Science.gov

Sample records for sunward propagating saps-associated

  1. Start-to-end global imaging as a sunward propagating, SAPS-associated giant undulation event

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael G; Donovan, Eric F; Foster, John C; Mann, Ian R; Immel, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    We present high-time resolution global imaging of a sunward propagating giant undulation event from start to finish. The event occurred on November 24, 2001 during a very disturbed storm interval. The giant undulations began to develop at around 13UT and persisted for approximately 2 hours. The sunward propagation speed was on the order of 0.6 km/s (relative to SM coordinate system). The undulations had a wavelength of {approx} 750 km, amplitudes of {approx} 890 km and produced ULF pulsations on the ground with a period of {approx} 1108s. We show that the undulations were associated with SAPs flows that were caused by the proton plasma sheet penetrating substantially farther Earthward than the electron plasma sheet on the duskside. The observations appear to be consistent with the development of a shear flow and/or ballooning type of instability at the plasmapause driven by intense SAPS-associated shear flows.

  2. Sunward-propagating Alfvénic Fluctuations Observed in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Chi; Belcher, John W.; He, Jiansen; Richardson, John D.

    2016-06-01

    The mixture/interaction of anti-sunward-propagating Alfvénic fluctuations (AFs) and sunward-propagating Alfvénic fluctuations (SAFs) is believed to result in the decrease of the Alfvénicity of solar wind fluctuations with increasing heliocentric distance. However, SAFs are rarely observed at 1 au and solar wind AFs are found to be generally outward. Using the measurements from Voyager 2 and Wind, we perform a statistical survey of SAFs in the heliosphere inside 6 au. We first report two SAF events observed by Voyager 2. One is in the anti-sunward magnetic sector with a strong positive correlation between the fluctuations of magnetic field and solar wind velocity. The other one is in the sunward magnetic sector with a strong negative magnetic field—velocity correlation. Statistically, the percentage of SAFs increases gradually with heliocentric distance, from about 2.7% at 1.0 au to about 8.7% at 5.5 au. These results provide new clues for understanding the generation mechanism of SAFs.

  3. Spatial distribution of the neutral carboneus compounds glow in the sunward Halley comet coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, V.; Stoeva, P.; Werner, R.

    The C2, C3, CH and CN glow in the Halley coma in sunward direction is studied in this work. For that reason, the 1035 spectra in the in the near UV and visible region registered by the Three-Channel spectrometer on board Vega-2 station on the 9 March 1986 are used. An improved method of the dust continuum extraction in the visible region is applied. The ``dust regions'' in the Halley comet spectra are re-examined. The spectral index u and a normalization coefficient of the continuum are computed for each spectrum by the least squares method on the basis of a linear regression. The index u is obtained to lay in the interval 3div 3.4. For all the spectra the average u and du values are: uav=3.2126, duav= 0.1197. Thus, the dust continuum evaluation is more reliable which conduce to a more precise separation of the gas emissions. The radial profiles presenting the carboneous compounds column intensities as a function of the projected distance to the nucleus are examined. The obtained profiles correspond very well to the Hazer's distribution when the optical thickness in the inner coma environment is taken into account. The deviation from Hazer's model for CN and C3 in the p<1000 km region, obtained in previous investigations, is not seen now. Possibly this deviation had been the result of a not perfectly subtracted dust continuum in this zone. The observed until now peculiarities of the C2, C3, CH and CN glow are confirmed. Thanks to the scanning of the Three-Channel spectrometer in a region of 7 rows and 15 columns spatial distributions of the examined radical intensities are computed using their emissions separated from the spectra in different scanner positions. From these distributions, complex intensity distributions for each carboneous compound are constructed, covering a larger space region. The obtained distributions are similar. The intensities decrease with the increase of the distance to the nucleus. Two jets are observed and discussed.

