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Sample records for suggests cross-species interactome

  1. Building and analyzing protein interactome networks by cross-species comparisons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A genomic catalogue of protein-protein interactions is a rich source of information, particularly for exploring the relationships between proteins. Numerous systems-wide and small-scale experiments have been conducted to identify interactions; however, our knowledge of all interactions for any one species is incomplete, and alternative means to expand these network maps is needed. We therefore took a comparative biology approach to predict protein-protein interactions across five species (human, mouse, fly, worm, and yeast) and developed InterologFinder for research biologists to easily navigate this data. We also developed a confidence score for interactions based on available experimental evidence and conservation across species. Results The connectivity of the resultant networks was determined to have scale-free distribution, small-world properties, and increased local modularity, indicating that the added interactions do not disrupt our current understanding of protein network structures. We show examples of how these improved interactomes can be used to analyze a genome-scale dataset (RNAi screen) and to assign new function to proteins. Predicted interactions within this dataset were tested by co-immunoprecipitation, resulting in a high rate of validation, suggesting the high quality of networks produced. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions were predicted in five species, based on orthology. An InteroScore, a score accounting for homology, number of orthologues with evidence of interactions, and number of unique observations of interactions, is given to each known and predicted interaction. Our website http://www.interologfinder.org provides research biologists intuitive access to this data. PMID:20353594

  2. A Novel Endogenous Betaretrovirus in the Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus) Suggests Multiple Independent Infection and Cross-Species Transmission Events

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M. Lisandra Zepeda; Heeger, Felix; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L.; Taboada, Blanca; Mazzoni, Camila J.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    The Desmodus rotundus endogenous betaretrovirus (DrERV) is fixed in the vampire bat D. rotundus population and in other phyllostomid bats but is not present in all species from this family. DrERV is not phylogenetically related to Old World bat betaretroviruses but to betaretroviruses from rodents and New World primates, suggesting recent cross-species transmission. A recent integration age estimation of the provirus in some taxa indicates that an exogenous counterpart might have been in recent circulation. PMID:25717107

  3. A novel endogenous betaretrovirus in the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) suggests multiple independent infection and cross-species transmission events.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Mendoza, M Lisandra Zepeda; Heeger, Felix; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Méndez-Ojeda, Maria L; Taboada, Blanca; Mazzoni, Camila J; Arias, Carlos F; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-05-01

    The Desmodus rotundus endogenous betaretrovirus (DrERV) is fixed in the vampire bat D. rotundus population and in other phyllostomid bats but is not present in all species from this family. DrERV is not phylogenetically related to Old World bat betaretroviruses but to betaretroviruses from rodents and New World primates, suggesting recent cross-species transmission. A recent integration age estimation of the provirus in some taxa indicates that an exogenous counterpart might have been in recent circulation. PMID:25717107

  4. Cross-species correlation between queen mating numbers and worker ovary sizes suggests kin conflict may influence ovary size evolution in honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueppell, Olav; Phaincharoen, Mananya; Kuster, Ryan; Tingek, Salim

    2011-09-01

    During social evolution, the ovary size of reproductively specialized honey bee queens has dramatically increased while their workers have evolved much smaller ovaries. However, worker division of labor and reproductive competition under queenless conditions are influenced by worker ovary size. Little comparative information on ovary size exists in the different honey bee species. Here, we report ovariole numbers of freshly dissected workers from six Apis species from two locations in Southeast Asia. The average number of worker ovarioles differs significantly among species. It is strongly correlated with the average mating number of queens, irrespective of body size. Apis dorsata, in particular, is characterized by numerous matings and very large worker ovaries. The relation between queen mating number and ovary size across the six species suggests that individual selection via reproductive competition plays a role in worker ovary size evolution. This indicates that genetic diversity, generated by multiple mating, may bear a fitness cost at the colony level.

  5. The interactome challenge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The properties of living cells are mediated by a huge number of ever-changing interactions of their component macromolecules forming living machines; collectively, these are termed the interactome. Pathogenic alterations in interactomes mechanistically underlie diseases. Therefore, there exists an essential need for much better tools to reveal and dissect interactomes. This need is only now beginning to be met. PMID:26572620

  6. Rapid, Optimized Interactomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Domanski, Michal; Hough, Loren; Oroskar, Asha A.; Oroskar, Anil R.; Keegan, Sarah; Dilworth, David J.; Molloy, Kelly R.; Sherman, Vadim; Aitchison, John D.; Fenyö, David; Chait, Brian T.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Rout, Michael P.; LaCava, John

    2015-01-01

    We must reliably map the interactomes of cellular macromolecular complexes in order to fully explore and understand biological systems. However, there are no methods to accurately predict how to capture a given macromolecular complex with its physiological binding partners. Here, we present a screen that comprehensively explores the parameters affecting the stability of interactions in affinity-captured complexes, enabling the discovery of physiological binding partners and the elucidation of their functional interactions in unparalleled detail. We have implemented this screen on several macromolecular complexes from a variety of organisms, revealing novel profiles even for well-studied proteins. Our approach is robust, economical and automatable, providing an inroad to the rigorous, systematic dissection of cellular interactomes. PMID:25938370

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Clostridium difficille interactomes: demonstration of rapid development of computational system for bacterial interactome prediction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks (interactomes) of most organisms, except for some model organisms, are largely unknown. Experimental methods including high-throughput techniques are highly resource intensive. Therefore, computational discovery of PPIs can accelerate biological discovery by presenting "most-promising" pairs of proteins that are likely to interact. For many bacteria, genome sequence, and thereby genomic context of proteomes, is readily available; additionally, for some of these proteomes, localization and functional annotations are also available, but interactomes are not available. We present here a method for rapid development of computational system to predict interactome of bacterial proteomes. While other studies have presented methods to transfer interologs across species, here, we propose transfer of computational models to benefit from cross-species annotations, thereby predicting many more novel interactions even in the absence of interologs. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Clostridium difficile (CD) have been used to demonstrate the work. Results We developed a random forest classifier over features derived from Gene Ontology annotations and genetic context scores provided by STRING database for predicting Mtb and CD interactions independently. The Mtb classifier gave a precision of 94% and a recall of 23% on a held out test set. The Mtb model was then run on all the 8 million protein pairs of the Mtb proteome, resulting in 708 new interactions (at 94% expected precision) or 1,595 new interactions at 80% expected precision. The CD classifier gave a precision of 90% and a recall of 16% on a held out test set. The CD model was run on all the 8 million protein pairs of the CD proteome, resulting in 143 new interactions (at 90% expected precision) or 580 new interactions (at 80% expected precision). We also compared the overlap of predictions of our method with STRING database interactions for CD and Mtb and also with

  8. Cross-species transmission of CWD prions.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Timothy D; Sigurdson, Christina J

    2016-01-01

    Prions cause fatal neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals and can be transmitted zoonotically. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly transmissible prion disease of wild deer and elk that affects cervids over extensive regions of the United States and Canada. The risk of cross-species CWD transmission has been experimentally evaluated in a wide array of mammals, including non-human primates and mouse models expressing human cellular prion protein. Here we review the determinants of cross-species CWD transmission, and propose a model that may explain a structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans. PMID:26809254

  9. Cross-species models of human melanoma.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Louise; Patton, E Elizabeth; Wood, Geoffrey A; Foote, Alastair K; Brenn, Thomas; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    Although transformation of melanocytes to melanoma is rare, the rapid growth, systemic spread, as well as the chemoresistance of melanoma present significant challenges for patient care. Here we review animal models of melanoma, including murine, canine, equine, and zebrafish models, and detail the immense contribution these models have made to our knowledge of human melanoma development, and to melanocyte biology. We also highlight the opportunities for cross-species comparative genomic studies of melanoma to identify the key molecular events that drive this complex disease. PMID:26354726

  10. Dynamic Zebrafish Interactome Reveals Transcriptional Mechanisms of Dioxin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alexeyenko, Andrey; Wassenberg, Deena M.; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Yen, Jerry; Linney, Elwood; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to generate hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) causes toxicity, we analyzed global gene expression changes in developing zebrafish embryos exposed to this potent toxicant in the context of a dynamic gene network. For this purpose, we also computationally inferred a zebrafish (Danio rerio) interactome based on orthologs and interaction data from other eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using novel computational tools to analyze this interactome, we distinguished between dioxin-dependent and dioxin-independent interactions between proteins, and tracked the temporal propagation of dioxin-dependent transcriptional changes from a few genes that were altered initially, to large groups of biologically coherent genes at later times. The most notable processes altered at later developmental stages were calcium and iron metabolism, embryonic morphogenesis including neuronal and retinal development, a variety of mitochondria-related functions, and generalized stress response (not including induction of antioxidant genes). Within the interactome, many of these responses were connected to cytochrome P4501A (cyp1a) as well as other genes that were dioxin-regulated one day after exposure. This suggests that cyp1a may play a key role initiating the toxic dysregulation of those processes, rather than serving simply as a passive marker of dioxin exposure, as suggested by earlier research. Conclusions/Significance Thus, a powerful microarray experiment coupled with a flexible interactome and multi-pronged interactome tools (which are now made publicly available for microarray analysis and related work) suggest the hypothesis that dioxin, best known in fish as a potent cardioteratogen, has many other targets. Many of these types of toxicity have been observed in mammalian species and are potentially caused by alterations to cyp1a. PMID:20463971

  11. How perfect can protein interactomes be?

    PubMed

    Levy, Emmanuel D; Landry, Christian R; Michnick, Stephen W

    2009-01-01

    Any engineered device should certainly not contain nonfunctional components, for this would be a waste of energy and money. In contrast, evolutionary theory tells us that biological systems need not be optimized and may very well accumulate nonfunctional elements. Mutational and demographic processes contribute to the cluttering of eukaryotic genomes and transcriptional networks with "junk" DNA and spurious DNA binding sites. Here, we question whether such a notion should be applied to protein interactomes-that is, whether these protein interactomes are expected to contain a fraction of nonselected, nonfunctional protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which we term "noisy." We propose a simple relationship between the fraction of noisy interactions expected in a given organism and three parameters: (i) the number of mutations needed to create and destroy interactions, (ii) the size of the proteome, and (iii) the fitness cost of noisy interactions. All three parameters suggest that noisy PPIs are expected to exist. Their existence could help to explain why PPIs determined from large-scale studies often lack functional relationships between interacting proteins, why PPIs are poorly conserved across organisms, and why the PPI space appears to be immensely large. Finally, we propose experimental strategies to estimate the fraction of evolutionary noise in PPI networks. PMID:19261595

  12. Toward a cross-species understanding of empathy

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, Jaak; Panksepp, Jules B.

    2013-01-01

    Although signs of empathy have now been well documented in non-human primates, only during the past few years have systematic observations suggested that a primal form of empathy exists in rodents. Thus, the study of empathy in animals has started in earnest. Here we review recent studies indicating that rodents are able to share states of fear, and highlight how affective neuroscience approaches to the study of primary-process emotional systems can help to delineate how primal empathy is constituted in mammalian brains. Cross-species evolutionary approaches to understanding the neural circuitry of emotional ‘contagion’ or ‘resonance’ between nearby animals, together with the underlying neurochemistries, may help to clarify the origins of human empathy. PMID:23746460

  13. Toward a cross-species understanding of empathy.

    PubMed

    Panksepp, Jaak; Panksepp, Jules B

    2013-08-01

    Although signs of empathy have now been well documented in non-human primates, only during the past few years have systematic observations suggested that a primal form of empathy exists in rodents. Thus, the study of empathy in animals has started in earnest. Here we review recent studies indicating that rodents are able to share states of fear, and highlight how affective neuroscience approaches to the study of primary-process emotional systems can help to delineate how primal empathy is constituted in mammalian brains. Cross-species evolutionary approaches to understanding the neural circuitry of emotional 'contagion' or 'resonance' between nearby animals, together with the underlying neurochemistries, may help to clarify the origins of human empathy. PMID:23746460

  14. Electron Transfer Interactome of Cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander N.; van Nuland, Nico A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET) is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes – necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism – is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc). Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1) reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2) indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3) suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility. PMID:23236271

  15. PTIR: Predicted Tomato Interactome Resource

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junyang; Xu, Wei; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Shengxiong; Miao, Min; Tang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Guoqing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in almost all biological processes and form the basis of the entire interactomics systems of living organisms. Identification and characterization of these interactions are fundamental to elucidating the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and metabolic pathways at both the cellular and systemic levels. Although a number of experimental and computational studies have been performed on model organisms, the studies exploring and investigating PPIs in tomatoes remain lacking. Here, we developed a Predicted Tomato Interactome Resource (PTIR), based on experimentally determined orthologous interactions in six model organisms. The reliability of individual PPIs was also evaluated by shared gene ontology (GO) terms, co-evolution, co-expression, co-localization and available domain-domain interactions (DDIs). Currently, the PTIR covers 357,946 non-redundant PPIs among 10,626 proteins, including 12,291 high-confidence, 226,553 medium-confidence, and 119,102 low-confidence interactions. These interactions are expected to cover 30.6% of the entire tomato proteome and possess a reasonable distribution. In addition, ten randomly selected PPIs were verified using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening or a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. The PTIR was constructed and implemented as a dedicated database and is available at http://bdg.hfut.edu.cn/ptir/index.html without registration. PMID:27121261

  16. PTIR: Predicted Tomato Interactome Resource.

    PubMed

    Yue, Junyang; Xu, Wei; Ban, Rongjun; Huang, Shengxiong; Miao, Min; Tang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Guoqing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in almost all biological processes and form the basis of the entire interactomics systems of living organisms. Identification and characterization of these interactions are fundamental to elucidating the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and metabolic pathways at both the cellular and systemic levels. Although a number of experimental and computational studies have been performed on model organisms, the studies exploring and investigating PPIs in tomatoes remain lacking. Here, we developed a Predicted Tomato Interactome Resource (PTIR), based on experimentally determined orthologous interactions in six model organisms. The reliability of individual PPIs was also evaluated by shared gene ontology (GO) terms, co-evolution, co-expression, co-localization and available domain-domain interactions (DDIs). Currently, the PTIR covers 357,946 non-redundant PPIs among 10,626 proteins, including 12,291 high-confidence, 226,553 medium-confidence, and 119,102 low-confidence interactions. These interactions are expected to cover 30.6% of the entire tomato proteome and possess a reasonable distribution. In addition, ten randomly selected PPIs were verified using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening or a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. The PTIR was constructed and implemented as a dedicated database and is available at http://bdg.hfut.edu.cn/ptir/index.html without registration. PMID:27121261

  17. [Cross-species Transmission of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanwei; He, Menglian; Zhang, Ji; Zhao, Manda; Wang, Guihua; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an avian retrovirus that can induce myelocytomas. A high-frequency mutation in gene envelope endows ALV-J with the potential for cross-species transmission. We wished to ascertain if the ALV-J can spread across species under selection pressure in susceptible and resistant hosts. First, we inoculated (in turn) two susceptible host birds (specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens and turkeys). Then, we inoculated three resistant hosts (pheasants, quails and ducks) to detect the viral shedding, pathologic changes, and genetic evolution of different isolates. We found that pheasants and quails were infected under the selective pressure that accumulates stepwise in different hosts, and that ducks were not infected. Infection rates for SPF chickens and turkeys were 100% (16/16), whereas those for pheasants and quails were 37.5% (6/16) and 11.1% (3/27). Infected hosts showed immune tolerance, and inflammation and tissue damage could be seen in the liver, spleen, kidneys and cardiovascular system. Non-synonymous mutation and synonymous ratio (NS/S) analyses revealed the NS/S in hypervariable region (hr) 2 of pheasants and quails was 2.5. That finding suggested that mutation of isolates in pheasants and quails was induced by selective pressure from the resistant host, and that the hr2 region is a critical domain in cross-species transmission of ALV-J. Sequencing showed that ALV-J isolates from turkeys, pheasants and quails had moved away from the original virus, and were closer to the ALV-J prototype strain HPRS-103. However, the HPRS-103 strain cannot infect pheasants and quails, so further studies are needed. PMID:27295883

  18. GENOMIC APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATION IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest tools for investigating stress in organisms, genomic technologies provide great insight into how different organisms respond to environmental conditions. However, their usefulness needs testing, verification, and codification. Genomic Approaches for Cross-Species Extra...

  19. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2.

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I; Cantley, Lewis C; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  20. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  1. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  2. Virtual Interactomics of Proteins from Biochemical Standpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kubrycht, Jaroslav; Sigler, Karel; Souček, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Virtual interactomics represents a rapidly developing scientific area on the boundary line of bioinformatics and interactomics. Protein-related virtual interactomics then comprises instrumental tools for prediction, simulation, and networking of the majority of interactions important for structural and individual reproduction, differentiation, recognition, signaling, regulation, and metabolic pathways of cells and organisms. Here, we describe the main areas of virtual protein interactomics, that is, structurally based comparative analysis and prediction of functionally important interacting sites, mimotope-assisted and combined epitope prediction, molecular (protein) docking studies, and investigation of protein interaction networks. Detailed information about some interesting methodological approaches and online accessible programs or databases is displayed in our tables. Considerable part of the text deals with the searches for common conserved or functionally convergent protein regions and subgraphs of conserved interaction networks, new outstanding trends and clinically interesting results. In agreement with the presented data and relationships, virtual interactomic tools improve our scientific knowledge, help us to formulate working hypotheses, and they frequently also mediate variously important in silico simulations. PMID:22928109

  3. Current structural biology of the heparin interactome.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H; Mulloy, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Heparin is the best known therapeutically active carbohydrate. It can bind and regulate multiple functional proteins such as coagulation cofactors, chemokines, and growth factors. This versatility has led to the recently developed concept of the heparin interactome--a group of proteins that, as the name implies, interact with heparin. The heparin interactome is structurally and functionally diverse. Though natural ligands of this class of proteins may be any of the glycosaminoglycans however, their structural biology is generally studied using heparin as a model compound. NMR spectroscopy contributes significantly to structural investigations of the resultant complexes in solution. This review aims therefore at discussing the current status in structural biology of the molecular complexes formed between heparin and its protein partners through the current concept of the heparin interactome. PMID:26038285

  4. Surface interactome in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Cesira L; Bove, Elia; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Nogarotto, Renzo; Norais, Nathalie; Pileri, Silvia; Lelli, Barbara; Falugi, Fabiana; Balloni, Sergio; Tedde, Vittorio; Chiarot, Emiliano; Bombaci, Mauro; Soriani, Marco; Bracci, Luisa; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2012-04-01

    Very few studies have so far been dedicated to the systematic analysis of protein interactions occurring between surface and/or secreted proteins in bacteria. Such interactions are expected to play pivotal biological roles that deserve investigation. Taking advantage of the availability of a detailed map of surface and secreted proteins in Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus (GAS)), we used protein array technology to define the "surface interactome" in this important human pathogen. Eighty-three proteins were spotted on glass slides in high density format, and each of the spotted proteins was probed for its capacity to interact with any of the immobilized proteins. A total of 146 interactions were identified, 25 of which classified as "reciprocal," namely, interactions that occur irrespective of which of the two partners was immobilized on the chip or in solution. Several of these interactions were validated by surface plasmon resonance and supported by confocal microscopy analysis of whole bacterial cells. By this approach, a number of interesting interactions have been discovered, including those occurring between OppA, DppA, PrsA, and TlpA, proteins known to be involved in protein folding and transport. These proteins, all localizing at the septum, might be part, together with HtrA, of the recently described ExPortal complex of GAS. Furthermore, SpeI was found to strongly interact with the metal transporters AdcA and Lmb. Because SpeI strictly requires zinc to exert its function, this finding provides evidence on how this superantigen, a major player in GAS pathogenesis, can acquire the metal in the host environment, where it is largely sequestered by carrier proteins. We believe that the approach proposed herein can lead to a deeper knowledge of the mechanisms underlying bacterial invasion, colonization, and pathogenesis. PMID:22199230

  5. Complementing the Eukaryotic Protein Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Robert; Zimmer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction networks are important for the understanding of regulatory mechanisms, for the explanation of experimental data and for the prediction of protein functions. Unfortunately, most interaction data is available only for model organisms. As a possible remedy, the transfer of interactions to organisms of interest is common practice, but it is not clear when interactions can be transferred from one organism to another and, thus, the confidence in the derived interactions is low. Here, we propose to use a rich set of features to train Random Forests in order to score transferred interactions. We evaluated the transfer from a range of eukaryotic organisms to S. cerevisiae using orthologs. Directly transferred interactions to S. cerevisiae are on average only 24% consistent with the current S. cerevisiae interaction network. By using commonly applied filter approaches the transfer precision can be improved, but at the cost of a large decrease in the number of transferred interactions. Our Random Forest approach uses various features derived from both the target and the source network as well as the ortholog annotations to assign confidence values to transferred interactions. Thereby, we could increase the average transfer consistency to 85%, while still transferring almost 70% of all correctly transferable interactions. We tested our approach for the transfer of interactions to other species and showed that our approach outperforms competing methods for the transfer of interactions to species where no experimental knowledge is available. Finally, we applied our predictor to score transferred interactions to 83 targets species and we were able to extend the available interactome of B. taurus, M. musculus and G. gallus with over 40,000 interactions each. Our transferred interaction networks are publicly available via our web interface, which allows to inspect and download transferred interaction sets of different sizes, for various species, and at specified

  6. Cross Species Amplification of Microsatellite Markers in Fragaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are one of the most preferred DNA-based tools for variety identification and linkage mapping. The objective of this study was to develop expressed sequence tag (EST)-SSR primers in Fragaria and determine their cross species amplification in fourteen ...

  7. MULTIPLE SOLVENT EXPOSURE IN HUMANS: CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple Solvent Exposures in Humans:
    Cross-Species Extrapolations
    (Future Research Plan)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    A few solvents can be safely studied in acute experiments in human subjects. Data exist in rats f...

  8. CROSS-SPECIES DOSE EXTRAPOLATION FOR DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models for cross-species (rat to human) dose extrapolation of diesel emission were evaluated for purposes of establishing guidelines for human exposure to diesel emissions (DE) based on DE toxicological data obtained in rats. Ideally, a model for this extrapolation would provide...

  9. A Proteome-wide Fission Yeast Interactome Reveals Network Evolution Principles from Yeasts to Human.

    PubMed

    Vo, Tommy V; Das, Jishnu; Meyer, Michael J; Cordero, Nicolas A; Akturk, Nurten; Wei, Xiaomu; Fair, Benjamin J; Degatano, Andrew G; Fragoza, Robert; Liu, Lisa G; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Trickey, Michelle; Horibata, Sachi; Grimson, Andrew; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Xia, Yu; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-01-14

    Here, we present FissionNet, a proteome-wide binary protein interactome for S. pombe, comprising 2,278 high-quality interactions, of which ∼ 50% were previously not reported in any species. FissionNet unravels previously unreported interactions implicated in processes such as gene silencing and pre-mRNA splicing. We developed a rigorous network comparison framework that accounts for assay sensitivity and specificity, revealing extensive species-specific network rewiring between fission yeast, budding yeast, and human. Surprisingly, although genes are better conserved between the yeasts, S. pombe interactions are significantly better conserved in human than in S. cerevisiae. Our framework also reveals that different modes of gene duplication influence the extent to which paralogous proteins are functionally repurposed. Finally, cross-species interactome mapping demonstrates that coevolution of interacting proteins is remarkably prevalent, a result with important implications for studying human disease in model organisms. Overall, FissionNet is a valuable resource for understanding protein functions and their evolution. PMID:26771498

  10. The role of the interactome in the maintenance of deleterious variability in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alonso, Luz; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Vela-Boza, Alicia; Santoyo-López, Javier; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic projects have revealed the existence of an unexpectedly large amount of deleterious variability in the human genome. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain such an apparently high mutational load. However, the mechanisms by which deleterious mutations in some genes cause a pathological effect but are apparently innocuous in other genes remain largely unknown. This study searched for deleterious variants in the 1,000 genomes populations, as well as in a newly sequenced population of 252 healthy Spanish individuals. In addition, variants causative of monogenic diseases and somatic variants from 41 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients were analysed. The deleterious variants found were analysed in the context of the interactome to understand the role of network topology in the maintenance of the observed mutational load. Our results suggest that one of the mechanisms whereby the effect of these deleterious variants on the phenotype is suppressed could be related to the configuration of the protein interaction network. Most of the deleterious variants observed in healthy individuals are concentrated in peripheral regions of the interactome, in combinations that preserve their connectivity, and have a marginal effect on interactome integrity. On the contrary, likely pathogenic cancer somatic deleterious variants tend to occur in internal regions of the interactome, often with associated structural consequences. Finally, variants causative of monogenic diseases seem to occupy an intermediate position. Our observations suggest that the real pathological potential of a variant might be more a systems property rather than an intrinsic property of individual proteins. PMID:25261458

  11. The primal scene in cross-species and cross-cultural perspectives.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Lawrence

    2011-10-01

    A review of cross-species and cross-cultural research suggests that, throughout most of human behavioral evolution, children may have been enlightened as to the facts of life by observing parental intercourse and then imitating it in sexual rehearsal play in the context of a continuously rising curve of sexual desire and sexual knowledge throughout childhood. Concealment of the primal scene and prohibition of cross-generational, bisexual, and 'polymorphously perverse' childhood sex play may be of relatively recent origin in human cultural evolution, buttressed by the instillation of culturally acquired sexual disgust in sexually conservative cultures. Looking at the primal scene in cross-species and cross-cultural perspectives utilizing the adaptationist framework of contemporary evolutionary biology can challenge normative assumptions that may still be embedded in psychoanalytic theories of species-wide psychosexual development. PMID:22014369

  12. Nuclear Functions of Nucleolin through Global Proteomics and Interactomic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Anna; Couté, Yohann; Epstein, Alberto; Arata, Loredana; Kraut, Alexandra; Navratil, Vincent; Bouvet, Philippe; Greco, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is a major component of the cell nucleolus, which has the ability to rapidly shuttle to several other cells' compartments. NCL plays important roles in a variety of essential functions, among which are ribosome biogenesis, gene expression, and cell growth. However, the precise mechanisms underlying NCL functions are still unclear. Our study aimed to provide new information on NCL functions via the identification of its nuclear interacting partners. Using an interactomics approach, we identified 140 proteins co-purified with NCL, among which 100 of them were specifically found to be associated with NCL after RNase digestion. The functional classification of these proteins confirmed the prominent role of NCL in ribosome biogenesis and additionally revealed the possible involvement of nuclear NCL in several pre-mRNA processing pathways through its interaction with RNA helicases and proteins participating in pre-mRNA splicing, transport, or stability. NCL knockdown experiments revealed that NCL regulates the localization of EXOSC10 and the amount of ZC3HAV1, two components of the RNA exosome, further suggesting its involvement in the control of mRNA stability. Altogether, this study describes the first nuclear interactome of human NCL and provides the basis for further understanding the mechanisms underlying the essential functions of this nucleolar protein. PMID:27049334

  13. Strain conformation controls the specificity of cross-species prion transmission in the yeast model.

    PubMed

    Grizel, Anastasia V; Rubel, Aleksandr A; Chernoff, Yury O

    2016-07-01

    Transmissible self-assembled fibrous cross-β polymer infectious proteins (prions) cause neurodegenerative diseases in mammals and control non-Mendelian heritable traits in yeast. Cross-species prion transmission is frequently impaired, due to sequence differences in prion-forming proteins. Recent studies of prion species barrier on the model of closely related yeast species show that colocalization of divergent proteins is not sufficient for the cross-species prion transmission, and that an identity of specific amino acid sequences and a type of prion conformational variant (strain) play a major role in the control of transmission specificity. In contrast, chemical compounds primarily influence transmission specificity via favoring certain strain conformations, while the species origin of the host cell has only a relatively minor input. Strain alterations may occur during cross-species prion conversion in some combinations. The model is discussed which suggests that different recipient proteins can acquire different spectra of prion strain conformations, which could be either compatible or incompatible with a particular donor strain. PMID:27565563

  14. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome.

    PubMed

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used membrane yeast two-hybrid technology to map the protein interactome of all of the nonmitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated 'interactome'. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in an unexpectedly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters. PMID:23831759

  15. The Levinthal paradox of the interactome.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter; Rose, George D

    2011-12-01

    The central biological question of the 21st century is: how does a viable cell emerge from the bewildering combinatorial complexity of its molecular components? Here, we estimate the combinatorics of self-assembling the protein constituents of a yeast cell, a number so vast that the functional interactome could only have emerged by iterative hierarchic assembly of its component sub-assemblies. A protein can undergo both reversible denaturation and hierarchic self-assembly spontaneously, but a functioning interactome must expend energy to achieve viability. Consequently, it is implausible that a completely "denatured" cell could be reversibly renatured spontaneously, like a protein. Instead, new cells are generated by the division of pre-existing cells, an unbroken chain of renewal tracking back through contingent conditions and evolving responses to the origin of life on the prebiotic earth. We surmise that this non-deterministic temporal continuum could not be reconstructed de novo under present conditions. PMID:21987416

  16. Comparative interactomes of SIRT6 and SIRT7: Implication of functional links to aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Namgyu; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Eung-Sam; Park, Sung Jin; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Shin, Jihye; Park, Seon-Min; Moon, Young Ho; Wang, Hee Jung; Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2014-07-01

    Sirtuins are NAD(+) -dependent deacetylases that regulate a range of cellular processes. Although diverse functions of sirtuins have been proposed, those functions of SIRT6 and SIRT7 that are mediated by their interacting proteins remain elusive. In the present study, we identified SIRT6- and SIRT7-interacting proteins, and compared their interactomes to investigate functional links. Our interactomes revealed 136 interacting proteins for SIRT6 and 233 for SIRT7 while confirming seven and 111 proteins identified previously for SIRT6 and SIRT7, respectively. Comparison of SIRT6 and SIRT7 interactomes under the same experimental conditions disclosed 111 shared proteins, implying related functional links. The interaction networks of interactomes indicated biological processes associated with DNA repair, chromatin assembly, and aging. Interactions of two highly acetylated proteins, nucleophosmin (NPM1) and nucleolin, with SIRT6 and SIRT7 were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. NPM1 was found to be deacetylated by both SIRT6 and SIRT7. In senescent cells, the acetylation level of NPM1 was increased in conjunction with decreased levels of SIRT6 and SIRT7, suggesting that the acetylation of NPM1 could be regulated by SIRT6 and SIRT7 in the aging process. Our comparative interactomic study of SIRT6 and SIRT7 implies important functional links to aging by their associations with interacting proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000159 and PXD000850 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000159, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000850). PMID:24782448

  17. Cross-species approaches to cognitive neuroplasticity research.

    PubMed

    Mishra, J; Gazzaley, A

    2016-05-01

    Neuroplasticity studies investigate the neural mechanisms that support learning-induced changes in cognition and behavior. These studies are performed in both experimental animals and humans across development from childhood to aging. Here, we review select recent studies that have sought to combine both animal and human neuroplasticity research within the same study. In investigating the same cognitive/behavioral functions in parallel in animals and humans, these studies take advantage of complementary neuroscience research methods that have been established for each species. In animals, these methods include investigations of genetic and molecular biomarker expression and micro-scale electrophysiology in single neurons in vivo or in brain slices. In humans, these studies assess macro-scale neural network dynamics using neuroimaging methods including EEG (electroencephalography) and functional and structural MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Thus, by combining these diverse and complementary methodologies cross-species studies have the unique ability to bridge molecular, systems and cognitive neuroscience research. Additionally, they serve a vital role in translational neuroscience, providing a direct bridge between animal models and human neuropsychiatric disorders. Comprehensive cross-species understanding of neural mechanisms at multiple scales of resolution and how these neural dynamics relate to behavioral outcomes, then serve to inform development and optimization of treatment strategies. PMID:26348561

  18. Microsatellites Cross-Species Amplification across Some African Cichlids.

    PubMed

    Bezault, Etienne; Rognon, Xavier; Gharbi, Karim; Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Chevassus, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of the genomic resources developed in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to other Tilapiines sensu lato and African cichlid would provide new possibilities to study this amazing group from genetics, ecology, evolution, aquaculture, and conservation point of view. We tested the cross-species amplification of 32 O. niloticus microsatellite markers in a panel of 15 species from 5 different African cichlid tribes: Oreochromines (Oreochromis, Sarotherodon), Boreotilapiines (Tilapia), Chromidotilapines, Hemichromines, and Haplochromines. Amplification was successfully observed for 29 markers (91%), with a frequency of polymorphic (P(95)) loci per species around 70%. The mean number of alleles per locus and species was 3.2 but varied from 3.7 within Oreochromis species to 1.6 within the nontilapia species. The high level of cross-species amplification and polymorphism of the microsatellite markers tested in this study provides powerful tools for a wide range of molecular genetic studies within tilapia species as well as for other African cichlids. PMID:22701809

  19. APID interactomes: providing proteome-based interactomes with controlled quality for multiple species and derived networks

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-López, Diego; Gutiérrez, Miguel A.; Lopes, Katia P.; Prieto, Carlos; Santamaría, Rodrigo; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-01-01

    APID (Agile Protein Interactomes DataServer) is an interactive web server that provides unified generation and delivery of protein interactomes mapped to their respective proteomes. This resource is a new, fully redesigned server that includes a comprehensive collection of protein interactomes for more than 400 organisms (25 of which include more than 500 interactions) produced by the integration of only experimentally validated protein–protein physical interactions. For each protein–protein interaction (PPI) the server includes currently reported information about its experimental validation to allow selection and filtering at different quality levels. As a whole, it provides easy access to the interactomes from specific species and includes a global uniform compendium of 90,379 distinct proteins and 678,441 singular interactions. APID integrates and unifies PPIs from major primary databases of molecular interactions, from other specific repositories and also from experimentally resolved 3D structures of protein complexes where more than two proteins were identified. For this purpose, a collection of 8,388 structures were analyzed to identify specific PPIs. APID also includes a new graph tool (based on Cytoscape.js) for visualization and interactive analyses of PPI networks. The server does not require registration and it is freely available for use at http://apid.dep.usal.es. PMID:27131791

  20. APID interactomes: providing proteome-based interactomes with controlled quality for multiple species and derived networks.

