Science.gov

Sample records for sulfur trioxide

  1. Production of sulfur trioxide, sulfuric acid and oleum

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, W.D.; Jaffe, J.

    1987-02-17

    A process is described for the production of sulfur trioxide which comprises the steps: (a) feeding a gas mixture having a sulfur dioxide partial pressure of at least about 0.5 atmosphere, an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.37 atmosphere, an oxygen:-sulfur dioxide mole ratio of between about 0.7:1 and about 1:1. It also has a total pressure between about 1 atmosphere and about 10 atmospheres in plug flow through a bed of a conversion catalyst selected from the group consisting of vanadium oxide conversion catalysts and platinum conversion catalysts; (b) cooling the catalyst bed to produce a first zone wherein the gas mixture increases in temperature from the inlet temperature to a temperature between about 475/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C., a second zone wherein the temperature is substantially constant at a temperature between about 450/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C. and a third zone wherein the temperature is declining from a temperature between about 450/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C. to a temperature between about 325/sup 0/C. and about 400/sup 0/C., (c) passing the gas mixture successively through the first, second and third zones with sufficient contact times in the second and third zones to produce a product gas mixture with a sulfur trioxide to sulfur dioxide mole ratio of at least about 99:1, (d) cooling the product gas mixture to a temperature between about 35/sup 0/C. and about 45/sup 0/C. to produce liquid sulfur trioxide, and (e) separating the liquid sulfur trioxide from the remaining gas stream.

  2. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  3. EMISSIONS OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough not to cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired co...

  4. Method for the reduction of sulfur trioxide in an effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W.R.; Sullivan, J.C.; Sprague, B.N.

    1989-04-18

    A method is described for the selective reduction of sulfur trioxide in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel, the method comprising introducing a treatment agent comprising hydrogen peroxide or an oxygenated hydrocarbon having at least two carbon atoms into the effluent at an effluent temperature of between about 1000/sup 0/F and about 1450/sup 0/F.

  5. Kinetics of sulfonation of amines of the benzene series with sulfur trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Khelevin, R.N.

    1988-08-20

    The sulfonation of amines of the benzene series with sulfur trioxide in dichloroethane is described by a third-order kinetic equation for an irreversible process, and first order is observed with respect to the compound being sulfonated and second with respect to the sulfur trioxide. The unprotonated molecules of the amines undergo sulfonation, and this leads to the production of the para-aminosulfonic acids with small amounts of the ortho isomers. The reaction mechanism involves electrophilic reaction of the unprotonated amine molecule with the sulfur trioxide dimer S/sub 2/O/sub 6/ and subsequent dissociation of the obtained pyrosulfonate with the production of the amino sulfonic acid and sulfur trioxide. Sulfonation with sulfur trioxide is of interest in connection with the high rate and degree of completion of the reaction and the absence of energy expenditures.

  6. Emissions of sulfur trioxide from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R K; Miller, C A; Erickson, C; Jambhekar, R

    2004-06-01

    Emissions of sulfur trioxide (SO3) are a key component of plume opacity and acid deposition. Consequently, these emissions need to be low enough to not cause opacity violations and acid deposition. Generally, a small fraction of sulfur (S) in coal is converted to SO3 in coal-fired combustion devices such as electric utility boilers. The emissions of SO3 from such a boiler depend on coal S content, combustion conditions, flue gas characteristics, and air pollution devices being used. It is well known that the catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for nitrogen oxides control oxidizes a small fraction of sulfur dioxide in the flue gas to SO3. The extent of this oxidation depends on the catalyst formulation and SCR operating conditions. Gas-phase SO3 and sulfuric acid, on being quenched in plant equipment (e.g., air preheater and wet scrubber), result in fine acidic mist, which can cause increased plume opacity and undesirable emissions. Recently, such effects have been observed at plants firing high-S coal and equipped with SCR systems and wet scrubbers. This paper investigates the factors that affect acidic mist production in coal-fired electric utility boilers and discusses approaches for mitigating emission of this mist. PMID:15242154

  7. Photoresist removal using gaseous sulfur trioxide cleaning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puppo, Helene; Bocian, Paul B.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1999-06-01

    A novel cleaning method for removing photoresists and organic polymers from semiconductor wafers is described. This non-plasma method uses anhydrous sulfur trioxide gas in a two-step process, during which, the substrate is first exposed to SO3 vapor at relatively low temperatures and then is rinsed with de-ionized water. The process is radically different from conventional plasma-ashing methods in that the photoresist is not etched or removed during the exposure to SO3. Rather, the removal of the modified photoresist takes place during the subsequent DI-water rinse step. The SO3 process completely removes photoresist and polymer residues in many post-etch applications. Additional advantages of the process are absence of halogen gases and elimination of the need for other solvents and wet chemicals. The process also enjoys a very low cost of ownership and has minimal environmental impact. The SEM and SIMS surface analysis results are presented to show the effectiveness of gaseous SO3 process after polysilicon, metal an oxide etch applications. The effects of both chlorine- and fluorine-based plasma chemistries on resist removal are described.

  8. Design studies of the sulfur trioxide decomposition reactor for the sulfur-cycle hydrogen-production process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.S.; Flaherty, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Sulfur Cycle is a two-step hybrid electrochemical/thermochemical process for decomposing water into hydrogen and oxygen. Integration of a complex chemical process with a solar heat source poses unique challenges with regard to process and equipment design. The conceptual design for a developmental test unit demonstrating the sulfur cycle was prepared in 1980. The test unit design is compatible with the power level of a large parabolic solar collector. One of the key components in the process is the sulfur trioxide decomposition reactor. The design studies of the sulfur trioxide decomposition reactor encompassing the thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, heat transfer, and mechanical considerations, are described along with a brief description of the test unit.

  9. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOL. 15: CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, discussing sulfur trioxide (SO3), is one of a series addressing the prevention of accidental releases of toxic chemicals. SO3, a clear oily liquid or solid at typical ambient conditions, has an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) concentration of 20 ppm, w...

  10. Mechanism for forming hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A molecular orbital study of sodium sulfate and hydrogen chloride formation from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride shows no activation barrier, in agreement with recent experimental work of Kohl, Fielder, and Stearns. Two overall steps are found for the process. First, gas-phase water reacts with sulfur trioxide along a pathway involving a linear O-H-O transition state yielding closely associated hydroxyl and bisulfite which rearrange to become a hydrogen sulfate molecule. Then the hydrogen sulfate molecule transfers a hydrogen atom to a surface chloride in solid sodium chloride while an electron and a sodium cation simultaneously transfer to yield sodium bisulfate and gas-phase hydrogen chloride. This process repeats. Both of these steps represent well-known reactions for which mechanisms have not been previously determined.

  11. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  12. Donor-Acceptor Complexes between Ammonia and Sulfur Trioxide: An FTIR and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Haupa, Karolina; Bil, Andrzej; Mielke, Zofia

    2015-10-29

    The complexes of ammonia with sulfur trioxide have been studied using FTIR matrix isolation spectroscopy and DFT/B3LYP calculations with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The NH3/SO3/Ar matrixes were prepared in two different ways. In one set of experiments the matrix was prepared by the simultaneous deposition of the NH3/Ar mixture and SO3 vapor from the thermal decomposition of K2S2O7. In the second set of experiments thermolysis products of sulfamic acid were trapped in an argon matrix. Both methods of matrix preparation led to the formation of the H3N·SO3 electron donor-acceptor complex that was characterized earlier. In the matrixes comprising thermolysis products of sulfamic acid, in addition to H3N·SO3, the H3N-SO3···NH3 complex (II(D)) was also identified. The identity of the complex was confirmed by comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectra of H3N-SO3···NH3 and D3N-SO3···ND3. The performed calculations show that in H3N-SO3···NH3 the two N atoms and the S atom are collinear; the two S-N bonds are nonequivalent, one is much shorter (2.230 Å) than the other one (2.852 Å). In the AIM topological analysis, the interaction energy decomposition and topological properties of the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) allowed us to categorize the stronger N-S bond in the II(D) complex as a dative bond and to assume that the fragile N-S bond is a consequence of a weak electron-donor-acceptor interaction. The calculations indicate that the identified II(D) complex corresponds to a local minimum on the PES of the NH3/SO3 system of 2:1 stoichiometry. The (NH3)2SO3 complex, II(HB), corresponding to a global minimum is 7.95 kcal mol(-1) more stable than the II(D) complex. The reason that the II(D) complex is present in the matrix but not the II(HB) complex is discussed. PMID:26447490

  13. DFT study of hydrogen fluoride and sulfur trioxide interactions on the surface of Pt-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the adsorption properties of hydrogen florid (HF) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) on the surface of platinum decorated graphene (PtG) using density functional theory. We found one optimized configuration for HF and two ones for SO3 upon adsorption on the surface of PtG. Our result show significant adsorption on PtG with calculated energy adsorption of -73.6 (-54.2 BSSE) kJ/mol for HF at its only position and -172.4 (-144.8 BSSE) and -62.7 (-53.7 BSSE) kJ/mol for SO3 at its two positions; P1 and P2, respectively), whereas there is weak physisorption of these analytes on pristine graphene (PG). Results of charge analyses reveled interesting net charge transfer; while the direction of charge is from HF to PtG, reverse direction is found for SO3 for its two configurations. To deep understand the concept of adsorption properties, we used orbital analyses including density of states for interaction of mentioned analytes on the surface of PtG.

  14. New Insights into the Detection of Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical by Spin Trapping: Radical Trapping versus Nucleophilic Addition

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) reacts with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in biological systems via a nonradical, nucleophilic reaction, implying that the radical adduct (DMPO/•SO3−) formation in these systems is an artifact and not the result of spin trapping of sulfur trioxide anion radical (•SO3−). Here, the one-electron oxidation of (bi)sulfite catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase/H2O2 has been re-investigated by ESR spin trapping with DMPO and oxygen uptake studies in order to obtain further evidence for the radical reaction mechanism. In the case of ESR experiments, the signal of DMPO/•SO3− radical adduct was detected, and the initial rate of its formation was calculated. Support for the radical pathway via •SO3− was obtained from the stoichiometry between the amount of consumed molecular oxygen and the amount of (bi)sulfite oxidized to sulfate (SO42−). When DMPO was incubated with (bi)sulfite, oxygen consumption was completely inhibited due to the efficiency of DMPO trapping. In the absence of DMPO, the initial rate of oxygen and H2O2 consumption was determined to be half of the initial rate of DMPO/•SO3− radical adduct formation as determined by ESR, demonstrating that DMPO forms the radical adduct by trapping the •SO3− exclusively. We conclude that DMPO is not susceptible to artifacts arising from nonradical chemistry (nucleophilic addition) except when both (bi)sulfite and DMPO concentrations are at nonphysiological levels of at least 0.1 M and the incubations are for longer time periods. PMID:19362142

  15. Antimony trioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Antimony trioxide ; CASRN 1309 - 64 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  16. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  17. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  18. FLY ASH CONDITIONING WITH SULFUR TRIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an evaluation of an SO3 injection system for the George Neal Unit 2 boiler of the Iowa Public Service Co. in Sioux City, Iowa. Results of base line tests without conditioning indicate a dust resistivity of 6 x 10 to the 12th power ohm-cm at 118C: the precipit...

  19. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DOCUMENT FOR MONITORING SULFURIC ACID VAPOR FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    When fuels containing sulfur are burned, almost quantitative formation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) occurs. As much as 5-8% of the sulfur dioxide emitted may be converted to sulfur trioxide either by atomic oxygen in the combustion zone or by efficient catalysis of heavy metal contami...

  20. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using gaseous sulfur trioxide

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Bryan E.; Lysenko, Zenon; Bernius, Mark T.; Hukkanen, Eric J.

    2016-01-05

    Disclosed herein are processes for preparing carbonized polymers, such as carbon fibers, comprising: sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 gas to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of said solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C.

  1. Polyol mediated synthesis of tungsten trioxide and Ti doped tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Porkodi, P.; Yegnaraman, V.; Jeyakumar, D. . E-mail: djkr@rediffmail.com

    2006-08-10

    Polyol mediated synthesis for the preparation of tungsten trioxide and titanium doped tungsten trioxide has been reported. The reaction was carried out using chlorides of tungsten and titanium in diethylene glycol medium and water as the reagent for hydrolysis at 190 deg. C. Formation of a blue coloured dimensionally stable suspension of the precursor materials was observed during the course of the reaction. The particle sizes of the precursor materials were observed to be around 100 nm. The precursor materials were annealed to give tungsten trioxide and titanium doped tungsten trioxide. The precursor materials were characterised using TGA/DTA, FT-IR, optical spectra, SEM, TEM and powder XRD methods. It was observed that the doping of titanium could be effected at least up to 10% of Ti in WO{sub 3}. The TGA/DTA studies indicated that WO{sub 3-x}.H{sub 2}O is the dominant material that formed during the polyol mediated synthesis. The XRD data of the annealed samples revealed that the crystalline phase could be manipulated by varying the extent of titanium doping in the tungsten trioxide matrix.

  2. Sulfur and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquin, Gerard E.; Fell, Robert C.

    Sulfur is one of the few elements that is found in its elemental form in nature. Typical sulfur deposits occur in sedimentary limestone/gypsum formations, in limestone/anhydrite formations associated with salt domes, or in volcanic rock.1 A yellow solid at normal temperatures, sulfur becomes progressively lighter in color at lower temperatures and is almost white at the temperature of liquid air. It melts at 114-119°C (depending on crystalline form) to a transparent light yellow liquid as the temperature is increased. The low viscosity of the liquid begins to rise sharply above 160°C, peaking at 93 Pa·s at 188°C, and then falling as the temperature continues to rise to its boiling point of 445°C. This and other anomalous properties of the liquid state are due to equilibria between the various molecular species of sulfur, which includes small chains and rings.

  3. Organic transformations catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.

    1995-11-01

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3}, was first prepared in 1979. MTO forms stable or unstable adducts with electron-rich ligands, such as amines (quinuclidine, 1,4-diazabicyclo-octane, pyridine, aniline, 2,2{prime}-bipyridine), alkynes, olefins, 1,2-diols, catechols, hydrogen peroxide, water, thiophenols, 1,2-dithiols, triphenylphosphine, 2-aminophenols, 2-aminothiophenols, 8-hydroxyquinoline and halides (Cl-, Br-, I-). After coordination, different further reactions will occur for different reagents. Reactions described in this report include the dehydration of alcohols, direct amination of alcohols, activation of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen transfer, and decomposition of ethyl diazoacetate.

  4. SULFUR CHEMISTRY. Gas phase observation and microwave spectroscopic characterization of formic sulfuric anhydride.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca B; Dewberry, Christopher T; Leopold, Kenneth R

    2015-07-01

    We report the observation of a covalently bound species, formic sulfuric anhydride (FSA), that is produced from formic acid and sulfur trioxide under supersonic jet conditions. FSA has been structurally characterized by means of microwave spectroscopy and further investigated by using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. Theory indicates that a π2 + π2 + σ2 cycloaddition reaction between SO3 and HCOOH is a plausible pathway to FSA formation and that such a mechanism would be effectively barrierless. We speculate on the possible role that FSA may play in the Earth's atmosphere. PMID:26138972

  5. Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Mandibular Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Ju-Hui; Chen, Chun-Ming; Du, Je-Kang

    2015-09-01

    Previously, arsenic was a popular devitalizing agent used to necrotize inflamed dental pulp to lower the pulp sensitivity owing to the unavailability of appropriate anesthesia. However, leakage from the apical foramen, lateral or accessory canals, or cracks in the tooth is common. This can be dangerous because of the reportedly high toxic effects of arsenic in both hard and soft tissues, leading to gingival and osseous necrosis and, consequently, osteomyelitis. Therefore, arsenic can prove fatal for both bones and teeth and is no longer used. We encountered a case involving a 50-year-old man who had developed mandibular osteomyelitis with lower lip paresthesia caused by arsenic trioxide used during endodontic treatment. The patient was treated with appropriate antibiotics, adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and adequate surgical debridement. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can induce neovascularization in necrosed tissues and improve bone and soft tissue healing. At a 4-year follow-up visit, bone healing was observed, with restoration of periodontal health, although the paresthesia had persisted. We describe this case, present a review of the relevant published data, and discuss the possible causes, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up protocol of mandibular osteomyelitis caused by arsenic trioxide. PMID:25896568

  6. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  7. Arsenic Trioxide Negatively Affects Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Fangfang; Xing, Guoqiang; Peng, Xinyu; Zhang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Spillage of cyst contents during surgery is the major cause of recurrences of hydatidosis, also called cystic echinococcosis (CE). Currently, many scolicidal agents are used for inactivation of the cyst contents. However, due to complications in the use of those agents, new and more-effective treatment options are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices. Protoscolices of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 2, 4, 6, and 8 μmol/liter ATO; viability of protoscolices was assessed daily by microscopic observation of movements and 0.1% eosin staining. A small sample from each culture was processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. ATO demonstrated a potent ability to kill protoscolices, suggesting that ATO may represent a new strategy in treating hydatid cyst echinococcosis. However, the in vivo efficacy and possible side effects of ATO need to be explored. PMID:26324279

  8. Can MTA be: Miracle trioxide aggregate?

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reshma M; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S; Hattarki, Sanjeevini A

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used for more than 10 years in the dental community and has often been thought of as a material of choice for the endodontist. The dental pulp is closely related to periodontal tissues through apical foramina, accessory canals, and dentinal tubules. Due to this interrelationship, pulpal diseases may influence periodontal health and periodontal infections may affect pulpal integrity. It is estimated that pulpal and periodontal problems are responsible for more than 50% of tooth mortality. Thus, these associations recommend an interdisciplinary approach. MTA appears to exhibit significant results even in periodontal procedures as it is the first restorative material that consistently allows for over-growth of cementum and may facilitate periodontal tissue regeneration. Thus, in the present review, an attempt is made to discuss the clinical applications of MTA as an interdisciplinary approach. PMID:24744536

  9. Mineral trioxide aggregate apexification: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmed; Chadgal, Sachin; Farooq, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth with immature root is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). MTA offers the option of a two-visit apexification procedure so that the fragile tooth can be restored immediately. However, difficulty in placing the material in the wide apical area requires the use of an apical matrix. Materials such as collagen, calcium sulfate, and hydroxyapatite have been used for this purpose. This article describes the use of resorbable suture material to form the apical matrix which offers many advantages over the contemporary materials. PMID:27563191

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate apexification: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Purra, Aamir Rashid; Ahangar, Fayaz Ahmed; Chadgal, Sachin; Farooq, Riyaz

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of choice for necrotic teeth with immature root is apexification, which is induction of apical closure to produce more favorable conditions for conventional root canal filling. The most commonly advocated medicament is calcium hydroxide although recently considerable interest has been expressed in the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). MTA offers the option of a two-visit apexification procedure so that the fragile tooth can be restored immediately. However, difficulty in placing the material in the wide apical area requires the use of an apical matrix. Materials such as collagen, calcium sulfate, and hydroxyapatite have been used for this purpose. This article describes the use of resorbable suture material to form the apical matrix which offers many advantages over the contemporary materials. PMID:27563191

  11. The chemical composition of mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Josette

    2008-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of Portland cement, with 4:1 addition of bismuth oxide added so that the material can be detected on a radiograph. The cement is made up of calcium, silicon and aluminium. The main constituent phases are tricalcium and dicalcium silicate and tricalcium aluminate. There are two commercial forms of MTA, namely the grey and the white. The difference between the grey and the white materials is the presence of iron in the grey material, which makes up the phase tetracalcium alumino-ferrite. This phase is absent in white MTA. Hydration of MTA occurs in two stages. The initial reaction between tricalcium aluminate and water in the presence of calcium sulphate results in the production of ettringite. Tricalcium and dicalcium silicate react with water to produce calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which is leached out of the cement with time. PMID:20351970

  12. Sulfur Mustard

    MedlinePlus

    ... the environment. Sulfur mustard was introduced in World War I as a chemical warfare agent. Historically it ... fatal. When sulfur mustard was used during World War I, it killed fewer than 5% of the ...

  13. Understanding the Oxygen Vacancy in Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) has a variety of applications in gas sensors, photocatalysis, and smart windows. As an electrochromic BO3 perovskite, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping. This color change is correlated with a drop in transmittance of near-IR radiation, and is used in smart windows for energy efficiency. In addition to monovalent species doping that modulates optical properties, oxygen deficiencies have been found to have a similar electrochromic effect. The influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structure and how it corresponds to electrochromic behavior remains a topic of debate. In this work, we examine the oxygen vacancy in monoclinic WO3 and its influence on electronic structure using density functional theory with a hybrid functional. We investigate the relative stability of different charge states and its implications for electrical properties, such as conductivity and electrochromism. We find oxygen vacancies to be shallow donors, and explore similarities and differences with monovalent species doping. Finally, we compare our theoretical findings with experiment to elucidate how vacancies may contribute to electrochromic behavior. This work is supported by DOE and NSF.

  14. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  15. Prophylactic treatment of dens evaginatus using mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Koh, E T; Ford, T R; Kariyawasam, S P; Chen, N N; Torabinejad, M

    2001-08-01

    Two case reports with dens evaginatus are presented. Each patient had one tooth affected. There was a prominent tubercle on the occlusal surface of the mandibular second premolar. Under local anesthesia and rubber dam isolation a partial pulpotomy was conducted and mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. After 6 months the teeth were removed as part of planned orthodontic treatment. Histological examination of these teeth showed an apparent continuous dentin bridge formation in both teeth, and the pulps were free of inflammation. These cases show that mineral trioxide aggregate can be used as an alternative to existing materials in the proplylactic treatment of dens evaginatus. PMID:11501594

  16. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  17. Construction of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide and their visible-light sensitive photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fanyong; Kong, Depeng; Fu, Yang; Ye, Qianghua; Wang, Yinyin; Chen, Li

    2016-03-15

    Herein we designed a simple and effective method for synthesizing carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide nanocomposite with high photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared carbon nanodots/ tungsten trioxide has strong photoabsorption under visible light irradiation. Then, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide was successfully applied to the degradation of methylene blue. The photodegradation efficiency of methylene blue can be reached as high as 100% after 0.5 h visible light illumination. In addition, carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide could also be used to degrade rhodamine B and methyl orange. Most importantly, the photocatalytic activity of carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide did not exhibit obvious changes after five cycles. The results indicate that carbon nanodots/tungsten trioxide has potential applications in the degradation of organic pollutants in industrial waste water. PMID:26745743

  18. Sulfonation of polyester fabrics by gaseous sulfur oxide activated by UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordoghli, Bessem; Khiari, Ramzi; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk; Sakli, Faouzi; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an original technique aiming to improve the hydrophilic properties of polyester fibres. In this method, the sulfonation of the aromatic rings is carried out using gaseous sulfur trioxide activated by UV irradiations. Thus, exposing the polyester textile fabric to the UVC light (wavelength around 254 nm) under a stream of sulfur trioxide leads to the fixation of sbnd SO3H groups. The amounts of the fixed sulfonate groups depended on the reaction conditions. Evidence of grafting deduced from the measurements of hygroscopic properties was carried out by contact angle measurement, moisture regain as well as by measuring the rate of retention. SEM and FT-IR analysis, DSC and DTA/TGA thermograms showed that no significant modifications have occurred in the bulk of the treated PET fabrics.

  19. Factors Determining Sensitivity and Resistance of Tumor Cells to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sertel, Serkan; Tome, Margaret; Briehl, Margaret M.; Bauer, Judith; Hock, Kai; Plinkert, Peter K.; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Previously, arsenic trioxide showed impressive regression rates of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Here, we investigated molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of cell lines of different tumor types towards arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide was the most cytotoxic compound among 8 arsenicals investigated in the NCI cell line panel. We correlated transcriptome-wide microarray-based mRNA expression to the IC50 values for arsenic trioxide by bioinformatic approaches (COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses, Ingenuity signaling pathway analysis). Among the identified pathways were signaling routes for p53, integrin-linked kinase, and actin cytoskeleton. Genes from these pathways significantly predicted cellular response to arsenic trioxide. Then, we analyzed whether classical drug resistance factors may also play a role for arsenic trioxide. Cell lines transfected with cDNAs for catalase, thioredoxin, or the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene were more resistant to arsenic trioxide than mock vector transfected cells. Multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing the MDR1, MRP1 or BCRP genes were not cross-resistant to arsenic trioxide. Our approach revealed that response of tumor cells towards arsenic trioxide is multi-factorial. PMID:22590507

  20. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  1. Proteomics-Based Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins from Human Keratinocytes Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tackett, Alan J; Byrum, Stephanie; Avaritt, Nathan L; Sengupta, Deepanwita; Moreland, Linley W; Tchounwou, Paul B; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Arsenic is a widely distributed environmental toxicant that can cause multi-tissue pathologies. Proteomic assays allow for the identification of biological processes modulated by arsenic in diverse tissue types. Method The altered abundance of proteins from HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line exposed to arsenic was quantified using a label-free LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry workflow. Selected proteomics results were validated using western blot and RT-PCR. A functional annotation analytics strategy that included visual analytical integration of heterogeneous data sets was developed to elucidate functional categories. The annotations integrated were mainly tissue localization, biological process and gene family. Result The abundance of 173 proteins was altered in keratinocytes exposed to arsenic; in which 96 proteins had increased abundance while 77 proteins had decreased abundance. These proteins were also classified into 69 Gene Ontology biological process terms. The increased abundance of transferrin receptor protein (TFRC) was validated and also annotated to participate in response to hypoxia. A total of 33 proteins (11 increased abundance and 22 decreased abundance) were associated with 18 metabolic process terms. The Glutamate--cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the only protein annotated with the term sulfur amino acid metabolism process, had increased abundance while succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit, mitochondrial precursor (SDHB), a tumor suppressor, had decreased abundance. Conclusion A list of 173 differentially abundant proteins in response to arsenic trioxide was grouped using three major functional annotations covering tissue localization, biological process and protein families. A possible explanation for hyperpigmentation pathologies observed in arsenic toxicity is that arsenic exposure leads to increased iron uptake in the normally hypoxic human skin. The proteins mapped to metabolic process terms and

  2. 78 FR 59679 - Antimony Trioxide TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... AGENCY Antimony Trioxide TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity To... review of EPA's draft Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical risk assessment, ``TSCA Workplan Chemical Risk Assessment for Antimony Trioxide.'' EPA will hold three peer review meetings by web...

  3. EFFECTS OF ARSENIC TRIOXIDE INHALATION EXPOSURE ON PULMONARY ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of single and multiple (5 and 20) 3 hr inhalation exposures to aerosols of arsenic trioxide on the pulmonary defense system of mice were investigated. Arsenic trioxide mist was generated from an aqueous solution and dried to produce particulate aerosols of 0.4 microme...

  4. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  5. Raman study of thermochromic phase transition in tungsten trioxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dong Yu; Chen, Jian; Chen, Huan Jun; Gong, Li; Deng, Shao Zhi; Xu, Ning Sheng; Liu, Yu Long

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanowires were synthesized by thermal evaporation of tungsten powder in two steps: tungsten suboxide (WO3-x) nanowires were synthesized, and then oxidized in O2 ambient and transformed into WO3 nanowires. Raman spectroscopy was applied to study the thermochromic phase transition of one-dimensional WO3 nanowires. From the temperature dependence of the characteristic mode at 33cm-1 in WO3, the phase transition temperature was determined. It was found that the phase transition of WO3 nanowires was reversible and the phase transition temperatures were even lower than that of WO3 nanopowder.

  6. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to arsenic trioxide-induced intrinsic apoptosis in human umbilical and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    King, Yih-An; Chiu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Hao-Ping; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide is an old drug and has been used for a long time in traditional Chinese and Western medicines. However, the cancer treatment of arsenic trioxide has heart and vascular toxicity. The cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide and its molecular mechanism in human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSC) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC-bm) were investigated in this study. Our results showed that arsenic trioxide significantly reduced the viability of HUMSC and HMSC-bm in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Arsenic trioxide is able to induce apoptotic cell death in HUMSC and HMSC-bm, as shown from the results of morphological examination, flow cytometric analyses, DAPI staining and comet assay. The appearance of arsenic trioxide also led to an increase of intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+) ) concentration and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). The caspase-9 and caspase-3 activities were time-dependently increased in arsenic trioxide-treated HUMSC and HMSC-bm. In addition, the proteomic analysis and DNA microarray were carried out to investigate the expression level changes of genes and proteins affected by arsenic trioxide treatment in HUMSC. Our results suggest that arsenic trioxide induces a prompt induction of ER stress and mitochondria-modulated apoptosis in HUMSC and HMSC-bm. A framework was proposed for the effect of arsenic trioxide cytotoxicity by targeting ER stress. PMID:25258189

  8. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  9. Use of arsenic trioxide in a hemodialysis-dependent patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Sarah; Moeller, Julie; Patel, Kejal; Eyler, Rachel; Pham, Trinh; Russell, Kerry; Podoltsev, Nikolai

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been established for use in both relapsed and front-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Dose adjustments are recommended to be considered in severe renal impairment although dosage reduction guidelines are not provided. In addition, toxicities of arsenic are significant. The use of arsenic trioxide has not been well studied in dialysis patients and there is a paucity of data in the literature to support the use in such a situation. We describe an 81-year-old relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia hemodialysis-dependent patient with a pre-existing cardiac condition who was treated with 10 mg arsenic trioxide three times weekly after dialysis. These findings provide support along with the marginal amount of currently published data for an arsenic trioxide dosing regimen in hemodialysis patients. PMID:25972392

  10. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 cm{sup 2}/C.

  11. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth. PMID:25346831

  12. Electrochromism of electrodeposited tungsten trioxide films; 1: Electrochemical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, P.K.; Chen, K.Y.; Tseung, A.C.C. . Dept. of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry)

    1994-07-01

    Electrodeposited tungsten trioxide films show fast electrochromic response both in aqueous and in nonaqueous solutions. The values of x in the tungsten bronzes, M[sub x]WO[sub 3], were determined by using a chronopotentiometric technique combined with UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis. The effect of double-layer charging was discussed. A finite diffusion control model was used to analyze the insertion behavior of M[sup +] ions into the films. The apparent diffusion coefficient of Li[sup +] through the electrodeposited WO[sub 3] film is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of vacuum-evaporated WO[sub 3] films, indicating that electrodeposited films are more suitable for use as display devices than vacuum-evaporated films. The higher porosity of the electrodeposited WO[sub 3] films may be a main reason for the fast electrochromic response.

  13. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  14. Microwave spectra and quadrupole coupling measurements for methyl rhenium trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, S. M.; Wikrent, P.; Drouin, B. J.; Kukolich, S. G.

    1996-12-01

    Microwave rotational transitions for J' ← J = 1 ← 0 and 2 ← 1 were measured in the 6-14 GHz range for methyl rhenium trioxide using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam spectrometer. The rotational constants for the most abundant isotopomers are B( 187Re) = 3466.964(2) MHz and B( 185Re) = 3467.049(3) MHz. The quadrupole coupling strengths are eQq( 187Re) = 716.55(2) MHz and eQq( 185Re) = 757.19(3) MHz. Transitions were also observed for 13C isotopomers and 18O isotopomers. The value for the ReC bond length obtained from a Kraitchman analysis is R( ReC) = 2.080 Å. The rhenium quadrupole coupling strengths are about 20% smaller than those obtained for HRe(CO) 5.

  15. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair.

  16. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  17. Mineral trioxide aggregate: part 2 - a review of the material aspects.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Agarwal, Antara; Mala, Kundabala

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this two-part series is to review the composition, properties, and products of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials. PubMed and MedLine electronic databases were used to identify scientific papers from January 1991 to May 2010. Based on the selected inclusion criteria, citations were referenced from the scientific peer-reviewed dental literature. Mineral trioxide aggregate is a refined form of the parent compound, Portland cement (PC), and demonstrates a strong biocompatibility due to the high pH level and the material's ability to form hydroxyapatite. Mineral trioxide aggregate materials provide better microleakage protection than traditional endodontic materials as observed in findings from dye-leakage, fluid-filtration, protein-leakage, and bacterial penetration-leakage studies and has been recognized as a bioactive material. Various MTA commercial products are available, including gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA), white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), and mineral trioxide aggregate-Angelus (AMTA). Although these materials are indicated for various dental uses and applications, long-term in-vivo clinical studies are needed. Part 1 of this article highlighted and discussed the composition and characteristics of the material. Part 2 provides an overview of commercially available MTA materials. PMID:23631637

  18. Volcanic sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    Although I may be overly demanding in expecting a member of the Eos staff to be familiar with recent articles in AGU journals, I am moved to make a mild protest concerning attribution in the “Volcanic Sulfur Dynamics” news item by Mario E. Godinez (Eos, June 14, 1983, p. 411).Since the news story stated that an important result of the RAVE experiment was to estimate the SO2 flux from Mount St. Helens on just one day, I must point out that both my research group and USGS scientists have monitored the emissions from Mount St. Helens and estimated SO2 (and other) fluxes over extended periods of time. Our results, which were based on in situ airborne measurements carried out over a period of a year, include estimates of the flux rates of SO2, H2S, H2O, sulfates, halides, and various other particles, prior to, during, and after the explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 [Hobbs et al., 1983]. The USGS measurements, which are made remotely through use of an airborne correlation spectrometer, also commenced in 1980 a n d have provided data several times a week since that time [Casadevall et al., 1981]. We have also estimated the fluxes of various materials (including SO2) from eight other volcanos [Radke et al.., 1976; Stith et al.., 1978; Radke, 1982].

  19. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  20. Severe Acute Axonal Neuropathy following Treatment with Arsenic Trioxide for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Marcus; Sammartin, Kety; Nabergoj, Mitja; Vianello, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of arsenic toxicity. Symptoms are usually mild and reversible following discontinuation of treatment. A more severe chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by distal axonal-loss neuropathy can be seen in chronic arsenic exposure. The clinical course of arsenic neurotoxicity in patients with coexistence of thiamine deficiency is only anecdotally known but this association may potentially lead to severe consequences. We describe a case of acute irreversible axonal neuropathy in a patient with hidden thiamine deficiency who was treated with a short course of arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thiamine replacement therapy and arsenic trioxide discontinuation were not followed by neurological recovery and severe polyneuropathy persisted at 12-month follow-up. Thiamine plasma levels should be measured in patients who are candidate to arsenic trioxide therapy. Prophylactic administration of vitamin B1 may be advisable. The appearance of polyneuropathy signs early during the administration of arsenic trioxide should prompt electrodiagnostic testing to rule out a pattern of axonal neuropathy which would need immediate discontinuation of arsenic trioxide. PMID:27158436

  1. Potassium Bromate Assay by Redox Titrimetry Using Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Smeller, Johanna M.; Leigh, Stefan D.

    2003-01-01

    Bromate, a disinfectant, is one of the analytes of interest in wastewater analysis. Environmental laboratories have a regulatory need for their measurements to be traceable to NIST standards. Bromate is not currently certified as a NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM). Therefore, a traceable assay of potassium bromate (KBrO3) is needed. KBrO3 was dissolved in water and assayed by redox titrimetry using arsenic trioxide (As2O3). A nominal (0.1 g) sample of As2O3 was dissolved in 10 mL of 5 mol/L sodium hydroxide. The solution was acidified with hydrochloric acid and about 95 % of the KBrO3 titrant was added gravimetrically. The end point was determined by addition of dilute (1:3) titrant using an automated titrator. The KBrO3 assay was determined to be 99.76 % ± 0.20 %. The expanded uncertainty considered the titrations of three independently prepared KBrO3 solutions.