  4. Spatial distribution of the neutral carboneous compounds glow in the sunward Halley comet coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, V.; Werner, R.; Stoeva, P.; Kostadinov, I.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a study of the C 2, C 3, CH, and CN glow in the Halley's coma in sunward direction. For that purpose, 1035 spectra in the near UV and visible region registered by the Three-Channel Spectrometer (TKS) on board Vega-2 station on 9 March 1986 are used. An improved method of the dust continuum extraction in the visible region is applied. The "dust regions" in the Halley's comet spectra are re-examined. The spectral index u and a normalization coefficient of the continuum are computed for each spectrum by the least squares method on the basis of a linear regression. The index u is obtained to lay in the interval 3-3.4. For all spectra, the average u and d u values are: uav = 3.2126, d uav = 0.1197. Thus, the dust continuum evaluation is reliable, which conduces to a correct separation of the gas emissions. The radial profiles, presenting the carboneous compounds column intensities as a function of the distance p of the line of sight to the nucleus, termed projected distance or p-parameter, are examined. The obtained profiles correspond very well to the Haser's distribution when the optical thickness in the inner coma environment is taken into account. The deviation from Haser's model for CN and C 3 in the p < 1000 km region, obtained in previous investigations, is not seen now. Possibly, this deviation had been the result of a dust continuum in this zone, not perfectly subtracted. Some estimates of the production rates Q and scale lengths L and their dependences on the distance to the nucleus R are made. We obtain Q=1028mol/s for 0.83 AU on 9 March 1986, which presupposes some changes of the used parameters. For the CH radical, best results are obtained when the dependencies LCH ˜ R2 and Q ˜ R-8 are used. A slight discrepancy between the measurements and the theoretical curve is obtained in the case of C 3 and CH at p > 4000 km. The peculiarities of the C 2, C 3, CH, and CN glow, observed until now, are confirmed. Thanks to the TKS scanning

  5. On the use of a sunward-libration-point orbiting spacecraft as an IMF monitor for magnetospheric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, T. J.; Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetospheric studies often require knowledge of the orientation of the IMF. In order to test the accuracy of using magnetometer data from a spacecraft orbiting the sunward libration point for this purpose, the angle between the IMF at ISEE 3, when it was positioned around the libration point, and at ISEE 1, orbiting Earth, has been calculated for a data set of two-hour periods covering four months. For each period, a ten-minute average of ISEE 1 data is compared with ten-minute averages of ISEE 3 data at successively lagged intervals. At the lag time equal to the time required for the solar wind to convect from ISEE 3 to ISEE 1, the median angle between the IMF orientation at the two spacecraft is 20 deg, and 80% of the cases have angles less than 38 deg. The results for the angles projected on the y-z plane are essentially the same.

  6. On the Generation of Enhanced Sunward Convection and Transpolar Aurora in the High-Latitude Ionosphere by Magnetic Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Baker, J. B.; Petrinec, S. M.; Elkington, S. R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Reme, H.; Greenwald, R. A.; Frey, H. U.; Ergun, R. E.; Balogh, A.

    2004-12-01

    The IMAGE SI-12 instrument indicates a region of diffuse aurora poleward of the duskside Northern Hemisphere oval, while the IMAGE WIC instrument observes a transpolar auroral (TPA) feature at the polar cap boundary of the diffuse aurora during much of the 0110 UT to 0445 UT time interval on 16 December 2001. We here focus on the 0302 UT to 0312 UT period when the SuperDARN convection data display enhanced 800-1100 m/s sunward directed ionospheric flows near the TPA region in a four-degree wide region centered at 81o magnetic latitude between 14 MLT and 16 MLT. This flow channel seemingly drives a single dayside lobe cell with a convection reversal boundary near 84o and 14 MLT. At 0300 UT, the Cluster C1 S/C traverses the Northern Hemisphere duskside flank magnetopause at [X,Y,Z]=[-1.2,9.2,9.1] RE (GSM) where it encounters a localized density depletion region and a clear deflection of the bulk plasma velocity relative to the observed magnetosheath flow. The magnetic field and plasma velocity observed by C1 satisfy the Walen stress balance relation for a rotational discontinuity and the corresponding flow deflection dV suggests a merging site poleward and tailward of the spacecraft. The IMF magnitude as measured by ACE is 18 nT with a steady and favorable 45o clock angle (positive By and Bz) direction for merging in the vicinity of these duskside regions. The Tsyganenko T01 model maps the Cluster position to 75o and 14 MLT at 0130 UT or a few degrees equatorward of the ionospheric flow channel. Based on these data sets, we examine whether the active merging region on the magnetopause is consistent with the enhanced flow signatures observed by SuperDARN on 16 December 2001 and the IMAGE observations in these duskside high-latitude regions. An MHD simulation of this event puts these observations into a global context and is further used to map the Cluster location at the time of the plasma flow deflections to the ionosphere.