    PubMed

    Alonso-López, Diego; Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Lopes, Katia P; Prieto, Carlos; Santamaría, Rodrigo; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    APID (Agile Protein Interactomes DataServer) is an interactive web server that provides unified generation and delivery of protein interactomes mapped to their respective proteomes. This resource is a new, fully redesigned server that includes a comprehensive collection of protein interactomes for more than 400 organisms (25 of which include more than 500 interactions) produced by the integration of only experimentally validated protein-protein physical interactions. For each protein-protein interaction (PPI) the server includes currently reported information about its experimental validation to allow selection and filtering at different quality levels. As a whole, it provides easy access to the interactomes from specific species and includes a global uniform compendium of 90,379 distinct proteins and 678,441 singular interactions. APID integrates and unifies PPIs from major primary databases of molecular interactions, from other specific repositories and also from experimentally resolved 3D structures of protein complexes where more than two proteins were identified. For this purpose, a collection of 8,388 structures were analyzed to identify specific PPIs. APID also includes a new graph tool (based on Cytoscape.js) for visualization and interactive analyses of PPI networks. The server does not require registration and it is freely available for use at http://apid.dep.usal.es. PMID:27131791

  1. Clinical interpretation of CNVs with cross-species phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Doelken, Sandra C; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Ibn-Salem, Jonas; Mungall, Christopher J; Smedley, Damian; Haendel, Melissa A; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation of CNVs identified via techniques such as array comparative genome hybridisation (aCGH) involves the inspection of lists of known and unknown duplications and deletions with the goal of distinguishing pathogenic from benign CNVs. A key step in this process is the comparison of the individual's phenotypic abnormalities with those associated with Mendelian disorders of the genes affected by the CNV. However, because often there is not much known about these human genes, an additional source of data that could be used is model organism phenotype data. Currently, almost 6000 genes in mouse and zebrafish are, when knocked out, associated with a phenotype in the model organism, but no disease is known to be caused by mutations in the human ortholog. Yet, searching model organism databases and comparing model organism phenotypes with patient phenotypes for identifying novel disease genes and medical evaluation of CNVs is hindered by the difficulty in integrating phenotype information across species and the lack of appropriate software tools. Methods Here, we present an integrated ranking scheme based on phenotypic matching, degree of overlap with known benign or pathogenic CNVs and the haploinsufficiency score for the prioritisation of CNVs responsible for a patient's clinical findings. Results We show that this scheme leads to significant improvements compared with rankings that do not exploit phenotypic information. We provide a software tool called PhenogramViz, which supports phenotype-driven interpretation of aCGH findings based on multiple data sources, including the integrated cross-species phenotype ontology Uberpheno, in order to visualise gene-to-phenotype relations. Conclusions Integrating and visualising cross-species phenotype information on the affected genes may help in routine diagnostics of CNVs. PMID:25280750

  2. Computational analysis of the LRRK2 interactome.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Claudia; Denny, Paul; Lovering, Ruth C; Lewis, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    LRRK2 was identified in 2004 as the causative protein product of the Parkinson's disease locus designated PARK8. In the decade since then, genetic studies have revealed at least 6 dominant mutations in LRRK2 linked to Parkinson's disease, alongside one associated with cancer. It is now well established that coding changes in LRRK2 are one of the most common causes of Parkinson's. Genome-wide association studies (GWAs) have, more recently, reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around the LRRK2 locus to be associated with risk of developing sporadic Parkinson's disease and inflammatory bowel disorder. The functional research that has followed these genetic breakthroughs has generated an extensive literature regarding LRRK2 pathophysiology; however, there is still no consensus as to the biological function of LRRK2. To provide insight into the aspects of cell biology that are consistently related to LRRK2 activity, we analysed the plethora of candidate LRRK2 interactors available through the BioGRID and IntAct data repositories. We then performed GO terms enrichment for the LRRK2 interactome. We found that, in two different enrichment portals, the LRRK2 interactome was associated with terms referring to transport, cellular organization, vesicles and the cytoskeleton. We also verified that 21 of the LRRK2 interactors are genetically linked to risk for Parkinson's disease or inflammatory bowel disorder. The implications of these findings are discussed, with particular regard to potential novel areas of investigation. PMID:25737818

  3. Restrictions to cross-species transmission of lentiviral infection gleaned from studies of FIV.

    PubMed

    VandeWoude, Sue; Troyer, Jennifer; Poss, Mary

    2010-03-15

    More than 40 species of primates and over 20 species of cats harbor antibodies that sero-react to lentiviral antigens. In nearly all cases where viral genetic analysis has been conducted, each host species is infected with a unique lentivirus. Though lentivirus clades within a species can be substantially divergent, they are typically monophyletic within that species. A notable significant departure from this observation is apparent cross-species transmission of FIV between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in Southern California that has occurred at least three times; evidence from one bobcat sequence suggests this cross-over may have also occurred in Florida between bobcats and the endangered Florida panther. Several other isolated reports demonstrate cross-species transmission of FIV isolates among captive animals housed in close proximity, and it is well established that HIV-1 and HIV-2 arose from human contact with SIV-infected non-human primates. Using an experimental model, we have determined that domestic cats (Felis catus) are susceptible to FIVs originating from pumas or lions. While infections are initially replicative, and animals seroconvert, within a relatively short period of time circulating virus is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in a majority of animals. This diminution of viral load is proportional to initial viral peak. Although viral reservoirs can be identified in gastrointestinal tissues, most viral genomes recovered peripherally are highly mutated, suggesting that the non-adapted host successfully inhibits normal viral replication, leading to replication incompetent viral progeny. Mechanisms possible for such restriction of cross-species infections in natural settings include: (1) Lack of contact conducive to lentiviral transmission between infected and shedding animals of different species; (2) Lack of suitable receptor repertoire to allow viral entry to susceptible cells of a new species; (3) Cellular machinery in the

  4. Cross-species identification of genomic drivers of squamous cell carcinoma development across preneoplastic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Coarfa, Cristian; Drummond, Jennifer A; Nguyen, Tri; Joseph, Aaron; Chilukuri, Suneel; Charpiot, Elizabeth; Adelmann, Charles H; Ching, Grace; Nguyen, Tran N; Nicholas, Courtney; Thomas, Valencia D; Migden, Michael; MacFarlane, Deborah; Thompson, Erika; Shen, Jianjun; Takata, Yoko; McNiece, Kayla; Polansky, Maxim A; Abbas, Hussein A; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Gower, Adam; Spira, Avrum; Covington, Kyle R; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi; Pickering, Curtis; Frederick, Mitchell; Myers, Jeffrey N; Shen, Li; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Rapini, Ronald P; Wheeler, David A; Hawk, Ernest T; Flores, Elsa R; Tsai, Kenneth Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC) comprises 15-20% of all skin cancers, accounting for over 700,000 cases in USA annually. Most cuSCC arise in association with a distinct precancerous lesion, the actinic keratosis (AK). To identify potential targets for molecularly targeted chemoprevention, here we perform integrated cross-species genomic analysis of cuSCC development through the preneoplastic AK stage using matched human samples and a solar ultraviolet radiation-driven Hairless mouse model. We identify the major transcriptional drivers of this progression sequence, showing that the key genomic changes in cuSCC development occur in the normal skin to AK transition. Our data validate the use of this ultraviolet radiation-driven mouse cuSCC model for cross-species analysis and demonstrate that cuSCC bears deep molecular similarities to multiple carcinogen-driven SCCs from diverse sites, suggesting that cuSCC may serve as an effective, accessible model for multiple SCC types and that common treatment and prevention strategies may be feasible. PMID:27574101

  5. Differentially expressed genes identified by cross-species microarray in the blind cavefish Astyanax.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Allen G; Jeffery, William R

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression were examined by microarray analysis during development of the eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus De Filippi, 1853. The cross-species microarray used surface and cavefish RNA hybridized to a DNA chip prepared from a closely related species, the zebrafish Danio rerio Hamilton, 1822. We identified a total of 67 differentially expressed probe sets at three days post-fertilization: six upregulated and 61 downregulated in cavefish relative to surface fish. Many of these genes function either in eye development and/or maintenance, or in programmed cell death. The upregulated probe set showing the highest mean fold change was similar to the human ubiquitin specific protease 53 gene. The downregulated probe sets showing some of the highest fold changes corresponded to genes with roles in eye development, including those encoding gamma crystallins, the guanine nucleotide binding proteins Gnat1 and Gant2, a BarH-like homeodomain transcription factor, and rhodopsin. Downregulation of gamma-crystallin and rhodopsin was confirmed by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with specific antibodies. Additional downregulated genes encode molecules that inhibit or activate programmed cell death. The results suggest that cross-species microarray can be used for identifying differentially expressed genes in cavefish, that many of these genes might be involved in eye degeneration via apoptotic processes, and that more genes are downregulated than upregulated in cavefish, consistent with the predominance of morphological losses over gains during regressive evolution. PMID:21392280

  6. Perturbation of the mutated EGFR interactome identifies vulnerabilities and resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannong; Bennett, Keiryn; Stukalov, Alexey; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Guolin; Yoshida, Takeshi; Okamoto, Isamu; Kim, Jae-Young; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Qian, Xiaoning; Rawal, Bhupendra; Schell, Michael; Grebien, Florian; Winter, Georg; Rix, Uwe; Eschrich, Steven; Colinge, Jacques; Koomen, John; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that elucidating the interactome of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) forms that are mutated in lung cancer, via global analysis of protein–protein interactions, phosphorylation, and systematically perturbing the ensuing network nodes, should offer a new, more systems-level perspective of the molecular etiology. Here, we describe an EGFR interactome of 263 proteins and offer a 14-protein core network critical to the viability of multiple EGFR-mutated lung cancer cells. Cells with acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) had differential dependence of the core network proteins based on the underlying molecular mechanisms of resistance. Of the 14 proteins, 9 are shown to be specifically associated with survival of EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines. This included EGFR, GRB2, MK12, SHC1, ARAF, CD11B, ARHG5, GLU2B, and CD11A. With the use of a drug network associated with the core network proteins, we identified two compounds, midostaurin and lestaurtinib, that could overcome drug resistance through direct EGFR inhibition when combined with erlotinib. Our results, enabled by interactome mapping, suggest new targets and combination therapies that could circumvent EGFR TKI resistance. PMID:24189400

  7. Cross-species spread of SCCmec IV subtypes in staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Davida S.; Wong, Agnes; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) is a mobile genetic element that carries resistance genes for beta-lactam antibiotics. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, such as S. epidermidis, are thought to be a reservoir of diverse SCCmec elements that can spread to the most virulent staphylococcal species, S. aureus, but very little is known about the extent of cross-species spread of these elements in natural populations or their dynamics in different species. We addressed these questions by using a sample of 86 S. aureus and S. epidermidis isolates with SCCmec type IV that were collected from a single hospital over a period of six months. To subtype SCCmec IV, we used multiplex PCR to detect structural variations and we used sequences from a fragment of the ccrB gene and from the dru repeats to detect additional variations. Multiplex PCR had significantly lower typeability than ccrB:dru sequencing, due to more nontypeable isolates among S. epidermidis. No statistically significant differences in diversity were detected by subtyping method or species. Interestingly, while only 4 of 24 subtypes (17%) were shared between species, these so-called shared subtypes represented 58 of 86 isolates (67%). The shared subtypes differed significantly between species in their frequencies. The shared subtypes were also significantly more concordant with genetic backgrounds in S. aureus than in S. epidermidis. Moreover, the shared subtypes had significantly higher minimum inhibitory concentrations to oxacillin in S. aureus than in S. epidermidis. This study has identified particular SCCmec IV subtypes with an important role in spreading beta-lactam resistance between species, and has further revealed some species differences in their abundance, linkage to genetic background, and antibiotic resistance level. PMID:21172458

  8. A brief history of cross-species organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation) offers the prospect of an unlimited supply of organs and cells for clinical transplantation, thus resolving the critical shortage of human tissues that currently prohibits a majority of patients on the waiting list from receiving transplants. Between the 17th and 20th centuries, blood was transfused from various animal species into patients with a variety of pathological conditions. Skin grafts were carried out in the 19th century from a variety of animals, with frogs being the most popular. In the 1920s, Voronoff advocated the transplantation of slices of chimpanzee testis into aged men whose “zest for life” was deteriorating, believing that the hormones produced by the testis would rejuvenate his patients. Following the pioneering surgical work of Carrel, who developed the technique of blood vessel anastomosis, numerous attempts at nonhuman primate organ transplantation in patients were carried out in the 20th century. In 1963–1964, when human organs were not available and chronic dialysis was not yet in use, Reemtsma transplanted chimpanzee kidneys into 13 patients, one of whom returned to work for almost 9 months before suddenly dying from what was believed to be an electrolyte disturbance. The first heart transplant in a human ever performed was by Hardy in 1964, using a chimpanzee heart, but the patient died within 2 hours. Starzl carried out the first chimpanzee-to-human liver transplantation in 1966; in 1992, he obtained patient survival for 70 days following a baboon liver transplant. With the advent of genetic engineering and cloning technologies, pigs are currently available with a number of different manipulations that protect their tissues from the human immune response, resulting in increasing pig graft survival in nonhuman primate models. Genetically modified pigs offer hope of a limitless supply of organs and cells for those in need of a transplant. PMID:22275786

  9. Cross Species Transcriptional Profiles Establish a Functional Portrait of Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Li, Huai; Liu, Ying; Shin, Soojung; Mattson, Mark P.; Rao, Mahendra S.; Zhan, Ming

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the regulatory mechanisms responsible for pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is critical for realizing their potential in medicine and science. Significant similarities exist among ESCs harvested from different species, yet major differences have also been observed. Here, by cross-species analysis of a large set of functional categories and all transcription factors and growth factors, we revealed conserved and divergent functional landscapes underlining fundamental and species-specific mechanisms that regulate ESC development. Global transcriptional trends derived from all expressed genes, instead of differentially expressed genes alone, were examined, allowing for a higher discriminating power in the functional portrait. We demonstrate that cross-species correlation of transcriptional changes that occur upon ESC differentiation is a powerful predictor of ESC-important biological pathways and functional cores within a pathway. Hundreds of functional modules, as defined by Gene Ontology, were associated with conserved expression patterns but bear no overt relationship to ESC development, suggestive of new mechanisms critical to ESC pluripotency. Yet other functional modules were not conserved; instead, they were significantly up-regulated in ESCs of either species, suggestive of species-specific regulation. The comparison of ESCs across species and between human ESCs and embryonal carcinoma stem cells (ECCs) suggest that while pluripotency as an essential function in multicellular organisms is conserved through evolution, mechanisms primed for differentiation are less conserved and contribute substantially to the differences among stem cells derived from different tissues or species. Our findings establish a basis for defining the “stemness” properties of ESCs from the perspective of functional conservation and variation. The data and analyses resulting from this study provide a framework for new hypotheses and research directions

  10. Serologic survey for cross-species pathogens in urban coyotes (Canis latrans), Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Malmlov, Ashley; Breck, Stewart; Fry, Tricia; Duncan, Colleen

    2014-10-01

    Abstract As coyotes (Canis latrans) adapt to living in urban environments, the opportunity for cross-species transmission of pathogens may increase. We investigated the prevalence of antibodies to pathogens that are either zoonotic or affect multiple animal species in urban coyotes in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, USA, in 2012. We assayed for antibodies to canine parvovirus-2, canine distemper virus, rabies virus, Toxoplasma gondii, Yersinia pestis, and serotypes of Leptospira interrogans. Overall, 84% of the animals had antibodies to canine parvovirus-2, 44% for canine distemper virus, 20% for T. gondii (IgG), 28% for Y. pestis, and 4% for L. interrogans serotype Grippotyphosa. No neutralizing antibodies were detected to rabies virus, T. gondii (IgM), or L. interrogans serotypes other than Grippotyphosa. With 88% of animals exposed to at least one pathogen, our results suggest that coyotes may serve as important reservoirs and sentinels for etiologic agents. PMID:25121408

  11. Hepatitis B virus lineages in mammalian hosts: Potential for bidirectional cross-species transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bonvicino, Cibele R; Moreira, Miguel A; Soares, Marcelo A

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a cosmopolitan infectious agent currently affecting over 350 million people worldwide, presently accounting for more than two billion infections. In addition to man, other hepatitis virus strains infect species of several mammalian families of the Primates, Rodentia and Chiroptera orders, in addition to birds. The mounting evidence of HBV infection in African, Asian and neotropical primates draws attention to the potential cross-species, zoonotic transmission of these viruses to man. Moreover, recent evidence also suggests the humans may also function as a source of viral infection to other mammals, particularly to domestic animals like poultry and swine. In this review, we list all evidence of HBV and HBV-like infection of nonhuman mammals and discuss their potential roles as donors or recipients of these viruses to humans and to other closely-related species. PMID:24976704

  12. Ketamine Suppresses the Ventral Striatal Response to Reward Anticipation: A Cross-Species Translational Neuroimaging Study.

    PubMed

    Francois, Jennifer; Grimm, Oliver; Schwarz, Adam J; Schweiger, Janina; Haller, Leila; Risterucci, Celine; Böhringer, Andreas; Zang, Zhenxiang; Tost, Heike; Gilmour, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Convergent evidence implicates regional neural responses to reward anticipation in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, where blunted ventral striatal responses to positive reward are observed in patients and at-risk populations. In vivo oxygen amperometry measurements in the ventral striatum in awake, behaving rats reveal reward-related tissue oxygen changes that closely parallel blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes observed in human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), suggesting that a cross-species approach targeting this mechanism might be feasible in psychopharmacology. The present study explored modulatory effects of acute, subanaesthetic doses of ketamine-a pharmacological model widely used in psychopharmacological research, both preclinically and clinically-on ventral striatum activity during performance of a reward anticipation task in both species, using fMRI in humans and in vivo oxygen amperometry in rats. In a region-of-interest analysis conducted following a cross-over placebo and ketamine study in human subjects, an attenuated ventral striatal response during reward anticipation was observed following ketamine relative to placebo during performance of a monetary incentive delay task. In rats, a comparable attenuation of ventral striatal signal was found after ketamine challenge, relative to vehicle, in response to a conditioned stimulus that predicted delivery of reward. This study provides the first data in both species demonstrating an attenuating effect of acute ketamine on reward-related ventral striatal (O2) and fMRI signals. These findings may help elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of the potential role of ketamine as a model for psychosis, show that cross-species pharmacological experiments targeting reward signaling are feasible, and suggest this phenotype as a promising translational biomarker for the development of novel compounds, assessment of disease status, and

  13. Competing endogenous RNA and interactome bioinformatic analyses on human telomerase.

    PubMed

    Arancio, Walter; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Genovese, Swonild Ilenia; Baiamonte, Concetta; Giordano, Carla

    2014-04-01

    We present a classic interactome bioinformatic analysis and a study on competing endogenous (ce) RNAs for hTERT. The hTERT gene codes for the catalytic subunit and limiting component of the human telomerase complex. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is essential for the integrity of telomeres. Telomere dysfunctions have been widely reported to be involved in aging, cancer, and cellular senescence. The hTERT gene network has been analyzed using the BioGRID interaction database (http://thebiogrid.org/) and related analysis tools such as Osprey (http://biodata.mshri.on.ca/osprey/servlet/Index) and GeneMANIA (http://genemania.org/). The network of interaction of hTERT transcripts has been further analyzed following the competing endogenous (ce) RNA hypotheses (messenger [m] RNAs cross-talk via micro [mi] RNAs) using the miRWalk database and tools (www.ma.uni-heidelberg.de/apps/zmf/mirwalk/). These analyses suggest a role for Akt, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), p70/p80 autoantigen, 14-3-3 proteins, and dynein in telomere functions. Roles for histone acetylation/deacetylation and proteoglycan metabolism are also proposed. PMID:24713059

  14. Interactomic and Pharmacological Insights on Human Sirt-1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankush; Gautam, Vasu; Costantini, Susan; Paladino, Antonella; Colonna, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Sirt-1 is defined as a nuclear protein involved in the molecular mechanisms of inflammation and neurodegeneration through the de-acetylation of many different substrates even if experimental data in mouse suggest both its cytoplasmatic presence and nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling upon oxidative stress. Since the experimental structure of human Sirt-1 has not yet been reported, we have modeled its 3D structure, highlighted that it is composed by four different structural regions: N-terminal region, allosteric site, catalytic core and C-terminal region, and underlined that the two terminal regions have high intrinsic disorder propensity and numerous putative phosphorylation sites. Many different papers report experimental studies related to its functional activators because Sirt-1 is implicated in various diseases and cancers. The aim of this article is (i) to present interactomic studies based human Sirt-1 to understand its most important functional relationships in the light of the gene–protein interactions that control major metabolic pathways and (ii) to show by docking studies how this protein binds some activator molecules in order to evidence structural determinants, physico-chemical features and those residues involved in the formation of complexes. PMID:22470339

  15. Examining the Interactome of Huperzine A by Magnetic Biopanning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Jinliang; Wei, Xiaohui; Sun, Ye; Qiu, Yangsheng; Gao, Guangwei; Wang, Peng; Xu, Yuhong

    2012-01-01

    Huperzine A is a bioactive compound derived from traditional Chinese medicine plant Qian Ceng Ta (Huperzia serrata), and was found to have multiple neuroprotective effects. In addition to being a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it was thought to act through other mechanisms such as antioxidation, antiapoptosis, etc. However, the molecular targets involved with these mechanisms were not identified. In this study, we attempted to exam the interactome of Huperzine A using a cDNA phage display library and also mammalian brain tissue extracts. The drugs were chemically linked on the surface of magnetic particles and the interactive phages or proteins were collected and analyzed. Among the various cDNA expressing phages selected, one was identified to encode the mitochondria NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1. Specific bindings between the drug and the target phages and target proteins were confirmed. Another enriched phage clone was identified as mitochondria ATP synthase, which was also panned out from the proteome of mouse brain tissue lysate. These data indicated the possible involvement of mitochondrial respiratory chain matrix enzymes in Huperzine A's pharmacological effects. Such involvement had been suggested by previous studies based on enzyme activity changes. Our data supported the new mechanism. Overall we demonstrated the feasibility of using magnetic biopanning as a simple and viable method for investigating the complex molecular mechanisms of bioactive molecules. PMID:22615909

  16. CTCF-Mediated Functional Chromatin Interactome in Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Handoko, Lusy; Xu, Han; Li, Guoliang; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chew, Elaine; Schnapp, Marie; Lee, Charlie Wah Heng; Ye, Chaopeng; Ping, Joanne Lim Hui; Mulawadi, Fabianus; Wong, Eleanor; Sheng, Jianpeng; Zhang, Yubo; Poh, Thompson; Chan, Chee Seng; Kunarso, Galih; Shahab, Atif; Bourque, Guillaume; Cacheux-Rataboul, Valere; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are viewed as functional organizations that orchestrate spatial and temporal gene regulation. CTCF, the most characterized insulator-binding protein, has been implicated as a key genome organizer. Yet, little is known about CTCF-associated higher order chromatin structures at a global scale. Here, we applied Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End-Tag sequencing to elucidate the CTCF-chromatin interactome in pluripotent cells. From this analysis, 1,480 cis and 336 trans interacting loci were identified with high reproducibility and precision. Associating these chromatin interaction loci with their underlying epigenetic states, promoter activities, enhancer binding and nuclear lamina occupancy, we uncovered five distinct chromatin domains that suggest potential new models of CTCF function in chromatin organization and transcriptional control. Specifically, CTCF interactions demarcate chromatin-nuclear membrane attachments and influence proper gene expression through extensive crosstalk between promoters and regulatory elements. This highly complex nuclear organization offers insights towards the unifying principles governing genome plasticity and function. PMID:21685913

  17. A comprehensive strategy to identify stoichiometric membrane protein interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Avanti; Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Duran, Charity; Hartzell, H. Criss; Faundez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous experimental approaches to identify the interaction networks of soluble proteins, but strategies for the identification of membrane protein interactomes remain limited. We discuss in detail the logic of an experimental design that led us to identify the interactome of a membrane protein of complex membrane topology, the calcium activated chloride channel Anoctamin 1/Tmem16a (Ano1). We used covalent chemical stabilizers of protein-protein interactions combined with magnetic bead immuno-affinity chromatography, quantitative SILAC mass-spectrometry and in silico network construction. This strategy led us to define a putative Ano1 interactome from which we selected key components for functional testing. We propose a combination of procedures to narrow down candidate proteins interacting with a membrane protein of interest for further functional studies. PMID:23676845

  18. Oxidative status interactome map: towards novel approaches in experiment planning, data analysis, diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zolotukhin, Peter; Kozlova, Yulia; Dovzhik, Anastasiya; Kovalenko, Konstantin; Kutsyn, Kseniya; Aleksandrova, Anzhela; Shkurat, Tatyana

    2013-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests an immense variety of processes associated with and aimed at producing reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species. Clinical studies implicate an enormous range of pathologies associated with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species metabolism deregulation, particularly oxidative stress. Recent advances in biochemistry, proteomics and molecular biology/biophysics of cells suggest oxidative stress to be an endpoint of complex dysregulation events of conjugated pathways consolidated under the term, proposed here, "oxidative status". The oxidative status concept, in order to allow for novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, requires elaboration of a new logic system comprehending all the features, versatility and complexity of cellular pro- and antioxidative components of different nature. We have developed a curated and regularly updated interactive interactome map of human cellular-level oxidative status allowing for systematization of the related most up-to-date experimental data. A total of more than 600 papers were selected for the initial creation of the map. The map comprises more than 300 individual factors with respective interactions, all subdivided hierarchically for logical analysis purposes. The pilot application of the interactome map suggested several points for further development of oxidative status-based technologies. PMID:23698602

  19. Obtaining Human Ischemic Stroke Gene Expression Biomarkers from Animal Models: A Cross-species Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cai, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the systematic altering of gene expression in human peripheral blood during the early stages of ischemic stroke, which suggests a new potential approach for the rapid diagnosis or prediction of stroke onset. Nevertheless, due to the difficulties of collecting human samples during proper disease stages, related studies are rather restricted. Many studies have instead been performed on manipulated animal models for investigating the regulation patterns of biomarkers during different stroke stages. An important inquiry is how well the findings of animal models can be replicated in human cases. Here, a method is proposed based on PageRank scores of miRNA-mRNA interaction network to select ischemic stroke biomarkers derived from rat brain samples, and biomarkers are validated with two human peripheral blood gene expression datasets. Hierarchical clustering results revealed that the achieved biomarkers clearly separate the blood gene expression of stroke patients and healthy people. Literature searches and functional analyses further validated the biological significance of these biomarkers. Compared to the traditional methods, such as differential expression, the proposed approach is more stable and accurate in detecting cross-species biomarkers with biological relevance, thereby suggesting an efficient approach of re-using gene biomarkers obtained from animal-model studies for human diseases. PMID:27407070

  20. Obtaining Human Ischemic Stroke Gene Expression Biomarkers from Animal Models: A Cross-species Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Cai, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the systematic altering of gene expression in human peripheral blood during the early stages of ischemic stroke, which suggests a new potential approach for the rapid diagnosis or prediction of stroke onset. Nevertheless, due to the difficulties of collecting human samples during proper disease stages, related studies are rather restricted. Many studies have instead been performed on manipulated animal models for investigating the regulation patterns of biomarkers during different stroke stages. An important inquiry is how well the findings of animal models can be replicated in human cases. Here, a method is proposed based on PageRank scores of miRNA-mRNA interaction network to select ischemic stroke biomarkers derived from rat brain samples, and biomarkers are validated with two human peripheral blood gene expression datasets. Hierarchical clustering results revealed that the achieved biomarkers clearly separate the blood gene expression of stroke patients and healthy people. Literature searches and functional analyses further validated the biological significance of these biomarkers. Compared to the traditional methods, such as differential expression, the proposed approach is more stable and accurate in detecting cross-species biomarkers with biological relevance, thereby suggesting an efficient approach of re-using gene biomarkers obtained from animal-model studies for human diseases. PMID:27407070

  1. Towards Establishment of a Rice Stress Response Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young-Su; Chern, Mawsheng; Bartley, Laura E.; Han, Muho; Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Insuk; Walia, Harkamal; Richter, Todd; Xu, Xia; Cao, Peijian; Bai, Wei; Ramanan, Rajeshwari; Amonpant, Fawn; Arul, Loganathan; Canlas, Patrick E.; Ruan, Randy; Park, Chang-Jin; Chen, Xuewei; Hwang, Sohyun; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is a staple food for more than half the world and a model for studies of monocotyledonous species, which include cereal crops and candidate bioenergy grasses. A major limitation of crop production is imposed by a suite of abiotic and biotic stresses resulting in 30%–60% yield losses globally each year. To elucidate stress response signaling networks, we constructed an interactome of 100 proteins by yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays around key regulators of the rice biotic and abiotic stress responses. We validated the interactome using protein–protein interaction (PPI) assays, co-expression of transcripts, and phenotypic analyses. Using this interactome-guided prediction and phenotype validation, we identified ten novel regulators of stress tolerance, including two from protein classes not previously known to function in stress responses. Several lines of evidence support cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress responses. The combination of focused interactome and systems analyses described here represents significant progress toward elucidating the molecular basis of traits of agronomic importance. PMID:21533176

  2. Evidence for network evolution in an arabidopsis interactome map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants have unique features that evolved in response to their environments and ecosystems. A full account of the complex cellular networks that underlie plant-specific functions is still missing. We describe a proteome-wide binary protein-protein interaction map for the interactome network of the pl...

  3. How and when should interactome-derived clusters be used to predict functional modules and protein function?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jimin; Singh, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Clustering of protein–protein interaction networks is one of the most common approaches for predicting functional modules, protein complexes and protein functions. But, how well does clustering perform at these tasks? Results: We develop a general framework to assess how well computationally derived clusters in physical interactomes overlap functional modules derived via the Gene Ontology (GO). Using this framework, we evaluate six diverse network clustering algorithms using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that (i) the performances of these algorithms can differ substantially when run on the same network and (ii) their relative performances change depending upon the topological characteristics of the network under consideration. For the specific task of function prediction in S.cerevisiae, we demonstrate that, surprisingly, a simple non-clustering guilt-by-association approach outperforms widely used clustering-based approaches that annotate a protein with the overrepresented biological process and cellular component terms in its cluster; this is true over the range of clustering algorithms considered. Further analysis parameterizes performance based on the number of annotated proteins, and suggests when clustering approaches should be used for interactome functional analyses. Overall our results suggest a re-examination of when and how clustering approaches should be applied to physical interactomes, and establishes guidelines by which novel clustering approaches for biological networks should be justified and evaluated with respect to functional analysis. Contact: msingh@cs.princeton.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19770263

  4. Bacterial Interactomes: Interacting Protein Partners Share Similar Function and Are Validated in Independent Assays More Frequently Than Previously Reported.

