouin spectra at a critical field between out-of-plane and in-plane magnetizations, which they attribute to a distribution of the first-order anisotropy.

Murayama, Akihiro; Hyomi, Kyoko; Eickmann, J.; Falco, C.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1998-07-01

176

Substrate effects on the analysis of biomolecular layers using Au +, Au 3+ and C 60+ bombardments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effects of platinum silicon, graphite and PET substrates on the secondary ion yield of sub-monolayer and multilayer samples of Cyclosporin A following 20 keV Au +, Au 3+and C 60+ impacts have been investigated. The obtained results of sub-monolayer samples show that platinum enhances the yield of the pseudo-molecular ion following Au + and Au 3+ impacts due to the high density of the substrate that enables the energy of the primary ions to be deposited near the surface. C 60+ impacts on sub-monolayer samples are less effective, but there is an enhancement on PET substrates. Impacts of 20 keV Au + and Au 3+ are not very efficient on multilayer samples. 20 keV C 60+ impacts enhance the yields significantly, especially for the relatively high molecular weight [M+H] + ion.

Kordys, Jeanette; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C.

2008-12-01

177

A comparative study of Ge/Au/Ni/Au-based ohmic contact on graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superior graphene—metal contacts can improve the performance of graphene devices. We report on an experimental demonstration of Ge/Au/Ni/Au-based ohmic contact on graphene. The transfer length method (TLM) is adopted to measure the resistivity of graphene-metal contacts. We designed a process flow, which can avoid residual photoresist at the interface of metal and graphene. Additionally, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at different temperatures as a post-processing method is studied to improve graphene—metal contact. The results reveal that the contact resistivity of graphene and Ge/Au/Ni/Au can reach 10?5 ?·cm2 after RTA, and that 350 °C is optimum annealing temperature for the contact of graphene—Ge/Au/Ni/Au. This paper provides guidance for fabrication and applications of graphene devices.

Wenchao, Min; Hao, Sun; Qilian, Zhang; Zhiying, Chen; Yanhui, Zhang; Guanghui, Yu; Xiaowei, Sun

2014-05-01

178

Au core/Au-Ag alloy shell nanorods: composition- and shape-tailored optical responses.  

PubMed

A feasible way is developed to prepare Au core/Au-Ag alloy shell nanorods (Au@Au(x)Ag(1-x) NRs) based on co-reduction of gold and silver ions under the guidance of Au NRs templates. Alloy nanorods with a wide composition range (x tunable from 0 to 1) are obtained. The Ag+/Au3+ ratios are found to affect the detailed morphology of the endcaps, which is responsible for the abnormal red-shift of localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mode. In consensus with theoretical prediction, dielectric sensitivity of the alloy NRs is mainly determined by the maximum of the LSPR band. Due to the change in electron structure, the alloy shells exhibit lower SERS activities than pure Ag shell. PMID:23646560

Liu, Jianbo; Feng, Lili; Hu, Zhijian; Hu, Xiaona; Hou, Shuai; Wen, Tao; Liu, Wenqi; Zhang, Ke; Zhu, Xing; Ji, Yinglu; Wang, Qi; Guo, Yuting; Wu, Xiaochun

2013-02-01

179

Comparative efficiencies of photothermal destruction of malignant cells using antibody-coated silica@Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three Au-based nanomaterials (silica@Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods) were evaluated for their comparative photothermal efficiencies at killing three types of malignant cells (A549 lung cancer cells, HeLa cervix cancer cells and TCC bladder cancer cells) using a CW NIR laser. Photodestructive efficiency was evaluated as a function of the number of nanoparticles required to destroy the cancer cells under 808 nm laser wavelength at fixed laser power. Of the three nanomaterials, silica@Au nanoshells needed the minimum number of particles to produce effective photodestruction, whereas Au nanorods needed the largest number of particles. Together with the calculated photothermal conversion efficiency, the photothermal efficiency rankings are silica@Au nanoshells > hollow Au/Ag nanospheres > Au nanorods. Additionally, we found that HeLa cells seem to present better heat tolerance than the other two cancer cell lines.

Cheng, Fong-Yu; Chen, Chen-Tai; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

2009-10-01

180

Initial Eccentricity in Deformed 197Au+197Au and 238U+238U Collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte-Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the non-sphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced due to deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi; Xu, Nu

2010-07-07

181

Thiol-capped ferromagnetic Au nanoparticles investigated by Au L3 x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different dodecanethiol capped Au nanoparticles (NP) with similar sizes (~2 nm) but different ferromagnetic signals at room temperature have been investigated by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L3-edge. The reversion of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal with the change of sign of the external applied magnetic field confirms the location of the magnetism at the Au

J. S. Garitaonandia; E. Goikolea; M. Insausti; M. Suzuki; N. Kawamura; H. Osawa; I. Gil Del Muro; K. Suzuki; J. D. Cashion; C. Gorria; F. Plazaola; T. Rojo

2009-01-01

182

Thermal Expansion of AuIn2  

SciTech Connect

The thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} gold is of great interest in soldering technology. Indium containing solders have been used to make gold wire interconnects at low soldering temperature and over time, AuIn{sub 2} is formed between the gold wire and the solder due to the high heat of formation and the high inter-metallic diffusion of indium. Hence, the thermal expansion of AuIn{sub 2} alloy in comparison with that of the gold wire and the indium-containing solder is critical in determining the integrity of the connection. We present the results of x-ray diffraction measurement of the coefficient of linear expansion of AuIn{sub 2} as well as the bulk expansion and density changes over the temperature range of 30 to 500 C.

Saw, C K; Siekhaus, W J

2004-07-12

183

Radical-involved photosynthesis of AuCN oligomers from Au nanoparticles and acetonitrile.  

PubMed

We show here the first radical route for the direct photosynthesis of AuCN oligomers with different sizes and shapes, as evidenced by TEM observations, from an Au nanoparticle/benzaldehyde/CH(3)CN ternary system in air under UV-light irradiation. This photochemical route is green, mild, and universal, which makes itself distinguishable from the common cyanidation process. Several elementary reaction steps, including the strong C-C bond dissociation of CH(3)CN and subsequent •CN radical addition to Au, have been suggested to be critical in the formation of AuCN oligomers based on the identification of •CN radical by in situ EPR and the radical trapping technique, and other reaction products by GC-MS and (1)H NMR, and DFT calculations. The resulting solid-state AuCN oligomers exhibit unique spectroscopic characters that may be a result of the shorter Au-Au distances (namely, aurophilicity) and/or special polymer-like structures as compared with gold cyanide derivatives in the aqueous phase. The nanosized AuCN oligomers supported on mesoporous silica showed relatively good catalytic activity on the homogeneous annulation of salicylaldehyde with phenylacetylene to afford isoflavanones employing PBu(3) as the cocatalyst under moderate conditions, which also serves as evidence for the successful production of AuCN oligomers. PMID:23061378

Li, Renhong; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Tong, Jiawei; Yan, Xiaoqing; Tang, Yu; Zou, Shihui; Jin, Jiabin; Yi, Wuzhong; Fan, Jie

2012-11-01

184

Bipolar resistive switching of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au heterostructure nanowires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arrays of Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires with a diameter of 50 nm were characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy, which was used to probe the electrical behavior of single nanowires still included in the array. A bipolar switching of the single Au/NiOx/Ni/Au nanowires is demonstrated and is attributed to the choice of an asymmetric couple of electrode materials and, possibly, to a non-uniform Ni oxidation profile inside the NiOx segments. An analysis of the conduction mechanism in a single nanowire is presented to further support this conclusion.

Brivio, S.; Perego, D.; Tallarida, G.; Bestetti, M.; Franz, S.; Spiga, S.

2013-10-01

185

Investigation of new neutron-rich gold isotopes203Au and205Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a208Pb beam of the UNILAC accelerator at GSI we produced the new isotopes203Au and205Au and identified them by measuring their ?-decay properties. Their half-lives were found to be 60(6) s and 31(2) s, respectively, and the Q-value of203Au was determined to be Q ? =2040(60)keV. Nuclear structure information of203,205Hg was derived from this measurement. Furthermore, production cross-sections of203,205Au are given and compared to those obtained in other experiments.

Wennemann, Ch.; Schmidt-Ott, W.-D.; Hild, T.; Krumbholz, K.; Kunze, V.; Meissner, F.; Keller, H.; Kirchner, R.; Roeckl, E.

1994-09-01

186

Advances in the catalysis of Au nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gold catalysts have recently been attracting rapidly growing interests due to their potential applicabilities to many reactions of both industrial and environmental importance. This article reviews the latest advances in the catalysis research on Au. For low-temperature CO oxidation mechanistic arguments are summarized, focusing on Au\\/TiO2 together with the effect of preparation conditions and pretreatments. The quantum size effect is

Masatake Haruta; Masakazu Daté

2001-01-01

187

Interplanetary magnetic clouds at 1 AU  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic clouds are defined as regions;with a radial dimension roughly-equal0.25 AU (at 1 AU) in which the magnetic field strength is high and the magnetic field direction changes appreciably by means of rotation of one component of B> nearly parallel to a plane. The magnetic field geometry in such a magnetic cloud is consistent with that of a magnetic loop,

L. W. Klein; L. F. Burlaga

1982-01-01

188

The Ternary System Au–Ni–Sn  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phase relations in the Au–Ni–Sn system have been examined by powder X-ray diffraction, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and thermal analysis. The range of homogeneity of the various phases, tie-lines, and tie-triangles are presented for an isothermal section of the phase diagram at 400°C. Au and Ni can scarcely be mutually exchanged in most of the phases, but a continuous

Alexandra Neumann; A. Kjekshus; E. Røst

1996-01-01

189

Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has\\u000aperformed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay\\u000achannel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at\\u000asqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the\\u000anuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au\\u000acollisions, studied as

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; N. Borggren; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; N. Cassano; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; C.-H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; L. D Orazio; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger Jr.; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-A. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; J. Hanks; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. J. Kim; Y.-J. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Kral; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; D. Roach; G. Roche

2010-01-01

190

Nuclear modification factors of varphi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of varphi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. Results are presented on the varphi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor RAA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and RdA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; N. Borggren; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. L. Charvet; C. H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa Del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'Yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger Jr.; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; J. Hanks; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. J. Kim; Y.-J. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; D. Roach

2011-01-01

191

Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the star detector.  

SciTech Connect

Identified charged-particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and {bar p} at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness, and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged-particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sup 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au+Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters because of the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freeze-out temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d+Au, and peripheral Au+Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au+Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

2009-01-01

192

Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR  

SciTech Connect

Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freezeout temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d + Au, and peripheral Au + Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au + Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au + Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

STAR Coll

2009-04-11

193

Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol by magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by the simple adsorption–reduction of Au(III) ions on chitosan-coated iron oxide magnetic nanocarrier. Au nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 3.14nm were well loaded on the surface of magnetic nanocarrier because chitosan layer provided an effective driving force in the formation and stabilization of Au nanoparticles. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst

Yang-Chuang Chang; Dong-Hwang Chen

2009-01-01

194

A comparative study of transition metal doped tubular gold cages:MatAu24(M=Au,Cu,Ag)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparative study of endohedral doping of Au24 tubular cage with transition metal M (M= Au, Cu, Ag) has been done using two different methodologies-the density functional theory (DFT) and semi empirical approach using the Gupta potential (GP). The GP predicts AuatAu24 to be the most stable while DFT predicts CuatAu24 to be the most stable; the AuatAu24 and AgatAu24 are found to be nearly isoenergetic. The Doping energy and HOMO-LUMO gap from DFT indicate that CuatAu24-I is chemically most inert.

Sumali; Priyanka; Dharamvir, Keya

2013-02-01

195

Hydrogen incorporation and embrittlement of electroformed Au, Cu and Au–Cu  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electroformed Au, Cu, Au–Cu layers and composites display severe brittleness in both as plated and heat treated conditions. This phenomenon has not been considered in the literature previously. In this paper we show the relevant embrittling phenomenology and explain it with the incorporation of hydrogen produced in electrochemical side reactions occurring during the formation of the metallic deposits. Our conclusions

B. Bozzini; G. Giovannelli; S. Natali; B. Brevaglieri; P. L. Cavallotti; G. Signorelli

1999-01-01

196

The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

2013-04-01

197

The centrality dependence of the source size for Au?Au collisions at the AGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent ???? correlation measurements and deuteron to proton yield ratio measurements for Au?Au collisions from Brookhaven E866 are presented. These measurements allow us, with some interpretation, to deduce the size of the participant region in a heavy ion collision. An unpredicted rise of the apparent source size is seen in the ???? data at midrapidity. No corresponding drop in the

M. D. Baker; L. Ahle; Y. Akiba; K. Ashktorab; D. Beavis; H. C. Britt; B. Budick; J. Chang; C. Chasman; Z. Chen; C.-Y. Chi; Y. Y. Chu; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; H. J. Crawford; H. J. Crawford; J. B. Cumming; R. Debbe; J. C. Dunlop; W. Eldredge; J. Engelage; S.-Y. Fung; J. J. Gaardhoje; M. Gonin; S. Gushue; H. Hamagaki; A. Hansen; L. Hansen; R. S. Hayano; S. Hayashi; G. Heintzelman; S. Homma; E. Judd; H. Kaneko; J. Kang; S. Kaufman; W. Kehoe; A. Kumagai; K. Kurita; M. J. Le Vine; H. Liu; J. Luke; Y. Miake; B. Moskowitz; M. Moulson; S. Nagamiya; M. N. Namboodiri; T. K. Nayak; C. A. Ogilvie; J. Olness; L. P. Remsberg; P. Rothschild; H. Sako; T. C. Sangster; H. Sakurai; R. Seto; J. Shea; K. Shigaki; R. Soltz; S. G. Steadman; G. S. F. Stephans; T. Sung; M. J. Tannenbaum; J. H. Thomas; S. Tonse; S Ueno; J. H. van Dijk; O. Vossnack; F. Videbæk; F. Wang; Y. Wang; H. Wegner; Y. Wu; H. Xiang; G. H. Xu; K. Yagi; X. Yang; D. Zachary; W. A. Zajc; Q. Zhu; F. Zhu

1996-01-01

198

Low-Q2 Partons in p-p and Au-Au Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We describe correlations of low-Q2 parton fragments on transverse rapidity yt and angles ({eta},{phi}) from p-p and Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s) = 130 and 200 AGeV. Evolution of correlations on yt from p-p to more-central Au-Au collisions shows evidence for parton dissipation. Cuts on yt isolate angular correlations on ({eta},{phi}) for low-Q2 partons which reveal a large asymmetry about the jet thrust axis in p-p collisions favoring the azimuth direction. Evolution of angular correlations with increasing Au-Au centrality reveals a rotation of the asymmetry to favor pseudorapidity. Angular correlations of transverse momentum pt in Au-Au collisions access temperature/velocity structure resulting from low-Q2 parton scattering pt autocorrelations on ({eta},{phi}), obtained from the scale dependence of fluctuations, reveal a complex parton dissipation process in heavy ion collisions which includes the possibility of collective bulk-medium recoil in response to parton stopping.

Trainor, Thomas A. [CENPA 354290, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2006-04-11

199

Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions at the AGS: recent results from E917.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions has been measured via the yields of K(+), K(-) at 6, 8 AGeV and of (- over Lambda) at 10.8 AGeV beam kinetic energy in experiment E917. By varying the collision centrality and beam energy, a systematic search for...

W. C. Chang B. Back R. Betts H. Britt W. Chang

1999-01-01

200

Phenomenological magnetic modeling of Au:Fe:Au nano-onions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new type of materials, the nano-onions, has been shown to exhibit GMR. These nanostructured composites consist of a nonmagnetic core coated with a thin layer of a bulk ferromagnet with a passivating nonmagnetic surface layer. The nano-onion investigated had a 3 nm Au core, a 1 nm Fe layer, and a 2 nm Au coating; all values correspond to

J. Wiggins; Everett E. Carpenter; Charles J. O'Connor

2000-01-01

201

Watchfully checking rapport with the Primary Child Health Care nurses - a theoretical model from the perspective of parents of foreign origin  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, multicultural interaction within health care seems to be challenging and problematic. This is also true among Primary Child Health Care nurses (PCHC nurses) in the Swedish Primary Child Health Care services (PCHC services). Therefore, there was a need to investigate the parents' perspective in-depth. Aim The aim of the study was to construct a theoretical model that could promote further understanding of the variety of experiences of parents of foreign origin regarding their interaction with the PCHC nurses at PCHC services. Method The study used Grounded Theory Methodology. Twenty-one parents of foreign origin in contact with PCHC servicies were interviewed. Results In our study parents were watchfully checking rapport, i.e. if they could perceive sympathy and understanding from the PCHC nurses. This was done by checking the nurse's demeanour and signs of judgement. From these interviews we created a theoretical model illustrating the interactive process between parents and PCHC nurses. Conclusion We found it to be of utmost importance for parents to be certain that it was possible to establish rapport with the PCHC nurse. If not, disruptions in the child's attendance at PCHC services could result. PCHC nurses can use the theoretical model resulting from this study as a basis for understanding parents, avoiding a demeanour and judgements that may cause misunderstandings thus promoting high-quality interaction in PCHC services.

2010-01-01

202

Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

2002-12-09

203

Transverse momentum distributions and string percolation study in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at root S-NN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiparticle production at high energies is described in terms of color strings stretched between the projectile and target. As string density increases, overlap among the strings leads to cluster formation. At some critical density, a macroscopic cluster appears, spanning the entire system. This marks the percolation phase transition. Data from p+p, d + Au and Au + Au collisions at

B. K. Srivastava; R. P. Scharenberg; T. J. Tarnowsky

2006-01-01

204

Interaction of HNCO with Au(111) surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface chemistry of isocyanic acid, HNCO, and its dissociation product, NCO, was studied on clean, O-dosed and Ar ion bombarded Au(111) surfaces. The techniques used are high resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The structure of Ar ion etched surface is explored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). HNCO adsorbs molecularly on Au(111) surface at 100 K yielding strong losses at 1390, 2270 and 3230 cm- 1. The weakly adsorbed HNCO desorbs in two peaks characterized by Tp = 130 and 145 K. The dissociation of the chemisorbed HNCO occurs at 150 K to give NCO species characterized by a vibration at 2185 cm- 1. The dissociation process is facilitated by the presence of preadsorbed O and by defect sites on Au(111) produced by Ar ion bombardment. In the latter case the loss feature of NCO appeared at 2130 cm- 1. Isocyanate on Au(111) surface was found to be more stable than on the single crystal surfaces of Pt-group metals. Results are compared with those obtained on supported Au catalysts.

Farkas, A. P.; Berkó, A.; Solymosi, F.

2012-08-01

205

Engineering the strain in graphene layers with Au decoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene sheets decorated with Au nanodots are synthesized by deposition of Au of three different thicknesses and subsequent annealing at 400 °C. Different thicknesses of Au film for the formation of Au nanodots on graphene are measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and morphology is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy indicates 3-6-fold increase in ID/IG ratio depending on the content of Au deposited on graphene. The increase in disorder in Au decorated graphene layers is explained on the basis of interaction of Au atoms with ? bonds of graphene. The splitting and blueshift in G band signifies compressive strain in Au deposited graphene. X-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation source confirm compressive strain in graphene, which increases with increase of Au film thickness.

Pannu, Compesh; Singh, Udai B.; Kumar, Sunil; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D. K.

2014-07-01

206

Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

2009-05-01

207

Indirect heating of Pt by short-pulse laser irradiation of Au in a nanoscale Pt/Au bilayer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal transport in a metallic multilayer on picosecond time scales is controlled by the electronic thermal conductivity (?e), the electronic interfacial thermal conductance (Gee), and electron-phonon coupling constant (g). We analyze heat transfer in a nanoscale Pt/Au bilayer using data obtained in pump-probe measurements and modeling using a transmission-line-equivalent circuit. For optical exciation of either the Pt or Au side of the bilayer, the majority of energy is deposited into the Pt phonons on a time scale of ?1 ps because gPt?gAu and Gee>gAuhAu, where hAu is the thickness of the Au layer. We determine g of the Au layer and set a lower bound on Gee of the Pt/Au interface: gAu = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 1016 W m-3 K-1 and Gee > 5 GW m-2 K-1.

Choi, Gyung-Min; Wilson, R. B.; Cahill, David G.

2014-02-01

208

Plasmonic Fano resonance and dip of Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study theoretically investigates Fano resonances and dips of an Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka that is excited by a nearby electric dipole. An analytical solution of dyadic Green's functions is used to analyze the radiative and nonradiative power spectra of a radial dipole in the proximity of a nanomatryoshka. From these spectra, the plasmon modes and Fano resonances that accompany the Fano dips are identified. In addition, the scattering and absorption spectra of a nanomatryoshka that is illuminated by a plane wave are investigated to confirm these modes and Fano dips. Our results reveal that a Fano dip splits each of the dipole and quadrupole modes into bonding and anti-bonding modes. The Fano dip and resonance result from the destructive interference of the plasmon modes of the Au shell and the Au core. The Fano factors that are obtained from the nonradiative power spectra of the Au shell and the Au core of a nanomatryoshka are in accordance with those obtained from the absorption cross section spectra. Moreover, these Fano factors increase as the plasmonic coupling of the Au shell with the core increases for both dipole and quadrupole modes.

Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chen, Huang-Chih; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

2013-11-01

209

Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d+ Au and Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector  

SciTech Connect

Yields, correlation shapes, and mean transverse momenta p{sub T} of charged particles associated with intermediate- to high-p{sub T} trigger particles (2.5Au and Au + Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV are presented. For associated particles at higher p{sub T} > or approx. 2.5 GeV/c, narrow correlation peaks are seen in d+ Au and Au + Au, indicating that the main production mechanism is jet fragmentation. At lower associated particle p{sub T}<2 GeV/c, a large enhancement of the near- ({Delta}{phi}{approx}0) and away-side ({Delta}{phi}{approx}{pi}) associated yields is found, together with a strong broadening of the away-side azimuthal distributions in Au + Au collisions compared to d+ Au measurements, suggesting that other particle production mechanisms play a role. This is further supported by the observed significant softening of the away-side associated particle yield distribution at {Delta}{phi}{approx}{pi} in central Au + Au collisions.

Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Horner, M. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-08-15

210

Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: a first principles study.  

PubMed

Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au(n-1) clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O(2) with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au(n-1)Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au(n-1)Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au(3)Al and Au(5)Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O(2) with Al, Au, AuAl, Au(3)Al, and Au(20)Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au(n-1)Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O(2) molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site. PMID:19548729

Rajesh, Chinagandham; Majumder, Chiranjib

2009-06-21

211

Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: A first principles study  

SciTech Connect

Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}Al and Au{sub 5}Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with Al, Au, AuAl, Au{sub 3}Al, and Au{sub 20}Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site.

Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2009-06-21

212

Production of ? mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ? meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ? production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of ?0 and ? in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.