  7. Observation of Counter Propagating Alfven Waves with Perpendicular Polarizations and the Associated Proton Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Pei, Z. T.; Wang, L.; Tu, C. Y.; Marsch, E.; Yao, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is believed that MHD turbulence cascading is mainly caused by the collisions between Alfven waves, which propagate oppositely and are polarized perpendicularly to each other. Nonlinear interaction will vanish if the counter-propagating Alfven waves have their polarization aligned with each other. However, the Alfven waves satisfying these collision criteria have not yet been found in the solar wind observations. Here we report the existence of Alfven waves with opposite propagation and non-aligned polarization in the solar wind. In one case of anti-sunward magnetic sector, with RTN as the coordinates, the magnetic fluctuations in T-component (BT) are anti-correlated with the velocity fluctuations in T-component (VT), while BR and BN fluctuations are in positive correlation with VR and VN fluctuations, respectively. These features suggest a possible nonlinear interaction between outward propagating Alfven wave with polarization in T-direction and inward propagating Alfven wave with polarization in R&N-directions. Moreover, the associated proton kinetics shows the existence of field-aligned sunward beam rather than anti-sunward beam, which may indicate a parallel Landau heating by sunward kinetic Alfven waves. A statistical study including more cases is also conducted.

  8. Day-night coupling by a localized flow channel visualized by polar cap patch propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Wang, B.; Oksavik, K.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L.; Donovan, E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Shiokawa, K.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Nishitani, N.; McWilliams, K. A.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although plasma convection in the polar cap is often thought of large-scale two-cell convection, recent radar observations have shown that dynamic meso-scale fast flows of the order of 100 km size are embedded within the large-scale convection. Those flow channels are colocated with polar cap airglow patches in many cases, and thus optical measurements can be used to track the origin of such flows, evolution in the polar cap, and their influence on nightside auroral activity. We present unique coordinated observations of the dayside auroral oval, polar cap, and nightside auroral oval by three All-Sky Imagers (ASIs), two SuperDARN radars, and DMSP. This dataset revealed that a dayside Poleward-Moving Auroral Form (PMAF) evolved into a polar cap airglow patch that propagated across the polar cap, and then nightside poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs). Radar observations detected fast anti-sunward flows associated with the PMAF, and the DMSP satellite, whose conjunction occurred within a few minutes after the PMAF initiation, measured enhanced Low-Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) precipitation and enhanced plasma density with a strong anti-sunward flow burst. The polar cap patch was spatially and temporally coincident with a localized anti-sunward flow channel. The propagation across the polar cap and the subsequent PBIs suggest that the flow channel originated from dayside reconnection and then reached the nightside open-closed boundary, triggering localized nightside reconnection and flow bursts within the plasma sheet. In addition, we have also statistically investigated the property of dayside and nightside polar cap flow channels using imagers, radars and low-altitude satellites. The flow channels are typically found to have a ~300 km width, propagate a few hundred km/s faster than background flows, and to occur during a By-dominant IMF with a weak southward component.