    PubMed

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara L; Liu, Nancy L; Juba, Thomas R; Reveco, Sonia A; Elias, Dwayne A; Prathapam, Ramadevi; He, Jennifer; Yang, Wenhong; Szakal, Evelin D; Liu, Haichuan; Singer, Mary E; Geller, Jil T; Lam, Bonita R; Saini, Avneesh; Trotter, Valentine V; Hall, Steven C; Fisher, Susan J; Brenner, Steven E; Chhabra, Swapnil R; Hazen, Terry C; Wall, Judy D; Witkowska, H Ewa; Biggin, Mark D; Chandonia, John-Marc; Butland, Gareth

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two-hybrid screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most of which are between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here, we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial yeast two-hybrid and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli Compared with the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller, are much less highly connected, and have significantly lower false discovery rates. In addition, our interactomes are much more enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays than the pairs reported in prior studies. Our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested. PMID:26873250

  5. The functional interactome of GSTP: A regulatory biomolecular network at the interface with the Nrf2 adaption response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Desirée; Galli, Francesco

    2016-04-15

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), and possibly other members of the subfamily of cytosolic GSTs, are increasingly proposed to have roles far beyond the classical GSH-dependent enzymatic detoxification of electrophilic metabolites and xenobiotics. Emerging evidence suggests that these are essential components of the redox sensing and signaling platform of cells. GSTP monomers physically interact with cellular proteins, such as other cytosolic GSTs, signaling kinases and the membrane peroxidase peroxiredoxin 6. Other interactions reported in literature include that with regulatory proteins such as Fanconi anemia complementation group C protein, transglutaminase 2 and several members of the keratin family of genes. Transcription factors downstream of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways, namely STAT3 and Nrf2, were recently identified to be further components of this interactome. Together these pieces of evidence suggest the existence of a regulatory biomolecular network in which GSTP represents a node of functional convergence and coordination of signaling and transcription proteins, namely the "GSTP interactome", associated with key cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the stress response. These aspects and the methodological approach to explore the cellular interactome(s) are discussed in this review paper. PMID:26922696

  6. Reference gene selection for cross-species and cross-ploidy level comparisons in Chrysanthemum spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibin; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of a (set of) stably expressed reference gene(s) is required to normalize transcription data. Polyploidy is very common in the plant kingdom, but it is not necessarily the case that a reference gene which works well at the diploid level will also work well at the polyploid level. Here, ten candidate reference genes are compared in the context of gene transcription in the genus Chrysanthemum. The robustness of some, but not all, of these was shown to be high across ploidy levels. MTP (metalloprotease) and ACTIN (actin) were the most stable in diploid and tetraploid C. nankingense, while PSAA (photosynthesis-related plastid gene representing photosystem I) and EF-1α (elongation factor-1α) were the most stable in tetraploid and hexaploid C. zawadskii. EF-1α and PGK (phosphoglycerate kinase) was the best combination for the complete set of four taxa. These results suggest that when making cross-species comparison of transcript abundance involving different ploidy levels, care needs to be taken in the selection of reference gene(s). PMID:25627791

  7. Human prion protein sequence elements impede cross-species chronic wasting disease transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Timothy D.; Jiang, Lin; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bett, Cyrus; Liu, Jun; Yang, Tom; Spraker, Terry R.; Castilla, Joaquín; Eisenberg, David; Kong, Qingzhong; Sigurdson, Christina J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of North American deer and elk and poses an unclear risk for transmission to humans. Human exposure to CWD occurs through hunting activities and consumption of venison from prion-infected animals. Although the amino acid residues of the prion protein (PrP) that prevent or permit human CWD infection are unknown, NMR-based structural studies suggest that the β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) may impact species barriers. Here we sought to define PrP sequence determinants that affect CWD transmission to humans. We engineered transgenic mice that express human PrP with four amino acid substitutions that result in expression of PrP with a β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) that exactly matches that of elk PrP. Compared with transgenic mice expressing unaltered human PrP, mice expressing the human-elk chimeric PrP were highly susceptible to elk and deer CWD prions but were concurrently less susceptible to human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. A systematic in vitro survey of amino acid differences between humans and cervids identified two additional residues that impacted CWD conversion of human PrP. This work identifies amino acids that constitute a substantial structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans and helps illuminate the molecular requirements for cross-species prion transmission. PMID:25705888

  8. Cross-species fertilization: the hamster egg receptor, Juno, binds the human sperm ligand, Izumo1.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J

    2015-02-01

    Fertilization is the culminating event in sexual reproduction and requires the recognition and fusion of the haploid sperm and egg to form a new diploid organism. Specificity in these recognition events is one reason why sperm and eggs from different species are not normally compatible. One notable exception is the unusual ability of zona-free eggs from the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) to recognize and fuse with human sperm, a phenomenon that has been exploited to assess sperm quality in assisted fertility treatments. Following our recent finding that the interaction between the sperm and egg recognition receptors Izumo1 and Juno is essential for fertilization, we now demonstrate concordance between the ability of Izumo1 and Juno from different species to interact, and the ability of their isolated gametes to cross-fertilize each other in vitro. In particular, we show that Juno from the golden hamster can directly interact with human Izumo1. These data suggest that the interaction between Izumo1 and Juno plays an important role in cross-species gamete recognition, and may inform the development of improved prognostic tests that do not require the use of animals to guide the most appropriate fertility treatment for infertile couples. PMID:25533103

  9. Cross-species fertilization: the hamster egg receptor, Juno, binds the human sperm ligand, Izumo1

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization is the culminating event in sexual reproduction and requires the recognition and fusion of the haploid sperm and egg to form a new diploid organism. Specificity in these recognition events is one reason why sperm and eggs from different species are not normally compatible. One notable exception is the unusual ability of zona-free eggs from the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) to recognize and fuse with human sperm, a phenomenon that has been exploited to assess sperm quality in assisted fertility treatments. Following our recent finding that the interaction between the sperm and egg recognition receptors Izumo1 and Juno is essential for fertilization, we now demonstrate concordance between the ability of Izumo1 and Juno from different species to interact, and the ability of their isolated gametes to cross-fertilize each other in vitro. In particular, we show that Juno from the golden hamster can directly interact with human Izumo1. These data suggest that the interaction between Izumo1 and Juno plays an important role in cross-species gamete recognition, and may inform the development of improved prognostic tests that do not require the use of animals to guide the most appropriate fertility treatment for infertile couples. PMID:25533103

  10. Crowd Sourcing a New Paradigm for Interactome Driven Drug Target Identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rohira, Harsha; Bhat, Ashwini G.; Passi, Anurag; Mukherjee, Keya; Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Kumar, Vikas; Arora, Anshula; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Subramanian, Ahalyaa; Venkatachalam, Aparna; S, Gayathri; Raj, Sweety; Chitra, Vijaya; Verma, Kaveri; Zaheer, Salman; J, Balaganesh; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Razeeth, Mohammed; Raja, Ilamathi; Thandapani, Madhumohan; Mevada, Vishal; Soni, Raviraj; Rana, Shruti; Ramanna, Girish Muthagadhalli; Raghavan, Swetha; Subramanya, Sunil N.; Kholia, Trupti; Patel, Rajesh; Bhavnani, Varsha; Chiranjeevi, Lakavath; Sengupta, Soumi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Atray, Naresh; Gandhi, Swati; Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Nisthar, Shefin; Anurag, Meenakshi; Sharma, Pratibha; Hasija, Yasha; Dash, Debasis; Sharma, Arun; Scaria, Vinod; Thomas, Zakir; Chandra, Nagasuma; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative ‘Connect to Decode’ (C2D) to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed ‘interactome pathway’ (IPW), encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach. PMID:22808064

  11. Mapping RNA–RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tri C.; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H.; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA–RNA interactions have to rely on an ‘anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA–RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA–RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA–FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA–RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  12. Mapping RNA-RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tri C; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA-RNA interactions have to rely on an 'anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA-RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA-RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA-FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA-RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  13. Ultra-deep sequencing of intra-host rabies virus populations during cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Borucki, Monica K; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Lao, Victoria; Vanier, Gilda; Wadford, Debra A; Messenger, Sharon; Allen, Jonathan E

    2013-11-01

    One of the hurdles to understanding the role of viral quasispecies in RNA virus cross-species transmission (CST) events is the need to analyze a densely sampled outbreak using deep sequencing in order to measure the amount of mutation occurring on a small time scale. In 2009, the California Department of Public Health reported a dramatic increase (350) in the number of gray foxes infected with a rabies virus variant for which striped skunks serve as a reservoir host in Humboldt County. To better understand the evolution of rabies, deep-sequencing was applied to 40 unpassaged rabies virus samples from the Humboldt outbreak. For each sample, approximately 11 kb of the 12 kb genome was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Average coverage was 17,448 and this allowed characterization of the rabies virus population present in each sample at unprecedented depths. Phylogenetic analysis of the consensus sequence data demonstrated that samples clustered according to date (1995 vs. 2009) and geographic location (northern vs. southern). A single amino acid change in the G protein distinguished a subset of northern foxes from a haplotype present in both foxes and skunks, suggesting this mutation may have played a role in the observed increased transmission among foxes in this region. Deep-sequencing data indicated that many genetic changes associated with the CST event occurred prior to 2009 since several nonsynonymous mutations that were present in the consensus sequences of skunk and fox rabies samples obtained from 20032010 were present at the sub-consensus level (as rare variants in the viral population) in skunk and fox samples from 1995. These results suggest that analysis of rare variants within a viral population may yield clues to ancestral genomes and identify rare variants that have the potential to be selected for if environment conditions change. PMID:24278493

  14. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  15. Ultra-Deep Sequencing of Intra-host Rabies Virus Populations during Cross-species Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Borucki, Monica K.; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Lao, Victoria; Vanier, Gilda; Wadford, Debra A.; Messenger, Sharon; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2013-01-01

    One of the hurdles to understanding the role of viral quasispecies in RNA virus cross-species transmission (CST) events is the need to analyze a densely sampled outbreak using deep sequencing in order to measure the amount of mutation occurring on a small time scale. In 2009, the California Department of Public Health reported a dramatic increase (350) in the number of gray foxes infected with a rabies virus variant for which striped skunks serve as a reservoir host in Humboldt County. To better understand the evolution of rabies, deep-sequencing was applied to 40 unpassaged rabies virus samples from the Humboldt outbreak. For each sample, approximately 11 kb of the 12 kb genome was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Average coverage was 17,448 and this allowed characterization of the rabies virus population present in each sample at unprecedented depths. Phylogenetic analysis of the consensus sequence data demonstrated that samples clustered according to date (1995 vs. 2009) and geographic location (northern vs. southern). A single amino acid change in the G protein distinguished a subset of northern foxes from a haplotype present in both foxes and skunks, suggesting this mutation may have played a role in the observed increased transmission among foxes in this region. Deep-sequencing data indicated that many genetic changes associated with the CST event occurred prior to 2009 since several nonsynonymous mutations that were present in the consensus sequences of skunk and fox rabies samples obtained from 20032010 were present at the sub-consensus level (as rare variants in the viral population) in skunk and fox samples from 1995. These results suggest that analysis of rare variants within a viral population may yield clues to ancestral genomes and identify rare variants that have the potential to be selected for if environment conditions change. PMID:24278493

  16. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  17. Charting the NF-κB pathway interactome map.

    PubMed

    Tieri, Paolo; Termanini, Alberto; Bellavista, Elena; Salvioli, Stefano; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is part of a complex physiological response to harmful stimuli and pathogenic stress. The five components of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) family are prominent mediators of inflammation, acting as key transcriptional regulators of hundreds of genes. Several signaling pathways activated by diverse stimuli converge on NF-κB activation, resulting in a regulatory system characterized by high complexity. It is increasingly recognized that the number of components that impinges upon phenotypic outcomes of signal transduction pathways may be higher than those taken into consideration from canonical pathway representations. Scope of the present analysis is to provide a wider, systemic picture of the NF-κB signaling system. Data from different sources such as literature, functional enrichment web resources, protein-protein interaction and pathway databases have been gathered, curated, integrated and analyzed in order to reconstruct a single, comprehensive picture of the proteins that interact with, and participate to the NF-κB activation system. Such a reconstruction shows that the NF-κB interactome is substantially different in quantity and quality of components with respect to canonical representations. The analysis highlights that several neglected but topologically central proteins may play a role in the activation of NF-κB mediated responses. Moreover the interactome structure fits with the characteristics of a bow tie architecture. This interactome is intended as an open network resource available for further development, refinement and analysis. PMID:22403694

  18. Charting the NF-κB Pathway Interactome Map

    PubMed Central

    Tieri, Paolo; Termanini, Alberto; Bellavista, Elena; Salvioli, Stefano; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is part of a complex physiological response to harmful stimuli and pathogenic stress. The five components of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) family are prominent mediators of inflammation, acting as key transcriptional regulators of hundreds of genes. Several signaling pathways activated by diverse stimuli converge on NF-κB activation, resulting in a regulatory system characterized by high complexity. It is increasingly recognized that the number of components that impinges upon phenotypic outcomes of signal transduction pathways may be higher than those taken into consideration from canonical pathway representations. Scope of the present analysis is to provide a wider, systemic picture of the NF-κB signaling system. Data from different sources such as literature, functional enrichment web resources, protein-protein interaction and pathway databases have been gathered, curated, integrated and analyzed in order to reconstruct a single, comprehensive picture of the proteins that interact with, and participate to the NF-κB activation system. Such a reconstruction shows that the NF-κB interactome is substantially different in quantity and quality of components with respect to canonical representations. The analysis highlights that several neglected but topologically central proteins may play a role in the activation of NF-κB mediated responses. Moreover the interactome structure fits with the characteristics of a bow tie architecture. This interactome is intended as an open network resource available for further development, refinement and analysis. PMID:22403694

  19. Schizophrenia interactome with 504 novel protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Thahir, Mohamed; Handen, Adam; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Sweet, Robert A; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Loscher, Christine E; Bauer, Eileen M; Chaparala, Srilakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia (GWAS) have revealed the role of rare and common genetic variants, but the functional effects of the risk variants remain to be understood. Protein interactome-based studies can facilitate the study of molecular mechanisms by which the risk genes relate to schizophrenia (SZ) genesis, but protein–protein interactions (PPIs) are unknown for many of the liability genes. We developed a computational model to discover PPIs, which is found to be highly accurate according to computational evaluations and experimental validations of selected PPIs. We present here, 365 novel PPIs of liability genes identified by the SZ Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). Seventeen genes that had no previously known interactions have 57 novel interactions by our method. Among the new interactors are 19 drug targets that are targeted by 130 drugs. In addition, we computed 147 novel PPIs of 25 candidate genes investigated in the pre-GWAS era. While there is little overlap between the GWAS genes and the pre-GWAS genes, the interactomes reveal that they largely belong to the same pathways, thus reconciling the apparent disparities between the GWAS and prior gene association studies. The interactome including 504 novel PPIs overall, could motivate other systems biology studies and trials with repurposed drugs. The PPIs are made available on a webserver, called Schizo-Pi at http://severus.dbmi.pitt.edu/schizo-pi with advanced search capabilities. PMID:27336055

  20. Proteomic data on the nuclear interactome of human MCM9

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Traver, Sabine; Coulombe, Philippe; Peiffer, Isabelle; Kitzmann, Magali; Latreille, Daniel; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    We present data relating to the interactome of MCM9 from the nuclei of human cells. MCM9 belongs to the AAA+ superfamily, and contains an MCM domain and motifs that may confer DNA helicase activity. MCM9 has been shown to bind MCM8, and has been implicated in DNA replication and homologous recombination. However, the mechanistic basis of MCM9’s role in DNA repair is poorly understood, and proteins with which it interacts were hitherto unknown. We performed tandem affinity purification of MCM9 and its interacting proteins from nuclear extracts of human cells, followed by proteomic analysis, thereby generating a set of mass spectrometry data corresponding to the MCM9 interactome [1]. The proteomic data set comprises 29 mass spectrometry RAW files, deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium, and freely available from the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000212. A set of 22 interacting proteins identified from the proteomic data was used to create an MCM9-centered interactive network diagram, using the Cytoscape program. These data allow the scientific community to access, mine and explore the human nuclear MCM9 interactome. PMID:26870752

  1. Analysis of the interactome of ribosomal protein S19 mutants.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Imperlini, Esther; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Ingenito, Laura; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2014-10-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia, characterized by defective erythroid progenitor maturation, is caused in one-fourth of cases by mutations of ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19), which is a component of the ribosomal 40S subunit. Our previous work described proteins interacting with RPS19 with the aim to determine its functions. Here, two RPS19 mutants, R62W and R101H, have been selected to compare their interactomes versus the wild-type protein one, using the same functional proteomic approach that we employed to characterize RPS19 interactome. Mutations R62W and R101H impair RPS19 ability to associate with the ribosome. Results presented in this paper highlight the striking differences between the interactomes of wild-type and mutant RPS19 proteins. In particular, mutations abolish interactions with proteins having splicing, translational and helicase activity, thus confirming the role of RPS19 in RNA processing/metabolism and translational control. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000640 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000640). PMID:25069755

  2. Schizophrenia interactome with 504 novel protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Thahir, Mohamed; Handen, Adam; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Sweet, Robert A; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Loscher, Christine E; Bauer, Eileen M; Chaparala, Srilakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia (GWAS) have revealed the role of rare and common genetic variants, but the functional effects of the risk variants remain to be understood. Protein interactome-based studies can facilitate the study of molecular mechanisms by which the risk genes relate to schizophrenia (SZ) genesis, but protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are unknown for many of the liability genes. We developed a computational model to discover PPIs, which is found to be highly accurate according to computational evaluations and experimental validations of selected PPIs. We present here, 365 novel PPIs of liability genes identified by the SZ Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). Seventeen genes that had no previously known interactions have 57 novel interactions by our method. Among the new interactors are 19 drug targets that are targeted by 130 drugs. In addition, we computed 147 novel PPIs of 25 candidate genes investigated in the pre-GWAS era. While there is little overlap between the GWAS genes and the pre-GWAS genes, the interactomes reveal that they largely belong to the same pathways, thus reconciling the apparent disparities between the GWAS and prior gene association studies. The interactome including 504 novel PPIs overall, could motivate other systems biology studies and trials with repurposed drugs. The PPIs are made available on a webserver, called Schizo-Pi at http://severus.dbmi.pitt.edu/schizo-pi with advanced search capabilities. PMID:27336055

  3. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, David G; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  4. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  5. Genetic and experimental evidence for cross-species infection by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, X J; Halbur, P G; Shapiro, M S; Govindarajan, S; Bruna, J D; Mushahwar, I K; Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U

    1998-12-01

    Prior to the recent discovery of the swine hepatitis E virus (swine HEV) in pigs from the midwestern United States, HEV was not considered endemic to this country. Since swine HEV is antigenically and genetically related to human strains of HEV, it was important to characterize this new virus further. The infectivity titer of a pool of swine HEV in pigs was determined in order to prepare a standardized reagent and to evaluate the dose response in pigs. Although the sequence of swine HEV varied extensively from those of most human strains of HEV, it was very closely related to the two strains of human HEV (US-1 and US-2) isolated in the United States. The U.S. strains which were recently recovered from two patients with clinical hepatitis E in the United States shared >/=97% amino acid identity with swine HEV in open reading frames 1 and 2. Phylogenetic analyses of different regions of the genome revealed that swine HEV and the U.S. strains grouped together and formed a distinct branch. These results suggested that swine HEV may infect humans. When we inoculated rhesus monkeys and a chimpanzee, experimental surrogates of humans, with swine HEV, the primates became infected. Furthermore, in a reciprocal experiment, specific-pathogen-free pigs were experimentally infected with the US-2 strain of human HEV that is genetically similar to swine HEV. These results provided experimental evidence for cross-species infection by the swine virus. Thus, humans appear to be at risk of infection with swine HEV or closely related viruses. PMID:9811705

  6. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  7. CROSS-SPECIES EVALUATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF LEAD (Pb) on MATURATION AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a cross-species evaluation conducted in support of the review of the US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Lead (Pb), findings from epidemiologic, toxicological and ecological disciplines were used in a weight of evidence approach to evaluate reproductive a...

  8. Cross-species gene-family fluctuations reveal the dynamics of horizontal transfers

    PubMed Central

    Grilli, Jacopo; Romano, Mariacristina; Bassetti, Federico; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotes vary their protein repertoire mainly through horizontal transfer and gene loss. To elucidate the links between these processes and the cross-species gene-family statistics, we perform a large-scale data analysis of the cross-species variability of gene-family abundance (the number of members of the family found on a given genome). We find that abundance fluctuations are related to the rate of horizontal transfers. This is rationalized by a minimal theoretical model, which predicts this link. The families that are not captured by the model show abundance profiles that are markedly peaked around a mean value, possibly because of specific abundance selection. Based on these results, we define an abundance variability index that captures a family's evolutionary behavior (and thus some of its relevant functional properties) purely based on its cross-species abundance fluctuations. Analysis and model, combined, show a quantitative link between cross-species family abundance statistics and horizontal transfer dynamics, which can be used to analyze genome ‘flux’. Groups of families with different values of the abundance variability index correspond to genome sub-parts having different plasticity in terms of the level of horizontal exchange allowed by natural selection. PMID:24829449

  9. Identification of Simple Sequence Repeat Biomarkers through Cross-Species Comparison in a Tag Cloud Representation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are not only applied as genetic markers in evolutionary studies but they also play an important role in gene regulatory activities. Efficient identification of conserved and exclusive SSRs through cross-species comparison is helpful for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and associations between specific gene groups and SSR motifs. In this paper, we developed an online cross-species comparative system and integrated it with a tag cloud visualization technique for identifying potential SSR biomarkers within fourteen frequently used model species. Ultraconserved or exclusive SSRs among cross-species orthologous genes could be effectively retrieved and displayed through a friendly interface design. Four different types of testing cases were applied to demonstrate and verify the retrieved SSR biomarker candidates. Through statistical analysis and enhanced tag cloud representation on defined functional related genes and cross-species clusters, the proposed system can correctly represent the patterns, loci, colors, and sizes of identified SSRs in accordance with gene functions, pattern qualities, and conserved characteristics among species. PMID:24800246

  10. Interactome of the hepatitis C virus: Literature mining with ANDSystem.

    PubMed

    Saik, Olga V; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Demenkov, Pavel S; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    A study of the molecular genetics mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions is of paramount importance in developing drugs against viral diseases. Currently, the literature contains a huge amount of information that describes interactions between HCV and human proteins. In addition, there are many factual databases that contain experimentally verified data on HCV-host interactions. The sources of such data are the original data along with the data manually extracted from the literature. However, the manual analysis of scientific publications is time consuming and, because of this, databases created with such an approach often do not have complete information. One of the most promising methods to provide actualisation and completeness of information is text mining. Here, with the use of a previously developed method by the authors using ANDSystem, an automated extraction of information on the interactions between HCV and human proteins was conducted. As a data source for the text mining approach, PubMed abstracts and full text articles were used. Additionally, external factual databases were analyzed. On the basis of this analysis, a special version of ANDSystem, extended with the HCV interactome, was created. The HCV interactome contains information about the interactions between 969 human and 11 HCV proteins. Among the 969 proteins, 153 'new' proteins were found not previously referred to in any external databases of protein-protein interactions for HCV-host interactions. Thus, the extended ANDSystem possesses a more comprehensive detailing of HCV-host interactions versus other existing databases. It was interesting that HCV proteins more preferably interact with human proteins that were already involved in a large number of protein-protein interactions as well as those associated with many diseases. Among human proteins of the HCV interactome, there were a large number of proteins regulated by microRNAs. It turned out that the results obtained for protein

  11. A predicted protein interactome identifies conserved global networks and disease resistance subnetworks in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An interactome is the genome-wide roadmap of protein-protein interactions that occur within an organism. Interactomes for humans, the fruit fly, and now plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa have been generated using high throughput experimental methods. It is possible to use these ...

  12. AIM: A comprehensive Arabidopsis Interactome Module database and related interologs in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems biology analysis of protein modules is important for understanding the functional relationships between proteins in the interactome. Here, we present a comprehensive database named AIM for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interactome modules. The database contains almost 250,000 modules th...

  13. Cross-Species Transmission of Simian Foamy Virus to Humans in Rural Gabon, Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Caron, Mélanie; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Telfer, Paul; Marx, Preston; Saïb, Ali; Leroy, Eric; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Gessain, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize simian foamy retroviruses (SFVs) in wild-born nonhuman primates (NHPs) in Gabon and to investigate cross-species transmission to humans, we obtained 497 NHP samples, composed of 286 blood and 211 tissue (bush meat) samples. Anti-SFV antibodies were found in 31 of 286 plasma samples (10.5%). The integrase gene sequence was found in 38/497 samples, including both blood and tissue samples, with novel SFVs in several Cercopithecus species. Of the 78 humans, mostly hunters, who had been bitten or scratched by NHPs, 19 were SFV seropositive, with 15 cases confirmed by PCR. All but one were infected with ape SFV. We thus found novel SFV strains in NHPs in Gabon and high cross-species transmission of SFVs from gorilla bites. PMID:22072747

  14. The ReproGenomics Viewer: an integrative cross-species toolbox for the reproductive science community

    PubMed Central

    Darde, Thomas A.; Sallou, Olivier; Becker, Emmanuelle; Evrard, Bertrand; Monjeaud, Cyril; Le Bras, Yvan; Jégou, Bernard; Collin, Olivier; Rolland, Antoine D.; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of the ReproGenomics Viewer (RGV), a multi- and cross-species working environment for the visualization, mining and comparison of published omics data sets for the reproductive science community. The system currently embeds 15 published data sets related to gametogenesis from nine model organisms. Data sets have been curated and conveniently organized into broad categories including biological topics, technologies, species and publications. RGV's modular design for both organisms and genomic tools enables users to upload and compare their data with that from the data sets embedded in the system in a cross-species manner. The RGV is freely available at http://rgv.genouest.org. PMID:25883147

  15. Cross-Species Network Analysis Uncovers Conserved Nitrogen-Regulated Network Modules in Rice.

    PubMed

    Obertello, Mariana; Shrivastava, Stuti; Katari, Manpreet S; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we used a cross-species network approach to uncover nitrogen (N)-regulated network modules conserved across a model and a crop species. By translating gene network knowledge from the data-rich model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to a crop, rice (Oryza sativa), we identified evolutionarily conserved N-regulatory modules as targets for translational studies to improve N use efficiency in transgenic plants. To uncover such conserved N-regulatory network modules, we first generated an N-regulatory network based solely on rice transcriptome and gene interaction data. Next, we enhanced the network knowledge in the rice N-regulatory network using transcriptome and gene interaction data from Arabidopsis and new data from Arabidopsis and rice plants exposed to the same N treatment conditions. This cross-species network analysis uncovered a set of N-regulated transcription factors (TFs) predicted to target the same genes and network modules in both species. Supernode analysis of the TFs and their targets in these conserved network modules uncovered genes directly related to N use (e.g. N assimilation) and to other shared biological processes indirectly related to N. This cross-species network approach was validated with members of two TF families in the supernode network, BASIC-LEUCINE ZIPPER TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1-TGA and HYPERSENSITIVITY TO LOW PI-ELICITED PRIMARY ROOT SHORTENING1 (HRS1)/HRS1 Homolog family, which have recently been experimentally validated to mediate the N response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26045464

  16. A portable expression resource for engineering cross-species genetic circuits and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Manish; Salis, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic circuits and metabolic pathways can be reengineered to allow organisms to process signals and manufacture useful chemicals. However, their functions currently rely on organism-specific regulatory parts, fragmenting synthetic biology and metabolic engineering into host-specific domains. To unify efforts, here we have engineered a cross-species expression resource that enables circuits and pathways to reuse the same genetic parts, while functioning similarly across diverse organisms. Our engineered system combines mixed feedback control loops and cross-species translation signals to autonomously self-regulate expression of an orthogonal polymerase without host-specific promoters, achieving nontoxic and tuneable gene expression in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Combining 50 characterized system variants with mechanistic modelling, we show how the cross-species expression resource's dynamics, capacity and toxicity are controlled by the control loops' architecture and feedback strengths. We also demonstrate one application of the resource by reusing the same genetic parts to express a biosynthesis pathway in both model and non-model hosts. PMID:26184393

  17. A portable expression resource for engineering cross-species genetic circuits and pathways.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Manish; Salis, Howard M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic circuits and metabolic pathways can be reengineered to allow organisms to process signals and manufacture useful chemicals. However, their functions currently rely on organism-specific regulatory parts, fragmenting synthetic biology and metabolic engineering into host-specific domains. To unify efforts, here we have engineered a cross-species expression resource that enables circuits and pathways to reuse the same genetic parts, while functioning similarly across diverse organisms. Our engineered system combines mixed feedback control loops and cross-species translation signals to autonomously self-regulate expression of an orthogonal polymerase without host-specific promoters, achieving nontoxic and tuneable gene expression in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Combining 50 characterized system variants with mechanistic modelling, we show how the cross-species expression resource's dynamics, capacity and toxicity are controlled by the control loops' architecture and feedback strengths. We also demonstrate one application of the resource by reusing the same genetic parts to express a biosynthesis pathway in both model and non-model hosts. PMID:26184393

  18. Initial description of a quantitative, cross-species (chimpanzee-human) social responsiveness measure

    PubMed Central

    Marrus, Natasha; Faughn, Carley; Shuman, Jeremy; Petersen, Steve; Constantino, John; Povinelli, Daniel; Pruett, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Comparative studies of social responsiveness, an ability that is impaired in autistic spectrum disorders, can inform our understanding of both autism and the cognitive architecture of social behavior. Because there is no existing quantitative measure of social responsiveness in chimpanzees, we generated a quantitative, cross-species (human-chimpanzee) social responsiveness measure. Method We translated the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), an instrument that quantifies human social responsiveness, into an analogous instrument for chimpanzees. We then retranslated this "Chimp SRS" into a human "Cross-Species SRS" (XSRS). We evaluated three groups of chimpanzees (n=29) with the Chimp SRS and typical and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) human children (n=20) with the XSRS. Results The Chimp SRS demonstrated strong inter-rater reliability at the three sites (ranges for individual ICCs: .534–.866 and mean ICCs: .851–.970). As has been observed in humans, exploratory principal components analysis of Chimp SRS scores supports a single factor underlying chimpanzee social responsiveness. Human subjects' XSRS scores were fully concordant with their SRS scores (r=.976, p=.001) and distinguished appropriately between typical and ASD subjects. One chimpanzee known for inappropriate social behavior displayed a significantly higher score than all other chimpanzees at its site, demonstrating the scale's ability to detect impaired social responsiveness in chimpanzees. Conclusion Our initial cross-species social responsiveness scale proved reliable and discriminated differences in social responsiveness across (in a relative sense) and within (in a more objectively quantifiable manner) humans and chimpanzees. PMID:21515200

  19. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-09-15

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy.