2011-10-01

213

Specific Heats of Au and AuSn at Low Temperatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specific heats of high-purity Au and AuSn alloys have been measured between 2 and 4°K. The electronic coefficient gamma rises strongly with tin concentration; expressed in terms of electron concentration ea, gamma=(0.730+\\/-0.007)+(0.60+\\/-0.08)(ea-1) mJ mole-1 °K-2 for alpha-phase AuSn. Hence a rise of gamma with ea is a universal characteristic of noble metals alloyed with polyvalent nontransition elements, and this slope

Theodore A. Will; Ben A. Green

1966-01-01

214

AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is typically done in ground structural testing, AU-FREDI identifies only the key transfer function parameters and uncertainty bounds that are necessary for on-line design and tuning of robust controllers. AU-FREDI's system identification algorithms are independent of the JPL-LSCL environment, and can easily be extracted and modified for use with input/output data files. The basic approach of AU-FREDI's system identification algorithms is to non-parametrically identify the sampled data in the frequency domain using either stochastic or sine-dwell input, and then to obtain a parametric model of the transfer function by curve-fitting techniques. A cross-spectral analysis of the output error is used to determine the additive uncertainty in the estimated transfer function. The nominal transfer function estimate and the estimate of the associated additive uncertainty can be used for robust control analysis and design. AU-FREDI's I/O data transfer routines are tailored to the environment of the CALTECH/ JPL-LSCL which included a special operating system to interface with the testbed. Input commands for a particular experiment (wideband, narrowband, or sine-dwell) were computed on-line and then issued to respective actuators by the operating system. The operating system also took measurements through displacement sensors and passed them back to the software for storage and off-line processing. In order to make use of AU-FREDI's I/O data transfer routines, a user would need to provide an operating system capable of overseeing such functions between the software and the experimental setup at hand. The program documentation contains information designed to support users in either providing such an operating system or modifying the system identification algorithms for use with input/output data files. It provides a history of the theoretical, algorithmic and software development efforts including operating system requirements and listings of some of the various special purpose subroutines which were developed and optimized for Lahey FORTRAN compilers on IBM PC-AT computers before th

Yam, Y.

1994-01-01

215

Instabilite des heures de travail au Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Les auteurs de nombreuses etudes des heures de travail ont tire d'importantes conclusions des resultats des enquetes transversales. Par exemple, a tout moment donne, la part des personnes qui travaillent de longues heures est assez importante. En outre, elle semble avoir augmente au cours des deux dernieres decennies, faisant ressortir la necessite d'elaborer des politiques visant a reduire les divergences

Andrew Larochelle-Cote Sebastien Heisz

2006-01-01

216

Deux écoles de formation professionnelle au Québec  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au Québec (Canada), la formation professionnelle est assurée dans des centres spécialisés soutenus par le ministre de l'éducation. Deux projets récents sont présents ci-dessous : une école de foresterie et de technologie du bois et un centre de formation aux métiers de l'acier.

2003-01-01

217

Au-nanocluster emission based glucose sensing.  

PubMed

Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on Au-cluster emission quenching in the UV region is reported. The glucose biosensor is highly sensitive to ?-d-glucose in 2.5-25.0mM range as confirmed from a linear calibration plot between Au-cluster colloid emission intensity as a function of ?-d-glucose concentration. The interaction of ?-d-glucose with l-cysteine capped Au cluster colloids has been confirmed from their Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. It has been found that the biomolecules present in the serum such as ascorbic and uric acids, proteins and peptides do not interfere and affect in glucose estimation as confirmed from their absorption and fluorescence (FL) emission measurements. Practical utility of this sensor based on FL quenching method has been demonstrated by estimating the glucose level in human serum that includes diabetes and the data were found to be comparable or more accurate than those of the pathological data obtained from a local hospital. In addition, this biosensor is useful to detect glucose level over a wide range with sensor response time of the order of nano to picoseconds that is emission lifetime of Au clusters. PMID:21855317

Hussain, A M P; Sarangi, S N; Kesarwani, J A; Sahu, S N

2011-11-15

218

Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?  

SciTech Connect

The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

2008-09-04

219

Trimetallic Ag@AuPt Neapolitan nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trimetallic Ag@AuPt Neapolitan nanoparticles were prepared by two sequential galvanic exchange reactions of 1-hexanethiolate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgC6, 5.70 +/- 0.82 nm in diameter) with gold(i)-thiomalic acid (AuITMA) and platinum(ii)-hexanethiolate (PtIIC6) complexes. The first reaction was carried out at the air-water interface by the Langmuir method where the AgC6 nanoparticles formed a compact monolayer and water-soluble AuITMA was injected into the water subphase; the nanoparticles were then deposited onto a substrate surface in the up-stroke fashion and immersed into an acetone solution of PtIIC6. As both reactions were confined to an interface, the Au and Pt elements were situated on two opposite poles of the original Ag nanoparticles. The tripatchy structure was clearly manifested in elemental mapping of the nanoparticles, and consistent with the damping and red-shift of the nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance. Further characterizations by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the reactions were mostly confined to the top layers of the Ag metal cores, and contact angle and infrared spectroscopic measurements confirmed the incorporation and segregated distribution of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface.

Song, Yang; Chen, Shaowei

2013-07-01

220

Le risque alimentaire face au consommateur  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dans le contexte contemporain de multiplication des crises sanitaires, de nombreux travaux en sciences économiques et sociales ont cherché à décrire et analyser le comportement des consommateurs face au risque alimentaire. Ces travaux partagent globalement deux prémisses : ils considèrent l'acte de consommation comme un comportement individuel et attribuent aux consommateurs des \\

Didier Torny

2005-01-01

221

High Resolution Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Au_2^- and Au_4^- by Photoelectron Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report high resolution photoelectron spectra of Au_2^- and Au_4^- obtained with a newly-built photoelectron imaging apparatus. Gold anions are produced by laser vaporization and the desired specie is mass selected and focused into the collinear velocity-map imaging (VMI) lens assembly. The design of the imaging lens has allowed us to obtain less than 0.9% energy resolution for high kinetic energy electrons ( > 1eV) while maintaining wavenumber resolution for low kinetic energy electrons. Although gold dimer and tetramer have been studied in the past, we present spectroscopic results under high resolution. For Au_2^-, we report high resolution spectra with an accurate determination of the electron affinity together with a complete vibrational assignment, for both the anion and neutral ground states, while for Au_4^-, we are able to resolve a low frequency mode and obtain accurately the adiabatic detachment energy.

Leon, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-06-01

222

CO oxidation on unsupported Au55, Ag55, and Au25Ag30 nanoclusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using density functional calculations, we demonstrate a catalytic reaction path with activation barriers of less than 0.5 eV for CO oxidation on the neutral and unsupported icosahedral nanoclusters of Au55, Ag55, and Au25Ag30. Both CO and O2 adsorb more strongly on these clusters than on the corresponding bulk surfaces. The reaction path consists of an intermediate involving OOCO complex through which the coadsorption energy of CO and O2 on these clusters is expected to play an important role in the reaction. Based on the studies for the Au and Ag nanoclusters, a model alloy nanocluster of Au25Ag30 was designed to provide a larger coadsorption energy for CO and O2 and was anticipated to be a better catalyst for CO oxidation from energetic analysis.

Chang, C. M.; Cheng, C.; Wei, C. M.

2008-03-01

223

Dispersion and STM Characterization of Au-CdSe Nanohybrids on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the dispersion and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterization of isolated Au-CdSe nanohybrids on atomically flat Au(111) through surface modifications. The top terminal groups of spacer molecules self-assembled on the surface are found critical for locking the nanohybrids into a well-separated state. The STM results indicate that both thiol and carboxylic terminals are effective in this aspect by making strong interaction with the Au portions of the nanohybrids. An argon ion sputtering technique is also proposed to clean up organic contaminants on the surface for improved STM imaging of individual Au-CdSe nanohybrids. These observations help to enrich technical approaches to dispersing individual nanostructures on the surface and provide opportunities to explore their local electroluminescent and energy transfer properties at the nanoscale.

Gao, Bo; Kuang, Yan-min; Liao, Yuan; Dong, Zhen-chao

2012-04-01

224

Optical nonlinearity of Au nanoparticles fabricated by negative ion implantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dispersion of the nonlinear dielectric function of Au nanoparticle composites in Al2O3, fabricated by negative ion implantation, was studied. Negative ion, Au?, with 60keV was applied for implantation at a flux of 10?A\\/cm2, achieving a fluence up to 2×1017ions\\/cm2 to fabricate the Au nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of Au:Al2O3 composite showed a blue shift due to a shallow distribution

Y. Takeda; O. A. Plaksin; H. Wang; N. Kishimoto

2007-01-01

225

Pion Interferometry of (sNN) = 130 GeV Au+Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two-pion correlation functions in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV have been measured by the STAR (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) detector. The source size extracted by fitting the correlations grows with event multiplicity and decreases with transverse momentum. Anomalously large sizes or emission durations, which have been suggested as signals of quark-gluon plasma formation and rehadronization, are not observed.

C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; C. Allgower; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; H. Bichsel; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; R. Bossingham; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; R. V. Cadman; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; S. Chattopadhyay; M. L. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; D. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; M. Guedon; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. S. Konstantinov; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; R. Lednický; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; D. Lynn; R. Majka; S. Margetis; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; J. Mitchell; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; E. Potrebenikova; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; S. Radomski; G. Rai; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; J. Sandweiss; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; K. Schweda; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; A. Schüttauf; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. Vanyashin; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; S. A. Voloshin; F. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; T. Wenaus; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; A. Yokosawa; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovský; W. M. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; A. N. Zubarev

2001-01-01

226

Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Study of Lattice Thermal Conductivity\\/Conductance of Au-SAM-Au Junctions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed on Au-SAM (self-assembly monolayer)-Au junctions. The SAM consisted of alkanedithiol molecules. The out-of-plane (z-direction) thermal conductance and in-plane (x- and y-direction) thermal conductivities were calculated. Simulation finite size effect, gold substrate thickness effect, temperature effect, normal pressure effect, molecule chain length effect and molecule coverage effect on thermal conductivity\\/conductance were studied.

Tengfei Luo; John R. Lloyd

2009-01-01

227

Net Charge Fluctuations in Au+Au Interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from Au+ Au interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are

K. Adcox; S. S. Adler; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. H. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. G. Bellaiche; S. T. Belyaev; M. J. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. A. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. C. Chang; L. L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. K. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. S. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; D. G. D'Enterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. V. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. V. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. E. Fields; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. K. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. L. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. K. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; J. S. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. G. Hansen; H. Hara; E. P. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. K. Hemmick; J. M. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. C. Hill; D. S. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. S. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. V. Jacak; W. Y. Jang; J. Jia; B. M. Johnson; S. C. Johnson; K. S. Joo; S. Kametani; J. H. Kang; M. Kann; S. S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. J. Kim; H. J. Kim; S. Y. Kim; Y. G. Kim; W. W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. J. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. G. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; M. J. Leitch; X. H. Li; Z. Li; D. J. Lim; M. X. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. F. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. I. Makdisi; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; S. K. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. D. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. L. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. E. Mischke; G. C. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; J. M. Moss; F. Mühlbacher; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. L. Nagle; Y. Nakada; B. K. Nandi; J. Newby; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. Österman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; A. P. Palounek; V. S. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; S. F. Pate; T. Peitzmann; A. N. Petridis; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; P. Pitukhin; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. L. Purschke; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; M. Rosati; A. A. Rose; S. S. Ryu; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; T. C. Sangster; R. Santo; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. R. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina; Y. H. Shin; I. G. Sibiriak; D. Silvermyr; K. S. Sim; J. Simon-Gillo; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; M. Sivertz; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; S. Sorensen; P. W. Stankus; N. Starinsky; P. Steinberg; E. Stenlund; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; M. Sugioka; T. Sugitate; J. P. Sullivan; Y. Sumi; Z. Sun; M. Suzuki; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; M. Tamai; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; E. Taniguchi; M. J. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; T. L. Thomas; W. Tian; J. Tojo; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; I. Tserruya; H. Tsuruoka; A. A. Tsvetkov; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; T. Ushiroda; H. W. van Hecke; C. Velissaris; J. Velkovska; M. Velkovsky; A. A. Vinogradov; M. A. Volkov; A. Vorobyov; E. Vznuzdaev; H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; S. N. White; C. Witzig; F. K. Wohn; C. L. Woody; W. Xie; K. Yagi; S. Yokkaichi; G. R. Young; I. E. Yushmanov; W. A. Zajc; Z. Zhang; S. Zhou

2002-01-01

228

Dihadron azimuthal correlations in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Azimuthal angle (Deltavarphi) correlations are presented for a broad range of transverse momentum (0.4Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. With increasing pT, the away-side Deltavarphi distribution evolves from a broad and relatively flat shape to a concave shape, then to a convex shape. Comparisons with p+p data suggest

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y.-S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; H. Lim; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; H. Okada; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slunecka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomásek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V.-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; J. Velkovska; R. Vertesi; A. A. Vinogradov; M. Virius; V. Vrba; E. Vznuzdaev; M. Wagner

2008-01-01

229

Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bulk film analysis using C 60 +, Au 3 +, and Au + primary ion beams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The damage characteristics of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have been studied under bombardment by C60+, Au3+ and Au+ primary ions. The observed damage cross-sections for the three ion beams are not dramatically different. The secondary ion yields however were significantly enhanced by the polyatomic primary ions where the secondary ion yield of the [M+H]+ is on average 5× higher for C60+

X. A. Conlan; I. S. Gilmore; A. Henderson; N. P. Lockyer; J. C. Vickerman

2006-01-01

230

Three-particle correlations from parton cascades in Au + Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a study of three-particle correlations among a trigger particle and two associated particles in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) with both partonic and hadronic interactions. We found that three-particle correlation densities in different angular directions with respect to the triggered particle (‘center’, ‘cone’, ‘deflected’, ‘near’ and ‘near-away’) increase with the number of participants.

G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; S. Zhang; X. Z. Caia; J. H. Chen; Z. J. He; H. Z. Huang; J. L. Long; W. Q. Shen; X. H. Shi; C. Zhong; J. X. Zuo

2007-01-01

231

Conical flow due to partonic jets in central Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In jet quenching, a hard QCD parton, before fragmenting into a jet of\\u000ahadrons, deposits a fraction of its energy in the medium, leading to suppressed\\u000aproduction of high-$p_T$ hadrons. The process can generate shock waves. We\\u000astudy the distortion of Mach shock waves due to jet quenching in central Au+Au\\u000acollisions and its effect on particle production. Finite fluid

A. K. Chaudhuri

2007-01-01

232

Conical flow due to partonic jets in central Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In jet quenching, a hard QCD parton, before fragmenting into a jet of hadrons, deposits a fraction of its energy in the medium, leading to suppressed production of high-p{sub T} hadrons. The process can generate shock waves. We study the distortion of Mach shock waves due to jet quenching in central Au+Au collisions and its effect on particle production. Finite

Chaudhuri

2007-01-01

233

Conical flow due to partonic jets in central Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In jet quenching, a hard QCD parton, before fragmenting into a jet of hadrons, deposits a fraction of its energy in the medium, leading to suppressed production of high-pT hadrons. The process can generate shock waves. We study the distortion of Mach shock waves due to jet quenching in central Au+Au collisions and its effect on particle production. Finite fluid

A. K. Chaudhuri

2007-01-01

234

Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at &surd;sNN = 130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values

K. H. Ackermann; N. Adams; C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; S. Ahmad; C. Allgower; J. Amsbaugh; M. Anderson; E. Anderssen; H. Arnesen; L. Arnold; G. S. Averichev; A. Baldwin; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; M. Beddo; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; S. Bennett; J. Bercovitz; J. Berger; W. Betts; H. Bichsel; F. Bieser; L. C. Bland; M. Bloomer; C. O. Blyth; J. Boehm; B. E. Bonner; D. Bonnet; R. Bossingham; M. Botlo; A. Boucham; N. Bouillo; S. Bouvier; K. Bradley; F. P. Brady; E. S. Braithwaite; W. Braithwaite; A. Brandin; R. L. Brown; G. Brugalette; C. Byrd; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; L. Carr; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; B. Caylor; D. Cebra; S. Chatopadhyay; M. L. Chen; W. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; J. Chrin; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; C. Consiglio; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; V. I. Danilov; D. Dayton; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; M. Dialinas; H. Diaz; P. A. Deyoung; L. Didenko; D. Dimassimo; J. Dioguardi; W. Dominik; C. Drancourt; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; T. Eggert; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; A. Etkin; P. Fachini; C. Feliciano; D. Ferenc; M. I. Ferguson; H. Fessler; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; I. Flores; K. J. Foley; D. Fritz; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; M. Gazdzicki; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; C. Gojak; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; M. Grau; D. Greiner; L. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; D. Grosnick; J. Gross; G. Guilloux; E. Gushin; J. Hall; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; G. Harper; J. W. Harris; P. He; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; D. Hill; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; M. Howe; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; W. Hunt; J. Hunter; G. J. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; S. Jacobson; R. Jared; P. Jensen; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. P. Kenney; A. Khodinov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; G. Koehler; A. S. Konstantinov; V. Kormilitsyne; L. Kotchenda; I. Kotov; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; T. Krupien; P. Kuczewski; C. Kuhn; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; W. J. Leonhardt; V. M. Leontiev; P. Leszczynski; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; Z. Li; C.-J. Liaw; J. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; V. Lindenstruth; P. J. Lindstrom; M. A. Lisa; H. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; D. Lopiano; W. A. Love; J. R. Lutz; D. Lynn; L. Madansky; R. Maier; R. Majka; A. Maliszewski; S. Margetis; K. Marks; R. Marstaller; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; E. A. Matyushevski; C. McParland; T. S. McShane; J. Meier; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; P. Middlekamp; N. Mikhalin; B. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; B. Minor; J. Mitchell; E. Mogavero; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; R. Morse; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; T. Ngo; M. Nguyen; T. Nguyen; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; T. Noggle; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; T. Nussbaum; J. Nystrand; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; C. A. Ogilvie; K. Olchanski; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. A. Ososkov; G. Ott; D. Padrazo; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; M. Pentia; V. Perevotchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; S. Pirogov; E. Platner; J. Pluta; I. Polk; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Puskar-Pasewicz; G. Rai; J. Rasson; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. Reid; R. E. Renfordt; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; J. Riso; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; D. Roehrich; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; R. Sanchez; Z. Sandler; J. Sandweiss; P. Sappenfield; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Scheblien; R. Scheetz; R. Schlueter; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; M. Schulz; A. Schüttauf; J. Sedlmeir; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; J. Seyboth; P. Seyboth; R. Seymour; E. I. Shakaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; Y. Shi; S. S. Shimanskii; D. Shuman; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; L. P. Smykov; R. Snellings; K. Solberg; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; N. Stone; R. Stone; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; T. J. Symons; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; A. Tarchini; J. Tarzian; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; A. Szanto de Toledo; S. Tonse; T. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; I. Vakula; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen

2001-01-01

235

Net Charge Fluctuations in Au+Au Interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from Au+ Au interactions at (sNN)=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays.

Adcox, K.; Adler, S. S.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Aphecetche, L.; Arai, Y.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barrette, J.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bellaiche, F. G.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bennett, M. J.; Berdnikov, Y.; Botelho, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J.; Butsyk, S.; Carey, T. A.; Chand, P.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chavez, L. L.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christ, T.; Chujo, T.; Chung, M. S.; Chung, P.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; D'Enterria, D. G.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dinesh, B. V.; Drees, A.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Ebisu, K.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Ferdousi, T.; Fields, D. E.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Godoi, A. L.; Goto, Y.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gupta, S. K.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hara, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Ho, D. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Ippolitov, M. S.; Ishihara, M.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jia, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Kametani, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kann, M.; Kapoor, S. S.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klinksiek, S.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Li, Z.; Lim, D. J.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.; Maguire, C. F.; Mahon, J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Mark, S. K.; Markacs, S.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masaike, A.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Merschmeyer, M.; Messer, F.; Messer, M.; Miake, Y.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakada, Y.; Nandi, B. K.; Newby, J.; Nikkinen, L.; Nilsson, P.; Nishimura, S.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Paffrath, L.; Palounek, A. P.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Petridis, A. N.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Pitukhin, P.; Plasil, F.; Pollack, M.; Pope, K.; Purschke, M. L.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Rosati, M.; Rose, A. A.; Ryu, S. S.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Sakuma, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sangster, T. C.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schlei, B. R.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Shin, Y. H.; Sibiriak, I. G.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sorensen, S.; Stankus, P. W.; Starinsky, N.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugioka, M.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sumi, Y.; Sun, Z.; Suzuki, M.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taniguchi, E.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tian, W.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tsvetkov, A. A.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Ushiroda, T.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velissaris, C.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vorobyov, A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Witzig, C.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yagi, K.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, S.

2002-08-01

236

Spectroscopy of 196Au, 202Au, 194Ir and 193Os  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reactions 198Hg(dvec ,?)196Au, 196Pt(dvec ,?)194Ir and 192Os(dvec ,p)193Os have been studied to test the model of supersymmetry in atomic nulcei. After encouraging results of the (dvec ,?) measurements the 204Hg(dvec ,?) reaction was performed to gain spectroscopic information on the unknown nucleus 202Au. About 70 levels have been observed in an energy range up to ~ 2 MeV.

Wirth, H.-F.; Eisermann, Y.; Hertenberger, R.; Graw, G.; Christen, S.; Möller, O.; Tonev, D.; Jolie, J.

2002-11-01

237

Low-Temperature Specific Heats of AgAu Alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specific heats of solid solutions of up to 40 at.% Au in Ag have been measured between 2 and 4°K. The electronic specific heat coefficient gamma decreases on adding Au to Ag at the initial rate of about -30% per unit concentration, reaching a minimum value at about 20% Au. This result disagrees sharply with scattering theories proposed to

Ben A. Green; Ariel A. Valladares

1966-01-01

238

Evidence of Significant Covalent Bonding in Au(CN)2-  

SciTech Connect

There have been intense recent interests in the homogeneous catalytic chemistry of Au(I) complexes.1 Among the Au(I) molecules, the Au(CN)2- ion is the most stable and has been widely used in gold extraction back to ancient times. Although AuCN in the condensed phase has been studied, including solution phase vibrational spectroscopy2 and crystal structures,3 the free AuCN molecule has been studied only very recently by microwave spectroscopy.4 The important Au(CN)2- complex has not been observed and studied in the gas phase. Because of the relativistic effects,5 Au-containing molecules exhibit distinctly different properties among the coinage elements. To elucidate the nature of the Au-ligand binding, high-level ab initio calculations are needed due to the complicated electron correlation and relativistic effects.6-8 The structure and bonding of the AuCN molecule were first examined computationally by Frenking and co-workers.7 Recent high-precision calculations by Pyykkö and co-workers suggest multiple-bond characters between Au-C in AuCN because the Au-C bond length is only slightly longer than the sum of the triple bond covalent radii.

Wang, Xue B.; wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiaopeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai S.

2009-11-18

239

Jet-Hadron Correlations in ?sNN =200 GeV p +p and Central Au +Au Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au +Au and p +p collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au +Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au +Au and p +p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au +Au collisions compared to p +p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L., Jr.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

2014-03-01

240

Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.  