  2. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  3. Photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical properties of tungsten trioxide nanostructured films.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO₃) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4-2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO₃ nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO₃ nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na₂SO₄) and ammonium fluoride (NH₄F). The influence of NH₄F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO₃ nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO₃. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH₄F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO₃ nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO₃ nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions. PMID:24782669

  4. Tetrandrine enhances the anticancer effects of arsenic trioxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youran; Li, Peichun; Yang, Shen; Tong, Nannan; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), an effective agent to treat leukemia and other solid tumors, is largely limited by its toxicity. QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and sudden death have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. The present study was designed to assess whether the combination of As2O3 and tetrandrine could generate a more powerful anti-cancer effect. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed for detecting the proliferation of HepG2 and A549 cells treated with tetrandrine and As2O3. Fluorescent microscopy measurements and flow cytometry were carried out to evaluate the apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells was also determined by flow cytometry. The cell proliferation assay in HepG2 and A549 cells indicated that tetrandrine significantly enhanced the inhibit effect of As2O3. In addition, the following Isobolograms further demonstrated that combining As2O3 with tetrandrine generated synergism action. Tetrandrine also enhanced the apoptosis, necrosis and cell cycle arrest in As2O3-treated HepG2 cells. Our present study showed that tetrandrine can dramatically enhance the anti- cancer effect induced by As2O3. Combining As2O3 with tetrandrine would be a novel strategy to treat cancer in clinical practice. PMID:24548979

  5. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  6. Photocatalysis and Photoelectrochemical Properties of Tungsten Trioxide Nanostructured Films

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chin Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) possesses a small band gap energy of 2.4–2.8 eV and is responsive to both ultraviolet and visible light irradiation including strong absorption of the solar spectrum and stable physicochemical properties. Thus, controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) WO3 nanotubular structures with desired length, diameter, and wall thickness has gained significant interest. In the present study, 1D WO3 nanotubes were successfully synthesized via electrochemical anodization of tungsten (W) foil in an electrolyte composed of 1 M of sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) and ammonium fluoride (NH4F). The influence of NH4F content on the formation mechanism of anodic WO3 nanotubular structure was investigated in detail. An optimization of fluoride ions played a critical role in controlling the chemical dissolution reaction in the interface of W/WO3. Based on the results obtained, a minimum of 0.7 wt% of NH4F content was required for completing transformation from W foil to WO3 nanotubular structure with an average diameter of 85 nm and length of 250 nm within 15 min of anodization time. In this case, high aspect ratio of WO3 nanotubular structure is preferred because larger active surface area will be provided for better photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions. PMID:24782669

  7. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  8. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kahtani, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The endodontic management of immature permanent incisors in young children can be challenging. This case reported an avulsed immature maxillary central incisors that underwent complete endodontic obturation using mineral trioxide aggregate. A 10-year-old male who suffered a fall injury avulsed both his central incisors. The revascularization process was not possible due to patient compliance and geographic reasons. Mineral trioxide aggregate was utilized as a novel endodontic treatment. After one year post-injury, the teeth remained symptom-free, the clinical and radiographic follow-up showed evidence of healthy periodontium. How to cite this article: Al-Kahtani A. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):88-96. PMID:24155609

  9. The embryotoxic response to maternal chromium trioxide exposure in different strains of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1982-10-01

    This paper compares the chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxic effects among one noninbred (LVG) and five inbred (CB, LHC, LSH, MHA, PD4) strains of hamsters. A single dose of chromium trioxide (8 mg/kg, iv) was injected into pregnant hamsters on the morning of gestation Day 8. Treated and control animals were killed on gestation Day 15 and studied for the types and incidence of external and internal abnormalities, as well as the frequency of resorption sites per uterus. The embryotoxic effects described in this study include significant rates of resorptions, external abnormalities, cleft palate, and hydrocephalus. The results indicate that the MHA, LSH, and LVG strains are susceptible, while the CB, LHC, and PD4 strains are resistant to chromium trioxide-induced embryotoxicity. This study was compared with prior work in which the same hamster strains were treated with either cadmium, lead, or mercury.

  10. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  11. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  12. Dye leakage and modification of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Challenger, Hereward; Lane, Jason; Becker, Ryan; Nassiripour, Sepehr; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine and decrease dye leakage of fast-setting mineral trioxide aggregate (FSMTA). Specimens using differing setting times or concentrations of calcium sulfate modified FSMTA were assessed for dye penetration. Based on the results, no statistical difference was found in the dye leakage of FSMTA compared with regular mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The addition of 10 percent calcium sulfate resulted in a statistical reduction in dye leakage compared to both unmodified FSMTA and regular MTA. PMID:25868222

  13. Effect of mixing conditions on irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide. [Guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O.; McCarthy, J.F.; Gill, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of mechanics of respiration in guinea pigs was used to assess the irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed under different conditions of temperature and humidity. Concentrations were 1-2 mg/m/sup 3/ zinc oxide and 1 ppm sulfur dioxide. Dry conditions of mixing (Chamber RH 30%) either at 24/sup 0/C in the exposure chamber or at 480/sup 0/C in a dry furnace gave a biological response which could be completely accounted for by responses to zinc oxide and/or sulfur dioxide alone. Chemical examination of the aerosols did not indicate the formation of particulate sulfur species. Zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed dry at 480/sup 0/C and fed into the exposure chamber at 80% RH reacted to produce an irritant aerosol as evidenced by a rapid increase in resistance to levels 29% above control; reversal was rapid when exposure ended. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfite on these aerosols. Addition of water vapor to the furnace during mixing at 480/sup 0/C produced a different irritant aerosol. The resistance rose slowly to 19% above control values and remained elevated during the post-exposure hour. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfate, sulfite, and adsorbed sulfur trioxide on these aerosols.

  14. Downregulation of thymidylate synthase with arsenic trioxide in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Mak, Judith Choi-Wo; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2014-06-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is an important chemotherapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been shown to suppress TYMS in a colonic cancer model. We examined the effects of TYMS suppression by ATO in lung adenocarcinoma. A panel of 4 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines was used to determine the effects of ATO treatment on cell viability, TYMS expression (protein and mRNA), E2F1 protein expression and TYMS activity. TYMS knockdown and overexpression were performed. Tumor growth inhibition in vivo was studied using a nude mouse xenograft model. ATO showed antiproliferative effects with clinically achievable concentrations (around 1.1-6.9 µM) in 4 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Downregulation of TYMS protein and mRNA expression, reduced TYMS activity, and suppressed E2F1 expression were demonstrated in lung adenocarcinoma with ATO. Cell viability was reduced by 15-50% with TYMS knockdown. Overexpression of TYMS led to a 2.7-fold increase in IC50 value with ATO treatment in H358 cells, but not in H23 cells. Using a xenograft model with H358 cell line, relative tumor volume was reduced to 44% that of the control following 8 days of treatment with 7.5 mg/kg ATO, and associated with significant downregulation of TYMS protein expression. In conclusion, ATO has potent in vitro and in vivo activity in lung adenocarcinoma, and is partially mediated by transcriptional downregulation of TYMS. PMID:24691991

  15. Thermal behaviour of arsenic trioxide adsorbed on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Frederic; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K; Helsen, Lieve

    2009-07-30

    The thermal stability and desorption of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) adsorbed on activated carbon (AC) was investigated as this phenomenon is expected to influence the arsenic release during low temperature pyrolysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood waste. Firstly, a thermogravimetric (TG) experiment with arsenolite, an allotropic form of As(2)O(3), was performed. The sample starts to sublime at temperatures lower than 200 degrees C with a sublimation peak temperature of 271 degrees C. Subsequently, TG experiments with samples of As(2)O(3) adsorbed on AC revealed that only very little (max. 6+/-3 wt%) As(2)O(3) was volatilized at temperatures below 280 degrees C, while still 41.6 (+/-5)wt% of the original arsenic concentration was retained at 440 degrees C and 28.5 (+/-3)wt% at 600 degrees C. The major arsenic volatilization occurred between 300 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The kinetic parameters of desorption, activation energy of desorption (E(d)) and pre-exponential factor (A), were determined by fitting an Arrhenius model to the experimental data, resulting in E(d)=69 kJ/mol, A=1.21 x 10(4)s(-1). It can be concluded that the adsorption of As(2)O(3) on AC can contribute to the thermal stabilisation of As(2)O(3). Consequently, during low temperature pyrolysis of CCA wood arsenic release may be prevented by adsorption of As(2)O(3) on the coal-type product formed during the thermal decomposition of the wood. PMID:19136209

  16. Oxidations of cyclic {beta}-diketones catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Omar, M.M.; Espenson, J.H. |

    1996-08-06

    Methylrhenium trioxide (CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} or MTO) catalyzes the oxidation of {beta}-diketones by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of the initial oxidation step have been investigated in CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O (1:1 v/v) at 25{degree}C for a group of cyclic {beta}-diketones. The initial oxidation step features the enol form, the majority species, as the reactant. Its rate responds to substituents in the `normal` manner: electron-donating groups accelerate the reaction. We suggest that the double bond of the enol attacks a peroxo oxygen of a peroxorhenium complex A = CH{sub 3}Re(O){sub 2}(O{sub 2}) or B = CH{sub 3}Re(O)(O{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O). This reaction affords a 2-hydroxy-1,3-dicarbonyl intermediate, which in some instances was detected by {sup 1}H NMR. This hydroxy intermediate is susceptible to cleavage via a Baeyer-Villiger oxidation to yield carboxylic acids as final products. In contrast to the first reaction, this step may feature the peroxorhenium complexes A and B as nucleophiles rather than their customary electrophilic behavior; perhaps the trend is reversed by substrate binding to rhenium. Time profiles for the different stages of the reaction were also determined. The mechanistic aspects of these multistep catalytic oxidations are discussed in terms of the electronic nature of the activated rhenium-bound peroxo ligands. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. 78 FR 67141 - Antimony Trioxide (ATO) TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... AGENCY Antimony Trioxide (ATO) TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity... Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical risk assessment, ``TSCA Workplan Chemical Risk Assessment for ATO... CONTACT: For technical information contact: Stan Barone, Jr., Risk Assessment Division (7403M), Office...

  18. Chemiluminescence in the oxidation of uranium (IV) by xenon trioxide and its analytical possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Khamidullina, L.A.; Lotnik, S.V.; Gusev, Yu.K.; Kazakov, V.P.

    1988-09-01

    This work is devoted to an investigation of the previously detected chemiluminescence in the oxidation of uranium (IV) by xenone trioxide and to evaluating the possibility of using it in determining nanogram quantities of U/sup (IV)/ in solution, including solutions containing a large excess of U/sup (VI)/.

  19. Contribution to the photometric determination of small amounts of boron trioxide in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, D.

    1985-01-01

    The photometric determination for boron trioxide is described in amounts of 0-75 micrograms B2O3 with an azomethin H reagent. The yellow colored complex which occurs in a medium held at a pH of 4.5 was measured in light of a wavelength of 415 nm.

  20. A note on the biological activity of the noble gas compound xenon trioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Smith, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of xenon trioxide for toxicity in the few common oxidants using three bioassays. On a molar basis XeO3 and HOCl were similar, but XeO3 was less active than expected when comparisons were based on normality.

  1. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  2. Sulfurization of α-MoO{sub 3} nanostructured thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K. Reddy, G. B.

    2015-08-28

    In this report, the sulfurization of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO{sub 3}) nanoflakes (NFs) with high aspect ratio (height/thickness >20) on the nickel coated glass substrates in a mixture of H{sub 2}S and argon gas at atmospheric pressure has been studied. The effect of sulfurization have been investigated to understand the basic reaction mechanism and the morphology, structural properties of grown nanoflakes. XPS and XRD indicate the formation of MoS{sub 2} along with the other intermediate phase such as MoO{sub 2} at temperature 200 °C. The surface morphology of samples have been studied systematically by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results demonstrate partial conversion of MoO{sub 3} NFs into MoS{sub 2} along with the change in the morphology of nanoflakes. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  3. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  4. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  5. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  6. Effect of plasma voltage on sulfurization of α-MoO3 nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K.; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this report, the effect of plasma voltage on plasma assisted sulfurization (PAS) of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO3) nanoflakes (NFs) on glass substrates has been studied systematically. MoO3 NFs were deposited using plasma assisted sublimation process. These nanoflakes were subjected to H2S/Ar plasma at two different plasma voltages 600 and 1000 volts; to study the effect of plasma ionization on degree of sulfurization of MoO3 into MoS2. XRD and Raman analysis show that film sulfurized at 1000 volts have relatively higher degree of conversion into MoS2, as more intense peaks of MoS2 and MoO2 are obtained than that sulfurized at 600 volts. HRTEM of sulfurized film shows that outer surface of nanoflake has been converted into MoS2 (4-5 monolayers). Meanwhile, MoO3 was reduced into MoO2 as confirmed by XRD and Raman results. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  7. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  8. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  9. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  10. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  11. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. PMID:23325336

  12. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  13. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  14. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  15. Arsenic trioxide-mediated growth inhibition in gallbladder carcinoma cells via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription mediated by Sp1 transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Zhilong; Lu, Weiqi; Ton, Saixiong; Liu, Houbao; Sou, Tao; Shen, Zhenbin; Qin, Xinyu . E-mail: smc_jjh@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-08-31

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), an aggressive and mostly lethal malignancy, is known to be resistant to a number of drug stimuli. Here, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide inhibited the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma in vivo and in vitro as well as the transcription of cell cycle-related protein Cyclin D1. And, Cyclin D1 overexpression inhibited the negative role of arsenic trioxide in cell cycle progression. We further explored the mechanisms by which arsenic trioxide affected Cyclin D1 transcription and found that the Sp1 transcription factor was down-regulated by arsenic trioxide, with a corresponding decrease in Cyclin D1 promoter activity. Taken together, these results suggested that arsenic trioxide inhibited gallbladder carcinoma cell proliferation via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription in a Sp1-dependent manner, which provided a new mechanism of arsenic trioxide-involved cell proliferation and may have important therapeutic implications in gallbladder carcinoma patients.

  16. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  17. Nitrogen oxides, sulfur trioxide, and mercury emissions during oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion of Victorian brown coal.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bithi; Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates, for the first time, the NOx, N2O, SO3, and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOx emissions and higher N2O formation were observed in the oxy-fuel atmosphere. These NOx reduction and N2O formations were further enhanced with steam in the combustion environment. The NOx concentration level in the flue gas was within the permissible limit in coal-fired power plants in Victoria. Therefore, an additional NOx removal system will not be required using this coal. In contrast, both SO3 and gaseous mercury concentrations were considerably higher under oxy-fuel combustion compared to that in the air combustion. Around 83% of total gaseous mercury released was Hg(0), with the rest emitted as Hg(2+). Therefore, to control harmful Hg(0), a mercury removal system may need to be considered to avoid corrosion in the boiler and CO2 separation units during the oxy-fuel fluidized-bed combustion using this coal. PMID:25402169

  18. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF CARBON DISULFIDE-OXYGEN ICES: TOWARD THE FORMATION OF SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2013-08-20

    The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2})-oxygen (O{sub 2}) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and/or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

  19. Treatment of Internal Resorption with Mineral Trioxide Aggregates: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankaj; Rao, Yogesh; Jain, Anurag; Relhan, Nikhil; Gupta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Tooth resorption is a common sequel which follows injuries or irritation to the periodontal ligament and/or tooth pulp. The course of tooth resorption involves an elaborate interaction among inflammatory cells, resorbing cells, and hard tissue structures. The key cells which are involved in resorption are multi–nucleated giant cells. Internal root resorptions are usually non–symptomatic and they are discovered occasionally through periapical radiographs, which reveal very defined and regular outlines. Many techniques and materials have been used to fill internal resorptive defects. Among them, Mineral Trioxide Aggregates (MTAs) have satisfactory properties, which include: biocompatibility, a favourable sealing ability, mechanical strength and a capacity to promote a periradicular tissue healing. Thus, a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) repair of a maxillary left central incisor tooth with an inflammatory resorptive defect, in the middle third of the root canal, has been reported here. PMID:24298543

  20. Summary of the Preliminary Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-10-13

    This report summarizes a preliminary special analysis of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 2). The analysis is considered preliminary because a final waste profile has not been submitted for review. The special analysis is performed to determine the acceptability of the waste stream for shallow land burial at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream requires a special analysis because the waste stream’s sum of fractions exceeds one. The 99Tc activity concentration is 98 percent of the NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria and the largest single contributor to the sum of fractions.

  1. Mineral trioxide aggregate: a review of the constituents and biological properties of the material.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J; Pitt Ford, T R

    2006-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the constituents and biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). A Medline search was conducted. The first publication on the material was in November 1993. The Medline search identified 206 papers published from November 1993 to August 2005. Specific searches on constituents and biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate, however, yielded few publications. Initially all abstracts were read to identify which fitted one of the two categories required for this review, constituents or biocompatibility. Based on this assessment and a review of the papers, 13 were included in the constituent category and 53 in the biocompatibility category. Relatively few articles addressed the constituents of MTA, whilst cytological evaluation was the most widely used biocompatibility test. PMID:16948659

  2. Treatment of internal resorption with mineral trioxide aggregates: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pankaj; Rao, Yogesh; Jain, Anurag; Relhan, Nikhil; Gupta, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Tooth resorption is a common sequel which follows injuries or irritation to the periodontal ligament and/or tooth pulp. The course of tooth resorption involves an elaborate interaction among inflammatory cells, resorbing cells, and hard tissue structures. The key cells which are involved in resorption are multi-nucleated giant cells. Internal root resorptions are usually non-symptomatic and they are discovered occasionally through periapical radiographs, which reveal very defined and regular outlines. Many techniques and materials have been used to fill internal resorptive defects. Among them, Mineral Trioxide Aggregates (MTAs) have satisfactory properties, which include: biocompatibility, a favourable sealing ability, mechanical strength and a capacity to promote a periradicular tissue healing. Thus, a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) repair of a maxillary left central incisor tooth with an inflammatory resorptive defect, in the middle third of the root canal, has been reported here. PMID:24298543

  3. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  4. Surgical management of iatrogenic perforation in maxillary central incisor using mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Rajni; Manuja, Naveen; Pandit, I K; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Root perforations are undesired complications of endodontic treatment. The repair of root perforation can be accomplished using different materials and techniques. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is widely used to seal perforations because of its biocompatibility and sealability. This article describes a case report where an iatrogenic root perforation was repaired successfully with MTA in maxillary right central incisor of a 13-year-old boy. PMID:23845686

  5. Comparison of radiation shielding ratios of nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Kim, M. S.; Rhim, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, radiation shielding fibers using non-hazardous nano-sized bismuth trioxide and molybdenum instead of lead were developed and evaluated. Among the elements with high densities and atomic numbers, non-hazardous elements such as bismuth trioxide and molybdenum were chosen as a shielding element. Then, bismuth trioxide (Bi2O3) with average particle size 1-500 µm was ball milled for 10 min to produce a powdered form of nanoparticles with average particle size of 10-100 nm. Bismuth trioxide nanoparticles were dispersed to make a colloidal suspension, followed by spreading and hardening onto one or two sides of fabric, to create the radiation shielding fabric. The thicknesses of the shielding sheets using nano-sized bismuth and molybdenum were 0.4 and 0.7 mm. According to the lead equivalent test of X-ray shielding products suggested by KS, the equivalent dose was measured, followed by calculation of the shielding rate. The shielding rate of bismuth with 0.4 mm thickness and at 50 kVp was 90.5%, which is comparable to lead of 0.082 mm thickness. The shielding rate of molybdenum was 51.89%%, which is comparable to lead of 0.034 mm. At a thickness of 0.7 mm, the shielding rate of bismuth was 98.73%, equivalent to 0.101 mm Pb, whereas the shielding rate of molybdenum was 74.68%, equivalent to 0.045 mm Pb. In conclusion, the radiation shielding fibers using nano-sized bismuth developed in this study are capable of reducing radiation exposure by X-ray and its low-dose scatter ray.

  6. Plutonium and transplutonium element trioxides: molecular structures, chemical bonding, and isomers.

    PubMed

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi

    2015-10-14

    Ground-state equilibrium geometries, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of AnO3 molecules, An = Pu through Cf, and their isomers are calculated using an accurate small-core pseudopotential model and the two-component relativistic density functional theory. The qualitative features of chemical bonding in these molecules are discussed in terms of oxidation states and bond orders. The actinide oxidation state (VI) is reached only in the plutonium trioxide molecule, whereas heavier actinide atoms in T-shaped trioxide molecules should be considered as pentavalent. At least at low temperatures, PuO3 and, to a lesser degree, AmO3 and BkO3 molecules should be stable both with respect to the isomerization into oxoperoxides or oxosuperoxides and the decay into dioxides and molecular oxygen. These trioxides can form dimers with significant (above 250 kJ mol(-1)) dissociation energies; the oxidation states of actinide atoms in the lowest-energy configurations of these dimers coincide with those in the corresponding monomers. The ability to reach high oxidation states in oxygen compounds gradually decreases from Pu onwards, with the only exception being the unexpectedly stable Bk(v)O3. PMID:26343514

  7. Electrosprayed molybdenum trioxide aqueous solution and its application in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer. PMID:25148047

  8. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helix nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xinjian; Choi, Il Yong; Zhang, Kan; Kwon, Jeong; Kim, Dong Yeong; Lee, Ja Kyung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyu; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide/bismuth vanadate heterojunction is one of the best pairs for solar water splitting, but its photocurrent densities are insufficient. Here we investigate the advantages of using helical nanostructures in photoelectrochemical solar water splitting. A helical tungsten trioxide array is fabricated on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate, followed by subsequent coating with bismuth vanadate/catalyst. A maximum photocurrent density of ~5.35±0.15 mA cm-2 is achieved at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, and related hydrogen and oxygen evolution is also observed from this heterojunction. Theoretical simulations and analyses are performed to verify the advantages of this helical structure. The combination of effective light scattering, improved charge separation and transportation, and an enlarged contact surface area with electrolytes due to the use of the bismuth vanadate-decorated tungsten trioxide helical nanostructures leads to the highest reported photocurrent density to date at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, to the best of our knowledge.

  9. Electrosprayed Molybdenum Trioxide Aqueous Solution and Its Application in Organic Photovoltaic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Liao, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    A molybdenum trioxide thin film with smooth surface and uniform thickness was successfully achieved by an electrospray deposition method using an aqueous solution with a drastically low concentration of 0.05 wt%. Previous papers demonstrated that an additive solvent technique is useful for depositing the thin film by the electrospray deposition, and the high vapor pressure and a low surface tension of an additive solvent were found to be important factors. As a result, the smooth molybdenum trioxide thin film was obtained when the acetonitrile was used as the additive solvent. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of acetone is much higher than that of aqueous solution, and this indicates that the acetone is easily evaporated after spraying from the glass capillary. By optimizing a concentration of acetone in the molybdenum aqueous solution, a minimum root mean square roughness of the MoO3 thin film became 3.7 nm. In addition, an organic photovoltaic cell was also demonstrated using the molybdenum trioxide as a hole transport layer. Highest photoconversion efficiency was 1.72%, a value comparable to that using conventional thermal evaporation process even though the aqueous solution was used for the solution process. The photovonversion efficiency was not an optimized value, and the higher value can be achieved by optimizing the coating condition of the active layer. PMID:25148047

  10. Effects of arsenic trioxide inhalation exposure on pulmonary antibacterial defenses in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; Bradof, J.N.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of single and multiple (5 and 20) 3-h inhalation exposures to aerosols of arsenic trioxide on the pulmonary defense system of mice were investigated. Arsenic trioxide mist was generated from an aqueous solution and dried to produce particulate aerosols of 0. 4 micron mass median aerodynamic diameter. Aerosol mass concentration ranged from 125 to 1000 micrograms As/m3. Effects of the exposures were evaluated by determination of changes in susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcal aerosol infection and in pulmonary bactericidal activity to /sup 35/S-labeled Klebsiella pneumoniae. Significant increases in mortality due to the infectious challenge and decreases in bactericidal activity were seen after single 3-h exposures to 270, 500, and 940 micrograms As/m3. Similarly, 5 or 20 multiple 3-h exposures to 500 micrograms As/m3 produced consistently significant increases in mortality and decreases in pulmonary bactericidal activity. At 125 or 250 micrograms As/m3, a decrease in bactericidal activity was seen only after 20 exposures to 250 micrograms/m3. Results from earlier studies with an arsenic-containing copper smelter dust were compared to these data. The possibility of the development of adaptation during multiple exposures to arsenic trioxide is also considered.

  11. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  12. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  13. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  14. Electronic structure of trioxide, oxoperoxide, oxosuperoxide, and ozonide clusters of the 3d elements: density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L

    2011-03-01

    The trioxide clusters with stoichiometry MO3, and the structural isomers with side-on and end-on bonded oxygen atoms, are studied by DFT with the B1LYP functional. For the first half of the 3d elements row (Sc to Cr), pyramidal or distorted pyramidal structures dominate among the trioxide and oxoperoxide ground states, while the remaining elements form planar trioxides, oxoperoxides, oxosuperoxides, and ozonides. Low-lying trioxide clusters are formed by Ti, V, Cr, and Mn, among which the distorted pyramidal VO3 in the (2)A'' state, the pyramidal CrO3 in the (1)A1 state, and the planar MnO3 in the (2)A1' state are global minima. With the exception of the middle-row elements Mn, Fe, and Co, the magnetic moment of the ground-state clusters is formed with a major contribution from unpaired electrons located at the oxygen atoms. The stability of trioxides and oxoperoxides toward release of molecular oxygen is significantly higher for Sc, Ti, and V than for the remaining elements of the row. A trend of increasing the capability to dissociate one oxygen molecule is observed from Cr to Cu, with the exception of OFe(O2) being more reactive than OCo(O2). A gradual increase of reactivity from Ti to Cu is observed for the complete fragmentation reaction M + O + O2. PMID:21299242

  15. Arsenic trioxide mediates HAPI microglia inflammatory response and subsequent neuron apoptosis through p38/JNK MAPK/STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiamin; Yang, Jianbing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ting; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Lingfei; Hu, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Nie, Xiaoke; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-15

    Arsenic is a widely distributed toxic metalloid all over the world. Inorganic arsenic species are supposed to affect astrocytic functions and to cause neuron apoptosis in CNS. Microglias are the key cell type involved in innate immune responses in CNS, and microglia activation has been linked to inflammation and neurotoxicity. In this study, using ELISA, we showed that Arsenic trioxide up-regulated the expression and secretion of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner and a time-dependent manner in cultured HAPI microglia cells. The secretion of IL-1β caused the apoptosis of SH-SY5Y. These pro-inflammatory responses were inhibited by the STAT3 blocker, AG490 and P38/JNK MAPK blockers SB202190, SP600125. Further, Arsenic trioxide exposure could induce phosphorylation and activation of STAT3, and the translocation of STAT3 from the cytosol to the nucleus in this HAPI microglia cell line. Thus, the STAT3 signaling pathway can be activated after Arsenic trioxide treatment. However, P38/JNK MAPK blockers SB202190, SP600125 also obviously attenuated STAT3 activation and transnuclear transport induced by Arsenic trioxide. In concert with these results, we highlighted that the secretion of IL-1β and STAT3 activation induced by Arsenic trioxide can be mediated by elevation of P38/JNK MAPK in HAPI microglia cells and then induced the toxicity of neurons. PMID:27174766

  16. Gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis related to the use of arsenic trioxide paste--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gin; Sung, Po-Ta

    2014-03-01

    The leakage of arsenic trioxide paste from tooth fillings has been associated with widespread necrosis of the supporting periodontal tissues. This report describes two cases of arsenic trioxide paste-induced gingival and localized alveolar bone necrosis in the mandible, following the use of arsenic trioxide paste as a pulp-devitalized agent. The first case was a 54-year-old female complaining of a painful white patch on the gingival tissue of the left mandibular second molar (tooth #37) after treatment by a private dentist. She underwent completely debridement of all necrotic soft tissue with physical saline irrigation. The gingival tissue was gradually replaced with vascular tissue and completely healed after 7 weeks. The second case was a 30-year-old female complaining of severe pain and continuous gingival bleeding from the right maxillary first bicuspid (tooth #14) following treatment by a private dentist. She finally accepted debridement of the sequestrum and necrotic alveolar bone with decortication to induce active bleeding. A partial thickness gingival flap was made to cover the wound. Four weeks later, the supporting tissues had completely healed. Arsenic trioxide paste is a cytotoxic agent and may cause harmful adverse effects on adjacent periodontium and supporting hard tissue if leakage occurs, or it is used carelessly. There is no indication for the use of arsenic trioxide paste in modern dental practice. PMID:24630037

  17. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J.D.; Groves, F.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Three possible regeneration concepts were identified as a result of a literature search. The potential for elemental sulfur production from a number of candidate metal oxide sorbents using each regeneration concept was evaluated on the basis of a thermodynamic analysis. Two candidate sorbents, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were chosen for experimental testing. The experimental test program using both electrobalance and fixed-bed reactor sis now getting underway. The objective is to determine reaction conditions--temperature, pressure, space velocity, and regeneration feed gas composition--which will maximize the yield of elemental sulfur in the regeneration product gas. Experimental results are to be used to define a conceptual desulfurization-regeneration process and to provide a preliminary economic evaluation.

  18. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  19. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  20. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  1. Sulfur in achondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Moore, C. B.; Primus, T. M.; Lewis, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfur abundances of samples of nearly 50 achondrites were examined to enlarge the database on the sulfur contents of various categories of achondrites. The study covered eucrites, howardites, diogenites, shergottites, chassignites, nakhilites, aubrites and three unique specimens. The study was spurred by the possibility that the S abundances could help identify the meteorites as originating on Mars or Venus. The S abundances and distributions varied widely, but confirmed that the data were valid indicators of the brecciation and thermal metamorphic history of each meteorite.

  2. Chemiluminescence by the interaction of XeO{sub 3} and the products of photolysis of uranyl solutions in sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Khamidullina, L.A.; Lotnik, S.V.; Kazakov, V.P.

    1994-10-01

    Using the chemiluminescence oxidation of U(IV) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with xenon trioxide as a model, it has been found that during the photolysis of solutions of UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in sulfuric acid in the absence of any organic compounds, the accumulation of U(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} takes place as a result of the reaction of the primary products of the photoreduction of uranyl ion, i.e., UO{sub 2}{sup +} and the OH radical.

  3. Method for preventing sulfur emissions from vessels containing molten sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R. H.

    1984-10-23

    Emissions from sulfur pits or other vessels containing molten sulfur are prevented or minimized by use of an air purge drawn into the vessel from the atmosphere and subsequently utilized as a portion of the oxidant required in a process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur.

  4. A systematic study of neutral and charged 3d-metal trioxides and tetraoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Kalpataru; Gutsev, Gennady L.; Weatherford, Charles A.; Jena, Purusottam

    2011-04-01

    Using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation, we have performed a systematic study of the structure and properties of neutral and charged trioxides (MO3) and tetraoxides (MO4) of the 3d-metal atoms. The results of our calculations revealed a number of interesting features when moving along the 3d-metal series. (1) Geometrical configurations of the lowest total energy states of neutral and charged trioxides and tetraoxides are composed of oxo and/or peroxo groups, except for CuO3- and ZnO3- which possess a superoxo group, CuO4+ and ZnO4+ which possess two superoxo groups, and CuO3+, ZnO3+, and ZnO4- which possess an ozonide group. While peroxo groups are found in the early and late transition metals, all oxygen atoms bind chemically to the metal atom in the middle of the series. (2) Attachment or detachment of an electron to/from an oxide often leads to a change in the geometry. In some cases, two dissociatively attached oxygen atoms combine and form a peroxo group or a peroxo group transforms into a superoxo group and vice versa. (3) The adiabatic electron affinity of as many as two trioxides (VO3 and CoO3) and four tetraoxides (TiO4, CrO4, MnO4, and FeO4) are larger than the electron affinity of halogen atoms. All these oxides are hence superhalogens although only VO3 and MnO4 satisfy the general superhalogen formula.

  5. A systematic study of neutral and charged 3d-metal trioxides and tetraoxides.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Kalpataru; Gutsev, Gennady L; Weatherford, Charles A; Jena, Purusottam

    2011-04-14

    Using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation, we have performed a systematic study of the structure and properties of neutral and charged trioxides (MO(3)) and tetraoxides (MO(4)) of the 3d-metal atoms. The results of our calculations revealed a number of interesting features when moving along the 3d-metal series. (1) Geometrical configurations of the lowest total energy states of neutral and charged trioxides and tetraoxides are composed of oxo and∕or peroxo groups, except for CuO(3)(-) and ZnO(3)(-) which possess a superoxo group, CuO(4)(+) and ZnO(4)(+) which possess two superoxo groups, and CuO(3)(+), ZnO(3)(+), and ZnO(4)(-) which possess an ozonide group. While peroxo groups are found in the early and late transition metals, all oxygen atoms bind chemically to the metal atom in the middle of the series. (2) Attachment or detachment of an electron to∕from an oxide often leads to a change in the geometry. In some cases, two dissociatively attached oxygen atoms combine and form a peroxo group or a peroxo group transforms into a superoxo group and vice versa. (3) The adiabatic electron affinity of as many as two trioxides (VO(3) and CoO(3)) and four tetraoxides (TiO(4), CrO(4), MnO(4), and FeO(4)) are larger than the electron affinity of halogen atoms. All these oxides are hence superhalogens although only VO(3) and MnO(4) satisfy the general superhalogen formula. PMID:21495753

  6. Self-assembled flower-like antimony trioxide microstructures with high infrared reflectance performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Shengsong; Yang, Xiaokun; Shao, Qian; Liu, Qingyun; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2013-04-15

    A simple hydrothermal process was adopted to self-assembly prepare high infrared reflective antimony trioxide with three-dimensional flower-like microstructures. The morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) respectively. It is also found that experimental parameters, such as NaOH concentration, surfactant concentration and volume ratio of ethanol–water played crucial roles in controlling the morphologies of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures. A possible growth mechanism of flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructure was proposed based on the experimental data. UV–vis–NIR spectra verified that the near infrared reflectivity of the obtained flower-like microstructures could averagely achieve as 92% with maximum reflectivity of 98%, obviously higher than that of other different morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures. It is expected that the flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures have some applications in optical materials and heat insulation coatings. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures that composed of nanosheets with thickness of ca. 100 nm exhibit high reflectivity under UV–vis–NIR spectra. Highlights: ► Uniform flower-like microstructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal reaction. ► The flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures exhibited higher reflectivity than other morphologies under the UV–vis–NIR light. ► Influencing parameters on the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphologies have been discussed in detail. ► Possible mechanism leading to flower-like microstructures was proposed.