  20. Cross-Species Network Analysis Uncovers Conserved Nitrogen-Regulated Network Modules in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Obertello, Mariana; Shrivastava, Stuti; Katari, Manpreet S.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used a cross-species network approach to uncover nitrogen (N)-regulated network modules conserved across a model and a crop species. By translating gene network knowledge from the data-rich model Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to a crop, rice (Oryza sativa), we identified evolutionarily conserved N-regulatory modules as targets for translational studies to improve N use efficiency in transgenic plants. To uncover such conserved N-regulatory network modules, we first generated an N-regulatory network based solely on rice transcriptome and gene interaction data. Next, we enhanced the network knowledge in the rice N-regulatory network using transcriptome and gene interaction data from Arabidopsis and new data from Arabidopsis and rice plants exposed to the same N treatment conditions. This cross-species network analysis uncovered a set of N-regulated transcription factors (TFs) predicted to target the same genes and network modules in both species. Supernode analysis of the TFs and their targets in these conserved network modules uncovered genes directly related to N use (e.g. N assimilation) and to other shared biological processes indirectly related to N. This cross-species network approach was validated with members of two TF families in the supernode network, BASIC-LEUCINE ZIPPER TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1-TGA and HYPERSENSITIVITY TO LOW PI-ELICITED PRIMARY ROOT SHORTENING1 (HRS1)/HRS1 Homolog family, which have recently been experimentally validated to mediate the N response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26045464

  1. A cross-modal, cross-species comparison of connectivity measures in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Reid, Andrew T; Lewis, John; Bezgin, Gleb; Khundrakpam, Budhachandra; Eickhoff, Simon B; McIntosh, Anthony R; Bellec, Pierre; Evans, Alan C

    2016-01-15

    In systems neuroscience, the term "connectivity" has been defined in numerous ways, according to the particular empirical modality from which it is derived. Due to large differences in the phenomena measured by these modalities, the assumptions necessary to make inferences about axonal connections, and the limitations accompanying each, brain connectivity remains an elusive concept. Despite this, only a handful of studies have directly compared connectivity as inferred from multiple modalities, and there remains much ambiguity over what the term is actually referring to as a biological construct. Here, we perform a direct comparison based on the high-resolution and high-contrast Enhanced Nathan Klein Institute (NKI) Rockland Sample neuroimaging data set, and the CoCoMac database of tract tracing studies. We compare four types of commonly-used primate connectivity analyses: tract tracing experiments, compiled in CoCoMac; group-wise correlation of cortical thickness; tractographic networks computed from diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI); and correlational networks obtained from resting-state BOLD (fMRI). We find generally poor correspondence between all four modalities, in terms of correlated edge weights, binarized comparisons of thresholded networks, and clustering patterns. fMRI and DWI had the best agreement, followed by DWI and CoCoMac, while other comparisons showed striking divergence. Networks had the best correspondence for local ipsilateral and homotopic contralateral connections, and the worst correspondence for long-range and heterotopic contralateral connections. k-Means clustering highlighted the lowest cross-modal and cross-species consensus in lateral and medial temporal lobes, anterior cingulate, and the temporoparietal junction. Comparing the NKI results to those of the lower resolution/contrast International Consortium for Brain Imaging (ICBM) dataset, we find that the relative pattern of intermodal relationships is preserved, but the correspondence

  2. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present ‘serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)–RNA–protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA–RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs. PMID:27040163

  3. Evolution of protein interactions: from interactomes to interfaces.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphael

    2014-07-15

    Protein-protein interactions lie at the heart of most cellular processes. Many experimental and computational studies aim to deepen our understanding of these interactions and improve our capacity to predict them. In this respect, the evolutionary perspective is most interesting, since the preservation of structure and function puts constraints on the evolution of proteins and their interactions. However, uncovering these constraints remains a challenge, and the description and detection of evolutionary signals in protein-protein interactions is currently a very active field of research. Here, we review recent works dissecting the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction evolution and exploring how to use evolutionary information to predict interactions, both at the global level of the interactome and at the detailed level of protein-protein interfaces. We first present to what extent protein-protein interactions are found to be conserved within interactomes and which properties can influence their conservation. We then discuss the evolutionary and co-evolutionary pressures applied on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we describe how the computational prediction of interfaces can benefit from evolutionary inputs. PMID:24853495

  4. Dissecting noncoding and pathogen RNA–protein interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A.; Martin, Lance; Spitale, Robert C.; Do, Brian T.; Sagan, Selena M.; Zarnegar, Brian; Qu, Kun; Khavari, Paul A.; Quake, Stephen R.; Sarnow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA–protein interactions are central to biological regulation. Cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP)-seq is a powerful tool for genome-wide interrogation of RNA–protein interactomes, but current CLIP methods are limited by challenging biochemical steps and fail to detect many classes of noncoding and nonhuman RNAs. Here we present FAST-iCLIP, an integrated pipeline with improved CLIP biochemistry and an automated informatic pipeline for comprehensive analysis across protein coding, noncoding, repetitive, retroviral, and nonhuman transcriptomes. FAST-iCLIP of Poly-C binding protein 2 (PCBP2) showed that PCBP2-bound CU-rich motifs in different topologies to recognize mRNAs and noncoding RNAs with distinct biological functions. FAST-iCLIP of PCBP2 in hepatitis C virus-infected cells enabled a joint analysis of the PCBP2 interactome with host and viral RNAs and their interplay. These results show that FAST-iCLIP can be used to rapidly discover and decipher mechanisms of RNA–protein recognition across the diversity of human and pathogen RNAs. PMID:25411354

  5. HIV–host interactome revealed directly from infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Greco, Todd M.; Mohammed, Kevin D.; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P.; Chait, Brian T.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen–host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27375898

  6. HIV-host interactome revealed directly from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y; Greco, Todd M; Mohammed, Kevin D; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M; Cristea, Ileana M; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T; Muesing, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen-host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27572969

  7. Bacterial interactomes: Interacting protein partners share similar function and are validated in independent assays more frequently than previously reported.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara; Liu, Nancy L.; Juba, Thomas R.; Elias, Dwayne A; Reveco, Sonia A.; Prathapam, Ramadevi; He, Jennifer; Yang, Wenhong; et al

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification – mass-spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial Y2H and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli. Compared to the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller; are much less highly connected; have significantly lower false discovery rates; and are much moremore » enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays. Lastly, our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested.« less

  8. Frequent cross-species transmission of parvoviruses among diverse carnivore hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species.

  9. Frequent Cross-Species Transmission of Parvoviruses among Diverse Carnivore Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species. PMID:23221559

  10. Frequent cross-species transmission of parvoviruses among diverse carnivore hosts.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Kohler, Dennis J; Fox, Karen A; Brown, Justin D; Gerhold, Richard W; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I; Dubovi, Edward J; Parrish, Colin R; Holmes, Edward C

    2013-02-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus ("FPV-like") or canine parvovirus ("CPV-like"). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species. PMID:23221559

  11. Functional proteomic and interactome analysis of proteins associated with beef tenderness in angus cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef is a source of high quality protein for the human population, and beef tenderness has significant influence on beef palatability, consumer expectation and industry profitability. To further elucidate the factors affecting beef tenderness, functional proteomics and bioinformatics interactome ana...

  12. A meta-analysis to evaluate the cellular processes regulated by the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed estrogen receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Joana; Amado, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the proteins complexes that regulate ERα subcellular localization and activity is still an open question in breast cancer biology. Identification of such complexes will help understand development of endocrine resistance in ER+ breast cancer. Mass spectrometry (MS) has allowed comprehensive analysis of the ERα interactome. We have compared six published works analyzing the ERα interactome of MCF-7 and HeLa cells in order to identify a shared or different pathway-related fingerprint. Overall, 806 ERα interacting proteins were identified. The cellular processes were differentially represented according to the ERα purification methodology, indicating that the methodologies used are complementary. While in MCF-7 cells, the interactome of endogenous and over-expressed ERα essentially represents the same biological processes and cellular components, the proteins identified were not over-lapping; thus, suggesting that the biological response may differ as the regulatory/participating proteins in these complexes are different. Interestingly, biological processes uniquely associated to ERα over-expressed in HeLa cell line included L-serine biosynthetic process, cellular amino acid biosynthetic process and cell redox homeostasis. In summary, all the approaches analyzed in this meta-analysis are valid and complementary; in particular, for those cases where the processes occur at low frequency with normal ERα levels, and can be identified when the receptor is over-expressed. However special effort should be put into validating these findings in cells expressing physiological ERα levels. PMID:26097882

  13. The Hepatitis E virus intraviral interactome

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Andreas; Stellberger, Thorsten; Gebhardt, Anna; Kurz, Marisa; Friedel, Caroline C.; Uetz, Peter; Nitschko, Hans; Baiker, Armin; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging virus causing epidemic acute hepatitis in developing countries as well as sporadic cases in industrialized countries. The life cycle of HEV is still poorly understood and the lack of efficient cell culture systems and animal models are the principal limitations for a detailed study of the viral replication cycle. Here we exhaustively examine all possible intraviral protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of HEV by systematic Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and LuMPIS screens, providing a basis for studying the function of these proteins in the viral replication cycle. Key PPIs correlate with the already published HEV 3D structure. Furthermore, we report 20 novel PPIs including the homodimerization of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), the self-interaction of the papain like protease, and ORF3 interactions with the papain-like protease and putative replicase components: RdRp, methylase and helicase. Furthermore, we determined the dissociation constant (Kd) of ORF3 interactions with the viral helicase, papain-like protease and methylase, which suggest a regulatory function for ORF3 in orchestrating the formation of the replicase complex. These interactions may represent new targets for antiviral drugs. PMID:26463011

  14. Photoreactive Stapled BH3 Peptides to Dissect the BCL-2 Family Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Craig R.; Mintseris, Julian; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Bird, Gregory H.; Gygi, Steven P.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Defining protein interactions forms the basis for discovery of biological pathways, disease mechanisms, and opportunities for therapeutic intervention. To harness the robust binding affinity and selectivity of structured peptides for interactome discovery, we engineered photoreactive stapled BH3 peptide helices that covalently capture their physiologic BCL-2 family targets. The crosslinking α-helices covalently trap both static and dynamic protein interactors, and enable rapid identification of interaction sites, providing a critical link between interactome discovery and targeted drug design. PMID:21168768

  15. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (P  from  8.01E − 05  (ADHD)  to  1.22E − 71) (multiple sclerosis), and autism (P = 0.013), but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD) to 33% (MS) of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively) to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity) and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as) to the disease itself. PMID:23533776

  16. Reranking candidate gene models with cross-species comparison for improved gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Crammer, Koby; Pereira, Fernando CN; Roos, David S

    2008-01-01

    Background Most gene finders score candidate gene models with state-based methods, typically HMMs, by combining local properties (coding potential, splice donor and acceptor patterns, etc). Competing models with similar state-based scores may be distinguishable with additional information. In particular, functional and comparative genomics datasets may help to select among competing models of comparable probability by exploiting features likely to be associated with the correct gene models, such as conserved exon/intron structure or protein sequence features. Results We have investigated the utility of a simple post-processing step for selecting among a set of alternative gene models, using global scoring rules to rerank competing models for more accurate prediction. For each gene locus, we first generate the K best candidate gene models using the gene finder Evigan, and then rerank these models using comparisons with putative orthologous genes from closely-related species. Candidate gene models with lower scores in the original gene finder may be selected if they exhibit strong similarity to probable orthologs in coding sequence, splice site location, or signal peptide occurrence. Experiments on Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that reranking based on cross-species comparison outperforms the best gene models identified by Evigan alone, and also outperforms the comparative gene finders GeneWise and Augustus+. Conclusion Reranking gene models with cross-species comparison improves gene prediction accuracy. This straightforward method can be readily adapted to incorporate additional lines of evidence, as it requires only a ranked source of candidate gene models. PMID:18854050

  17. The extended pluripotency protein interactome and its links to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    A pluripotent state of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is maintained through the combinatorial activity of core transcriptional factors (TFs) such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog in conjunction with many other factors including epigenetic regulators. Proteins rarely act alone, and knowledge of protein-protein interaction network (interactome) provides an extraordinary resource about how pluripotency TFs collaborate and crosstalk with epigenetic regulators in ESCs. Recent advances in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) allow for efficient, high-throughput identification of hundreds of interacting protein partners, which can be used to map the pluripotency landscape. Here we review recent publications employing AP-MS to investigate protein interaction networks in ESCs, discuss how protein-protein connections reveal novel pluripotency regulatory circuits and new factors for efficient reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:25173149

  18. Comprehensive analysis of TGF-β and BMP receptor interactomes.

    PubMed

    Poorgholi Belverdi, Mohammad; Krause, Carola; Guzman, Asja; Knaus, Petra

    2012-04-01

    An immense number of cellular processes are initiated by cell surface serine/threonine kinase receptors belonging to the TGF-β/BMP family. Subsequent downstream signalling cascades, as well as their crosstalk results in enormous specificity in terms of phenotypic outcome, e.g. proliferation, differentiation, migration or apoptosis. Such signalling diversity is achieved by the ability of receptors to interact with distinct proteins in a spatio-temporal manner. Following the cloning of the TGF-β/BMP receptors a variety of different technologies were applied to identify such interacting proteins. Here we present a comprehensive survey of known interactome analyses, including our own data, on these receptors and discuss advantages and disadvantages of the applied technologies. PMID:21715044

  19. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced. PMID:25469159

  20. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  1. Identification of novel and diverse rotaviruses in rodents and insectivores, and evidence of cross-species transmission into humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Lin, Xian-Dan; Huang, Kai-Yu; Zhang, Bing; Shi, Mang; Guo, Wen-Ping; Wang, Miao-Ruo; Wang, Wen; Xing, Jian-Guang; Li, Ming-Hui; Hong, Wang-Sheng; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Rotaviruses are an important cause of severe diarrheal illness in children globally. We characterized rotaviruses sampled in humans, insectivores (shrews) and rodents from urban and rural regions of Zhejiang province, China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed seven genotypic constellations of human rotaviruses with six different combinations of G and P genotypes - G3P[8] (50.06%), G9P[8] (36.16%), G1P[8] (8.92%), G2P[4] (4.63%), G3P[3] (0.12%), and G3P[9] (0.12%). In rodents and shrews sampled from the same locality we identified a novel genotype constellation (G32-P[46]-I24-R18-C17-M17-A28-N17-T19-E24-H19), a novel P genotype (P[45]), and two different AU-1-like rotaviruses associated with a G3P[3] genotype combination. Of particular note was a novel rotavirus from a human patient that was closely related to viruses sampled from rodents in the same region, indicative of a local species jump. In sum, these data are suggestive of the cross-species transmission of rodent rotaviruses into humans and for reassortment among human and animal rotaviruses. PMID:27115729

  2. Opposing roles of NF-κB in anti-cancer treatment outcome unveiled by cross-species investigations.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Kase, Julia; Dörr, Jan R; Milanovic, Maja; Lenze, Dido; Grau, Michael; Beuster, Gregor; Ji, Sujuan; Reimann, Maurice; Lenz, Peter; Hummel, Michael; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg; Scheidereit, Claus; Schmitt, Clemens A; Lee, Soyoung

    2011-10-15

    In malignancies, enhanced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity is largely viewed as an oncogenic property that also confers resistance to chemotherapy. Recently, NF-κB has been postulated to participate in a senescence-associated and possibly senescence-reinforcing cytokine response, thereby suggesting a tumor-restraining role for NF-κB. Using a mouse lymphoma model and analyzing transcriptome and clinical data from lymphoma patients, we show here that therapy-induced senescence presents with and depends on active NF-κB signaling, whereas NF-κB simultaneously promotes resistance to apoptosis. Further characterization and genetic engineering of primary mouse lymphomas according to distinct NF-κB-related oncogenic networks reminiscent of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) subtypes guided us to identify Bcl2-overexpressing germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL as a clinically relevant subgroup with significantly superior outcome when NF-κB is hyperactive. Our data illustrate the power of cross-species investigations to functionally test genetic mechanisms in transgenic mouse tumors that recapitulate distinct features of the corresponding human entity, and to ultimately use the mouse model-derived genetic information to redefine novel, clinically relevant patient subcohorts. PMID:21979374

  3. Possible cross-species transmission of circoviruses and cycloviruses among farm animals.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Shan, Tongling; Soji, Oderinde Bamidele; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Kunz, Thomas H; Zaidi, Sohail Zahoor; Delwart, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Circoviruses consist of highly prevalent and genetically diverse porcine and avian pathogens. The genomes of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the family Circoviridae, were recently identified in human and chimpanzee faeces. Here, six cyclovirus and four circovirus genomes from the tissues of chickens, goats, cows, and a bat were amplified and sequenced using rolling-circle amplification and inverse PCR. A goat cyclovirus was nearly identical to a cyclovirus from a cow. USA beef contained circoviruses with >99% similarity to porcine circovirus 2b. Circoviruses in chicken were related to those of pigeons. The close genetic similarity of a subset of cycloviruses and circoviruses replicating in distinct animal species may reflect recent cross-species transmissions. Further studies will be required to determine the impact of these highly prevalent infections on the health of farm animals. PMID:21177928

  4. Cross-species fostering affects meat preferences of wild house mice.

    PubMed

    Wuensch, K L

    1993-10-01

    Wild-strain male house mice were fostered at birth onto conspecifics, deer mice, or domestic Norway rats. In adulthood, their flesh-eating preferences were tested by allowing them to feed from freshly asphyxiated conspecifics and either deer mice or rats. The mice ate significantly more conspecific flesh than contraspecific flesh, except when the flesh offered was that of the contraspecies upon which the mouse had been fostered at birth. The failure of cross-species-fostered mice to discriminate between their own species and their foster species in flesh-preference tests is attributed to their having learned early in life to respond to the foster species in the same way they normally respond to conspecifics, that is, by approaching them, investigating them, and, when finding them dead, feeding upon them. PMID:8189209

  5. Cross-species and intraspecies morphometric analysis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Olivares, R; Michalland, S; Aboitiz, F

    2000-01-01

    A cross-species morphometric study of the corpus callosum was performed in the rat, rabbit, cat, dog, horse, cow and human. Across species, the results indicate a strong, although less than linear, dependency of callosal size on brain weight. This relation tends to lose significance within species. This is consistent with other morphometric studies indicating a tendency to decrease the correlations between morphometric variables in within-species analyses as compared to between-species analyses. There are species differences in the relative size of some callosal segments particularly in the posterior third, which is larger in frontally-looking species than in laterally-looking species. No sex differences in callosal size were detected in any of the species examined. These findings are discussed in the light of possible developmental and functional correlates of the variability observed. PMID:10773624

  6. COLOMBOS v3.0: leveraging gene expression compendia for cross-species analyses

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Dierckxsens, Nicolas; Brilli, Matteo; Bianco, Luca; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Galardini, Marco; Romualdi, Chiara; Laukens, Kris; Collado-Vides, Julio; Meysman, Pieter; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    COLOMBOS is a database that integrates publicly available transcriptomics data for several prokaryotic model organisms. Compared to the previous version it has more than doubled in size, both in terms of species and data available. The manually curated condition annotation has been overhauled as well, giving more complete information about samples’ experimental conditions and their differences. Functionality-wise cross-species analyses now enable users to analyse expression data for all species simultaneously, and identify candidate genes with evolutionary conserved expression behaviour. All the expression-based query tools have undergone a substantial improvement, overcoming the limit of enforced co-expression data retrieval and instead enabling the return of more complex patterns of expression behaviour. COLOMBOS is freely available through a web application at http://colombos.net/. The complete database is also accessible via REST API or downloadable as tab-delimited text files. PMID:26586805

  7. Karyotyping of Brachypodium pinnatum (2n = 18) chromosomes using cross-species BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Wolny, Elzbieta; Fidyk, Wojciech; Hasterok, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Identification of individual chromosomes in a complement is usually a difficult task in the case of most plant species, especially for those with small, numerous, and morphologically uniform chromosomes. In this paper, we demonstrate that the landmarks produced by cross-species fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) of Brachypodium distachyon derived bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be used for discrimination of Brachypodium pinnatum (2n = 18) chromosomes. Selected sets of clones were hybridised in several sequential experiments performed on exactly the same chromosome spreads, using reprobing of cytological preparations. Analysis of the morphometric features of B. pinnatum chromosomes was performed to establish their total length, the position of centromeres, and the position of BAC-based landmarks in relation to the centromere, thereby enabling their effective karyotyping, which is a prerequisite for more complex study of the grass genome structure and evolution at the cytomolecular level. PMID:23706077

  8. Cross-Species Application of SNP Chips is Not Suitable for Identifying Runs of Homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Miller, Joshua M; Kardos, Marty

    2016-03-01

    Cross-species application of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips is a valid, relatively cost-effective alternative to the high-throughput sequencing methods generally required to obtain a genome-wide sampling of polymorphisms. Kharzinova et al. (2015) examined the applicability of SNP chips developed in domestic bovids (cattle and sheep) to a semi-wild cervid (reindeer). The ancestors of bovids and cervids diverged between 20 and 30 million years ago (Hassanin and Douzery 2003; Bibi et al. 2013). Empirical work has shown that for a SNP chip developed in a bovid and applied to a cervid species, approximately 50% genotype success with 1% of the loci being polymorphic is expected (Miller et al. 2012). The genotyping of Kharzinova et al. (2015) follows this pattern; however, these data are not appropriate for identifying runs of homozygosity (ROH) and can be problematic for estimating linkage disequilibrium (LD) and we caution readers in this regard. PMID:26774056

  9. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Natália J.; Cruz, Vanessa P.; Ashikaga, Fernando Y.; Camargo, Sâmia M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N.; Burgess, George H.; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide.

  10. Cross-species stromal signaling programs human embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Renea A; Risbridger, Gail P

    2014-01-01

    The generation of human embryonic stem cell lines in the late 1990s awakened new prospects in the research arena. The opportunity to define and direct the differentiation of the most primitive stem cells in the laboratory, and their potential application to regenerative medicine, invigorated the developmental biology field. Whilst initial studies used in vitro differentiation techniques, the application of in vivo models greatly enhanced the success of directing the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. Controlling cell fate decisions in embryonic cells requires thorough knowledge of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that direct differentiation and the complex cell-cell interactions that exist within different tissues. Thus, tissue-specific approaches were applied to generate various differentiated cell types. In this review, cross-species tissue recombination will be discussed as a successful approach to direct embryonic stem cell differentiation. PMID:24530222

  11. Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, W.; SHEN, Q.; MOU, J.; YANG, Z. B.; YUAN, C. L.; CUI, L.; ZHU, J. G.; HUA, X. G.; XU, C. M.; HU, J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen of which several species of animals are considered to be reservoirs. Thirty-eight faecal samples, obtained from 22 species of animals including birds in a wildlife first-aid centre in Eastern China, were tested for HEV RNA. Our survey revealed that in total 28·9% (95% confidence interval 14·5–43·4) of the faecal samples from various mammals and birds were HEV RNA positive. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 11 isolates demonstrated that all sequences clustered in genotype 4 with 96–100% identity to each other. In addition, serum samples from seven animal handlers have shown that five (71·4%) were seropositive. The findings imply that cross-species infection of HEV had probably occurred in this zoo-like location, and moreover, birds can be infected naturally with mammalian HEV. PMID:17961279

  12. Proteome Mapping of Adult Zebrafish Marrow Neutrophils Reveals Partial Cross Species Conservation to Human Peripheral Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sethi, Sachin; Aravamudhan, Sriram; Krüger, Marcus; Grabher, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are pivotal cells within the first line of host defense of the innate immune system. In this study, we have used a gel-based LC-MS/MS approach to explore the proteome of primary marrow neutrophils from adult zebrafish. The identified proteins originated from all major cellular compartments. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant association of proteins with different immune-related network and pathway maps. 75% of proteins identified in neutrophils were identified in neutrophils only when compared to neutrophil-free brain tissue. Moreover, cross-species comparison with human peripheral blood neutrophils showed partial conservation of immune-related proteins between human and zebrafish. This study provides the first zebrafish neutrophil proteome and may serve as a valuable resource for an understanding of neutrophil biology and innate immunity. PMID:24019943

  13. Cross-species transmission and emergence of novel viruses from birds.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Chen, Honglin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-02-01

    Birds, the only living member of the Dinosauria clade, are flying warm-blooded vertebrates displaying high species biodiversity, roosting and migratory behavior, and a unique adaptive immune system. Birds provide the natural reservoir for numerous viral species and therefore gene source for evolution, emergence and dissemination of novel viruses. The intrusions of human into natural habitats of wild birds, the domestication of wild birds as pets or racing birds, and the increasing poultry consumption by human have facilitated avian viruses to cross species barriers to cause zoonosis. Recently, a novel adenovirus was exclusively found in birds causing an outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci infection among birds and humans. Instead of being the primary cause of an outbreak by jumping directly from bird to human, a novel avian virus can be an augmenter of another zoonotic agent causing the outbreak. A comprehensive avian virome will improve our understanding of birds' evolutionary dynamics. PMID:25644327

  14. Serial transcriptome analysis and cross species integration identifies CENPE as a novel neuroblastoma target

    PubMed Central

    Balamuth, Naomi J.; Wood, Andrew; Wang, Qun; Jagannathan, Jayanti; Mayes, Patrick; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Zhongxue; Rappaport, Eric; Courtright, Joshua; Pawel, Bruce; Weber, Barbara; Wooster, Richard; Sekyere, Eric O.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Maris, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer genomic studies that rely on analysis of biopsies from primary tumors may not fully identify the molecular events associated with tumor progression. We hypothesized that characterizing the transcriptome during tumor progression in the TH-MYCN transgenic model would identify oncogenic drivers that would be targetable therapeutically. We quantified expression of 32,381 murine genes in 9 hyperplastic ganglia harvested at 3 time points, and 4 tumor cohorts of progressively larger size in mice homozygous for the TH-MYCN transgene. We found 93 genes that showed a linearly increasing or decreasing pattern of expression from the preneoplastic ganglia to end stage tumors. Cross-species integration identified 24 genes that were highly expressed in human MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. The genes prioritized were not exclusively driven by increasing Myc transactivation or proliferative rate. We prioritized 3 targets (Cenpe, Gpr49, Impdh2) with previously determined roles in cancer. Using siRNA knockdown in human neuroblastoma cell lines, we further prioritized CENPE due to inhibition of cellular proliferation. Targeting CENPE with the small molecular inhibitor GSK923295 showed inhibition of in vitro proliferation of 19 neuroblastoma cell lines (median IC50=41 nM; range 27–266 nM), and delayed tumor growth in 3 xenograft models (p-values ranged from p<0.0001 to p=0.018). We provide preclinical validation that serial transcriptome analysis of a transgenic mouse model followed by cross-species integration is a useful method to identify therapeutic targets, and identify CENPE as a novel therapeutic candidate in neuroblastoma. PMID:20233875

  15. Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Yoshan; Masello, Juan F; Cole, Theresa L; Calderon, Luciano; Munimanda, Gopi K; Thali, Marco R; Alderman, Rachael; Cuthbert, Richard J; Marin, Manuel; Massaro, Melanie; Navarro, Joan; Phillips, Richard A; Ryan, Peter G; Suazo, Cristián G; Cherel, Yves; Weimerskirch, Henri; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in convergently evolved allele size classes, biasing measures of interspecific genetic differentiation. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to develop microsatellite markers from a shotgun genome sequence of the sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Pachyptila belcheri), that we tested for cross-species amplification in other Pachyptila and related sub-Antarctic species. We found that heterozygosity decreased and the proportion of nonamplifying loci increased with phylogenetic distance from the target species. Surprisingly, we found that species trees estimated from interspecific FST provided better approximations of mtDNA relationships among the studied species than those estimated using DC , even though FST was more affected by null alleles. We observed a significantly nonlinear second order polynomial relationship between microsatellite and mtDNA distances. We propose that the loss of linearity with increasing mtDNA distance stems from an increasing proportion of homoplastic allele size classes that are identical in state, but not identical by descent. Therefore, despite high cross-species amplification success and high polymorphism among the closely related Pachyptila species, we caution against the use of microsatellites in phylogenetic inference among distantly related taxa. PMID:25594938

  16. Analysis of the long control region of bovine papillomavirus type 1 associated with sarcoids in equine hosts indicates multiple cross-species transmission events and phylogeographical structure

    PubMed Central

    Trewby, Hannah; Ayele, Gizachew; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Brandt, Sabine; Campo, M. Saveria; Del Fava, Claudia; Marais, Johan; Leonardi, Leonardo; Vanselow, Barbara; Biek, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a family of slowly evolving DNA viruses and their evolution is commonly linked to that of their host species. However, whilst bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1) primarily causes warts in its natural host, the cow, it can also cause locally aggressive and invasive skin tumours in equids, known as sarcoids, and thus provides a rare contemporary example of cross-species transmission of a papillomavirus. Here, we describe the first phylogenetic analysis of BPV-1 in equine sarcoids to our knowledge, allowing us to explore the evolutionary history of BPV-1 and investigate its cross-species association with equids. A phylogenetic analysis of the BPV-1 transcriptional promoter region (the long control region or LCR) was conducted on 15 bovine and 116 equine samples from four continents. Incorporating previous estimates for evolutionary rates in papillomavirus implied that the genetic diversity in the LCR variants was ancient and predated domestication of both equids and cattle. The phylogeny demonstrated geographical segregation into an ancestral group (African, South American and Australian samples), and a more recently derived, largely European clade. Whilst our data are consistent with BPV-1 originating in cattle, we found evidence of multiple, probably relatively recent, cross-species transmission events into horses. We also demonstrated the high prevalence of one particular sequence variant (variant 20), and suggest this may indicate that this variant shows a fitness advantage in equids. Although strong host specificity remains the norm in papillomaviruses, our results demonstrate that exceptions to this rule exist and can become epidemiologically relevant. PMID:25185436

  17. Analysis of the long control region of bovine papillomavirus type 1 associated with sarcoids in equine hosts indicates multiple cross-species transmission events and phylogeographical structure.