PubMed

The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities. PMID:16090462

Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

2005-06-17

241

Probing the quenching of CdSe/ZnS qdots by Au, Au/Ag, and Au/Pd nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resonance energy transfer between CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (qdots) and three metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with different surface plasmon resonance (SPR) characteristics were studied. Gold, gold/silver and gold/palladium NPs were used as energy acceptors for qdots with donor emission at 570 nm. Due to the different spectral overlaps between the SPR signatures and qdot emission, varied energy transfer characteristics were observed. The energy transfer was quantified via the Stern-Volmer relationship, since in this study the energy transfer was collision based. The Au/Ag and Au/Pd NPs in particular showed high KSV values, while the Au NPs showed much lower energy transfer efficiency. Since the NPs used in this study were relatively large (d ˜ 15-20 nm), the experimental system was also influenced by the NP extinction coefficients of ?108 M-1 cm-1. To address this potential inner filter effect, the quenching profiles were normalized by SPR transmittance. The results are important to the field, as many of these classes of nanomaterials are being employed in energy transfer based studies, as well as in colorimetric sensing.

Han, Hyunjoo; Valle, Valerie; Maye, Mathew M.

2012-11-01

242

Enhanced spin pumping at yttrium iron garnet/Au interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Spin injection across the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au interface was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The spin mixing conductance was determined by comparing the Gilbert damping parameter {alpha} in YIG/Au and YIG/Au/Fe heterostructures. The main purpose of this study was to correlate the spin pumping efficiency with chemical modifications of the YIG film surface using in situ etching and deposition techniques. By means of Ar{sup +} ion beam etching, one is able to increase the spin mixing conductance at the YIG/Au interface by a factor of 5 compared to the untreated YIG/Au interface.

Burrowes, C.; Heinrich, B.; Kardasz, B.; Montoya, E. A.; Girt, E. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Dr., Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Sun Yiyan; Song, Young-Yeal; Wu Mingzhong [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2012-02-27

243

IMMIGRATION OF FISHES THROUGH THE SUEZ CANAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The number,of Red Sea fishes found in the eastern Mediterranean,amounts,to 36 species. Twelve immigrants, namely: Spratelloides delicatulus, Herklotsichthyspunctatus, Tylosurus choram, Sebas­ tapistes nuchalis, Epinephelus tauvina, Autisthesputa, Pelates quadrilineatus,Silago sihama, Rhon­ sicusstridens,Crenidenscrenidens,Rastrelligerkanagurta,Scomberomoruscommerson,were found in the last 12 yr. The southward migration, from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea is almost negligible. Only Liza aurata, Dicentrarchuspunctatus, and perhaps Carcharhinusplumbeus can be

Adam Bentuvia

244

Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers  

SciTech Connect

The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

2009-10-29

245

Transverse Momentum Distributions and String Percolation Study in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au at $\\\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiparticle production at high energies is described in terms of color strings stretched between the projectile and target. As string density increases, overlap among the strings leads to cluster formation. At some critical density a macroscopic cluster appears, spanning the entire system. This marks the percolation phase transition. Data from p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV has been

Terence J. Tarnowsky; Brijesh K. Srivastava; Rolf P. Scharenberg

2006-01-01

246

Nuclear modification factors of ? mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed systematic measurements of ? meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. Results are presented on the ? invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor RAA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and RdA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1Au+Au collisions, the RAA of ? exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the ?0 and the ? in the intermediate pT range (2-5GeV/c), whereas, at higher pT, the ?, ?0, and ? show similar suppression. The baryon (proton and antiproton) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate pT is not observed for the ? meson despite the similar masses of the proton and the ?. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of valence quarks in the hadron rather than its mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality, and, for peripheral collisions, the RAA values for both particle species are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of Npart. The RdA of ? shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Borggren, N.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chiba, J.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; He, X.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.

2011-02-01

247

Polymers effects on synthesis of AuNPs, and Au/Ag nanoalloys: indirectly generated AuNPs and versatile sensing applications including anti-leukemic agent.  

PubMed

Polymers either serve as shielding or capping agents to restrict the nanoparticle size. This study demonstrates the polymer depositions and their effects in synthesis and sharp stabilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to develop gold/silver nanoalloys (Au/Ag nanoalloys). Effects of different polymers are tested to justify their role in synthesis and stability of phloroglucinol (PG) coated AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloys. Cationic and anionic i.e. [Polydiallyldimethylammonium](+) (PDDA), [Polyethyleneimine](+) (PEI), [Polystyrene sulfonate](2-) (PSS) and neutral polymer Polychlorotriflouroethylene (PCTFE) produce praiseworthy stable AuNPs and Au/Ag nanoalloy. To prove polymer effects characterization protocols including UV-vis, Fluorescence (PL), IR and AFM imaging are performed to fully investigate the mechanism and size characteristics of these nanoparticles/nanoalloys. In this study sharp size controlling/sheilding effects were observed particularly with cationic polymers simply through the favorable electrostatic interactions with the terminal ends of PG Potent/significant detection of doxorubicin (DOX, an antileukemic agent) via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between PEI shielded AuNPs (AuNPEI) and DOX was achieved upto 10 pM level, while PDDA protected AuNPs facilitated the detection of ascorbic acid based on fluorescence enhancement effects in wide range (10-200 nM) and with detection limit of 200 pM. Similarly sensing performance of PEI stabilized Au/Ag nanoalloys on addition of halides (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) is evaluated through red shifted SPR along with continuous increase in absorbance and also through AFM. Moreover the addition of halide ions also helped the regeneration of AuNPs by taking away silver from the Au/Ag nanoalloys enabling their detections upto subnanomolar levels. PMID:24121208

Jahan, Shanaz; Mansoor, Farrukh; Kanwal, Shamsa

2014-03-15

248

Rhombohedrally distorted ?-Au(5-x)Zn(8+y) phases in the Au-Zn system.  

PubMed

The region of the Au-Zn phase diagram encompassing ?-brass-type phases has been studied experimentally from 45 to 85 atom % Zn. The ? phases were obtained directly from the pure elements by heating to 680 °C in evacuated silica tubes, followed by annealing at 300 °C. Powder X-ray and single-crystal diffraction studies show that ?-"Au(5)Zn(8)" phases adopt a rhombohedrally distorted Cr(5)Al(8) structure type rather than the cubic Cu(5)Zn(8) type. The refined compositions from two single crystals extracted from the Zn- and Au-rich loadings are Au(4.27(3))Zn(8.26(3))?(0.47) (I) and Au(4.58(3))Zn(8.12(3))?(0.3) (II), respectively (? = vacancy). These (I and II) refinements indicated both nonstatistical mixing of Au and Zn atoms as well as partially ordered vacancy distributions. The structures of these ? phases were solved in the acentric space group R3m (No. 160, Z = 6), and the observed lattice parameters from powder patterns were found to be a = 13.1029(6) and 13.1345(8) Å and c = 8.0410(4) and 8.1103(6) Å for crystals I and II, respectively. According to single-crystal refinements, the vacancies were found on the outer tetrahedron (OT) and octahedron (OH) of the 26-atom cluster. Single-crystal structural refinement clearly showed that the vacancy content per unit cell increases with increasing Zn, or valence-electron concentration. Electronic structure calculations, using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method with the atomic-sphere approximation (TB-LMTO-ASA) method, indicated the presence of a well-pronounced pseudogap at the Fermi level for "Au(5)Zn(8)" as the representative composition, an outcome that is consistent with the Hume-Rothery interpretation of ? brass. PMID:23323925

Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; Miller, Gordon J

2013-02-01

249

Fluorescence quenching of uranine on confeito-like Au nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Effect of structure and size of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on fluorescence behavior of uranine was examined. Confeito-like AuNPs with different sizes (30 nm, 60 nm and 100 nm, respectively) had plasmon absorption bands at 555, 600 and 660 nm, while the band of spherical AuNP (20 nm in size) was at 525 nm. Fluorescence of uranine was significantly quenched by the small and medium confeito-like AuNPs, and the quenching effect by the large particle was less. In comparison, the spherical AuNP quenched more remarkable than the confeito-like AuNPs. A mechanism of resonance energy transfer from uranine to AuNPs via the surface plasmon was suggested, and the strong quenching effect of the small AuNPs could be explained by the energy transfer from adsorbed uranine molecules to AuNPs. These behaviors indicate that the large confeito-like AuNPs can be a preferable nano-probe and useful for plasmonic devices, which can tune or maintain the fluorescence properties of other markers. PMID:24757961

Ujihara, Masaki; Dang, Nhut Minh; Imae, Toyoko

2014-07-01

250

Fabrication of a chitosan/glucose oxidase-poly(anilineboronic acid)-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode for biosensor and biofuel cell.  

PubMed

Enzyme immobilization is one of the key factors in constructing high-performance enzyme biosensors and biofuel cells (BFCs). Herein, we propose a new protocol for efficient immobilization of a glycoprotein enzyme based on the interaction of the 1, 2- or 1, 3-diols in the glycoprotein with a boronic acid functionalized monomer. Briefly, casting a mixture of glucose oxidase (GOx) and anilineboronic acid (ABA) followed by a NaAuCl(4) solution to an Au-plated Au electrode surface yielded a GOx-poly(ABA) (PABA)-gold nanoparticle (Au(nano)) bionanocomposite, and chitosan (CS) was then cast and air-dried. In the present protocol, the small-sized Au(nano) or Au subnanostructures can form near/on the enzyme molecule, which greatly promotes the electron transfer of enzymatic reaction and enhances the amperometric responses. The thus-prepared CS/GOx-PABA-Au(nano)/Au-plated Au electrode worked well in the first-/second generation biosensing modes and as a bioanode in a monopolar biofuel cell, with analytical or cell-power performance superior to those of most analogues hitherto reported. PMID:22099959

Huang, Yi; Qin, Xiaoli; Li, Zou; Fu, Yingchun; Qin, Cong; Wu, Feng; Su, Zhaohong; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo; Hu, Jiming

2012-01-15

251

Structure-activity relationships in cytotoxic Au(I)/Au(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole.  

PubMed

Gold(I) and gold(III) complexes derived from 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pbiH) were proven to be a promising class of in vitro antitumor agents against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. In this paper, a comparative electrochemical, UV-vis absorption, and emission spectroscopic investigation is reported on pbiH, the two mononuclear Au(III) complexes [(pbi)AuX2] (X = Cl (1), AcO (2)), the four mononuclear Au(I) derivatives [(pbiH)AuCl] (3), [(pbiH)Au(PPh3)]PF6 ((4(+))(PF6(-))), [(pbi)Au(PPh3)] (5), and [(pbi)Au(TPA)] (6), the three mixed-valence Au(III)/Au(I) complexes [(?-pbi)Au2Cl3] (7), [(Ph3P)Au(?-pbi)AuX2]PF6 (X = Cl ((8(+))(PF6(-))), AcO ((9(+))(PF6(-)))), and the binuclear Au(I)-Au(I) compound [(?-pbi)Au2(PPh3)2]PF6 ((10(+))(PF6(-))). All complexes feature irreversible reduction processes related to the Au(III)/Au(I) or Au(I)/Au(0) processes and peculiar luminescent emission at about 360-370 nm in CH2Cl2, with quantum yields that are remarkably lower ((0.7-14.5) × 10(-2)) in comparison to that determined for the free pbiH ligand (31.5 × 10(-2)) in the same solvent. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of all complexes were interpreted on the grounds of time-dependent PBE0/DFT calculations carried out both in the gas phase and in CH2Cl2 implicitly considered within the IEF-PCM SCRF approach. The electronic structure of the complexes, and in particular the energy and composition of the Kohn-Sham LUMOs, can be related to the antiproliferative properties against the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line, providing sound quantitative structure-activity relationships and shedding a light on the role played by the global charge and nature of ancillary ligands in the effectiveness of Au-based antitumor drugs. PMID:24679072

Maiore, Laura; Aragoni, Maria Carla; Deiana, Carlo; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Pintus, Anna; Serratrice, Maria; Arca, Massimiliano

2014-04-21

252

Phase transformations and age-hardening behaviors related to Au3Cu in Au-Cu-Pd alloys.  

PubMed

Phase transformation behaviors in Au-Cu-Pd alloys were investigated by means of electrical resistivity measurements, hardness tests, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Anisothermal and isothermal annealing were performed. Two types of phase transformations were found, namely related to the single phase of Au3Cu and the coexistent phase of Au3Cu and AuCu I. The latter produced more remarkable hardening than the former. Hardening was brought about by the antiphase domain size effect of Au3Cu ordered phase in the single phase and by the formation of AuCu I ordered phase in the Au3Cu ordered matrix. There are three modes of phase transformation in the coexistent region depending on the composition. Each sequence is discussed. PMID:10786133

Winn, H; Udoh, K; Tanaka, Y; Hernandez, R I; Takuma, Y; Hisatsune, K

1999-09-01

253

Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO2, ZnO, and TiO2) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity.

Liao, Hongbo; Wen, Weijia; Wong, George K.

2006-12-01

254

PION INTERFEREMETRY FROM P+P TO AU+AU IN STAR.  

SciTech Connect

The geometric substructure of the particle-emitting source has been characterized via two-particle interferometry by the STAR collaboration for all energies and colliding systems at RHIC. We present systematic studies of charged pion interferometry. The collective nature of the source is revealed through the m{sub T} dependence of HBT radii for all particle types. Preliminary results suggest a scaling in the pion HBT radii with overall system size, as central Au+Au collisions are compared to peripheral collisions as well as with Cu+Cu and even with d+Au and p+p collisions, naively suggesting comparable flow strength in all systems. To probe this issue in greater detail, multidimensional correlation functions are studied using a spherical decomposition method. This allows clear identification of source anisotropy and, for the light systems, the presence of significant long-range non-femtoscopic correlations.

CHAJECKI, Z. (FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION)

2005-08-15

255

Microstructure of precipitated Au nanoclusters in MgO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gold nanoclusters dispersed in single crystal MgO have been prepared by ion implantation at 975 K and subsequent annealing at 1275 K for 10 h. The morphological features, size, and crystallographic orientation of the Au nanoclusters with respect to the MgO matrix, as well as the interface structure between the Au nanoclusters and MgO, have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. During annealing, the Au clusters nucleate coherently in the MgO lattice, leading to an epitaxial orientation relationship of [010]MgO//[010]Au and (200)MgO//(200)Au that is maintained for all the Au clusters. Above a critical size of ~5 to 8 nm, a coherent-semicoherent interface transition is observed for the Au clusters in MgO. This critical cluster size is larger than the critical size ~3 nm based on energetic considerations. This discrepancy is discussed with respect to the point and extended defect structures at the interface between the Au clusters and the MgO matrix. The Au clusters larger than this critical size exhibit faceting on the {001} planes and internal dislocations. It is further suggested that the density of quantum antidots should depend on the size of the Au clusters.

Wang, C. M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Cavanagh, A.; Jiang, W.; Thomas, L. E.; Weber, W. J.

2003-05-01

256

Possible triplet superconductivity in Nb/Au/CoFe trilayers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have fabricated the Nb/Au and Nb/CoFe bilayer and Nb/Au/CoFe trilayer samples and investigated their T_c's by systematically varying d_Nb, d_CoFe, and d_Au. These samples were deposited on the oxidized Si substrates using DC magnetron sputtering system and the superconducting critical temperature Tc of the samples were measured electrically using standard DC and AC 4-point method. The SN bilayer system showed well-known exponential-like dependence of Tc on d_Au, while the SF bilayer system displayed oscillatory dependence of Tc on d_CoFe, as expected from the SF proximity effect theory. On the other hand, with fixed d_Nb and d_CoFe, the Tc of SNF trilayers as a function of d_Au increased rapidly for d_Au < 10 nm and then approached a saturated value near d_Au = 200 nm. The T_c's of these trilayer systems are higher than a theory based on conventional singlet superconductivity can predict. Moreover, we observed small oscillatory Tc behavior in the trilayer system when d_Au is varied in the range of 30 nm < d_Au < 90 nm. In order to explain our unexpected data, we propose the possibility of triplet superconductivity created inside Au layer.

Kim, Jinho; Doh, Yong-Joo; Chang, Jaewan; Char, Kookrin

2004-03-01

257

Doping Golden Buckyballs: Cu@Au16- and Cu@Au17- Cluster Anions  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of the unique catalytic effects of gold nanoparticles on oxide substrates has stimulated a flurry of research into the structures and properties of free gold nanoclusters, which may hold the key to elucidating the catalytic mechanisms of supported gold clusters. One of the most remarkable results has been the discovery of planar gold cluster anions (Aun_) of up to twelve gold atoms and the 2D to 3D transition for clusters with n larger than 12. Among larger gold clusters, Au20 has been found to be a perfect tetrahedron. A more recent study of the structures of Aun_ cluster anions in the medium size range (n=15–19) has shown that clusters with n=16–18 possess unprecedented empty cage structures. In particular, the Au16_ cluster anion has an interesting tetrahedral structure with an inner diameter of about 5.5 0 and can be compared to the fullerenes (buckyballs). Although Au32 was first suggested to be a “24- carat golden fullerene”, subsequent studies showed that the Au32_ ion is in fact a low-symmetry compact 3D structure. Other larger gold cage clusters have also been proposed computationally, but none has been observed or is expected to be the global minimum. The cage structures of the cluster anions Au16_ and Au17_ have recently been confirmed by electron diffraction and thus they are the first experimentally confirmed and the smallest possible gold cages. The large empty space inside these cage clusters immediately suggested that they can be doped with a foreign atom to produce a new class of endohedral gold cages analogous to endohedral fullerenes.

Wang, Leiming; Bulusu, Satya; Zhai, Hua-jin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, Lai S.

2007-04-13

258

Initial-state geometry and fluctuations in Au + Au, Cu + Au, and U + U collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study within the IP-Glasma and two-component MC-Glauber models the effects of initial-state geometry and fluctuations on multiplicities and eccentricities for several collision species at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These include copper-gold (Cu + Au), gold-gold (Au + Au), and uranium-uranium (U + U) collisions. The multiplicity densities per participant pair are very similar in all systems studied. Ellipticities vary strongly between collision systems, most significantly for central collisions, while fluctuation driven odd moments vary little between systems. Event-by-event distributions of eccentricities in mid-central collisions are wider in Cu + Au relative to Au + Au and U + U systems. An anticorrelation between multiplicity and eccentricity is observed in ultracentral U + U collisions which is weaker in the IP-Glasma model than the two-component MC-Glauber model. In ultracentral Au + Au collisions the two models predict opposite signs for the slope of this correlation. Measurements of elliptic flow as a function of multiplicity in such central events can therefore be used to discriminate between models with qualitatively different particle production mechanisms.

Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

2014-06-01

259

Midrapidity phi production in Au+Au collisions at (sNN)=130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first measurement of midrapidity vector meson phi production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC ((sNN)=130 GeV) from the STAR detector. For the 11% highest multiplicity collisions, the slope parameter from an exponential fit to the transverse mass distribution is T=379+\\/-50(stat)+\\/-45(syst) MeV, the yield dN\\/dy=5.73+\\/-0.37(stat)+\\/-0.69(syst) per event, and the ratio Nphi\\/Nh- is found to be 0.021+\\/-0.001(stat)+\\/-0.004(syst). The measured ratio

C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; C. Allgower; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; H. Bichsel; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; R. V. Cadman; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; S. Chattopadhyay; M. L. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; D. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; M. Guedon; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; A. S. Konstantinov; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; R. Lednický; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; D. Lynn; R. Majka; S. Margetis; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; J. Mitchell; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; E. Platner; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; S. Radomski; G. Rai; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; J. Sandweiss; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; A. Schüttauf; K. Schweda; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. Vanyashin; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; S. A. Voloshin; F. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; T. Wenaus; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; A. Yokosawa; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovský; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; A. N. Zubarev

2002-01-01

260

Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v_1), elliptic flow\\u000a(v_2), and the fourth harmonic (v_4) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution\\u000aof particles from Au+Au collisions at sqrtsNN = 200 GeV are summarized and\\u000acompared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results\\u000afor identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model.\\u000aDifferent anisotropic

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; V. S. Bhatia; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. M. de Moura; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; K. Fomenko; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; F. Guerts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; V. Yu. Khodyrev; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; S. Lehocka; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Q. J. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Langacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. N. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; I. Savin; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; W. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; A. Urkinbaev; G. Van Buren; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Vznuzdaev; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Z. M. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; R. Wells; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Z. Xu; E. Yamamoto; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2005-01-01

261

Nuclear Stopping in Au+Au Collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse momentum spectra and rapidity densities, dN\\/dy, of protons, antiprotons, and net protons (p-p¯) from central (0% 5%) Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN)=200 GeV were measured with the BRAHMS experiment within the rapidity range 0<=y<=3. The proton and antiproton dN\\/dy decrease from midrapidity to y=3. The net-proton yield is roughly constant for y<1 at dN\\/dy˜7, and increases to dN\\/dy˜12 at y˜3.

I. G. Bearden; D. Beavis; C. Besliu; B. Budick; H. Bøggild; C. Chasman; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; J. Cibor; R. Debbe; E. Enger; J. J. Gaardhøje; M. Germinario; K. Hagel; O. Hansen; A. K. Holme; H. Ito; A. Jipa; F. Jundt; J. I. Jørdre; C. E. Jørgensen; R. Karabowicz; E. J. Kim; T. Kozik; T. M. Larsen; J. H. Lee; Y. K. Lee; G. Løvhøiden; Z. Majka; A. Makeev; M. Mikelsen; M. Murray; J. Natowitz; B. S. Nielsen; J. Norris; K. Olchanski; D. Ouerdane; R. Planeta; F. Rami; C. Ristea; D. Röhrich; B. H. Samset; D. Sandberg; S. J. Sanders; R. A. Scheetz; P. Staszel; T. S. Tveter; F. Videbæk; R. Wada; Z. Yin; I. S. Zgura

2004-01-01

262

Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Study of Lattice Thermal Conductivity\\/Conductance of Au-SAM-Au Junctions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed on\\u000aAu-SAM (self-assembly monolayer)-Au junctions. The SAM consisted of\\u000aalkanedithiol molecules. The out-of-plane (z-direction) thermal conductance and\\u000ain-plane (x- and y-direction) thermal conductivities were calculated.\\u000aSimulation finite size effect, gold substrate thickness effect, temperature\\u000aeffect, normal pressure effect, molecule chain length effect and molecule\\u000acoverage effect on thermal conductivity\\/conductance were studied.