  7. Evaluation of the prenatal developmental toxicity of orally administered arsenic trioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Holson, J F; Stump, D G; Clevidence, K J; Knapp, J F; Farr, C H

    2000-05-01

    A thorough review of the literature revealed no published repeated-dose oral developmental toxicity studies of inorganic arsenic in rats. In the present study, which was conducted according to modern regulatory guidelines, arsenic trioxide was administered orally beginning 14 days prior to mating and continuing through mating and gestation until gestational day 19. Exposures began prior to mating in an attempt to achieve a steady state of arsenic in the bloodstream of dams prior to embryo-foetal development. Groups of 25 Crl:CD(SD)BR female rats received doses of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10mg/kg/day by gavage. The selection of these dose levels was based on a preliminary range-finding study, in which excessive post-implantation loss and markedly decreased foetal weight occurred at doses of 15 mg/kg/day and maternal deaths occurred at higher doses. Maternal toxicity in the 10mg/kg/day group was evidenced by decreased food consumption and decreased net body weight gain during gestation, increased liver and kidney weights, and stomach abnormalities (adhesions and eroded areas). Transient decreases in food consumption in the 5mg/kg/day group caused the maternal no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) to be determined as 2. 5mg/kg/day. Intrauterine parameters were unaffected by arsenic trioxide. No treatment-related foetal malformations were noted in any dose group. Increased skeletal variations at 10mg/kg/day were attributed to reduced foetal weight at that dose level. The developmental NOAEL was thus 5mg/kg/day. Based on this study, orally administered arsenic trioxide cannot be considered to be a selective developmental toxicant (i.e. it is not more toxic to the conceptus than to the maternal organism), nor does it exhibit any propensity to cause neural tube defects, even at maternally toxic dose levels. PMID:10762732

  8. Absence of prenatal developmental toxicity from inhaled arsenic trioxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Holson, J F; Stump, D G; Ulrich, C E; Farr, C H

    1999-09-01

    A review of the literature revealed no published inhalational developmental toxicity studies of arsenic performed according to modern regulatory guidelines and with exposure throughout gestation. In the present study, inorganic arsenic, as arsenic trioxide (As(+3), As2O3), was administered via whole-body inhalational exposure to groups of twenty-five Crl:CD(SD)BR female rats for six h per day every day, beginning fourteen days prior to mating and continuing throughout mating and gestation. Exposures were begun prior to mating in order to achieve a biological steady state of As(+3) in the dams prior to embryonal-fetal development. In a preliminary exposure range-finding study, half of the females that had been exposed to arsenic trioxide at 25 mg/m3 died or were euthanized in extremis. In the definitive study, target exposure levels were 0.3, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/m3. Maternal toxicity, which was determined by the occurrence of rales, a decrease in net body weight gain, and a decrease in food intake during pre-mating and gestational exposure, was observed only at the 10 mg/m3 exposure level. Intrauterine parameters (mean numbers of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions and viable fetuses, and mean fetal weights) were unaffected by treatment. No treatment-related malformations or developmental variations were noted at any exposure level. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for maternal toxicity was 3.0 mg/m3; the NOAEL for developmental toxicity was greater than or equal to 10 mg/m3, 760 times both the time-weighted average threshold limit value (TLV) and the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for humans. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that arsenic trioxide, when administered via whole-body inhalation to pregnant rats, is not a developmental toxicant. PMID:10496680

  9. A P53 target gene, PIG11, contributes to chemosensitivity of cells to arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Qiu; Cao, En-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Qin, Jing-Fen

    2004-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of various genes that promote apoptosis. PIG11 (P53-induced gene 11), also referred to as TP53I11 (tumor protein p53 inducible protein 11), is a direct p53 target gene. Recent data demonstrated that PIG11 was up-regulated markedly in arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis by DDRT-PCR, suggesting a new class of p53 target genes that sensitize cells to the effects of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, through the construction of a recombinant GFP-PIG11 expression vector and transfection of HEK293 cells with GFP or GFP-PIG11, the role of PIG11 in apoptosis was analyzed. Results demonstrated that the percentage (11.38%) of apoptotic cells with GFP-PIG11 transfection was higher than that (7.28%) of with only GFP transfection (P<0.05). At 24 h after 1 microM of arsenic trioxide treatment, apoptotic cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of GFP-PIG11 (36.67%+/-2.78), in contrast, 10.50%+/-2.03 only GFP and 5.25%+/-0.96 vehicle control (P<0.01). In addition, we showed that intracellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was 9.66+/-0.52 in GFP-PIG11 transfection, higher than 5.21+/-0.08 in GFP only and 5.99+/-0.45 in vehicle control (P<0.01). The above results suggest that overexpression of PIG11 could induce cell apoptosis in the low levels and enhanced the apoptotic effects of arsenic trioxide. The process could be involved in intracellular generation of ROS. PMID:15225615

  10. Polymerization of aniline in the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide and its electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yanping; Xiang Yixian; Dong Xiaowen; Xu Jiaqiang; Ruan Fei; Pan Qingyi

    2009-08-15

    Molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite was prepared first by ion-exchange reaction between aniline (ANI) and dodecylamine (DDA) which was intercalated precursor, and then was formed under the polymerization of ANI within the interlayer space of MoO{sub 3} at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air. According to powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical testing, MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite has layered structure, and its interlayer spacing is 1.127 nm. Moreover, it has high thermal stability with the compound and completes its weight loss at 751.9 deg. C. Electrochemical investigation shows that MoO{sub 3} is the major active substance in the MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode, and MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode demonstrates better conductivity and electrochemical activity than pure MoO{sub 3} electrode, attributed to the promotion of Li{sup +} and/or electron transport. In addition, the alternating current impedance proves that if the resistance of MoO{sub 3}/PANI electrode reduces apparently, the electrochemical activity will increase correspondingly, the same as the relationship between the ohmic resistance and the electrical conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Aniline (ANI) monomer was intercalated into the interlayer space of molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) and heat-treated at 120 deg. C for 3 d in air, and then polymerized to form layered structure of molybdenum trioxide/polyaniline (MoO{sub 3}/PANI) composite. Its interlayer spacing of MoO{sub 3}/PANI composite is 1.127 nm.

  11. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  12. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apexification: a novel approach for traumatised young immature permanent teeth

    PubMed Central

    Vijayran, Manisha; Chaudhary, Seema; Manuja, Naveen; Kulkarni, Adwait Uday

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a case of 9-year-old boy who came with a chief complaint of pain and fractured upper front teeth. Significant history of trauma was revealed 6 months before reporting, during playing at his school time. Proper diagnosis was made with the help of radiological investigations. The available treatment options were discussed with the patient's parents and root canal therapy, using mineral trioxide aggregate, as an apical barrier was carried out in his upper right front teeth. However, later on, the boy was aesthetically rehabilitated in relation to his fractured upper front teeth with the help of post and core and acrylic crown. PMID:23314456

  13. Photoelectrochemical and physical properties of tungsten trioxide films obtained by aerosol pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadale, S.B.; Chaqour, S.M.; Gorochov, O.; Neumann-Spallart, M.

    2008-06-03

    Aerosol pyrolysis (AP) was used for preparing semiconducting films of tungsten trioxide using peroxotungstic acid as a precursor. The films were characterized by SEM, XRD, and by their photoelectrochemical response. Porous, polycrystalline (monoclinic) films of thickness up to 3 {mu}m were prepared. An incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) of 0.55 at 365 nm was obtained for films of 1 {mu}m thickness on conducting F:SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates under depletion conditions, in junctions with aqueous electrolytes. The spectral (photocurrent) response extended into the visible region (up to 470 nm) which is of importance for solar applications like photocatalysis.

  14. Nanostructures of crystalline molybdenum trioxide grown by condensation in a carrier gas.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Droguett, D E; Fuenzalida, V M; Solorzano, G

    2008-11-01

    Molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were grown by direct evaporation of MoO3 from a tungsten boat resistively heated in the presence of hydrogen or helium as carrier gas at pressures from 100 to 600 Pa. Crystalline structures such as, nanoribbons, nanofibers, nanoneedles and nanoparticles were obtained at source temperatures below 900 degrees C. On the other hand, at source temperatures above 1000 degrees C, nanoporous structures were obtained. The latter were found more often when hydrogen was used as carrier gas. PMID:19198335

  15. Enhanced water splitting at thin film tungsten trioxide photoanodes bearing plasmonic gold-polyoxometalate particles.

    PubMed

    Solarska, Renata; Bienkowski, Krzysztof; Zoladek, Sylwia; Majcher, Aldona; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Kulesza, Pawel J; Augustynski, Jan

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is one of a few stable semiconductor materials liable to produce solar fuel by photoelectrochemical water splitting. To enhance its visible light conversion efficiency, we incorporated plasmonic gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) derivatized with polyoxometalate (H3PMo12O40) species into WO3. The combined plasmonic and catalytic effect of Au NPs anchored to the WO3 surface resulted in a large increase of water photooxidation currents. Shielding the Au NPs with polyoxometalates appears to be an effective means to avoid formation of recombination centers at the photoanode surface. PMID:25332175

  16. COAL SULFUR MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new technique for sulfur forms analysis based on low-temperature oxygen plasma ashing. The technique involves analyzing the low-temperature plasma ash by modified ASTM techniques after selectively removing the organic material. The procedure has been tested...

  17. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  18. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  19. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  20. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  1. Correlation of electrochromic properties and oxidation states in nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

    PubMed

    Darmawi, S; Burkhardt, S; Leichtweiss, T; Weber, D A; Wenzel, S; Janek, J; Elm, M T; Klar, P J

    2015-06-28

    Although tungsten trioxide (WO3) has been extensively studied since its electrochromic properties were first discovered, the mechanism responsible for the coloration or bleaching effect is still disputed. New insights into the coloration mechanism of electrochromic, nanocrystalline WO3 are provided in this paper by studying thin WO3 films combining the electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. By employing in situ UV-Vis transmission spectroscopy at a fixed spectral band pass during electrochemical experiments, such as cyclic voltammetry, a two-step insertion process for both protons and lithium ions is identified, of which one step exhibits a significantly higher coloration efficiency than the other. To obtain a better understanding of the insertion process AxWO3 (A = H, Li,…) thin films were studied at different stages of intercalation using UV-Vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that the first step of the intercalation process represents the reduction from initial W(6+) to W(5+) and the second step the reduction of W(5+) to W(4+). We found that the blue coloration of this nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide is mainly due to the presence of W(4+) rather than that of W(5+). PMID:26018838

  2. Swallowing a bitter pill-oral arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Torka, Pallawi; Al Ustwani, Omar; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S; Griffiths, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Parenteral arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been firmly established as a standard therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Despite widespread use of oral arsenicals in medicine historically, they had disappeared from modern pharmacopeia until oral ATO was redeveloped in Hong Kong in 2000. Since then, over 200 patients with leukemia (predominantly APL) have been treated with oral ATO in Hong Kong and China. Oral arsenic trioxide and other formulations of arsenic appear to have a clinical efficacy comparable to that of IV formulations. These drugs given orally also appear to have a slightly better safety profile, lower operational costs and improved convenience for patients. The clinical experience with oral ATO has previously been reported piecemeal as case series, pilot studies or subgroup analyses rather than in a comprehensive cohort. In this report we attempt to synthesize the published English language literature on oral arsenicals and present the argument for further development of these compounds. Systematic study of this drug with well-designed randomized multi-center clinical trials is needed to accelerate its development and incorporation into clinical practice. PMID:26709030

  3. Capping a Pulpotomy with Calcium Aluminosilicate Cement: Comparison to Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Woodmansey, Karl F.; White, Robert; Primus, Carolyn M.; Opperman, Lynne A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Calcium aluminate cements have shown little affinity for bacterial growth, low toxicity, and immunogenicity when used as a restoration material, but calcium aluminate cements have not been tested in vivo in pulpotomy procedures. Methods To address this question, a calcium aluminate cement (Quick-Set) was tested along with 2 mineral trioxide aggregates, ProRoot MTA and MTA Plus. These cements were used as a capping agent after pulpotomy. Control rats had no pulpotomy, or the pulpotomy was not capped. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-1α were measured, and histology was performed at 30 and 60 days after capping. The nociceptive response was determined by measuring the lengthening of the rat's meal duration. Results and Conclusions: IL-1β and IL-1α concentrations were reduced in the capped teeth, but no differences were observed among the 3 cements. Dentinal bridging could be detected at both 30 and 60 days with each of the 3 cements, and the pulps were still vital 60 days after capping. Meal duration significantly shortened after placement of the 3 different cements, indicating a nociceptive response, but there were no differences among the materials. Calcium aluminate cements had similar properties to mineral trioxide aggregates and is a viable option for pulpotomy procedures. PMID:25146026

  4. The charge and discharge behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in lithium perchlorate-propylene carbonate electrolyte. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, H.F.; Ellison, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    The anodic and cathodic behavior of molybdenum trioxide electrodes in various states of lithiation was investigated in 1M LiClO/sub 4/-PC electrolytes at room temperature. A comparison was made between the anodic and cathodic rate capabilities of the electrodes. From cycling experiments at various depths of discharge, cycle life data were obtained. Problems observed after deep discharges are discussed.

  5. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  6. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip T M; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C; Maaß, Mona-C; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric pressure, the addition of SO(2) suppresses the formation of the secondary ozonide and leads to highly increased nopinone yields. A complete consumption of SO(2) is observed at initial SO(2) concentrations below the yield of stabilised CIs. In experiments using 2-butene a significant consumption of SO(2) and additional formation of acetaldehyde are observed at 1 bar. A consistent kinetic simulation of the experimental findings is possible when a fast CI + SO(2) reaction rate in the range of recent direct measurements [Welz et al., Science, 2012, 335, 204] is used. For 2-butene the addition of SO(2) drastically increases the observed aerosol yields at higher pressures. Below 60 mbar the SO(2) oxidation induced particle formation becomes inefficient pointing to the critical role of collisional stabilisation for sulfuric acid controlled nucleation at low pressures. PMID:23090096

  8. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  9. Effects of Combined Treatment With Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Ransohoff, Katherine; Sarin, Kavita; Atwood, Scott X.; Rezaee, Melika; Bailey-Healy, Irene; Kim, Jynho; Beachy, Philip A.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Oro, Anthony; Tang, Jean Y.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Tumor resistance is an emerging problem for Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor–treated metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Arsenic trioxide and itraconazole antagonize the hedgehog (HH) pathway at sites distinct from those treated by SMO inhibitors. OBJECTIVE To determine whether administration of intravenous arsenic trioxide and oral itraconazole in patients with metastatic BCC is associated with a reduction in GLI1 messenger RNA expression in tumor and/or normal skin biopsy samples. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Five men with metastatic BCC who experienced relapse after SMO inhibitor treatment underwent intravenous arsenic trioxide treatment for 5 days, every 28 days, and oral itraconazole treatment on days 6 to 28. Data were collected from April 10 to November 14, 2013. Follow-up was completed on October 3, 2015, and data were analyzed from June 5 to October 6, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the change in messenger RNA levels of the GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) gene (HH-pathway target gene) in biopsy specimens of normal skin or BCC before and after treatment. Secondary objectives were evaluation of tumor response and tolerability. RESULTS Of the 5 patients (mean [SD] age, 52 [9] years; age range, 43-62 years), 3 completed 3 cycles of treatment and 2 discontinued treatment early owing to disease progression or adverse events. Adverse effects included grade 2 transaminitis and grade 4 leukopenia with a grade 3 infection. Overall, arsenic trioxide and itraconazole reduced GLI1 messenger RNA levels by 75% from baseline (P < .001). The best overall response after 3 treatment cycles was stable disease in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Targeting the HH pathway with sequential arsenic trioxide and itraconazole treatment is a feasible treatment for metastatic BCC. Although some patients experienced stable disease for 3 months, none had tumor shrinkage, which may be owing to transient GLI1 suppression with sequential dosing

  10. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer. PMID:26936016

  11. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  12. Analysis of six heavy metals in Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kum, Kee-Yeon; Zhu, Qiang; Safavi, Kamran; Gu, Yu; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Chang, Seok Woo

    2013-12-01

    Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a mineral aggregate newly developed for perforation repair, root end filling and pulp capping. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in Ortho MTA and ProRoot MTA. A total of 0.2 g of each MTA was digested using a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids and filtered. Six heavy metals in the resulting filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (n = 5). The results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in Ortho MTA were 0.10, 7.73, 49.51, 2.58, 0.82 and 10.09 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in ProRoot MTA were 0.16, 9.38, 1438.11, 74.51, 18.98 and 4.05 p.p.m., respectively. In conclusion, Ortho MTA had lower levels of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni than ProRoot MTA. PMID:24279659

  13. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  14. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  15. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a pulpotomy agent in immature teeth: Long-term case report

    PubMed Central

    Subay, Rustem Kemal; Ilhan, Banu; Ulukapi, Hasmet

    2013-01-01

    This case report aimed to present the long-term clinical performance of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomies in immature permanent teeth. Four patients with complicated crown fractures of five maxillary immature central incisor teeth were treated with pulpotomy using gray MTA. An immature mandibular first molar showing signs of reversible pulpitis that was exposed mechanically during cavity preparation was also treated with MTA pulpotomy. Four of the 6 immature teeth were diagnosed vitally with complete root maturation and with the presence of dentin bridges after 55 months (mean time of follow-ups). MTA pulpotomy was assessed unsuccessfully in two fractured central incisors. Severe discoloration in the crowns was present in all 6 cases. MTA may induce pulp healing with dentin bridge formation and prevent necrosis at long-term periods in most of the pulpotomy cases. However, discoloration following MTA pulpotomy is a significant clinical complication. PMID:23408174

  16. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  17. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  18. Erythema multiforme due to arsenic trioxide in a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Badarkhe, Girish V.; Sil, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Nath, Uttam Kumar; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, Type IV hypersensitivity reactions associated with infections and drugs. In this case of acute promyelocytic leukemia, EM diagnosed during the induction phase was mistakenly attributed to vancomycin used to treat febrile neutropenia during that period. However, the occurrence of the lesions of EM again during the consolidation phase with arsenic trioxide (ATO) lead to a re-evaluation of the patient and both the Naranjo and World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre scale showed the causality association as “probable.” The rash responded to topical corticosteroids and antihistamines. This rare event of EM being caused by ATO may be attributed to the genetic variation of methyl conjugation in the individual which had triggered the response, and the altered metabolic byproducts acted as a hapten in the subsequent keratinocyte necrosis. PMID:27114640

  19. Tungsten Trioxide (WO3) Nanoparticles as a New Anode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Santhosha, A L; Das, Shyamal K; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is investigated for the first time as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries. Pristine WO3 displays a discharge potential plateau at 1 V and exhibits a 1st discharge cycle sodium storage capacity of 640 mAh g-1. Electronic wiring of WO3 with graphene oxide (GO, 1% by weight) led to a significant increase in the storage capacity and cyclability of WO3. As a result, the discharge capacity of 1% GO-WO3 is enhanced to 927 mAh g-1 in the 1st discharge cycle. The electrochemical intercalation of Na in to WO3 and (1%) GO-WO3 as obtained from galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling is also supported by cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27451776

  20. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area. PMID:26478404

  1. Chemical and morphological characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahbaz; Kaleem, Muhammad; Fareed, Muhammad Amber; Habib, Amir; Iqbal, Kefi; Aslam, Ayesha; Ud Din, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and particle morphology of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and two white Portland cements (CEM 1 and CEM 2). Compositional analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction whereas, morphological characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and Laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. The elemental composition of WMTA, CEM 1 and CEM 2 were similar except for the presence of higher amounts of bismuth in WMTA. Calcium oxide and silicon oxide constitute the major portion of the three materials whereas, tricalcium silicate was detected as the major mineral phase. The particle size distribution and morphology of WMTA was finer compared to CEM 1 and CEM 2. The three tested materials had relatively similar chemical composition and irregular particle morphologies. PMID:26830831

  2. Preservation of an injured vital tooth using ultrasonic device and mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, S; Bortolin, M; Weinstein, T; Del Fabbro, M

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present a root fracture repair procedure for non devitalized injured tooth. One injured, non-endodontically treated maxillary anterior tooth in which an incomplete vertical root fracture involving only the buccal side was suspected, underwent an exploratory flap to visualize the pattern of bone loss and assess the type of root fracture. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed. A groove following fracture line was prepared using retro-tips driven by an ultrasonic device and sealed with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), following filling of the bone defect with Calcium Sulphate. At 24 months follow up the case showed clinical and radiographic success. The present surgical approach showed preservation of function and vitality of tooth with a shallow incomplete vertical root fracture. PMID:21956353

  3. Conservative Management of Unset Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Root-End Filling: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parirokh, Masoud; Farzaneh, Sedigheh; Hallajmofrad, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents conservative management of unset mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after being placed as a root-end filling material following periapical surgery. Periapical surgery was indicated for a maxillary lateral incisor of a 15-year-old male due to persistent exudate and a large periapical lesion. During surgery Angelus MTA was placed as root-end filling. The next session it was noticed that MTA had failed to completely set. In an orthograde approach, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was used to obturate the root canal space. The patient was followed up for 27 months and did not exhibit any clinical signs and symptoms. Radiographic images showed complete healing of the lesion. PMID:27471540

  4. Erythema multiforme due to arsenic trioxide in a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Badarkhe, Girish V; Sil, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Nath, Uttam Kumar; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute, self-limited, Type IV hypersensitivity reactions associated with infections and drugs. In this case of acute promyelocytic leukemia, EM diagnosed during the induction phase was mistakenly attributed to vancomycin used to treat febrile neutropenia during that period. However, the occurrence of the lesions of EM again during the consolidation phase with arsenic trioxide (ATO) lead to a re-evaluation of the patient and both the Naranjo and World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre scale showed the causality association as "probable." The rash responded to topical corticosteroids and antihistamines. This rare event of EM being caused by ATO may be attributed to the genetic variation of methyl conjugation in the individual which had triggered the response, and the altered metabolic byproducts acted as a hapten in the subsequent keratinocyte necrosis. PMID:27114640

  5. Conservative Management of Unset Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Root-End Filling: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Parirokh, Masoud; Farzaneh, Sedigheh; Hallajmofrad, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents conservative management of unset mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after being placed as a root-end filling material following periapical surgery. Periapical surgery was indicated for a maxillary lateral incisor of a 15-year-old male due to persistent exudate and a large periapical lesion. During surgery Angelus MTA was placed as root-end filling. The next session it was noticed that MTA had failed to completely set. In an orthograde approach, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was used to obturate the root canal space. The patient was followed up for 27 months and did not exhibit any clinical signs and symptoms. Radiographic images showed complete healing of the lesion. PMID:27471540

  6. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  7. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  8. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  9. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  10. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  11. Comparison of two histopathologic methods for evaluating subcutaneous reaction to mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Moradzadeh, Monir; Aghbali, Amirala; Rahimi, Saeed; Saghiri, Mohammadali; Zand, Vahid; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Doosti, Sirvan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: One of the most important factors for suitable materials for pulp therapy is biocompatibility. Two histopathologic methods of Cox and Federation Dentaire International (FDI) were used to evaluate inflammation. In Cox method, density of inflammatory cells, tissue reactions like fibrosis, vascular responses like congestion and fibrin extravasation have been used to evaluate inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of pathologists’ interpretations using two different methods. Study design: Three pathologists observed the degree of inflammation in 225 histopathologic sections. These sections showed inflammation in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats adjacent to polyethylene tubes, filled with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregate. Empty tubes served as controls. Samples were harvested after 7-, 15-, 30-, 60-, and 90-days. All pathologists examined the sections under a light microscope (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) at ×400 magnifications. Chi-Square test was used to evaluate the difference between inflammation grades when one pathologist used two methods. Cohen’s Kappa value was used to measure agreement of three pathologists to recognize the degrees of inflammations when using one of the methods. Results: There were no significant differences between the two methods when one of the pathologist used these methods to report the degree of inflammation (p=0.054). However, two other pathologists reported significant differences between two methods (p=0.005, p=0.001). In the FDI method, there was an acceptable agreement between first and second, and first and third pathologist in terms of the degree of inflammation, and intermediate agreement existed between the second and third pathologist. With the Cox method, no agreement among the pathologists could be found. Conclusion: The results of three pathologists in terms of rating inflammation with the FDI method showed better agreement than with the Cox method

  12. Methylrhenium trioxide revisited: mechanisms for nonredox oxygen insertion in an M-CH3 bond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Jason M; Distasio, Robert; Periana, Roy A; Goddard, William A; Oxgaard, Jonas

    2007-12-26

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) has the rare ability to stoichiometrically generate methanol at room temperature with an external oxidant (H2O2) under basic conditions. In order to use this transformation as a model for nonredox oxidative C-O coupling, the mechanisms have been elucidated using density functional theory (DFT). Our studies show several possible reaction pathways to form methanol, with the lowest net barrier (DeltaH++) being 23.3 kcal mol-1. The rate-determining step is a direct "Baeyer-Villiger" type concerted oxygen insertion into MTO, forming methoxyrhenium trioxide. The key to the low-energy transition state is the donation of electron density, first, from HOO(-) to the -CH3 group (making -CH3 more nucleophilic and HOO- more electrophilic) and, second, from the Re-C bond to both the forming Re-O and breaking O-O bonds, simultaneously (thus forming the Re-O bond as the Re-C bond is broken). In turn, the ability of MTO to undergo these transfers can be traced to the electrophilic nature of the metal center and to the absence of accessible d-orbitals. If accessible d-orbitals are present, they would most likely donate the required electron density instead of the M-CH3 moiety, and this bond would thus not be broken. It is possible that other metal centers with similar qualities, such as PtIV or IrV, could be competent for the same type of chemistry. PMID:18052160

  13. Aberrantly Expressed Genes in HaCaT Keratinocytes Chronically Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K.; Cohly, Hari H.P.; Graham-Evans, Barbara E.; Ndebele, Kenneth; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Nanduri, Bindu; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known environmental toxicant and carcinogen of global public health concern. Arsenic is genotoxic and cytotoxic to human keratinocytes. However, the biological pathways perturbed in keratinocytes by low chronic dose inorganic arsenic are not completely understood. The objective of the investigation was to discover the mechanism of arsenic carcinogenicity in human epidermal keratinocytes. We hypothesize that a combined strategy of DNA microarray, qRT-PCR and gene function annotation will identify aberrantly expressed genes in HaCaT keratinocyte cell line after chronic treatment with arsenic trioxide. Microarray data analysis identified 14 up-regulated genes and 21 down-regulated genes in response to arsenic trioxide. The expression of 4 up-regulated genes and 1 down-regulated gene were confirmed by qRT-PCR. The up-regulated genes were AKR1C3 (Aldo-Keto Reductase family 1, member C3), IGFL1 (Insulin Growth Factor-Like family member 1), IL1R2 (Interleukin 1 Receptor, type 2), and TNFSF18 (Tumor Necrosis Factor [ligand] SuperFamily, member 18) and down-regulated gene was RGS2 (Regulator of G-protein Signaling 2). The observed over expression of TNFSF18 (167 fold) coupled with moderate expression of IGFL1 (3.1 fold), IL1R2 (5.9 fold) and AKR1C3 (9.2 fold) with a decreased RGS2 (2.0 fold) suggests that chronic arsenic exposure could produce sustained levels of TNF with modulation by an IL-1 analogue resulting in chronic immunologic insult. A concomitant decrease in growth inhibiting gene (RGS2) and increase in AKR1C3 may contribute to chronic inflammation leading to metaplasia, which may eventually lead to carcinogenicity in the skin keratinocytes. Also, increased expression of IGFL1 may trigger cancer development and progression in HaCaT keratinocytes. PMID:21461292

  14. Liquid sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan; Langer, Janice M; Capacio, Benedict; Barr, John; McIntosh, Roger G

    2007-02-01

    A 35-year-old active duty service member sustained a 6.5% body surface area burn as a result of exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, which is the most severe mustard exposure of a U.S. military member since World War II that is known to us. New techniques were used to demonstrate the detectable persistence of mustard metabolites in the patient's blood for at least 41 days after exposure, validating these techniques for the first time for a human mustard patient; they were also used for the first time with human mustard blister fluid. The techniques extend eightfold the period of time that mustard exposure can be definitively diagnosed, compared with previous techniques. Although this patient's lesions were never life-threatening, he required 2 weeks of intensive burn care. He has been left with ongoing posttraumatic stress disorder and has had an incomplete dermatological recovery. In a major terrorist attack involving many patients exposed to sulfur mustard, care resources would be depleted quickly. PMID:17357776

  15. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  16. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  17. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  18. SULFUR RETENTION IN COAL ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analytical study to assess the potential for sulfur retention in various types of coal-fired boilers. Results of a field test of 10 industrial coal-fired boilers were used to evaluate the impact on sulfur retention of the operating variables (load a...

  19. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L.; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K.; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. Aims: The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. Conclusion: GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA. PMID:26430305

  20. Electron-diffraction study of the interaction of carbon with the products of reduction of molybdenum from the trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Solonin, Yu. M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper studies the mechanisms of the structural transformations at the remaining possible stages of the process of reduction of molybdenum trioxide by hydrogen in the presence of simultaneous interaction of the reaction products with carbon. The authors find that the intermediate molybdenum suboxide (NaC1 structural type) in this case restructures directly into hexagonal molybdenum carbide. The hexagonal Mo/sub 2/C apparently forms on the (110) planes of molybdenum.

  1. Blood biochemistry, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status of guinea pigs challenged with sodium arsenite or arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Anil Kumar; Dass, Ram Sharan; Behera, Suvendu Kumar

    2014-08-01

    The present experiment aimed to compare the two most commonly used compounds of arsenic (sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide) for their effect on blood metabolites, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status in guinea pigs. Twenty-one adult guinea pigs were randomly divided into three equal groups. Animals in group T1 (control) were fed a basal diet, whereas 50 ppm arsenic was added in the basal diet either as sodium arsenite (T2) or arsenic trioxide (T3) and fed for 11 weeks. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were significantly increased along with a decrease in blood hemoglobin level in both the arsenic-administered groups. The level of erythrocytic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione reductase) was decreased and lipid peroxidation was elevated upon arsenic exposure. Serum thyroid hormone levels were reduced and arsenic levels in tissues increased in both the arsenic-exposed groups, irrespective of the arsenic compound. Thus, sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide exerted similar adverse effects on blood metabolic profile, antioxidant status, and thyroid hormones in guinea pigs. PMID:24948398

  2. Effect of Synthetic Tissue Fluid on Microleakage of Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as Root-End Filling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Reyhani, Mohammad Forough; Samiei, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Negin; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Azimi, Shahram; Shokohinejad, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The success of endodontic surgery has been shown to depend partly on the apical seal. Grey mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) produces hydroxyapatite twice as often as white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) when suspended in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage phenomenon of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregates as root-end filling materials after immersion in synthetic tissue fluid (STF). Methods: 55 single-rooted extracted maxillary anterior human teeth were divided into two experimental groups of 20 teeth each, plus 3 groups of 5 teeth each as two negative and one positive control groups. The root canals were cleaned, shaped, and laterally compacted with gutta-percha. The root ends were resected and 3 mm deep cavities were prepared. The root-end preparations were filled with GMTA or WMTA in the experimental groups. Leakage was determined using a dye penetration method. Data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: The mean dye leakage was 0.40 ± 0.1 mm for GMTA and 0.50±0.1 mm for WMTA groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P = 0.14). Conclusion: Despite the different properties and behaviours of GMTA and WMTA in STF, there were no significant differences in microleakage when using GMTA or WMTA. PMID:22912925

  3. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  4. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  5. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  6. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  7. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  8. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  9. Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Disodium Hydrogen Phosphate on BMP-2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Solaimanirad, Jafar; Shahi, Shahriar; Shafaie, Hajar; Salem Milani, Amin; Shakuie, Sahar; Zand, Vahid; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the hypotheses regarding the calcification induction by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the involvement of transforming growth factor-Beta (TGF-β) super family. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is one of the endodontic biomaterials with clinical applications similar to MTA. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) by a combination of disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) and tooth colored ProRoot MTA (WMTA), to that of CEM cement and WMTA. Methods and Materials: Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin, and streptomycin. Cells in groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to WMTA, CEM and WMTA+DSHP discs, respectively. The fourth group served as the control. After 72 h of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. BMP-2 levels in cell-free culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA, followed by the post hoc Games-Howell test for BMP-2 and post hoc Tukey’s test for the results of MTT assay. Results: Cellular viability was significantly higher in group 3 compared to the other groups (P<0.05); however, CEM and WMTA did not exhibit significant differences (P=0.08). The control group exhibited significantly higher cellular viability in comparison to the other groups of the study (P<0.05). The highest and lowest protein production rates were observed in the WMTA (3167±274.46 pg/mL) and WMTA+DSHP (1796±839.49 pg/mL) groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the control, WMTA and CEM groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: WMTA and CEM did not exhibit any significant differences in terms of inducing BMP-2 production; however, incorporation of DSHP into WMTA resulted in a

  10. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  11. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  12. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  13. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  14. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  15. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  16. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  17. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  18. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  19. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  20. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  1. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  2. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  3. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  4. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. PMID:26706053

  5. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with and without Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Shakoei, Sahar; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most current root-end filling materials do not provide a perfect seal. Thus, a microscopic space is likely to exist in the interface between walls of the root-end cavity and filling material, which allows microorganisms and their products to penetrate. In addition to good sealing ability and biocompatibility, root-end filling materials should ideally have some antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this in vitro study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of Angelus white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the mixture of MTA with silver nanoparticles (1% weight; MTA/SN). Materials and Methods Antimicrobial properties of MTA and MTA/SN were tested by agar diffusion technique against Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The microbial inhibition zones around the materials were measured by a caliper with 0.1-mm accuracy. Student’s t-test was used for comparison between the two groups in normal data distribution and Man-Whitney U test for non-normal distribution. Results Student’s t-test revealed that for E. faecalis, C. albicans, and P. aeruginosa, microbial inhibition zone of MTA/SN was significantly greater than that of MTA (P = 0.000). Mann-Whitney U test indicated no significant difference between the effect of MTA and MTA/SN on S. aureus (P > 0.05). Conclusion Based on the results of this study, adding silver nanoparticles to MTA improved its antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:24171023

  6. Morphological and chemical analysis of different precipitates on mineral trioxide aggregate immersed in different fluids.

    PubMed

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi; Okawa, Seigo

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the ultrastructures and chemical compositions of precipitates formed on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; White ProRoot MTA) immersed in distilled water (DW) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS), based on the attribution that MTA's bioactivity and sealing ability are influenced by its interaction with the external fluid environment. After 1 and 14 days of immersion, precipitates formed on MTA disks were analyzed using wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyzer with image observation function (SEM-EPMA; EPMA1601, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan), and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. On DW specimens, cubic-like crystals containing Ca, O, and C (17, 66, and 17 at% respectively) were produced. State analysis of calcium k(β)spectrum also revealed calcium hydroxide. On PBS specimens, acicular-spherical and lath-like crystals with Ca/P molar ratios of 1.42 and 1.58 respectively were produced. In conclusion, the precipitates formed on DW specimens were identified as calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxide primarily, whereas the precipitates on PBS specimens were inferred to be amorphous calcium phosphate. PMID:20823620

  7. Effects of surface porosity on tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) films' electrochromic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.J.; Fang, Y.K.; Ho, J.J.; Hsieh, W.T.; Ting, S.F.; Huang, Daoyang; Ho, F.C.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, the correlation between the electrochromic performance and the surface morphology of the tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films sputtered by dc reactive magnetron sputtering with widely varying target-substrate distances was investigated. It is found that the optical density change ({Delta}OD) of films is strongly affected by the target-substrate distance. The coloration efficiency (CE) at 633 nm was also found to be sensitive to the target-substrate distance, with 16 cm{sup 2}/C of film sputtered at 6 cm and 50 cm{sup 2}/C at 18 cm. X-ray diffraction showed that the crystal structure of films was amorphous. By using atomic force microscope to identify the surface porosity of the sputtered WO{sub 3} films, the authors found that the film at longer target-substrate distance was rough, porous, and having a cone-shaped columns morphology, this offering a good electrochromic performance for opto-switching applications.

  8. Electrolyte Gated Transistors based on Solution Processed Mesoporous Tungsten Trioxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Clara; Isik, Dilek; Cicoira, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an important material for electrochromic displays, gas sensors, and photoelectrochemical cells. Despite intensive research efforts, the charge transport properties of nanostructured WO3 films, as well as of other metal oxide films, are still largely undiscovered. Electrolyte gating provides a powerful platform to study the charge transport properties of nanostructured WO3 films permitting to achieve high charge density regimes. In turn, this opens the possibility to improve the film transport properties for a wide range of applications. Here we report on electrolyte gated transistors making use of WO3 films as the semiconductor and H2SO4(aq) 1M as the gate dielectric. WO3 films, prepared by sol-gel method, were deposited on source and drain patterned ITO substrates. The liquid electrolyte was confined using a PDMS well. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images show a mesoporous film structure where the electrolyte can easily penetrate. The mesoporous structure permits an efficient electrolyte gating compared to bulk WO3 films because of the higher surface available for electrical double layers, which are the underpinning of the electrolyte gating. Upon application of gate bias in the 0-1 V range, with an applied drain voltage ranging between 0-1 V, we were able to tune the conductivity in the WO3 transistor channel: electrolyte gating of the films led to clear transistor behaviour. Electrolyte gating of WO3 electrochromism is presently under investigation.