    PubMed

    Trewby, Hannah; Ayele, Gizachew; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Brandt, Sabine; Campo, M Saveria; Del Fava, Claudia; Marais, Johan; Leonardi, Leonardo; Vanselow, Barbara; Biek, Roman; Nasir, Lubna

    2014-12-01

    Papillomaviruses are a family of slowly evolving DNA viruses and their evolution is commonly linked to that of their host species. However, whilst bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1) primarily causes warts in its natural host, the cow, it can also cause locally aggressive and invasive skin tumours in equids, known as sarcoids, and thus provides a rare contemporary example of cross-species transmission of a papillomavirus. Here, we describe the first phylogenetic analysis of BPV-1 in equine sarcoids to our knowledge, allowing us to explore the evolutionary history of BPV-1 and investigate its cross-species association with equids. A phylogenetic analysis of the BPV-1 transcriptional promoter region (the long control region or LCR) was conducted on 15 bovine and 116 equine samples from four continents. Incorporating previous estimates for evolutionary rates in papillomavirus implied that the genetic diversity in the LCR variants was ancient and predated domestication of both equids and cattle. The phylogeny demonstrated geographical segregation into an ancestral group (African, South American and Australian samples), and a more recently derived, largely European clade. Whilst our data are consistent with BPV-1 originating in cattle, we found evidence of multiple, probably relatively recent, cross-species transmission events into horses. We also demonstrated the high prevalence of one particular sequence variant (variant 20), and suggest this may indicate that this variant shows a fitness advantage in equids. Although strong host specificity remains the norm in papillomaviruses, our results demonstrate that exceptions to this rule exist and can become epidemiologically relevant. PMID:25185436

  18. A convex optimization approach for identification of human tissue-specific interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Grama, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of organism-specific interactomes has yielded novel insights into cellular function and coordination, understanding of pathology, and identification of markers and drug targets. Genes, however, can exhibit varying levels of cell type specificity in their expression, and their coordinated expression manifests in tissue-specific function and pathology. Tissue-specific/tissue-selective interaction mechanisms have significant applications in drug discovery, as they are more likely to reveal drug targets. Furthermore, tissue-specific transcription factors (tsTFs) are significantly implicated in human disease, including cancers. Finally, disease genes and protein complexes have the tendency to be differentially expressed in tissues in which defects cause pathology. These observations motivate the construction of refined tissue-specific interactomes from organism-specific interactomes. Results: We present a novel technique for constructing human tissue-specific interactomes. Using a variety of validation tests (Edge Set Enrichment Analysis, Gene Ontology Enrichment, Disease-Gene Subnetwork Compactness), we show that our proposed approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art techniques. Finally, using case studies of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, we show that tissue-specific interactomes derived from our study can be used to construct pathways implicated in pathology and demonstrate the use of these pathways in identifying novel targets. Availability and implementation: http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/mohammas/projects/ActPro.html Contact: mohammadi@purdue.edu PMID:27307623

  19. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R; Hackney, Jason A; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus-host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus-host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  20. Protein-drug interactome analysis of SSRI-mediated neurorecovery following stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Fang; Pan, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Jian-Wei; Kong, Hui-Mei; Fu, Ya-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been widely used as first-line drugs in the treatment of a range of depressive and anxiety disorders. Recently, clinical studies found that this class of agents also shows significant efficacy in promoting neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and neurorecovery following stroke. Here, we attempt to elucidate molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying the SSRI-mediated neurorecovery. In the procedure, a comprehensive protein-drug interactome (PDI) was constructed for various SSRIs and their major metabolites as well as a group of control drugs across a large panel of human neuroproteins via a high-throughput molecular docking approach. The obtained PDI was then analyzed at systematic level to extract unexpected targets for SSRIs/metabolites. Biological network analysis and gene ontology (GO) enrichment solidified that the inferred targets have high potential to be directly or indirectly involved in diverse neural events, and further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and post molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area (MM-PB/SA) characterization revealed a stable complex architecture and high-affinity interaction between the targets and SSRIs/metabolites. Specifically, two human proteins, i.e. neurogenic locus notch homolog protein 1 (NOTCH 1) and Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK 1), were suggested as promising regulators in the SSRI-mediated neurorecovery, which can be targeted efficiently by fluoxetine and paroxetine, respectively, as well as other SSRIs and metabolites. PMID:24705245

  1. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2014-12-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness mediated by E-cadherin is conferred by its extracellular cadherin domains and is regulated by an assembly of intracellular adaptors and enzymes associated with its cytoplasmic tail. We used proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to identify 561 proteins in the vicinity of the cytoplasmic tail of E-cadherin. In addition, we used proteomics to identify proteins associated with E-cadherin-containing adhesion plaques from a cell-glass interface, which enabled the assignment of cellular localization to putative E-cadherin-interacting proteins. Moreover, by tagging identified proteins with GFP (green fluorescent protein), we determined the subcellular localization of 83 putative E-cadherin-proximal proteins and identified 24 proteins that were previously uncharacterized as part of adherens junctions. We constructed and characterized a comprehensive E-cadherin interaction network of 79 published and 394 previously uncharacterized proteins using a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions. Finally, we found that calcium chelation, which disrupts the interaction of the extracellular E-cadherin domains, did not disrupt most intracellular protein interactions with E-cadherin, suggesting that the E-cadherin intracellular interactome is predominantly independent of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:25468996

  2. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R.; Hackney, Jason A.; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J.; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T.; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E.; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus–host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus–host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  3. SInCRe—structural interactome computational resource for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Rahul; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Anand, Praveen; Raghavender, Upadhyayula S.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Higueruelo, Alicia P.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Chandra, Nagasuma R.; Blundell, Tom L.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an integrated database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Mtb) that collates information on protein sequences, domain assignments, functional annotation and 3D structural information along with protein–protein and protein–small molecule interactions. SInCRe (Structural Interactome Computational Resource) is developed out of CamBan (Cambridge and Bangalore) collaboration. The motivation for development of this database is to provide an integrated platform to allow easily access and interpretation of data and results obtained by all the groups in CamBan in the field of Mtb informatics. In-house algorithms and databases developed independently by various academic groups in CamBan are used to generate Mtb-specific datasets and are integrated in this database to provide a structural dimension to studies on tuberculosis. The SInCRe database readily provides information on identification of functional domains, genome-scale modelling of structures of Mtb proteins and characterization of the small-molecule binding sites within Mtb. The resource also provides structure-based function annotation, information on small-molecule binders including FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and natural compounds that bind to pathogen proteins potentially and result in weakening or elimination of host–pathogen protein–protein interactions. Together they provide prerequisites for identification of off-target binding. Database URL: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/sincre PMID:26130660

  4. SInCRe-structural interactome computational resource for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Metri, Rahul; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Anand, Praveen; Raghavender, Upadhyayula S; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Higueruelo, Alicia P; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Chandra, Nagasuma R; Blundell, Tom L; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an integrated database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Mtb) that collates information on protein sequences, domain assignments, functional annotation and 3D structural information along with protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. SInCRe (Structural Interactome Computational Resource) is developed out of CamBan (Cambridge and Bangalore) collaboration. The motivation for development of this database is to provide an integrated platform to allow easily access and interpretation of data and results obtained by all the groups in CamBan in the field of Mtb informatics. In-house algorithms and databases developed independently by various academic groups in CamBan are used to generate Mtb-specific datasets and are integrated in this database to provide a structural dimension to studies on tuberculosis. The SInCRe database readily provides information on identification of functional domains, genome-scale modelling of structures of Mtb proteins and characterization of the small-molecule binding sites within Mtb. The resource also provides structure-based function annotation, information on small-molecule binders including FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and natural compounds that bind to pathogen proteins potentially and result in weakening or elimination of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions. Together they provide prerequisites for identification of off-target binding. PMID:26130660

  5. Integrative analysis of cancer genes in a functional interactome.

    PubMed

    Ung, Matthew H; Liu, Chun-Chi; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The post-genomic era has resulted in the accumulation of high-throughput cancer data from a vast array of genomic technologies including next-generation sequencing and microarray. As such, the large amounts of germline variant and somatic mutation data that have been generated from GWAS and sequencing projects, respectively, show great promise in providing a systems-level view of these genetic aberrations. In this study, we analyze publicly available GWAS, somatic mutation, and drug target data derived from large databanks using a network-based approach that incorporates directed edge information under a randomized network hypothesis testing procedure. We show that these three classes of disease-associated nodes exhibit non-random topological characteristics in the context of a functional interactome. Specifically, we show that drug targets tend to lie upstream of somatic mutations and disease susceptibility germline variants. In addition, we introduce a new approach to measuring hierarchy between drug targets, somatic mutants, and disease susceptibility genes by utilizing directionality and path length information. Overall, our results provide new insight into the intrinsic relationships between these node classes that broaden our understanding of cancer. In addition, our results align with current knowledge on the therapeutic actionability of GWAS and somatic mutant nodes, while demonstrating relationships between node classes from a global network perspective. PMID:27356765

  6. Interactome Analysis Reveals Ezrin Can Adopt Multiple Conformational States*

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Raghuvir; Wayt, Jessica; Ohouo, Patrice Y.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM), is an essential regulator of the structure of microvilli on the apical aspect of epithelial cells. Ezrin provides a linkage between membrane-associated proteins and F-actin, oscillating between active/open and inactive/closed states, and is regulated in part by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine. In the open state, ezrin can bind a number of ligands, but in the closed state the ligand-binding sites are inaccessible. In vitro analysis has proposed that there may be a third hyperactivated form of ezrin. To gain a better understanding of ezrin, we conducted an unbiased proteomic analysis of ezrin-binding proteins in an epithelial cell line, Jeg-3. We refined our list of interactors by comparing the interactomes using quantitative mass spectrometry between wild-type ezrin, closed ezrin, open ezrin, and hyperactivated ezrin. The analysis reveals several novel interactors confirmed by their localization to microvilli, as well as a significant class of proteins that bind closed ezrin. Taken together, the data indicate that ezrin can exist in three different conformational states, and different ligands “perceive” ezrin conformational states differently. PMID:24151071

  7. Integrative analysis of cancer genes in a functional interactome

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Matthew H.; Liu, Chun-Chi; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The post-genomic era has resulted in the accumulation of high-throughput cancer data from a vast array of genomic technologies including next-generation sequencing and microarray. As such, the large amounts of germline variant and somatic mutation data that have been generated from GWAS and sequencing projects, respectively, show great promise in providing a systems-level view of these genetic aberrations. In this study, we analyze publicly available GWAS, somatic mutation, and drug target data derived from large databanks using a network-based approach that incorporates directed edge information under a randomized network hypothesis testing procedure. We show that these three classes of disease-associated nodes exhibit non-random topological characteristics in the context of a functional interactome. Specifically, we show that drug targets tend to lie upstream of somatic mutations and disease susceptibility germline variants. In addition, we introduce a new approach to measuring hierarchy between drug targets, somatic mutants, and disease susceptibility genes by utilizing directionality and path length information. Overall, our results provide new insight into the intrinsic relationships between these node classes that broaden our understanding of cancer. In addition, our results align with current knowledge on the therapeutic actionability of GWAS and somatic mutant nodes, while demonstrating relationships between node classes from a global network perspective. PMID:27356765

  8. Current Approaches Toward Quantitative Mapping of the Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Buntru, Alexander; Trepte, Philipp; Klockmeier, Konrad; Schnoegl, Sigrid; Wanker, Erich E.

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) play a key role in many, if not all, cellular processes. Disease is often caused by perturbation of PPIs, as recently indicated by studies of missense mutations. To understand the associations of proteins and to unravel the global picture of PPIs in the cell, different experimental detection techniques for PPIs have been established. Genetic and biochemical methods such as the yeast two-hybrid system or affinity purification-based approaches are well suited to high-throughput, proteome-wide screening and are mainly used to obtain qualitative results. However, they have been criticized for not reflecting the cellular situation or the dynamic nature of PPIs. In this review, we provide an overview of various genetic methods that go beyond qualitative detection and allow quantitative measuring of PPIs in mammalian cells, such as dual luminescence-based co-immunoprecipitation, Förster resonance energy transfer or luminescence-based mammalian interactome mapping with bait control. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different techniques and their potential applications in biomedical research. PMID:27200083

  9. Induction of ebolavirus cross-species immunity using retrovirus-like particles bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein lacking the mucin-like domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Ebolavirus includes five distinct viruses. Four of these viruses cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. Currently there are no licensed vaccines for any of them; however, several vaccines are under development. Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP1,2) is highly immunogenic, but antibodies frequently arise against its least conserved mucin-like domain (MLD). We hypothesized that immunization with MLD-deleted GP1,2 (GPΔMLD) would induce cross-species immunity by making more conserved regions accessible to the immune system. Methods To test this hypothesis, mice were immunized with retrovirus-like particles (retroVLPs) bearing Ebola virus GPΔMLD, DNA plasmids (plasmo-retroVLP) that can produce such retroVLPs in vivo, or plasmo-retroVLP followed by retroVLPs. Results Cross-species neutralizing antibody and GP1,2-specific cellular immune responses were successfully induced. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GPΔMLD presented through retroVLPs may provide a strategy for development of a vaccine against multiple ebolaviruses. Similar vaccination strategies may be adopted for other viruses whose envelope proteins contain highly variable regions that may mask more conserved domains from the immune system. PMID:22273269

  10. A protein domain-based interactome network for C. elegans early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boxem, Mike; Maliga, Zoltan; Klitgord, Niels; Li, Na; Lemmens, Irma; Mana, Miyeko; de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Mul, Joram D.; van de Peut, Diederik; Devos, Maxime; Simonis, Nicolas; Yildirim, Muhammed A.; Cokol, Murat; Kao, Huey-Ling; de Smet, Anne-Sophie; Wang, Haidong; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Hao, Tong; Milstein, Stuart; Fan, Changyu; Tipsword, Mike; Drew, Kevin; Galli, Matilde; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Drechsel, David; Koller, Daphne; Roth, Frederick P.; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Dunker, A. Keith; Bonneau, Richard; Gunsalus, Kristin C.; Hill, David E.; Piano, Fabio; Tavernier, Jan; van den Heuvel, Sander; Hyman, Anthony A.; Vidal, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many protein-protein interactions are mediated through independently folding modular domains. Proteome-wide efforts to model protein-protein interaction or “interactome” networks have largely ignored this modular organization of proteins. We developed an experimental strategy to efficiently identify interaction domains and generated a domain-based interactome network for proteins involved in C. elegans early embryonic cell divisions. Minimal interacting regions were identified for over 200 proteins, providing important information on their domain organization. Furthermore, our approach increased the sensitivity of the two-hybrid system, resulting in a more complete interactome network. This interactome modeling strategy revealed new insights into C. elegans centrosome function and is applicable to other biological processes in this and other organisms. PMID:18692475

  11. Cross-species assessments of Motor and Exploratory Behavior related to Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W.; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.; Perry, William

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in exploratory behavior are a fundamental feature of bipolar mania, typically characterized as motor hyperactivity and increased goal-directed behavior in response to environmental cues. In contrast, abnormal exploration associated with schizophrenia and depression can manifest as prominent withdrawal, limited motor activity, and inattention to the environment. While motor abnormalities are cited frequently as clinical manifestations of these disorders, relatively few empirical studies have quantified human exploratory behavior. This article reviews the literature characterizing motor and exploratory behavior associated with bipolar disorder and genetic and pharmacological animal models of the illness. Despite sophisticated assessment of exploratory behavior in rodents, objective quantification of human motor activity has been limited primarily to actigraphy studies with poor cross-species translational value. Furthermore, symptoms that reflect the cardinal features of bipolar disorder have proven difficult to establish in putative animal models of this illness. Recently, however, novel tools such as the Human Behavioral Pattern Monitor provide multivariate translational measures of motor and exploratory activity, enabling improved understanding of the neurobiology underlying psychiatric disorders. PMID:20398694

  12. Modeling neurodevelopmental cognitive deficits in tasks with cross-species translational validity.

    PubMed

    Cope, Z A; Powell, S B; Young, J W

    2016-01-01

    Numerous psychiatric disorders whose cognitive dysfunction links to functional outcome have neurodevelopmental origins including schizophrenia, autism and bipolar disorder. Treatments are needed for these cognitive deficits, which require development using animal models. Models of neurodevelopmental disorders are as varied and diverse as the disorders themselves, recreating some but not all aspects of the disorder. This variety may in part underlie why purported procognitive treatments translated from these models have failed to restore functioning in the targeted patient populations. Further complications arise from environmental factors used in these models that can contribute to numerous disorders, perhaps only impacting specific domains, while diagnostic boundaries define individual disorders, limiting translational efficacy. The Research Domain Criteria project seeks to 'develop new ways to classify mental disorders based on behavioral dimensions and neurobiological measures' in hopes of facilitating translational research by remaining agnostic toward diagnostic borders derived from clinical presentation in humans. Models could therefore recreate biosignatures of cognitive dysfunction irrespective of disease state. This review highlights work within the field of neurodevelopmental models of psychiatric disorders tested in cross-species translational cognitive paradigms that directly inform this newly developing research strategy. By expounding on this approach, the hopes are that a fuller understanding of each model may be attainable in terms of the cognitive profile elicited by each manipulation. Hence, conclusions may begin to be drawn on the nature of cognitive neuropathology on neurodevelopmental and other disorders, increasing the chances of procognitive treatment development for individuals affected in specific cognitive domains. PMID:26667374

  13. Novel Microsatellite Markers of Meretrix petechialis and Cross-species Amplification in Related Taxa (Bivalvia: Veneroida)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Byeng-Hak; Park, Jung-Youn; Lee, Jung-Mi; Jeong, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jun-Sang; Ko, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Yong-Seok

    2012-01-01

    The Asian hard clam, Meretrix petechialis, is an economically important bivalve, but its catch and population sizes are decreasing rapidly, owing to many factors, including large-scale reclamation of its natural habitat on the western coast of the Korean peninsula. Attempts to restore the resources and production of this species require genetic structure and diversity information. In this study, we developed 15 microsatellite markers from a partial genomic library enriched in GT repeats. Nine of these markers were polymorphic, with an average allele number of six, and six were monomorphic in 95 tested individuals. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci (p > 0.05), and deviations from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test showing excess of heterozygotes was observed in only one of nine loci. In addition, no null alleles or genetic differentiation between two tested populations were detected. A cross-species amplification in 12 species of four families resulted in two M. petechialis-specific loci and three possible universal markers. This information will be useful in the future development of high-quality artificial seedlings and sustainable resource management. PMID:23443103

  14. Development of polymorphic SSR markers in the razor clam (Sinonovacula constricta) and cross-species amplification.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y H; Yao, H H; Sun, C S; Lv, D M; Li, M Q; Lin, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing provides large-scale sequencing data with relative ease and at a reasonable cost, making it possible to identify a large amount of SSR markers in a timely and cost-effective manner. On the basis of the transcriptome database of Sinonovacula constricta obtained by Illumina/Solexa pyrosequencing, 60 polymorphic SSR markers were developed and characterized in 30 individuals. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 3.75 alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.050 to 1.000 and from 0.050 to 0.836, respectively. Nineteen loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.01) after Bonferroni's correction for multiple tests. In addition, interspecific transferability revealed that 20 polymorphic loci in Solen linearis were first characterized in this study. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest number of SSRs in S. constricta and the first report of cross-species amplification. These novel polymorphic SSR markers will be particularly useful for conservation genetics, evolutionary studies, genetic trait mapping, and marker assisted selection in the species. PMID:26909924

  15. Aleutian mink disease virus in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis): evidence for cross-species spillover.

    PubMed

    Nituch, Larissa A; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2015-04-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes a parvovirus infection, initially characterized in American mink (Neovison vison), that may have harmful effects on wild populations of susceptible animals. In North America, where American mink are native, the origin, host range, and prevalence of AMDV in wild species is not clear. We studied striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) to determine whether species sympatric with mink are potential reservoirs in the transmission of AMDV to wild mink and mink farms. Antibodies to AMDV were detected in 41% of skunk serum samples (143/347) and AMDV nucleic acids were detected in 32% (14/40) of skunk spleen samples by PCR, indicating that AMDV exposure and infection were frequent in skunks. We detected no AMDV antibodies in 144 raccoon blood samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a newly identified AMDV haplogroup consisting of isolates from Ontario skunks and a free-ranging domestic mink from Ontario. Our findings of frequent AMDV infection in skunks, close genetic similarity between skunk and mink AMDV isolates, and evidence of AMDV transmission from skunks to mink support the hypothesis that skunks may be acting as alternative hosts and reservoirs of AMDV to wild mink through cross-species virus spillover. PMID:25647590

  16. Superinfection reconciles host-parasite association and cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Haven, James; Park, Andrew William

    2013-12-01

    Parasites are either dedicated to a narrow host range, or capable of exploiting a wide host range. Understanding how host ranges are determined is very important for public health, as well as wildlife, plant, livestock and agricultural diseases. Our current understanding of host-parasite associations hinges on co-evolution, which assumes evolved host preferences (host specialization) of the parasite. Despite the explanatory power of this framework, we have only a vague understanding of why many parasites routinely cross the host species' barrier. Here we introduce a simple model demonstrating how superinfection (in a heterogeneous community) can promote host-parasite association. Strikingly, the model illustrates that strong host-parasite association occurs in the absence of host specialization, while still permitting cross-species transmission. For decades, host specialization has been foundational in explaining the maintenance of distinct parasites/strains in host species. We argue that host specializations may be exaggerated, and can occur as a byproduct (not necessarily the cause) of host-parasite associations. PMID:24161558

  17. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Models for Predicting Lead Transfer from Soil to Wheat Grain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Lv, Jialong; Dai, Yunchao; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yingfei

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of Pb from the soil to crops is a serious food hygiene security problem in China because of industrial, agricultural, and historical contamination. In this study, the characteristics of exogenous Pb transfer from 17 Chinese soils to a popular wheat variety (Xiaoyan 22) were investigated. In addition, bioaccumulation prediction models of Pb in grain were obtained based on soil properties. The results of the analysis showed that pH and OC were the most important factors contributing to Pb uptake by wheat grain. Using a cross-species extrapolation approach, the Pb uptake prediction models for cultivar Xiaoyan 22 in different soil Pb levels were satisfactorily applied to six additional non-modeled wheat varieties to develop a prediction model for each variety. Normalization of the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) to specific soil physico-chemistry is essential, because doing so could significantly reduce the intra-species variation of different wheat cultivars in predicted Pb transfer and eliminate the influence of soil properties on ecotoxicity parameters for organisms of interest. Finally, the prediction models were successfully verified against published data (including other wheat varieties and crops) and used to evaluate the ecological risk of Pb for wheat in contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:27518712

  18. Functional characterization of transcription factor motifs using cross-species comparison across large evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaebum; Cunningham, Ryan; James, Brian; Wyder, Stefan; Gibson, Joshua D; Niehuis, Oliver; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Robertson, Hugh M; Robinson, Gene E; Werren, John H; Sinha, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of finding statistically significant associations between cis-regulatory motifs and functional gene sets, in order to understand the biological roles of transcription factors. We develop a computational framework for this task, whose features include a new statistical score for motif scanning, the use of different scores for predicting targets of different motifs, and new ways to deal with redundancies among significant motif-function associations. This framework is applied to the recently sequenced genome of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, making use of the existing knowledge of motifs and gene annotations in another insect genome, that of the fruitfly. The framework uses cross-species comparison to improve the specificity of its predictions, and does so without relying upon non-coding sequence alignment. It is therefore well suited for comparative genomics across large evolutionary divergences, where existing alignment-based methods are not applicable. We also apply the framework to find motifs associated with socially regulated gene sets in the honeybee, Apis mellifera, using comparisons with Nasonia, a solitary species, to identify honeybee-specific associations. PMID:20126523

  19. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Models for Predicting Lead Transfer from Soil to Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lv, Jialong; Dai, Yunchao; Zhang, Hong; Cao, Yingfei

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of Pb from the soil to crops is a serious food hygiene security problem in China because of industrial, agricultural, and historical contamination. In this study, the characteristics of exogenous Pb transfer from 17 Chinese soils to a popular wheat variety (Xiaoyan 22) were investigated. In addition, bioaccumulation prediction models of Pb in grain were obtained based on soil properties. The results of the analysis showed that pH and OC were the most important factors contributing to Pb uptake by wheat grain. Using a cross-species extrapolation approach, the Pb uptake prediction models for cultivar Xiaoyan 22 in different soil Pb levels were satisfactorily applied to six additional non-modeled wheat varieties to develop a prediction model for each variety. Normalization of the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) to specific soil physico-chemistry is essential, because doing so could significantly reduce the intra-species variation of different wheat cultivars in predicted Pb transfer and eliminate the influence of soil properties on ecotoxicity parameters for organisms of interest. Finally, the prediction models were successfully verified against published data (including other wheat varieties and crops) and used to evaluate the ecological risk of Pb for wheat in contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:27518712

  20. Multidirectional cross-species painting illuminates the history of karyotypic evolution in Perissodactyla.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Stanyon, Roscoe; Nesterenko, Anastasia I; Fu, Beiyuan; Perelman, Polina L; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Stone, Gary; Rubtsova, Nadezhda V; Houck, Marlys L; Robinson, Terence J; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Dobigny, Gauthier; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2008-01-01

    The order Perissodactyla, the group of odd-toed ungulates, includes three extant families: Equidae, Tapiridae, and Rhinocerotidae. The extremely rapid karyotypic diversification in perissodactyls has so far prevented the establishment of genome-wide homology maps between these three families by traditional cytogenetic approaches. Here we report the first genome-wide comparative chromosome maps of African rhinoceroses, four tapir species, four equine species, and humans. These maps were established by multidirectional chromosome painting, with paint probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Equus grevyi, Tapirus indicus, and Ceratotherium simum as well as painting probes from horse and human. The Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), Baird's tapir (T. bairdii), mountain tapir (T. pinchaque), lowland tapir (T. terrestris), and onager (E. hemionus onager), were studied by cross-species chromosome painting for the first time. Our results, when integrated with previously published comparative chromosome maps of the other perissodactyl species, have enabled the reconstruction of perissodactyl, ceratomorph, and equid ancestral karyotypes, and the identification of the defining evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements along each lineage. Our results allow a more reliable estimate of the mode and tempo of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, revealing a striking switch between the slowly evolving ceratomorphs and extremely rapidly evolving equids. PMID:18293107

  1. Chromosome evolution in Solanum traced by cross-species BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Szinay, Dóra; Wijnker, Erik; van den Berg, Ronald; Visser, Richard G F; de Jong, Hans; Bai, Yuling

    2012-08-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are relatively rare evolutionary events and can be used as markers to study karyotype evolution. This research aims to use such rearrangements to study chromosome evolution in Solanum. Chromosomal rearrangements between Solanum crops and several related wild species were investigated using tomato and potato bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in a multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The BACs selected are evenly distributed over seven chromosomal arms containing inversions described in previous studies. The presence/absence of these inversions among the studied Solanum species were determined and the order of the BAC-FISH signals was used to construct phylogenetic trees.Compared with earlier studies, data from this study provide support for the current grouping of species into different sections within Solanum; however, there are a few notable exceptions, such as the tree positions of S. etuberosum (closer to the tomato group than to the potato group) and S. lycopersicoides (sister to S. pennellii). These apparent contradictions might be explained by interspecific hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting. This cross-species BAC painting technique provides unique information on genome organization, evolution and phylogenetic relationships in a wide variety of species. Such information is very helpful for introgressive breeding. PMID:22686400

  2. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms. PMID:24439387

  3. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species. PMID:26202078

  4. Evolution of genome organizations of squirrels (Sciuridae) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Biltueva, Larisa; Fu, Beiyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Nie, Wenhui; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2004-01-01

    With complete sets of chromosome-specific painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of human and grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), the whole genome homologies between human and representatives of tree squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, Callosciurus erythraeus), flying squirrels (Petaurista albiventer) and chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) have been defined by cross-species chromosome painting. The results show that, unlike the highly rearranged karyotypes of mouse and rat, the karyotypes of squirrels are highly conserved. Two methods have been used to reconstruct the genome phylogeny of squirrels with the laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as the out-group: (1) phylogenetic analysis by parsimony using chromosomal characters identified by comparative cytogenetic approaches; (2) mapping the genome rearrangements onto recently published sequence-based molecular trees. Our chromosome painting results, in combination with molecular data, show that flying squirrels are phylogenetically close to New World tree squirrels. Chromosome painting and G-banding comparisons place chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus ), with a derived karyotype, outside the clade comprising tree and flying squirrels. The superorder Glires (orde Rodentia + order Lagomorpha) is firmly supported by two conserved syntenic associations between human chromosomes 1 and 10p homologues, and between 9 and 11 homologues. PMID:15241012

  5. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, J.R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  6. CO2 exposure as translational cross-species experimental model for panic.

    PubMed

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Viechtbauer, W; Buchanan, G F; Goossens, L; Lange, I; Knuts, I; Lesch, K P; Steinbusch, H W M; Schruers, K R J

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are being challenged by the heterogeneity and the symptom overlap of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a framework toward a more etiology-based classification has been initiated by the US National Institute of Mental Health, the research domain criteria project. The basic neurobiology of human psychiatric disorders is often studied in rodent models. However, the differences in outcome measurements hamper the translation of knowledge. Here, we aimed to present a translational panic model by using the same stimulus and by quantitatively comparing the same outcome measurements in rodents, healthy human subjects and panic disorder patients within one large project. We measured the behavioral-emotional and bodily response to CO2 exposure in all three samples, allowing for a reliable cross-species comparison. We show that CO2 exposure causes a robust fear response in terms of behavior in mice and panic symptom ratings in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients. To improve comparability, we next assessed the respiratory and cardiovascular response to CO2, demonstrating corresponding respiratory and cardiovascular effects across both species. This project bridges the gap between basic and human research to improve the translation of knowledge between these disciplines. This will allow significant progress in unraveling the etiological basis of panic disorder and will be highly beneficial for refining the diagnostic categories as well as treatment strategies. PMID:27598969

  7. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Prediction Model for Lead Transfer from Soil to Corn Grain under Stress of Exogenous Lead

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaojun; Yang, Hua; Li, Yupeng; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing concern in recent years regarding lead (Pb) transfer in the soil-plant system. In this study the transfer of Pb (exogenous salts) was investigated from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Prediction models were developed with combination of the Pb bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958, and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) through multiple stepwise regressions. Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the soil pH and OM were the major factors that controlled Pb transfer from soil to corn grain. The lower pH and OM could improve the bioaccumulation of Pb in corn grain. No significant differences were found between two prediction models derived from the different exogenous Pb contents. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2-fold and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Moreover, the prediction model i.e. Log[BCF] = −0.098 pH-0.150 log[OM] −1.894 at the treatment of high Pb can effectively reduce the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. These suggested that this prediction model derived from the high Pb content was more adaptable to be applied to other non-model corn species to predict the Pb bioconcentration in corn grain and assess the ecological risk of Pb in different agricultural soils. PMID:24416440

  8. A CROSS-SPECIES MODE OF ACTION (MOA) INFORMATION ASSESSMENT: A CASE STUDY OF BISPHENOL A (BPA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released a report entitled, A Cross-Species Mode of Action Information Assessment: A Case Study of Bisphenol A [EPA/600/R-50/044F] (PDF, 98pp, 2 MB, CROSS-SPECIES TRANSMISSION OF GIARDIA: INOCULATION OF BEAVERS AND MUSKRATS WITH CYSTS OF HUMAN, BEAVER, MOUSE, AND MUSKRAT ORIGIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giardia cysts isolated from humans, beavers, mice and muskrats were tested in cross-species transmission experiments for their ability to infect either beavers or muskrats. iardia cysts, derived from multiple symptomatic human donors and used for inoculation of beavers ormuskrats...