Tengfei Luo; John R. Lloyd

2010-01-01

263

Single identified hadron spectra from sNN=130GeV Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse momentum spectra and yields of hadrons are measured by the PHENIX\\u000acollaboration in Au + Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 130 GeV at the Relativistic\\u000aHeavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The time-of-flight resolution allows identification\\u000aof pions to transverse momenta of 2 GeV\\/c and protons and antiprotons to 4\\u000aGeV\\/c. The yield of pions rises approximately linearly with the number

K. Adcox; S. Adler; N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. Awes; K. Barish; P. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. Bellaiche; S. Belyaev; M. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. Brooks; D. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. Chang; L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. Cole; D. d’Enterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. En’yo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. Fields; S. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; J. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. Hansen; H. Hara; E. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. Hemmick; J. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. Hill; D. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. Jacak; W. Jang; J. Jia; B. Johnson; S. Johnson; K. Joo; S. Kametani; J. Kang; M. Kann; S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. Kim; H. Kim; S. Kim; Y. Kim; W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. Lee; M. Leitch; X. Li; Z. Li; D. Lim; M. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. Makdisi; V. Manko; Y. Mao; S. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; T. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. Mischke; G. Mishra; J. Mitchell; A. Mohanty; D. Morrison; J. Moss; F. Mühlbacher; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. Nagle; Y. Nakada; B. Nandi; J. Newby; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; A. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O’Brien; C. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. Ojha; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. Österman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; A. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; S. Pate; T. Peitzmann; A. Petridis; C. Pinkenburg; R. Pisani; P. Pitukhin; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. Purschke; I. Ravinovich; K. Read; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; M. Rosati; A. Rose; S. Ryu; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; T. Sangster; R. Santo; H. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; T. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina; Y. Shin; I. Sibiriak; D. Silvermyr; K. Sim; J. Simon-Gillo; C. Singh; V. Singh; M. Sivertz; A. Soldatov; R. Soltz; S. Sorensen; P. Stankus; N. Starinsky; P. Steinberg; E. Stenlund; A. Ster; S. Stoll; M. Sugioka; T. Sugitate; J. Sullivan; Y. Sumi; Z. Sun; M. Suzuki; E. Takagui; A. Taketani; M. Tamai; K. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; E. Taniguchi; M. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; T. Thomas; W. Tian; J. Tojo; H. Torii; R. Towell; I. Tserruya; H. Tsuruoka; A. Tsvetkov; S. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; T. Ushiroda; H. van Hecke; C. Velissaris; J. Velkovska; M. Velkovsky; A. Vinogradov; M. Volkov; A. Vorobyov; E. Vznuzdaev; H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; S. White; C. Witzig; F. Wohn; C. Woody; W. Xie; K. Yagi; S. Yokkaichi; G. Young; I. Yushmanov; W. Zajc; Z. Zhang; S. Zhou

2004-01-01

264

Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.  

PubMed

Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays. PMID:12190459

Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

2002-08-19

265

Tunable and augmented plasmon resonances of Au/SiO2/Au nanodisks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The plasmon resonance of Au/SiO2 multilayered nanodisks was studied using light scattering spectroscopy and numerical calculations. Compared to single layered Au nanodisks, multilayered nanodisks exhibit several distinctive properties including significantly enhanced plasmon resonances and tunable resonance wavelengths which can be tailored to desired values by simply varying dielectric layer thickness while the particle diameter is kept constant. Numerical calculations show that slicing one metal layer into metal multilayers leads to higher scattering intensity and more ``hot spots,'' or regions of strong field enhancement. This tunable and augmented plasmon resonance holds a great potential in the applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

Su, K. H.; Wei, Q. H.; Zhang, X.

2006-02-01

266

Champ de Pression Engendre Par le Mouvement Chaotique de Tourbillons au Voisinage d'Une Paroi. Rapport Final (Pressure Field Developed by the Random Movement of the Vortices Near a Wall).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The behavior of a linear ensemble of vortices, in a two dimensional non rotating fluid near a wall is modeled. The experimental results are presented and discussed. The initial motion of the vortices are characterized by Fourier transformation, by phase a...

L. Collorec D. Juve

1991-01-01

267

African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development. Report and Recommendations = Colloque regional africain la telematique au service du developpement. Rapport et recommandations (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 3-7, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development was organized in view of the special educational and communication needs of Africa in a time of accelerating change and development of information technologies. The symposium brought together more than 150 African specialists, and over 40 participants from other regions and development…

International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

268

Controle Optimal Par Large Bande de Frequence. Application au Controle Acoustique Par Technique Piezoelectrique. Rapport Final (Optimal Control by Wideband Frequency. Application to Acoustic Control by Piezoelectric Technique (Final Report)).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The definition of the problem of wideband frequency optimal control for a large class of variably complex dynamical systems is addressed. Existence and uniqueness of the solutions are examined. The problem is discretized by finite elements. The numerical ...

N. Meidinger

1990-01-01

269

Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

2008-09-01

270

Reliability of Au-Ge and Au-Si Eutectic Solder Alloys for High-Temperature Electronics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-temperature electronics will facilitate deeper drilling, accessing harder-to-reach fossil fuels in oil and gas industry. A key requirement is reliability under harsh conditions for a minimum continuous operating time of 500 h at 300°C. Eutectic solder alloys are generally favored due to their excellent fatigue resistance. Performance of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys at 300°C up to 500 h has been evaluated. Nanoindentation results confirm the loss of strength of Au-Ge and Au-Si eutectic solder alloys during thermal aging at 300°C, as a result of grain coarsening. However, the pace at which the Au-Ge eutectic alloy loses its strength is much slower when compared with Au-Si eutectic alloy. The interfacial reactions between these eutectic solder alloys and the underbump metallization (UBM), i.e., electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) UBM and Cu/Au UBM, have been extensively studied. Spalling of Au3Cu intermetallic compound is observed at the interface between Au-Ge eutectic solder and the Cu/Au UBM, when aged at 300°C for 500 h, while the consumption of ENIG UBM is nominal. Unlike the Au-Si solder joint, hot ball shear testing at high temperature confirmed that the Au-Ge joint on ENIG UBM, when aged at 300°C for 500 h, could still comply with the minimum qualifying bump shear strength based on the UBM dimension used in this work. Thus, it has been determined that, among these two binary eutectic alloys, Au-Ge eutectic alloy could fulfill the minimum requirement specified by the oil and gas exploration industry.

Chidambaram, Vivek; Yeung, Ho Beng; Shan, Gao

2012-08-01

271

Microstructured Au/TiO2 model catalyst systems.  

PubMed

The preparation of microstructured Au/TiO2 model catalysts as a first step toward micrometer-scale parallel studies on model catalysts and toward studies of mesoscopic effects in catalytic reactions was investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The model systems, which consist of micrometer-size active areas covered with Au nanoparticles that are separated by similarly sized inactive areas free of Au particles, are fabricated by combining optical lithography methods for microstructuring and ultrahigh vacuum evaporation for Au nanoparticle deposition and by applying suitable cleaning steps. It is demonstrated that practically perfect microstructures with Au nanoparticles of catalytically relevant sizes (2-3-nm diameter) on a clean TiO2 substrate can be produced this way and that the processing steps do not affect the deposited Au nanoparticles, neither in size nor in lateral distribution. PMID:15274568

Kielbassa, S; Kinne, M; Behm, R J

2004-08-01

272

Conductive Au nanowires regulated by silk fibroin nanofibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conductive Au-biopolymer composites have promising applications in tissue engineering such as nerve tissue regeneration. In this study, silk fibroin nanofibers were formed in aqueous solution by regulating silk self-assembly process and then used as template for Au nanowire fabrication. We performed the synthesis of Au seeds by repeating the seeding cycles for several times in order to increase the density of Au seeds on the nanofibers. After electroless plating, densely decorated Au seeds grew into irregularly shaped particles following silk nanofiber to fill the gaps between particles and finally form uniform continuous nanowires. The conductive property of the Au-silk fibroin nanowires was studied with current-voltage ( I-V) measurement. A typical ohmic behavior was observed, which highlighted their potential applications in nerve tissue regeneration.

Dong, Bo-Ju; Lu, Qiang

2014-03-01

273

Structural and electronic properties of AuIr nanoalloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lowest-energy structures of binary (AuIr) n , (AuIr3) s , and (Au3Ir) s clusters, with n = 2-20, and s = 5, modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, were obtained by using a genetic-symbiotic algorithm. These structures were further relaxed within the density functional theory to obtain the most stable structures for each composition. Segregation is observed in all the AuIr clusters, where the Ir atoms occupy the cluster core and the Au atoms are situated on the cluster surface. On the other hand, there is experimental evidence that the (AuIr) n nanoalloys could have an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation. In order to study this phenomenon, we also performed first-principles density functional calculations of the CO and O2 adsorption on these bimetallic nanoclusters, considering three different compositions and a fixed cluster size of 20 atoms.

Jiménez-Díaz, Laura M.; Pérez, Luis A.

2013-01-01

274

Optical nonlinearity of Au nanoparticles fabricated by negative ion implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dispersion of the nonlinear dielectric function of Au nanoparticle composites in Al 2O 3, fabricated by negative ion implantation, was studied. Negative ion, Au -, with 60 keV was applied for implantation at a flux of 10 ?A/cm 2, achieving a fluence up to 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 to fabricate the Au nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of Au:Al 2O 3 composite showed a blue shift due to a shallow distribution of Au nanoparticles in Al 2O 3. Transient transmission and reflection spectra were measured with the pump-probe method using a femtosecond laser system. The dispersion of the nonlinear dielectric function of Au:Al 2O 3 composite is evaluated from these transient spectra with total differential. The evaluated dispersion around the surface plasmon resonance was compared with calculated dispersions including interband and intraband transitions and a local electric field factor. The dispersion reflects the overlap with these transitions.

Takeda, Y.; Plaksin, O. A.; Wang, H.; Kishimoto, N.

2007-04-01

275

Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl < HCO3 < CH2 < CN < HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.

Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, María C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2014-09-01

276

Experimental determination of the solubility of Au in silicate melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary We report here new data on the solubility of Au in silicate melts of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at a wide range of oxygen fugacities, from pure oxygen to 10-8 atm, and at a temperature range of 1300 °C to 1480 °C. Because experiments were done with metal loops at temperatures above the Au-melting temperature, PdAu-metal-alloys had to be used.

A. Borisov; H. Palme

1996-01-01

277

MOS photodetectors based on Au-nanorod doped graphene electrodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

By using Au-nanorod (Au-NR) doped graphene as a transparent conducting electrode, Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) photodetectors (PDs) exhibit high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and fast response time. It is found that upon adding Au-NRs to the graphene, a significant increase in EQE is observed for both planar and Si-nanotip (Si-NT) MOS PDs. The planar Si-based MOS PDs reveal a notable photoresponse

Yung-Ting Chen; Ya-Ping Hsieh; Fu-Yu Shih; Chih-Yung Chang; Mario Hofmann; Yang-Fang Chen

2011-01-01

278

Reliability of Au-Ag alloy wire bonding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au-Ag alloy wire is a low cost wire bonding solution instead of gold wire for IC packaging. Comparing with copper wire, Au-Ag wire has better productivity because it does not need protective gas and it is softer. The main issue of Au-Ag alloy wire bonding is its reliability in humidity environment. In present study, the bond parameters effect on PCT

Hai Liu; Qi Chen; Zhenqing Zhao; Qian Wang; Jianfeng Zeng; Jonghyun Chae; Jaisung Lee

2010-01-01

279

Janus Au Nanoparticle Patterning via Polymer Single Crystals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possess remarkable electrical and optical properties coupled with good chemical stability. Thus, they have wide potential applications in fabrication of advanced optical and electronic devices. In order to efficiently transfer their outstanding properties from nano- to micro-scale, patterned AuNPs are desired. Here, we report a novel method using polymer single crystals as substrates to pattern AuNPs. By

Christopher Li; Bing Li

2008-01-01

280

Observation of sputtering damage on Au(111)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The morphology of a Au(111) surface has been observed with the STM (scanning tunneling microscope) after ion bombardment with 2.5 keV Ne + ions at about 400 K. Mostly triangular and hexagonal shaped vacancy islands are seen in the STM topographs. They are bounded by monatomic steps, oriented along the closed packed <110> directions. The general morphology confirms the conclusions inferred from TEAS (thermal energy atom scattering) measurements on ion bombarded Pt(111) surfaces. The observation of a propensity for the formation of {100} microfacetted <110> ledges is discussed.

Michely, Thomas; Besocke, Karl H.; Comsa, George

1990-05-01

281

Amphiphilic multiblock copolymer stabilized Au nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are synthesized in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) by using amphiphilic multiblock copolymer (P4VP–PS–P4VP)n containing multiple trithiocarbonate moieties or amphiphilic triblock copolymer (HS–P4VP–PS–P4VP–SH) with thiol end groups as protecting agents. Only isolated gold nanoparticles are obtained, which indicate that the multiple functional groups of a single polymer chain are grafted at the same time to the same nanoparticle. The

Binyang Du; Bin Zhao; Pengjun Tao; Kezheng Yin; Ping Lei; Qi Wang

2008-01-01

282

Transition probability studies in 175Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transition probabilities have been measured between the low-lying yrast states in 175Au by employing the recoil distance Doppler-shift method combined with the selective recoil-decay tagging technique. Reduced transition probabilities and magnitudes of transition quadrupole moments have been extracted from measured lifetimes allowing dramatic changes in nuclear structure within a low excitation-energy range to probed. The transition quadrupole moment data are discussed in terms of available systematics as a function of atomic number and aligned angular momentum.

Grahn, T.; Watkins, H.; Joss, D. T.; Page, R. D.; Carroll, R. J.; Dewald, A.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hackstein, M.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Köll, Th; Krücken, R.; Labiche, M.; Leino, M.; Lumley, N.; Maierbeck, P.; Nyman, M.; Nieminen, P.; O'Donnell, D.; Ollier, J.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Pissulla, Th; Rahkila, P.; Revill, J. P.; Rother, W.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Rigby, S. V.; Sarén, J.; Sapple, P. J.; Scheck, M.; Scholey, C.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Venhart, M.

2013-03-01

283

Crystal chemistry and spectroscopic properties of ScAuSn, YAuSn, and LuAuSn  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stannides ScAuSn, YAuSn, and LuAuSn were synthesized as single phase materials from the elements via arc-melting. All samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals: MgAgAs type, F4¯3m, a=641.94(12) pm, wR2=0.035, 85 F values, 5 variables for ScAuSn, a=656.52(8) pm, wR2=0.029, 89 F values, 5 variables for LuAuSn, and NdPtSb type, P6mc, a=463.55(16), c=737.26(15) pm, wR2=0.057, 233 F values, 11 variables for YAuSn. The gold and tin atoms in ScAuSn and LuAuSn build up three-dimensional [AuSn] networks of corner-sharing AuSn 4/4 tetrahedra (278 and 284 pm Au sbnd Sn in ScAuSn and LuAuSn, respectively) similar to the blende type structure. The scandium atoms fill octahedral voids formed by the tin substructure. In contrast, the [AuSn] network of YAuSn is two-dimensional. The gold and tin atoms build up layers of puckered [Au 3Sn 3] hexagons with intralayer Au sbnd Sn distances of 277 pm, while the interlayer Au sbnd Sn distances of 297 pm are much longer. In every other layer the [Au 3Sn 3] hexagons are rotated by 60°. The layers are separated by the yttrium atoms. Spectroscopic measurements indicate significant differences in the chemical bonding properties: As revealed by both 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy and 119Sn solid-state NMR data, the local electronic environment at the tin site is more anisotropic in YAuSn as compared to the other materials, which feature tin on a site with cubic point symmetry. In ScAuSn, the cubic site symmetry of the scandium position is reflected by a single sharp line in the 45Sc solid-state NMR spectrum.

Sebastian, C. Peter; Eckert, Hellmut; Rayaprol, Sudhindra; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Pöttgen, Rainer

2006-05-01

284

Transverse Expansion (sup 197)Au+(sup 197)Au Collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Using the RQMD model, transverse momentum distributions and particle ratios are studies for (sup 197) AU + (sup 197) collisions at square root of (sup s)(sub NN) equals 200 GeV. In particular, we present results on the mean transverse momentum of charged ...

Y. Cheng F. Liu Z. Liu K. Schweda N. Xu

2003-01-01

285

"Au Revoir" to Film Illiteracy: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of "Au Revior Les Enfants."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the power of film and films as teaching tools. Describes how the 1987 French film "Au Revior Les Enfants" can serve these purposes. Discusses its historical context, and ways to show the film in class. Lists numerous topics (on important film themes, and on technical aspects of film) for student projects. (SR)

Corbitt, J. Catherine

1998-01-01

286

An Exploration of Catalytic Chemistry on Au/Ni(111)  

SciTech Connect

This project explored the catalytic oxidation chemistry that can be effected on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy. A Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is a Ni(111) surface on which less than 60% of the Ni atoms are replaced at random positions by Au atoms. The alloy is produced by vapor deposition of a small amount of Au onto Ni single crystals. The Au atoms do not result in an epitaxial Au overlayer or in the condensation of the Au into droplets. Instead, Au atoms displace and then replace Ni atoms on a Ni(111) surface, even though Au is immiscible in bulk Ni. The two dimensional structure of the clean Ni surface is preserved. This alloy is found to stabilize an adsorbed peroxo-like O2 species that is shown to be the critical reactant in the low temperature catalytic oxidation of CO and that is suspected to be the critical reactant in other oxidation reactions. This investigation revealed a new, practically important catalyst for CO oxidation that has since been patented.

Sylvia T. Ceyer

2011-12-09

287

Layer growth in Au-Pb/In solder joints  

SciTech Connect

The solid state reaction between a Pb-In solder alloy and thin film Au has been investigated at ten aging temperatures ranging from 70 to 170/sup 0/C. Also, bulk Au-solder samples were aged at 150/sup 0/C for metallographic analysis. No significant difference was found between the aging behavior of thin and bulk Au specimens. A thin single phase layer of Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ was found adjacent to Au while a thick two-phase layer of AuIn/sub 2/ and Pb was found between Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ and solder. The Pb phase was shown to have considerable mobility and able to ripen at room temperature. Peculiar planar interface instabilities and voids in the Au-Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ interface were found. The total layer thickness was found to vary linearly with aging time, indicating an interface-controlled reaction. An activation energy of 14,000 calories per mole was found by regression analysis of the kinetic data.

Yost, F.G.; Ganyard, F.P.; Karnowsky, M.M.

1986-01-01

288

Structural and optical studies of Au doped titanium oxide films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thin films of TiO 2 were doped with Au by ion implantation and in situ during the deposition. The films were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and deposited in silicon and glass substrates at a temperature around 150 °C. The undoped films were implanted with Au fluences in the range of 5 × 10 15 Au/cm 2-1 × 10 17 Au/cm 2 with a energy of 150 keV. At a fluence of 5 × 10 16 Au/cm 2 the formation of Au nanoclusters in the films is observed during the implantation at room temperature. The clustering process starts to occur during the implantation where XRD estimates the presence of 3-5 nm precipitates. After annealing in a reducing atmosphere, the small precipitates coalesce into larger ones following an Ostwald ripening mechanism. In situ XRD studies reveal that Au atoms start to coalesce at 350 °C, reaching the precipitates dimensions larger than 40 nm at 600 °C. Annealing above 700 °C promotes drastic changes in the Au profile of in situ doped films with the formation of two Au rich regions at the interface and surface respectively. The optical properties reveal the presence of a broad band centered at 550 nm related to the plasmon resonance of gold particles visible in AFM maps.

Alves, E.; Franco, N.; Barradas, N. P.; Nunes, B.; Lopes, J.; Cavaleiro, A.; Torrell, M.; Cunha, L.; Vaz, F.

2012-02-01

289

Atomistic simulations of Au-silica nanocomposite film growth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growth of Au-silica nanocomposite film is simulated in the framework of kinetic three dimensional lattice Monte Carlo simulations considering the basic phenomena in the deposition process. In case of co-sputter deposition, the growth kinetics of nanoparticles has been studied taking into consideration the effect of the energetic sputtered species reaching the surface of the film during deposition. Formation of Au nanorod like structures are predicted under certain growth conditions particularly when surface diffusion assisted phase separation plays the dominant role and bulk kinetics is frozen. The observed dependence of the Au nanoparticle size on Au/silica ratio is in agreement with the experimental results.

Khan, Saif A.; Heinig, K.-H.; Avasthi, D. K.

2011-05-01

290

Photochemically grafted polystyrene layer assisting selective Au electrodeposition.  

PubMed

We describe the selective electrodeposition of submicrometer gold (Au) patterns achieved by a thin film resist layer of polystyrene (PS) that was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light on a photoreactive monolayer of a benzophenone-containing alkylthiol formed on a Au-plated substrate and patterned by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The presence of a PS graft layer caused by the benzophenone monolayer photochemistry at an interface between the PS resist layer and photoreactive monolayer played the important role of suppressing the unfavorable growth of tiny Au grains in regions masked with the PS resist layer, resulting in the selective Au electrodeposition in aperture regions of PS resist patterns. The suppressive effect on selective Au electrodeposition depended on the molecular weight of PS used as a resist material. Among unimodal PSs having weight-average molecular weights (M(w)'s) of 2100, 10,900, and 106,000 g mol(-1), the PS of M(w) = 10,900 g mol(-1) functioned most effectively as the resist layer. Au electrodeposition at a low current density allowed the preparation of Au lines having widths of submicrometers and a uniform height independent of line widths in resist aperture regions. Submicrometer bump structures of Au lines could be fabricated on transparent silica substrates by the subsequent wet etching of a Au electrode layer and then a chromium adhesive layer. PMID:22780225

Nagase, Koichi; Kubo, Shoichi; Nakagawa, Masaru

2012-08-01

291

Etude de L'energie Moyenne de Creation de Paire dans les Detecteurs de Particules AU Silicium Amorphe Hydrogene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ce travail porte sur la mesure et le calcul de l'energie de creation d'une paire electron-trou, epsilon_{p}, par une particule ionisante dans des detecteurs en couches minces au a-Si:H. Cette etude fut realisee a l'aide de dispositifs specialement concus et qui sont de deux types. Le premier emprunte au domaine des cellules photovoltaiques des structures p/i/n qui ont des couches dopees de ~30 nm mais dont on augmente l'epaisseur de la couche sensible, la couche i, a 3 ou 4 mum. Ces dispositifs peuvent etre polarises en inverse jusqu'a 20 V/ mum. Le second type consiste aussi en des structures p/i/n qui cette fois sont adaptees specialement aux applications de detection. Ces nouveaux dispositifs possedent une couche p de plus de 300 nm qui attenue l'injection d'electrons lors de l'application de la tension inverse, prevenant ainsi le claquage premature et permettant l'application de tensions de plus de 60 V/mum. De plus, ils ont une couche i faisant de 4 a 18 mu m. Nous avons soumis ces dispositifs a des protons et des particules alpha couvrant un domaine de dE/dx de 7.5 a 300 keV/mum. On met ainsi en evidence deux regimes d'operations. Premierement, lorsqu'on utilise des particules ayant des dE/dx eleves, a des incidences normales a la surface du detecteur et que la tension appliquee aux bornes du dispositif est faible, le signal est fortement attenue par des effets plasmas. Deuxiemement, a de fortes tensions pour des particules a incidences obliques et dE/dx faibles, l'amplitude du signal est proportionnelle a l'energie deposee dans la zone i du detecteur. Cependant, ce signal n'est pas sature et il semble augmenter avec la tension au-dela de la tension de claquage. De plus, on demontre qu'a des tensions intermediaires le signal est plus eleve si la tension est pulsee et si le temps d'integration de l'electronique est long (~ 20mus). En extrapolant l'amplitude du signal a une tension infinie nous obtenons une valeur de epsilon _{p} affranchie de tout effet de recombinaison et egale a 3.8 +/- 0.5 eV. Cette valeur, tres proche de celle du silicium cristallin, est surprenante compte tenu du gap de mobilite tres large du materiau amorphe, 1.7 eV, par comparaison a la bande interdite du materiau cristallin, 1.12 eV. En effet, le modele de Klein, qui reproduit les valeurs de epsilon_{p} dans un grand nombre de semiconducteurs cristallins, predit une energie de creation de paire de 5.8 eV dans le a-Si:H. Cependant, notre valeur experimentale est compatible avec le resultat d'un calcul Monte Carlo que nous avons effectue et au cours duquel nous simulons, en detail, la thermatisation des porteurs dans les bandes de valence et de conduction par processus Auger et par generation de phonons optiques de 60 meV. On trouve alors 3.35 eV pour le silicium cristallin et 4.4 eV pour le a-Si:H pour des rapports realistes des deux processus de thermalisation. Un important resultat de la simulation indique que la presence des etats localises dans le gap de mobilite du a-Si:H a peu d'effet sur epsilon_ {p}, ce qui mene a la conclusion que la recombinaison geminee joue un role negligeable dans la generation du signal par une particule.