  9. In vitro investigations into the etiology of mineral trioxide tooth staining

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Todd; Baratz, Adam Z.; Gutmann, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of bismuth oxide, a constituent of contemporary mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials, and its response to various solutions that may contribute to the potential discoloration that occurs following MTA applications within the scope of endodontics. Setting and Design: Laboratory assessment of chemical reactions with white ProRoot® MTA and white Portland cement (WPC). Materials and Methods: Set specimens and freshly mixed specimens of white ProRoot® MTA and white ProRoot® MTA powder, along with specimens of WPC were exposed to distilled water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 10% formalin, hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) base, and hydrochloric acid (HCl) acid. Specimens were visually inspected periodically for color changes. Results: All forms of ProRoot MTA showed discoloration when exposed to 10% formalin within 30 min, as opposed to WPC, and were completely blackened at 4 days. Bismuth oxide alone and with calcium oxide also turned black within 30 min after exposure to 10% formalin. No discoloration was seen when exposed to the other solutions. Conclusions: Exposing MTA in various forms to a variety of liquids has determined that bismuth oxidein combination with other chemical moieties is the prime cause of staining observed by clinicians. PMID:25506138

  10. Pulpotomy of Symptomatic Permanent Teeth with Carious Exposure Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Barngkgei, Imad Hassan; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Alboni, Roula Safouh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of pulpotomy treatment with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 27-54 years presented with 11 symptomatic permanent teeth (n=11). Each offending carious tooth was clinically and radiographically determined. We removed caries as conservatively as possible; however pulp exposure was inevitable. ProRoot MTA pulpotomy was performed on these teeth. The patients were followed-up clinically and radiographically for 24-42 months. Results Immediate relief of patients` symptoms occurred. Moreover, teeth responses to the electric pulp tester were within normal range on follow-up appointment and the radiographs did not reveal any abnormality/lesion in the periapical areas. Conclusion Pulpotomy using MTA could be a good alternative for root canal therapy (RCT) for managing symptomatic mature permanent teeth with carious exposure, however further large-scale multicenter clinical trials are highly encouraged to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:23717332

  11. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  12. Performances and mechanistic investigations of a triphosphine trioxide/ionic liquid system for rare earth extraction.

    PubMed

    Turgis, R; Arrachart, G; Dubois, V; Dourdain, S; Virieux, D; Michel, S; Legeai, S; Lejeune, M; Draye, M; Pellet-Rostaing, S

    2016-01-21

    The extraction of rare earth elements (REEs) from nitric acid solution with a triphosphine trioxide (TPO) is presented. Performances of such a ligand in ionic liquids vs. a classical solvent (benzyl ether) are compared. TPO seems to be 10 to 100 times more efficient when it is dissolved in ionic media whatever the concentration of nitric acid involved. Mechanistic investigations reveal that cation exchange classically observed in ionic liquids is not consistent with the experimental data. Moreover, clear differences in the TPO/Ln complexes between classical and ionic media are highlighted. A stable complex of 1 lanthanide for 3 TPO is formed in an ionic liquid whereas a complex of 1 lanthanide for 6 to 9 TPO is formed in benzyl ether. Back extraction is also studied and good recovery of REEs could be obtained. The TPO/ionic liquid system shows remarkable performances i.e. efficiency and selectivity towards lanthanides in a simulated leaching solution of a Nd/Fe/B/Dy magnet. PMID:26673884

  13. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    A Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials. PMID:27429722

  14. Porous dimanganese trioxide microflowers derived from microcoordinations for flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huan; Li, Xinran; Li, Bing; Zhang, Yizhou; Zhao, Qunxing; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Dimanganese trioxide microflowers are easily obtained from a Mn(ii) 8-hydroxyquinoline microcoordination after calcination in air. We also look into the possible formation mechanism of the flower-like morphology, and find that the reaction time affects the morphology of the coordination. Furthermore, the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers are made of many nanoplates which form many nanogaps and nanochannels. Interestingly, the assembled electrode based on the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers proves to be a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The electrode shows a specific capacitance of 994 F g(-1), which can work well even after 4000 cycles at 0.75 A g(-1). More importantly, the porous Mn2O3 microflowers and activated carbons are assembled into a high-performance flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with a specific capacitance of 312.5 mF cm(-2). The cycle test shows that the device can offer 95.6% capacity of the initial capacitance at 2.0 mA cm(-2) after 5000 cycles with little decay. The maximum energy density of the device can achieve 6.56 mWh cm(-3) and the maximum power density can also achieve 283.5 mW cm(-3), which are among the best results for manganese based materials. PMID:27221767

  15. Comparing Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Diluted Formocresol in Pulpotomized Human Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Zealand, Cameron M.; Briskie, Daniel M.; Botero, Tatiana M.; Boynton, James R.; Hu, Jan C.C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this multisite, multioperator, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 6-month outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) as pulpotomy medicament. Methods Determined by a power analysis, 252 molars of 152 children were recruited. The teeth were randomly assigned to receive GMTA or DFC. At the 6-month follow-up, 118 children with 203 treated teeth were evaluated. Results Four blinded and calibrated evaluators scored each radiograph for pathologies. Clinical success was similar for DFC (97%) and GMTA (100%), (P<.09). Radiographic success differed significantly (P<.04) for DFC (86%) and GMTA (95%). Pulp canal obliteration was radiographically observed in 25% of the DFC group and in 37% of the GMTA group (P=.07). Dentin bridging was observed in 22% of the GMTA group but was not found in the DFC group (P<.01). Conclusion Teeth treated with GMTA showed more favorable radiographic outcomes than DFC at 6 months post-treatment. PMID:21070705

  16. Enhancement of Arsenic Trioxide-Mediated Changes in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (IPS)

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barbara; Stevens, Jacqueline; Wells, Phatia; Sims, Jennifer; Rogers, Christian; Leggett, Sophia S.; Ekunwe, Stephen; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPS) are an artificially derived type of pluripotent stem cell, showing many of the same characteristics as natural pluripotent stem cells. IPS are a hopeful therapeutic model; however there is a critical need to determine their response to environmental toxins. Effects of arsenic on cells have been studied extensively; however, its effect on IPS is yet to be elucidated. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and genotoxicity in many cells. Based on ATOs action in other cells, we hypothesize that it will induce alterations in morphology, inhibit cell viability and induce a genotoxic effect on IPS. Cells were treated for 24 hours with ATO (0–9 µg/mL). Cell morphology, viability and DNA damage were documented. Results indicated sufficient changes in morphology of cell colonies mainly in cell ability to maintain grouping and ability to remain adherent. Cell viability decreased in a dose dependent manner. There were significant increases in tail length and moment as well as destruction of intact DNA as concentration increased. Exposure to ATO resulted in a reproducible dose dependent sequence of events marked by changes in morphology, decrease of cell viability, and induction of genotoxicity in IPS. PMID:25054231

  17. Use of Arsenic Trioxide as an Antivascular and Thermosensitizing Agent in Solid Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Robert J; Lee, Sang H; Rood, Kelly L; Stewart, Michael J; Lyons, John C; Lew, Young S; Park, Heonjoo; Song, Chang W

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Arsenic trioxide, As2O3 (ATO), has been found to be an effective chemotherapy drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia but its effect on solid tumors has not been fully explored. In the present report, we describe our observation that ATO is a potent antivascular agent and that it markedly enhances the effect of hyperthermia on tumors. The tumor blood perfusion in SCK tumors of A/J mice and FSall tumors of C3H mice was significantly suppressed for up to 24 hours after an i.p. injection of 8 mg/kg ATO. ATO was also found to be able to increase the thermosensitivity of tumor cells in vitro. As a probable consequence of these effects, ATO treatment markedly increased the tumor growth delay caused by hyperthermia at 41.5–42.5°C. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue revealed that the expression levels of several adhesion molecules and TNFα are noticeably increased in tumors 2–6 hours after systemic ATO treatment. It is concluded that ATO is potentially useful to enhance the effect of hyperthermia on tumors at a clinically relevant temperature. PMID:11228548

  18. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-12-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA-PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization. PMID:25012869

  19. Tissue Reaction and Biocompatibility of Implanted Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Silver Nanoparticles in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Vahid; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Aghbali, Amirala; Mesgariabbasi, Mehran; Janani, Maryam; Mokhtari, Hadi; Tehranchi, Pardis; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of endodontic materials are of utmost importance. Considering the extensive applications of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in dentistry and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles, this study aimed to evaluate the subcutaneous inflammatory reaction of rat connective tissues to white MTA with and without nanosilver (NS) particles. Methods and Materials: Polyethylene tubes (1.1×8 mm) containing experimental materials (MTA and MTA+NS and empty control tubes) were implanted in subcutaneous tissues of seventy-five male rats. Animals were divided into five groups (n=15) according to the time of evaluation: group 1; after 7 days, group 2; after 15 days, group 3; after 30 days, group 4; after 60 days and group 5; after 90 days. The inflammatory reaction was graded and data was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Statistical significance was defined at 0.05. Results: Comparison of cumulative inflammatory reaction at all intervals revealed that the mean grade of inflammatory reaction to MTA, MTA+NS and control samples were 3, 2 and 2, respectively. According to the Mann-Whitney analysis there were no significant differences between MTA+NS and MTA (P=0.42). Conclusion: Incorporation of 1% nanosilver to MTA does not affect the inflammatory reaction of subcutaneous tissue in rat models. PMID:26843871

  20. Targeting hedgehog signalling by arsenic trioxide reduces cell growth and induces apoptosis in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karen A; Zaborski, Julian J; Riester, Rosa; Schweiss, Sabrina K; Hopp, Ulrike; Traub, Frank; Kluba, Torsten; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schleicher, Sabine B

    2016-02-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are soft tissue tumours treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. However, mortality rates remain high in case of recurrences and metastatic disease due to drug resistance and failure to undergo apoptosis. Therefore, innovative approaches targeting specific signalling pathways are urgently needed. We analysed the impact of different hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitors on growth and survival of six RMS cell lines using MTS assay, colony formation assay, 3D spheroid cultures, flow cytometry and western blotting. Especially the glioma-associated oncogene family (GLI) inhibitor arsenic trioxide (ATO) effectively reduced viability as well as clonal growth and induced cell death in RMS cell lines of embryonal, alveolar and sclerosing, spindle cell subtype, whereas normal skeletal muscle cells were hardly compromised by ATO. Combination of ATO with itraconazole potentiated the reduction of colony formation and spheroid size. These results show that ATO is a promising substance for treatment of relapsed and refractory RMS by directly targeting GLI transcription factors. The combination with itraconazole or other chemotherapeutic drugs has the opportunity to enforce the treatment efficiency of resistant and recurrent RMS. PMID:26676886

  1. Arsenic trioxide plus PX-478 achieves effective treatment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lang, Mingxiao; Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Hongwei; Dong, Jie; Lan, Chungen; Hao, Jihui; Huang, Chongbiao; Li, Xin; Yu, Ming; Yang, Yanhui; Yang, Shengyu; Ren, He

    2016-08-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been selected as a promising treatment not only in leukemia but also in solid tumors. Previous studies showed that the cytotoxicity of ATO mainly depends on the induction of reactive oxygen species. However, ATO has only achieved a modest effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, suggesting that the existing radical scavenging proteins, such as hypoxia inducible factor-1, attenuate the effect. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of combination treatment of ATO plus PX-478 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 inhibitor) and its underlying mechanism. Here, we showed that PX-478 robustly strengthened the anti-growth and pro-apoptosis effect of ATO on Panc-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Meanwhile, in vivo mouse xenograft models also showed the synergistic effect of ATO plus PX-478 compared with any single agent. Further studies showed that the anti-tumor effect of ATO plus PX-478 was derived from the reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis. We next confirmed that Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 cleared reactive oxygen species by its downstream target, forkhead box O transcription factors, and this effect may justify the strategy of ATO plus PX-478 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27212442

  2. Role of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Arsenic Trioxide-induced Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chaoyun; Zhu, Dihan; Zhuo, Jianjiang; Li, Limin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) has been shown to operate as a negative regulator in cancer cell survival. The mechanism underneath such function, however, remains poorly defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of SIRPα in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells results in apoptosis possibly via inhibiting the β-catenin signaling pathway and upregulating Foxo3a. Pharmacological activation of β-catenin signal pathway attenuates apoptosis caused by SIRPα. Interestingly, we also find that the pro-apoptotic effect of SIRPα plays an important role in arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced apoptosis in APL cells. ATO treatment induces the SIRPα protein expression in APL cells and abrogation of SIRPα induction by lentivirus-mediated SIRPα shRNA significantly reduces the ATO-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic study further shows that induction of SIRPα protein in APL cells by ATO is mediated through suppression of c-Myc, resulting in reduction of three SIRPα-targeting microRNAs: miR-17, miR-20a and miR-106a. In summary, our results demonstrate that SIRPα inhibits tumor cell survival and significantly contributes to ATO-induced APL cell apoptosis. PMID:27010069

  3. Role of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Arsenic Trioxide-induced Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chaoyun; Zhu, Dihan; Zhuo, Jianjiang; Li, Limin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) has been shown to operate as a negative regulator in cancer cell survival. The mechanism underneath such function, however, remains poorly defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of SIRPα in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells results in apoptosis possibly via inhibiting the β-catenin signaling pathway and upregulating Foxo3a. Pharmacological activation of β-catenin signal pathway attenuates apoptosis caused by SIRPα. Interestingly, we also find that the pro-apoptotic effect of SIRPα plays an important role in arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced apoptosis in APL cells. ATO treatment induces the SIRPα protein expression in APL cells and abrogation of SIRPα induction by lentivirus-mediated SIRPα shRNA significantly reduces the ATO-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic study further shows that induction of SIRPα protein in APL cells by ATO is mediated through suppression of c-Myc, resulting in reduction of three SIRPα-targeting microRNAs: miR-17, miR-20a and miR-106a. In summary, our results demonstrate that SIRPα inhibits tumor cell survival and significantly contributes to ATO-induced APL cell apoptosis. PMID:27010069

  4. Mineral trioxide aggregate as a pulpotomy agent in primary molars: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Naik, S; Hegde, A H

    2005-03-01

    The retention of pulpally involved deciduous tooth in a healthy state until the time of normal exfoliation remains to be one of the challenges for Pedodontists. A scientific noise has been generated about several materials some of which have been popular pulpotomy medicaments. Concerns have been raised about the toxicity and potential carcinogenicity of these materials, and alternatives have been proposed to maintain the partial pulp vitality, however to date no material has been accepted as an ideal pulpotomy agent. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biocompatible material which provides a biological seal. MTA has been proposed as a potential medicament for various pulpal procedures like pulp capping with reversible pulpitis, apexification, repair of root perforations, etc. Hence the present study was done to evaluate the efficacy of MTA as a pulpotomy medicament. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was done on children where MTA was used as pulpotomy medicament in primary molars for a period of 6 months and it was found to be a successful material. PMID:15858300

  5. A prospective clinical study of mineral trioxide aggregate for partial pulpotomy in cariously exposed permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Barrieshi-Nusair, Kefah Mahmood; Qudeimat, Muawia Abdulla

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of using gray mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for partial pulpotomy in cariously exposed young permanent first molars. Thirty-one first permanent molars of 23 patients with a carious exposure were treated using a partial pulpotomy technique. The age of the patients ranged from 7.2 to 13.1 yr with an average of 10 yr. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed a pulpal response within normal limits and normal appearance of the periradicular area respectively. A diagnosis of reversible pulpitis and normal periapex was established. After isolation, caries removal and carious exposure, the exposed pulp tissue was removed with a diamond bur to a depth of 2 to 4 mm. After hemostasis, 2 to 4 mm of gray MTA paste was placed against the fresh wound. The floor of the cavity was covered with a base of glass ionomer. The teeth were restored with amalgam or stainless steel crowns. Teeth were reviewed radiographically and clinically at 3, 6, 12, and 24 month intervals. Twenty-two of the treated teeth did not show any clinical or radiographic signs of failure during the follow-up evaluation period. Six teeth did not respond to vitality testing at the final follow-up period; however, no radiographic signs of failure or clinical symptoms were detected. Gray MTA was a suitable dressing agent for parital pulpotomy in cariously exposed young permanent first molars. PMID:16861071

  6. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide Exposure on Heat Shock Protein Response in the Immune Organs of Chickens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Hu, Zhibo; Tian, Li; Zhang, Kexin; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Xianguang; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), a kind of pentavalent arsenic, has recently been linked to disrupted immune function. Heat shock proteins (Hsps), a group of highly conserved proteins, are rapidly synthesised when living organisms are exposed to various stress conditions. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of As2O3 on the expression level of Hsps (Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp60, Hsp40 and Hsp27) in the immune organs (spleen, thymus and bursa of Fabricius (BF)) of chickens. A total of 72 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were randomly divided into four groups, including the low-As group (L group), middle-As group (M group), high-As group (H group) and control group (C group). Immune organs were collected, and levels of Hsp messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were examined on days 30, 60 and 90. The results showed that the levels of Hsp mRNA (Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp60, Hsp40 and Hsp27) and protein (Hsp70 and Hsp60) expression were significantly increased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in the As2O3 treatment groups compared with the corresponding control groups. Taken together, these results suggest that As2O3 influences the level of Hsps in immune organs. PMID:26050236

  7. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  8. Tooth discoloration induced by a novel mineral trioxide aggregate-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Lim, Myung-Jin; Choi, Yoorina; Rosa, Vinicius; Hong, Chan-Ui; Min, Kyung-San

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth discoloration caused by contact with a novel injectable mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based root canal sealer (Endoseal; Maruchi, Wonju, Korea) compared with a widely used resin-based root canal sealer (AHplus; Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) and conventional MTA (ProRoot; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK, USA). Materials and Methods: Forty standardized bovine tooth samples were instrumented and divided into three experimental groups and one control group (n = 10/group). Each material was inserted into the cavity, and all specimens were sealed with a self-adhesive resin. Based on CIE Lab system, brightness change (ΔL) and total color change (ΔE) of each specimen between baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks were obtained. Results: At all time points, Endoseal showed no significant difference in ΔL and ΔE compared to AHplus and control group (P > 0.05), whereas the ProRoot group showed significantly higher ΔL and ΔE values than the Endoseal group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (P < 0.05). Therefore, Endoseal showed less discoloration than conventional MTA and a similar color change to AHplus. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our data indicate that the MTA-based sealer produces a similar amount of tooth discoloration as AHplus which is considered to be acceptable. PMID:27403062

  9. Placement in an acidic environment increase the solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Hamid Reza; Borna, Zahra; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) in an acidic environment. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four metal rings were prepared, filled with WMTA and randomly divided into two groups. The samples in groups 1 and 2 were set in synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.4 and 4.4, respectively and then were transferred to beakers containing synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.7 and 4.4. Solubility of WMTA samples were calculated at the 9 experimental intervals. Data was analyzed with two-factor ANOVA and Bonferroni test (P < 0.03). Results: The total solubility of WMTA in groups 1 and 2 were −9.1796 ± 1.9158% and −1.1192 ± 2.6236%, (P = 0.028) with weight changes of 9.1574 ± 2.1432% and 7.3276 ± 1.5823%, respectively (P = 0.002). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions: It was concluded that solubility of WMTA increases in acidic environments and additional therapeutic precautions should be taken to decrease inflammation in endodontic treatment. PMID:23833462

  10. Comparative Performance of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Versus Calcium Hydroxide as a Direct Pulp Capping Agent.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Vital pulp therapy is the general concept involved in the "regenerative" restorative treatment of the reversibly injured dental pulp with the intention of maintaining its vitality in a restored, functioning tooth. While this procedure has been attempted with various materials and techniques over a period of several centuries, the advent of hard-setting calcium hydroxide materials in the late 1950s made the procedure of direct pulp capping a more routine and relatively predictable procedure. More recently, in the mid 1990s, a new type of water-based, "hydraulic-type," calcium silicate-based cement, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), was introduced to dentistry as a possible alternative to the established standard of hard-setting calcium hydroxide. Over the last two decades, a slowly growing body of pre-clinical and human clinical studies evaluating and comparing these two materials has developed. Most recently, a number of well-designed, randomized controlled studies and resultant systematic reviews have been completed and published regarding the comparative efficacy of calcium hydroxide versus MTA for direct pulp capping. This Critical Appraisal considers and reviews some of the more recently published reports which provide a more definitive answer to this clinical research question. PMID:26876369

  11. Remineralization of artificial dentinal caries lesions by biomimetically modified mineral trioxide aggregate.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-pin; Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Primus, Carolyn M; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-02-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative materials are available for remineralization of enamel and root caries. However, remineralization of dentin is more difficult than remineralization of enamel due to the paucity of apatite seed crystallites along the lesion surface for heterogeneous crystal growth. Extracellular matrix proteins play critical roles in controlling apatite nucleation/growth in collagenous tissues. This study examined the remineralization efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in phosphate-containing simulated body fluid (SBF) by incorporating polyacrylic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate as biomimetic analogs of matrix proteins for remineralizing caries-like dentin. Artificial caries-like dentin lesions incubated in SBF were remineralized over a 6 week period using MTA alone or MTA containing biomimetic analogs in the absence or presence of dentin adhesive application. Lesion depths and integrated mineral loss were monitored with microcomputed tomography. The ultrastructure of baseline and remineralized lesions was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dentin remineralization was best achieved using MTA containing biomimetic analogs regardless of whether an adhesive was applied; dentinal tubules within the remineralized dentin were occluded by apatite. It is concluded that the version of MTA employed in this study may be doped with biomimetic analogs for remineralization of unbonded and bonded artificial caries-like lesions in the presence of SBF. PMID:22085925

  12. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  13. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  14. Arsenic trioxide suppressed mantle cell lymphoma by downregulation of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rico K H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2014-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is aggressive with poor prognosis. Due to t(11;14)(q13;q32), cyclin D1 is overexpressed. The in vitro activities of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in MCL were investigated. In MCL lines Jeko-1 and Granta-519, As2O3 induced dose-dependent and time-dependent increases in apoptosis accompanied by cyclin D1 suppression. Downregulation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation, which led to repressed G1 progression to S/G2 phases. As2O3 did not affect cyclin D1 gene transcription. Instead, As2O3 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (by tyrosine-216 phosphorylation) and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta (by serine-176/180 phosphorylation), both of which phosphorylated cyclin D1 at threonine-286, leading to its poly-ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. These observations were recapitulated partly in primary MCL samples obtained from patients refractory to conventional treatment. Our findings suggested that As2O3 might be clinically useful in MCL. PMID:23949314

  15. Arsenic trioxide rewires mantle cell lymphoma response to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Ling; Liu, Yuan-Fang; Peng, Li-Jun; Fei, Ai-Mei; Cui, Wen; Miao, Sheng-Chao; Hermine, Olivier; Gressin, Remy; Khochbin, Saadi; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Jin; Mi, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Although most of the mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients initially responded well to bortezomib (BTZ), the dose-dependent toxicities have greatly limited the application of BTZ to MCL. To investigate the efficacy and mechanism of arsenic trioxide (ATO) with BTZ in inducing apoptosis of MCL cells, two MCL cell lines, along with primary cells from MCL patients (n = 4), were used. Additionally, the NOD-SCID mice xenograft model of Jeko-1 cells was established to study the anti-MCL mechanisms in an in vivo setting. ATO treatment highly improved BTZ capacity to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of MCL cells. Furthermore, the interaction of Noxa and Mcl-1 leads Bak to release from Mcl-1 or from Bcl-xl, which could further activate Bak and Bax and then induce cell apoptosis. We also found that when lower doses of BTZ were used in combination with ATO, more effective proapoptotic effects in both the cell lines and the primary cells were obtained compared to the effects of BTZ used alone at higher doses. Simultaneously, the combination of these two drugs delayed the tumor growth in mice more effectively than BTZ alone. The cooperative anti-MCL effects of this combination therapy both in vitro and in vivo strongly provided a new strategy to the clinical treatment of MCL. PMID:26310857

  16. Optimization of combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and fractionated radiotherapy for malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Shoucheng; Knox, Susan J. . E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to optimize the combined treatment regimen using arsenic trioxide (ATO) and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Nude mice with human glioma xenograft tumors were treated with fractionated local tumor radiation of 250 cGy/fraction/day and 5 mg/kg ATO for 5-10 days. Results: Time course experiments demonstrated that maximal tumor growth delay occurred when ATO was administered between 0 and 4 h after radiation. The combination treatment of ATO and radiation synergistically inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor growth delay time of 13.2 days, compared with 1.4 days and 6.5 days for ATO and radiation alone (p < 0.01), respectively. The use of concurrent therapy of radiation and ATO initially, followed by ATO as maintenance therapy, was superior to the use of preloading with ATO before combined therapy and produced a tumor growth delay time of 22.7 days as compared with 11.7 days for the ATO preloading regimen (p < 0.01). The maintenance dose of ATO after concurrent therapy was effective and important for continued inhibition of tumor growth. Conclusions: The combined use of fractionated radiation and ATO is effective for the treatment of glioma xenograft tumors. ATO was most effective when administered 0-4 h after radiation without pretreatment with ATO. These results have important implications for the optimization of treatment regimen using ATO and fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors.

  17. Cytotoxic effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium enrichedmixture cement, Biodentine and octacalcium pohosphate onhuman gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    A. Saberi, Eshagh; Farhadmollashahi, Narges; Ghotbi, Faroogh; Karkeabadi, Hamed; Havaei, Roholla

    2016-01-01

    Background. This in vitro study compared the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium enriched mixture(CEM) cement, Biodentine (BD) and octacalcium phosphate (OCP) on the viability of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Methods. After completion of the setting time of the materials under study, fibroblasts were placed in 24-well insert platesand 1 mg of each material was added to the respective wells. The plates were then incubated at 37°C. The inserts were removedat 24, 48 and 168 hours and 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide was added to assess cytotoxicity via the MTT colorimetricassay. Data were analyzed at different time intervals using repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Bonferronitest at three levels of significance of P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. Results. Cytotoxicity of the materials under study was not significantly different at 24 and 48 hours compared to the controlgroup. However, at 168 hours, a significant difference was noted between MTA (P < 0.05) and Biodentine (P < 0.01)and the control group. Conclusion. Cytotoxicity of MTA, CEM, Biodentine and OCP against HGFs was similar to that of the control group at 24and 48 hours. Over time, MTA and Biodentine exhibited less cytotoxicity than other materials. PMID:27429722

  18. One-step apexification using platelet rich fibrin matrix and mineral trioxide aggregate apical barrier.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anisha; Yadav, Amit; Shetty, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    The absence of a natural apical constriction in a nonvital young permanent tooth makes endodontic treatment a challenge. There is a need to induce or create an apical barrier against, which the obturating material can be condensed. Traditionally, calcium hydroxide is the material of choice to induce apexification. Due to certain drawbacks such as prolonged treatment duration and unpredictable apical barrier formation, it is being replaced by materials, which have a more predictable outcome like mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). One-step apexification with MTA reduces the treatment time when compared with traditional calcium hydroxide apexification, which requires an average time of 12-19 months. In one-step apexification using MTA, the technical problem encountered is controlling the overfill or underfill of MTA. The use of a matrix material helps to overcome this shortcoming. Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is an immune platelet concentrate, which can be used as a matrix, it also promotes wound healing and repair. This case report presents a case of one step apexification using MTA as an apical barrier and autologous PRF as an internal matrix. PMID:25728119

  19. Synchronization in the Heart Rate and the Vasomotion in Rat Aorta: Effect of Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Fredi; Palacios, Javier; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is used clinically in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) in this management is important as arsenic use may cause distortion of the electrical properties with its attendant sequel. We studied the effect of As2O3 on vasomotion in rat aortic rings using isometric tension recordings and ECG in anesthetized rats. The results showed that As2O3 (10(-5) M) significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the frequency of acetylcholine (10(-5) M ACh)- and KCl (10 mM)-induced vasomotion, and it also increased the relaxation time (R t) of vasomotion. This effect was restored by 10(-8) M sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). ACh-induced NO release in the aorta was blunted in the presence of As2O3. The corrected QT interval (QTc) of the ECG, and time dilation (T d) of the pulse wave in the tail artery of the anesthetized rat were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in the arsenic-treated group (50 ppb As) versus control. In conclusion, data suggest that arsenic-induced reduction in vasomotion frequency of the isolated aortic rings is associated with a decreased bioavailability of NO, an increase in QTc and a decrease in the frequency of the pulse wave generated by the cardiac cycle in anesthetized rats. PMID:25666560

  20. Effect of methods of evaluation on sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Suri, Navleen Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with three different methods. Materials and Methods: Forty single canal teeth were decoronated, and root canals were enlarged to simulate immature apex. The samples were randomly divided into Group MD = MTA-angelus mixed with distilled water and Group MC = MTA-angelus mixed with 2% chlorhexidine, and apical seal was recorded with glucose penetration method, fluid filtration method, and dye penetration methods and compared. Results: The three methods of evaluation resulted differently. The glucose penetration method showed that MD sealed better than MC, but difference was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The fluid filtration method resulted that Group MC was statistically insignificant superior to Group MD (P > 0.05). The dye penetration method showed that Group MC sealed statistically better than Group MD. Conclusion: No correlation was found among the results obtained with the three methods of evaluation. Addition of chlorhexidine enhanced the sealing ability of MTA according to the fluid filtration test and dye leakage while according to the glucose penetration test, chlorhexidine did not enhance the sealing ability of MTA. This study showed that relying on the results of apical sealing by only method can be misleading. PMID:27217635

  1. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, B.; Hendy, S. C.; Chong, S. V.; Tallon, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming “tungsten bronzes.” Similar effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO3 . We present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behavior of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. A study of fractional doping in the NaxWO3 system (0⩽x⩽1) showed a linear variation in cell parameter and a systematic shift in the Fermi level into the conduction band. In the oxygen-deficient WO3-x system the Fermi level undergoes a sudden jump into the conduction band at around x=0.2 . Lastly, three compounds of a layered WO4•α,ω -diaminoalkane hybrid series were studied and found to be insulating, with features in the band structure similar to those of the parent WO3 compound that relate well to experimental UV-visible spectroscopy results.

  2. Arsenic Trioxide Induces Apoptosis in Human Platelets via C-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicun; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Weilin; Yan, Rong; Zhang, Yiwen; Ruan, Changgeng; Dai, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO), one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS) exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO. PMID:24466103

  3. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in human platelets via C-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicun; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Weilin; Yan, Rong; Zhang, Yiwen; Ruan, Changgeng; Dai, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO), one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS) exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO. PMID:24466103

  4. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) combined with distilled water, chlorhexidine, and doxycycline.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Roberta A A; Cunha, Rodrigo S; Miguita, Kenner B; Silveira, Cláudia F M; De Martin, Alexandre S; Pinheiro, Sérgio L; Rocha, Daniel G P; Bueno, Carlos E S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Bio) combined with different mixing agents (distilled water, chlorhexidine, doxycycline), used as an apical root-end filling material. Forty-two extracted human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 12); six teeth were used as controls. Root-ends were resected at 90 degrees, 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were prepared using ultrasonic tips and filled with MTA Bio plus distilled water, 2% chlorhexidine solution, or 10% doxycycline solution. Apical sealing was assessed by microleakage of 50% silver nitrate solution. Roots were longitudinally sectioned in a buccolingual plane and analyzed using an operating microscope (20× magnification). Depth of dye leakage into the dentinal walls was measured in millimeters. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P = 0.05). MTA Bio plus distilled water showed significantly higher mean leakage results (1.06 mm) when compared with MTA Bio plus doxycycline (0.61 mm), and higher, although not significant, results when compared with MTA Bio plus chlorhexidine (0.79 mm). In conclusion, replacing distilled water with two biologically active mixing agents (doxycycline and chlorhexidine) did not alter the sealing properties of MTABio. The antimicrobial properties of these combinations should be further investigated. PMID:23047034

  5. Morphine Attenuated the Cytotoxicity Induced by Arsenic Trioxide in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Momeny, Majid; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Khedri, Mostafa; Jahanabadi, Samane; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is an efficient drug for the treatment of the patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Inhibition of proliferation as well as apoptosis, attenuation of migration, and induction of differentiation in tumor cells are the main mechanisms through which ATO acts against APL. Despite advantages of ATO in treatment of some malignancies, certain harmful side effects, such as cardiotoxicity, have been reported. It has been well documented that morphine has antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and cytoprotective properties and is able to attenuate cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of morphine against ATO toxicity in H9c2 myocytes using multi-parametric assay including thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caspase 3 activity, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) phosphorylation assay, and expression of apoptotic markers. Our results showed that morphine (1 μM) attenuated cytotoxicity induced by ATO in H9c2 cells. Results of this study suggest that morphine may have protective properties in management of cardiac toxicity in patients who receive ATO as an anti-cancer treatment. PMID:26815588

  6. Blockage of JNK pathway enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.-S.; Liu, Z.-M.; Hong, D.-Y.

    2010-04-15

    Arsenic is well known as a carcinogen predisposing humans to some severe diseases and also as an effective medicine for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, syphilis, and psoriasis. Multiple active mechanisms, including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, have been proposed in therapy; however, the opposing effects of arsenic remain controversial. Our previous study found that arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced activation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) led to A431 cell death through the antagonistic effects of the signaling of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of JNK1 on ATO-induced p21 expression were explored. Over-expression of JNK1 in A431 cells could inhibit p21 expression, which was associated with HDAC1 and TGIF. Using the GST pull-down assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-108) of TGIF, critical to its binding with c-Jun, was found. Using reporter assays, requirement of the C-terminal domain (amino acids 138-272) of TGIF to suppress ATO-induced p21 expression was observed. Thus, the domains of TGIF that carried out its inhibitory effects on p21 were identified. Finally, treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 could enhance ATO-induced apoptosis of HaCaT keratinocytes by using flow cytometry.