  9. Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embleton, Tony F. W.; Daigle, Gilles A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed here is the current state of knowledge with respect to each basic mechanism of sound propagation in the atmosphere and how each mechanism changes the spectral or temporal characteristics of the sound received at a distance from the source. Some of the basic processes affecting sound wave propagation which are present in any situation are discussed. They are geometrical spreading, molecular absorption, and turbulent scattering. In geometrical spreading, sound levels decrease with increasing distance from the source; there is no frequency dependence. In molecular absorption, sound energy is converted into heat as the sound wave propagates through the air; there is a strong dependence on frequency. In turbulent scattering, local variations in wind velocity and temperature induce fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the sound waves as they propagate through an inhomogeneous medium; there is a moderate dependence on frequency.

  10. Parametric instabilities of parallel propagating incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2007-12-15

    Large amplitude, low-frequency Alfven waves constitute one of the most essential elements of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the fast solar wind. Due to small collisionless dissipation rates, the waves can propagate long distances and efficiently convey such macroscopic quantities as momentum, energy, and helicity. Since loading of such quantities is completed when the waves damp away, it is important to examine how the waves can dissipate in the solar wind. Among various possible dissipation processes of the Alfven waves, parametric instabilities have been believed to be important. In this paper, we numerically discuss the parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma using a one-dimensional hybrid (superparticle ions plus an electron massless fluid) simulation, in order to explain local production of sunward propagating Alfven waves, as suggested by Helios/Ulysses observation results. Parameter studies clarify the dependence of parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves on the ion and electron beta ratio. Parametric instabilities of coherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma are vastly different from those in the cold ions (i.e., MHD and/or Hall-MHD systems), even if the collisionless damping of the Alfven waves are neglected. Further, ''nonlinearly driven'' modulational instability is important for the dissipation of incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma regardless of their polarization, since the ion kinetic effects let both the right-hand and left-hand polarized waves become unstable to the modulational instability. The present results suggest that, although the antisunward propagating dispersive Alfven waves are efficiently dissipated through the parametric instabilities in a finite ion beta plasma, these instabilities hardly produce the sunward propagating waves.

  11. Rift propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Schubert, G.

    1989-01-01

    A model for rift propagation which treats the rift as a crack in an elastic plate which is filled from beneath by upwelling viscous asthenosphere as it lengthens and opens. Growth of the crack is driven by either remotely applied forces or the pressure of buoyant asthenosphere in the crack and is resisted by viscous stresses associated with filling the crack. The model predicts a time for a rift to form which depends primarily on the driving stress and asthenosphere viscosity. For a driving stress on the order of 10 MPa, as expected from the topography of rifted swells, the development of rifts over times of a few Myr requires an asthenosphere viscosity of 10 to the 16th Pa s (10 to the 17th poise). This viscosity, which is several orders of magnitude less than values determined by postglacial rebound and at least one order of magnitude less than that inferred for spreading center propagation, may reflect a high temperature or large amount of partial melting in the mantle beneath a rifted swell.

  12. The universal propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1993-01-01

    For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

  13. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA propagation studies objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite communication systems and services by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals through the intervening environment and to support NASA missions. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages unique NASA assets (currently Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through referred journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  14. Limitations in scatter propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, E. W.

    1982-04-01

    A short description of the main scatter propagation mechanisms is presented; troposcatter, meteor burst communication and chaff scatter. For these propagation modes, in particular for troposcatter, the important specific limitations discussed are: link budget and resulting hardware consequences, diversity, mobility, information transfer and intermodulation and intersymbol interference, frequency range and future extension in frequency range for troposcatter, and compatibility with other services (EMC).

  15. Propagation research in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakana, Hiromitsu

    1991-01-01

    L-band propagation measurements for land-mobile, maritime, and aeronautical satellite communications have been carried out by using the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite-Five (ETS-5) which was launched in Aug. 1987. This paper presents propagation characteristics for each of the mobile satellite communication channels.