  9. Computational prediction of the human-microbial oral interactome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The oral cavity is a complex ecosystem where human chemical compounds coexist with a particular microbiota. However, shifts in the normal composition of this microbiota may result in the onset of oral ailments, such as periodontitis and dental caries. In addition, it is known that the microbial colonization of the oral cavity is mediated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between the host and microorganisms. Nevertheless, this kind of PPIs is still largely undisclosed. To elucidate these interactions, we have created a computational prediction method that allows us to obtain a first model of the Human-Microbial oral interactome. Results We collected high-quality experimental PPIs from five major human databases. The obtained PPIs were used to create our positive dataset and, indirectly, our negative dataset. The positive and negative datasets were merged and used for training and validation of a naïve Bayes classifier. For the final prediction model, we used an ensemble methodology combining five distinct PPI prediction techniques, namely: literature mining, primary protein sequences, orthologous profiles, biological process similarity, and domain interactions. Performance evaluation of our method revealed an area under the ROC-curve (AUC) value greater than 0.926, supporting our primary hypothesis, as no single set of features reached an AUC greater than 0.877. After subjecting our dataset to the prediction model, the classified result was filtered for very high confidence PPIs (probability ≥ 1-10−7), leading to a set of 46,579 PPIs to be further explored. Conclusions We believe this dataset holds not only important pathways involved in the onset of infectious oral diseases, but also potential drug-targets and biomarkers. The dataset used for training and validation, the predictions obtained and the network final network are available at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/oralint. PMID:24576332

  10. Forward Individualized Medicine from Personal Genomes to Interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Groen, Albert K.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, and their interaction with the environment, every individual can be rightfully considered as a unique biological entity. Individualized medicine promises to take this uniqueness into account to optimize disease treatment and thereby improve health benefits for every patient. The success of individualized medicine relies on a precise understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship. Although omics technologies advance rapidly, there are several challenges that need to be overcome: Next generation sequencing can efficiently decipher genomic sequences, epigenetic changes, and transcriptomic variation in patients, but it does not automatically indicate how or whether the identified variation will cause pathological changes. This is likely due to the inability to account for (1) the consequences of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and (2) (post)transcriptional as well as (post)translational processes that eventually determine the concentration of key metabolites. The technologies to accurately measure changes in these latter layers are still under development, and such measurements in humans are also mainly restricted to blood and circulating cells. Despite these challenges, it is already possible to track dynamic changes in the human interactome in healthy and diseased states by using the integration of multi-omics data. In this review, we evaluate the potential value of current major bioinformatics and systems biology-based approaches, including genome wide association studies, epigenetics, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks, and genome-scale metabolic modeling. Moreover, we address the question whether integrative analysis of personal multi-omics data will help understanding of personal genotype-phenotype relationships. PMID:26696898

  11. Identifying Human Disease Genes through Cross-Species Gene Mapping of Evolutionary Conserved Processes

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Martin; Badea, Alexandra; Williams, Robert W.; Kas, Martien J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding complex networks that modulate development in humans is hampered by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity within and between populations. Here we present a method that exploits natural variation in highly diverse mouse genetic reference panels in which genetic and environmental factors can be tightly controlled. The aim of our study is to test a cross-species genetic mapping strategy, which compares data of gene mapping in human patients with functional data obtained by QTL mapping in recombinant inbred mouse strains in order to prioritize human disease candidate genes. Methodology We exploit evolutionary conservation of developmental phenotypes to discover gene variants that influence brain development in humans. We studied corpus callosum volume in a recombinant inbred mouse panel (C57BL/6J×DBA/2J, BXD strains) using high-field strength MRI technology. We aligned mouse mapping results for this neuro-anatomical phenotype with genetic data from patients with abnormal corpus callosum (ACC) development. Principal Findings From the 61 syndromes which involve an ACC, 51 human candidate genes have been identified. Through interval mapping, we identified a single significant QTL on mouse chromosome 7 for corpus callosum volume with a QTL peak located between 25.5 and 26.7 Mb. Comparing the genes in this mouse QTL region with those associated with human syndromes (involving ACC) and those covered by copy number variations (CNV) yielded a single overlap, namely HNRPU in humans and Hnrpul1 in mice. Further analysis of corpus callosum volume in BXD strains revealed that the corpus callosum was significantly larger in BXD mice with a B genotype at the Hnrpul1 locus than in BXD mice with a D genotype at Hnrpul1 (F = 22.48, p<9.87*10−5). Conclusion This approach that exploits highly diverse mouse strains provides an efficient and effective translational bridge to study the etiology of human developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia

  12. Development, characterization, and cross-species/genera transferability of SSR markers for rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Bao-Hua; Feng, Su-Ping; Wang, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Guo; Wu, Yao-Ting

    2011-03-01

    Genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are particularly valuable in studies of genetic diversity, evolution, genetic linkage map construction, quantitative trait loci tagging, and marker-assisted selection because of their multi-allelic nature, reproducibility, co-dominant inheritance, high abundance, and extensive genome coverage. The traditional methods of SSR marker development, such as genomic-SSR hybrid screening and microsatellite enrichment, have the disadvantages of high cost and complex operation. The selectively amplified microsatellite method is less costly and highly efficient as well as being simple and convenient. In this study, 252 sequences with SSRs were cloned from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) genome from which 258 SSR loci were obtained. The average repeat number was six. There were only 10 (3.9%) mononucleotide, trinucleotide, and pentanucleotide repeats, whereas the remaining 248 (96.1%) were dinucleotide repeats, including 128 (49.6%) GT/CA repeats, 118 (45.7%) GA/CT repeats, and 2 (0.8%) AT/TA repeats. A total of 126 primer pairs (see ESM) were successfully designed of which 36 primer pairs generated polymorphic products from 12 accessions of the cultivated species, 4 related species, and 3 species of the family Euphorbiaceae. In addition, investigations based on four genomic SSRs (GAR4, ACR22, CTR25, and GTR28) by cloning and sequencing provided evidence for cross-species/genera applicability, and homologous sequences were obtained from the rubber tree and Euphorbiaceae. Further analysis about the variation of the flanking regions of the four markers was carried out. PMID:20960206

  13. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Prediction Models for Cadmium Transfer from Soil to Corn Grain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Li, Zhaojun; Lu, Lu; Long, Jian; Liang, Yongchao

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals. The presence of Cd in agricultural soils is of great concern regarding its transfer in the soil-plant system. This study investigated the transfer of Cd (exogenous salts) from a wide range of Chinese soils to corn grain (Zhengdan 958). Through multiple stepwise regressions, prediction models were developed, with the combination of Cd bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Zhengdan 958 and soil pH, organic matter (OM) content, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Moreover, these prediction models from Zhengdan 958 were applied to other non-model corn species through cross-species extrapolation approach. The results showed that the pH of the soil was the most important factor that controlled Cd uptake and lower pH was more favorable for Cd bioaccumulation in corn grain. There was no significant difference among three prediction models in the different Cd levels. When the prediction models were applied to other non-model corn species, the ratio ranges between the predicted BCF values and the measured BCF values were within an interval of 2 folds and close to the solid line of 1∶1 relationship. Furthermore, these prediction models also reduced the measured BCF intra-species variability for all non-model corn species. Therefore, the prediction models established in this study can be applied to other non-model corn species and be useful for predicting the Cd bioconcentration in corn grain and assessing the ecological risk of Cd in different soils. PMID:24324636

  14. Cross-species epigenetics identifies a critical role for VAV1 in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J C; Kawauchi, D; Schwalbe, E C; Solecki, D J; Selby, M P; McKinnon, P J; Olson, J M; Hayden, J T; Grundy, R G; Ellison, D W; Williamson, D; Bailey, S; Roussel, M F; Clifford, S C

    2015-09-01

    The identification of key tumorigenic events in Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) subgroup medulloblastomas (MBSHH) will be essential for the development of individualized therapies and improved outcomes. However, beyond confirmation of characteristic SHH pathway mutations, recent genome-wide sequencing studies have not revealed commonly mutated genes with widespread relevance as potential therapeutic targets. We therefore examined any role for epigenetic DNA methylation events in MBSHH using a cross-species approach to candidate identification, prioritization and validation. MBSHH-associated DNA methylation events were first identified in 216 subgrouped human medulloblastomas (50 MBSHH, 28 Wnt/Wingless, 44 Group 3 and 94 Group 4) and their conservation then assessed in tumors arising from four independent murine models of Shh medulloblastoma, alongside any role in tumorigenesis using functional assessments in mouse and human models. This strategy identified widespread regional CpG hypo-methylation of VAV1, leading to its elevated expression, as a conserved aberrant epigenetic event, which characterizes the majority of MBSHH tumors in both species, and is associated with a poor outcome in MBSHH patients. Moreover, direct modulation of VAV1 in mouse and human models revealed a critical role in tumor maintenance, and its abrogation markedly reduced medulloblastoma growth. Further, Vav1 activity regulated granule neuron precursor germinal zone exit and migration initiation in an ex vivo model of early postnatal cerebellar development. These findings establish VAV1 as a critical epigenetically regulated oncogene with a key role in MBSHH maintenance, and highlight its potential as a validated therapeutic target and prognostic biomarker for the improved therapy of medulloblastoma. PMID:25531316

  15. GeneWeaver: finding consilience in heterogeneous cross-species functional genomics data.

    PubMed

    Bubier, Jason A; Phillips, Charles A; Langston, Michael A; Baker, Erich J; Chesler, Elissa J

    2015-10-01

    A persistent challenge lies in the interpretation of consensus and discord from functional genomics experimentation. Harmonizing and analyzing this data will enable investigators to discover relations of many genes to many diseases, and from many phenotypes and experimental paradigms to many diseases through their genomic substrates. The GeneWeaver.org system provides a platform for cross-species integration and interrogation of heterogeneous curated and experimentally derived functional genomics data. GeneWeaver enables researchers to store, share, analyze, and compare results of their own genome-wide functional genomics experiments in an environment containing rich companion data obtained from major curated repositories, including the Mouse Genome Database and other model organism databases, along with derived data from highly specialized resources, publications, and user submissions. The data, largely consisting of gene sets and putative biological networks, are mapped onto one another through gene identifiers and homology across species. A versatile suite of interactive tools enables investigators to perform a variety of set analysis operations to find consilience among these often noisy experimental results. Fast algorithms enable real-time analysis of large queries. Specific applications include prioritizing candidate genes for quantitative trait loci, identifying biologically valid mouse models and phenotypic assays for human disease, finding the common biological substrates of related diseases, classifying experiments and the biological concepts they represent from empirical data, and applying patterns of genomic evidence to implicate novel genes in disease. These results illustrate an alternative to strict emphasis on replicability, whereby researchers classify experimental results to identify the conditions that lead to their similarity. PMID:26092690

  16. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt

    PubMed Central

    Weljie, Aalim M.; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S.; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Dinges, David F.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss. PMID:25675494

  17. Oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 are cross-species markers of sleep debt.

    PubMed

    Weljie, Aalim M; Meerlo, Peter; Goel, Namni; Sengupta, Arjun; Kayser, Matthew S; Abel, Ted; Birnbaum, Morris J; Dinges, David F; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-02-24

    Sleep is an essential biological process that is thought to have a critical role in metabolic regulation. In humans, reduced sleep duration has been associated with risk for metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of sleep loss is only in its nascent stages. In this study we used rat and human models to simulate modern-day conditions of restricted sleep and addressed cross-species consequences via comprehensive metabolite profiling. Serum from sleep-restricted rats was analyzed using polar and nonpolar methods in two independent datasets (n = 10 per study, 3,380 measured features, 407 identified). A total of 38 features were changed across independent experiments, with the majority classified as lipids (18 from 28 identified). In a parallel human study, 92 metabolites were identified as potentially significant, with the majority also classified as lipids (32 of 37 identified). Intriguingly, two metabolites, oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3, were robustly and quantitatively reduced in both species following sleep restriction, and recovered to near baseline levels after sleep restriction (P < 0.05, false-discovery rate < 0.2). Elevated phospholipids were also noted after sleep restriction in both species, as well as metabolites associated with an oxidizing environment. In addition, polar metabolites reflective of neurotransmitters, vitamin B3, and gut metabolism were elevated in sleep-restricted humans. These results are consistent with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and disruptions of the circadian clock. The findings provide a potential link between known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction, and potential biomarkers for sleep loss. PMID:25675494

  18. Cross-species transcriptomic approach reveals genes in hamster implantation sites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Herington, Jennifer; Galindo, Cristi L; Ding, Tianbing; Brown, Naoko; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C

    2014-12-01

    The mouse model has greatly contributed to understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of progesterone (P4) plus estrogen (E)-dependent blastocyst implantation process. However, little is known about contributory molecular mechanisms of the P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation process that occurs in species such as hamsters, guineapigs, rabbits, pigs, rhesus monkeys, and perhaps humans. We used the hamster as a model of P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation and carried out cross-species microarray (CSM) analyses to reveal differentially expressed genes at the blastocyst implantation site (BIS), in order to advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of implantation. Upregulation of 112 genes and downregulation of 77 genes at the BIS were identified using a mouse microarray platform, while use of the human microarray revealed 62 up- and 38 down-regulated genes at the BIS. Excitingly, a sizable number of genes (30 up- and 11 down-regulated genes) were identified as a shared pool by both CSMs. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization validated the expression patterns of several up- and down-regulated genes identified by both CSMs at the hamster and mouse BIS to demonstrate the merit of CSM findings across species, in addition to revealing genes specific to hamsters. Functional annotation analysis found that genes involved in the spliceosome, proteasome, and ubiquination pathways are enriched at the hamster BIS, while genes associated with tight junction, SAPK/JNK signaling, and PPARα/RXRα signalings are repressed at the BIS. Overall, this study provides a pool of genes and evidence of their participation in up- and down-regulated cellular functions/pathways at the hamster BIS. PMID:25252651

  19. Deriving Heterospecific Self-Assembling Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Computational Interactome Screen.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Richard O; Baxter, Daniel; Panek, Anna S; Lubben, Anneke T; Mason, Jody M

    2016-01-29

    Interactions between naturally occurring proteins are highly specific, with protein-network imbalances associated with numerous diseases. For designed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), required specificity can be notoriously difficult to engineer. To accelerate this process, we have derived peptides that form heterospecific PPIs when combined. This is achieved using software that generates large virtual libraries of peptide sequences and searches within the resulting interactome for preferentially interacting peptides. To demonstrate feasibility, we have (i) generated 1536 peptide sequences based on the parallel dimeric coiled-coil motif and varied residues known to be important for stability and specificity, (ii) screened the 1,180,416 member interactome for predicted Tm values and (iii) used predicted Tm cutoff points to isolate eight peptides that form four heterospecific PPIs when combined. This required that all 32 hypothetical off-target interactions within the eight-peptide interactome be disfavoured and that the four desired interactions pair correctly. Lastly, we have verified the approach by characterising all 36 pairs within the interactome. In analysing the output, we hypothesised that several sequences are capable of adopting antiparallel orientations. We subsequently improved the software by removing sequences where doing so led to fully complementary electrostatic pairings. Our approach can be used to derive increasingly large and therefore complex sets of heterospecific PPIs with a wide range of potential downstream applications from disease modulation to the design of biomaterials and peptides in synthetic biology. PMID:26655848

  1. Empirically controlled mapping of the Caenorhabditis elegans protein-protein interactome network.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Nicolas; Rual, Jean-François; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Hao, Tong; Sahalie, Julie M; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Gebreab, Fana; Cevik, Sebiha; Klitgord, Niels; Fan, Changyu; Braun, Pascal; Li, Ning; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Dann, Elizabeth; Bertin, Nicolas; Szeto, David; Dricot, Amélie; Yildirim, Muhammed A; Lin, Chenwei; de Smet, Anne-Sophie; Kao, Huey-Ling; Simon, Christophe; Smolyar, Alex; Ahn, Jin Sook; Tewari, Muneesh; Boxem, Mike; Milstein, Stuart; Yu, Haiyuan; Dreze, Matija; Vandenhaute, Jean; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Cusick, Michael E; Hill, David E; Tavernier, Jan; Roth, Frederick P; Vidal, Marc

    2009-01-01

    To provide accurate biological hypotheses and elucidate global properties of cellular networks, systematic identification of protein-protein interactions must meet high quality standards.We present an expanded C. elegans protein-protein interaction network, or 'interactome' map, derived from testing a matrix of approximately 10,000 x approximately 10,000 proteins using a highly specific, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system. Through a new empirical quality control framework, we show that the resulting data set (Worm Interactome 2007, or WI-2007) was similar in quality to low-throughput data curated from the literature. We filtered previous interaction data sets and integrated them with WI-2007 to generate a high-confidence consolidated map (Worm Interactome version 8, or WI8). This work allowed us to estimate the size of the worm interactome at approximately 116,000 interactions. Comparison with other types of functional genomic data shows the complementarity of distinct experimental approaches in predicting different functional relationships between genes or proteins PMID:19123269

  2. Deriving Heterospecific Self-Assembling Protein–Protein Interactions Using a Computational Interactome Screen

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Richard O.; Baxter, Daniel; Panek, Anna S.; Lubben, Anneke T.; Mason, Jody M.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between naturally occurring proteins are highly specific, with protein-network imbalances associated with numerous diseases. For designed protein–protein interactions (PPIs), required specificity can be notoriously difficult to engineer. To accelerate this process, we have derived peptides that form heterospecific PPIs when combined. This is achieved using software that generates large virtual libraries of peptide sequences and searches within the resulting interactome for preferentially interacting peptides. To demonstrate feasibility, we have (i) generated 1536 peptide sequences based on the parallel dimeric coiled-coil motif and varied residues known to be important for stability and specificity, (ii) screened the 1,180,416 member interactome for predicted Tm values and (iii) used predicted Tm cutoff points to isolate eight peptides that form four heterospecific PPIs when combined. This required that all 32 hypothetical off-target interactions within the eight-peptide interactome be disfavoured and that the four desired interactions pair correctly. Lastly, we have verified the approach by characterising all 36 pairs within the interactome. In analysing the output, we hypothesised that several sequences are capable of adopting antiparallel orientations. We subsequently improved the software by removing sequences where doing so led to fully complementary electrostatic pairings. Our approach can be used to derive increasingly large and therefore complex sets of heterospecific PPIs with a wide range of potential downstream applications from disease modulation to the design of biomaterials and peptides in synthetic biology. PMID:26655848

  3. ∆F508 CFTR interactome remodelling promotes rescue of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E; Yates, John R

    2015-12-24

    Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (∆F508 CFTR) is the major cause of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases can partly rescue ∆F508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favourable change of ∆F508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as a mechanism of rescue; however, CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases are unknown. Here we report the first comprehensive analysis of the CFTR and ∆F508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method, we identify 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discover a ∆F508 deletion-specific interactome, which is extensively remodelled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodelling identifies key novel interactors, whose loss promote ∆F508 CFTR channel function in primary cystic fibrosis epithelia or which are critical for CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodelling of ∆F508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of cystic fibrosis caused by deletion of F508. PMID:26618866

  4. ΔF508 CFTR interactome remodeling promotes rescue of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E.; Yates, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is the major cause of Cystic Fibrosis (CF), one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of CF patients. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACi) can partially rescue ΔF508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favorable change of ΔF508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as mechanism of rescue, however CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature-shift and HDACi rescue are unknown. Here, we report the first comprehensive analysis of the wt and ΔF508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and HDACi. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method (CoPIT), we identified 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discovered a mutation-specific interactome, which is extensively remodeled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodeling identified key novel interactors, whose loss promoted enhanced CFTR channel function in primary CF epithelia or which were critical for normal CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodeling of ΔF508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of CF caused by deletion of F508. PMID:26618866

  5. Microsatellite cross-species amplification and utility in southern African elasmobranchs: A valuable resource for fisheries management and conservation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Similarly to the rest of the world, southern Africa’s diverse chondrichthyan fauna is currently experiencing high fishing pressures from direct and non-direct fisheries to satisfy market demands for shark products such as fins and meat. In this study, the development of microsatellite markers through cross-species amplification of primer sets previously developed for closely related species is reported as an alternative approach to de novo marker development. This included the design of four microsatellite multiplex assays and their cross-species utility in genetic diversity analysis of southern African elasmobranchs. As this study forms part of a larger project on the development of genetic resources for commercially important and endemic southern African species, Mustelus mustelus was used as a candidate species for testing these multiplex assays in down-stream applications. Results Thirty five microsatellite primer sets previously developed for five elasmobranch species were selected from literature for testing cross-species amplification in 16 elasmobranch species occurring in southern Africa. Cross-species amplification success rates ranged from 28.6%-71.4%. From the successfully amplified microsatellites, 22 loci were selected and evaluated for levels of polymorphism, and four multiplex assays comprising of the 22 microsatellites were successfully constructed, optimised and characterised in a panel of 87 Mustelus mustelus individuals. A total of 125 alleles were observed across all loci, with the number of alleles ranging from 3–12 alleles. Cross-species amplification of the four optimised multiplex assays was further tested on 11 commercially important and endemic southern African elasmobranch species. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 31.8%-95.5% in these species with polymorphic information content decreasing exponentially with evolutionary distance from the source species. Conclusions Cross-species amplification of the 35

  6. Characterization of the Cardiac Overexpression of HSPB2 Reveals Mitochondrial and Myogenic Roles Supported by a Cardiac HspB2 Interactome.

    PubMed

    Grose, Julianne H; Langston, Kelsey; Wang, Xiaohui; Squires, Shayne; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Hayes, Whitney; Neubert, Jonathan; Fischer, Susan K; Fasano, Matthew; Saunders, Gina Moore; Dai, Qiang; Christians, Elisabeth; Lewandowski, E Douglas; Ping, Peipei; Benjamin, Ivor J

    2015-01-01

    Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that transiently interact with other proteins, thereby assisting with quality control of proper protein folding and/or degradation. They are also recruited to protect cells from a variety of stresses in response to extreme heat, heavy metals, and oxidative-reductive stress. Although ten human sHSPs have been identified, their likely diverse biological functions remain an enigma in health and disease, and much less is known about non-redundant roles in selective cells and tissues. Herein, we set out to comprehensively characterize the cardiac-restricted Heat Shock Protein B-2 (HspB2), which exhibited ischemic cardioprotection in transgenic overexpressing mice including reduced infarct size and maintenance of ATP levels. Global yeast two-hybrid analysis using HspB2 (bait) and a human cardiac library (prey) coupled with co-immunoprecipitation studies for mitochondrial target validation revealed the first HspB2 "cardiac interactome" to contain many myofibril and mitochondrial-binding partners consistent with the overexpression phenotype. This interactome has been submitted to the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID). A related sHSP chaperone HspB5 had only partially overlapping binding partners, supporting specificity of the interactome as well as non-redundant roles reported for these sHSPs. Evidence that the cardiac yeast two-hybrid HspB2 interactome targets resident mitochondrial client proteins is consistent with the role of HspB2 in maintaining ATP levels and suggests new chaperone-dependent functions for metabolic homeostasis. One of the HspB2 targets, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has reported roles in HspB2 associated phenotypes including cardiac ATP production, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis, and was validated as a potential client protein of HspB2 through chaperone assays. From the clientele and phenotypes identified herein, it is tempting to

  7. System-Level Insights into the Cellular Interactome of a Non-Model Organism: Inferring, Modelling and Analysing Functional Gene Network of Soybean (Glycine max)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yungang; Guo, Maozu; Zou, Quan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular interactome, in which genes and/or their products interact on several levels, forming transcriptional regulatory-, protein interaction-, metabolic-, signal transduction networks, etc., has attracted decades of research focuses. However, such a specific type of network alone can hardly explain the various interactive activities among genes. These networks characterize different interaction relationships, implying their unique intrinsic properties and defects, and covering different slices of biological information. Functional gene network (FGN), a consolidated interaction network that models fuzzy and more generalized notion of gene-gene relations, have been proposed to combine heterogeneous networks with the goal of identifying functional modules supported by multiple interaction types. There are yet no successful precedents of FGNs on sparsely studied non-model organisms, such as soybean (Glycine max), due to the absence of sufficient heterogeneous interaction data. We present an alternative solution for inferring the FGNs of soybean (SoyFGNs), in a pioneering study on the soybean interactome, which is also applicable to other organisms. SoyFGNs exhibit the typical characteristics of biological networks: scale-free, small-world architecture and modularization. Verified by co-expression and KEGG pathways, SoyFGNs are more extensive and accurate than an orthology network derived from Arabidopsis. As a case study, network-guided disease-resistance gene discovery indicates that SoyFGNs can provide system-level studies on gene functions and interactions. This work suggests that inferring and modelling the interactome of a non-model plant are feasible. It will speed up the discovery and definition of the functions and interactions of other genes that control important functions, such as nitrogen fixation and protein or lipid synthesis. The efforts of the study are the basis of our further comprehensive studies on the soybean functional interactome at the genome

  8. A "candidate-interactome" aggregate analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Rosella; Umeton, Renato; Policano, Claudia; Annibali, Viviana; Coarelli, Giulia; Ricigliano, Vito A G; Vittori, Danila; Fornasiero, Arianna; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Romano, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Ristori, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Though difficult, the study of gene-environment interactions in multifactorial diseases is crucial for interpreting the relevance of non-heritable factors and prevents from overlooking genetic associations with small but measurable effects. We propose a "candidate interactome" (i.e. a group of genes whose products are known to physically interact with environmental factors that may be relevant for disease pathogenesis) analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis. We looked for statistical enrichment of associations among interactomes that, at the current state of knowledge, may be representative of gene-environment interactions of potential, uncertain or unlikely relevance for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, HHV8-Kaposi sarcoma, H1N1-influenza, JC virus, human innate immunity interactome for type I interferon, autoimmune regulator, vitamin D receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and a panel of proteins targeted by 70 innate immune-modulating viral open reading frames from 30 viral species. Interactomes were either obtained from the literature or were manually curated. The P values of all single nucleotide polymorphism mapping to a given interactome were obtained from the last genome-wide association study of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium & the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, 2. The interaction between genotype and Epstein Barr virus emerges as relevant for multiple sclerosis etiology. However, in line with recent data on the coexistence of common and unique strategies used by viruses to perturb the human molecular system, also other viruses have a similar potential, though probably less relevant in epidemiological terms. PMID:23696811

  9. Human transcriptional interactome of chromatin contribute to gene co-expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcriptional interactome of chromatin is one of the important mechanisms in gene transcription regulation. By chromatin conformation capture and 3D FISH experiments, several chromatin interactions cases among sequence-distant genes or even inter-chromatin genes were reported. However, on genomics level, there is still little evidence to support these mechanisms. Recently based on Hi-C experiment, a genome-wide picture of chromatin interactions in human cells was presented. It provides a useful material for analysing whether the mechanism of transcriptional interactome is common. Results The main work here is to demonstrate whether the effects of transcriptional interactome on gene co-expression exist on genomic level. While controlling the effects of transcription factors control similarities (TCS), we tested the correlation between Hi-C interaction and the mutual ranks of gene co-expression rates (provided by COXPRESdb) of intra-chromatin gene pairs. We used 6,084 genes with both TF annotation and co-expression information, and matched them into 273,458 pairs with similar Hi-C interaction ranks in different cell types. The results illustrate that co-expression is strongly associated with chromatin interaction. Further analysis using GO annotation reveals potential correlation between gene function similarity, Hi-C interaction and their co-expression. Conclusions According to the results in this research, the intra-chromatin interactome may have relation to gene function and associate with co-expression. This study provides evidence for illustrating the effect of transcriptional interactome on transcription regulation. PMID:21156067

  10. A cross-species bi-clustering approach to identifying conserved co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun; Bi, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A growing number of studies have explored the process of pre-implantation embryonic development of multiple mammalian species. However, the conservation and variation among different species in their developmental programming are poorly defined due to the lack of effective computational methods for detecting co-regularized genes that are conserved across species. The most sophisticated method to date for identifying conserved co-regulated genes is a two-step approach. This approach first identifies gene clusters for each species by a cluster analysis of gene expression data, and subsequently computes the overlaps of clusters identified from different species to reveal common subgroups. This approach is ineffective to deal with the noise in the expression data introduced by the complicated procedures in quantifying gene expression. Furthermore, due to the sequential nature of the approach, the gene clusters identified in the first step may have little overlap among different species in the second step, thus difficult to detect conserved co-regulated genes. Results: We propose a cross-species bi-clustering approach which first denoises the gene expression data of each species into a data matrix. The rows of the data matrices of different species represent the same set of genes that are characterized by their expression patterns over the developmental stages of each species as columns. A novel bi-clustering method is then developed to cluster genes into subgroups by a joint sparse rank-one factorization of all the data matrices. This method decomposes a data matrix into a product of a column vector and a row vector where the column vector is a consistent indicator across the matrices (species) to identify the same gene cluster and the row vector specifies for each species the developmental stages that the clustered genes co-regulate. Efficient optimization algorithm has been developed with convergence analysis. This approach was first validated on

  11. Long-term potentiation modulates synaptic phosphorylation networks and reshapes the structure of the postsynaptic interactome.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wilkinson, Brent; Clementel, Veronica A; Hou, Junjie; O'Dell, Thomas J; Coba, Marcelo P

    2016-01-01

    The postsynaptic site of neurons is composed of more than 1500 proteins arranged in protein-protein interaction complexes, the composition of which is modulated by protein phosphorylation through the actions of complex signaling networks. Components of these networks function as key regulators of synaptic plasticity, in particular hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a complex multicomponent structure that includes receptors, enzymes, scaffold proteins, and structural proteins. We triggered LTP in the mouse hippocampus CA1 region and then performed large-scale analyses to identify phosphorylation-mediated events in the PSD and changes in the protein-protein interactome of the PSD that were associated with LTP induction. Our data indicated LTP-induced reorganization of the PSD. The dynamic reorganization of the PSD links glutamate receptor signaling to kinases (writers) and phosphatases (erasers), as well as the target proteins that are modulated by protein phosphorylation and the proteins that recognize the phosphorylation status of their binding partners (readers). Protein phosphorylation and protein interaction networks converged at highly connected nodes within the PSD network. Furthermore, the LTP-regulated phosphoproteins, which included the scaffold proteins Shank3, Syngap1, Dlgap1, and Dlg4, represented the "PSD risk" for schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder, such that without these proteins in the analysis, the association with the PSD and these two psychiatric diseases was not present. These data are a rich resource for future studies of LTP and suggest that the PSD holds the keys to understanding the molecular events that contribute to complex neurological disorders that affect synaptic plasticity. PMID:27507650

  12. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis reveals conservation and variation in response to metal stress in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As one of the most dominant bacterial groups on Earth, cyanobacteria play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycling and the Earth atmosphere composition. Understanding their molecular responses to environmental perturbations has important scientific and environmental values. Since important biological processes or networks are often evolutionarily conserved, the cross-species transcriptional network analysis offers a useful strategy to decipher conserved and species-specific transcriptional mechanisms that cells utilize to deal with various biotic and abiotic disturbances, and it will eventually lead to a better understanding of associated adaptation and regulatory networks. Results In this study, the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) approach was used to establish transcriptional networks for four important cyanobacteria species under metal stress, including iron depletion and high copper conditions. Cross-species network comparison led to discovery of several core response modules and genes possibly essential to metal stress, as well as species-specific hub genes for metal stresses in different cyanobacteria species, shedding light on survival strategies of cyanobacteria responding to different environmental perturbations. Conclusions The WGCNA analysis demonstrated that the application of cross-species transcriptional network analysis will lead to novel insights to molecular response to environmental changes which will otherwise not be achieved by analyzing data from a single species. PMID:23421563

  13. Cross-Species Transmission of a Novel Adenovirus Associated with a Fulminant Pneumonia Outbreak in a New World Monkey Colony

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eunice C.; Yagi, Shigeo; Kelly, Kristi R.; Mendoza, Sally P.; Maninger, Nicole; Rosenthal, Ann; Spinner, Abigail; Bales, Karen L.; Schnurr, David P.; Lerche, Nicholas W.; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2011-01-01

    should be monitored closely as potential causes of cross-species outbreaks. PMID:21779173

  14. Cross-species immunoreactivity of airway mucin as revealed by monoclonal antibodies directed against mucins from human, hamster, and rat.

    PubMed

    Shin, C Y; Lee, W J; Kim, D J; Park, C S; Choi, E Y; Ko, K H

    2000-10-01

    Airway mucin plays crucial role in host-defense and has been implicated in pathophysiology of various airway diseases including asthma and cystic fibrosis. The analysis of airway mucin has been hampered mostly by the lack of specific and efficient methods for the detection of mucin. Recent production of antibodies against airway mucin from several species and also the development of immunoassay procedures make it more efficient to study the airway mucin. However, the cross-species immunoreactivity of antibodies against airway mucin has not been clearly demonstrated and this prompted us to investigate the cross-species immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human (HM02), hamster (HTA), and rat airway mucin (RT03), which is three most widely used species in the study of mucin. All the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) used in this study is IgM isotype and recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine-linked carbohydrate core or backbone portion of airway mucin. In enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical staining experiments, it was demonstrated that human and hamster airway mucin showed strong cross-species immunoreactivity. However, rat airway mucin did not show any cross-species immunoreactivity against human and hamster airway mucin. Endotoxin-induced secretory cell metaplasia and hence the increase in mucin release from hamster airway mucin could be detected with antibodies against hamster and human airway mucin in vivo and in vitro. However, the same increase from rat airway could only be detected with antibody against rat airway mucin but not with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin. In addition, the increase in mucin release from asthmatic patients could be detected with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin but not with the antibody against rat airway mucin. The data from the present study implicates that the carbohydrate chain of human and hamster airway mucin, but not that

  15. A comprehensive protein–protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 reveals direct inhibition of respiration through the phosphorylation of Cbf1

    PubMed Central

    DeMille, Desiree; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Mathis, Andrew D.; Prince, John T.; Mackay, Jordan T.; Sowa, Steven W.; Hall, Tacie D.; Grose, Julianne H.