  7. Arsenic Trioxide Exposure Induces Heat Shock Protein Responses in Cock Livers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kexin; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Guo, Ying; Li, Siwen; He, Ying; Sun, Xiao; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic is a trace element widely found in nature, and there are several forms of arsenic, including the most toxic form of trivalent arsenic. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is widespread in nature and tends to accumulate in animals and humans, thus causing great harm. Although the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) has been demonstrated in many types of mammals exposed to As2O3, the function of these proteins in poultry, especially in cocks, remains unclear. In this study, we used experimental animals (male chickens), which were fed a diet including 0, 7.5, 15, and 30 mg kg(-1) As2O3, respectively, in the control, low, middle, and high groups. The livers were collected after the cocks were treated with arsenic for 30, 60, and 90 days. We detected HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 levels in the livers of the cocks by real-time PCR and HSP60 and HSP70 levels by Western blot. The results showed that the messenger RNA and protein expression of HSPs exposed to As2O3 had obviously increased. These results demonstrated that arsenic toxicity affected the expression of HSP levels in cock livers. PMID:26329997

  8. Morphology-tailored synthesis of tungsten trioxide (hydrate) thin films and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhihui; Wang, Jinmin; Ke, Lin; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (3WO(3)·H(2)O) films with different morphologies were directly grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate via a facile crystal-seed-assisted hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that 3WO(3)·H(2)O thin films composed of platelike, wedgelike, and sheetlike nanostructures could be selectively synthesized by adding Na(2)SO(4), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and CH(3)COONH(4) as capping agents, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated that these films were of orthorhombic structure. The as-prepared thin films after dehydration showed obvious photocatalytic activities. The best film grown using CH(3)COONH(4) as a capping agent generated anodic photocurrents of 1.16 mA/cm(2) for oxidization of methanol and 0.5 mA/cm(2) for water splitting with the highest photoconversion efficiency of about 0.3% under simulated solar illumination. PMID:21218846

  9. Bortezomib and Arsenic Trioxide Activity on a Myelodysplastic Cell Line (P39): A Gene Expression Study

    PubMed Central

    Savlı, Hakan; Galimberti, Sara; Sünnetçi, Deniz; Canestraro, Martina; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Nagy, Balint; Raimondo, Francesco Di; Petrini, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to understand the molecular pathways affected by bortezomib and arsenic trioxide treatment on myelomonocytoid cell line P39. Materials and Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray platforms were used for gene expression and pathway analysis. Confirmation studies were performed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: Bortezomib treatment has shown upregulated DIABLO and NF-κBIB (a NF-κB inhibitor) and downregulated NF-κB1, NF-κB2, and BIRC1 gene expressions. Combination treatment of the two compounds showed gene expression deregulations in concordance by the results of single bortezomib treatment. Especially, P53 was a pathway more significantly modified and a gene network centralized around the beta estradiol gene. Beta estradiol, BRCA2, and FOXA1 genes were remarkable deregulations in our findings. Conclusion: Results support the suggestions about possible use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). NF-κB was observed as an important modulator in leukemic transformation of MDS. PMID:25913414

  10. Process for removing sulfur and sulfur compounds from the effluent of industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur dioxide in the stack gas from an industrial process is converted to elemental sulfur in a claus reactor at low temperature to produce sulfur fume. The sulfur is condensed by direct heat transfer with a continuously flowing countercurrent recirculating catalyst and a substantially sulfur dioxide-free gas is discharged. Catalyst and condensed sulfur are fed into the top of a sulfur recovery column and heated in the top of the column by direct heat transfer with a countercurrent stream of recycle gas. The sulfur and catalyst descend into a vaporization zone of the column where sulfur is vaporized. The vaporized sulfur is carried by the recycle gas back towards the top of the column and condensed to a fume by incoming sulfur bearing catalyst. The sulfur fume is carried from the top of the column in cold recycle gas. Hot catalyst from the vaporization section of the column is cooled by recycle gas entering the bottom of the column. Sulfur fume is recovered conventionally. Regenerated catalyst from the column is returned to the sulfur dioxide reactor. Claus plant tail gas with air passes into the base of an incinerator and passes countercurrent to recycled heat transfer solids and is oxidized to convert sulfur and sulfur bearing compounds to sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide is then converted to sulfur in the process just described.

  11. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  12. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  13. Smaller sulfur molecules promise better lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sen; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Na-Hong; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhou, Long-Jie; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-11-14

    The lithium-sulfur battery holds a high theoretical energy density, 4-5 times that of today's lithium-ion batteries, yet its applications have been hindered by poor electronic conductivity of the sulfur cathode and, most importantly, the rapid fading of its capacity due to the formation of soluble polysulfide intermediates (Li(2)S(n), n = 4-8). Despite numerous efforts concerning this issue, combatting sulfur loss remains one of the greatest challenges. Here we show that this problem can be effectively diminished by controlling the sulfur as smaller allotropes. Metastable small sulfur molecules of S(2-4) were synthesized in the confined space of a conductive microporous carbon matrix. The confined S(2-4) as a new cathode material can totally avoid the unfavorable transition between the commonly used large S(8) and S(4)(2-). Li-S batteries based on this concept exhibit unprecedented electrochemical behavior with high specific capacity, good cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which promise a practicable battery with high energy density for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and large-scale energy storage systems. PMID:23101502

  14. Environmentally relevant concentration of arsenic trioxide and humic acid promoted tumor progression of human cervical cancer cells: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Ling; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lu, Fung-Jou; Ting, Hung-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, treatment at higher concentrations of arsenic trioxide or co-exposure to arsenic trioxide and humic acid was found to be inhibited cell growth of cervical cancer cells (SiHa cells) by reactive oxygen species generation. However, treatment at lower concentrations slightly increased cell viability. Here, we investigate the enhancement of progression effects of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid and arsenic trioxide in SiHa cell lines in vitro and in vivo by measuring cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and the carcinogenesis-related protein (MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A) expressions. SiHa cells treated with low concentrations of humic acid and arsenic trioxide alone or in co-exposure significantly increased reactive oxygen species, glutathione levels, cell proliferation, scratch wound-healing activities, migration abilities, and MMP-2 expression as compared to the untreated control. In vivo the tumor volume of either single drug (humic acid or arsenic trioxide) or combined drug-treated group was significantly larger than that of the control for an additional 45 days after tumor cell injection on the back of NOD/SCID mice. Levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A, also significantly increased compared to the control. Histopathologic effects of all tumor cells appeared round in cell shape with high mitosis, focal hyperkeratosis and epidermal hyperplasia in the skin, and some tumor growth in the muscle were observed. Our results may indicate that exposure to low concentrations of arsenic trioxide and humic acid is associated with the progression of cervical cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1121-1132, 2016. PMID:25728215

  15. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. The sulfurized InP surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, C. W.; Geib, K. M.; Shin, J.; Iyer, R.; Lile, D. L.; Pouch, J. J.

    1989-07-01

    Sulfur treatments have previously been shown to improve the electrical characteristics of InP and GaAs devices. This paper reports the results of an Auger/x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of the InP surface after sulfur treatment. It is shown that the sulfur remains on the surface bonded to indium. There is no indication of elemental sulfur or sulfur bonded to phosphorus. This suggests that the sulfur has replaced phosphorus on the surface and has filled the phosphorus vacancies.

  17. Sulfur capture in combination bark boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Someshwar, A.V.; Jain, A.K. )

    1993-07-01

    A review of sulfur dioxide emission data for eight combination bark boilers in conjunction with the sulfur contents of the fuels reveals significant sulfur capture ranging from 10% to over 80% within the solid ash phase. Wood ash characteristics similar to activated carbon as well as the significant wood ash alkali oxide and carbonate fractions are believed responsible for the sulfur capture. Sulfur emissions from combination bark-fossil fuel firing are correlated to the sulfur input per ton of bark or wood residue fired.

  18. The NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway is associated with tumor cell resistance to arsenic trioxide across the NCI-60 panel

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is associated with increased risk for different types of cancer. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide can also be used to induce remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a success rate of approximately 80%. A comprehensive study examining the mechanisms and potential signaling pathways contributing to the anti-tumor properties of arsenic trioxide has not been carried out. Methods Here we applied a systems biology approach to identify gene biomarkers that underlie tumor cell responses to arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. The baseline gene expression levels of 14,500 well characterized human genes were associated with the GI50 data of the NCI-60 tumor cell line panel from the developmental therapeutics program (DTP) database. Selected biomarkers were tested in vitro for the ability to influence tumor susceptibility to arsenic trioxide. Results A significant association was found between the baseline expression levels of 209 human genes and the sensitivity of the tumor cell line panel upon exposure to arsenic trioxide. These genes were overlayed onto protein-protein network maps to identify transcriptional networks that modulate tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. The analysis revealed a significant enrichment for the oxidative stress response pathway mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) with high expression in arsenic resistant tumor cell lines. The role of the NRF2 pathway in protecting cells against arsenic-induced cell killing was validated in tumor cells using shRNA-mediated knock-down. Conclusions In this study, we show that the expression level of genes in the NRF2 pathway serve as potential gene biomarkers of tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. Importantly, we demonstrate that tumor cells that are deficient for NRF2 display increased sensitivity to arsenic trioxide. The results of our study will be useful in understanding the mechanism of

  19. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  20. Monoclinic sulfur cathode utilizing carbon for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Chul; Han, Young-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries have been designed to be combined with conductive carbon because the insulating nature of sulfur causes low active material utilization and poor rate capability. This paper is the first to report that carbon can induce a phase transition in a sulfur cathode. The stable form of a sulfur crystal at ambient temperature is orthorhombic sulfur. We found that monoclinic sulfur becomes more stable than orthorhombic sulfur if carbon atoms penetrate into the sulfur at elevated temperatures and the carbon density exceeds a threshold of C0.3S8. The high stability of the carbon-containing monoclinic sulfur persists during lithiation and is attributed to locally formed linear SC3S chains with marked stability. This study provides a novel perspective on the role of carbon in the sulfur cathode and suggests control of the crystal phase of electrodes by composite elements as a new way of designing efficient electrode materials.

  1. Healing process of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp covering with mineral trioxide aggregate or Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Holland, R; de Souza, V; Murata, S S; Nery, M J; Bernabé, P F; Otoboni Filho, J A; Dezan Júnior, E

    2001-01-01

    Considering several reports about the similarity between the chemical compositions of the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement (PC), the subject of this investigation was to analyze the behavior of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with these materials. After pulpotomy, the pulp stumps of 26 roots of dog teeth were protected with MTA or PC. Sixty days after treatment, the animal was sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histomorphological analysis. There was a complete tubular hard tissue bridge in almost all specimens. In conclusion, MTA and PC show similar comparative results when used in direct pulp protection after pulpotomy. PMID:11445912

  2. Effects of freshwater exposure to arsenic trioxide on the parr-smolt transformation of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.W.; Wedemeyer, G.A.; Mayer, F.L.; Dickhoff, Walton W.; Gregory, S.V.; Yasutake, W.T.; Smith, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of chronic (6 months) exposure to arsenic trioxide in fresh water on the Parr-smolt transformation of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) were evaluated. Exposure to 300 μg As/L (as As2O3) appeared to delay the onset of the normal increase in plasma thyroxine concentration and cause a transient reduction of gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Fish exposed to 300 μg As/L also migrated to the sea less successfully than did nonexposed smolts, but there were no effects on the survival and growth of smolts held in 28‰ salt water for 6 months.

  3. Arsenic trioxide inhibits tumor cell growth in malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in vivo by targeting overexpressed Gli1.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Kornelius; Moreno, Natalia; Holsten, Till; Ahlfeld, Julia; Mertins, Julius; Hotfilder, Marc; Kool, Marcel; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schüller, Ulrich; Meisterernst, Michael; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-08-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive tumors occurring in infants and very young children. Despite multimodal and intensive therapy prognosis remains poor. Molecular analyses have uncovered several deregulated pathways, among them the CDK4/6-Rb-, the WNT- and the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathways. The SHH pathway is activated in rhabdoid tumors by GLI1 overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that arsenic trioxide (ATO) inhibits tumor cell growth of malignant rhabdoid tumors in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model by suppressing Gli1. Our data uncover ATO as a promising therapeutic approach to improve prognosis for rhabdoid tumor patients. PMID:24420698

  4. Efficient synthesis of plate-like crystalline hydrated tungsten trioxide thin films with highly improved electrochromic performance.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhihui; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Jinmin; Ke, Lin; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Koh, Tien Wei; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2012-01-11

    Plate-like hydrated tungsten trioxide (3WO(3)·H(2)O) films were grown on a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated transparent conductive substrate via an efficient, facile and template-free hydrothermal method. The film exhibited a fast coloration/bleaching response (t(c90%) = 4.3 s and t(b90%) = 1.4 s) and a high coloration efficiency (112.7 cm(2) C(-1)), which were probably due to a large surface area. PMID:22083170

  5. Porous dimanganese trioxide microflowers derived from microcoordinations for flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Huan; Li, Xinran; Li, Bing; Zhang, Yizhou; Zhao, Qunxing; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Dimanganese trioxide microflowers are easily obtained from a Mn(ii) 8-hydroxyquinoline microcoordination after calcination in air. We also look into the possible formation mechanism of the flower-like morphology, and find that the reaction time affects the morphology of the coordination. Furthermore, the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers are made of many nanoplates which form many nanogaps and nanochannels. Interestingly, the assembled electrode based on the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers proves to be a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The electrode shows a specific capacitance of 994 F g-1, which can work well even after 4000 cycles at 0.75 A g-1. More importantly, the porous Mn2O3 microflowers and activated carbons are assembled into a high-performance flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with a specific capacitance of 312.5 mF cm-2. The cycle test shows that the device can offer 95.6% capacity of the initial capacitance at 2.0 mA cm-2 after 5000 cycles with little decay. The maximum energy density of the device can achieve 6.56 mWh cm-3 and the maximum power density can also achieve 283.5 mW cm-3, which are among the best results for manganese based materials.Dimanganese trioxide microflowers are easily obtained from a Mn(ii) 8-hydroxyquinoline microcoordination after calcination in air. We also look into the possible formation mechanism of the flower-like morphology, and find that the reaction time affects the morphology of the coordination. Furthermore, the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers are made of many nanoplates which form many nanogaps and nanochannels. Interestingly, the assembled electrode based on the as-prepared porous Mn2O3 microflowers proves to be a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. The electrode shows a specific capacitance of 994 F g-1, which can work well even after 4000 cycles at 0.75 A g-1. More importantly, the porous Mn2O3 microflowers and activated carbons are

  6. Arsenic trioxide attenuated the rejection of major histocompatibility complex fully-mismatched cardiac allografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Zhang, Q Y; Zhou, B; Xue, L; Chen, H; Wang, Y; Zheng, S S

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on allogeneic immune response using a mouse heart transplantation model. Mice were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each. The control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); the As(2)O(3)-treated group, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of As(2)O(3) (1 mg/kg) from days -3 to 10 after heart transplantation. The cyclosporine (CsA)-treated group was given a subtherapeutic dose of CsA (10 mg/kg) IP, and the As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated group, a combined protocol of As(2)O(3) and CsA. Six days after transplantation, cardiac allografts were harvested for immunohistology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The survival of the allografts was significantly improved among the As(2)O(3)-treated group compared with the control group (17.2 +/- 1.9 vs 8.0 +/- 0.9 days; P < .05). A marked prolongation (28.6 +/- 6.0 days) of graft survival was achieved by the combined protocol compared with the CsA-treated group (9.6 +/- 3.0 days; P < .05) or the As(2)O(3)-treated group. Allografts of As(2)O(3)-treated and As(2)O(3) plus CsA-treated mice showed a changing pattern of Th1/Th2 cytokine mRNA expression. Allograft rejection was apparently alleviated by low-dose As(2)O(3), and particularly when combined with a subtherapeutic CsA dose. PMID:19545743

  7. Preferential action of arsenic trioxide in solid-tumor microenvironment enhances radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Robert J. . E-mail: griff007@umn.edu; Williams, Brent W.; Park, Heon Joo; Song, Chang W.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of arsenic trioxide, Trisenox (TNX), on primary cultures of endothelial cells and tumor tissue under varying pH and pO{sub 2} environments and the effects of combined TNX and radiation therapy on experimental tumors. Methods and Materials: Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were cultured in vitro and exposed to TNX under various combinations of aerobic, hypoxic, neutral, or acidic conditions, and levels of activated JNK MAP kinase were assessed by Western blotting. FSaII fibrosarcoma cells grown in the hind limb of female C3H mice were used to study the effect of TNX on tumor blood perfusion and oxygenation. The tumor-growth delay after a single or fractionated irradiation with or without TNX treatment was assessed. Results: A single intraperitoneal injection of 8 mg/kg TNX reduced the blood perfusion in FSaII tumors by 53% at 2 hours after injection. To increase the oxygenation of the tumor vasculature during TNX treatment, some animals were allowed to breathe carbogen (95% O{sub 2}/5% CO{sub 2}). Carbogen breathing alone for 2 hours reduced tumor perfusion by 33%. When carbogen breathing was begun immediately after TNX injection, no further reduction occurred in tumor blood perfusion at 2 hours after injection. In vitro, TNX exposure increased activity JNK MAP kinase preferentially in endothelial cells cultured in an acidic or hypoxic environment. In vivo, the median oxygenation in FSaII tumors measured at 3 or 5 days after TNX injection was found to be significantly elevated compared with control tumors. Subsequently, radiation-induced tumor-growth delay was synergistically increased when radiation and TNX injection were fractionated at 3-day or 5-day intervals. Conclusions: Trisenox has novel vascular-damaging properties, preferentially against endothelium in regions of low pH or pO{sub 2}, which leads to tumor cell death and enhancement of the response of tumors to radiotherapy.

  8. Inflammatory Factor Alterations in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Cocks Overexposed to Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingwei; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Kexin; Tian, Li; He, Ying; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Exposure of people and animals to arsenic (As) is a global public health concern because As is widely distributed and associated with numerous adverse effects. As is a poisonous metalloid and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is a form of As. Thus far, there have been very few reports on the inflammatory factor alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in birds exposed to As2O3. To investigate the possible correlation of As2O3 with inflammatory injury induced by an arsenic-supplemented diet in birds, 72 1-day-old male Hy-line cocks were selected and randomly divided into four groups. They were fed with either a commercial diet or an arsenic-supplemented diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days, and samples of gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum were collected at days 30, 60, and 90 of the experiment period. The inflammation-related genes were determined, including NF-κB, iNOS, COX-2, PTGEs, and TNF-α. The connection between arsenic dosage and inflammation-related genes was assessed. The content of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was measured by Western blot of the samples. The results showed that arsenic supplementation increased the mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related genes in the gastrointestinal tract of cocks at different time points (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression of the tissue and organ injury-related gene iNOS was upregulated (p < 0.05). These data suggest that As induces the inflammatory response and may trigger digestive function regression of the gastrointestinal tract by affecting inflammation-related genes and iNOS in cocks. This study offers some information on the mechanism of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory injury and iNOS expression level alterations induced by arseniasis. PMID:25784090

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status. PMID:26887578

  10. Effect of arsenic trioxide on different cell lines derived from chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hong-Mei; Yukihiro, Shimizu; Ke, Xiao-Yan; Yoshiro, Kashii; Akiharu, Watanabe

    2002-10-01

    The objective is to explore the effect and the mechanism of arsenic trioxide, As(2)O(3), on different cell lines of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Different concentrations of As(2)O(3) (0.2, 2 and 10 micro mol/L) were added to CML cell lines KU812 and MEG-01 and other leukemia cell lines U937 and PL21, the cell numbers were counted at different times, TUNEL and DNA ladder were assayed. Different antibodies, CD34, CD13, CD33, CD19, CD11b, CD14 and CD7, were added to detect the change of the molecules on cell surface, the change of bcr-abl by RT-PCR and the activity of caspase-3 were assayed. The results showed that different concentrations of As(2)O(3) had different effects on the survival of the 4 cell lines. After culture for 24 hours with As(2)O(3), there was no significant increase in CD11b in all the four cell lines. There were no changes of bcr-abl in the two CML cell lines treated and untreated with As(2)O(3) by RT-PCR. Activities of caspase-3 were all increased. It is concluded that As(2)O(3) can induce apoptosis in CML cell lines, the concentration to induce apoptosis is different, CML cell lines are more sensitive than the other 2 leukemia cell lines. As(2)O(3) induced apoptosis may have some relation with the activation of caspase-3. PMID:12513739

  11. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45-1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350-400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre-crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra- and/or inter-tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz-MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50-56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  12. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate vs. Calcium Hydroxide in Primary Molar Pulpotomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Armin; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this quantitative systematic review/meta-analysis was to compare the treatment outcomes of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) in pulpotomy of human primary molars. The focused PICO question was “in case of pulp exposure in vital primary molars, how does MTA pulpotomy compare to CH in terms of clinical/radiographic success?” Methods and Materials: We retrieved published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of at least 6-month duration; our search included articles published up to March 2013 in five following databases: PubMed (Medline), Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Science Citation Index, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Mantel Haenszel and Inverse Variance-weighted methods were applied by STATA; the relative risk (RR) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: A total of 282 English articles were collected. Two authors independently screened the articles and five RCTs were selected; data extraction and quality assessment were then carried out. Four RCTs were appropriate for meta-analysis according to their follow-up times by Mantel Haenszel method. Statistically significant difference was found between success rate of MTA compared to CH, with RR=0.08 (95% CI, 0.02-0.39), RR=0.19 (95% CI, 0.08-0.46), and RR=0.38 (95% CI, 0.21-0.68) for 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups, respectively. A significant difference was also observed for all included RCTs after analyses using the Inverse Variance-weighted method (RR=0.44; 95% CI, 0.27-0.72). Conclusions: Systematic review/meta-analysis of included RCTs revealed that for pulpotomy of vital primary molars, MTA has better treatment outcomes compared to CH. PMID:24688575

  13. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P.; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status.

  14. Hexagonal nanorods of tungsten trioxide: Synthesis, structure, electrochemical properties and activity as supporting material in electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaoui, Samiha; Sediri, Faouzi; Gharbi, Néji; Perruchot, Christian; Aeiyach, Salah; Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Kulesza, Pawel J.; Jouini, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Tungsten trioxide, unhydrated with hexagonal structure (h-WO 3), has been prepared by hydrothermal method at a temperature of 180 °C in acidified sodium tungstate solution. Thus prepared h-WO 3 has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method and using electrochemical techniques. The morphology has been examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies (SEM and TEM) and it is consistent with existence of nanorods of 50-70 nm diameter and up to 5 μm length. Cyclic voltammetric characterization of thin films of h-WO 3 nanorods has revealed reversible redox behaviour with charge-discharge cycling corresponding to the reversible lithium intercalation/deintercalation into the crystal lattice of the h-WO 3 nanorods. In propylene carbonate containing LiClO 4, two successive redox processes of hexagonal WO 3 nanorods are observed at the scan rate of 50 mV/s. Such behaviour shall be attributed to the presence of at least two W atoms of different surroundings in the lattice structure of h-WO 3 nanorods. On the other hand, in aqueous LiClO 4 solution, only one redox process is observed at the scan rate of 10 mV/s. The above observations can be explained in terms of differences in the diffusion of ions inside two types of channel cavities existing in the structure of the h-WO 3 nanorods. Moreover, the material can be applied as active support for the catalytic bi-metallic Pt-Ru nanoparticles during electrooxidation of ethanol in acid medium (0.5 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4).

  15. Surface microhardness of three thicknesses of mineral trioxide aggregate in different setting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jafargholizadeh, Leila; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Raoof, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the surface microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) samples having different thicknesses and exposed to human blood from one side and with or without a moist cotton pellet on the other side. Materials and Methods Ninety cylindrical molds with three heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm were fabricated. In group 1 (dry condition), molds with heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm (10 molds of each) were filled with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental), and the upper surface of the material was not exposed to any additional moisture. In groups 2 and 3, a distilled water- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-moistened cotton pellet was placed on the upper side of MTA, respectively. The lower side of the molds in all the groups was in contact with human blood-wetted foams. After 4 day, the Vickers microhardness of the upper surface of MTA was measured. Results In the dry condition, the 4 and 6 mm-thick MTA samples showed significantly lower microhardness than the 2 mm-thick samples (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively). However, when a distilled water- or PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed over the MTA, no significant difference was found between the surface microhardness of samples having the abovementioned three thicknesses of the material (p = 0.210 and p = 0.112, respectively). Conclusions It could be concluded that a moist cotton pellet must be placed over the 4 to 6 mm-thick MTA for better hydration of the material. However, this might not be necessary when 2 mm-thick MTA is used. PMID:25383342

  16. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  17. E2F1 downregulation by arsenic trioxide in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Leung, Leanne Lee; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Nonetheless preliminary data have suggested potential activity of ATO in solid tumors including lung cancer. This study aimed to examine the underlying mechanisms of ATO in the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. Using a panel of 7 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, the effects of ATO treatment on cell viability, expression of E2F1 and its downstream targets, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and alteration of apoptotic/anti-apoptotic factors were studied. Tumor growth inhibition in vivo was investigated using a nude mouse xenograft model. ATO decreased cell viability with clinically achievable concentrations (8 µM) in all cell lines investigated. This was accompanied by reduced expression of E2F1, cyclin A2, skp2, c-myc, thymidine kinase and ribonucleotide reductase M1, while p-c-Jun was upregulated. Cell viability was significantly decreased with E2F1 knockdown. Treatment with ATO resulted in phosphatidylserine externalization in H23 cells and mitochondrial membrane depolarization in all cell lines, associated with truncation of Bid, downregulation of Bcl-2, upregulation of Bax and Bak, caspase-9 and -3 activation and PARP cleavage. Using the H358 xenograft model, the tumor growth was suppressed in the ATO treatment group during 8 days of treatment, associated with downregulation of E2F1 and upregulation of truncated Bid and cleaved caspase-3. In conclusion, ATO has potent in vitro and in vivo activity in lung adenocarcinoma, partially mediated through E2F1 downregulation and apoptosis. PMID:25174355

  18. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: No significant difference was observed among the MTA, BA, and biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  19. Vitamin D3 potentiates the antitumorigenic effects of arsenic trioxide in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a novel form of therapy that has been found to aid acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Our laboratory has demonstrated that ATO-induced cytotoxicity in human leukemia (HL-60) cells is mediated by oxidative stress. Pro-oxidants have been known to play a role in free radical-mediated oxidative stress. Vitamin D3, (Vit D3) an active metabolite of vitamin D has been reported to inhibit the growth of number neoplasms such as prostate, breast, colorectal, leukemia, and skin cancers. The goal of the present research was to use (HL-60) cells as an in vitro test model to evaluate whether low doses of Vit D3 potentiate the toxicity of ATO and whether this toxic action is mediated via apoptotic mechanisms. Method HL-60 cells were treated either with a pharmacologic dose of ATO alone and with several low doses of Vit D3. Cell survival was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was measured both by flow cytometry assessment, and DNA laddering assay. Results MTT assay indicated that Vit D3 co-treatment potentiates ATO toxicity in HL-60 cells in a dose dependent manner. A statistically significant and dose-dependent increase (p <0.05) was recorded in annexin V positive cells (apoptotic cells) with increasing doses of Vit D3 in ATO-treated cells. This finding was confirmed by the result of DNA laddering assay showing clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in vitamin and ATO co-treated cells. Conclusion The present study indicates that Vit D3 potentiates the antitumor effects of ATO. This potentiation is mediated at least in part, through induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings highlight the potential impact of Vit D3 in promoting the pharmacological effect of ATO, suggesting a possible future role of Vit D3/ATO combination therapy in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). PMID:24661615

  20. Comparison of Tooth Discoloration Induced by Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Armita; Akbari, Majid; Farhadi-faz, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tooth discoloration induced by calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods and Materials: Forty five endodontically treated human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into three groups (n=15) after removing the coronal 3 mm of the obturating materials. In the MTA group, white MTA plug was placed in pulp chamber and coronal zone of the root canal. In CEM cement group, CEM plug was placed in the tooth in the same manner. In both groups, a wet cotton pellet was placed in the access cavity and the teeth were temporarily sealed. After 24 h the teeth were restored with resin composite. In the negative control group the teeth were also restored with resin composite. The color change in the cervical third of teeth was measured with a colorimeter and was repeated 3 times for each specimen. The teeth were kept in artificial saliva for 6 months. After this period, the color change was measured again. Data were collected by Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*a*b color values, and corresponding ΔE values were calculated. The results were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test with the significance level defined as 0.05. Results: There was no significant differences between CEM group and control group in mean discoloration. The mean tooth discoloration in MTA group was significantly greater than CEM and control groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: According to the result of the present study CEM cement did not induce tooth discoloration after six months. Therefore it can be used in vital pulp therapy of esthetically sensitive teeth. PMID:27471526

  1. A New Simulated Plasma for Assessing the Solubility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Aslaminabadi, Naser; Valizadeh, Hadi; Aghazadeh, Zahra; Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is an important characteristic that affects other properties such as microleakage and biocompatibility. Distilled water (DW) has previously been used for solubility tests. This experimental study compared the solubility of MTA in DW, synthetic tissue fluid (STF) and new simulated plasma (SP). Methods and Materials: In this study, 36 samples of tooth-colored ProRoot MTA were prepared and divided into three groups (n=12) to be immersed in three different solutions (DW, STF, and SP). Solubility tests were conducted at 2, 5, 9, 14, 21, 30, 50, and 78-day intervals. The unequal variance F-test (Welch test) was utilized to determine the effect of solubility media and Games-Howell analysis was used for pairwise comparisons. The repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess the importance of immersion duration. Results: Welch test showed significant differences in solubility rates of samples between all the different solubility media at all the study intervals (P<0.05) except for the 14-day interval (P=0.094). The mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference in solubility rate of MTA in three different solutions at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Games-Howell post-hoc test revealed that all pairwise comparisons were statistically significant at all time-intervals (P=0.000). Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the long-term solubility of MTA in simulated plasma was less than that in synthetic tissue fluid and distilled water. PMID:25598806

  2. White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Induces Migration and Proliferation of Stem Cells from the Apical Papilla

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robert; Holland, G. Rex; Chiego, Daniel; Hu, Jan C. C.; Nör, Jacques E.; Botero, Tatiana M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regenerative endodontic protocols recommend White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA) as a capping material due to its osteoinductive properties. Stem Cells from the Apical Papilla (SCAP) are presumed to be involved in this regenerative process, but the effects of WMTA on SCAP are largely unknown. Our hypothesis is that WMTA induces proliferation and migration of SCAP. Methods Here, we used an unsorted population of SCAP (passages 3 to 5) characterized by high CD24, CD146 and Stro-1 expression. The effect of WMTA on SCAP migration was assessed using transwells and its effect on proliferation was determined by the WST-1 assay. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) and calcium-chloride enriched media were used as positive controls. Results The SCAP analyzed here showed a low percentage of STRO-1+ and CD24+ cells. Both set and unset WMTA significantly increased the short-term migration of SCAP after 6 hours (P<0.05), whereas calcium-chloride enriched medium did after 24 hours of exposure. Set WMTA significantly increased proliferation on days 1 to 5 while calcium-enriched media showed a significant increase on day 7 with a significant reduction on proliferation afterwards. SCAP migration and proliferation were significantly and steadily induced by the presence of 2% and 10% FBS Conclusions Collectively, these data demonstrate that WMTA induced an early short-term migration and proliferation of a mixed population of stem cells from apical papilla as compared to a later and longer-term induction by calcium-chloride or FBS. PMID:24935538

  3. Dissolution of a mineral trioxide aggregate sealer in endodontic solvents compared to conventional sealers.

    PubMed

    Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin Ahmad; Hassouneh, Layla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the solubility of a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate sealer (MTA-Fillapex) compared with five other sealers, calcium hydroxide (Sealapex), resin (Realseal), zinc oxide-eugenol (Tubli-Seal), and two epoxy resins (AH-26 and AH-Plus), in chloroform and eucalyptoil in static and ultrasonic environments. Samples of each sealer were prepared (n = 180) and then divided into 12 groups that were immersed in solvents for 5 and 10 min in static and ultrasonic environments. The mean weight loss was determined, and the values were compared using Student's t-test, One-way ANOVA, and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (p < 0.05). In chloroform, MTA-Fillapex, AH-26, and Sealapex displayed moderate solubility with no significant difference in dissolution (p = 0.125); however, their dissolution was significantly lower than that of AH-Plus (p < 0.001), which was almost fully dissolved after 10 minutes. Realseal was significantly less soluble than all sealers (p < 0.001). In eucalyptoil, MTA-Fillapex showed low solubility, as all of the sealers did, but Tubli-Seal was significantly more soluble than other sealers (p < 0.001). Using ultrasonic activation resulted in a significantly higher dissolution rate in chloroform for all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 10 min (p = 0.226). In eucalyptoil, ultrasonic activation significantly increased the dissolution rate of all sealers except MTA-Fillapex after 5 and 10 min, Sealapex at 10 min, and AH-Plus at 5 min (p > 0.05). In conclusion, MTA-Fillapex was not sufficiently dissolved in either solvent. Ultrasonic activation had limited effectiveness on MTA-Fillapex dissolution, whereas it significantly increased the efficiency of solvents in dissolving a number of endodontic sealers. PMID:26910018

  4. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  5. The cytotoxic evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Gözde; Yalcin, Yagmur; Dindar, Seckin; Sancakli, Hande; Erdemir, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BA, a bioceramic nanoparticulate cement, on subcutaneous rat tissue. Study Design: Fifty Sprouge Dawley rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes filled with ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BioAggregate, along with a control group of empty, were implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After estimated time intervals the rats were sacrificed. The specimens were fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and then evaluated under a light microscope for inflammatory reactions and mineralization. Results: All groups evoked a severe to moderate chronic inflammatory reaction at 7 and 15 days, which decreased with time. Both the MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar inflammatory reactions, except at 90 days when MTA showed statistically significant greater inflammation (p>0.05). The MTA group showed foreign body reaction at all times. Compared to BioAggregate, MTA showed significantly more foreign body reaction at 60 and 90 days (p<0.0001). After 30 days foreign body reaction of BioAggregate decreased significantly. Both MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar necrosis at 7 and 15 days (p=0.094 and p=0.186 respectively). No necrosis was observed after 15 days. Similarly there was no fibrosis after 30 days for both MTA and BioAggregate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Since DiaRoot BioAggregate showed significantly better results than MTA, we can conclude that it is more biocompatible. However, further studies are required to confirm this result. Key words:Biocompatibility, mineral trioxide aggregate, bioAggregate. PMID:23722144

  6. Arsenic trioxide phosphorylates c-Fos to transactivate p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zimiao; Huang, H.-S.

    2008-12-01

    An infamous poison, arsenic also has been used as a drug for nearly 2400 years; in recently years, arsenic has been effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Increasing evidence suggests that opposite effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on tumors depend on its concentrations. For this reason, the mechanisms of action of the drug should be elucidated, and it should be used therapeutically only with extreme caution. Previously, we demonstrated the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and JNK on p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) expression in response to ATO in A431 cells. In addition, JNK phosphorylates c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) to recruit TGIF/HDAC1 to suppress p21 gene expression. Presently, we demonstrated that a high concentration of ATO sustains ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increases c-Fos biosynthesis and stability, which enhances p21 gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a DNA affinity precipitation assay, and functional assays, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of the C-terminus of c-Fos (Thr{sup 232}, Thr{sup 325}, Thr{sup 331}, and Ser{sup 374}) plays an important role in its binding to the p21 promoter, and in conjunction with N-terminus phosphorylation of c-Fos (Ser{sup 70}) to transactivate p21 promoter expression. In conclusion, a high concentration of ATO can sustain ERK1/2 activation to enhance c-Fos expression, then dimerize with dephosphorylated c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) and recruit p300/CBP to the Sp1 sites (- 84/- 64) to activate p21 gene expression in A431 cells.

  7. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  8. GENOTOXIC MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC TRIOXIDE IN HUMAN JURKAT T-LYMPHOMA CELLS.

    PubMed

    Yedjou, Clement; Sutton, La'mont; Tchounwou, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) has cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by As(2)O(3) in a human Jurkat T-lymphoma cell line using the trypan blue exclusion test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assays, respectively. Jurkat T-cells were treated with different doses of As(2)O(3) for 24 and 48 h prior to cytogenetic assessment. Data obtained from the trypan blue exclusion test indicated that As(2)O(3) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the viability of Jurkat T-cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Data generated from the comet assay also indicated a significant dose and time-dependent increase in DNA damage in Jurkat T-cells associated with As(2)O(3) exposure. We observed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in comet tail-length, tail arm and tail moment, as well as in percentages of DNA cleavage at all doses tested, showing an evidence As(2)O(3) -induced genotoxic damage in Jurkat T-cells. This study confirms that the comet assay is a sensitive and effective method to detect DNA damage caused by heavy metals such as arsenic. Taken together, our findings suggest that As(2)O(3) exposure significantly (p < 0.05) reduces cellular viability and induces DNA damage in human Jurkat T-lymphoma cells. PMID:21796259

  9. Arsenic trioxide and resveratrol show synergistic anti-leukemia activity and neutralized cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuhua; Chen, Meng; Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity. PMID:25144547

  10. Resveratrol protects against arsenic trioxide-induced nephrotoxicity by facilitating arsenic metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meiling; Xue, Jiangdong; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Weiqian; Ma, Dexing; Liu, Lian; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is an environmental toxicant and a potent antineoplastic agent. Exposure to arsenic causes renal cancer. Resveratrol is a well-known polyphenolic compound that is reported to reduce As(2)O(3)-induced cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on As(2)O(3)-induced nephrotoxicity and arsenic metabolism. Chinese Dragon-Li cats were injected with 1 mg/kg As(2)O(3) on alternate days; resveratrol (3 mg/kg) was administered via the forearm vein 1 h before the As(2)O(3) treatment. On the sixth day, the cats were killed to determine the histological renal damage, renal function, the accumulation of arsenic, and antioxidant activities in the kidney. Urine samples were taken for arsenic speciation. In the resveratrol + As(2)O(3)-treated group, activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione, the total arsenic concentrations, and the percentage of methylated arsenic in urine were significantly increased. The concentrations of renal malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and renal arsenic accumulation were significantly decreased and reduced renal morphologic injury was observed compared with the As(2)O(3)-treated group. These results demonstrate that resveratrol could significantly scavenge reactive oxygen species, inhibit As(2)O(3)-induced oxidative damage, and significantly attenuate the accumulation of arsenic in renal tissues by facilitating As(2)O(3) metabolism. These data suggest that use of resveratrol as postremission therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia as well as adjunctive therapy in patients with exposure to arsenic may decrease arsenic nephrotoxicity. PMID:23471352

  11. Images of Jupiter's Sulfur Ring.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, C B

    1980-01-11

    Images of the ring of singly ionized sulfur encircling Jupiter obtained on two successive nights in April 1979 show that the ring characteristics may change dramatically in approximately 24 hours. On the first night the ring was narrow and confined to the magnetic equator inside Io's orbit. On the second it was confined symmetrically about the centrifugal symmetry surface and showed considerable radial structure, including a "fan" extending to Io's orbit. Many of the differences in the ring on the two nights can be explained in terms of differences in sulfur plasma temperature. PMID:17809102

  12. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Xuran; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiaoqing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-01-01

    The polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li-S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S4 2 - and S5 2 - species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S8 2 - and S6 2 - for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  13. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  14. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  15. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  16. Sulfur hexafluoride as a surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.H.; Chadbourne, J.F.