  16. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  17. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  18. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  19. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  20. An eastward propagating compressional Pc 5 wave observed by AMPTE/CCE in the postmidnight sector. [Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mcentire, R. W.; Zanetti, L. J.; Lopez, R. E.; Kistler, L. M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of a compressional Pc 5 wave observed in the postmidnight sector on July 21, 1986, using data from the magnetometer, the charge-energy-mass spectrometer, and the medium-energy particle analyzer aboard the AMPTE/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft. The Pc 5 wave exhibited harmonically related transverse and compressional magnetic oscillations, modulation of the flux of medium energy protons, and a large azimuthal wave number, i.e., properties that are similar to those of compressional Pc5 waves observed previously at geostationary orbit. The unique observations recorded by the AMPTE/CCE included the occurrence of the wave in the postmidnight sector, its sunward propagation with respect to the spacecraft, and the left-handed polarization of the perturbed magnetic field. In spite of the morphological uniqueness observed, the excitation of the July 21 event is considered to be due to the same type of instability as operates at geostationary orbit.

  1. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  2. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  3. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  4. Wave Propagation Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  5. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet website which provides information to enable the development of new commerical satellite systems and services by providing timely data and models about the propagation of satellite radio signals. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages NASA assets, currently the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through refereed journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  6. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  7. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  8. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  9. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  10. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  11. PROPER: Optical propagation routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John E.

    2014-05-01

    PROPER simulates the propagation of light through an optical system using Fourier transform algorithms (Fresnel, angular spectrum methods). Distributed as IDL source code, it includes routines to create complex apertures, aberrated wavefronts, and deformable mirrors. It is especially useful for the simulation of high contrast imaging telescopes (extrasolar planet imagers like TPF).

  12. GRC RF Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been involved in the characterization of atmospheric effects on space communications links operating at Ka-band and above for the past 20 years. This presentation reports out on the most recent activities of propagation characterization that NASA is currently involved in.

  13. A Database for Propagation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James

    1997-01-01

    The Propagation Models Database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The database is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a database of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The database not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  14. Atmospheric sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    The propagation of sound waves at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods 1.0 - 1000 seconds) in the atmosphere is being studied by a network of seven stations separated geographically by distances of the order of thousands of kilometers. The stations measure the following characteristics of infrasonic waves: (1) the amplitude and waveform of the incident sound pressure, (2) the direction of propagation of the wave, (3) the horizontal phase velocity, and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various frequencies of oscillation. Some infrasonic sources which were identified and studied include the aurora borealis, tornadoes, volcanos, gravity waves on the oceans, earthquakes, and atmospheric instability waves caused by winds at the tropopause. Waves of unknown origin seem to radiate from several geographical locations, including one in the Argentine.

  15. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Kelley, Thomas A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of VHF signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in FORTRAN 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, delta times of arrival (DTOA) study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of DTOAs vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  16. Florida's propagation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    One of the key goals of the Florida Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.

  17. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Kelley, T.A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of vhf signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in Fortran 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, DTOA study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of delta-times-of-arrival (DTOAs) vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  18. The ACTS propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, D.; Davarian, Faramaz

    1992-01-01

    The success or failure of the ACTS experiment will depend on how accurately the rain-fade statistics and fade dynamics can be predicted in order to derive an appropriate algorithm that will combat weather vagaries, specifically for links with small terminals, such as very small aperture terminals (VSAT's) where the power margin is a premium. The planning process and hardware development program that will comply with the recommendations of the ACTS propagation study groups are described.

  19. OPEX: (Olympus Propagation EXperiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brussaard, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The Olympus-1 satellite carries four distinct payloads for experimental utilization and research in the field of satellite communications: (1) the Direct Broadcasting Service (DBS) payload; (2) the Specialized Services Payload; (3) the 20/30 GHz Advanced Communications Payload; and (4) the Propagation Payload. Experimental utilization of the first three payloads involves ground transmissions to the satellite and hence sharing of available satellite time among experimenters. This is coordinated through the Olympus Utilization Program.