    2014-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase is a sensory protein kinase required for glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and humans, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its function. Using both yeast two-hybrid and copurification approaches, we identified the protein–protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 (Psk1), revealing 93 novel putative protein binding partners. Several of the Psk1 binding partners expand the role of PAS kinase in glucose homeostasis, including new pathways involved in mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, the interactome suggests novel roles for PAS kinase in cell growth (gene/protein expression, replication/cell division, and protein modification and degradation), vacuole function, and stress tolerance. In vitro kinase studies using a subset of 25 of these binding partners identified Mot3, Zds1, Utr1, and Cbf1 as substrates. Further evidence is provided for the in vivo phosphorylation of Cbf1 at T211/T212 and for the subsequent inhibition of respiration. This respiratory role of PAS kinase is consistent with the reported hypermetabolism of PAS kinase–deficient mice, identifying a possible molecular mechanism and solidifying the evolutionary importance of PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:24850888

  16. Mapping the Protein-Protein Interactome Networks Using Yeast Two-Hybrid Screens.

    PubMed

    Rajagopala, Seesandra Venkatappa

    2015-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H) is a powerful method to identify binary protein-protein interactions in vivo. Here we describe Y2H screening strategies that use defined libraries of open reading frames (ORFs) and cDNA libraries. The array-based Y2H system is well suited for interactome studies of small genomes with an existing ORFeome clones preferentially in a recombination based cloning system. For large genomes, pooled library screening followed by Y2H pairwise retests may be more efficient in terms of time and resources, but multiple sampling is necessary to ensure comprehensive screening. While the Y2H false positives can be efficiently reduced by using built-in controls, retesting, and evaluation of background activation; implementing the multiple variants of the Y2H vector systems is essential to reduce the false negatives and ensure comprehensive coverage of an interactome. PMID:26621469

  17. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Rao, Megha Vaman; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness is conferred by cadherin extracellular domains, and is regulated by an assembly of adaptors and enzymes associated with the cytoplasmic tail. Here, we employed proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to isolate and identify 612 proteins in the vicinity of E-cadherin’s cytoplasmic tail. We used a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions to construct the most comprehensive E-cadherin interactome to date, containing 89 known E-cadhesome components and 346 novel proteins. Moreover, through cloning and expression of GFP-tagged fusion proteins we localized 26 of the novel proteins to adherens junctions. Finally, employing calcium depletion and myosin inhibition we show the E-cadherin interactome to be remarkably robust to perturbation and essentially independent of cell-cell junctions or actomyosin contractility. PMID:25468996

  18. InteractoMIX: a suite of computational tools to exploit interactomes in biological and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Poglayen, Daniel; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Bonet, Jaume; Fornes, Oriol; Garcia-Garcia, Javier; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Segura, Joan; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2016-06-15

    Virtually all the biological processes that occur inside or outside cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Hence, the charting and description of the PPI network, initially in organisms, the interactome, but more recently in specific tissues, is essential to fully understand cellular processes both in health and disease. The study of PPIs is also at the heart of renewed efforts in the medical and biotechnological arena in the quest of new therapeutic targets and drugs. Here, we present a mini review of 11 computational tools and resources tools developed by us to address different aspects of PPIs: from interactome level to their atomic 3D structural details. We provided details on each specific resource, aims and purpose and compare with equivalent tools in the literature. All the tools are presented in a centralized, one-stop, web site: InteractoMIX (http://interactomix.com). PMID:27284060

  19. Preparation of Gap Junctions in Membrane Microdomains for Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry Interactome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephanie; Akins, Mark; Bennett, Steffany A L

    2016-01-01

    Protein interaction networks at gap junction plaques are increasingly implicated in a variety of intracellular signaling cascades. Identifying protein interactions of integral membrane proteins is a valuable tool for determining channel function. However, several technical challenges exist. Subcellular fractionation of the bait protein matrix is usually required to identify less abundant proteins in complex homogenates. Sufficient solvation of the lipid environment without perturbation of the protein interactome must also be achieved. The present chapter describes the flotation of light and heavy liver tissue membrane microdomains to facilitate the identification and analysis of endogenous gap junction proteins and includes technical notes for translation to other integral membrane proteins, tissues, or cell culture models. These procedures are valuable tools for the enrichment of gap junction membrane compartments and for the identification of gap junction signaling interactomes. PMID:27207290

  20. Hubba: hub objects analyzer--a framework of interactome hubs identification for network biology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yen; Chin, Chia-Hao; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Ho, Chin-Wen; Ko, Ming-Tat

    2008-07-01

    One major task in the post-genome era is to reconstruct proteomic and genomic interacting networks using high-throughput experiment data. To identify essential nodes/hubs in these interactomes is a way to decipher the critical keys inside biochemical pathways or complex networks. These essential nodes/hubs may serve as potential drug-targets for developing novel therapy of human diseases, such as cancer or infectious disease caused by emerging pathogens. Hub Objects Analyzer (Hubba) is a web-based service for exploring important nodes in an interactome network generated from specific small- or large-scale experimental methods based on graph theory. Two characteristic analysis algorithms, Maximum Neighborhood Component (MNC) and Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC) are developed for exploring and identifying hubs/essential nodes from interactome networks. Users can submit their own interaction data in PSI format (Proteomics Standards Initiative, version 2.5 and 1.0), tab format and tab with weight values. User will get an email notification of the calculation complete in minutes or hours, depending on the size of submitted dataset. Hubba result includes a rank given by a composite index, a manifest graph of network to show the relationship amid these hubs, and links for retrieving output files. This proposed method (DMNC || MNC) can be applied to discover some unrecognized hubs from previous dataset. For example, most of the Hubba high-ranked hubs (80% in top 10 hub list, and >70% in top 40 hub list) from the yeast protein interactome data (Y2H experiment) are reported as essential proteins. Since the analysis methods of Hubba are based on topology, it can also be used on other kinds of networks to explore the essential nodes, like networks in yeast, rat, mouse and human. The website of Hubba is freely available at http://hub.iis.sinica.edu.tw/Hubba. PMID:18503085

  1. Comparative interactomics analysis of different ALS-associated proteins identifies converging molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Blokhuis, Anna M; Koppers, Max; Groen, Ewout J N; van den Heuvel, Dianne M A; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Anink, Jasper J; Fumoto, Katsumi; van Diggelen, Femke; Snelting, Anne; Sodaar, Peter; Verheijen, Bert M; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Veldink, Jan H; Aronica, Eleonora; Bozzoni, Irene; den Hertog, Jeroen; van den Berg, Leonard H; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment available. An increasing number of genetic causes of ALS are being identified, but how these genetic defects lead to motor neuron degeneration and to which extent they affect common cellular pathways remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed an interactomic analysis to identify binding partners of wild-type (WT) and ALS-associated mutant versions of ATXN2, C9orf72, FUS, OPTN, TDP-43 and UBQLN2 in neuronal cells. This analysis identified several known but also many novel binding partners of these proteins. Interactomes of WT and mutant ALS proteins were very similar except for OPTN and UBQLN2, in which mutations caused loss or gain of protein interactions. Several of the identified interactomes showed a high degree of overlap: shared binding partners of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43 had roles in RNA metabolism; OPTN- and UBQLN2-interacting proteins were related to protein degradation and protein transport, and C9orf72 interactors function in mitochondria. To confirm that this overlap is important for ALS pathogenesis, we studied fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), one of the common interactors of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43, in more detail in in vitro and in vivo model systems for FUS ALS. FMRP localized to mutant FUS-containing aggregates in spinal motor neurons and bound endogenous FUS in a direct and RNA-sensitive manner. Furthermore, defects in synaptic FMRP mRNA target expression, neuromuscular junction integrity, and motor behavior caused by mutant FUS in zebrafish embryos, could be rescued by exogenous FMRP expression. Together, these results show that interactomics analysis can provide crucial insight into ALS disease mechanisms and they link FMRP to motor neuron dysfunction caused by FUS mutations. PMID:27164932

  2. Detection of RHDV strains in the Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis): earliest evidence of rabbit lagovirus cross-species infection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana M; Marques, Sara; Silva, Eliane; Magalhães, Maria J; Pinheiro, Ana; Alves, Paulo C; Le Pendu, Jacques; Esteves, Pedro J; Thompson, Gertrude; Abrantes, Joana

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a highly lethal Lagovirus, family Caliciviridae, that threatens European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Although a related virus severely affects hares, cross-species infection was only recently described for new variant RHDV in Cape hares (Lepus capensis mediterraneus). We sequenced two strains from dead Iberian hares (Lepus granatensis) collected in the 1990s in Portugal. Clinical signs were compatible with a Lagovirus infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete capsid gene positioned them in the RHDV genogroup that circulated on the Iberian Peninsula at that time. This is the earliest evidence of RHDV affecting a species other than European rabbits. PMID:25248407

  3. GPSy: a cross-species gene prioritization system for conserved biological processes—application in male gamete development

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Ramona; Sallou, Olivier; Collin, Olivier; Michaux, Grégoire; Primig, Michael; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    We present gene prioritization system (GPSy), a cross-species gene prioritization system that facilitates the arduous but critical task of prioritizing genes for follow-up functional analyses. GPSy’s modular design with regard to species, data sets and scoring strategies enables users to formulate queries in a highly flexible manner. Currently, the system encompasses 20 topics related to conserved biological processes including male gamete development discussed in this article. The web server-based tool is freely available at http://gpsy.genouest.org. PMID:22570409

  4. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  5. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein-Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Chris H

    2012-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i) A. thaliana PPI data from three major DBs, BioGRID, IntAct, and TAIR. (ii) ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i) ortholog predictions, (ii) identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii) BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain-domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability. PMID:23293649

  6. Interactome Mapping Reveals Important Pathways in Skeletal Muscle Development of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianhua; Huang, Tinghua; Li, Xinyun; Zhao, Shuhong

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory relationship and connectivity among genes involved in myogenesis and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle in pigs still remain large challenges. Presentation of gene interactions is a potential way to understand the mechanisms of developmental events in skeletal muscle. In this study, genome-wide transcripts and miRNA profiling was determined for Landrace pigs at four time points using microarray chips. A comprehensive method integrating gene ontology annotation and interactome network mapping was conducted to analyze the biological patterns and interaction modules of muscle development events based on differentially expressed genes and miRNAs. Our results showed that in total 484 genes and 34 miRNAs were detected for the duration from embryonic stage to adult in pigs, which composed two linear expression patterns with consensus changes. Moreover, the gene ontology analysis also disclosed that there were three typical biological events i.e., microstructure assembly of sarcomere at early embryonic stage, myofibril formation at later embryonic stage and function establishments of myoblast cells at postnatal stage. The interactome mappings of different time points also found the down-regulated trend of gene expression existed across the whole duration, which brought a possibility to introduce the myogenesis related miRNAs into the interactome regulatory networks of skeletal muscle in pigs. PMID:25431924

  7. Mining protein interactomes to improve their reliability and support the advancement of network medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput detection of protein interactions has had a major impact in our understanding of the intricate molecular machinery underlying the living cell, and has permitted the construction of very large protein interactomes. The protein networks that are currently available are incomplete and a significant percentage of their interactions are false positives. Fortunately, the structural properties observed in good quality social or technological networks are also present in biological systems. This has encouraged the development of tools, to improve the reliability of protein networks and predict new interactions based merely on the topological characteristics of their components. Since diseases are rarely caused by the malfunction of a single protein, having a more complete and reliable interactome is crucial in order to identify groups of inter-related proteins involved in disease etiology. These system components can then be targeted with minimal collateral damage. In this article, an important number of network mining tools is reviewed, together with resources from which reliable protein interactomes can be constructed. In addition to the review, a few representative examples of how molecular and clinical data can be integrated to deepen our understanding of pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:26442112

  8. Inferring the Brassica rapa Interactome Using Protein–Protein Interaction Data from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhua; Osman, Kim; Iqbal, Mudassar; Stekel, Dov J.; Luo, Zewei; Armstrong, Susan J.; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2013-01-01

    Following successful completion of the Brassica rapa sequencing project, the next step is to investigate functions of individual genes/proteins. For Arabidopsis thaliana, large amounts of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data are available from the major PPI databases (DBs). It is known that Brassica crop species are closely related to A. thaliana. This provides an opportunity to infer the B. rapa interactome using PPI data available from A. thaliana. In this paper, we present an inferred B. rapa interactome that is based on the A. thaliana PPI data from two resources: (i) A. thaliana PPI data from three major DBs, BioGRID, IntAct, and TAIR. (ii) ortholog-based A. thaliana PPI predictions. Linking between B. rapa and A. thaliana was accomplished in three complementary ways: (i) ortholog predictions, (ii) identification of gene duplication based on synteny and collinearity, and (iii) BLAST sequence similarity search. A complementary approach was also applied, which used known/predicted domain–domain interaction data. Specifically, since the two species are closely related, we used PPI data from A. thaliana to predict interacting domains that might be conserved between the two species. The predicted interactome was investigated for the component that contains known A. thaliana meiotic proteins to demonstrate its usability. PMID:23293649

  9. A disease module in the interactome explains disease heterogeneity, drug response and captures novel pathways and genes in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Huang, C. Chris; Ort, Tatiana; Zhou, Xiaobo; Kitsak, Maksim; Sahni, Nidhi; Thibault, Derek; Voung, Linh; Guo, Feng; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Gulbahce, Natali; Baribaud, Frédéric; Tocker, Joel; Dobrin, Radu; Barnathan, Elliot; Liu, Hao; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Qiu, Weiliang; Raby, Benjamin A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Vidal, Marc; Weiss, Scott T.; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics have spurred rapid progress towards the systematic identification of genes involved in complex diseases. Still, the detailed understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms through which these genes affect disease phenotypes remains a major challenge. Here, we identify the asthma disease module, i.e. the local neighborhood of the interactome whose perturbation is associated with asthma, and validate it for functional and pathophysiological relevance, using both computational and experimental approaches. We find that the asthma disease module is enriched with modest GWAS P-values against the background of random variation, and with differentially expressed genes from normal and asthmatic fibroblast cells treated with an asthma-specific drug. The asthma module also contains immune response mechanisms that are shared with other immune-related disease modules. Further, using diverse omics (genomics, gene-expression, drug response) data, we identify the GAB1 signaling pathway as an important novel modulator in asthma. The wiring diagram of the uncovered asthma module suggests a relatively close link between GAB1 and glucocorticoids (GCs), which we experimentally validate, observing an increase in the level of GAB1 after GC treatment in BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. The siRNA knockdown of GAB1 in the BEAS-2B cell line resulted in a decrease in the NFkB level, suggesting a novel regulatory path of the pro-inflammatory factor NFkB by GAB1 in asthma. PMID:25586491

  10. A disease module in the interactome explains disease heterogeneity, drug response and captures novel pathways and genes in asthma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Huang, C Chris; Ort, Tatiana; Zhou, Xiaobo; Kitsak, Maksim; Sahni, Nidhi; Thibault, Derek; Voung, Linh; Guo, Feng; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Gulbahce, Natali; Baribaud, Frédéric; Tocker, Joel; Dobrin, Radu; Barnathan, Elliot; Liu, Hao; Panettieri, Reynold A; Tantisira, Kelan G; Qiu, Weiliang; Raby, Benjamin A; Silverman, Edwin K; Vidal, Marc; Weiss, Scott T; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in genetics have spurred rapid progress towards the systematic identification of genes involved in complex diseases. Still, the detailed understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms through which these genes affect disease phenotypes remains a major challenge. Here, we identify the asthma disease module, i.e. the local neighborhood of the interactome whose perturbation is associated with asthma, and validate it for functional and pathophysiological relevance, using both computational and experimental approaches. We find that the asthma disease module is enriched with modest GWAS P-values against the background of random variation, and with differentially expressed genes from normal and asthmatic fibroblast cells treated with an asthma-specific drug. The asthma module also contains immune response mechanisms that are shared with other immune-related disease modules. Further, using diverse omics (genomics, gene-expression, drug response) data, we identify the GAB1 signaling pathway as an important novel modulator in asthma. The wiring diagram of the uncovered asthma module suggests a relatively close link between GAB1 and glucocorticoids (GCs), which we experimentally validate, observing an increase in the level of GAB1 after GC treatment in BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. The siRNA knockdown of GAB1 in the BEAS-2B cell line resulted in a decrease in the NFkB level, suggesting a novel regulatory path of the pro-inflammatory factor NFkB by GAB1 in asthma. PMID:25586491

  11. CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDE METABOLITES USING RAT AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCHLORHYNCHUS MYKISS) HEPATIC MICROSOMES AND PURIFIED HUMAN CYP 3A4

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessment frequently relies on cross-species extrapolation to predict acute toxicity from chemical exposures. A major concern for environmental risk characterization is the degree of uncertainty in assessing xenobiotic biotansformation processes. Although inheren...

  12. Influenza as a model system for studying the cross-species transfer and evolution of the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Robin M

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) moved into humans from a reservoir species and subsequently caused an epidemic in its new host. We know little about the processes that allowed the cross-species transfer of this previously unknown virus. I discuss what we have learned about the movement of viruses into humans from studies of influenza A, both how it crossed from birds to humans and how it subsequently evolved within the human population. Starting with a brief review of severe acute respiratory syndrome to highlight the kinds of problems we face in learning about this viral disease, I then turn to influenza A, focusing on three topics. First, I present a reanalysis of data used to test the hypothesis that swine served as a "mixing vessel" or intermediate host in the transmission of avian influenza to humans during the 1918 "Spanish flu" pandemic. Second, I review studies of archived viruses from the three recent influenza pandemics. Third, I discuss current limitations in using molecular data to study the evolution of infectious disease. Although influenza A and SARS-CoV differ in many ways, our knowledge of influenza A may provide important clues about what limits or favours cross-species transfers and subsequent epidemics of newly emerging pathogens. PMID:15306391

  13. Cross-species amplification of microsatellite markers in Mycteria leucocephala Pennant 1769: molted feathers as successful DNA source.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Mustafa, Mohd; Sharma, Tusha; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Urfi, Abdul Jamil

    2014-10-01

    DNA from molted feathers is being increasingly used for genetic studies on birds. However, the DNA obtained from such non-invasive sources is often not of enough quantity and quality for isolation of new microsatellite markers. The present study examined the potential of shed feathers of near threatened Painted Stork as a source of its DNA for cross-species amplification of microsatellites. Thirty-one shed feathers of varying conditions ('good' and 'deteriorated') and sizes ('large', 'intermediate' and 'small') collected in a north Indian population were used to isolate DNA by a standard isopropanol method and 11 microsatellite markers already developed in the Wood Stork were screened for amplification. Nine plucked feathers from two dead Painted Storks were also used to compare the DNA yield and amplification success. The DNA yield of feathers varied significantly in relation to the calamus size and condition. Among molted feathers, 'good' and 'large' samples provided more DNA than 'deteriorated' and 'small' ones, respectively. 'Large' plucked feathers yielded more DNA than 'large' molted feathers. DNA was almost degraded in all the samples and ratio of absorbance at 260/280 nm varied from 1.0 to 1.8, indicating impurity in many samples. Independent of DNA yields, all microsatellites were cross-amplified in all kinds of feathers, with > 80% success in different feather categories. It is concluded that the shed feathers can be successfully used to isolate DNA in the Painted Stork and for cross-species amplification of microsatellites. PMID:25345251

  14. Cross-species protection: Schistosoma mansoni Sm-p80 vaccine confers protection against Schistosoma haematobium in hamsters and baboons.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Torben, Workineh; Alam, Mayeen U; Le, Loc; Damian, Raymond T; Wolf, Roman F; White, Gary L; Carey, David W; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-03-01

    The ability of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen, Sm-p80, to provide cross-species protection against Schistosoma haematobium challenge was evaluated in hamster and baboon models. Pronounced reduction in worm burden (48%) and in tissue egg load (64%) was observed in hamsters vaccinated with recombinant Sm-p80 admixed with glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE). Similarly, in baboons, the Sm-p80/GLA-SE vaccine produced a 25% reduction in S. haematobium adult worms and decreased the egg load in the urinary bladder by 64%. A 40% and 53% reduction in fecal and urine egg output, respectively, was observed in vaccinated baboons. A balanced pro-inflammatory (Th17 and Th1) and Th2 type of response was generated after vaccination and appears indicative of augmented prophylactic efficacy. These data on cross-species protection coupled with the prophylactic, therapeutic and antifecundity efficacy against the homologous parasite, S. mansoni, reinforces Sm-p80 as a promising vaccine candidate. It is currently being prepared for GMP-compliant manufacture and for further pre-clinical development leading to human clinical trials. These results solidify the expectation that the Sm-p80 vaccine will provide relief for both the intestinal and the urinary schistosomiasis and thus will be greatly beneficial in reducing the overall burden of schistosomiasis. PMID:24397898

  15. Construction and accessibility of a cross-species phenotype ontology along with gene annotations for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Ruef, Barbara J; Bauer, Sebastian; Washington, Nicole; Westerfield, Monte; Gkoutos, George; Schofield, Paul; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype analyses, e.g. investigating metabolic processes, tissue formation, or organism behavior, are an important element of most biological and medical research activities. Biomedical researchers are making increased use of ontological standards and methods to capture the results of such analyses, with one focus being the comparison and analysis of phenotype information between species. We have generated a cross-species phenotype ontology for human, mouse and zebrafish that contains classes from the Human Phenotype Ontology, Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and generated classes for zebrafish phenotypes. We also provide up-to-date annotation data connecting human genes to phenotype classes from the generated ontology. We have included the data generation pipeline into our continuous integration system ensuring stable and up-to-date releases. This article describes the data generation process and is intended to help interested researchers access both the phenotype annotation data and the associated cross-species phenotype ontology. The resource described here can be used in sophisticated semantic similarity and gene set enrichment analyses for phenotype data across species. The stable releases of this resource can be obtained from http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/hp/uberpheno/. PMID:24358873

  16. Identification of broadly conserved cross-species protective Leishmania antigen and its responding CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zhirong; Li, Jintao; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Hamana, Hiroshi; Ezzati, Peyman; Hu, Chuanmin; Yi, Weijing; Liu, Dong; Khadem, Forough; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Wang, Shufeng; Ndao, Momar; Petersen, Christine; Chen, Jianping; Rafati, Sima; Louzir, Hechmi; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Wilkins, John A; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-10-21

    There is currently no clinically effective vaccine against leishmaniasis because of poor understanding of the antigens that elicit dominant T cell immunity. Using proteomics and cellular immunology, we identified a dominant naturally processed peptide (PEPCK335-351) derived from Leishmania glycosomal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK was conserved in all pathogenic Leishmania, expressed in glycosomes of promastigotes and amastigotes, and elicited strong CD4(+) T cell responses in infected mice and humans. I-A(b)-PEPCK335-351 tetramer identified protective Leishmania-specific CD4(+) T cells at a clonal level, which comprised ~20% of all Leishmania-reactive CD4(+) T cells at the peak of infection. PEPCK335-351-specific CD4(+) T cells were oligoclonal in their T cell receptor usage, produced polyfunctional cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor), and underwent expansion, effector activities, contraction, and stable maintenance after lesion resolution. Vaccination with PEPCK peptide, DNA expressing full-length PEPCK, or rPEPCK induced strong durable cross-species protection in both resistant and susceptible mice. The effectiveness and durability of protection in vaccinated mice support the development of a broadly cross-species protective vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis by targeting PEPCK. PMID:26491077

  17. In vitro cross-species infections using a caprine arthritis encephalitis lentivirus carrying the GFP marker gene.

    PubMed

    Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Guiguen, François; Greenland, Timothy; Mornex, Jean-François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2007-07-01

    A caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), carrying the green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the tat region was recently reported [Mselli-Lakhal, L., Guiguen, F., Greenland, T., Mornex, J.F., Chebloune, Y., 2006. Gene transfer system derived from the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus. J. Virol. Meth. 136, 177-184]. This construct, called pK2EGFPH replicated to titres up to 10(5)IU/ml on infection of caprine cells, and could be concentrated to 10(6)IU/ml by ultracentrifugation. In the present study, the pK2EGFPH construct was characterized better and used in cross-species infection studies. The pK2EGFPH virus could transduce GFP protein expression both to goat synovial membrane cells and to an immortalized goat milk epithelial cell line. The pK2EGFPH infected cells were demonstrated to express both GFP protein and CAEV viral proteins, as demonstrated by radioimmunoprecipitation and multinucleated cell formation. However GFP expression could not be maintained over passages. This vector was used to investigate cross-species infectious potential of CAEV. The bovine cell lines MDBK and GBK were found to be sensitive to infection while the human cell lines Hela, A431 and THP-1 were not. The pK2EGFPH vector should prove useful in studies of CAEV tropism both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17386948

  18. A Computational Pipeline for Cross-Species Analysis of RNA-seq Data Using R and Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome analysis through profiling the expression of thousands of genes at the same time. Systematic analysis of orthologous transcripts across species is critical for understanding the evolution of gene expression and uncovering important information in animal models of human diseases. Several computational methods have been published for analyzing gene expression between species, but they often lack crucial details and therefore cannot serve as a practical guide. Here, we present the first step-by-step protocol for cross-species RNA-seq analysis with a concise workflow that is largely based on the free open-source R language and Bioconductor packages. This protocol covers the entire process from short-read mapping, gene expression quantification, differential expression analysis to pathway enrichment. Many useful utilities for data visualization are included. This complete and easy-to-follow protocol provides hands-on guidance for users who are new to cross-species gene expression analysis. PMID:26692761

  19. Development and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Sedum sarmentosum (Crassulaceae) and Their Cross-Species Transferability.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Hou, Fu-Yuan; Wan, Ding-Rong; Wang, Sha; Xu, Dong-Mei; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Sedum sarmentosum is an important Chinese medicinal herb that exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-nociceptive properties. However, little is known about its genetic background. The first set of 14 microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized for S. sarmentosum using an SSR-enriched library. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were acquired with satisfactory amplifications and a polymorphic pattern in 48 S. sarmentosum individuals. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.0833 to 0.8750 and 0.2168 to 0.9063, respectively. Two loci showed significant departure from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Cross-species amplification was carried out in other Sedum species. High rates of cross-species amplification were observed. The transferability value ranged from 85.7% in S. lineare to 64.3% in S. ellacombianum. These markers will be valuable for studying the genetic variation, population structure and germplasm characterization of S. sarmentosum and related Sedum species. PMID:26556327

  20. Comprehensive Protein Interactome Analysis of a Key RNA Helicase: Detection of Novel Stress Granule Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bish, Rebecca; Cuevas-Polo, Nerea; Cheng, Zhe; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Munschauer, Mathias; Landthaler, Markus; Vogel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    DDX6 (p54/RCK) is a human RNA helicase with central roles in mRNA decay and translation repression. To help our understanding of how DDX6 performs these multiple functions, we conducted the first unbiased, large-scale study to map the DDX6-centric protein-protein interactome using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Using DDX6 as bait, we identify a high-confidence and high-quality set of protein interaction partners which are enriched for functions in RNA metabolism and ribosomal proteins. The screen is highly specific, maximizing the number of true positives, as demonstrated by the validation of 81% (47/58) of the RNA-independent interactors through known functions and interactions. Importantly, we minimize the number of indirect interaction partners through use of a nuclease-based digestion to eliminate RNA. We describe eleven new interactors, including proteins involved in splicing which is an as-yet unknown role for DDX6. We validated and characterized in more detail the interaction of DDX6 with Nuclear fragile X mental retardation-interacting protein 2 (NUFIP2) and with two previously uncharacterized proteins, FAM195A and FAM195B (here referred to as granulin-1 and granulin-2, or GRAN1 and GRAN2). We show that NUFIP2, GRAN1, and GRAN2 are not P-body components, but re-localize to stress granules upon exposure to stress, suggesting a function in translation repression in the cellular stress response. Using a complementary analysis that resolved DDX6's multiple complex memberships, we further validated these interaction partners and the presence of splicing factors. As DDX6 also interacts with the E3 SUMO ligase TIF1β, we tested for and observed a significant enrichment of sumoylation amongst DDX6's interaction partners. Our results represent the most comprehensive screen for direct interaction partners of a key regulator of RNA life cycle and localization, highlighting new stress granule components and possible DDX6 functions-many of which are likely

  1. Comprehensive Protein Interactome Analysis of a Key RNA Helicase: Detection of Novel Stress Granule Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bish, Rebecca; Cuevas-Polo, Nerea; Cheng, Zhe; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Munschauer, Mathias; Landthaler, Markus; Vogel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    DDX6 (p54/RCK) is a human RNA helicase with central roles in mRNA decay and translation repression. To help our understanding of how DDX6 performs these multiple functions, we conducted the first unbiased, large-scale study to map the DDX6-centric protein-protein interactome using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Using DDX6 as bait, we identify a high-confidence and high-quality set of protein interaction partners which are enriched for functions in RNA metabolism and ribosomal proteins. The screen is highly specific, maximizing the number of true positives, as demonstrated by the validation of 81% (47/58) of the RNA-independent interactors through known functions and interactions. Importantly, we minimize the number of indirect interaction partners through use of a nuclease-based digestion to eliminate RNA. We describe eleven new interactors, including proteins involved in splicing which is an as-yet unknown role for DDX6. We validated and characterized in more detail the interaction of DDX6 with Nuclear fragile X mental retardation-interacting protein 2 (NUFIP2) and with two previously uncharacterized proteins, FAM195A and FAM195B (here referred to as granulin-1 and granulin-2, or GRAN1 and GRAN2). We show that NUFIP2, GRAN1, and GRAN2 are not P-body components, but re-localize to stress granules upon exposure to stress, suggesting a function in translation repression in the cellular stress response. Using a complementary analysis that resolved DDX6’s multiple complex memberships, we further validated these interaction partners and the presence of splicing factors. As DDX6 also interacts with the E3 SUMO ligase TIF1β, we tested for and observed a significant enrichment of sumoylation amongst DDX6’s interaction partners. Our results represent the most comprehensive screen for direct interaction partners of a key regulator of RNA life cycle and localization, highlighting new stress granule components and possible DDX6 functions—many of which are

  2. The Cellular EJC Interactome Reveals Higher Order mRNP Structure and an EJC-SR Protein Nexus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Guramrit; Kucukural, Alper; Cenik, Can; Leszyk, John D.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Weng, Zhiping; Moore, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In addition to sculpting eukaryotic transcripts by removing introns, pre-mRNA splicing greatly impacts protein composition of the emerging mRNP. The exon junction complex (EJC), deposited upstream of exon-exon junctions after splicing, is a major constituent of spliced mRNPs. Here we report comprehensive analysis of the endogenous human EJC protein and RNA interactomes. We confirm that the major “canonical” EJC occupancy site in vivo lies 24 nucleotides upstream of exon junctions and that the majority of exon junctions carry an EJC. Unexpectedly, we find that endogenous EJCs multimerize with one another and with numerous SR proteins to form megadalton sized complexes in which SR proteins are super-stoichiometric to EJC core factors. This tight physical association may explain known functional parallels between EJCs and SR proteins. Further, their protection of long mRNA stretches from nuclease digestion suggests that endogenous EJCs and SR proteins cooperate to promote mRNA packaging and compaction. PMID:23084401

  3. DDI-CPI, a server that predicts drug–drug interactions through implementing the chemical–protein interactome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Huang, Hui; Huang, Jialiang; Kao, Emily; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2014-01-01

    Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) may cause serious side-effects that draw great attention from both academia and industry. Since some DDIs are mediated by unexpected drug–human protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical–protein interactome (CPI) profiles of the drugs to predict their DDIs. Here we introduce the DDI-CPI server, which can make real-time DDI predictions based only on molecular structure. When the user submits a molecule, the server will dock user's molecule across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile that can be used as a feature vector for the pre-constructed prediction model. It can suggest potential DDIs between the user's molecule and our library of 2515 drug molecules. In cross-validation and independent validation, the server achieved an AUC greater than 0.85. Additionally, by investigating the CPI profiles of predicted DDI, users can explore the PK/PD proteins that might be involved in a particular DDI. A 3D visualization of the drug-protein interaction will be provided as well. The DDI-CPI is freely accessible at http://cpi.bio-x.cn/ddi/. PMID:24875476

  4. Proteome Based Construction of the Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1 (LFA-1) Interactome in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Christina; Lasonder, Edwin; Cruz, Luis J.; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2016-01-01

    The β2-integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) plays an important role in the migration, adhesion and intercellular communication of dendritic cells (DCs). During the differentiation of human DCs from monocyte precursors, LFA-1 ligand binding capacity is completely lost, even though its expression levels were remained constant. Yet LFA-1-mediated adhesive capacity on DCs can be regained by exposing DCs to the chemokine CCL21, suggesting a high degree of regulation of LFA-1 activity during the course of DC differentiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation of LFA-1 function in DCs, however, remain elusive. To get more insight we attempted to identify specific LFA-1 binding partners that may play a role in regulating LFA-1 activity in DCs. We used highly sensitive label free quantitative mass-spectrometry to identify proteins co-immunoprecipitated (co-IP) with LFA-1 from ex vivo generated DCs. Among the potential binding partners we identified not only established components of integrin signalling pathways and cytoskeletal proteins, but also several novel LFA-1 binding partners including CD13, galectin-3, thrombospondin-1 and CD44. Further comparison to the LFA-1 interaction partners in monocytes indicated that DC differentiation was accompanied by an overall increase in LFA-1 associated proteins, in particular cytoskeletal, signalling and plasma membrane (PM) proteins. The here presented LFA-1 interactome composed of 78 proteins thus represents a valuable resource of potential regulators of LFA-1 function during the DC lifecycle. PMID:26889827

  5. The interactome of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages show highly specific patterns of interactions among bacteria and their phages.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G; Häuser, Roman; Uetz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although an abundance of bacteriophages exists, little is known about interactions between their proteins and those of their bacterial hosts. Here, we experimentally determined the phage-host interactomes of the phages Dp-1 and Cp-1 and their underlying protein interaction network in the host Streptococcus pneumoniae. We compared our results to the interaction patterns of E. coli phages lambda and T7. Dp-1 and Cp-1 target highly connected host proteins, occupy central network positions, and reach many protein clusters through the interactions of their targets. In turn, lambda and T7 targets cluster to conserved and essential proteins in E. coli, while such patterns were largely absent in S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, targets in E. coli were mutually strongly intertwined, while targets of Dp-1 and Cp-1 were strongly connected through essential and orthologous proteins in their immediate network vicinity. In both phage-host systems, the impact of phages on their protein targets appears to extend from their network neighbors, since proteins that interact with phage targets were located in central network positions, have a strong topologically disruptive effect and touch complexes with high functional heterogeneity. Such observations suggest that the phages, biological impact is accomplished through a surprisingly limited topological reach of their targets. PMID:27103053