Dubeau, Jacques

292

Au–Cu alloy nanoparticles supported on silica gel as catalyst for CO oxidation: Effects of Au\\/Cu ratios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au–Cu bimetallic catalysts with Au\\/Cu ratios ranging from 3\\/1 to 20\\/1 were prepared on silica gel support by a two-step method. The catalysts were characterized by ICP, XRD and TEM. The results showed that, irrespective of Au\\/Cu ratios, all the bimetallic nanoparticles had significantly reduced particle sizes (3.0–3.6nm) in comparison with monometallic gold catalysts (5.7nm). Both CO oxidation and PROX

Xiaoyan Liu; Aiqin Wang; Tao Zhang; Dang-Sheng Su; Chung-Yuan Mou

2011-01-01

293

Lateral diffusion of In and formation of AuIn2 in Au-In thin films  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lateral diffusion of In in 20–100-nm-thick Au-In films has been studied in the 60–150 °C temperature range. Indium diffusion due to the chemical potential gradient occurs from In to Au-In with an AuIn2 phase being formed in the diffusion zone. The growth of the diffusion zone obeys a parabolic rate law with the growth rate strongly dependent on In concentration

Yuji Hasumi; Morinosato Wakamiya

1985-01-01

294

Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241-0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74-0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458-0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon-hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration.

Huang, Chang-Ning; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

2009-11-01

295

Mesomorphic lamella rolling of au in vacuum.  

PubMed

Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241-0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74-0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458-0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon-hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration. PMID:20628452

Huang, Chang-Ning; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

2009-01-01

296

Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum  

PubMed Central

Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241–0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74–0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458–0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon–hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration.

2009-01-01

297

Controlled synthesis of PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers and cap-like Au nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uniform PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers consisting of one Au nanoparticle grown on one horn of a well-defined six-horn PbS nanostar were prepared using the PbS nanostars as growth substrates for the selective deposition of Au nanoparticles. The size of the Au nanoparticles on the horns of the PbS nanostars could be readily adjusted by changing the PbS concentration for the deposition of Au nanoparticles. An optimum cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration and temperature were essential for the selective deposition of uniform Au nanoparticles on single horns of the PbS nanostars. Unusual PbS-Au nanoframe-nanoparticle heterodimers were obtained by etching the PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers with oxalic acid while novel cap-like Au nanoparticles were obtained by etching with hydrochloric acid. The obtained heterodimeric nanostructures and cap-like nanoparticles are promising candidates for anisotropic nanoscale building blocks for the controllable assembly of useful, complex architectures.

Zhao, Nana; Li, Lianshan; Huang, Teng; Qi, Limin

2010-11-01

298

Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.  

PubMed

We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur. PMID:17026027

Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

2006-09-29

299

Probing the reactivity of C 6-hydrocarbons on Au surfaces: cyclohexane, cyclohexyl and cyclohexene on Au( 1 1 1 )  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au is often added to reduce the activity of Group-VIII transition metals like Ni, Pd and Pt in dehydrogenation catalysts. In order to improve understanding of the fundamental chemistry of hydrocarbons at Au sites, further studies of stable hydrocarbon molecules and reactive intermediates on Au surfaces are needed. The adsorption and thermal chemistry of cyclohexane (C 6H 12), cyclohexyl groups (C 6H 11) produced by electron-induced dissociation (EID) of cyclohexane, and cyclohexene (C 6H 10) on Au(1 1 1) was studied by using primarily temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Fourier-Transform Infrared Reflection-Absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Both cyclohexane and cyclohexene are reversibly adsorbed on Au(1 1 1) surfaces, with desorption peak temperatures of 198 and 213 K from the adsorbed monolayer, respectively, and 143 K from both multilayer films. EID with an incident electron energy of 30 eV on a monolayer film of cyclohexane selectively breaks one C-H bond in weakly bound cyclohexane molecules to form adsorbed C 6H 11 groups on the Au(1 1 1) surface, as established by TPD and IRAS. The Au(1 1 1) surface can readily and selectively dehydrogenate adsorbed cyclohexyl groups to produce cyclohexene at or below 216 K. Cyclohexyl groups also undergo disproportionation reactions at 273 K to produce cyclohexane and cyclohexene. We suggest that surface Au atoms may play a more important, direct role in the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation selectivity found for transition metal-Au alloys than is commonly discussed.

Syomin, Denis; Koel, Bruce. E.

2002-02-01

300

Energy Loss and Flow of Heavy Quarks in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured electrons with 0.3Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV. The nuclear modification factor RAA relative to p+p collisions shows a strong suppression in central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial energy loss of heavy quarks in the medium produced at RHIC

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J.-S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J.-L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörgo; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. D'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'Yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kano; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y.-S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y.-S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; H. Lim; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; X. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; H. Okada; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slunecka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomásek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V.-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle; H. W. van Hecke; J. Velkovska; R. Vertesi; A. A. Vinogradov; M. Virius; V. Vrba; E. Vznuzdaev

2007-01-01

301

CO oxidation on h-BN supported Au atom  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of CO oxidation by O{sub 2} on Au atoms supported on the pristine and defected hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surface has been studied theoretically using density functional theory. It is found that O{sub 2} binds stronger than CO on an Au atom supported on the defect free h-BN surface and h-BN surface with nitrogen vacancy (V{sub N}-h-BN), but weaker than CO on a free Au atom or Au trapped by a boron vacancy (V{sub B}-h-BN). The excess of the positive or negative charge on Au can considerably change its catalytic properties and enhance activation of the adsorbed O{sub 2}. Coadsorption of CO and O{sub 2} on Au, Au/V{sub N}-h-BN, and Au/V{sub B}-h-BN results in additional charge transfer to O{sub 2}. Various pathways of the CO oxidation reaction by molecular oxygen are studied. We found two different pathways for CO oxidation: a two-step pathway where two CO{sub 2} molecules are formed independently, and a self-promotion pathway where oxidation of the first CO molecule is promoted by the second CO molecule. Interaction of Au with the defect-free and defected h-BN surface considerably affects the CO oxidation reaction pathways and barriers. Therefore, Au supported on the h-BN surface (pristine or defected) cannot be considered as pseudo-free atom and support effects have to be taken into account, even when the interaction of Au with the support is weak.

Gao Min [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Lyalin, Andrey; Taketsugu, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Center for Strategic Utilization of Elements, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB), Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

2013-01-21

302

Transverse Momentum Distributions and String Percolation Study in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au at $\\\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiparticle production at high energies is described in terms of color\\u000astrings stretched between the projectile and target. As string density\\u000aincreases, overlap among the strings leads to cluster formation. At some\\u000acritical density a macroscopic cluster appears, spanning the entire system.\\u000aThis marks the percolation phase transition. Data from p+p, d+Au and Au+Au\\u000acollisions at 200 GeV has been

Terence J. Tarnowsky; Brijesh K. Srivastava; Rolf P. Scharenberg

2006-01-01

303

Transverse-Momentum Spectra in Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at (sNN)=200 GeV and the Pseudorapidity Dependence of High-pT Suppression  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present spectra of charged hadrons from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at (sNN)=200 GeV measured with the BRAHMS experiment at RHIC. The spectra for different collision centralities are compared to spectra from p+p¯ collisions at the same energy scaled by the number of binary collisions. The resulting ratios (nuclear modification factors) for central Au+Au collisions at eta=0 and eta=2.2 evidence

I. Arsene; I. G. Bearden; D. Beavis; C. Besliu; B. Budick; H. Bøggild; C. Chasman; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; J. Cibor; R. Debbe; E. Enger; J. J. Gaardhøje; M. Germinario; K. Hagel; O. Hansen; A. Holm; H. Ito; A. Jipa; F. Jundt; J. I. Jørdre; C. E. Jørgensen; R. Karabowicz; E. J. Kim; T. Kozik; T. M. Larsen; J. H. Lee; Y. K. Lee; S. Lindal; G. Lystad; G. Løvhøiden; Z. Majka; A. Makeev; B. McBreen; M. Mikelsen; M. Murray; J. Natowitz; B. Neumann; B. S. Nielsen; J. Norris; D. Ouerdane; R. Planeta; F. Rami; C. Ristea; O. Ristea; D. Röhrich; B. H. Samset; D. Sandberg; S. J. Sanders; R. A. Scheetz; P. Staszel; T. S. Tveter; F. Videbæk; R. Wada; Z. Yin; I. S. Zgura

2003-01-01

304

Mono- and dinuclear Ag(I), Au(I), and Au(III) metallamacrocycles containing N-heterocyclic dicarbene ligands.  

PubMed

Ag(I) dicarbene complexes [Ag(m)(L(n))m]X(m) (L(n) = Im(Me)(CH2)(n)Im(Me), Im(Me) = N-methylimidazol-N-yl-2-ylidene; n = 3, X = PF6, m = 2; n = 6-8, 10, X = AgBr2, m = 1, 2) were prepared by reacting Ag2O with 1 equiv of the corresponding bisimidazolium salt [H2L(n)]A2 (A = PF6, Br). The dibromoargentates react with 1 equiv of AgTfO to afford [Ag(m)(L(n))m](TfO)m (m = 1, 2). The room temperature transmetalation reaction of [Ag(m)(L(n))m][AgBr2]m (n = 3, 5, 6-8, 10) with [AuCl(SMe2)] and AgTfO (L(n):Au:TfO = 1:1:1) affords [Au2(?-L(n))2](TfO)2 (n = 3, 5, 10), or mixtures of [Au(?(2)-L(n))]TfO (main product for n = 7) and [Au2(?-L(n))2](TfO)2 (main product for n = 6, 8). At room temperature, the equilibrium between [M2(?-L(n))2](TfO)2 and [M(?(2)-L(n))]TfO is fast for M = Ag, but slow for M = Au, in the NMR time scale. When n ? 7 and M = Ag or Au, the equilibrium is shifted toward the mononuclear complexes in the order 8 > 10 > 7, which proves that the (CH2)8 linker has the optimal length for trans chelation. Correspondingly, the high-temperature metalation of [H2L(n)]Br2 (n = 8, 10) with 1 equiv of [AuCl(SMe2)] and excess of NaAcO, affords [Au(?(2)-L(n))]Br with a small amount of [Au2(?-L(n))2]Br2. If AgTfO is added to the reaction mixture, [Au(?(2)-L(8))]2[AgBr3] is isolated instead of the desired triflate, which can be obtained by reacting the mixture of [Au(?(2)-L(8))]Br and [Au2(?-L(8))2]Br2 with AgTfO. [Au(?(2)-L(10))]TfO was isolated after thermal conversion of [Au2(?-L(10))2](TfO)2. [Au(?(2)-L(8))]TfO reacts with I2 to give trans-[AuI2(?(2)-L(8))]TfO, which is the first Au(III) complex containing a trans-spanning bidentate ligand. We have determined the crystal structures of complexes [Ag2(?-L(3))2](PF6)2, [Ag(?(2)-L(7))]TfO, [Au2(?-L(3))2](TfO)2, [Au(?(2)-L(8))]Br, [Au(?(2)-L(8))]2[AgBr3], and trans-[AuI2(?(2)-L(8))]TfO. PMID:23488928

Gil-Rubio, Juan; Cámara, Verónica; Bautista, Delia; Vicente, José

2013-04-01

305

Preparation and optical absorption spectra of Au{sub core}Pt{sub shell} and Pt{sub core}Au{sub shell} colloidal nanoparticles in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Bimetallic gold and platinum particles of the Pt-Au and Au-Pt core-shell type are prepared using hydrogen reduction and radiolysis techniques. The optical absorption spectra are recorded and compared to various Au-Pt particles described in the literature. Au{sub core}Pt{sub shell} particles catalyze the hydrogen reduction of silver ions to yield trimetallic particles.

Henglein, A.

2000-03-16

306

Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints  

SciTech Connect

Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

Song, Ho Geon

2002-05-31

307

AuAg alloy nanomolecules with 38 metal atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au38-nAgn(SCH2CH2Ph)24 alloy nanomolecules were synthesized, purified and characterized by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. Similar to 25 and unlike 144 metal atom count AuAg alloy nanomolecules, incorporation of Ag atoms here results in loss or smearing out of distinct UV-vis features. We propose that the short and long staples contain Au atoms, while the inner core consists of both Au and Ag atoms.Au38-nAgn(SCH2CH2Ph)24 alloy nanomolecules were synthesized, purified and characterized by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. Similar to 25 and unlike 144 metal atom count AuAg alloy nanomolecules, incorporation of Ag atoms here results in loss or smearing out of distinct UV-vis features. We propose that the short and long staples contain Au atoms, while the inner core consists of both Au and Ag atoms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11781a

Kumara, Chanaka; Dass, Amala

2012-06-01

308

Plasmon resonances and electron phase shifts near Au nanospheres  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative phase maps from Au and polystyrene nanospheres were obtained using the transport of intensity equation approach for phase retrieval in the electron microscope. These were compared to surface plasmon maps, as generated by electron energy loss spectroscopy. Large phase excursions were observed in the vacuum regions surrounding the Au nanospheres, yet not near adjacent polystyrene nanospheres. It is proposed

T. C. Petersen; M. Bosman; V. J. Keast; G. R. Anstis

2008-01-01

309

Transparent, conductive gold nanowire networks assembled from soluble Au thiocyanate.  

PubMed

Extremely long gold nanowires spontaneously assemble in a water-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution of Au(SCN)4(-). The Au nanowires were crystalline, exhibited a very high aspect ratio, and, importantly, were produced without co-addition of reducing agents. Transparent conductive films were formed by surface deposition of the nanowires and plasma treatment. PMID:23945825

Morag, Ahiud; Ezersky, Vladimir; Froumin, Natalya; Mogiliansky, Dimitry; Jelinek, Raz

2013-10-01

310

Stripe domains in obliquely deposited Co-Au films  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetic properties and domain structure of obliquely deposited Co-Au films have been studied. Some films deposited at 40° contained weak and strong stripe domains. Those deposited at 60° contained strong stripes, which were more regular in films with a higher Au concentration. Department of Metallurgy and Science of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH, UK.

A. Ovadia; I. B. Puchalska; J. P. Jakubovics

1986-01-01

311

Hillock Growth and Stress Relief in Sputtered Au Films  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growth of hillocks has been observed during annealing of sputtered Au films. The height of a hillock is proportional to the area it occupies in the film. This empirical relationship has been used in a model which postulates that hillock growth is associated with stress relief in the Au. The model is able to relate the sign and magnitude of

W. B. Pennebaker

1969-01-01

312

Interaction of oxygen with supported Ag-Au alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The effects of alloying silver with gold on the oxygen adsorption properties of Ag are studied over a set of 15% (Ag-Au)/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts of variable alloy composition, using microgravimetric and temperature desorption techniques. Three adsorbed oxygen species are observed on the alloy surfaces at elevated temperatures, namely molecular, atomic and subsurface. It is found that geometric and electronic alterations induced by the presence of Au influence the adsorption characteristics differently for each species. When the Au content of the surface increases, the population of atomic oxygen decreases, its activation energy of adsorption increases, and the Ag-O bond weakens, while the enthalpy of adsorption decreases linearly from approximately 170 kJ/mol over pure Ag to about 70 kJ/mol over surfaces containing 24 at.% Au. Molecular oxygen adsorption on Ag is favored by the presence of Au, as indicated by the decrease of its activation energy of adsorption with increasing Au content. Finally, subsurface oxygen diffusion is strongly inhibited by the presence of gold, and the activation energy of this process increases from 100 kJ/mol for pure Ag to 400 kJ/mol for samples containing 24 surface at.% Au. These results are discussed evoking geometric and electronic alterations induced by the presence of Au on the catalytic surfaces. 48 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Kondarides, D.I.; Verykios, X.E. [Univ. of Patras (Greece)] [Univ. of Patras (Greece)

1996-02-01

313

Development of amperometric lysine biosensors based on Au nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polymers modified Au electrodes.  

PubMed

The construction of two amperometric l-lysine biosensors is described in this study. The construction comprises the covalent immobilization of lysine oxidase (LOx) onto nanocomposite composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT), decorated on (i) polyaniline (PANI) and (ii) poly 1,2 diaminobenzene (DAB), electrodeposited on Au electrodes. The biosensors were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The optimum response (current) was observed within 2 s at pH 7.0 and 25 °C for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/PANI/Au, and 4 s at pH 7.0 and 30 °C for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/DAB/Au electrodes. There was a linear relationship between current and lysine concentration ranging from 5.0 to 600 ?M for LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/PANI/Au with a detection limit of 5.0 ?M, and 20 to 600 ?M for the LOx/AuNPs/c-MWCNT/DAB/Au electrode with a detection limit of 20 ?M. The PANI modified electrode was in good agreement with the standard HPLC method, with a better correlation (r = 0.992) compared to the DAB modified electrode (r = 0.986). These observations revealed that the PANI modified Au electrode was better than the DAB modified electrode, and hence it was employed for the determination of lysine in milk, pharmaceutical tablets and sera. The PANI modified electrode showed a half life of 120 days, compared to that of 90 days for the DAB modified electrode, after their 100 uses, when stored at 4 °C. PMID:22986735

Chauhan, Nidhi; Singh, Anamika; Narang, Jagriti; Dahiya, Swati; Pundir, C S

2012-11-01

314

Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.  

PubMed

We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions. PMID:12935009

Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zo?nierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

2003-08-15

315

Three-dimensional assembly of Au nanoparticles using dipeptides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An assembly of Au nanoparticles is fabricated by the condensation of peptide bonds between L-lysine molecules attached to the surface of 13 nm Au nanoparticles. The formation of peptide bonds between the L-lysine molecules is confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that L-lysine molecules are absorbed onto the Au colloid surface via the interactions between the ?-amino group of L-lysine and the Au colloid. UV-visible spectral measurements show there are strong interactions between the Au nanoparticles linked by dipeptides (lysine-lysine) in the self-assembly. Transmission electron microscopy observations show that the distance between two adjacent nanoparticles is about 1.5 nm, which is consistent with the calculated length of the dipeptide.

Xu, Li; Guo, Yi; Xie, Renguo; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Tiejin

2002-12-01

316

Adhesion of thick film Au to alumina ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Thick film Au metallizations are commonly used as conductors in hybrid microelectronics that operate at high frequencies. Discrete components are attached to these conductors with 5OPb/5OIn solder. Intermetallic compounds form and grow in the solid state with time; AuIn{sub 2} is the primary compound formed in the Au-5OPb/50In system. A hybrid failed after being artificially aged to consume all of the Au and then subjected to normal thermal cycle and vibration testing. Postmortem analysis revealed that three capacitors had debonded. The failed parts were studied to determine the failure mechanism(s) and define a parametric study to characterize the mechanisms that bond the Au thick film to the ceramic substrate.

Nelson, G.C.; Stephens, J.J.; Hlava, P.F.

1993-03-01

317

Thermal and mechanical properties of Cu Au intermetallic alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermal and mechanical properties of Cu, Au pure metals and their ordered intermetallic alloys of Cu3Au(L12), CuAu(L10) and CuAu3(L12) are studied by using the molecular dynamics simulation. The effects of temperature and concentration on the physical properties of CuxAu1-x are analysed. Sutton-Chen (SC) and quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body potentials are used. The simulation results such as cohesive energy, density, elastic constants, bulk modulus, heat capacity, thermal expansion, melting points and phonon dispersion curves are in good agreement with the available experimental data at the various temperatures. Q-SC potential parameter results are usually closer to experimental values than the ones predicted from SC potential parameters.

Kart, H. H.; Tomak, M.; Çagin, T.

2005-07-01

318

Recherche de leptons lourds au LEP 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

En 1989, la mise en opération de la première phase du LEP (le LEP 1), au CERN, a une Energie correspondant a la résonance du boson Z0, a permis d'étudier et de confirmer avec une grande précision le Modèle Standard des interactions électrofaibles. Malgré le succès remarquable de ce modèle à décrire toutes les données expérimentales recueillies jusqu'à ce jour en physique des hautes énergies, ce dernier laisse plusieurs questions sans réponse. Il n'explique pas entre autres pourquoi il n'y a que trois familles de particules dont le neutrino associé est léger et la hiérarchie des masses observées des fermions reste une énigme. Ici, nous nous intéressons à l'existence éventuelle de nouveaux fermions, tels que prédits par des extensions du Modèle Standard. Ces nouveaux fermions ont été recherches au LEP 1, mais en vain, et une limite inférieure sur leur masse d'environ MZ/2 a pu être imposée. La deuxième phase du LEP (le LEP 2) qui a débuté dans l'automne 1995 avec une énergie disponible de ?s = 130, et 136 GeV, puis dans l'été 1996 a ?s = 161 GeV a permis d'améliorer ces limites. Nous présentons ici la recherche de leptons lourds, neutres (N) et chargés (L+/-), effectuée à partir des données recueillies dans l'automne 1996 avec le détecteur de la collaboration OPAL au LEP 2, à des énergies au centre de masse de ?s = 170 et 172 GeV. La luminosité totale intégrée fut de 10.3 pb-1. Un nouveau générateur, EXOTIC, conçu et développé a cette fin, a été utilise pour la simulation des échantillons d'événements Monte Carlo qui ont servi à comparer les données obtenues avec les prédictions théoriques. Plus spécifiquement, nous avons recherché le processus e+e- --> NN où N, pouvant être de type Dirac ou Majorana, se désintègre en un lepton léger standard (e, ?, ou ?) et un boson W+/- virtuel (W+/-*). Pour un N de type Dirac, une limite inférieure sur la masse à 95% de niveau de confiance est obtenue: mN > 79.1 GeV si N --> e W, mN > 78.5 GeV si N --> ? W, et mN > 69.0 GeV si N --> ? W; dans le cas où N est de type Majorana, les limites correspondantes sont: mN > 69.8 GeV pour le cas où N --> e W, mN > 68.5 GeV pour N --> ? W, et m N > 54.4 GeV pour N --> ? W. Nous avons également recherche le processus e+e- --> L+L -: dans le cas ou L+/- se désintègre en L+/- --> N W+/- (où N est stable dans le volume du détecteur), on obtient une limite inférieure mL > 81.5 GeV à 95 % de niveau de confiance (pour une différence de masse mL - m N > 8.4 GeV), et mL > 80.2 GeV dans le cas où L+/- --> ? t W+/-, où ?t est un neutrino léger standard avec l = e, ?, ou ?.

Tafirout, Reda

319

An excitation function of K- and K+ production in Au+Au reactions at the AGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mid-rapidity spectra and yields of K- and K+ have been measured for Au+Au collisions at 4, 6, 8, and 10.7 AGeV. The K- yield increases faster with beam energy than for K+ and hence the K-/K+ ratio increases with beam energy. This ratio is studied as a function of both /sqrt(s) and sqrt(s)-?sth which allows the direct comparison of the kaon yields with respect to the production threshold in p+p reactions. For equal sqrt(s)-?sth the measured ratio K-/K+=0.2 at energies above threshold in contrast to the K-/K+ ratio of near unity observed at energies below threshold. The use of the K-/K+ ratio to test the predicted changes of kaon properties in dense nuclear matter is discussed.

Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.; Ashktorab, K.; Baker, M. D.; Beavis, D.; Budick, B.; Chang, J.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y. Y.; Chujo, T.; Cumming, J.; Debbe, R.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Fleming, K.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garcia, E.; Gushue, S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hayano, R.; Heintzelman, G. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, E. J.; Kumagai, A.; Kurita, K.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Y. K.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Moulson, M.; Muentz, C.; Nagano, K.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olness, J.; Oyama, K.; Remsberg, L.; Sako, H.; Seto, R.; Shea, J.; Shigaki, K.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tamagawa, T.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Ueno-Hayashi, S.; Videbaek, F.; Xiang, H.; Wang, F.; Yagi, K.; Zhu, F.; Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chi, C. Y.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cumming, J. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Fung, S. Y.; Ganz, R.; Garcia, E.; Gillitzer, A.; Heintzelman, G. H.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kwon, Y.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Moulson, M.; Nanal, V.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Pak, R.; Ruangma, A.; Russ, D.; Seto, R.; Stanskas, P. J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Wang, H.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Xiang, H.; Xu, G. H.; Yao, H. B.; Zou, C. M.

2000-09-01

320

STAR physics program and technical challenges with the RHIC energy scan with Au + Au collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The future STAR physics program includes an Au + Au energy scan extending to low \\sqrt{s_{NN}} . Among other things, this energy scan will provide a unique opportunity to search for the phase boundary between quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and hadronic gas (HG), and a key landmark, a possible critical point, in the QCD phase diagram. Due to its large uniform acceptance and (with the addition of the time-of-flight detector) excellent particle identification capabilities, by the time of Run 10 (in 2010) STAR will be uniquely positioned to cover this physics in unprecedented depth and detail, as well as other novel physics possibilities. Running at very low energies poses major new challenges for accelerator experts at RHIC and for physicists preparing for data taking. We report on the status of STAR preparation for Run 10.

Odyniec, G.; STAR Collaboration

2008-10-01

321

Proton-antiproton suppression in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the measured nuclear suppression of p+p production in 200A GeV Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) within radiative energy loss. For the Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) set of fragmentation functions, proton production is dominated by gluons, giving rise to the expectation that the nuclear suppression for p+p should be stronger than for pions due to the stronger coupling of gluons to the quenching medium. Using a hydrodynamical description for the soft matter evolution, we show that this is indeed seen in the calculation. However, the expected suppression factors for pions and protons are sufficiently similar that a discrimination with present data is not possible. In the high p{sub T} region above 6 GeV where the contributions of hydrodynamics and recombination to hadron production are negligible, the model calculation is in good agreement with the data on p+p suppression.

Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland) and Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

2007-08-15

322

Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H? emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H?, H?, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R ?, thickness of 5.2 R ?, density of 1.0 × 10-13 g cm-3, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4 × 10-9 M ? yr-1. We show H? Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the H? profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Ján; Peters, Geraldine J.

2012-12-01

323

Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics and photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO nanowires decorated with Au nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to examine the possible photosensitization effect of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) by directly monitoring the charge carrier lifetime in AuNP-decorated ZnO NWs. ZnO-Au nanocomposite structures showed reduced photocurrent compared to pristine ZnO NWs due to the combined effect of ZnO etching during the AuNPs growth and competitive absorption\\/scattering effects from AuNPs

Jason K. Cooper; Yichuan Ling; Yat Li; Jin Z. Zhang

2011-01-01

324

CO Oxidation mechanism on CeO2-supported Au nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect

To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters(NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design Au13 and Au12 supported on a flat and a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the Au-CeO2 interface and the Au NC as well.

Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

2013-09-08

325

Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size ˜15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

Philip, Daizy

2009-07-01

326

Experimental Observation and Confirmation of Icosahedral W@Au12 and Mo@Au12 Molecules  

SciTech Connect

The recently predicted W@Au12 cluster has been observed and probed experimentally using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. It is shown that this unique molecule and its Mo congener indeed possess an icosahedral structure and a large HOMO-LUMO gap. Relativistic density functional theory is used to calculate their geometries, energetics, and energy spectra. The simulated density-of-states spectra are in good agreement with the photoelectron spectra, confirming the icosahedral structure of these complexes.

Li, Xi; Boggavarapu, Kiran; Li, Jun; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2002-12-16

327

Tunneling characteristics of Au-alkanedithiol-Au junctions formed via nanotransfer printing (nTP).  

PubMed

Construction of permanent metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions, though technically challenging, is desirable for both fundamental investigations and applications of molecule-based electronics. In this study, we employed the nanotransfer printing (nTP) technique using perfluoropolyether (PFPE) stamps to print Au thin films onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanedithiol formed on Au thin films. We show that the resulting MMM junctions form permanent and symmetrical tunnel junctions, without the need for an additional protection layer between the top metal electrode and the molecular layer. This type of junction makes it possible for direct investigations into the electrical properties of the molecules and the metal-molecule interfaces. Dependence of transport properties on the length of the alkane molecules and the area of the printed Au electrodes has been examined systematically. From the analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the Simmons model, the height of tunneling barrier associated with the molecule (alkane) has been determined to be 3.5 ± 0.2 eV, while the analysis yielded an upper bound of 2.4 eV for the counterpart at the interface (thiol). The former is consistent with the theoretical value of ~3.5-5.0 eV. The measured I-V curves show scaling with respect to the printed Au electrode area with lateral dimensions ranging from 80 nm to 7 ?m. These results demonstrate that PFPE-assisted nTP is a promising technique for producing potentially scalable and permanent MMM junctions. They also demonstrate that MMM structures (produced by the unique PFPE-assisted nTP) constitute a reliable test bed for exploring molecule-based electronics. PMID:22720785

Niskala, Jeremy R; Rice, William C; Bruce, Robert C; Merkel, Timothy J; Tsui, Frank; You, Wei

2012-07-25

328

Fast ternary and quaternary breakup of the 197Au + 197Au system in collisions at 15 MeV/nucleon.  

PubMed

A new reaction mechanism of violent reseparation of a heavy nucleus-nucleus system, 197Au + 197Au, into three or four massive fragments in collisions at 15 MeV/nucleon has been observed. After reseparation, the fragments are almost exactly aligned, thus showing a very short time scale of the reseparation process, of about 70-80 fm/c. PMID:19437637

Skwira-Chalot, I; Siwek-Wilczy?iska, K; Wilczy?ski, J; Amorini, F; Anzalone, A; Auditore, L; Baran, V; Brzychczyk, J; Cardella, G; Cavallaro, S; Chatterjee, M B; Colonna, M; De Filippo, E; Di Toro, M; Gawlikowicz, W; Geraci, E; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Kowalski, S; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lanzanò, G; ?ukasik, J; Maiolino, C; Majka, Z; Nicolis, N G; Pagano, A; Piasecki, E; Pirrone, S; P?aneta, R; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rizzo, F; Russotto, P; Schmidt, K; Sochocka, A; Swiderski, ?; Trifirò, A; Trimarchi, M; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L; Zipper, W

2008-12-31

329

Fast Ternary and Quaternary Breakup of the Au197+Au197 System in Collisions at 15MeV\\/nucleon  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new reaction mechanism of violent reseparation of a heavy nucleus-nucleus system, Au197+Au197, into three or four massive fragments in collisions at 15MeV\\/nucleon has been observed. After reseparation, the fragments are almost exactly aligned, thus showing a very short time scale of the reseparation process, of about 70-80fm\\/c.

I. Skwira-Chalot; K. Siwek-Wilczynska; J. Wilczynski; F. Amorini; A. Anzalone; L. Auditore; V. Baran; J. Brzychczyk; G. Cardella; S. Cavallaro; M. B. Chatterjee; M. Colonna; E. de Filippo; M. di Toro; W. Gawlikowicz; E. Geraci; A. Grzeszczuk; P. Guazzoni; S. Kowalski; E. La Guidara; G. Lanzalone; G. Lanzanò; J. Lukasik; C. Maiolino; Z. Majka; N. G. Nicolis; A. Pagano; E. Piasecki; S. Pirrone; R. Planeta; G. Politi; F. Porto; F. Rizzo; P. Russotto; K. Schmidt; A. Sochocka; L. Swiderski; A. Trifirò; M. Trimarchi; J. P. Wieleczko; L. Zetta; W. Zipper

2008-01-01

330

{phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

2004-06-01

331

Neutron diffraction study of La 4LiAuO 8: Understanding Au 3+ in an oxide environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Owing to gold's oxophobicity, its oxide chemistry is rather limited, and elevated oxygen pressures are usually required to prepare ternary and quaternary oxide compounds with gold ions. The Au 3+ oxide, La 4LiAuO 8, is remarkable both because it can be prepared at ambient pressure in air, and because of its unusual stability toward thermal decomposition and reduction. The structure of La 4LiAuO 8 was established by Pietzuch et al. using single crystal X-ray diffraction [1]. The compound adopts an ordered modification of the Nd 2CuO 4 structure, containing two-dimensional sheets in which AuO 4 square planes are separated from one another by LiO 4 square planes. In light of the meager X-ray scattering factors of Li and O, relative to La and Au, we report here a neutron powder diffraction study of La 4LiAuO 8, definitively confirming the structure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported neutron diffraction study of any stoichiometric oxide compound of gold. X- N maps, which make use of nuclear positions obtained from Rietveld refinement of time-of-flight neutron diffraction data and electron densities obtained from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, point to the highly covalent nature of the Au-O bonding in La 4LiAuO 8. This is in good agreement with charge densities and Bader charges obtained from full density functional relaxation of the structure.

Kurzman, Joshua A.; Moffitt, Stephanie L.; Llobet, Anna; Seshadri, Ram

2011-06-01

332

Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU - A comparison of observations and theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P.

1985-01-01

333

Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

1984-01-01

334

Influence of contacts on charge collection in an Au/CdTe/Au detector: A Simulation  

SciTech Connect

We report our simulations on the influence of contacts on charge collection in semi-insulating (CdZn)Te with Au contacts under radiation flux, employing simultaneous solutions of the drift-diffusion and Poisson equations. The type of the space charge and the distribution of the electric field in the Au/(CdZn)Te/Au structure at high fluxes reflect the combined influence of charge generated by band bending at the electrodes, and from photogenerated carriers trapped at deep levels. We show that the space charge originating from the latter approaches dominance at high fluxes while the influence of the contacts becomes negligible. The ratio of trapping and collection times at low fluxes strongly depends on band bending, due mainly to a change in the occupation of deep levels by injection or depletion from the contacts. Such dependence is weak at high fluxes; in this case, the space charge due to trapped carriers prevails over that formed due to band bending. These phenomena can cause the formation an electric-field minimum within the device (the pinch point), the position of which is influenced by the nature of the contacts. The field minimum can completely disappear or develop into a dead layer as band bending changes.

Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; KUBAT, J.; BELAS, E.; HOSCHL, P.; MORAVEC, P.; AND Praus, P.

2010-12-01

335

Neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of midrapidity (0Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. The neutral pions are reconstructed from photons measured either by the STAR Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter or by the Time Projection Chamber via tracking of conversion electron-positron pairs. Our measurements are compared to previously published ?± and ?0 results. The nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA of ?0 are also presented as a function of pT. In the most central Au+Au collisions, the binary collision scaled ?0 yield at high pT is suppressed by a factor of about 5 compared to the expectation from the yield of p+p collisions. Such a large suppression is in agreement with previous observations for light quark mesons and is consistent with the scenario that partons suffer considerable energy loss in the dense medium formed in central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, L. C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Nieuwenhuizen, G. Van; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

2009-10-01

336

Protecting Au-stabilized vicinal Si surfaces from degradation: Graphene on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose an efficient method of protecting the Au-induced stepped Si(5 5 3) surface from degradation when exposed to the environment. This applies to both the atomic and electronic structures, and is achieved by covering the surface with graphene. Using density functional theory we show that graphene deposited on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface extremely weakly interacts with it, leaving its structural and electronic properties unaltered. In particular, the ?-electrons of graphene are completely decoupled from electrons of the surface Au chains. At the same time, the graphene-covered Si(5 5 3)-Au surface is more resistant to the adsorption of foreign atoms, which is very promising in view of technological applications of the Au-stabilized vicinal Si surfaces. The proposed idea could be generalized to other vicinal Si surfaces.

Krawiec, Mariusz

2014-06-01

337

Self-assembled nanostructure of Au nanoparticles on a self-assembled monolayer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated self-assembled nanostructure of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a dithiol-inserted self-assembled monolayer (SAM) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Phosphine-stabilized AuNPs were immobilized on the SAM covering an Au(111) surface by the dithiol anchoring bridges. The phosphine-stabilized AuNPs were transformed to dithiol-stabilized AuNPs by a ligand exchange reaction. The additional phosphine-stabilized AuNPs were attached to the dithiol-stabilized AuNPs on the

Satoshi Wakamatsu; Jun-ichi Nakada; Shintaro Fujii; Uichi Akiba; Masamichi Fujihira

2005-01-01

338

Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ?G° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ?G°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ?G° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ?G°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors. This article was submitted as part of a Themed Issue on metallic clusters. Other papers on this topic can be found in issue 14 of vol. 4 (2012). This issue can be found from the Nanoscale homepage [http://www.rsc.org/nanoscale].

Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

2012-08-01

339

Heliospheric hydrogen beyond 15 AU - Evidence for a termination shock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Voyager and Pioneer 10 spacecraft are moving upstream and downstream into the local interstellar flow, monitoring H Lyman alpha radiation resonantly scattered from heliospheric hydrogen. Voyager Cruise Maneuver observations obtained between 15 and 35 AU reveal that H Lyman alpha intensities in the upstream direction fall as r exp -0.75+/-0.05. Beyond 15 AU downstream, Pioneer 10 intensities fall as r exp -1.07+/-0.1. These trends cannot be simultaneously reproduced using a hot H distribution model that does not include termination shock structure. The Voyager H Lyman alpha intensities also show a distinctive trend to decrease less rapidly with increasing heliocentric distance. Between 15 and 20 AU, Voyager intensities fall as r exp -1, whereas between 30 and 35 AU they fall as r exp -0.35. This flattening trend implies that the upstream H density is increasing rapidly with heliocentric distance beyond about 25 AU. This steepening trend is significant because similar H density gradients are predicted in models which include the effects of the termination shock. Taken together, the Voyager and Pioneer 10 H Lyman alpha observations beyond 15 AU imply the existence of a solar wind termination shock, suggesting that it lies between 70 and 105 AU in the upstream direction.

Hall, D. T.; Shemansky, D. E.; Judge, D. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Gruntman, M. A.

1993-01-01

340

Corrosion behavior and microstructures of experimental Ti-Au alloys.  

PubMed

Anodic polarization was performed in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions to characterize the relationship between the corrosion behavior and microstructures of cast Ti-Au (5-40%) alloys. An abrupt increase in the current density occurred at approximately 0.6 V vs. SCE for the 30% and 40% Au alloys in the 0.9% NaCl solution. The microstructures after corrosion testing indicated that this breakdown may have been caused by the preferential dissolution of the Ti3Au. However, the potential for preferential dissolution was higher than the breakdown potential of stainless steel or Co-Cr alloy, which meant that the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was superior. In 1% lactic acid solution, the corrosion resistance of the Ti-Au alloys was excellent, with no breakdown at any composition. In the present test solutions, the Ti-Au alloys up to 20% Au had good corrosion resistance comparable to that for pure titanium. PMID:15287555

Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu; Okabe, Toru

2004-06-01

341

Fluctuations Magnetiques des Gaz D'electrons Bidimensionnels: Application AU Compose Supraconducteur LANTHANE(2-X) Strontium(x) Cuivre OXYGENE(4)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nous presentons une etude des fluctuations magnetiques de la phase normale de l'oxyde de cuivre supraconducteur La_{2-x}Sr _{x}CuO_4 . Le compose est modelise par le Hamiltonien de Hubbard bidimensionnel avec un terme de saut vers les deuxiemes voisins (modele tt'U). Le modele est etudie en utilisant l'approximation de la GRPA (Generalized Random Phase Approximation) et en incluant les effets de la renormalisation de l'interaction de Hubbard par les diagrammes de Brueckner-Kanamori. Dans l'approche presentee dans ce travail, les maximums du facteur de structure magnetique observes par les experiences de diffusion de neutrons sont associes aux anomalies 2k _{F} de reseau du facteur de structure des gaz d'electrons bidimensionnels sans interaction. Ces anomalies proviennent de la diffusion entre particules situees a des points de la surface de Fermi ou les vitesses de Fermi sont tangentes, et conduisent a des divergences dont la nature depend de la geometrie de la surface de Fermi au voisinage de ces points. Ces resultats sont ensuite appliques au modele tt'U, dont le modele de Hubbard usuel tU est un cas particulier. Dans la majorite des cas, les interactions ne determinent pas la position des maximums du facteur de structure. Le role de l'interaction est d'augmenter l'intensite des structures du facteur de structure magnetique associees a l'instabilite magnetique du systeme. Ces structures sont souvent deja presentes dans la partie imaginaire de la susceptibilite sans interaction. Le rapport d'intensite entre les maximums absolus et les autres structures du facteur de structure magnetique permet de determiner le rapport U_ {rn}/U_{c} qui mesure la proximite d'une instabilite magnetique. Le diagramme de phase est ensuite etudie afin de delimiter la plage de validite de l'approximation. Apres avoir discute des modes collectifs et de l'effet d'une partie imaginaire non-nulle de la self-energie, l'origine de l'echelle d'energie des fluctuations magnetiques est examinee. Il est ensuite demontre que le modele a trois bandes predit les memes resultats pour la position des structures du facteur de structure magnetique que le modele a une bande, dans la limite ou l'hybridation des orbitales des atomes d'oxygene des plans Cu-O_2 et l'amplitude de sauts vers les seconds voisins sont nulles. Il est de plus constate que l'effet de l'hybridation des orbitales des atomes d'oxygene est bien modelise par le terme de saut vers les seconds voisins. Meme si ils decrivent correctement le comportement qualitatif des maximums du facteur de structure magnetique, les modeles a trois bandes et a une bande ne permettent pas d'obtenir une position de ces structures conforme avec les mesures experimentales, si on suppose que la bande est rigide, c'est-a-dire que les parametres du Hamiltonien sont independants de la concentration de strontium. Ceci peut etre cause par la dependance des parametres du Hamiltonien sur la concentration de strontium. Finalement, les resultats sont compares avec les experiences de diffusion de neutrons et les autres theories, en particulier celles de Littlewood et al. (1993) et de Q. Si et al. (1993). La comparaison avec les resultats experimentaux pour le compose de lanthane suggere que le liquide de Fermi possede une surface de Fermi disjointe, et qu'il est situe pres d'une instabilite magnetique incommensurable.

Benard, Pierre

342

Energy level alignment in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy level alignment and molecular orientation at the interfaces in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks. We deduced a standing orientation for pentacene grown on Au while we conclude a flat lying geometry for PTCDA grown onto pentacene. We propose that the rough surface of polycrystalline Au induces the standing geometry in pentacene. It is further shown that in situ deposition of PTCDA on pentacene can influence the orientation of the surface pentacene layer, flipping part of the surface pentacene molecules into a flat lying geometry, maximizing the orbital interaction across the pentacene-PTCDA heterojunction.

Sehati, P.; Braun, S.; Fahlman, M.

2013-09-01

343

Study of electrodepositing Au on hollow polystyrene microspheres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electrodeposited Au film on hollow polystyrene microspheres is successfully prepared by a set of self-designed device. The film is more compact and uniform on account of the microspheres freely moving on the cathode. These experiments mainly focus on the analysis of spherical symmetry, thickness and roughness of electrodeposited Au film. Under conditions of current density 1.5-3 mA cm-2, the temperature 25 °C, and the stirring rate 150 rpm, the electrodeposited microsphere is coated with a considerably orbicular film. The morphology, thickness and roughness of Au electrodeposits are studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), respectively.

Rong, Jin; Yunwang, Zhang; Lin, Zhang; Chengfu, Wei; Jianjun, Guo

2013-01-01

344

Synthesis and characterizations of hollow spheres and nanospheres of Au  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hollow spheres and nanospheres of Au have been prepared by a simple reaction of HAuCl4·4H2O, NaOH and (NH2OH)2·H2SO4 in the presence of gelatin. The role of gelatin and the effect of the temperature of the reaction in producing the spherical particles of Au are discussed. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and UV Vis absorption spectroscopy. The sizes of the nanospheres of Au were estimated by the Debye Scherrer formula according to the XRD spectrum.

Yang, Ming; Yang, Xiao; Huai, Lufeng

2008-08-01

345

Fluorescence quenching amplification in silica nanosensors for Au3+  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) were covalently modified by the fluorescence ligand 2-((7-oxo-7H- furo [3, 2-g] chromen-9-yl) oxy)-N-(3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl) acetamide (CTPA) and provided an optical sensor allowing highly sensitive and selective detection for Au3+. The probe exhibited a dynamic response range for Au3+ from 5.0 × 10-7 to 1.0 × 10-4 M, with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10-8 M. Other alkali, earth alkali and transition metal ions, even those that exist in high concentration, had no significant interference with Au3+ determination.

Song, Zhiguang; Xiao, Chuan; Dai, Yanna; Fei, Qiang; Huan, Yanfu; Feng, Guodong

2012-10-01

346

CO-induced lifting of Au (001) surface reconstruction.  

SciTech Connect

We report CO-induced lifting of the hexagonal surface reconstruction on Au(001). Using in situ surface X-ray scattering, we determined a pressure-temperature phase diagram for the reconstruction and measured the dynamical evolution of the surface structure in real time. Our observations provide evidence that, under certain conditions, even macroscopic Au surfaces, much larger than catalytic Au nanoparticles (Haruta, M. Catal. Today 1997, 36, 153), can exhibit some of the reactive properties and surface transitions observed in systems known to be catalytically active such as Pt(001).

Pierce, M. S.; Chang, K.-C.; Hennessy, D. C.; Komanicky, V.; Menzel, A.; You, H.; Materials Science Division; Slovakia Academy of Science; Paul Scherrer Inst.

2008-02-21

347

Pulse Plating Enhanced Au-Co Nanocomposite Coatings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This investigation described the development of a technique to produce Au-Co nanostructured composite coatings with improved hardness. Pulse power has been used with the traditional Au electroplating solution to synthesize multilayer nanocomposite coatings. The phase structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Mechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results indicate that the hardness was increased to 3.15 ± 0.05 GPa, compared to 2.70 ± 0.07 GPa of that produced by the direct current Au coatings. The hardening mechanisms have also been discussed.

Ju, Ying; Wang, Yuxin; Wen, Yi; Gao, Wei

2013-07-01

348

Field emission performance enhancement of Au nanoparticles doped graphene emitters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene (GP) field emitters fabricated by the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and their field emission performance can be enhanced and tailed simultaneously by chemical doping Au nanoparticles (NPs). It was found that doped Au NPs could both decrease the resistance of GP emitters and increase the density of field emission sites. The Au-doped GP emitters showed lower turn-on voltage, lower threshold field, higher field enhancement factor, higher luminance intensity, and emitting uniformity, compared with that of pristine GP. This study will provide us to further understand the role of doping effect on the GP emitters used for the future display.