    1987-06-01

    A viable chemical surrogate for monitoring the effectiveness of hazardous waste incinerators must include high thermal stability and low toxicity among its characteristics. The relationship between sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and hazardous constituent thermal stability for a mixture of chlorinated hydrocarbons indicates that SF6 has the potential to satisfy the basic requirements of a chemical surrogate for hazardous waste incineration.

  17. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  18. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  19. Nutrient cyling in soils: Sulfur

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element required for normal plant growth, a fact that has been recognized since the nineteenth century. It is considered a secondary macronutrient, following the primary macronutrients nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), but is needed by plants at levels compa...

  20. SULFUR DIOXIDE SOURCES IN AK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map shows industrial plants which emit 100 tons/year or more of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Alaska. The SO2 sources are plotted on a background map of cities and county boundaries. Data Sources: SO2 Sites: U.S. EPA AIRS System, County Outlines: 1990 Census Tiger Line Files 1:1...

  1. Growth mechanism of largescale MoS2 monolayer by sulfurization of MoO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Payam; Wang, Jieqiong; Xing, Hui; Destino, Joel F.; Murat Arik, Mumtaz; Zhao, Chuan; Kang, Kaifei; Blizzard, Brett; Zhang, Lijie; Zhao, Puqin; Huang, Shaoming; Yang, Sen; Bright, Frank V.; Cerne, John; Zeng, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2 with broken inversion symmetry possesses two degenerate yet inequivalent valleys that can be selectively excited by circularly polarized light. This unique property renders interesting valley physics. The ability to manipulate valley degrees of freedom with light or external field makes them attractive for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. There is great demand for large area monolayer (ML) TMDCs for certain measurements and device applications. Recent reports on large area ML TDMCs focus on chemical vapor deposition growth. In this work, we report a facile approach to grow largescale continuous ML MoS2 nearly free of overgrowth and voids, by sulfurizing evaporated molybdenum trioxide ultrathin films. Photo conductivity scales with device sizes up to 4.5 mm, suggesting excellent film uniformity. The growth mechanism is found to be vaporization, diffusion, sulfurization and lateral growth, all at local micrometer scale. Our approach provides a new pathway for large-area ML TMDC growth and lithography-free device fabrication.

  2. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  3. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  9. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also known as oil of vitriol,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  18. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  19. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  20. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  1. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  2. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  4. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  6. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur...

  8. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  9. Comparison of Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Diluted Formocresol in Pulpotomized Primary Molars: A 6- to 24-month Observation

    PubMed Central

    Sushynski, John M.; Zealand, Cameron M.; Botero, Tatiana M.; Boynton, James R.; Majewski, Robert F.; Shelburne, Charles E.; Hu, Jan ChingChun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this multisite, multioperator, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to evaluate 2-year outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) as pulpotomy medicaments. Methods Following the standard pulpotomy procedure, the pulp stumps of 252 primary molars in 168 healthy children were randomly covered with GMTA or DFC. Pulp chambers were filled with Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM®) and teeth were restored with stainless steel crowns. At each follow-up appointment, the clinical status of the treated tooth was assessed and radiographs were taken. A total of 694 clinical and radiographic evaluations were analyzed. Results Gender, study site, arch type, and tooth type did not influence treatment outcome. At the combined 6- to 24-month follow-up, clinical success in the DFC group was no different than for the GMTA group. Radiographically, a significantly lower success rate was found in the DFC group vs the MTA group at all time points (P<.01). Dentin bridge formation was observed at a significantly higher frequency among the GMTA group (P<.01), while internal root resorption was observed at a higher frequency in the DFC group (P<.01). Conclusion At the combined 6- to 24-month follow-up, gray mineral trioxide aggregate demonstrated significantly better radiographic outcomes vs diluted formocresol as pulpotomy medicaments. PMID:23211896

  10. Current-voltage characteristics and grain growth of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-doped tungsten trioxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yang, X.S.; Li, Z.Q.; Yao, K.L.; Liu, Z.L

    2004-08-03

    Ceramics samples of tungsten trioxide doped with lithium carbonate from 0.5 to 5 mol% were prepared by conventional electroceramic technique. The current-voltage characteristics of these ceramics were measured under various ambient temperatures. All of the I-V curves showed non-ohmic electrical properties with obvious negative-resistance characteristic at room temperature. It is found that there exists a direct correlation between the negative-resistance phenomenon in the I-V curves and the electrical history of these samples. The suitability of some models regarding the negative-resistance characteristics is discussed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed coexistence of two phases of tungsten trioxide, which depends on the amount of lithium. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed great differences for both grain shape and size between the Li-doped and undoped WO{sub 3} ceramics, and this indicates that Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} doped into WO{sub 3} influences strongly the growing of WO{sub 3} during sintering process.

  11. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether and antimony trioxide on controlled pyrolysis of high-impact polystyrene mixed with polyolefins.

    PubMed

    Mitan, Nona Merry M; Bhaskar, Thallada; Hall, William J; Muto, Akinori; Williams, Paul T; Sakata, Yusaku

    2008-07-01

    The controlled pyrolysis of polyethylene/polypropylene/polystyrene mixed with brominated high-impact polystyrene containing decabromodiphenyl ether as a brominated flame-retardant with antimony trioxide as a synergist was performed. The effect of decabromodiphenyl ether and antimony trioxide on the formation of its congeners and their effect on distribution of pyrolysis products were investigated. The controlled pyrolysis significantly affected the decomposition behavior and the formation of products. Analysis with gas chromatograph with electron capture detector confirmed that the bromine content was rich in step 1 (oil 1) liquid products leaving less bromine content in the step 2 (oil 2) liquid products. In the presence of antimony containing samples, the major portion of bromine was observed in the form of antimony bromide and no flame-retardant species were found in oil 1. In the presence of synergist, the step 1 and step 2 oils contain both light and heavy compounds. In the absence of synergist, the heavy compounds in step 1 oil and light compounds in step 2 oils were observed. The presence of antimony bromide was confirmed in the step 1 oils but not in step 2 oils. PMID:18499216

  12. Improved method for minimizing sulfur loss in analysis of particulate organic sulfur.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Kwang Young

    2014-02-01

    The global sulfur cycle depends primarily on the metabolism of marine microorganisms, which release sulfur gas into the atmosphere and thus affect the redistribution of sulfur globally as well as the earth's climate system. To better quantify sulfur release from the ocean, analysis of the production and distribution of organic sulfur in the ocean is necessary. This report describes a wet-based method for accurate analysis of particulate organic sulfur (POS) in the marine environment. The proposed method overcomes the considerable loss of sulfur (up to 80%) that occurs during analysis using conventional methods involving drying. Use of the wet-based POS extraction procedure in conjunction with a sensitive sulfur analyzer enabled accurate measurements of cellular POS. Data obtained using this method will enable accurate assessment of how rapidly sulfur can transfer among pools. Such information will improve understanding of the role of POS in the oceanic sulfur cycle. PMID:24428718

  13. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries. PMID:26378622

  14. Determination of total sulfur content via sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N.; DiSanzo, F.P.

    1995-12-31

    A specially designed system, based upon sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD), was developed to permit the determination of total sulfur content in a variety of samples. This type of detection system possesses several advantages such as excellent linearity and selectivity, low minimum detectable levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. This paper will focus on the design and application of a sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection system for use in determining total sulfur content in gasoline.

  15. Have all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide replaced all-trans retinoic acid and anthracyclines in APL as standard of care.

    PubMed

    Iland, Harry J; Wei, Andrew; Seymour, John F

    2014-03-01

    Until recently, the standard of care in the treatment of APL has involved the combination of all-trans retinoic acid with anthracycline-based chemotherapy during both induction and consolidation. Additionally, the intensity of consolidation chemotherapy has evolved according to a universally accepted relapse-risk stratification algorithm based on the white cell and platelet counts at presentation. That standard of care is being challenged by the increasing incorporation of arsenic trioxide into front-line treatment protocols, based on two complementary observations. The first is the undoubted anti-leukaemic activity of arsenic trioxide as shown in the relapsed and refractory setting, and in the initial management of low- and intermediate-risk patients. The second is an improved understanding of the action of both all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in mediating APL cell eradication, with increasing recognition that PML-RARA fusion protein degradation rather than direct induction of terminal differentiation is the primary mechanism for their ability to eliminate leukaemia initiating cells. As a result, we believe the standard of care for initial therapy in APL is shifting towards an all-trans retinoic acid plus arsenic trioxide-based approach, with additional chemotherapy reserved for patients with high-risk disease. PMID:24907016

  16. Age-related differences in the metabolism of sulphite to sulphate and in the identification of sulphur trioxide radical in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Constantin, D; Bini, A; Meletti, E; Moldeus, P; Monti, D; Tomasi, A

    1996-07-01

    Sulphite oxidation and sulphur trioxide radical formation were studied in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) isolated from healthy young, old and centenarian donors and from patients with Down's syndrome. The sulphur radical formation measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy-spin trapping (EPR-ST) was correlated with the activity of sulphite oxidase and with the rate of sulphite oxidation to sulphate by PMNs. Sulphite metabolism was studied both in resting, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated freshly isolated cells. The rate of sulphur trioxide radical formation was demonstrated by use of the spin trapping agent 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyroline-1-oxide (DMPO) with subsequent formation of an adduct. The intensity of adduct formation was most intense in cells with low sulphite oxidase activity, while a mixture of the adduct and of DMPO hydroxyl radical was mainly observed in cells with high sulphite oxidase activity. Furthermore, experiments carried out on purified sulphite oxidase showed that in the presence of sulphite the enzyme could also give rise to a DMPO-OH adduct. Sulphite oxidase activity in cells isolated from healthy young and old donors was positive correlated with both rates of sulphur trioxide radical formation and sulphite oxidation to sulphate, respectively. However, sulphite oxidase activity in cells isolated from centenarians and patients with Down's syndrome seems to loose partly its rate of oxidising sulphite to sulphate. The intensity of the sulphur centred radical adduct increased in the two latter groups of population and the radical observed was predominantly sulphur trioxide radical. PMID:8803926

  17. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 23. SULFUR, SULFUR OXIDES AND SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The sulfur indus...

  18. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus. PMID:22496367

  19. Antibotulinal efficacy of sulfur dioxide in meat.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1980-01-01

    The addition of sodium metabisulfite as a source of sulfur dioxide delayed botulinal outgrowth in perishable canned comminuted pork when it was temperature abused at 27 degree C. The degree of inhibition was directly related to the level of sulfur dioxide. Levels greater than 100 microgram of sulfur dioxide per g were necessary to achieve significant inhibition when a target level of 100 botulinal spores per g was used. Sodium nitrite partially reduced the efficacy of the sulfur dioxide. Sulfur dioxide offers a new option for the control of botulinal outgrowth in cured or noncured meat and poultry products. PMID:6996613

  20. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  1. Activity of Nanobins Loaded with Cisplatin and Arsenic Trioxide in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindell, Elden Peter, III

    Despite recent advances in breast cancer screening and detection, the disease is still a leading cause of death for women of all ages. Young, African-American women are disproportionally affected with a type of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, which is particularly difficult to treat and has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. These tumors often spread to the lungs, liver, bones and brains of patients, which is ultimately fatal. This dissertation presents results from a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments that investigate the clinical utility of a novel nanoparticulate formulation of cisplatin and arsenic trioxide, NB(Pt,As) for treating primary and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. These nanobins consist of a solid, crystalline metal nanoparticle surrounded by a lipid bilayer with 80-90 nm diameter. This drug payload is extremely stable, and so NB(Pt,As) is extremely well tolerated in mice. Furthermore, NB(Pt,As) is effective in two different mouse models of breast cancer, one of primary tumor growth an another of lung metastases. A discovery presented here, that thiol containing compounds are required for drug release, may explain these seemingly incongruous results. The large amount of intracellular thiol can trigger drug release, while the low concentration of free thiols in blood is insufficient to cause drug release. To improve the treatment of brain tumors with this unique drug, we added transferrin to the surface of the nanobin using copper-catalyzed "click" chemistry, which preserves protein activity. The addition of transferrin to the nanobins enables 10 fold greater uptake in the brains of mice treated with the transferrin-targeted nanobins Tf-NB(Pt,A) compared to NB(Pt,As). By penetrating the blood brain barrier, the Tf-NB(Pt,As) was able to reduce breast cancer metastases in the brains of mice, whereas NB(Pt,As) had no effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate the intricate balance of drug release

  2. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  3. Effect of pH on compressive strength of some modification of mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad A.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Khezri-Boukani, Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, it was shown that NanoMTA improved the setting time and promoted a better hydration process which prevents washout and the dislodgment of this novel biomaterial in comparison with WTMA. This study analyzed the compressive strength of ProRoot WMTA (Dentsply), a NanoWMTA (Kamal Asgar Research Center), and Bioaggregate (Innovative Bioceramix) after its exposure to a range of environmental pH conditions during hydration. Study Design: After mixing the cements under aseptic condition and based on the manufacturers` recommendations, the cements were condensed with moderate force using plugger into 9 × 6 mm split molds. Each type of cement was then randomly divided into three groups (n=10). Specimens were exposed to environments with pH values of 4.4, 7.4, or 10.4 for 3 days. Cement pellets were compressed by using an Instron testing machine. Values were recorded and compared. Data were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey’s test. Results: After 3 days, the samples were solid when probed with an explorer before removing them from the molds. The greatest mean compressive strength 133.19±11.14 MPa was observed after exposure to a pH value of 10.4 for NanoWMTA. The values decreased to 111.41±8.26 MPa after exposure to a pH value of 4.4. Increasing of pH had a significant effect on the compressive strength of the groups (p<0.001). The mean compressive strength for the NanoWMTA was statistically higher than for ProRoot WMTA and Bioaggregate (p<0.001). Moreover, increasing of pH values had a significant effect on compressive strength of the experimental groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: The compressive strength of NanoWMTA was significantly higher than WMTA and Bioaggregate; the more acidic the environmental pH, the lower was the compressive strength. Key words:Compressive strength, mineral trioxide aggregate, Nano. PMID:23722137

  4. Effect of Acidic Environment on Dislocation Resistance of Endosequence Root Repair Material and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Yazdi, Kazem Ashofteh; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Matmir, Shakiba; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of an acidic environment on dislocation resistance (push-out bond strength) of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), a new bioceramic-based material, to that of mineral tri-oxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: One-hundred twenty root dentin slices with standardized canal spaces were divided into 6 groups (n = 20 each) and filled with tooth-colored ProRoot MTA (groups 1 and 2), ERRM putty (groups 3 and 4), or ERRM paste (groups 5 and 6). The specimens of groups 1, 3, and 5 were exposed to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH=7.4) and those of groups 2, 4, and 6 were exposed to butyric acid (pH= 4.4). The specimens were then incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out bond strength was then measured using a universal testing machine. Failure modes after the push-out test were examined under a light microscope at ×40 magnification. The data for dislocation resistance were analyzed using the t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Results: In PBS environment (pH=7.4), there were no significant differences among materials (P=0.30); but the mean push-out bond strength of ERRM putty was significantly higher than that of other materials in an acidic environment (P<0.001). Push-out bond strength of MTA and ERRM paste decreased after exposure to an acidic environment; whereas ERRM putty was not affected by acidic pH. The bond failure mode was predominantly cohesive for all groups except for MTA in an acidic environment; which showed mixed bond failure in most of the specimens. Conclusion: The force needed for dislocation of MTA and ERRM paste was significantly lower in samples stored in acidic pH; however, push-out bond strength of ERRM putty was not influenced by acidity. PMID:24910691

  5. Downregulation of thymidylate synthase and E2F1 by arsenic trioxide in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze-Kwan; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Chun-Yan; Ho, James Chung-Man

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a global health issue. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been shown to suppress thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in lung adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer, and induce apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia. With TYMS as a putative therapeutic target, the effect of ATO in mesothelioma was therefore studied. A panel of 5 mesothelioma cell lines was used to study the effect of ATO on cell viability, protein expression, mRNA expression and TYMS activity by MTT assay, western blot, qPCR and tritium-release assay, respectively. The knockdown of TYMS and E2F1 was performed with a specific siRNA. Phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization were measured by Annexin V and JC-1 staining respectively. The in vivo effect of ATO was studied using a nude mouse xenograft model. Application of ATO demonstrated anticancer effects in the cell line model with clinically achievable concentrations. Downregulation of TYMS protein (except H226 cells and 1.25 µM ATO in H2052 cells) and mRNA expression (H28 cells), pRB1 (H28 cells) and E2F1 and TYMS activity (except H226 cells) were also evident. E2F1 knockdown decreased cell viability more significantly than TYMS knockdown. In general, thymidine kinase 1, ribonucleotide reductase M1, c-myc and skp2 were downregulated by ATO. p-c-Jun was downregulated in H28 cells while upregulated in 211H cells. Phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and upregulation of Bak and cleaved caspase-3 were observed. In the H226 xenograft model, the relative tumor growth was aborted, and E2F1 was downregulated while cleaved caspase-3 was elevated and localized to the nucleus in the ATO treatment group. ATO has potent antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in mesothelioma in vitro and in vivo, partially mediated through E2F1 targeting (less effect through TYMS targeting). There is sound scientific evidence to support the

  6. Evaluation of a Chemical Fixation Technique for Remediation of Soils Contaminated with Arsenic Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahoe, R. J.; Yang, L.; Graham, E. Y.; Redwine, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    The results of an experimental study designed to test a chemical fixation technique for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils are reported. Soil samples were collected from two industrial sites where herbicide application contaminated the soil with arsenic trioxide. Weathering has redistributed and changed the speciation of the arsenic and caused contamination of soil water and groundwater. Remediation techniques requiring excavation of the affected soil are impractical due to the lack of site access for heavy equipment and the large area impacted. To address these concerns, an in situ treatment method was developed and tested in laboratory experiments. Column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the soil treatment method. Homogenized soil samples from each site were packed into duplicate 4"x18" Plexiglas columns and treated with ferrous sulfate solution using a flow rate of 2 ml/min until iron breakthrough was achieved. Another pair of packed columns was leached with DDI water to provide baseline data for the effect of the treatment solution matrix on arsenic mobility. All soil column effluents showed an initial spike of arsenic after onset of fluid flow; however, the soils undergoing treatment leached less than one half the amount of arsenic leached from the soil by DDI water. When the soil became saturated with the ferrous sulfate treatment solution, effluent solution arsenic concentrations fell below detectable levels. After breakthrough of the treatment solution was achieved, the treated soil columns were allowed to drain and cure for 7 days. One treated soil column and one untreated soil column were then continuously leached with EPA Method 1312 SPLP fluid to observe the effect of treatment on the mobility of arsenic. The second set of treated and untreated soil columns was also leached with SPLP fluid, but in a manner designed to simulate periodic rainfall events. Preliminary experimental results show that ferrous sulfate treatment

  7. Heat Shock Protein Alteration in the Gastrointestinal Tract Tissues of Chickens Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Zhang, Kexin; Guo, Guangyang; Sun, Xiao; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in our living environment and is useful for industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and other fields. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an existing form of As. Exposure to As2O3 has a toxic effect on humans and animals. It not only leads to skin cancer, peripheral vascular disease, hyperkeratosis, etc. but also interferes with the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract is an important organ for animals to transform the food they eat into the nutrients their body needs for maintenance and growth. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) exist in the non-stress normal cells and their expression increases under stimuli. Therefore, we wonder whether the "stimulus" of As2O3 could change the messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and expression level of Hsps in the gastrointestinal tract of birds. To investigate the relation between arseniasis and Hsp alterations in the chicken's gastrointestinal tract induced by an As2O3-supplemented diet, we selected 72 one-day-old male Hy-line chickens and randomly divided them into four groups. They were fed either a commercial diet or an As2O3-supplemented diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days, and gastrointestinal tract tissue samples (gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum) were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. The mRNA contents of Hsps (including Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90) were examined by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The correlation between As2O3 and Hsp genes was assessed. In addition, the protein expression levels of Hsp60 and Hsp70 in the gastrointestinal tract tissue samples were measured by western blot. The results indicated that the mRNA expression levels and the Hsp expression levels in the gastrointestinal tract tissues of chickens with As2O3 supplementation increased at different time points in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). These data suggested that arseniasis influenced the

  8. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  9. Multiple heteroatom containing sulfur compounds in coals

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.; Neill, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Flash vacuum pyrolysis of a high sulfur coal has been combined with high resolution mass spectrometry information on aromatic sulfur compounds containing an additional heteroatom. Sulfur emission from coal utilization is a critical problem and in order to devise efficient methods for removing organic sulfur, it is important to know what types of molecules contain sulfur. A high sulfur Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal (Argonne Premium Coal Sample No. 3) was pyrolyzed on a platinum grid using a quartz probe inserted into a modified all glass heated inlet system, and the products characterized by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS). A significant number of products were identified which contained both sulfur and an additional heteroatom. In some cases two additional heteroatoms were observed. These results are compared to those found in coal extracted and liquefaction products. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Addition of Arsenic Trioxide into Induction Regimens Could Not Accelerate Recovery of Abnormality of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, SiJing; Luo, Dan; Zhou, JianFeng; Li, DengJu

    2016-01-01

    Aim All-trans retinoic acid combined to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is the standard regimen of acute promyelocytic leukemia. The advent of arsenic trioxide has contributed to improve the anti-leukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate if dual induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide could accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed in 103 newly-diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hemostatic variables and the consumption of component blood were comparably analyzed among patients treated by different induction regimen with or without arsenic trioxide. Results Compared to patients with other subtypes of de novo acute myeloid leukemia, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia had lower platelet counts and fibrinogen levels, significantly prolonged prothrombin time and elevated D-dimers (P<0.001). Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification presented lower initial fibrinogen level than that of low-risk group (P<0.05). After induction treatment, abnormal coagulation and fibrinolysis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia was significantly improved before day 10. The recovery of abnormal hemostatic variables (platelet, prothrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer) was not significantly accelerated after adding arsenic trioxide in induction regimens; and the consumption of transfused component blood (platelet and plasma) did not dramatically change either. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification had higher platelet transfusion demands than that of low-risk group (P<0.05). Conclusions Unexpectedly, adding arsenic trioxide could not accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who

  11. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage, and final utilization of sulfur (S) containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops. PMID:25250037

  12. Sodium Sulfur Technology Program Nastec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highley, Bob; Somerville, W. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The NaSTEC program focuses on developing currently available sodium sulfur cells for use in space applications and investigating the operational parameters of the cells. The specific goals of the program are to determine the operational parameters and verify safety limits of Na/S technology battery cells; test long term zero-g operation; and create a life test database. The program approach and ground and flight test objectives are described in textual and graphic form.

  13. Geochemical and sulfur isotope signatures of microbial activity in acidic and sulfuric hot springs, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Chen, K.; Cheng, T.; Hsieh, H.; Lin, L.

    2009-12-01

    Acidic and sulfuric hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic sulfur-utilizing microorganisms. Integration of bioenergetic evaluation, molecular analysis and stable isotopic signatures may be able to exhibit a full view of microbial activity in such an extreme environment. Widely distributed hot springs hosted by the Tatung volcano group in northern Taiwan provide a chance to evaluate the interplay between geochemical variation and microbial metabolism especially for sulfur. Several hot spring ponds varying in sizes and geochemical characteristics were studied to reveal the possible control of fluid compositions on microbial metabolisms, and vice versa. Sulfate, sulfide, elemental sulfur and dissolved organic carbon were available in spring water and sediments in the ponds. Dominant microbial metabolisms inferred from the bioenergetic evaluation were aerobic oxidations of various reduced compounds, including elemental sulfur, pyrite, ferrous iron and organic carbon. Sulfate and sulfur reductions were thermodynamically favorable but provided less energy flux, while sulfur disproportionation was thermodynamically incapable. The analyses of 16S rRNA genes extracted from the spring water and sediments indicated that aerobic oxidation of sulfur, hydrogen or organic carbon and anaerobic elemental sulfur reduction were possible metabolisms. Since the major portion of 16S rRNA sequences were affiliated with unclassified environmental sequences, their potential metabolisms remained obscure. Sulfur isotopic compositions of dissolved sulfate, pyrite and elemental sulfur exhibited significant variations among the different hot spring ponds. Apparently, the microbial effects on the sulfur isotopic signatures were various. A disproportionation reaction of volcanic gas was required to account for high sulfur isotope difference between sulfate and reduced sulfur in the large hot ponds. In contrary, abiotic or microbial oxidation of reduced sulfur might be dominant in the

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Haisong

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  15. Theoretical studies on vicinal-tetrazine compounds: furoxano-1,2,3,4-tetrazine-1,3,5-trioxide (FTTO-α) and furoxano-1,2,3,4-tetrazine-1,3,7-trioxide (FTTO-β).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Liwen; Wu, Xionghui; Gong, Xuedong; Xia, Mingzhu

    2014-12-01

    The derivatives of 1,2,3,4-tetrazine may be promising candidates of high-energy density compounds and are receiving more and more attention. In this study, two 1,2,3,4-tetrazines, furoxano-1,2,3,4-tetrazine-1,3,5-trioxide (FTTO-α) and furoxano-1,2,3,4-tetrazine-1,3,7-trioxide (FTTO-β), were theoretically studied. The geometrical structures in gas phase were studied at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of density functional theory (DFT). The gas phase enthalpies of formation were calculated by the homodesmotic reaction method. The enthalpies of sublimation and solid phase enthalpies of formation were predicted with corrections of electrostatic potential method at the B3PW91/6-31G(d,p) level. The detonation properties were estimated with the Kamlet-Jacobs equations based on the predicted densities and enthalpies of formation in solid state. The available free space in the lattice was calculated to evaluate their stability. Calculations of potential energy surface and structure interconversion thermodynamics under different temperatures were carried out to further confirm their stability. FTTOs have better performance than HMX and FTDO but are easy to decompose to 5,6-dinitroso-v-tetrazine 1,3-dioxide. A synthesis route for FTTO-β was proposed to provide a consideration for the further study. We believe FTTOs could be the key compounds to synthesize other v-tetrazines such as TTTO. PMID:25413679

  16. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfurmore » were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.« less

  17. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  18. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Dong; Yang, Xuran; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Qu, Deyang

    2015-10-30

    In this study, the polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li–S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S42– and S52– species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S82– and S62– for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  19. Long-term observation of the mineral trioxide aggregate extrusion into the periapical lesion: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, Tae-Seok; Lee, WooCheol; Cheung, Gary Shun-Pan; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-03-01

    One-step apexification using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been reported as an alternative treatment modality with more benefits than the use of long-term calcium hydroxide for teeth with open apex. However, orthograde placement of MTA is a challenging procedure in terms of length control. This case series describes the sequence of events following apical extrusion of MTA into the periapical area during a one-step apexification procedure for maxillary central incisor with an infected immature apex. Detailed long-term observation revealed complete resolution of the periapical radiolucent lesion around the extruded MTA. These cases revealed that direct contact with MTA had no negative effects on healing of the periapical tissues. However, intentional MTA overfilling into the periapical lesion is not to be recommended. PMID:23558344

  20. Refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia successfully treated with combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and tamibarotene: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Minoru; Ogiya, Daisuke; Ichiki, Akifumi; Hara, Ryujiro; Amaki, Jun; Kawai, Hidetsugu; Numata, Hiroki; Sato, Ai; Miyamoto, Mitsuki; Suzuki, Rikio; Machida, Shinichiro; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old male developed refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after various treatments including all-trans retinoic acid, tamibarotene, arsenic trioxide (As2O3), conventional chemotherapy, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. We attempted to use both tamibarotene and As2O3 as a combination therapy, and he achieved molecular complete remission. Grade 2 prolongation of the QTc interval on the electrocardiogram was observed during the therapy. The combination therapy of As2O3 and tamibarotene may be effective and tolerable for treating refractory APL cases who have no treatment options, even when they have previously been treated with tamibarotene and As2O3as a single agent. PMID:27144119

  1. Refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia successfully treated with combination therapy of arsenic trioxide and tamibarotene: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Minoru; Ogiya, Daisuke; Ichiki, Akifumi; Hara, Ryujiro; Amaki, Jun; Kawai, Hidetsugu; Numata, Hiroki; Sato, Ai; Miyamoto, Mitsuki; Suzuki, Rikio; Machida, Shinichiro; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Kawada, Hiroshi; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old male developed refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) after various treatments including all-trans retinoic acid, tamibarotene, arsenic trioxide (As2O3), conventional chemotherapy, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. We attempted to use both tamibarotene and As2O3 as a combination therapy, and he achieved molecular complete remission. Grade 2 prolongation of the QTc interval on the electrocardiogram was observed during the therapy. The combination therapy of As2O3 and tamibarotene may be effective and tolerable for treating refractory APL cases who have no treatment options, even when they have previously been treated with tamibarotene and As2O3 as a single agent. PMID:27144119

  2. Mechanism behind Improved Apparent Field-Effect Mobility in Pentacene Thin-Film Transistors with Thin Molybdenum Trioxide Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Baba, Akira; Shinbo, Kazunari; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2012-10-01

    Insertion of a thin layer of the Lewis acid molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) improves the apparent mobility of charge carriers in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). In order to identify the dominant mechanism responsible for this, we characterized devices having a bottom pentacene (70-z nm)/MoO3 (1 nm)/top pentacene (z nm) structure and those having pentacene (69 nm)/MoO3 (1 nm) only under the gold source and drain electrodes. The former devices exhibited large drain currents (IDS) and mobilities, regardless of the z value. Moreover, the latter devices exhibited comparable IDS and mobilities to those of conventional pentacene OFETs, suggesting that the formation of CT complexes just above the conduction channel is the critical mechanism. Carriers generated by dissociation of CT complexes at the pentacene/MoO3 interface contribute to the formation of an effective channel and the apparent mobility.

  3. Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy in autotransplanted immature mandibular third molar with a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Devi, Takhellambam Premlata

    2016-01-01

    Autotransplantation is the surgical transposition of a tooth from its original site to another, replacing a lost or a compromised tooth by another tooth, usually the third molar in the same individual. This technique is considered a viable method due to its high success rate, well-grounded treatment option, provided the case selection and the procedure followed is within the acceptable limits. Autotransplantation is considered as an alternative approach of oral rehabilitations in a conservative manner mainly in young patients with compromised financial conditions to perform a high cost treatment. It is a fast way to recover function and aesthetic properties without interfering with the orofacial growth. This report describes a successful 4-year follow-up of a case of immediately performed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy in autotransplantated mandibular left immature third molar to replace the mandibular left first molar that was extracted due to extensive carious lesion. PMID:27217648

  4. Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy in autotransplanted immature mandibular third molar with a 4-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Devi, Takhellambam Premlata

    2016-01-01

    Autotransplantation is the surgical transposition of a tooth from its original site to another, replacing a lost or a compromised tooth by another tooth, usually the third molar in the same individual. This technique is considered a viable method due to its high success rate, well-grounded treatment option, provided the case selection and the procedure followed is within the acceptable limits. Autotransplantation is considered as an alternative approach of oral rehabilitations in a conservative manner mainly in young patients with compromised financial conditions to perform a high cost treatment. It is a fast way to recover function and aesthetic properties without interfering with the orofacial growth. This report describes a successful 4-year follow-up of a case of immediately performed mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy in autotransplantated mandibular left immature third molar to replace the mandibular left first molar that was extracted due to extensive carious lesion. PMID:27217648

  5. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of 3D metal trioxide and tetraoxide superhalogen cluster-doped monolayer BN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Li, Dan; Niu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongmin; Liang, Chunjun; He, Zhiqun

    2016-07-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of monolayer BN doped with 3D metal trioxide and tetraoxide superhalogen clusters are investigated using first-principle calculations. TMO3(4)-doped monolayer BN exhibits a low negative formation energy, whereas TM atoms embedded in monolayer BN show a high positive formation energy. TMO3(4) clusters are embedded more easily in monolayer BN than TM atoms. Compared with TMO3-doped structures, TMO4-doped structures have a higher structural stability because of their higher binding energies. Given their low negative formation energies, TMO4-doped structures are more favored for specific applications than TMO3-doped structures and TM atom-doped structures. Large magnetic moments per supercell and significant ferromagnetic couplings between a TM atom and neighboring B and N atoms on the BN layer were observed in all TMO4-doped structures, except for TiO4-doped structures.

  6. Arsenic trioxide stimulates SUMO-2/3 modification leading to RNF4-dependent proteolytic targeting of PML.

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, Stefan R; Keusekotten, Kirstin; Krause, Anke; Horst, Christiane; Springer, Helen M; Göttsche, Kerstin; Dohmen, R Jürgen; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2008-09-22

    We have recently reported that poly-SUMO-2/3 conjugates are subject to a ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic control in human cells. Here we show that arsenic trioxide (ATO) increases SUMO-2/3 modification of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) leading to its subsequent ubiquitylation in vivo. The SUMO-binding ubiquitin ligase RNF4 mediates this modification and causes disruption of PML nuclear bodies upon treatment with ATO. Reconstitution of SUMO-dependent ubiquitylation of PML by RNF4 in vitro and in a yeast trans vivo system revealed a preference of RNF4 for chain forming SUMOs. Polysumoylation of PML in response to ATO thus leads to its recognition and ubiquitylation by RNF4. PMID:18708055

  7. Need total sulfur content? Use chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N.; DiSanzo, F.P.

    1996-09-01

    Regulations issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency require petroleum refineries to reduce or control the amount of total sulfur present in their refined products. These legislative requirements have led many refineries to search for online instrumentation that can produce accurate and repeatable total sulfur measurements within allowed levels. Several analytical methods currently exist to measure total sulfur content. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), microcoulometry, lead acetate tape, and pyrofluorescence techniques. Sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD) has recently received much attention due to its linearity, selectivity, sensitivity, and equimolar response. However, its use has been largely confined to the area of gas chromatography. This article focuses on the special design considerations and analytical utility of an SSCD system developed to determine total sulfur content in gasoline. The system exhibits excellent linearity and selectivity, the ability to detect low minimum levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  9. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  10. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  11. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  12. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  13. Are the clouds of Venus sulfuric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that strong aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have the right refractive index and freeze at Venusian cloud temperature, explain the dryness of the Venusian stratosphere, are consistent with some features of the Venusian IR spectrum, and do not absorb in highly reflecting areas of Venus. It is also indicated that such solutions should be produced by reactions between known atmospheric constituents and most sulfur-bearing rock at the Venusian surface temperature, and require only small amounts of sulfur consistent with its cosmic abundance and with the amounts of other volatile elements present in the atmosphere. It is believed therefore that the clouds of Venus consist of sulfuric acid solutions.