  6. TCTEX1D4 Interactome in Human Testis: Unraveling the Function of Dynein Light Chain in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Maria João; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Morais-Santos, Filipa; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Studies were designed to identify the TCTEX1D4 interactome in human testis, with the purpose of unraveling putative protein complexes essential to male reproduction and thus novel TCTEX1D4 functions. TCTEX1D4 is a dynein light chain that belongs to the DYNT1/TCTEX1 family. In spermatozoa, it appears to be important to sperm motility, intraflagellar transport, and acrosome reaction. To contribute to the knowledge on TCTEX1D4 function in testis and spermatozoa, a yeast two-hybrid assay was performed in testis, which allowed the identification of 40 novel TCTEX1D4 interactors. Curiously, another dynein light chain, TCTEX1D2, was identified and its existence demonstrated for the first time in human spermatozoa. Immunofluorescence studies proved that TCTEX1D2 is an intra-acrosomal protein also present in the midpiece, suggesting a role in cargo movement in human spermatozoa. Further, an in silico profile of TCTEX1D4 revealed that most TCTEX1D4 interacting proteins were not previously characterized and the ones described present a very broad nature. This reinforces TCTEX1D4 as a dynein light chain that is capable of interacting with a variety of functionally different proteins. These observations collectively contribute to a deeper molecular understanding of the human spermatozoa function. PMID:24606217

  7. APC is an RNA-Binding Protein and its Interactome Provides a Link to Neural Development and Microtubule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Nowakowski, Dan W.; Hancock, Melissa L.; Shi, Jianhua; Tcherkezian, Joseph; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.; Flanagan, John G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a microtubule plus-end scaffolding protein important in biology and disease. APC is implicated in RNA localization, although the mechanisms and functional significance remain unclear. We show that APC is an RNA-binding protein, and identify an RNA interactome by HITS-CLIP. Targets were highly enriched for APC-related functions, including microtubule organization, cell motility, cancer and neurologic disease. Among the targets is β2B-tubulin, known to be required in human neuron and axon migration. We show β2B-tubulin is synthesized in axons and localizes preferentially to dynamic microtubules in the growth cone periphery. APC binds the β2B-tubulin 3'UTR; treatments interfering with this interaction reduced β2B-tubulin mRNA axonal localization and expression, depleted dynamic microtubules and the growth cone periphery, and impaired neuron migration. These results identify APC as a platform binding functionally-related protein and RNA networks, and suggest a self-organizing model for the microtubule to localize synthesis of its own subunits. PMID:25036633

  8. Quantitative model of R-loop forming structures reveals a novel level of RNA–DNA interactome complexity

    PubMed Central

    Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Kuznetsov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    R-loop is the structure co-transcriptionally formed between nascent RNA transcript and DNA template, leaving the non-transcribed DNA strand unpaired. This structure can be involved in the hyper-mutation and dsDNA breaks in mammalian immunoglobulin (Ig) genes, oncogenes and neurodegenerative disease related genes. R-loops have not been studied at the genome scale yet. To identify the R-loops, we developed a computational algorithm and mapped R-loop forming sequences (RLFS) onto 66 803 sequences defined by UCSC as ‘known’ genes. We found that ∼59% of these transcribed sequences contain at least one RLFS. We created R-loopDB (http://rloop.bii.a-star.edu.sg/), the database that collects all RLFS identified within over half of the human genes and links to the UCSC Genome Browser for information integration and visualisation across a variety of bioinformatics sources. We found that many oncogenes and tumour suppressors (e.g. Tp53, BRCA1, BRCA2, Kras and Ptprd) and neurodegenerative diseases related genes (e.g. ATM, Park2, Ptprd and GLDC) could be prone to significant R-loop formation. Our findings suggest that R-loops provide a novel level of RNA–DNA interactome complexity, playing key roles in gene expression controls, mutagenesis, recombination process, chromosomal rearrangement, alternative splicing, DNA-editing and epigenetic modifications. RLFSs could be used as a novel source of prospective therapeutic targets. PMID:22121227

  9. The interactome of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages show highly specific patterns of interactions among bacteria and their phages

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan; Vizoso-Pinto, Maria G.; Häuser, Roman; Uetz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although an abundance of bacteriophages exists, little is known about interactions between their proteins and those of their bacterial hosts. Here, we experimentally determined the phage-host interactomes of the phages Dp-1 and Cp-1 and their underlying protein interaction network in the host Streptococcus pneumoniae. We compared our results to the interaction patterns of E. coli phages lambda and T7. Dp-1 and Cp-1 target highly connected host proteins, occupy central network positions, and reach many protein clusters through the interactions of their targets. In turn, lambda and T7 targets cluster to conserved and essential proteins in E. coli, while such patterns were largely absent in S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, targets in E. coli were mutually strongly intertwined, while targets of Dp-1 and Cp-1 were strongly connected through essential and orthologous proteins in their immediate network vicinity. In both phage-host systems, the impact of phages on their protein targets appears to extend from their network neighbors, since proteins that interact with phage targets were located in central network positions, have a strong topologically disruptive effect and touch complexes with high functional heterogeneity. Such observations suggest that the phages, biological impact is accomplished through a surprisingly limited topological reach of their targets. PMID:27103053

  10. Characterization of the Cardiac Overexpression of HSPB2 Reveals Mitochondrial and Myogenic Roles Supported by a Cardiac HspB2 Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Grose, Julianne H.; Langston, Kelsey; Wang, Xiaohui; Squires, Shayne; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Hayes, Whitney; Neubert, Jonathan; Fischer, Susan K.; Fasano, Matthew; Saunders, Gina Moore; Dai, Qiang; Christians, Elisabeth; Lewandowski, E. Douglas; Ping, Peipei; Benjamin, Ivor J.

    2015-01-01

    Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that transiently interact with other proteins, thereby assisting with quality control of proper protein folding and/or degradation. They are also recruited to protect cells from a variety of stresses in response to extreme heat, heavy metals, and oxidative-reductive stress. Although ten human sHSPs have been identified, their likely diverse biological functions remain an enigma in health and disease, and much less is known about non-redundant roles in selective cells and tissues. Herein, we set out to comprehensively characterize the cardiac-restricted Heat Shock Protein B-2 (HspB2), which exhibited ischemic cardioprotection in transgenic overexpressing mice including reduced infarct size and maintenance of ATP levels. Global yeast two-hybrid analysis using HspB2 (bait) and a human cardiac library (prey) coupled with co-immunoprecipitation studies for mitochondrial target validation revealed the first HspB2 “cardiac interactome” to contain many myofibril and mitochondrial-binding partners consistent with the overexpression phenotype. This interactome has been submitted to the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID). A related sHSP chaperone HspB5 had only partially overlapping binding partners, supporting specificity of the interactome as well as non-redundant roles reported for these sHSPs. Evidence that the cardiac yeast two-hybrid HspB2 interactome targets resident mitochondrial client proteins is consistent with the role of HspB2 in maintaining ATP levels and suggests new chaperone-dependent functions for metabolic homeostasis. One of the HspB2 targets, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has reported roles in HspB2 associated phenotypes including cardiac ATP production, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis, and was validated as a potential client protein of HspB2 through chaperone assays. From the clientele and phenotypes identified herein, it is tempting to

  11. Increased prevalence of carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospital setting due to cross-species transmission of the bla NDM-1 element and clonal spread of progenitor resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Chen, Gongxiang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangping; Cai, Jiachang; Chan, Edward W; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the transmission characteristics of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) strains collected from a hospital setting in China, in which consistent emergence of CRE strains were observable during the period of May 2013 to February 2014. Among the 45 CRE isolates tested, 21 (47%) strains were found to harbor the bla NDM-1 element, and the rest of 24 CRE strains were all positive for bla KPC-2. The 21 bla NDM-1-borne strains were found to comprise multiple Enterobacteriaceae species including nine Enterobacter cloacae, three Escherichia coli, three Citrobacter freundii, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two Klebsiella oxytoca, and two Morganella morganii strains, indicating that cross-species transmission of bla NDM-1 is a common event. Genetic analyses by PFGE and MLST showed that, with the exception of E. coli and E. cloacae, strains belonging to the same species were often genetically unrelated. In addition to bla NDM-1, several CRE strains were also found to harbor the bla KPC-2, bla VIM-1, and bla IMP-4 elements. Conjugations experiments confirmed that the majority of carbapenem resistance determinants were transferable. Taken together, our findings suggest that transmission of mobile resistance elements among members of Enterobacteriaceae and clonal spread of CRE strains may contribute synergistically to a rapid increase in the population of CRE in clinical settings, prompting a need to implement more rigorous infection control measures to arrest such vicious transmission cycle in CRE-prevalent areas. PMID:26136735

  12. BodyMap-Xs: anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal ESTs for cross-species comparison of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Osamu; Otsuji, Makiko; Watanabe, Kouji; Iizuka, Takayasu; Tamura, Takuro; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Kawamoto, Shoko; Okubo, Kousaku

    2006-01-01

    BodyMap-Xs () is a database for cross-species gene expression comparison. It was created by the anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal expressed sequence tag (EST) records in DDBJ using a sorting program tailored for this purpose. In BodyMap-Xs, users are allowed to compare the expression patterns of orthologous and paralogous genes in a coherent manner. This will provide valuable insights for the evolutionary study of gene expression and identification of a responsive motif for a particular expression pattern. In addition, starting from a concise overview of the taxonomical and anatomical breakdown of all animal ESTs, users can navigate to obtain gene expression ranking of a particular tissue in a particular animal. This method may lead to the understanding of the similarities and differences between the homologous tissues across animal species. BodyMap-Xs will be automatically updated in synchronization with the major update in DDBJ, which occurs periodically. PMID:16381946

  13. Cross-species hybridisation of human and bovine orthologous genes on high density cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Adjaye, James; Herwig, Ralf; Herrmann, Doris; Wruck, Wasco; BenKahla, Alia; Brink, Thore C; Nowak, Monika; Carnwath, Joseph W; Hultschig, Claus; Niemann, Heiner; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background Cross-species gene-expression comparison is a powerful tool for the discovery of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and pathways of expression control. The usefulness of cDNA microarrays in this context is that broad areas of homology are compared and hybridization probes are sufficiently large that small inter-species differences in nucleotide sequence would not affect the analytical results. This comparative genomics approach would allow a common set of genes within a specific developmental, metabolic, or disease-related gene pathway to be evaluated in experimental models of human diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of cross-species analysis employing a human cDNA microarray as probe. Results As a proof of principle, total RNA derived from human and bovine fetal brains was used as a source of labelled targets for hybridisation onto a human cDNA microarray composed of 349 characterised genes. Each gene was spotted 20 times representing 6,980 data points thus enabling highly reproducible spot quantification. Employing high stringency hybridisation and washing conditions, followed by data analysis, revealed slight differences in the expression levels and reproducibility of the signals between the two species. We also assigned each of the genes into three expression level categories- i.e. high, medium and low. The correlation co-efficient of cross hybridisation between the orthologous genes was 0.94. Verification of the array data by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using common primer sequences enabled co-amplification of both human and bovine transcripts. Finally, we were able to assign gene names to previously uncharacterised bovine ESTs. Conclusions Results of our study demonstrate the harnessing and utilisation power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using human microarrays to facilitate the identification of co-expressed orthologous genes in common tissues derived from different

  14. Quantitative Cross-Species Extrapolation between Humans and Fish: The Case of the Anti-Depressant Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Owen, Stewart F.; Cumming, Rob I.; de Polo, Anna; Winter, Matthew J.; Panter, Grace H.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; Sumpter, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Fish are an important model for the pharmacological and toxicological characterization of human pharmaceuticals in drug discovery, drug safety assessment and environmental toxicology. However, do fish respond to pharmaceuticals as humans do? To address this question, we provide a novel quantitative cross-species extrapolation approach (qCSE) based on the hypothesis that similar plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals cause comparable target-mediated effects in both humans and fish at similar level of biological organization (Read-Across Hypothesis). To validate this hypothesis, the behavioural effects of the anti-depressant drug fluoxetine on the fish model fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were used as test case. Fish were exposed for 28 days to a range of measured water concentrations of fluoxetine (0.1, 1.0, 8.0, 16, 32, 64 µg/L) to produce plasma concentrations below, equal and above the range of Human Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations (HTPCs). Fluoxetine and its metabolite, norfluoxetine, were quantified in the plasma of individual fish and linked to behavioural anxiety-related endpoints. The minimum drug plasma concentrations that elicited anxiolytic responses in fish were above the upper value of the HTPC range, whereas no effects were observed at plasma concentrations below the HTPCs. In vivo metabolism of fluoxetine in humans and fish was similar, and displayed bi-phasic concentration-dependent kinetics driven by the auto-inhibitory dynamics and saturation of the enzymes that convert fluoxetine into norfluoxetine. The sensitivity of fish to fluoxetine was not so dissimilar from that of patients affected by general anxiety disorders. These results represent the first direct evidence of measured internal dose response effect of a pharmaceutical in fish, hence validating the Read-Across hypothesis applied to fluoxetine. Overall, this study demonstrates that the qCSE approach, anchored to internal drug concentrations, is a powerful tool to guide the

  15. Cross-species comparison of mammalian saliva using an LC-MALDI based proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Cova, Marta; Abrantes, Joana; Ferreira, Rita; Trindade, Fábio; Barros, António; Gomes, Pedro; Colaço, Bruno; Amado, Francisco; Esteves, Pedro J; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Despite the importance of saliva in the regulation of oral cavity homeostasis, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively compare the saliva of different mammal species. Aiming to define a proteome signature of mammals' saliva, an in-depth SDS-PAGE-LC coupled to MS/MS (GeLC-MS/MS) approach was used to characterize the saliva from primates (human), carnivores (dog), glires (rat and rabbit), and ungulates (sheep, cattle, horse). Despite the high variability in the number of distinct proteins identified per species, most protein families were shared by the mammals studied with the exception of cattle and horse. Alpha-amylase is an example that seems to reflect the natural selection related to digestion efficacy and food recognition. Casein protein family was identified in all species but human, suggesting an alternative to statherin in the protection of hard tissues. Overall, data suggest that different proteins might assure a similar role in the regulation of oral cavity homeostasis, potentially explaining the specific mammals' salivary proteome signature. Moreover, some protein families were identified for the first time in the saliva of some species, the presence of proline-rich proteins in rabbit's saliva being a good example. PMID:25641928

  16. Multiple Cross-Species Transmission Events of Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) during Hominine Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Hohmann, Gottfried; Fruth, Barbara; Karhemere, Stomy; Madinda, Nadège F.; Mugisha, Lawrence; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Todd, Angelique; Petrzelkova, Klara J.; Gray, Maryke; Robbins, Martha; Bergl, Richard A.; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe; Schubert, Grit; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV; species HAdV-A to -G) are highly prevalent in the human population, and represent an important cause of morbidity and, to a lesser extent, mortality. Recent studies have identified close relatives of these viruses in African great apes, suggesting that some HAdV may be of zoonotic origin. We analyzed more than 800 fecal samples from wild African great apes and humans to further investigate the evolutionary history and zoonotic potential of hominine HAdV. HAdV-B and -E were frequently detected in wild gorillas (55%) and chimpanzees (25%), respectively. Bayesian ancestral host reconstruction under discrete diffusion models supported a gorilla and chimpanzee origin for these viral species. Host switches were relatively rare along HAdV evolution, with about ten events recorded in 4.5 My. Despite presumably rare direct contact between sympatric populations of the two species, transmission events from gorillas to chimpanzees were observed, suggesting that habitat and dietary overlap may lead to fecal-oral cross-hominine transmission of HAdV. Finally, we determined that two independent HAdV-B transmission events to humans occurred more than 100,000 years ago. We conclude that HAdV-B circulating in humans are of zoonotic origin and have probably affected global human health for most of our species lifetime. PMID:25862141

  17. Cross-species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone.

    PubMed

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Cavallin, Jenna E; Kahl, Michael D; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Kathleen M; Stevens, Kyle E; Severson, Megan N; Blanksma, Chad A; Flynn, Kevin M; Hartig, Philip C; Woodard, Jonne S; Berninger, Jason P; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-11-01

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that in humans is used to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female-pattern hair loss through antagonism of the androgen receptor. Although not routinely monitored in the environment, spironolactone has been detected downstream of a pharmaceutical manufacturer, indicating a potential for exposure of aquatic species. Furthermore, spironolactone has been reported to cause masculinization of female western mosquitofish, a response indicative of androgen receptor activation. Predictive methods to identify homologous proteins to the human and western mosquitofish androgen receptor suggest that vertebrates would be more susceptible to adverse effects mediated by chemicals like spironolactone that target the androgen receptor compared with invertebrate species that lack a relevant homolog. In addition, an adverse outcome pathway previously developed for activation of the androgen receptor suggests that androgen mimics can lead to reproductive toxicity in fish. To assess this, 21-d reproduction studies were conducted with 2 fish species, fathead minnow and Japanese medaka, and the invertebrate Daphnia magna. Spironolactone significantly reduced the fecundity of medaka and fathead minnows at 50 μg/L, whereas daphnia reproduction was not affected by concentrations as large as 500 μg/L. Phenotypic masculinization of females of both fish species was observed at 5 μg/L as evidenced by formation of tubercles in fathead minnows and papillary processes in Japanese medaka. Effects in fish occurred at concentrations below those reported in the environment. These results demonstrate how a priori knowledge of an adverse outcome pathway and the conservation of a key molecular target across vertebrates can be utilized to identify potential chemicals of concern in terms of monitoring and highlight potentially sensitive species and endpoints for testing. PMID:23881739

  18. Spatiotemporal interactions between wild boar and cattle: implications for cross-species disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Barasona, Jose A; Latham, M Cecilia; Acevedo, Pelayo; Armenteros, Jose A; Latham, A David M; Gortazar, Christian; Carro, Francisco; Soriguer, Ramon C; Vicente, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Controlling infectious diseases at the wildlife/livestock interface is often difficult because the ecological processes driving transmission between wildlife reservoirs and sympatric livestock populations are poorly understood. Thus, assessing how animals use their environment and how this affects interspecific interactions is an important factor in determining the local risk for disease transmission and maintenance. We used data from concurrently monitored GPS-collared domestic cattle and wild boar (Sus scrofa) to assess spatiotemporal interactions and associated implications for bovine tuberculosis (TB) transmission in a complex ecological and epidemiological system, Doñana National Park (DNP, South Spain). We found that fine-scale spatial overlap of cattle and wild boar was seasonally high in some habitats. In general, spatial interactions between the two species were highest in the marsh-shrub ecotone and at permanent water sources, whereas shrub-woodlands and seasonal grass-marshlands were areas with lower predicted relative interactions. Wild boar and cattle generally used different resources during winter and spring in DNP. Conversely, limited differences in resource selection during summer and autumn, when food and water availability were limiting, resulted in negligible spatial segregation and thus probably high encounter rates. The spatial gradient in potential overlap between the two species across DNP corresponded well with the spatial variation in the observed incidence of TB in cattle and prevalence of TB in wild boar. We suggest that the marsh-shrub ecotone and permanent water sources act as important points of TB transmission in our system, particularly during summer and autumn. Targeted management actions are suggested to reduce potential interactions between cattle and wild boar in order to prevent disease transmission and design effective control strategies. PMID:25496754

  19. Identification of RNA-binding Proteins in Macrophages by Interactome Capture.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S; Simons, Nadine; Eichelbaum, Katrin; Föhr, Sophia; Archer, Stuart K; Castello, Alfredo; Usadel, Björn; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Preiss, Thomas; Marx, Gernot; Hentze, Matthias W; Ostareck, Dirk H; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje

    2016-08-01

    Pathogen components, such as lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria that activate Toll-like receptor 4, induce mitogen activated protein kinases and NFκB through different downstream pathways to stimulate pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Importantly, post-transcriptional control of the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 downstream signaling molecules contributes to the tight regulation of inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. Emerging evidence highlights the role of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in the post-transcriptional control of the innate immune response. To systematically identify macrophage RBPs and their response to LPS stimulation, we employed RNA interactome capture in LPS-induced and untreated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. This combines RBP-crosslinking to RNA, cell lysis, oligo(dT) capture of polyadenylated RNAs and mass spectrometry analysis of associated proteins. Our data revealed 402 proteins of the macrophage RNA interactome including 91 previously not annotated as RBPs. A comparison with published RNA interactomes classified 32 RBPs uniquely identified in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Of these, 19 proteins are linked to biochemical activities not directly related to RNA. From this group, we validated the HSP90 cochaperone P23 that was demonstrated to exhibit cytosolic prostaglandin E2 synthase 3 (PTGES3) activity, and the hematopoietic cell-specific LYN substrate 1 (HCLS1 or HS1), a hematopoietic cell-specific adapter molecule, as novel macrophage RBPs. Our study expands the mammalian RBP repertoire, and identifies macrophage RBPs that respond to LPS. These RBPs are prime candidates for the post-transcriptional regulation and execution of LPS-induced signaling pathways and the innate immune response. Macrophage RBP data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002890. PMID:27281784

  20. Investigation of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG interactomes by affinity-purification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr), a post-translational modification involved in several important biological processes, namely surveillance of genome integrity, cell cycle progression, initiation of the DNA damage response, apoptosis, and regulation of transcription. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), on the other hand, catabolizes pADPr and thereby accounts for the transient nature of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Our investigation of the interactomes of PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG by affinity-purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) aimed, on the one hand, to confirm current knowledge on these interactomes and, on the other hand, to discover new protein partners which could offer insights into PARPs and PARG functions. Results PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARG were immunoprecipitated from human cells, and pulled-down proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis prior to in-gel trypsin digestion. Peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Our AP-MS experiments resulted in the identifications of 179 interactions, 139 of which are novel interactions. Gene Ontology analysis of the identified protein interactors points to five biological processes in which PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG may be involved: RNA metabolism for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG; DNA repair and apoptosis for PARP-1 and PARP-2; and glycolysis and cell cycle for PARP-1. Conclusions This study reveals several novel protein partners for PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARG. It provides a global view of the interactomes of these proteins as well as a roadmap to establish the systems biology of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:20388209

  1. Impaired autophagy and APP processing in Alzheimer's disease: The potential role of Beclin 1 interactome.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu; Ojala, Johanna; Haapasalo, Annakaisa; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β-containing neuritic plaques and intracellular tau protein tangles are key histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This type of pathology clearly indicates that the mechanisms of neuronal housekeeping and protein quality control are compromised in AD. There is mounting evidence that the autophagosome-lysosomal degradation is impaired, which could disturb the processing of APP and provoke AD pathology. Beclin 1 is a molecular platform assembling an interactome with stimulating and suppressive components which regulate the initiation of the autophagosome formation. Recent studies have indicated that the expression Beclin 1 is reduced in AD brain. Moreover, the deficiency of Beclin 1 in cultured neurons and transgenic mice provokes the deposition of amyloid-β peptides whereas its overexpression reduces the accumulation of amyloid-β. There are several potential mechanisms, which could inhibit the function of Beclin 1 interactome and thus impair autophagy and promote AD pathology. The mechanisms include (i) reduction of Beclin 1 expression or its increased proteolytic cleavage by caspases, (ii) sequestration of Beclin 1 to non-functional locations, such as tau tangles, (iii) formation of inhibitory complexes between Beclin 1 and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins or inflammasomes, (iv) interaction of Beclin 1 with inhibitory neurovirulent proteins, e.g. herpex simplex ICP34.5, or (v) inhibition of the Beclin 1/Vps34 complex through the activation of CDK1 and CDK5. We will shortly introduce the function of Beclin 1 interactome in autophagy and phagocytosis, review the recent evidence indicating that Beclin 1 regulates autophagy and APP processing in AD, and finally examine the potential mechanisms through which Beclin 1 dysfunction could be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:23827971

  2. Cross-Species Interaction between Rapidly Evolving Telomere-Specific Drosophila Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vedelek, Balázs; Blastyák, András; Boros, Imre M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere integrity in Drosophila melanogaster is maintained by a putative multisubunit complex called terminin that is believed to act in analogy to the mammalian shelterin complex in protecting chromosome ends from being recognized as sites of DNA damage. The five proteins supposed to form the terminin complex are HP1-ORC associated protein, HP1-HOAP interacting protein, Verrocchio, Drosophila Telomere Loss/Modigliani and Heterochromatic Protein 1. Four of these proteins evolve rapidly within the Drosophila genus. The accelerated evolution of terminin components may indicate the involvement of these proteins in the process by which new species arise, as the resulting divergence of terminin proteins might prevent hybrid formation, thus driving speciation. However, terminin is not an experimentally proven entity, and no biochemical studies have been performed to investigate its assembly and action in detail. Motivated by these facts in order to initiate biochemical studies on terminin function, we attempted to reconstitute terminin by co-expressing its subunits in bacteria and investigated the possible role of the fast-evolving parts of terminin components in complex assembly. Our results suggest formation of stable subcomplexes of terminin, but not of the whole complex in vitro. We found that the accelerated evolution is restricted to definable regions of terminin components, and that the divergence of D. melanogaster Drosophila Telomere Loss and D. yakuba Verrocchio proteins does not preclude their stable interaction. PMID:26566042

  3. Solutions to Peto's paradox revealed by mathematical modelling and cross-species cancer gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Caulin, Aleah F; Graham, Trevor A; Wang, Li-San; Maley, Carlo C

    2015-07-19

    Whales have 1000-fold more cells than humans and mice have 1000-fold fewer; however, cancer risk across species does not increase with the number of somatic cells and the lifespan of the organism. This observation is known as Peto's paradox. How much would evolution have to change the parameters of somatic evolution in order to equalize the cancer risk between species that differ by orders of magnitude in size? Analysis of previously published models of colorectal cancer suggests that a two- to three-fold decrease in the mutation rate or stem cell division rate is enough to reduce a whale's cancer risk to that of a human. Similarly, the addition of one to two required tumour-suppressor gene mutations would also be sufficient. We surveyed mammalian genomes and did not find a positive correlation of tumour-suppressor genes with increasing body mass and longevity. However, we found evidence of the amplification of TP53 in elephants, MAL in horses and FBXO31 in microbats, which might explain Peto's paradox in those species. Exploring parameters that evolution may have fine-tuned in large, long-lived organisms will help guide future experiments to reveal the underlying biology responsible for Peto's paradox and guide cancer prevention in humans. PMID:26056366

  4. Solutions to Peto's paradox revealed by mathematical modelling and cross-species cancer gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Caulin, Aleah F.; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Li-San; Maley, Carlo C.

    2015-01-01

    Whales have 1000-fold more cells than humans and mice have 1000-fold fewer; however, cancer risk across species does not increase with the number of somatic cells and the lifespan of the organism. This observation is known as Peto's paradox. How much would evolution have to change the parameters of somatic evolution in order to equalize the cancer risk between species that differ by orders of magnitude in size? Analysis of previously published models of colorectal cancer suggests that a two- to three-fold decrease in the mutation rate or stem cell division rate is enough to reduce a whale's cancer risk to that of a human. Similarly, the addition of one to two required tumour-suppressor gene mutations would also be sufficient. We surveyed mammalian genomes and did not find a positive correlation of tumour-suppressor genes with increasing body mass and longevity. However, we found evidence of the amplification of TP53 in elephants, MAL in horses and FBXO31 in microbats, which might explain Peto's paradox in those species. Exploring parameters that evolution may have fine-tuned in large, long-lived organisms will help guide future experiments to reveal the underlying biology responsible for Peto's paradox and guide cancer prevention in humans. PMID:26056366

  5. RISKY CHOICE IN PIGEONS AND HUMANS: A CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISON

    PubMed Central

    Lagorio, Carla H; Hackenberg, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    Pigeon and human subjects were given repeated choices between variable and adjusting delays to token reinforcement that titrated in relation to a subject's recent choice patterns. Indifference curves were generated under two different procedures: immediate exchange, in which a token earned during each trial was exchanged immediately for access to the terminal reinforcer (food for pigeons, video clips for humans), and delayed exchange, in which tokens accumulated and were exchanged after 11 trials. The former was designed as an analogue of procedures typically used with nonhuman subjects, the latter as an analogue to procedures typically used with human participants. Under both procedure types, different variable-delay schedules were manipulated systematically across conditions in ways that altered the reinforcer immediacy of the risky option. Under immediate-exchange conditions, both humans and pigeons consistently preferred the variable delay, and indifference points were generally ordered in relation to relative reinforcer immediacies. Such risk sensitivity was greatly reduced under delayed-exchange conditions. Choice and trial-initiation response latencies varied directly with indifference points, suggesting that local analyses may provide useful ancillary measures of reinforcer value. On the whole, the results indicate that modifying procedural features brings choices of pigeons and humans into better accord, and that human–nonhuman differences on risky choice procedures reported in the literature may be at least partly a product of procedural differences. PMID:20676266

  6. Phylogenomic study of spiral-horned antelope by cross-species chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Rubes, Jiri; Kubickova, Svatava; Pagacova, Eva; Cernohorska, Halina; Di Berardino, Dino; Antoninova, Marketa; Vahala, Jiri; Robinson, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal homologies have been established between cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60) and eight species of spiral-horned antelope, Tribe Tragelaphini: Nyala (Tragelaphus angasii, 2n = 55male/56female), Lesser kudu (T. imberbis, 2n = 38male,female), Bongo (T. eurycerus, 2n = 33male/34female), Bushbuck (T. scriptus, 2n = 33male/34female), Greater kudu (T. strepsiceros, 2n = 31male/32female), Sitatunga (T. spekei, 2n = 30male,female) Derby eland (Taurotragus derbianus 2n = 31male/32female) and Common eland (T. oryx 2n = 31male/32female). Chromosomes involved in centric fusions in these species were identified using a complete set of cattle painting probes generated by laser microdissection. Our data support the monophyly of Tragelaphini and a clade comprising T. scriptus, T. spekei, T. euryceros and the eland species T. oryx and T. derbianus, findings that are largely in agreement with sequence-based molecular phylogenies. In contrast, our study suggests that the arid adaptiveness of T. oryx and T. derbianus is recent. Finally, we have identified the presence of the rob(1;29) fusion as an evolutionary marker in most of the tragelaphid species investigated. This rearrangement is associated with reproductive impairment in cattle and raises questions whether subtle distinctions in breakpoint location or differential rescue during meiosis underpin the different outcomes detected among these lineages. PMID:18704723

  7. The phylogeny of howler monkeys (Alouatta, Platyrrhini): reconstruction by multicolor cross-species chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Neusser, Michaela; Figueiredo, Wilsea B; Nagamachi, Cleusa; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Sbalqueiro, Ives J; Wienberg, Johannes; Müller, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    We performed multidirectional chromosome painting in a comparative cytogenetic study of the three howler monkey species Alouatta fusca, A. caraya and A. seniculus macconnelli (Atelinae, Platyrrhini) in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within this genus. Comparative genome maps between these species were established by multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) employing human, Saguinus oedipus and Lagothrix lagothricha chromosome-specific probes. The three species included in this study and previously analyzed howler monkey species were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis on the basis of a data matrix comprised of 98 discrete molecular cytogenetic characters. The results revealed that howler monkeys represent the genus with the most extensive karyotype diversity within Platyrrhini so far analyzed with high levels of intraspecific chromosomal variability. Two different multiple sex chromosome systems were identified. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that Alouatta is a monophyletic clade which can be derived from a proposed ancestral Atelinae karyotype of 2n = 62 chromosomes by a chromosome fusion, a fission, a Y-autosomal translocation and a pericentric inversion. Following these suggestions, the genus Alouatta can be divided into two distinct species groups: the first includes A. caraya and A. belzebul, the second A. s. macconnelli, A. sara, A. s. arctoidea and A. fusca. PMID:12575795

  8. Cross-Species Interferon Signaling Boosts Microbicidal Activity within the Tick Vector.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexis A; Navasa, Nicolas; Yang, Xiuli; Wilder, Cara N; Buyuktanir, Ozlem; Marques, Adriana; Anguita, Juan; Pal, Utpal

    2016-07-13

    Evolution of hematophagy in blood-sucking parasites likely involves communication with their hosts. We find that Ixodes ticks are responsive to IFNγ acquired in a blood meal from mice infected with the Lyme disease-causing bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, leading to induction of antimicrobial responses. Ixodes ticks parasitizing B. burgdorferi-infected mice upregulated an I. scapularis Rho-like GTPase (IGTPase). IGTPase knockdown enhanced B. burgdorferi levels in post-fed ticks, suggesting this protein controls spirochete survival. Notably, IGTPase was only induced during pathogen acquisition from mice and not upon transmission to naive hosts. Microinjection of ticks with IFNγ induced IGTPase, and ticks parasitizing IFNγ knockout mice, failed to upregulate IGTPase. Additionally, ticks lacking the transcription factor STAT, which signals downstream of IFNγ, did not induce IGTPase. IGTPase expression induced antimicrobial peptides, including Dae2, previously shown to inhibit B. burgdorferi. These results identify an interspecies signaling cascade allowing ticks to detect invading bacteria and mount microbicidal responses. PMID:27374407

  9. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  10. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for