Chen, Leifeng; He, Hong; Lei, Da; Menggen, QiQiGe; Hu, Liqin; Yang, Deren

2013-12-01

349

The growth and enhanced catalytic performance of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes.Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization and catalytic performance measurement of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanostructures, TEM image of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites after four cycles of the Suzuki coupling reaction, TEM and high-resolution images of a single Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrite, and XRD pattern of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites, UV-vis spectrum of Au@Pd nanodendrites in the range 200-400 nm, references. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32849f

Wang, Haihua; Sun, Zhenhua; Yang, Yi; Su, Dangsheng

2012-12-01

350

Site-Selective Deposition of Au Nanoparticles on Au Islands on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite Substrate Using DNA-Based Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A DNA-based method was applied to the site-selective deposition of Au nanoparticles on Au islands on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate. Au particles of 10 nm diameter were modified with thiolated single-stranded DNA (SH-ssDNA), and then attached to Au islands modified with complementary SH-ssDNA through DNA hybridization. Atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the deposition of Au particles was dependent on the SH-ssDNA concentration in the treatment of Au/HOPG substrates. It was found that Au particles were selectively deposited on Au islands when the Au/HOPG substrate was treated with 100 nmol/L SH-ssDNA.

Maeda, Yasushi; Maeda, Yukiko Y.; Okada, Tomoko; Kodaka, Masato; Fujitani, Tadahiro; Tsubota, Susumu

2005-07-01

351

Fe3O4-Au and Fe2O3-Au Hybrid Nanorods: Layer-by-Layer Assembly Synthesis and Their Magnetic and Optical Properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A layer-by-layer technique has been developed to synthesize FeOOH-Au hybrid nanorods that can be transformed into Fe2O3-Au and Fe3O4-Au hybrid nanorods via controllable annealing process. The homogenous deposition of Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeOOH nanorods can be attributed to the strong electrostatic attraction between metal ions and polyelectrolyte-modified FeOOH nanorods. The annealing atmosphere controls the phase transformation from FeOOH-Au to Fe3O4-Au and ?-Fe2O3-Au. Moreover, the magnetic and optical properties of as-synthesized Fe2O3-Au and Fe3O4-Au hybrid nanorods have been investigated.

Zhu, Hongliang; Zhu, Enze; Ou, Guofu; Gao, Linhui; Chen, Jianjun

2010-11-01

352

Transverse-energy distributions at midrapidity in p +p, d +Au, and Au +Au collisions at ?sNN =62.4-200 GeV and implications for particle-production models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of the midrapidity transverse-energy distribution, dET/d?, are presented for p +p, d +Au, and Au +Au collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV and additionally for Au +Au collisions at ?sNN =62.4 and 130 GeV. The dET/d? distributions are first compared with the number of nucleon participants Npart, number of binary collisions Ncoll, and number of constituent-quark participants Nqp calculated from a Glauber model based on the nuclear geometry. For Au +Au, /Npart increases with Npart, while /Nqp is approximately constant for all three energies. This indicates that the two-component ansatz, dET/d? ?(1-x)Npart/2+xNcoll, which was used to represent ET distributions, is simply a proxy for Nqp, and that the Ncoll term does not represent a hard-scattering component in ET distributions. The dET/d? distributions of Au +Au and d +Au are then calculated from the measured p +p ET distribution using two models that both reproduce the Au +Au data. However, while the number-of-constituent-quark-participant model agrees well with the d +Au data, the additive-quark model does not.

Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörg?, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Gadrat, S.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawagishi, T.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leâ Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, M. K.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McGaughey, P. L.; Miake, Y.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nakamura, T.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.

2014-04-01

353

FT-ICR/MS and ab initio study of polynuclear Au and Au-Cu clusters in aqueous fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The geochemistry and transport of aqueous transition metals such as copper and gold in the Earth's crust is still poorly known. FT-ICR mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations can provide fundamental insight on a molecular-scale level into the structure, stability and abundance of relevant Cu and Au species. We have measured high temperature ion cluster mass spectra of aqueous gold and copper chloride solutions using a custom-modified FT-ICR mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. In pure dilute aqueous AuCl3 solutions (1-25mM), Au(III) is present as an ion complex [AuCl2]+ and is hydrated with up to four water molecules, with the trihydrate [AuCl2]+(H2O)3 being the most stable species. In addition, several polynuclear ion clusters were observed, e.g. the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, including the hydrated forms [Au2Cl5]+(H2O) and [Au2Cl5]+(H2O)2. In more concentrated AuCl3 solutions (100mM, pH=2.3) the protonated Zundel cation [H5O2]+, [H7O3]+ and Eigen cation [H9O4]+ were detected, suggesting that protonated water clusters are equally relevant species in crustal fluids. We also measured mass spectra of binary solutions of aqueous transition metals, i.e. CuCl2/AuCl3 (5mM) and detected mixed Au(III)/Cu(II)-chloro clusters up to the tetranuclear [AuCu3Cl8]+ ion and their hydrated forms. The ab initio component of this study was designed to deliver additional insight into the structure of individual transition metal clusters as well as to the relative stability of each species, both unhydrated and in the presence of water molecules. Ab initio calculations were first conducted using MP2 theory and results thereof were then applied as starting points for subsequent couple-cluster CCSD(T) theory calculations. For the dinuclear ion [Au2Cl5]+, for example, the MP2 global minimum is a planar structure (see Figure; A) with an Au-Au bond distance of 3.435Å, while the second isomer (see Figure; B) has an Au-Au bond distance of 3.588Å and is around 3.5 kJ/mol higher in energy. Theoretical [Au2Cl5]+ ion cluster geometries are then used to compute higher temperature heat capacity data that may be used to predict fundamental thermodynamic properties of transition metal-charged aqueous systems at elevated temperatures. Results from such mass spectrometric and ab initio studies would allow modeling of gold and copper speciation in crustal fluids and assist in understanding prenucleation processes in metal halides in nature.

Lemke, K.; Tse, K.; Sadjadi, A.

2011-12-01

354

Interaction of energetic clusters (Au 3, Au 400 and C 60) with organic material and adsorbed gold nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using molecular dynamics simulations (MD), this contribution compares the interaction of three energetic clusters (Au 3, Au 400 and C 60) with a hybrid surface of crystalline polyethylene (PE) covered by a layer of gold nanoparticles. This model system mimics the situation encountered in metal-assisted secondary ion mass spectrometry. The chosen impact points are representative of the PE surface, the metal particles and the frontier between the metal and the polymer. The simulations show the differences between the impact over the Au nanoparticle and the polymer surface, in terms of projectile penetration, crater formation and sputtering yield of PE and gold species. For C 60 and Au 3 projectiles, a simple correlation is found between the quantity of energy deposited in the top polymeric layers and the quantity of sputtered polymer material, including all the impact points. The results obtained with Au 400 do not fit on this line, indicating that other physical parameters are prevalent. The mechanistic view of the interaction provided by the MD helps explain the differences. In short, while C 60 and Au 3 quickly break apart, creating energetic recoils and severing many bonds in the surface, Au 400, with the largest total momentum by far (˜10 times larger than the others) and the lowest energy per atom (25 eV), tends to act and implant in the solid as a single entity, pushing the polymeric material downwards and breaking few bonds in the surface.

Restrepo, Oscar A.; Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Delcorte, Arnaud

2011-07-01

355

Electrical properties of Au/n-InP and Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the electrical characteristics of Au/n-InP and Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. It has been seen that the Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structures showed a good rectifying behavior compared to the conventional Au/n-InP Schottky structure. Calculations showed that the Schottky barrier height and ideality factor of Au/n-InP Schottky structure is 0.57 eV (I-V), 0.71 eV (C-V) and 1.45, respectively. It is observed that the Schottky barrier height value increases to 0.66 eV (I-V), 0.82 eV (C-V) and ideality factor decreases to 1.32 for Au/PVA/n-InP Schottky structure. From the above observations, it is clear that the modification of interfacial potential barrier of Au/InP are achieved using a thin PVA organic interlayer.

Umapathi, A.; Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Reddy, K. Ravindranatha; Reddy, V. Rajagopal

2013-06-01

356

Exclusive production of chloroaniline from chloronitrobenzene over Au/TiO2 and Au/Al2O3.  

PubMed

The gas-phase continuous hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) over 1 mol% Au/TiO2 and Au/Al2O3 was compared for the first time. Both catalysts exhibit 100% selectivity in terms of -NO2 group reduction, resulting in the sole formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN). Au/TiO2 exhibited a narrower particle size (1-10 nm) distribution than Au/Al2O3 (1-20 nm) and a smaller surface-area-weighted mean Au size (6 nm versus 9 nm). Au/TiO2 delivered a higher specific hydrogenation rate (by a factor of up to four), a response that is discussed in terms of Au particle size and a possible contribution of the support to p-CNB activation. A CNB isomer reactivity sequence was established, that is, o> p> m, which is attributed to resonance stabilisation effects. The results presented establish a basis for the development of a sustainable alternative route for the production of haloamines. PMID:18605209

Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Gómez-Quero, Santiago; Keane, Mark A

2008-01-01

357

MeV Au irradiation induced nanoparticle formation and recrystallization in a low energy Au implanted Si layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au implantation at 32 keV into Si(100), in a fluence range of 1 × 1015-1 × 1017 cm-2, has been used to produce a gold-rich damaged Si layer of thickness around 30 nm. Local recrystallization of this layer, induced by 1.5 MeV Au irradiation, to a fluence of 1 × 1015 cm-2, has been studied using Raman scattering, photoluminescence (PL) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). For a sample with a low energy Au fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2, the MeV Au irradiation has been found to result in Si nanocrystal (NC) formation. The size of the NCs, as estimated from the PL data, has been found to be about 4 nm, which agrees well with the result of a thermal spike model calculation. Annealing of the sample at 500 °C resulted in an enhanced PL signal, without any significant shift in peak position, indicating an increase in the local concentration of the NCs. In the case of samples with an initial Au fluence above 1 × 1016 cm-2, the MeV Au irradiation has been found to result in better overall recrystallization of the amorphous layer, with silicide formation as observed by XPS. However, there was no PL signal, indicating the absence of Si NCs in the system. The results suggest that the initial amorphizing Au fluence plays a crucial role in Si NC formation induced by MeV ion irradiation.

Sahu, G.; Joseph, B.; Lenka, H. P.; Kuiri, P. K.; Pradhan, A.; Mahapatra, D. P.

2007-12-01

358

Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO2(110)  

SciTech Connect

The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

S Tenney; W He; J Ratliff; D Mullins; D Chen

2011-12-31

359

Characterization of Pt-Au and Ni-Au Clusters on TiO(2)(110)  

SciTech Connect

The surface composition and properties of Pt-Au and Ni-Au clusters on TiO{sub 2}(110) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS). STM studies show that bimetallic clusters are formed during sequential deposition of the two metals, regardless of the order of deposition. At the 2 ML of Au/2 ML of Pt or Ni coverages studied here, the second metal contributes to the growth of existing clusters rather than forming new pure metal clusters. LEIS experiments demonstrate that the surfaces of the bimetallic clusters are almost 100% Au when 2 ML of Au is deposited on top of 2 ML of Pt or Ni. However, a much larger fraction of Pt or Ni (50 and 20%, respectively) remains at the surface when 2 ML of Pt or Ni is deposited on 2 ML of Au, most likely due to limited diffusion of atoms within the clusters at room temperature. According to sXPS investigations, the binding energies of the metals in the bimetallic clusters are shifted from those observed for pure metal clusters; the Pt(4f{sub 7/2}) and Ni(3p{sub 3/2}) peaks are shifted to lower binding energies while the position of the Au(4f{sub 7/2}) peak is dominated by surface core level shifts. Pure Pt clusters as well as 0.4 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters reduce the titania support upon encapsulation after annealing to 800 K, whereas 2 ML of Au on 2 ML of Pt clusters do not reduce titania, presumably because there is no Pt at the surface of the clusters. Pure Ni clusters are also known to become encapsulated upon heating, but the reduction of titania is much less extensive compared to that of pure Pt clusters.

Chen, D. A. [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Ratliff, J. S. [University of South Carolina, Columbia; He, Wei [University of South Carolina; Tenney, Samuel [University of South Carolina

2011-01-01

360

The AuScope geodetic VLBI array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12-m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia, will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper, we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.

Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Reid, P. B.; McCulloch, P. M.; Baynes, B. E.; Dickey, J. M.; Shabala, S. S.; Watson, C. S.; Titov, O.; Ruddick, R.; Twilley, R.; Reynolds, C.; Tingay, S. J.; Shield, P.; Adada, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Morgan, J. S.; Bignall, H. E.

2013-06-01

361

Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.  

PubMed

Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed. PMID:16241721

Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zo?nierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

2005-10-01

362

Instability of gold oxide Au 2O 3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kinetics of the dissociation of gold oxide, Au 2O 3, formed by O 2-plasma treatment of Au film were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by taking electrical resistance measurements. The surface resistance of the gold film was markedly increased by O 2-plasma treatment and then gradually returned to the initial value in air at room temperature (22 °C). XPS indicated that Au 2O 3 can be formed by O 2-plasma treatment and spontaneously dissociated to gold elements. The time dependence of the dissociation of Au 2O 3 was also analyzed by monitoring the surface resistance and applying a first-order rate equation at temperatures between 22 and 100 °C; the activation energy was calculated to be 57 kJ/mol.

Tsai, Hungchun; Hu, Emily; Perng, Kuoguang; Chen, Minkar; Wu, Jung-Chun; Chang, Yee-Shyi

2003-07-01

363

Baryon emission at target rapidities in Si+Al,Cu,Au collisions at 14.6A GeV\\/c and Au+Au collisions at 11.7A GeV\\/c  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report measurements of proton emission at target rapidities for minimum bias and central collisions of 14.6A GeV\\/c 28Si with Al, Cu, and Au nuclei as well as minimum bias and central collisions of 11.7A GeV\\/c 197Au with Au nuclei. Results for deuteron emission are also reported for the Si+Au reaction. The spectra span the laboratory angular range of 50°<=theta<=130°

L. Ahle; Y. Akiba; D. Beavis; P. Beery; H. C. Britt; B. Budick; C. Chasman; Z. Chen; C. Y. Chi; Y. Y. Chu; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; J. B. Costales; H. J. Crawford; J. B. Cumming; R. Debbe; J. Engelage; S. Y. Fung; M. Gonin; S. Gushue; H. Hamagaki; R. S. Hayano; S. Hayashi; S. Homma; H. Kaneko; J. Kang; S. Kaufman; W. L. Kehoe; K. Kurita; R. J. Ledoux; M. J. Levine; Y. Miake; D. P. Morrison; R. J. Morse; B. Moskowitz; S. Nagamiya; M. N. Namboodiri; T. K. Nayak; J. Olness; C. G. Parsons; L. P. Remsberg; D. Roerich; P. Rothschild; H. Sakurai; T. C. Sangster; R. Seto; K. Shigaki; R. Soltz; P. Stankus; S. G. Steadman; G. S. Stephans; T. Sung; Y. Tanaka; M. J. Tannenbaum; J. Thomas; S. Tonse; S. Ueno; J. H. van Dijk; F. Videbaek; O. Vossnack; V. Vustadakis; F. Q. Wang; Y. Wang; H. E. Wegner; D. S. Woodruff; Y. D. Wu; K. Yagi; X. Yang; D. Zachary; W. A. Zajc

1997-01-01

364

Humidity-voltaic characteristics of Au porous silicon interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

The humidity-voltaic effect, i.e. generation of open-circuit voltage (Voc), in Au-porous silicon (PS) interface in humid atmosphere (up to 450 mV at 95% relative humidity) in dark and daylight illumination is discovered. The humidity-stimulated voltage generation is attributed to the splitting of water and hydrogen molecules on the surfaces of the Au catalyst, where further diffusion penetration of hydrogen ions

T. D. Dzhafarov; C. Oruc; S. Aydin

2004-01-01

365

Fabrication of Multifunctional Au Doped CoPt Nanowires  

Microsoft Academic Search

Au-doped CoPt nanowires were prepared in anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotemplates by electrodeposition and the doping effects on their microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. Dependent on the deposition conditions, the CoPtAu nanowires can have the cubic or tetragonal phase. The magnetic measurements indicate that the nanowires demonstrate ferromagnetic behavior, showing the easy axis along the direction of the nanowires

Ji Hyun Min; Hong-Ling Liu; Ju Hun Lee; Jun-Hua Wu; Jae-Seon Ju; Young Keun Kim

2009-01-01

366

AuRA: principles and practice in review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews key concepts of the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Its structure, strengths, and roots in biology are presented. AuRA is a hybrid deliberative\\/reactive robotic architecture that has been developed and refined over the past decade. In this article, particular focus is placed on the reactive behavioral component of this hybrid architecture. Various real world robots that have been

Ronald C. Arkin; Tucker R. Balch

1997-01-01

367

Hyperfine field distributions in Au(Fe) spin glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the basis of the Mookerjee-Roy theory, the hyperfine field distribution P( Hhf) obtained from the Mössbauer absorption spectra for the Au 0.841Fe 0.159 alloy is well reproduced at any temperature except near the freezing temperature. For the Au 0.832Fe 0.168 alloy, however, the observed shoulder in P( Hhf) cannot be explained by the theory.

Nakai, Y.; Furukawa, Y.; Kunitomi, N.

1986-02-01

368

Pd versus Au as evaporated metal contacts to molecules  

SciTech Connect

Indirect e-beam evaporation of metal on a cooled substrate that allows making reproducible and gentle electrical contact to molecular films of organic molecules yields strikingly different results with Pd and Au. This is attributed to different growth modes of the metals, which lead to different molecule/metal interactions and to Au penetration in between the molecules. These differences can radically change the effect of the molecules on the resulting junctions.

Haick, Hossam; Ghabboun, Jamal; Cahen, David [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2005-01-24

369

Electrochemical reduction process of Sb(III) on Au substrate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electrochemical reduction mechanism of antimony on Au substrate from the solution containing Sb(III), complexing reagent tartaric acid and nitric acid was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results indicated that the reduction of Sb(III) on Au substrate was an irreversible multi-step process. The entire reduction process is completed by the following two steps: 1)

Feihui Li; Wei Wang

2007-01-01

370

Origin of Au nanostructures on tungsten surface carbides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The template-assisted self-organization of Au deposited on surface carbides W(110)/C-R(15×12) and W(110)/C-R(15×3) is investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy. The existence of two principally different ways of self-organization of Au nanostructures is revealed on each of the substrates. The room temperature deposition results in the growth of Au nanoclusters controlled by the potential profile of the carbidic nanomesh. The Au clusters are aligned along the surface carbide and appear uniform but geometrically different on the different carbides. In particular, they are one monolayer high when grown on the R(15×12) structure and two monolayers high on the R(15×3) structure. Subsequent annealing of the sample at 900-1000K produces a rearrangement of Au adatoms toward a one-dimensionally patterned overlayer with nanowirelike reconstruction which is identical on a both W(110)/C-R(15×12) and W(110)/C-R(15×3) and no longer aligned along the surface carbide but along the [001] direction of the W. This delivers strong evidence that self-organization at elevated temperature is driven by chemical Au-W interaction. Additional support for this explanation is found in photoemission spectra from the valence band and the W4f core level. The W4f shows a large core-level shift of +440meV which exists neither for the bare surface carbides R(15×12) and R(15×3) , nor for Au on pure W(110), nor for Au deposited on the surface carbides without annealing.

Varykhalov, A.; Rader, O.; Gudat, W.

2008-01-01

371

Intrinsic Spin Seebeck Effect in Au/YIG  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The acute magnetic proximity effects in Pt/YIG compromise the suitability of Pt as a spin current detector. We show that Au/YIG, with no anomalous Hall effect and a negligible magnetoresistance, allows the measurements of the intrinsic spin Seebeck effect with a magnitude much smaller than that in Pt/YIG. The experiment results are consistent with the spin polarized density functional calculations for Pt with a sizable and Au with a negligible magnetic moment near the interface with YIG.

Qu, D.; Huang, S. Y.; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Chien, C. L.

2013-02-01

372

Displacement Cascade Collapse at Low Temperatures in Cu_3Au  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic study by transmission electron microscopy has been made of factors affecting the collapse of displacement cascades in ordered Cu_3Au. Thin foils of ordered Cu_3Au were bombarded with Ar^+, Cu^+ and Kr^+ ions of energies 50 keV and 100 keV to nominal doses of 1015 ions m-2 both at room temperature and at 30 K. The damage induced at

T. J. Black; M. L. Jenkins; C. A. English; M. A. Kirk

1987-01-01

373

On the stability of AuFe alloy nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AuFe nanoparticles with mean diameters d p = 13.2 nm have been prepared by inert-gas condensation. Conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy investigations show that the particles are mostly icosahedra. Scanning transmission electron microscopy–energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy–electron energy-loss spectroscopy show that the as-grown particles exhibit a core-shell structure. The shell is mainly composed of an amorphous FeO layer. Although Fe and Au are immiscible in the bulk, the particle cores are found to be homogeneously mixed at the atomic level with a local composition of around Au84Fe16 (at.%). AuFe nanoparticles exhibit a complex magnetic structure in which the core behaves as a spin glass with a freezing temperature of 35 K, whereas the amorphous FeO shell behaves as a ferro-ferrimagnetic system. On annealing above 300 °C, the AuFe icosahedra phases separate into their elemental constituents. Hence the as-grown AuFe icosahedra are metastable, thereby implying that the bulk phase diagram also applies for nanoscopic materials.

Velasco, V.; Pohl, D.; Surrey, A.; Bonatto-Minella, A.; Hernando, A.; Crespo, P.; Rellinghaus, B.

2014-05-01

374

On the stability of AuFe alloy nanoparticles.  

PubMed

AuFe nanoparticles with mean diameters d p  = 13.2 nm have been prepared by inert-gas condensation. Conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy investigations show that the particles are mostly icosahedra. Scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy-loss spectroscopy show that the as-grown particles exhibit a core-shell structure. The shell is mainly composed of an amorphous FeO layer. Although Fe and Au are immiscible in the bulk, the particle cores are found to be homogeneously mixed at the atomic level with a local composition of around Au84Fe16 (at.%). AuFe nanoparticles exhibit a complex magnetic structure in which the core behaves as a spin glass with a freezing temperature of 35 K, whereas the amorphous FeO shell behaves as a ferro-ferrimagnetic system. On annealing above 300 °C, the AuFe icosahedra phases separate into their elemental constituents. Hence the as-grown AuFe icosahedra are metastable, thereby implying that the bulk phase diagram also applies for nanoscopic materials. PMID:24784895

Velasco, V; Pohl, D; Surrey, A; Bonatto-Minella, A; Hernando, A; Crespo, P; Rellinghaus, B

2014-05-30

375

Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

2011-08-30

376

Spin Polarization and Quantum Spins in Au Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

The present study focuses on investigating the magnetic properties and the critical particle size for developing sizable spontaneous magnetic moment of bare Au nanoparticles. Seven sets of bare Au nanoparticle assemblies, with diameters from 3.5 to 17.5 nm, were fabricated with the gas condensation method. Line profiles of the X-ray diffraction peaks were used to determine the mean particle diameters and size distributions of the nanoparticle assemblies. The magnetization curves M(Ha) reveal Langevin field profiles. Magnetic hysteresis was clearly revealed in the low field regime even at 300 K. Contributions to the magnetization from different size particles in the nanoparticle assemblies were considered when analyzing the M(Ha) curves. The results show that the maximum particle moment will appear in 2.4 nm Au particles. A similar result of the maximum saturation magnetization appearing in 2.3 nm Au particles is also concluded through analysis of the dependency of the saturation magnetization MP on particle size. The MP(d) curve departs significantly from the 1/d dependence, but can be described by a log-normal function. Magnetization can be barely detected for Au particles larger than 27 nm. Magnetic field induced Zeeman magnetization from the quantum confined Kubo gap opening appears in Au nanoparticles smaller than 9.5 nm in diameter.