  14. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  15. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  16. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, H.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.; Hormes, J.

    2007-02-01

    In this `feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of `standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  17. Sulfur recovery process including removal of residual sulfur from Claus catalyst after regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanaw, B.E.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur. It comprises: passing an acid gas feedstream having as a sulfur species essentially only hydrogen sulfide therein to a Claus plant comprising a thermal conversion zone and at least one Claus catalytic reaction zone operated under adsorption conditions including temperature for forming and depositing a preponderance of sulfur formed on catalyst therein.

  18. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  19. Binding mechanism of sulfur and dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile in sulfur/polymer composite cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, The Nam Long; Ghaznavi, Mahmoudreza; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Konarov, Aishuak; Sadhu, Mikhail; Tangirala, Ravichandra; Chen, P.

    2013-11-01

    A composite consisting of sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile is one of the most promising cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries. However, the reported sulfur contents have been low, less than 50 wt%, which compromise the intrinsic high specific capacity and energy of elemental sulfur and hence decrease significantly the specific energy of the composite. To identify the potential to further increase the sulfur content, we elucidate the binding mechanism of sulfur and polyacrylonitrile in their composite. The heat treatment experiments at varying timespans with excess sulfur showed a constancy of sulfur content after a critical length of timespan, indicating the saturation of sulfur in the structure of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. Based on molecular structure and size consideration, it is proposed that the binding involves the formation of an 8 membered ring of sulfur embedded between 4 heterocyclic rings of dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile. From this model and experimental results, we show that there exists an upper limit of sulfur content in the sulfur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile composite at 56 wt%.

  20. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  1. Sulfur gradient-distributed CNF composite: a self-inhibiting cathode for binder-free lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Li, Yanpeng; Dirican, Mahmut; Chen, Chen; Lu, Yao; Zhu, Jiadeng; Li, Yao; Cao, Linyou; Bradford, Philip D; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2014-09-14

    A self-inhibiting, gradient sulfur structure was designed and developed by the synthesis of a carbon nanofiber-sulphur composite via sulfur vapor deposition method for use as a binder-free sulfur cathode, exhibiting high sulfur loading (2.6 mg cm(-2)) and high sulfur content (65%) with a stable capacity of >700 mA h g(-1). PMID:25056154

  2. Electrically active sulfur-defect complexes in sulfur implanted diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalish, R.; Uzan-Saguy, C.; Walker, R.; Prawer, S.

    2003-09-01

    Single crystal type IIa <100> diamonds were implanted with sulfur, phosphorus, and argon ions under different implantation and annealing conditions. Shallow (sub-MeV) as well as deep (MeV) implantations into samples held at low (liquid nitrogen) ambient (room temperature) and high (400 °C) temperatures were employed. The implanted samples were subjected to postimplantation annealing up to 1000 °C. Following each processing step the samples were subjected to (i) Raman spectroscopy, in order to investigate the implantation related residual defects, and (ii) electrical (resistivity and sometimes Hall effect) measurements as function of temperature. The correlation between the results of these structural and electrical measurements and the comparison of results obtained under identical processing conditions for possible n-type dopant ion-implantations (S and P) and inert (Ar) ion-implantations, as controls, leads to the following conclusions: (a) Sulfur implanted samples always exhibit at least one order of magnitude higher conductivity than Ar control implanted samples. The activation energy associated with the S related conductivity is 0.32-0.37 eV whereas that of the Ar control is 0.5 to 0.6 eV. Hall effect shows, for selected cases, n-type conductivity with low carrier concentration and mobility. (b) Although the presence of some residual defects (mainly split interstitials) seems to accompany the appearance of the S related electrical activity, the level of residual damage in the S implanted samples is always less than that of the Ar control. (c) The electrical effects due to the implantation of S vanish upon annealing at temperatures in access of 800 °C. (d) No significant difference in the electrical properties between P and control Ar implantations are evident. It is concluded that a sulfur-defect related complex, which decomposes at T>800 °C, is responsible for the electrical effects in S implanted diamond. The presence of B contamination which has

  3. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J; Howe, Jane Y

    2015-05-05

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  4. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  5. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  6. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  7. Fate of excess sulfur in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms which have evolved in higher plants to cope with excess sulfur in their environments are reviewed. Survival in a sulfur-rich environment is seldom achieved through avoidance of the intake of sulfur. The presence of excess sulfur in the soil or in the air usually results in an intake of excess sulfur into plants. An immediate injury by the excess sulfur taken up is, however, prevented by a series of metabolic processes. Storage of excess sulfur in a metabolically inactive compartment, i.e. the vacuole, appears to occur in most plants. The finding of a storage of glutathione is several investigations suggests that with increasing accumulation of sulfate its reduction also increases. Under these conditions the cysteine concentration in different compartments of the cell may still be maintained at a low level by the incorporation of the excess cysteine synthesized into glutathione. This peptide appears to be the storage form of reduced sulfur in higher plants. 167 references, 2 figures.

  8. Dielectric strength of sulfur hexafluoride upon condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, A.V.; Lyapin, A.G.; Popkov, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur hexafluoride in a sealed high-voltage device has been modeled for cooling to the condensation point of the insulating medium. The temperature dependences of the breakdown voltages of sulfur hexafluoride have been investigated for several interelectrode separations. The dielectric strength has been shown to decrease upon condensation with formation of a bridge of boiling liquid phase between the electrodes.

  9. Novel aqueous aluminum/sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Peramunage, D. )

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum sulfur batteries based on concentrated polysulfide catholytes and an alkaline aluminum anode are introduced and investigated. The new battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous sulfur reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + S[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  10. Ambient Air Monitoring for Sulfur Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Joseph; Newman, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    A literature review of analytical techniques available for the study of compounds at low concentrations points up some of the areas where further research is needed. Compounds reviewed are sulfur dioxide, sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate and bisulfate, metal sulfates, hydrogen sulfide, and organic sulfides. (BL)

  11. Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-12-26

    High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

  12. SURFACE REACTIONS OF OXIDES OF SULFUR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface reactions of several sulfur-containing molecules have been studied in order to understand the mechanism by which sulfate ions are formed on atmospheric aerosols. At 25C the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 to sulfuric acid and sulfate ions occurred on hydrated silica...

  13. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  14. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  15. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  16. Sulfur Chemistry in Bacterial Leaching of Pyrite

    PubMed Central

    Schippers, A.; Jozsa, P.; Sand, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the case of pyrite bioleaching by Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, an organism without sulfur-oxidizing capacity, besides the production of tetra- and pentathionate, a considerable accumulation of elemental sulfur occurred. A similar result was obtained for chemical oxidation assays with acidic, sterile iron(III) ion-containing solutions. In the case of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, only slight amounts of elemental sulfur were detectable because of the organism's capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. In the course of oxidative, chemical pyrite degradation under alkaline conditions, the accumulation of tetrathionate, trithionate, and thiosulfate occurred. The data indicate that thiosulfate, trithionate, tetrathionate, and disulfane-monosulfonic acid are key intermediate sulfur compounds in oxidative pyrite degradation. A novel (cyclic) leaching mechanism is proposed which basically is indirect. PMID:16535406

  17. Sulfur Production by Obligately Chemolithoautotrophic Thiobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Visser, J. M.; Robertson, L. A.; Van Verseveld, H. W.; Kuenen, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    Transient-state experiments with the obligately autotrophic Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 revealed that sulfide oxidation proceeds in two physiological phases, (i) the sulfate-producing phase and (ii) the sulfur- and sulfate-producing phase, after which sulfide toxicity occurs. Specific sulfur-producing characteristics were independent of the growth rate. Sulfur formation was shown to occur when the maximum oxidative capacity of the culture was approached. In order to be able to oxidize increasing amounts of sulfide, the organism has to convert part of the sulfide to sulfur (HS(sup-)(symbl)S(sup0) + H(sup+) + 2e(sup-)) instead of sulfate (HS(sup-) + 4H(inf2)O(symbl)SO(inf4)(sup2-) + 9 H(sup+) + 8e(sup-)), thereby keeping the electron flux constant. Measurements of the in vivo degree of reduction of the cytochrome pool as a function of increasing sulfide supply suggested a redox-related down-regulation of the sulfur oxidation rate. Comparison of the sulfur-producing properties of Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 and Thiobacillus neapolitanus showed that the former has twice the maximum specific sulfide-oxidizing capacity of the latter (3.6 versus 1.9 (mu)mol/mg of protein/min). Their maximum specific oxygen uptake rates were very similar. Significant mechanistic differences in sulfur production between the high-sulfur-producing Thiobacillus sp. strain W5 and the moderate-sulfur-producing species T. neapolitanus were not observed. The limited sulfide-oxidizing capacity of T. neapolitanus appears to be the reason that it can convert only 50% of the incoming sulfide to elemental sulfur. PMID:16535627

  18. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy.Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity

  19. [Determination and distribution of sulfur compounds in coked gasoline by gas chromatography-sulfur chemiluminescence detection].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongtan; Wang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    The method for the separation and determination of sulfur compounds in coked gasoline by gas chromatography-sulfur chemiluminescence detection (GC-SCD) was established. Seventy-four sulfur compounds including hydrogen sulfide, mercaptans, sulfides, disulfides, thiophene, alkyl thiophenes, benzothiophene, alkyl benzothiophenes in a coked gasoline sample were identified by standard samples and past identified results. The retention indexes of different sulfur compounds in coked gasoline under programmed temperature condition were calculated based on the retention times of hydrosulfide, ethyl mercaptan, n-propyl mercaptan, thiophene, 2-methyl thiophene, 2-ethylthiophene, 2-propylthiophene, C4-thiophene (t(R) = 40.28 min), benzothiophene, and methylbenzothiophene (t(R) = 58.13 min). The relative standard deviations of the determination results of main sulfur compounds (isopropyl mercaptan, n-propyl mercaptan, n-butyl mercaptan, 2-methylthiophene, 3-methylthiophene, 2, 4-dimethylthiophene, 2,3,4-trimethylthiophene) in coked gasoline were less than 5%, and the detection limit for sulfur was 0.05 mg/L. The linear range of sulfur was 0.2 - 400 mg/L for each sulfur compounds (r2 = 0. 999). The contents of sulfur compounds, especially the content of mercaptan, are much more than those in the catalytic gasoline. There is also a big difference in the sulfur contents between 2-methylthiophene and 3-methylthiophene. The data can be useful for the study of hydrodesulfurizing catalyst and industrial process planning. PMID:17679435

  20. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  1. A mesoporous carbon–sulfur composite as cathode material for high rate lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunji; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • CMK-3 mesoporous carbon was synthesized as conducting reservoir for housing sulfur. • Sulfur/CMK-3 composites were prepared by two-stage thermal treatment. • The composite at 300 °C for 20 h shows improved electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Sulfur composite was prepared by encapsulating sulfur into CMK-3 mesoporous carbon with different heating times and then used as the cathode material for lithium sulfur batteries. Thermal treatment at 300 °C plays an important role in the sulfur encapsulation process. With 20 h of heating time, a portion of sulfur remained on the surface of carbon, whereas with 60 h of heating time, sulfur is confined deeply in the small pores of carbon that cannot be fully exploited in the redox reaction, thus causing low capacity. The S/CMK-3 composite with thermal treatment for 40 h at 300 °C contained 51.3 wt.% sulfur and delivered a high initial capacity of 1375 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C. Moreover, it showed good capacity retention of 704 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 578 mA h g{sup −1} at 2 C even after 100 cycles, which proves its potential as a cathode material for high capability lithium sulfur batteries.

  2. Spatial variation of organic sulfur in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Tseng, B.H.; Hsieh, K.C.; Buckentin, M.; Ge, Y.P.

    1987-01-01

    Spatial variation of organic sulfur concentration in coals has been generally known for years. The high resolution of the transmission electron microscope permits that variation to be measured more precisely than is possible by bulk techniques; variations may be measured over distances less than 1 /mu/m. Measurement of organic sulfur content using the transmission electron microscope requires use of ultra thin films or very fine powders. We typically use foils less than 1 /mu/m thickness or powders ground to a few /mu/m. The organic sulfur content is proportional to the ratio of the count rate for the sulfur K/alpha/ line to the count rate for the background radiation measured over some convenient energy interval. The proportionality constant is determined using sulfur standards. The technique is highly reliable for sulfur, as is shown in earlier publications. The PIXE method for heavier elements also utilizes the background radiation to permit absolute numerical concentrations to be derived. This paper reports a particular application of the TEM method to determination of the spatial variation of organic sulfur, both within a given maceral and among maceral types. Some of the observations report measurements on powdered specimens, others on foil specimens prepared from bulk coal.

  3. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur.

    PubMed

    Garrels, R M; Lerman, A

    1981-08-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO(2) to SO(4) from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  4. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  5. Observational tests for sulfur allotropes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, H. B.; Goguen, J. D.; Sinton, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that, if the Io surface is primarily composed of sulfur allotropes, a change in reflectivity at certain wavelengths should be observable shortly after eclipse reappearance (ER). Four ERs were observed during July and August 1983 with a 61-cm telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and no posteclipse brightening effects in the filter bands selected for sensitivity to color changes in sulfur were found. The proposed model of the brightness change of elemental sulfur (S8) implies that this material covers less than 50 percent of the Io surface. It is concluded that no significant condensation of optically thick SO2 occurred on the Io surface during the four eclipses.

  6. New sulfur-containing corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.

    2000-04-01

    No corrosion inhibitor available today is ideal in every way, but a new class of sulfur-containing compounds promises to address many field requirements. This article describes the performance characteristics of these compounds and discusses possible inhibition mechanisms. The emphasis in this work was on better understanding corrosion inhibition by sulfur-containing inhibitors under high shear-stress conditions, with special focus on localized (pitting) corrosion. The results indicate that the new sulfur-containing inhibitors (e.g., mercaptoalcohol [MA]) could be more effective in the field than currently available inhibitors.

  7. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  8. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA). We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions rather than attempt to cool the planet through geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  9. A Carbon-Sulfur Hybrid with Pomegranate-like Structure for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanting; Lv, Wei; Niu, Shuzhang; He, Yanbing; Zhou, Guangmin; Chen, Guohua; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2016-05-01

    A carbon-sulfur hybrid with pomegranate-like core-shell structure, which demonstrates a high rate performance and relatively high cyclic stability, is obtained through carbonization of a carbon precursor in the presence of a sulfur precursor (FeS2 ) and a following oxidation of FeS2 to sulfur by HNO3 . Such a structure effectively protects the sulfur and leaves enough buffer space after Fe(3+) removal and, at the same time, has an interconnected conductive network. The capacity of the obtained hybrid is 450 mA h g(-1) under the current density of 5 C. This work provides a simple strategy to design and prepare various high-performance carbon-sulfur hybrids for lithium-sulfur batteries. PMID:26918663

  10. A nano-structured and highly ordered polypyrrole-sulfur cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Zhaoyin; Huang, Lezhi; Wang, Xiuyan; Zhang, Hao

    A tubular polypyrrole (T-PPy) fiber is synthesized as a conductive matrix for the cathode of lithium-sulfur secondary battery. The sublimed sulfur is incorporated with the T-PPy by a co-heating process. The location and the content of sulfur show a significant effect on the electrochemical behavior of the composite. A reversible capacity of ca. 650 mAh g -1 is maintained for over 80 cycles for the S/T-PPy composite with 30 wt.% sulfur. The enhanced conductivity, the favorable distribution of the nano-sized sulfur in the T-PPy and the stable retention of polysulfides lead to the improvement of the cycling stability of the sulfur based electrode.

  11. Outcome of Therapy-Related Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With or Without Arsenic Trioxide as a Component of Frontline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dayyani, Farshid; Kantarjian, Hagop; O’Brien, Susan; Pierce, Sherry; Jones, Dan; Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia (t-APL) have been commonly exposed to topoisomerase inhibitors and may potentially benefit from induction regimens omitting anthracyclines. METHODS Retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 29 patients with t-APL who were either treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO) and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or with standard ATRA plus anthracycline-based chemotherapy was performed. RESULTS Prior therapy included chemotherapy alone, radiation alone, or a combination of the 2 in 19%, 33%, and 47% of patients, respectively. The combination of ATO and ATRA (n = 19) for induction resulted in a similar remission rate compared with ATRA plus chemotherapy (n = 10) (89% vs 70%; P = .35). The median overall survival for the patients treated with ATRA plus ATO was not reached compared with that for patients treated with ATRA plus chemotherapy (161 weeks; P =.79). CONCLUSIONS In this cohort of t-APL patients, outcomes with ATO and ATRA appeared to be comparable to anthracycline-containing induction regimens. This combination may be preferable in t-APL patients to avoid any risk of anthracycline-induced toxicities. PMID:20803607

  12. Arsenic trioxide promotes mitochondrial DNA mutation and cell apoptosis in primary APL cells and NB4 cell line.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ran; Zhou, Jin; Sui, Meng; Li, ZhiYong; Feng, GuoSheng; Yang, BaoFeng

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. The NB4 cell line was treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro, and the primary APL cells were treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro and 0.16 mg kg(-1) d(-1) As(2)O(3) in vivo. The mitochondrial DNA of all the cells above was amplified by PCR, directly sequenced and analyzed by Sequence Navigatore and Factura software. The apoptosis rates were assayed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial DNA mutation in the D-loop region was found in NB4 and APL cells before As(2)O(3) use, but the mutation spots were remarkably increased after As(2)O(3) treatment, which was positively correlated to the rates of cellular apoptosis, the correlation coefficient: r (NB4-As2O3)=0.973818, and r (APL-As2O3)=0.934703. The mutation types include transition, transversion, codon insertion or deletion, and the mutation spots in all samples were not constant and regular. It is revealed that As(2)O(3) aggravates mtDNA mutation in the D-loop region of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial DNA might be one of the targets of As(2)O(3) in APL treatment. PMID:20596959

  13. Comparative evaluation of intracanal sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Gauri; Bogra, Poonam; Singh, Simranjeet; Samra, Rupandeep K

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) when used over gutta-percha as intracanal sealing materials. The study also evaluated the sealing ability of Zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) cement and Acroseal sealer. Materials and Methods: Teeth were obturated with gutta-percha using sealer ZOE (group A, C, D) and Acroseal (group B). The groups were further divided into 2 subgroups (15 premolars each) on the basis of intracanal sealing material used: GIC subgroups (A1, B1) and MTA in subgroups (A2, B2). The clearing technique was used in this study for leakage evaluation. Seventy mandibular premolars were prepared using step-back technique and divided into experimental groups A and B (30 premolars each) and the positive and negative control groups C and D (5 premolars each). Statistical analysis used: Coronal microleakage was determined under stereomicroscope using 15X magnification. Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc Multiple comparison (Bonferroni). Results: MTA group leaked significantly less than GIC group (P < 0.05). Acroseal exhibited better sealing ability than ZOE sealer. Teeth with no intracanal barrier showed almost complete leakage. Conclusions: MTA may be preferred over GIC as an intracanal barrier. PMID:24347890

  14. Comparing Gray and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as a Repair Material for Furcation Perforation: An in Vitro Dye Extraction Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kiran; Baba, Suheel Manzoor; Jaiswal, Shikha; Venkataraghavan, Karthik; Jani, Mehul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Furcation perforation can have a negative impact on the prognosis of the affected tooth by compromising the attached apparatus. Hence these perforations require immediate repair. A variety of materials have been suggested for repair, of that MTA is the most promising material. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of Gray and White MTA to seal furcation perforations using a dye extraction method under spectrophotometer. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 permanent mandibular molars were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 15 samples each as follows: Group A: Perforation repaired with White MTA. Group B: Perforation repaired with Gray MTA. Group C: Perforation left unsealed (positive). Group D: without perforation (negative). Dye extraction was performed using full concentration nitric acid. Dye absorbance was measured at 550 nm using spectrophotometer. The data analyzed using one-way-Anova Ratio and Unpaired t-test showing statistically significance difference among the groups. Result: It was seen that Group D samples without perforation showed least absorbance followed by Group A (perforation repaired with White MTA) and Group B (perforation repaired with Gray MTA). Group C (perforation left unsealed) showed highest absorbance. Conclusion: The White and Gray Mineral Trioxide Aggregate performed similarly as a furcation perforation repair material. There was no significant difference between the Gray MTA and White MTA. PMID:25478452

  15. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. PMID:26607805

  16. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment. PMID:26283888

  17. Evaluation of pulpal response of deciduous teeth after direct pulp capping with bioactive glass and mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Ahmadvand, Motahare

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulpal response of primary teeth after direct pulp capping (DPC) with two biocompatible materials namely mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and bioactive glass (BAG). Settings and Design: This study was a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 22 healthy primary canine teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons were selected. The teeth were divided into two groups of 11 and underwent DPC. The exposure sites were randomly capped with MTA or BAG in the two groups. After 2 months, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histopathologic evaluation. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: In the BAG group, inflammation was seen in three patients; internal resorption and abscess were not seen at all. In the MTA group, inflammation was seen in one patient and internal resorption and abscess were not seen in any patient. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Dentinal bridge formation was noted in five patients in the BAG group and six patients in the MTA group. No significant difference was observed between the BAG and MTA groups using Chi-square analysis (P = 0.67). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, MTA and BAG can be used for DPC of primary teeth.

  18. The Coadministration of N-Acetylcysteine Ameliorates the Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on the Male Mouse Genital System

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Raquel Frenedoso; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Villela e Silva, Patrícia; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo Almeida; Pupo, André Sampaio; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Anselmo-Franci, Janete Aparecida; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown effectiveness in treatment of leukemia but is also associated with reproductive toxicity. Since remediation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may mitigate the adverse effects caused by exposure, we assessed the effects of As2O3 and its potential reversibility after exposure cessation or coadministration of NAC. Animals received 0.3 or 3.0 mg/Kg/day of As2O3 subcutaneously and 40 mM of NAC in tap water. As2O3 treatment impaired spermatogenesis and sperm motility and decreased seminal vesicle weight and testosterone serum levels; after suspension of treatment, these parameters remained altered. When NAC was administered, animals showed improvement in sperm parameters and seminal vesicle weight. In vitro epididymal contractility was increased in As2O3-treated animals. We concluded that As2O3 is toxic to the male mouse genital system by compromising sperm quality and quantity; these effects persisted even after suspension of the treatment. However, the coadministration of NAC ameliorates the harmful effects of the drug on the male genital system. PMID:26839632

  19. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids attenuate reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation, and apoptosis in carcinoma cells treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liu; Chen, Chen; Gong, Wei; Li, Yuanjing; Edin, Matthew L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wang, Dao Wen

    2011-11-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 promote tumorogenesis in vivo and in vitro via direct stimulation of tumor cell growth and inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism of inhibition of tumor cell apoptosis by EETs. In Tca-8113 cancer cells, the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide (ATO) led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired mitochondrial function, and induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET pretreatment increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and inhibited ATO-induced apoptosis. 11,12-EET also prevented the ATO-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, caspase-3, and caspase-9. Therefore, 11,12-EET-pretreatment attenuated the ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial function, and caspase activation observed after ATO treatment. Moreover, the CYP2J2-specific inhibitor compound 26 enhanced arsenic cytotoxicity to a clinically relevant concentration of ATO (1-2 μM). Both the thiol-containing antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine, and 11,12-EET reversed the synergistic effect of the two agents. Taken together, these data indicate that 11,12-EET inhibits apoptosis induced by ATO through a mechanism that involves induction of antioxidant proteins and attenuation of ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21846841

  20. [Apoptosis-inducing effect of valproic acid combined with arsenic trioxide on RPMI 8226 cells and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Mei

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the apoptosis-inducing effect of valproic acid (VPA) combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO) on human multiple myeloma RPMI 8226 cells and its mechanism. The cell proliferation of RPMI 8226 cells was assayed by CCK-8 method. The cell apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were applied respectively to detect the mRNA and protein expression level of BCL-2, BAX, caspase-8 and caspase-9 gene. The results showed that both the VPA and ATO inhibited RPMI 8226 cell proliferation. The combination of ATO and VPA has synergistic effect (Q values greater than 1.15). The RPMI 8226 cell apoptosis rate in combined drug group was significantly higher than that in single drug group (P < 0.05). The mRNA and protein expressions of BCL-2 gene in combined drug group decreased, while the mRNA and protein expressions of BAX, caspase-8 and caspase-9 significantly increased, compared with single drug group (P < 0.05) . It is concluded that VPA can enhance the sensitivity of RPMI 8226 cells to ATO-induced apoptosis, which may be associated with decreasing the BCL-2 expression and increasing the BAX, caspase-8 and caspase-9 gene expression. PMID:25130820

  1. Microbial degradation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS), an e-plastic with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Mohan, Arya J; Nair, Nimisha R; Bhaskar, Thallada; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-11-15

    Accumulation of electronic waste has increased catastrophically and out of that various plastic resins constitute one of the leading thrown out materials in the electronic machinery. Enrichment medium, containing high impact polystyrene (HIPS) with decabromodiphenyl oxide and antimony trioxide as sole carbon source, was used to isolate microbial cultures. The viability of these cultures in the e-plastic containing mineral medium was further confirmed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction test. Four cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Enterobacter sp., Citrobacter sedlakii, Alcaligenes sp. and Brevundimonas diminuta. Biodegradation experiments were carried out in flask level and gelatin supplementation (0.1% w/v) along with HIPS had increased the degradation rate to a maximum of 12.4% (w/w) within 30days. This is the first report for this kind of material. The comparison of FTIR, NMR, and TGA analysis of original and degraded e-plastic films revealed structural changes under microbial treatment. Polystyrene degradation intermediates in the culture supernatant were also detected using HPLC analysis. The gravity of biodegradation was validated by morphological changes under scanning electron microscope. All isolates displayed depolymerase activity to substantiate enzymatic degradation of e-plastic. PMID:27434738

  2. Root canal filling in primary molars without successors: Mineral trioxide aggregate versus gutta-percha/AH-Plus.

    PubMed

    Bezgin, Tugba; Ozgul, Betul Memiş; Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographical success of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and gutta-percha/AH-Plus used as a root canal filling material in primary second molars without successors. A total of 16 patients (9 girls, 7 boys) aged 6-13 years (mean: 10.5) were selected and randomly distributed into the treatment groups. Children were recalled for clinical and radiographic examination at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Differences in treatment outcomes were analysed using chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Clinically, there was no significant difference in the success rates between the groups at the end of a 3-year follow-up period (MTA: 100%; Gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 70%) (P > 0.05). However, radiographically, there was a significant difference between the groups (MTA: 80%; gutta-percha/AH-Plus: 30%) (P < 0.05). The present study showed that MTA can be recommended for use in root canal treatment of primary molars without successors based on better radiographic success. PMID:26534871

  3. Arsenic trioxide-based therapy of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: registry results from the European LeukemiaNet.

    PubMed

    Lengfelder, E; Lo-Coco, F; Ades, L; Montesinos, P; Grimwade, D; Kishore, B; Ramadan, S M; Pagoni, M; Breccia, M; Huerta, A J G; Nloga, A M; González-Sanmiguel, J D; Schmidt, A; Lambert, J-F; Lehmann, S; Di Bona, E; Cassinat, B; Hofmann, W-K; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M-C; Fenaux, P; Sanz, M

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, a European registry of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia was established by the European LeukemiaNet. Outcome data were available for 155 patients treated with arsenic trioxide in first relapse. In hematological relapse (n=104), 91% of the patients entered complete hematological remission (CR), 7% had induction death and 2% resistance, 27% developed differentiation syndrome and 39% leukocytosis, whereas no death or side effects occurred in patients treated in molecular relapse (n=40). The rate of molecular (m)CR was 74% in hematological and 62% in molecular relapse (P=0.3). All patients with extramedullary relapse (n=11) entered clinical and mCR. After 3.2 years median follow-up, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of second relapse were 68% and 41% in hematological relapse, 66% and 48% in molecular relapse and 90 and 11% in extramedullary relapse, respectively. After allogeneic or autologous transplantation in second CR (n=93), the 3-year OS was 80% compared with 59% without transplantation (n=55) (P=0.03). Multivariable analysis demonstrated the favorable prognostic impact of first remission duration ⩾1.5 years, achievement of mCR and allogeneic or autologous transplantation on OS of patients alive after induction (P=0.03, P=0.01, P=0.01) and on leukemia-free survival (P=0.006, P<0.0001, P=0.003), respectively. PMID:25627637

  4. X-ray Diffraction Analysis of ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Hydrated at Different pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Hengameh; Mohebbi, Pooneh; Firouzi, Amir; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the chemical compounds of white ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) hydrated at different pH environments. Methods and Materials: Mixed samples of WMTA were kept in acidic (pH=5.4), neutral (pH=7.4) and alkaline (pH=9.4) environments for 48 h. Then, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed for both hydrated and powder forms of WMTA. Portlandite crystalline structures of environments were compared from three aspects: intensity (height of the peak, corresponding to the concentration), crystallinity (peak area/total area) and crystal size (full-width at half-maximum of the peak). Results: After matching the peaks of each sample with those of the International Center for Diffraction Data (ICDD) database, the main constituent of all set cements and powder form was found to be bismuth oxide. Acidic environment exhibited lower intensity and crystallinity of portlandite in comparison with neutral environment. Conclusion: The highest concentration and crystallinity of portlandite were observed in WMTA samples hydrated at neutral pH and the highest crystal size was detected after hydration in alkaline pH. PMID:27141218

  5. Arsenic trioxide enhances the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    KOTOWSKI, ULANA; HEIDUSCHKA, GREGOR; BRUNNER, MARKUS; EROVIC, BOBAN M.; MARTINEK, HELGA; THURNHER, DIETMAR

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved for the treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukaemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether ATO would lead to cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines and whether it was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic agent. The four HNSCC cell lines SCC9, SCC25, CAL27 and FADU were treated with ATO or cisplatin alone or with ATO and cisplatin in combination. Cytotoxicity assays, immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and flow cytometry were carried out. Possible interactions between the two drugs were calculated using the Chou-Talalay equation. Ther results demonstrated a synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of ATO and cisplatin at high doses. The two agents induced apoptosis in all four HNSCC cell lines. In conclusion, this study showed that ATO is a promising therapeutic drug with cytotoxic effects in HNSCC. We demonstrated a synergistic effect in the combined treatment with cisplatin at high doses. PMID:22783443

  6. Osseous reaction to implantation of two endodontic cements: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM)

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Kazemi, Ali; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad J.; Mesgariabbasi, Mehran; Mohajeri, Daryoush

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present in vivo study was to determine bone tissue reaction to calcium enriched mixture (CEM) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) using a rat femur model. Study Design: Sixty-three rats were selected and randomly divided into three groups of 21 each [experimental groups (n=15), control (n=6)]. Implantation cavities were prepared in each femoral bone and randomly filled with the biomaterials only in the experimental groups. The animals in three groups were sacrificed 1, 4, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Histologic evaluations comprising inflammation severity and new bone formation were blindly made on H&E-stained decalcified 6-µm sections. Results: At 1, 4, and 8 weeks after implantation number of inflammatory cells had decreased in the CEM, MTA and control groups, respectively, with no statistically significant differences. Conversely, new bone formation had increased in all the experimental and control groups, without statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The results suggest that biocompatibility of MTA, as gold standard, and CEM cement as a new endodontic biomaterial are comparable Key words:Endodontics, MTA,CEM, osseous reaction. PMID:22549692

  7. BIBR 1532 increases arsenic trioxide-mediated apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells: therapeutic potential for APL.

    PubMed

    Bashash, Davood; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Zaker, Farhad; Kazerani, Maryam; Hezave, Kebria; Hassani, Saeed; Rostami, Masomeh; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-09-01

    The current treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with arsenic trioxide (ATO) has increased long-lasting complete remissions; however, a proportion of patients continues to die eventually as a result of disease recurrence. In an effort to enhance the effectiveness of the APL treatment, we designed experiments to evaluate the effects of ATO in combination with the lead compound of non-nucleoside inhibitor of telomerase, BIBR 1532. After combined treatments with BIBR 1532 and ATO, decreased cell viability index with a concomitant increase in apoptotic cell death was observed in NB4 leukemic cells. Apoptosis induced by the combined treatments was accompanied by elevated Bax/Bcl-2 molecular ratio and enhanced caspase 3 activation. Our study has also demonstrated that the combined treatment suppressed NB4 cell proliferative capacity and inhibited telomerase activity probably via transcriptional suppression of c-Myc and hTERT. In conclusion, this study may supply insight into the application of this new combination therapy to APL cells intrinsically less sensitive to routine therapies and suggested a novel combination therapy for patients with more aggressive disease; those who may not respond favorably to the arsenic mono-therapy. PMID:23293885

  8. Mechanism for doping induced p type C60 using thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) as a dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Wang, Wen-Qing; Cheng, Li-Wen; Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Zeng, Xiang-hua

    2016-05-01

    Thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) doped C60 films, which could change n type features of pristine C60 to form a p type mixed C60 layer, are investigated by x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that C60 HOMO progressively shifts closer to the Fermi level after increased MoO3 doping concentration, and final onset of C60 HOMO is pinned at binding energy of 0.20 eV, indicating the formation of p type C60 films. It is proposed that in charge transfer induced p type C60 formation, due to large electron affinity of MoO3 (6.37 eV), electrons from HOMO of C60 could easily transfer to MoO3 to form cations and therefore increase hole concentration, which could gradually push C60 HOMO to the Fermi level and finally form p type C60 films. Moreover, clear different types of C60 species have been confirmed from UPS spectra in highly doped films.

  9. Tungsten trioxide nanoplate array supported platinum as a highly efficient counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Dandan; Cui, Peng; Zhao, Xing; Li, Meicheng; Chu, Lihua; Wang, Tianyue; Jiang, Bing

    2015-03-19

    A tungsten trioxide (WO₃) nanoplate array is fabricated directly on the FTO/glass substrate and used as a platinum (Pt) nanoscale supporter for a highly efficient and low Pt-consumption counter electrode (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A Pt/WO₃ composite structure, with Pt nanoparticles having a diameter of 2-3 nm, increases the electrochemical catalytic activity in catalyzing the reduction of triiodide. Accordingly, the power conversion efficiency is increased from less than 1% for WO₃ CE and 8.1% for Pt CE, respectively, to 8.9% for Pt/WO₃ CE. Moreover, the use of Pt/WO₃ CE can dramatically reduce the consumption of scarce Pt material, with a relatively low Pt-loading of ∼2 μg cm(-2), while maintaining a much better performance. The excellent performance of Pt/WO₃ CE is attributed to the efficient electron injection and transport via WO₃ supporters, as well as the nanostructure array morphology of WO₃ for deposition of fine Pt nanoparticles. This work provides an approach for developing highly catalytic and low-cost Pt based CEs, which also has implications for the development of Pt/WO₃ nanoplate arrays for other applications. PMID:25743611

  10. Reparative Dentinogenesis Induced by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Review from the Biological and Physicochemical Points of View

    PubMed Central

    Okiji, Takashi; Yoshiba, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to review the biological and physicochemical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with respect to its ability to induce reparative dentinogenesis, which involves complex cellular and molecular events leading to hard-tissue repair by newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells. Compared with that of calcium hydroxide-based materials, MTA is more efficient at inducing reparative dentinogenesis in vivo. The available literature suggests that the action of MTA is attributable to the natural wound healing process of exposed pulps, although MTA can stimulate hard-tissue-forming cells to induce matrix formation and mineralization in vitro. Physicochemical analyses have revealed that MTA not only acts as a “calcium hydroxide-releasing” material, but also interacts with phosphate-containing fluids to form apatite precipitates. MTA also shows better sealing ability and structural stability, but less potent antimicrobial activity compared with that of calcium hydroxide. The clinical outcome of direct pulp capping and pulpotomy with MTA appears quite favorable, although the number of controled prospective studies is still limited. Attempts are being conducted to improve the properties of MTA by the addition of setting accelerators and the development of new calcium silicate-based materials. PMID:20339574

  11. A comparative evaluation of the effect of various additives on selected physical properties of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anushree; Pushpa, Shankarappa; Arunagiri, Doraiswamy; Sawhny, Asheesh; Misra, Abhinav; Sujatha, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study examined the setting time, compressive strength, and pH of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) mixed with various additives: Calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium formate (CaF), disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (Na2HPO4). Materials and Methods: Group 1 (Control) was obtained by mixing MTA with distilled water. In Groups 2 and 3, MTA containing 10% CaCl2 and 20% CaF, respectively, was mixed with distilled water. In Group 4, MTA was mixed with 15% Na2HPO4. Setting time, compressive strength, and pH of each group were examined. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Comparison of mean values was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc Games-Howell test. Results: The setting time of test groups were significantly shorter than that of control group (P < 0.001). The compressive strengths of test groups were lower than that of control group (P < 0.001). The pH value obtained for Groups 3 and 4 were higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Study result showed that additives significantly reduced the setting time of MTA and also maintained the pH at a high value. However, there was not much improvement in the compressive strength of the material. PMID:26069412

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Different Solvents for Retrieval of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium-Enriched Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Adl, Alireza; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Khademi, Azam; Hamedi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different solvents; carbonic acid (H2CO3), hydrochloric acid (HCl), chlorhexidine (CHX) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the surface hardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Plexiglass molds were prepared and filled with Angelus MTA or CEM cement and then exposed to 2% carbonic acid, 37% hydrochloric acid, 2% chlorhexidine, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and normal saline at intervals of 1 and 21 days, respectively (n=4). Surface microhardness of all specimens was analyzed by a universal testing machine and an electron microscope for some selected samples. Data were analyzed using the three-way ANOVA. Subgroup analysis was performed by Student’s t-test, One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: On the first day, all solvents and on 21st day HCl, and H2CO3 were more effective in reducing the microhardness of MTA compared to CEM cement (P<0.05). Conclusion: The two experimental cements were differently affected by the solvents at specific time intervals. The solvents were more effective on MTA. PMID:27471536

  13. Treatment of experimental furcation perforations with mineral trioxide aggregate, platelet rich plasma or platelet rich fibrin in dogs' teeth.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hosam E; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M; Hashem, Ahmed A; El-Khawlani, Mohammed M

    2016-06-01

    This work evaluates the effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet rich fibrin (PRF) on healing of non-contaminated and contaminated furcation perforations. A total of 192 teeth of 12 dogs was divided into three equal groups according to evaluation period. Each group was further subdivided into MTA, PRP, PRF, negative and positive control subgroups. Each experimental subgroup was further subdivided according to perforation status into non-contaminated and contaminated subdivisions. Root canal therapy was carried out and furcation perforation was made in all teeth except in negative control subgroup. The furcation perforation was repaired immediately in subdivision (1) and after 4 weeks in subdivision (2). The change in vertical bone loss was measured by radiography. Inflammatory cell count, cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation were assessed. Both PRP and PRF demonstrated statistically significant reduction in vertical bone loss and inflammatory cell count than MTA. No significant difference was found between MTA, PRP and PRF in cemental deposition, new bone formation, bone resorption and epithelial proliferation. The non-contaminated teeth demonstrated better treatment outcomes than the contaminated teeth. In conclusion, PRP and PRF are successful treatment options for repairing of furcation perforation in both non-contaminated and contaminated teeth in dogs with superior outcomes in non contaminated teeth. PMID:27033179

  14. Consolidation therapy of arsenic trioxide alternated with chemotherapy achieves remarkable efficacy in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-cheng; Wang, Hua; Wang, Wei-da; Zhu, Meng-yuan; Geng, Qi-rong; Lu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) combined with daunorubicin and ATRA combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO) therapies are considered the standard induction therapy regimens for adult patients newly diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, there is no consensus concerning the optimal consolidation and maintenance therapies after induction therapy. In this study, we explored a new therapeutic strategy for APL that may be simple, effective, and safe. Methods The patients in our study were divided into high white blood cell (WBC) group and low WBC group according to the numeration of leukocytes at the first visit. The low WBC group received ATRA and ATO until complete remission (CR), and the high WBC group received anthracycline, ATRA, and ATO until CR. After achieving hematologic CR, ATO was alternated with chemotherapy for consolidation therapy. Three cycles were completed in the 1st year with no maintenance therapy. The patients were followed for a median of 5 years after their initial treatment. Results After induction therapy, the rate of CR for the 18 patients was 100%. The rate of negativity for the PML/RARα fusion gene following induction therapy was 100%. There was no mortality during the treatment. Both the 5-year event-free survival rate and 5-year overall survival rate were 100%. No relapses occurred during the follow-up period. Conclusion This study proposes a novel treatment for APL that is efficient, well-tolerated, and very simple to perform. PMID:26622182

  15. Partial Pulpotomy of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis using Bioceramics and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Cheng Fei

    2016-06-01

    Pulpal necrosis of an immature permanent tooth with an open apex poses a challenge for the clinician. The conventional apexification technique using calcium hydroxide has yielded short-term success, but this technique has inevitable shortcomings. Hence, this case series aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using bioceramics (iRoot BP) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for partial pulpotomies. Three boys aged 9 to 11 years old presented with partial pulp necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis of the mandibular right and left second premolar. The involved teeth were treated with a partial pulpotomy using either iRoot BP (case 1 and 2) or MTA (case 3). At the 8-month follow-up, no abnormal clinical signs or symptoms were observed. Periapical radiographs revealed a significant reduction in periapical radiolucency, a marked increase in the root canal wall thickness and ongoing closure of the apical opening. The bioceramic material (iRoot BP) and MTA both produced successful outcomes in the partial pulpotomy of immature teeth with partial pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. However, iRoot BP was superior in terms of ease of clinical application, and would therefore be a better treatment alternative than MTA. PMID:27379350

  16. Perturbation of cellular oxidative state induced by dichloroacetate and arsenic trioxide for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Ashkan; Sadowska, Mariola; Carter-Cooper, Brandon; Bhatnagar, Vishal; van der Merwe, Isabella; Levis, Mark J; Sausville, Edward A; Lapidus, Rena G

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rising and the outcome of current therapy, which has not changed significantly in the last 40 years, is suboptimal. Cellular oxidative state is a credible target to selectively eradicate AML cells, because it is a fundamental property of each cell that is sufficiently different between leukemic and normal cells, yet its aberrancy shared among different AML cells. To this end, we tested whether a short-time treatment of AML cells, including cells with FLT3-ITD mutation, with sub-lethal dose of dichloroacetate (DCA) (priming) followed by pharmacologic dose of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in presence of low-dose DCA could produce insurmountable level of oxidative damage that kill AML cells. Using cellular cytotoxicity, apoptotic and metabolic assays with both established AML cell lines and primary AML cells, we found that priming with DCA significantly potentiated the cytotoxicity of ATO in AML cells in a synergistic manner. The combination decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as expression of Mcl-1 and GPx in primary AML cells more than either drug alone. One patient with AML whose disease was refractory to several lines of prior treatments was treated with this combination, and tolerated it well. These data suggest that targeting cellular redox balance in leukemia may provide a therapeutic option for AML patients with relapsed/refractory disease. PMID:25982179

  17. Bacterial Leakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture and Biodentine as Furcation Perforation Repair Materials in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Nahid; Sadeghi, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate seal of iatrogenically perforated area within the root canal system can improve the long term treatment prognosis. This in vitro study evaluated the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and Biodentine in repair of furcation perforation in primary molars. Methods and Materials: A total of 61 freshly extracted primary mandibular second molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=17) and 10 teeth were put in negative (without perforation, n=5) and positive (perforated without repair, n=5) control groups. Turbidity was used as the criteria of bacterial leakage, when detected in the model of dual-chamber leakage. Data were analyzed using the Chi-Square and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in SPSS software. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: All positive samples showed turbidity, whereas none of the negative samples allowed bacterial leakage. There was no significant difference between the number of turbidity samples in repaired teeth with all test materials (P=0.13). No significant difference was also detected in the mean survival time (P>0.05). Conclusion: CEM cement and Biodentine showed promising results as perforation repair materials and can be recommended as suitable alternatives of MTA for repair of furcation perforation of primary molars. PMID:27471534

  18. Mechanism for doping induced p type C60 using thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) as a dopant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Peng; Wang, Wen-Qing; Cheng, Li-Wen; Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Zeng, Xiang-Hua

    2016-05-11

    Thermally evaporated molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) doped C60 films, which could change n type features of pristine C60 to form a p type mixed C60 layer, are investigated by x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that C60 HOMO progressively shifts closer to the Fermi level after increased MoO3 doping concentration, and final onset of C60 HOMO is pinned at binding energy of 0.20 eV, indicating the formation of p type C60 films. It is proposed that in charge transfer induced p type C60 formation, due to large electron affinity of MoO3 (6.37 eV), electrons from HOMO of C60 could easily transfer to MoO3 to form cations and therefore increase hole concentration, which could gradually push C60 HOMO to the Fermi level and finally form p type C60 films. Moreover, clear different types of C60 species have been confirmed from UPS spectra in highly doped films. PMID:27058225

  19. VEGFA Expression Is Inhibited by Arsenic Trioxide in HUVECs through the Upregulation of Ets-2 and miRNA-126.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-Yan; Han, Zhong-Jing; Tian, Pei; Sun, Wen-Jie; Xue, Da-Xi; Bi, Yu; Yang, Zhang-Hui; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, studies have shown that ATO can induce apoptosis in leukemic cells and blood vessel endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) production. VEGFA is a key factor in angiogenesis initiation. Targeted inhibition of VEGF or VEGFA expression can suppress angiogenesis; however, little is known about the mechanism by which ATO inhibits VEGFA expression. In this study, we investigated the role of miRNA-126 in the mechanism of action of ATO in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). ATO significantly decreased the viability and proliferation of HUVECs and decreased their migration at 48 h. Cell proliferation was inhibited by 50% (IC50) when 5.0 μmol/L ATO was used. ATO treatment induced miR-126 upregulation and HUVEC apoptosis. Transfection with a miR-126 mimic significantly downregulated VEGFA mRNA levels, and transfection with a miR-126 inhibitor significantly upregulated VEGFA mRNA levels. Finally, we showed that ATO treatment upregulated Ets-2 and miR-126 expression in HUVECs. These results demonstrate that ATO inhibits the growth of HUVECs and induces apoptosis by downregulating VEGFA. One mechanism by which this occurs is Ets-2 upregulation, which results in an increase in miR-126 levels and downregulation of VEGFA expression. PMID:26274316

  20. Cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide is enhanced by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate via suppression of ferritin in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Te-Chang; Cheng, I-Cheng; Shue, Jun-Jie; Wang, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment is a useful therapy against human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), however, it concomitantly brings potential adverse consequences including serious side effect, human carcinogenicity and possible development of resistance. This investigation revealed that those problems might be relaxed by simultaneous application with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major components from green tea. EGCG significantly lowered down the ATO concentration required for an effective control of APL cells, HL-60. The simultaneous treatment of ATO with EGCG induced a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in HL-60 cells significantly, which accounted for more than 70% of the cell death in the treatment. The mechanism of apoptosis induction was elucidated. EGCG in HL-60 cells acted as a pro-oxidant enhancing intracellular hydrogen peroxide significantly. ATO, on the other hand, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to catalyze heme degradation, thereby provided ferrous iron for EGCG-induced hydrogen peroxide to precede Fenton reaction, which in turn generated deleterious reactive oxygen species to damage cell. In addition, EGCG inhibited expression of ferritin, which supposedly to sequester harmful ferrous iron, thereby augmented the occurrence of Fenton reaction. This investigation also provided evidence that ATO, since mainly acted to induce HO-1 in simultaneous treatment with EGCG, could be replaced by other HO-1 inducer with much less human toxicity. Furthermore, several of our preliminary investigations revealed that the enhanced cytotoxicity induced by combining heme degradation and Fenton reaction is selectively toxic to malignant but not non-malignant cells.

  1. Arsenic trioxide-based therapy in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    He, Xuepeng; Yang, Kai; Chen, Peng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Fang; Guo, Zhi; Liu, Xiaodong; Lou, Jinxing; Chen, Huiren

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal malignancy characterized by the proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow and the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. Although some newly approved drugs (thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib) demonstrate significant benefit for MM patients with improved survival, all MM patients still relapse. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is the most active single agent in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the antitumor activity of which is partly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species. Due to its multifaceted effects observed on MM cell lines and primary myeloma cells, Phase I/II trials have been conducted in heavily pretreated patients with relapsed or refractory MM. Therapy regimens varied dramatically as to the dosage of ATO and monotherapy versus combination therapy with other agents available for the treatment of MM. Although ATO-based combination treatment was well tolerated by most patients, most trials found that ATO has limited effects on MM patients. However, since small numbers of patients were randomized to different treatment arms, trials have not been statistically powered to determine the differences in progression-free survival and overall survival among the experimental arms. Therefore, large Phase III studies of ATO-based randomized controlled trials will be needed to establish whether ATO has any potential beneficial effects in the clinical setting. PMID:25246802

  2. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-21

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a "one-pot" method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy. PMID:26840759

  3. Clinical and radiographical evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate, biodentine and propolis as pulpotomy medicaments in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rakesh, Kumar; Richa, Khanna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine and Propolis as pulpotomy medicaments in primary dentition, both clinically and radiographically. Materials and Methods A total of 75 healthy 3 to 10 yr old children each having at least one carious primary molar tooth were selected. Random assignment of the pulpotomy medicaments was done as follows: Group I, MTA; Group II, Biodentine; Group III, Propolis. All the pulpotomized teeth were evaluated at 3, 6, and 9 mon clinically and radiographically, based on the scoring criteria system. Results The clinical success rates were found to be similar among the three groups at 3 and 6 mon where as a significant decrease in success rate was observed in Group III (84%) compared to both Group I (100%) and Group II (100%) at 9 mon. Radiographic success rates over a period of 9 mon in Groups I, II, and III were 92, 80, and 72%, respectively. Conclusions Teeth treated with MTA and Biodentine showed more favorable clinical and radiographic success as compared to Propolis at 9 mon follow-up. PMID:26587413

  4. Mass-independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Wing, B A; McKeegan, K D; Harris, J W; Cartigny, P; Thiemens, M H

    2002-12-20

    Populations of sulfide inclusions in diamonds from the Orapa kimberlite pipe in the Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe craton, Botswana, preserve mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations. The data indicate that material was transferred from the atmosphere to the mantle in the Archean. The data also imply that sulfur is not well mixed in the diamond source regions, allowing for reconstruction of the Archean sulfur cycle and possibly offering insight into the nature of mantle convection through time. PMID:12493909

  5. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  6. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  7. Controlling sulfur emissions with BSRP and Selectox technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.; Bertram, R.V.; Robinson, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Two processes have been developed for controlling sulfur emissions from gas streams. They are the Beavon Sulfur Recovery Process (BSRP) which recovers sulfur from Claus tail gas, and the Selectox process which oxidizes gaseous H/sub 2/S to sulfur using air. Recent developments and commercial experience for both processes are reviewed.

  8. Purification of crude hexafluoroacetone containing nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfield, J. H.; Karsay, B. I.

    1984-09-25

    Crude hexafluoroacetone containing as impurities nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide is purified by admixing with water to form an aqueous solution, admixing the aqueous solution with concentrated sulfuric acid or oleum to form a vapor and scrubbing the vapor with liquid concentrated sulfuric acid to produce purified anhydrous hexafluoroacetone. The sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides interact with the aqueous solution and conc

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid of concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity)...

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid of concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity)...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid of concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity)...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid of concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity)...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-84 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 151.50-84 Section 151.50-84 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-84 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Sulfur... respiratory protective device that protects the wearer against sulfur dioxide vapors and provides...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-84 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 151.50-84 Section 151.50-84 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-84 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Sulfur... respiratory protective device that protects the wearer against sulfur dioxide vapors and provides...

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-84 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 151.50-84 Section 151.50-84 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-84 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Sulfur... respiratory protective device that protects the wearer against sulfur dioxide vapors and provides...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-84 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 151.50-84 Section 151.50-84 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-84 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Sulfur... respiratory protective device that protects the wearer against sulfur dioxide vapors and provides...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-84 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 151.50-84 Section 151.50-84 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-84 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Sulfur... respiratory protective device that protects the wearer against sulfur dioxide vapors and provides...

  18. Surface sulfur measurements on stratospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, I. D. R.; Mogk, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The surface chemistries of three particulate samples collected from the lower stratosphere have been determined using a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM). These samples are typical of the most abundant natural and anthropogenic particles observed within the stratosphere in the greater-than-2-micron diameter size fraction. Succsessive sputtering and analysis below the first few adsorbed monolayers of all particles shows the presence of a thin (less than 150A) sulfur layer. These sulfur regions probably formed by surface reaction of sulfur-rich aerosols with each particle within the stratosphere. Settling rate calculations show that a typical sphere (10-micron diameter) may reside within the aerosol layer for 20 days and thus provide a qualitative guide to surface sulfur reaction rates.

  19. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted. PMID:26108794

  20. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... deck sweepings must be disposed of pursuant to 33 CFR 151.55 through 151.77. (c) A cargo space that... lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  1. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... deck sweepings must be disposed of pursuant to 33 CFR 151.55 through 151.77. (c) A cargo space that... lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  2. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... deck sweepings must be disposed of pursuant to 33 CFR 151.55 through 151.77. (c) A cargo space that... lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  3. 46 CFR 148.315 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... deck sweepings must be disposed of pursuant to 33 CFR 151.55 through 151.77. (c) A cargo space that... lump or coarse grain powder sulfur only. Fine-grained powder (“flowers of sulfur”) may not...

  4. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  5. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations on nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  6. Sulfur and nitrogen uptake by loblolly pine seedlings as influenced by nitrogen and sulfur addition

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    The influence of increasing levels of nitrogen addition at several levels of sulfur input on nitrogen and sulfur uptake by loblolly pine seedlings was evaluated in a greenhouse study. All possible combinations of nitrogen and sulfur were incorporated into soil collected from the A horizon of a southeastern forest soil at rates of 0, 200, 500, and 1,000 ..mu..g/g of N, and 0, 14, 35, and 70 ..mu..g/g of S. Soil samples collected at the end of the study indicated that a similar amount of soil SO/sub 4/-S had been mineralized in all treatment combinations, compared to a general pattern of increasing soil nitrogen mineralization with increasing nitrogen input. Most mineralized sulfate appeared to come from nonprotein organic compounds as there was not a significant concomitant release of nitrogen. Both shoot and root biomass responded significantly to nitrogen addition, but there was no sulfur or nitrogen-sulfur interaction response. Nitrogen treatment generally increased shoot nitrogen concentration compared to a general decrease in shoot total-, sulfate-, and organically bound-sulfur. Organically bound-sulfur concentrations were 26 to 60 percent below sulfur values calculated from an S/N ratio of 0.03 on a gram atom basis. The results show that increased nitrogen addition affected both growth and sulfur status of loblolly pine seedlings, but not entirely in the manner predicted by theoretical considerations.

  7. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  8. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  9. Definition of Non-Conventional Sulfur Utilization in Western Kazakhstan for Sulfur Concrete (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, Paul

    2007-05-31

    Battelle received a contract from Agip-KCO, on behalf a consortium of international oil and gas companies with exploration rights in the North Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. The objective of the work was to identify and help develop new techniques for sulfur concrete products from waste, by-product sulfur that will be generated in large quantitites as drilling operations begin in the near future. BNL has significant expertise in the development and use of sulfur concrete products and has direct experience collaborating with the Russian and Kazakh partners that participated. Feasibility testing was successfully conducted for a new process to produce cost-effective sulfur polymer cement that has broad commerical applications.

  10. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  11. Dual protection of sulfur by carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Wen, Yanfen; Ye, Delai; Yu, Hua; Sun, Bing; Wang, Guoxiu; Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-04-25

    Well-confined elemental sulfur was implanted into a stacked block of carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets through a simple solution process to create a new type of composite cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping analysis confirm that the as-prepared composite material consists of graphene-wrapped carbon nanospheres with sulfur uniformly distributed in between, where the carbon nanospheres act as the sulfur carriers. With this structural design, the graphene contributes to direct coverage of sulfur to inhibit the mobility of polysulfides, whereas the carbon nanospheres undertake the role of carrying the sulfur into the carbon network. This composite achieves a high loading of sulfur (64.2 wt %) and gives a stable electrochemical performance with a maximum discharge capacity of 1394 mAh g(-1) at a current rate of 0.1 C as well as excellent rate capability at 1 C and 2 C. The improved electrochemical properties of this composite material are attributed to the dual functions of the carbon components, which effectively restrain the sulfur inside the carbon nano-network for use in lithium-sulfur rechargeable batteries. PMID:24692070

  12. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results

  13. Sulfur nutrition of deciduous trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur in its reduced form (-II) is an essential nutrient for growth and development, but is mainly available to plants in its oxidised form as sulfate. Deciduous trees take up sulfate by the roots from the soil solution and reduce sulfate to sulfide via assimilatory sulfate reduction in both roots and leaves. For reduction in the leaves, sulfate is loaded into the xylem and transported to the shoot. The surplus of sulfate not reduced in the chloroplast or stored in the vacuole and the surplus of reduced S not used for protein synthesis in the leaves is loaded into the phloem and transported back to the roots. Along the transport path, sulfate and glutathione (GSH) is unloaded from the phloem for storage in xylem and phloem parenchyma as well as in pit and ray cells. Re-mobilised S from storage tissues is loaded into the xylem during spring, but a phloem to xylem exchange does not appear to exist later in the season. As a consequence, a cycling pool of S was only found during the change of the seasons. The sulfate:glutathione ratio in the phloem seems to be involved in the regulation of S nutrition. This picture of S nutrition is discussed in relation to the different growth patterns of deciduous trees from the temperate climate zone, i.e. (1) terminated, (2) periodic and (3) indeterminate growth patterns, and in relation to environmental changes.

  14. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed. PMID:22742653

  15. Recovery of elemental sulfur from sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1984-07-31

    Excess heat generated in a thermal reaction zone of a Claus sulfur recovery plant is used, by means of a high boiling point heat transfer medium, to reheat the Claus plant process stream prior to high temperature Claus catalytic conversion, and/or to regenerate Claus catalyst on which sulfur is deposited, or for other functions. In another aspect, low temperature Claus catalytic converters are operated at equivalent pressures during a cycle comprising an adsorption phase, a regeneration phase, and a cooling phase.

  16. Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators

    DOEpatents

    Eller, Phillip G.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    1979-01-01

    Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

  17. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, Tetsuo; Squires, Thomas G.; Venier, Clifford G.

    1985-02-05

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  18. A Cable-Shaped Lithium Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Weng, Wei; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-01-20

    A carbon nanostructured hybrid fiber is developed by integrating mesoporous carbon and graphene oxide into aligned carbon nanotubes. This hybrid fiber is used as a 1D cathode to fabricate a new cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery. The fiber cathode exhibits a decent specific capacity and lifespan, which makes the cable-shaped lithium-sulfur battery rank far ahead of other fiber-shaped batteries. PMID:26585740

  19. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  20. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Gosselink, Denise; Doan, The Nam Long; Sadhu, Mikhail; Cheang, Ho-Jae; Chen, Pu

    2012-01-01

    This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes. PMID:24958296

  1. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA). We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We find equatorial injections increase aerosol optical depth in the Northern Hemisphere more than the Southern Hemisphere, potentially inducing regional climate changes. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through means other than geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  2. World copper smelter sulfur balance-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, S.W. )

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the US Bureau of Mines initiated a contract to gather engineering, operating, and environmental cost data for 1988 for 30 major foreign primary copper smelters in market economy countries. Data were collected for 29 of the designated smelters together with information on applicable environmental regulations. Materials balance data obtained were used with available data for the eight US smelters to determine the approximate extent of copper smelter sulfur emission control in 1988. A broad characterization of the status of sulfur emission control regulation was made. The 37 US and foreign smelters represented roughly 73.2% of world and 89.3% of market economy primary copper production in 1988. The 29 non-US smelters attained 55.3% control of their input sulfur in 1988. Combined with the 90.4% control of US smelters, an aggregate 63.4% sulfur control existed. Roughly 1,951,100 mt of sulfur was emitted from the 37 market economy smelters in 1988. Identifiable SO[sub 2] control regulations covered 72.4% of the 29 foreign smelters, representing 65.5% of smelting capacity. Including US smelters, 78.4% of the major market economy smelters were regulated, representing 73.1% of smelting capacity. Significant changes since 1988 that may increase sulfur emission control are noted.

  3. Theoretical studies of the marine sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kasting, James B.; Liu, May S.

    1985-01-01

    Several reduced sulfur compounds are produced by marine organisms and then enter the atmosphere, where they are oxidized and ultimately returned to the ocean or the land. The oceanic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) flux, in particular, represents a significant fraction of the annual global sulfur input to the atmosphere. In the atmosphere, this gas is converted to sulfur dioxide (SO2), methane sulfonic acid, and other organic acids which are relatively stable and about which little is known. SO2 is a short lived gas which, in turn, is converted to sulfuric acid and other sulfate compounds which contribute significantly to acid rain. Because of the complexity of the sulfur system, it is not well understood even in the unperturbed atmosphere. However, a number of new observations and experiments have led to a significant increase in the understanding of this system. A number of one dimensional model experiments were conducted on the gas phase part of the marine sulfur cycle. The results indicate the measured concentration of DMS and the amplitude of its diurnal cycle are in agreement with estimates of its global flux. It was also found that DMS can make a large contribution to the background SO2 concentration in the free troposphere. Estimates of CS2 concentrations in the atmosphere are inconsistent with estimated fluxes; however, measured reaction rates are consistent with the observed steep tropospheric gradient in CS2. Observations of CS2 are extremely sparse. Further study is planned.

  4. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  5. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  6. Generation of Sulfur-rich, Sulfur-undersaturated Basaltic Melts in Oxidized Arc Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Luth, R. W.; Richards, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Although sulfur is a minor element in the Earth, it has a disproportionate impact because it commonly occurs as sulfide. Sulfides largely control the behavior of chalcophile (e.g., Cu, Ni) and highly siderophile elements (Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) that are of interest because either they are economically important or because they provide valuable information about geochemical processes. Island arc basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings and therefore, in these settings, sulfur maybe present not as sulfide but as sulfate. In addition to the impact on the behavior of chalcophile and siderophile elements, sulfur speciation as sulfate may have a role on the occurrence of sulfur-rich explosive volcanism, which has been linked to significant short-term variations in global climate. However, little is known about the range in oxygen fugacity for the transition from solubility as sulfide to solubility as sulfate. We used experimental data on the solubility of sulfur in basaltic melts saturated with either sulfide or sulfate at different oxygen fugacities to model this transition. Our model shows that the ten-fold increase in the solubility of sulfur (from 0.14 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%) observed experimentally occurs at oxygen fugacities between ˜FMQ+1 and ˜FMQ+2, conditions under which many arc magmas are thought to be generated. The increase in the solubility of sulfur with increasing oxygen fugacity implies that in oxidized arc sources very low degrees of partial melting are sufficient to generate basaltic melts that are simultaneously sulfur-rich and sulfur-undersaturated. In the absence of sulfides, oxides and metallic alloys may influence the behavior of some (but not all) the highly siderophile elements whereas the chalcophile and some siderophile elements become incompatible. As a consequence, melting of oxidized sources in which sulfides are not stable would favor incorporation of metals such as Cu, Ni, Au and Pd in the melts and

  7. Acidithiobacillus caldus Sulfur Oxidation Model Based on Transcriptome Analysis between the Wild Type and Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase Defective Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Linxu; Ren, Yilin; Lin, Jianqun; Liu, Xiangmei; Pang, Xin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus) is widely used in bio-leaching. It gains energy and electrons from oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) for carbon dioxide fixation and growth. Genomic analyses suggest that its sulfur oxidation system involves a truncated sulfur oxidation (Sox) system (omitting SoxCD), non-Sox sulfur oxidation system similar to the sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans, and sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR). The complexity of the sulfur oxidation system of A. caldus generates a big obstacle on the research of its sulfur oxidation mechanism. However, the development of genetic manipulation method for A. caldus in recent years provides powerful tools for constructing genetic mutants to study the sulfur oxidation system. Results An A. caldus mutant lacking the sulfur oxygenase reductase gene (sor) was created and its growth abilities were measured in media using elemental sulfur (S0) and tetrathionate (K2S4O6) as the substrates, respectively. Then, comparative transcriptome analysis (microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR) of the wild type and the Δsor mutant in S0 and K2S4O6 media were employed to detect the differentially expressed genes involved in sulfur oxidation. SOR was concluded to oxidize the cytoplasmic elemental sulfur, but could not couple the sulfur oxidation with the electron transfer chain or substrate-level phosphorylation. Other elemental sulfur oxidation pathways including sulfur diooxygenase (SDO) and heterodisulfide reductase (HDR), the truncated Sox pathway, and the S4I pathway for hydrolysis of tetrathionate and oxidation of thiosulfate in A. caldus are proposed according to expression patterns of sulfur oxidation genes and growth abilities of the wild type and the mutant in different substrates media. Conclusion An integrated sulfur oxidation model with various sulfur oxidation pathways of A. caldus is proposed and the features of this model are summarized. PMID:22984393

  8. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  9. Airborne sulfur trace species intercomparison campaign: Sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Hoell, James M., Jr.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of sulfur trace gases are presented. The intercomparison was part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) and was conducted during the summer of 1989. The intercomparisons were conducted on the Wallops Electra aircraft during flights from Wallops Island, Virginia, and Natal, Brazil. Sulfur measurements intercompared included sulfur dioxide (SO2), dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Measurement techniques ranged from filter collection systems with post-flight analyses to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph systems employing various methods for measuring and identifying the sulfur gases during flight. Sampling schedules for the techniques ranged from integrated collections over periods as long as 50 minutes to one- to three-minute samples every ten or fifteen minutes. Several of the techniques provided measurements of more than one sulfur gas. Instruments employing different detection principles were involved in each of the sulfur intercomparisons. Also included in the intercomparison measurement scenario were a host of supporting measurements (i.e., ozone, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, total sulfur, aerosols, etc.) for purposes of: (1) interpreting results (i.e., correlation of any noted instrument disagreement with the chemical composition of the measurement environment); and (2) providing supporting chemical data to meet CITE-3 science objectives of studying ozone/sulfur photochemistry, diurnal cycles, etc. The results of the intercomparison study are briefly discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS §...

  11. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National primary ambient air quality... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to...

  12. Fibrous hybrid of graphene and sulfur nanocrystals for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangmin; Yin, Li-Chang; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Lu; Pei, Songfeng; Gentle, Ian Ross; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-06-25

    Graphene-sulfur (G-S) hybrid materials with sulfur nanocrystals anchored on interconnected fibrous graphene are obtained by a facile one-pot strategy using a sulfur/carbon disulfide/alcohol mixed solution. The reduction of graphene oxide and the formation/binding of sulfur nanocrystals were integrated. The G-S hybrids exhibit a highly porous network structure constructed by fibrous graphene, many electrically conducting pathways, and easily tunable sulfur content, which can be cut and pressed into pellets to be directly used as lithium-sulfur battery cathodes without using a metal current-collector, binder, and conductive additive. The porous network and sulfur nanocrystals enable rapid ion transport and short Li(+) diffusion distance, the interconnected fibrous graphene provides highly conductive electron transport pathways, and the oxygen-containing (mainly hydroxyl/epoxide) groups show strong binding with polysulfides, preventing their dissolution into the electrolyte based on first-principles calculations. As a result, the G-S hybrids show a high capacity, an excellent high-rate performance, and a long life over 100 cycles. These results demonstrate the great potential of this unique hybrid structure as cathodes for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries. PMID:23672616

  13. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... producing steam by heat transfer. (v) Heat input means the total gross calorific value (where gross....0 × 10 6 BTU per hour total rated capacity of heat input, the emission rate in pounds of sulfur... allowable emission rate in pounds of sulfur dioxide per million BTU actual heat input. (ii) For fossil...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... producing steam by heat transfer. (v) Heat input means the total gross calorific value (where gross....0 × 10 6 BTU per hour total rated capacity of heat input, the emission rate in pounds of sulfur... allowable emission rate in pounds of sulfur dioxide per million BTU actual heat input. (ii) For fossil...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... producing steam by heat transfer. (v) Heat input means the total gross calorific value (where gross....0 × 10 6 BTU per hour total rated capacity of heat input, the emission rate in pounds of sulfur... allowable emission rate in pounds of sulfur dioxide per million BTU actual heat input. (ii) For fossil...

  16. COULOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TOTAL SULFUR AND REDUCED INORGANIC SULFUR FRACTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the solid-phase partitioning of sulfur is frequently an important analytical component of risk assessments at hazardous waste sites because minerals containing reduced-sulfur can significantly affect the transport and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in na...

  17. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities. PMID:26325146

  18. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  19. Evaluation of the change in sphingolipids in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Guangji; Shen, Li; Zhou, Liting; Yu, Yu; Zhu, Fanfan; Chen, Zhe

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been found to display anticancer activity against many types of tumors and has been developed into an anticancer drug in clinical treatments. Sphingolipids are membrane lipids that participate in many signal transduction pathways. In this paper, the changes in sphingolipids of the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide were investigated using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method. Analytes were separated by an XBridge BEH C8 column used for Cer, HexCer, LacCer and SM chromatographic separation, and a Capcell PAK MG II C18 column was used for Sph, dhSph, S1P and dhS1P chromatographic separation and gradient elution with acetonitrile-water containing 0.1% formic acid as a mobile phase. A tandem mass spectrometer QTrap in SRM mode was employed in combination with RPLC as a detector for quantitative analysis. The ceramide/sphingolipid internal standard (IS) mixture was used to quantify the levels of sphingolipids. The distributions of sphingolipids were found to be different in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Ceramide (Cer), hexosylceramide (HexCer) and dihexosylceramide (Hex2Cer) levels in U266 cell line are higher than those in MGC-803 cell line. Additionally, sphingomyelin (SM), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (dhS1P) levels in the MGC-803 cell line are higher than those in the U266 cell line. When treated with arsenic trioxide (1-5μM iAs(III)(As(III) ions)), the levels of Hex2Cer in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 decreased, and the levels of S1P and dhS1P in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 decreased. The decrease of Hex2Cer, S1P and dhS1P in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 were observed when the concentration of iAs(III) is 1.0μM. Therefore, arsenic trioxide exhibits anti-cancer activity by altering the sphingolipid pathway in the

  20. The solvent extraction of americium(III) in HCl solutions by 2,6-bis[(diphenylphospino)methyl]pyridine N,P,P{prime}-trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, E.M.; Engelhardt, U.; Deere, T.P.; Rapko, B.M.; Paine, R.T.; FitzPatrick, J.R.

    1998-07-01

    The liquid/liquid extraction of Am(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions with chloroform solutions of 2,6-bis[(diphenylphosphino)methyl]pyridine N,P,P{prime}-trioxide (ENOPOPO) is described. ENOPOPO exhibits modest extraction ability for americium(III) (D{sub Am} = 2.2 at 5 M HCl) and can be efficiently back extracted from the organic phase at 0.1 M HCl. The ligand dependency data suggest that three ligand molecules are coordinated to the americium in the extraction complex. Additional aspects of the extraction mechanism are described.