Li, Chi-Yen; Karna, Sunil K.; Wang, Chin-Wei; Li, Wen-Hsien

2013-01-01

377

The effect of expressive and instrumental touch on the behavior states of older adults with late-stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type and on music therapist's perceived rapport.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of music therapy interventions utilizing two types of touch, expressive touch and instrumental touch, on the behavior states of older adults who have late-stage dementia of the Alzheimer's type. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine the perceived effectiveness of the music therapist when expressive and instrumental touch was employed during music therapy sessions. A within-subject design was used with 9 participants receiving 3 sessions in each of the experimental conditions: no touch, expressive touch, and instrumental touch. Results of a one-way ANOVA revealed that expressive touch was significantly more effective during the initial session in eliciting and maintaining alert behavior states than the instrumental and control conditions; however, there were no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions during the first and second session repetitions. Rapport ratings revealed that the therapist's client rapport was perceived to be significantly higher during both the expressive touch and instrumental touch conditions than during the control condition. These findings have important implications for music therapy practice and the effective use of nonverbal communication. PMID:19463031

Belgrave, Melita

2009-01-01

378

Au-Sn SLID Bonding: A Reliable HT Interconnect and Die Attach Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Au-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding is an established reliable high temperature (HT) die attach and interconnect technology. This article presents the life cycle of an optimized HT Au-Sn SLID bond, from fabrication, via thermal treatment, to mechanical rupture. The layered structure of a strong and uniform virgin bond was identified by X-ray diffraction to be Au/? (Au0.85Sn0.15)/Au. During HT exposure, it was transformed to Au/? (Au1.8Sn0.2)/Au. After HT exposure, the die shear strength was reduced by 50 pct, from 14 Pa to 70 MPa, which is still remarkably high. Fractographic studies revealed a change in fracture mode; it was changed from a combination of adhesive Au/Ni and cohesive SiC fracture to a cohesive ?-phase fracture. Design rules for high quality Au-Sn SLID bonds are given.

Tollefsen, Torleif André; Larsson, Andreas; Taklo, Maaike Margrete Visser; Neels, Antonia; Maeder, Xavier; Høydalsvik, Kristin; Breiby, Dag W.; Aasmundtveit, Knut

2013-04-01

379

Strangeness enhancement in Cu-Cu and Au-Au collisions at ?S(NN)=200 GeV.  

PubMed

We report new STAR measurements of midrapidity yields for the ?, ?[over ¯], K(S)(0), ?(-), ?[over ¯](+), ?(-), ?[over ¯](+) particles in Cu+Cu collisions at ?S(NN)==200??GeV, and midrapidity yields for the ?, ?[over ¯], K(S)(0) particles in Au+Au at ?S(NN)==200??GeV. We show that, at a given number of participating nucleons, the production of strange hadrons is higher in Cu+Cu collisions than in Au+Au collisions at the same center-of-mass energy. We find that aspects of the enhancement factors for all particles can be described by a parametrization based on the fraction of participants that undergo multiple collisions. PMID:22401196

Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anderson, B D; Anson, C D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barnby, L S; Beavis, D R; Behera, N K; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Geurts, F; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kizka, V; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Koroleva, L; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, N; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Lu, Y; Lukashov, E V; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pei, H; Peitzmann, T; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schaub, J; Schmah, A M; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Steadman, S G; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Witzke, W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y

2012-02-17

380

Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.  

PubMed

We report on the yield of protons and antiprotons, as a function of centrality and transverse momentum, in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In central collisions at intermediate transverse momenta (1.5Au+Au, p+p, and e(+)e(-) collisions. This enhancement is limited to p(T)<5 GeV/c as deduced from the ratio of charged hadrons to pi(0) measured in the range 1.5

Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, G; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

2003-10-24

381

CENTRALITY DEFINITION USING MID-RAPIDITY ET DISTRIBUTIONS FROM P+BE TO AU+AU AT AGS ENERGIES.  

SciTech Connect

Measurements by the E802 Collaboration of the A-dependence and pseudorapidity interval ({delta}{eta}) dependence of mid-rapidity ET distributions in a half-azimuth electromagnetic calorimeter are presented for p+Be, p+Au, O+Cu, Si+Au and Au+Au collisions at the BNL-AGS. The issues addressed are (1) whether the shapes of the upper edges of the ET distributions vary with {delta}{eta} similarly to the variation in shapes of mid-rapidity charged particle distributions and (2) how small a {delta}{eta} interval would still give a meaningful characterization of the ''nuclear geometry'' of a reaction. A new way of plotting ET distributions was found from which the reaction dynamics could be read directly.

TANNENBAUM,M.J. FOR E802 COLLABORATION

1999-05-10

382

Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A(center-dot)GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N(anti N) annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions.

Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.; Ashktorab, K.; Baker, M. D.; Beavis, D.; Britt, H. C.; Chang, J.; Chasman, C.; Chen, Z.; Chu, Y. Y.; Cianciolo, V.; Cole, B. A.; Crawford, H. J.; Cumming, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eldredge, W.; Engelage, J.; Fung, S.-Y.

1997-01-01

383

Evidence from d Au Measurements for Final-State Suppression of High-pT Hadrons in Au Au Collisions at RHIC  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle\\u000aazimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high\\u000a$p_T$) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at $\\\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV.\\u000aThe inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled\\u000ap+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar\\u000ato those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate

J. Adams; C. Adler; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; S. K. Badyal; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bhardwaj; P. Bhaskar; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; A. Billmeier; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; A. Bravar; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; J. E. Draper; A. K. Dubey; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; J. Faivre; R. Fatemi; K. Filimonov; P. Fachini; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. Filimonov; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; M. S. Ganti; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; O. Grachov; V. Grigoriev; S. Gronstal; D. Grosnick; M. Guedon; S. M. Guertin; E. Gushin; T. D. Gutierrez; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; A. S. Konstantinov; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; J. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; S. Mahajan; L. K. Mangotra; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; C. Mironov; D. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; M. J. Mora-Corral; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; S. K. Nayak; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rai; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; G. Renault; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. J. Ruan; V. Rykov; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; K. Schweda; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; R. N. Singaraju; F. Simon; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; Anoop Gupta

2003-01-01

384

RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN  

SciTech Connect

Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2010-05-23

385

Collective flow of light particles in Au + Au collisions at intermediate energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Skyrme potential energy density functional is introduced into the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model and the updated version is applied to studying the directed and elliptic flows of light particles (protons, neutrons, deuterons, tritons, 3He, and 4He) in 197Au + 197Au collisions at beam energies 150, 250, and 400 MeV/nucleon. The results are compared with the recent FOPI experimental data. It is found that the yields and collective flows of light particles can be described quite well. The influence of the equation of state, medium-modified nucleon-nucleon elastic cross sections (NNECS) and cluster recognition criteria on the directed and elliptic flows is studied in detail. It is found that the flows of light particles are sensitive to the medium-modified NNECS, but not sensitive to the isospin dependent cluster recognition criteria. It seems difficult, however, even with the new data and calculations, to obtain a more accurate constraint on the nuclear incompressibility K0 than the interval 200-260 MeV.

Wang, Yongjia; Guo, Chenchen; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Li, Zhuxia; Trautmann, Wolfgang

2014-03-01

386

Radiation-induced segregation in Cu-Au alloys. [1 at. % Au  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced segregation in a Cu-1 at. % Au alloy was investigated using in situ Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Irradiation with 1.8-MeV He produced nonequilibrium Au atom depletion in the near surface region. The amount of segregation was measured as a function of dose, dose rate and temperature. Segregation was observed between 300 and 500/sup 0/C. For a calculated dose rate of 3.9 x 10/sup -5/ dpa/s, the radiation-induced segregation rate peaked near 400/sup 0/C. Theoretical analysis based on the Johnson-Lam model predicted that the amount of segregation would be directly proportional to dose at the early stage of irradiation, would deviate from linearity with a continuously decreasing slope at intermediate doses, and finally approach a constant value after high doses. The analysis also predicted that the segregation rate would vary as the -1/4th power of the dose rate at constant dose in the low temperature region. These predictions were all verified experimentally. A procedure for extracting relative defect production efficiencies from similar measurements is discussed.

Hashimoto, T.; Rehn, L.E.; Okamoto, P.R.

1986-04-01

387

DeltavarphiDeltaeta correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report charged particle pair correlation analyses in the space of Deltavarphi (azimuth) and Deltaeta (pseudorapidity), for central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV in the STAR detector. The analysis involves unlike-sign charged pairs and like-sign charged pairs, which are transformed into charge-dependent (CD) signals and charge-independent (CI) signals. We present detailed parametrizations of the data. A model featuring dense gluonic

J. Adams; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; B. I. Bezverkhny; S. Bharadwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; S.-L. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón De La Barca Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; Y. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; H. A. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; M. Daugherity; M. M. De Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; J. Gans; M. S. Ganti; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; Y. G. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; Y. Guo; N. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Yu. Khodyrev; B. C. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; J. Reinnarth; D. Relyea; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto De Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. Van Der Kolk; M. Van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; V. I. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2007-01-01

388

Partonic Flow and varphi-Meson Production in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present first measurements of the varphi-meson elliptic flow (v2(pT)) and high-statistics pT distributions for different centralities from sNN=200GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In minimum bias collisions the v2 of the varphi meson is consistent with the trend observed for mesons. The ratio of the yields of the Omega to those of the varphi as a function of transverse momentum

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Baumgart; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; R. R. Betts; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; M. Bombara; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; J. Callner; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; S. U. Chung; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. de Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; A. Feng; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; E. Garcia-Solis; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. G. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; N. Gupta; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Heppelmann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; V. Yu. Khodyrev; B. C. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; C. Nepali; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; I. A. Qattan; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; D. Relyea; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; N. van der Kolk; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wu; Y. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; V. I. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev; J. X. Zuo

2007-01-01

389

Strange Baryon Resonance Production in sNN=200GeV p+p and Au+Au Collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the pT spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central

B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; Y. Bai; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; A. Bellingeri-Laurikainen; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; S. Bhardwaj; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; S.-L. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; M. Botje; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bravar; T. P. Burton; M. Bystersky; R. V. Cadman; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón De La Barca Sánchez; J. Castillo; O. Catu; D. Cebra; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; M. R. Cosentino; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Das; S. Dash; M. Daugherity; M. M. de Moura; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; T. Dietel; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; W. J. Dong; X. Dong; J. E. Draper; F. Du; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; V. Eckardt; W. R. Edwards; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; K. Filimonov; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; L. Gaillard; M. S. Ganti; L. Gaudichet; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; J. E. Gonzalez; Y. G. Gorbunov; H. Gos; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; S. M. Guertin; K. S. F. F. Guimaraes; N. Gupta; T. D. Gutierrez; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; J. W. Harris; W. He; M. Heinz; T. W. Henry; S. Hepplemann; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; M. J. Horner; H. Z. Huang; S. L. Huang; E. W. Hughes; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; F. Jia; H. Jiang; P. G. Jones; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; V. Yu. Khodyrev; B. C. Kim; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; E. M. Kislov; S. R. Klein; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; M. Kopytine; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; K. L. Kowalik; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; V. I. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; S. Lapointe; F. Laue; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; S. Lehocka; M. J. Levine; C. Li; Q. Li; Y. Li; G. Lin; X. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; T. Ludlam; D. Lynn; G. L. Ma; J. G. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. Magestro; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; L. Martin; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; C. J. McClain; T. S. McShane; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; J. Millane; M. L. Miller; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; C. Mironov; A. Mischke; D. K. Mishra; J. Mitchell; B. Mohanty; L. Molnar; C. F. Moore; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; M. Pachr; S. K. Pal; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; R. Picha; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; M. Potekhin; E. Potrebenikova; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; J. Putschke; G. Rakness; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; J. Reinnarth; D. Relyea; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; M. Sarsour; P. S. Sazhin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; K. Schweda; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; A. Shabetai; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shimanskiy; E. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; G. Sood; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; J. Speltz; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; A. Stadnik; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; M. Sumbera; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; M. Swanger; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; A. Tai; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; N. van der Kolk; M. van Leeuwen; A. M. Vander Molen; R. Varma; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vernet; S. E. Vigdor; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; W. T. Waggoner; F. Wang; G. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; J. W. Watson; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; A. Wetzler; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; J. Wood; J. Wu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Z. Xu; P. Yepes; I.-K. Yoo; V. I. Yurevich; W. Zhan; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Y. Zhao; C. Zhong; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva; A. N. Zubarev

2006-01-01

390

Identified Particle Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report first results on elliptic flow of identified particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV using the STAR TPC at RHIC. The elliptic flow as a function of transverse momentum and centrality differs significantly for particles of different masses. This dependence can be accounted for in hydrodynamic models, indicating that the system created shows a

C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; C. Allgower; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; H. Bichsel; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; R. Bossingham; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; R. V. Cadman; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; S. Chattopadhyay; M. L. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; L. Conin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; D. Greiner; V. Grigoriev; M. Guedon; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. Kisiel; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. S. Konstantinov; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. I. Kulikov; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; A. A. Kuznetsov; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; T. Lecompte; R. Lednický; V. M. Leontiev; P. Leszczynski; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; D. Lynn; R. Majka; A. Maliszewski; S. Margetis; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; J. Mitchell; V. A. Moiseenko; D. Moltz; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; W. Pinganaud; E. Potrebenikova; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; S. Radomski; G. Rai; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; D. Russ; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; J. Sandweiss; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; K. Schweda; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; A. Schüttauf; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; H. Stroebele; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; J. H. Thomas; V. Tikhomirov; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. Vanyashin; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; S. A. Voloshin; F. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; T. Wenaus; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; A. Yokosawa; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovský; W. M. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; A. N. Zubarev

2001-01-01

391

Measurement of Inclusive Antiprotons from Au+Au Collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the first measurement of inclusive antiproton production at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The antiproton transverse mass distributions in the measured transverse momentum range of 0.25

C. Adler; Z. Ahammed; C. Allgower; J. Amonett; B. D. Anderson; M. Anderson; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; O. Barannikova; L. S. Barnby; J. Baudot; S. Bekele; V. V. Belaga; R. Bellwied; J. Berger; H. Bichsel; L. C. Bland; C. O. Blyth; B. E. Bonner; A. Boucham; A. Brandin; R. V. Cadman; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; A. Cardenas; J. Carroll; J. Castillo; M. Castro; D. Cebra; S. Chattopadhyay; M. L. Chen; Y. Chen; S. P. Chernenko; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; B. Choi; W. Christie; J. P. Coffin; T. M. Cormier; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; M. Demello; W. S. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; L. Didenko; J. E. Draper; V. B. Dunin; J. C. Dunlop; V. Eckardt; L. G. Efimov; V. Emelianov; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; P. Fachini; V. Faine; K. Filimonov; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; D. Flierl; K. J. Foley; J. Fu; C. A. Gagliardi; N. Gagunashvili; J. Gans; L. Gaudichet; M. Germain; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; J. Grabski; O. Grachov; V. Grigoriev; M. Guedon; E. Gushin; T. J. Hallman; D. Hardtke; J. W. Harris; M. Heffner; S. Heppelmann; T. Herston; B. Hippolyte; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; G. W. Hoffmann; M. Horsley; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; H. Hümmler; G. Igo; A. Ishihara; Yu. I. Ivanshin; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; M. Janik; I. Johnson; P. G. Jones; E. Judd; M. Kaneta; M. Kaplan; D. Keane; A. S. Konstantinov; J. Klay; S. R. Klein; A. Klyachko; L. Kotchenda; A. D. Kovalenko; M. Kramer; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; C. Kuhn; A. A. Kuznetsov; G. J. Kunde; C. L. Kunz; R. Kh. Kutuev; L. Lakehal-Ayat; J. Lamas-Valverde; M. A. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lange; C. P. Lansdell; B. Lasiuk; F. Laue; A. Lebedev; R. Lednický; V. M. Leontiev; M. J. Levine; Q. Li; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; L. Liu; Z. Liu; Q. J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; G. Locurto; H. Long; R. S. Longacre; M. Lopez-Noriega; W. A. Love; D. Lynn; R. Majka; S. Margetis; L. Martin; J. Marx; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; T. S. McShane; F. Meissner; Yu. Melnick; A. Meschanin; M. Messer; M. L. Miller; Z. Milosevich; N. G. Minaev; J. Mitchell; V. A. Moiseenko; C. F. Moore; V. Morozov; M. M. de Moura; M. G. Munhoz; G. S. Mutchler; J. M. Nelson; P. Nevski; V. A. Nikitin; L. V. Nogach; B. Norman; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; V. Okorokov; M. Oldenburg; D. Olson; G. Paic; S. U. Pandey; Y. Panebratsev; S. Y. Panitkin; A. I. Pavlinov; T. Pawlak; V. Perevoztchikov; W. Peryt; V. A. Petrov; E. Platner; J. Pluta; N. Porile; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; E. Potrebenikova; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; S. Radomski; G. Rai; O. Ravel; R. L. Ray; S. V. Razin; D. Reichhold; J. G. Reid; F. Retiere; A. Ridiger; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevski; J. L. Romero; C. Roy; V. Rykov; I. Sakrejda; J. Sandweiss; A. C. Saulys; I. Savin; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; L. S. Schroeder; A. Schüttauf; K. Schweda; J. Seger; D. Seliverstov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; K. E. Shestermanov; S. S. Shimanskii; V. S. Shvetcov; G. Skoro; N. Smirnov; R. Snellings; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; E. J. Stephenson; R. Stock; A. Stolpovsky; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; C. Struck; A. A. Suaide; E. Sugarbaker; C. Suire; M. Sumbera; T. J. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; P. Szarwas; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; J. H. Thomas; M. Thompson; V. Tikhomirov; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; M. Tokarev; M. B. Tonjes; V. Trofimov; O. Tsai; K. Turner; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; A. M. Vandermolen; A. Vanyashin; I. M. Vasilevski; A. N. Vasiliev; S. E. Vigdor; S. A. Voloshin; F. Wang; H. Ward; J. W. Watson; R. Wells; T. Wenaus; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; R. Willson; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; N. Xu; Z. Xu; A. E. Yakutin; E. Yamamoto; J. Yang; P. Yepes; V. I. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevski; I. Zborovský; H. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; R. Zoulkarneev; A. N. Zubarev

2001-01-01

392

Observation of fast collinear partitioning of the Au197 + Au197 system into three and four fragments of comparable size  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collisions of a very heavy nonfusing nuclear system Au197+Au197 were studied at an energy of 15 MeV\\/nucleon. An interesting process of violent reseparation of this heavy system into three or four fragments of comparable size was observed. In the case of ternary partitioning, either the projectile-like fragment (PLF) or target-like fragment (TLF) breaks up almost collinearly with the PLF-TLF separation

J. Wilczynski; I. Skwira-Chalot; K. Siwek-Wilczynska; A. Pagano; F. Amorini; A. Anzalone; L. Auditore; V. Baran; J. Brzychczyk; G. Cardella; S. Cavallaro; M. B. Chatterjee; M. Colonna; E. de Filippo; M. Di Toro; W. Gawlikowicz; E. Geraci; A. Grzeszczuk; P. Guazzoni; S. Kowalski; E. La Guidara; G. Lanzalone; J. Lukasik; C. Maiolino; Z. Majka; N. G. Nicolis; M. Papa; E. Piasecki; S. Pirrone; R. Planeta; G. Politi; F. Porto; F. Rizzo; P. Russotto; K. Schmidt; A. Sochocka; L. Swiderski; A. Trifirò; M. Trimarchi; J. P. Wieleczko; L. Zetta; W. Zipper

2010-01-01

393

Preparation and characterization of Au\\/ZrO 2 nanoparticles obtained by oxidation of Zr X Au Y alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, we have shown that powders containing both gold and ZrO2 nanosized particles could be prepared by low temperature (T<100 °C) oxidation of cast crystalline Zr–Au alloys. In this report, we present the preliminary results of a study aiming at preparing the mixed nanosized particles from thin films. In a first step, pure Zr and Au layers are alternatively deposited

N Sanz; M Lomello-Tafin; J.-C Valmalette; M Isa; Ph Galez

2002-01-01

394

Metal-on-metal thin-film growth: Au/Ni(001) and Ni/Au(001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Growth modes and dynamics of vapor-deposited thin metal films on metal substrates are studied by means of molecular-dynamics simulations using embedded-atom interactions. Gold films deposited on a room-temperature Ni(001) substrate exhibit Stranski-Krastanov growth of Au(111) films, and growth of nickel films on Au(001) involves interspecies mixing and three-dimensional growth of strained films pseudomorphic to the substrate.

Luedtke, W. D.; Landman, Uzi

1991-09-01

395

Single identified hadron spectra from &surd;(sNN )=130 GeV Au+Au collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transverse momentum spectra and yields of hadrons are measured by the PHENIX collaboration in Au+Au collisions at &surd;(sNN )=130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The time-of-flight resolution allows identification of pions to transverse momenta of 2 GeV\\/c and protons and antiprotons to 4 GeV\\/c . The yield of pions rises approximately linearly with the number of nucleons participating

K. Adcox; S. S. Adler; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; J. Alexander; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; S. H. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. G. Bellaiche; S. T. Belyaev; M. J. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Botelho; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; T. A. Carey; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. C. Chang; L. L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; R. K. Choudhury; T. Christ; T. Chujo; M. S. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; B. A. Cole; D. G. D'Enterria; G. David; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; B. V. Dinesh; A. Drees; A. Durum; D. Dutta; K. Ebisu; Y. V. Efremenko; K. El Chenawi; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. E. Fields; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; S.-Y. Fung; S. Garpman; T. K. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. L. Godoi; Y. Goto; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; S. K. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; J. S. Haggerty; H. Hamagaki; A. G. Hansen; H. Hara; E. P. Hartouni; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; T. K. Hemmick; J. M. Heuser; M. Hibino; J. C. Hill; D. S. Ho; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Ichihara; K. Imai; M. S. Ippolitov; M. Ishihara; B. V. Jacak; W. Y. Jang; J. Jia; B. M. Johnson; S. C. Johnson; K. S. Joo; S. Kametani; J. H. Kang; M. Kann; S. S. Kapoor; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. J. Kim; H. J. Kim; S. Y. Kim; Y. G. Kim; W. W. Kinnison; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. J. Kroon; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; J. G. Lajoie; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; M. J. Leitch; X. H. Li; Z. Li; D. J. Lim; M. X. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. F. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. I. Makdisi; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; S. K. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. D. Marx; A. Masaike; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; P. L. McGaugh