  20. Olympus propagation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-08-01

    A summary of the activities of the OPEX (Olympus Propagation EXperimenters) group is given and some of the recent findings are presented. OLYMPUS, a telecommunication satellite owned by the European Space Agency, was launched on 12 June 1989. After the in-orbit tests were completed (in September 1989) the first propagation experiments started. Throughout 1990 the spacecraft functioned very well and a large number of experimenters received the beacon signals. On 29 May 1991 the spacecraft became inoperational after a major technical problem. With a series of complicated procedures OLYMPUS was recovered on 15 August 1991 - the first time in history that a civilian telecommunications satellite was brought back to service after losing power and telemetry. The propagation experiments were back on track. However, the recovery had used up so much fuel that the North-South station keeping had to be abandoned, which led to a natural increase of inclination at a rate of about 0.8 deg per year. On 10 October 1992 the second 30 GHz beacon tube failed, causing a loss of this beacon signal. The other two beacon frequencies continued to deliver a stable signal for more than two years. On 12 August 1993 the spacecraft experienced another problem with the altitude control, but this time there was not enough fuel left for a recovery maneuver and thus the mission came to an end.

  1. Olympus propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-01-01

    A summary of the activities of the OPEX (Olympus Propagation EXperimenters) group is given and some of the recent findings are presented. OLYMPUS, a telecommunication satellite owned by the European Space Agency, was launched on 12 June 1989. After the in-orbit tests were completed (in September 1989) the first propagation experiments started. Throughout 1990 the spacecraft functioned very well and a large number of experimenters received the beacon signals. On 29 May 1991 the spacecraft became inoperational after a major technical problem. With a series of complicated procedures OLYMPUS was recovered on 15 August 1991 - the first time in history that a civilian telecommunications satellite was brought back to service after losing power and telemetry. The propagation experiments were back on track. However, the recovery had used up so much fuel that the North-South station keeping had to be abandoned, which led to a natural increase of inclination at a rate of about 0.8 deg per year. On 10 October 1992 the second 30 GHz beacon tube failed, causing a loss of this beacon signal. The other two beacon frequencies continued to deliver a stable signal for more than two years. On 12 August 1993 the spacecraft experienced another problem with the altitude control, but this time there was not enough fuel left for a recovery maneuver and thus the mission came to an end.

  2. Propagation in the ionosphere, A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Paul S.

    1994-09-01

    The use of ionospheric models and ray tracing models as components of a propagation model are discussed. These can be used as decision aids to support human interpretation of ionospheric propagation. The physical basis for ionospheric decision aids is introduced by reference to ionospheric morphology and the basic theory of ionospheric propagation, which, along with ray tracing techniques, is then reviewed.

  3. Tropospheric propagation assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. D.; Richter, J. H.; Hitney, H. V.

    1984-02-01

    It is well known that microwave propagation in a marine environment frequently exhibits unexpected behavior. The deviation from 4/3 earth propagation calculations is due to the fact that the vertical refractivity distribution of the troposphere rarely follows the standard lapse rate of -39 N/km. Instead, the troposphere is generally composed of horizontally stratified layers of differing refractivity gradients. The most striking propagation anomalies result when a layer gradient is less than -157 N/km, forming a trapping layer. In the marine environment, there are two mechanisms which produce such layers. An elevated trapping layer is created by the advection of a warm, dry air mass over a cold, moist air mass producing either a surface-based or an elevated duct which may affect frequencies as low as 100 MHz. A very persistent surface trapping layer is due to water evaporation at the air-sea interface. This surface, or evaporation duct is generally thin, on the order of 10 m in vertical extent, and is an effective trapping mechanism for frequencies greater than 3 GHz. With the introduction of the Integrated Refraction Effects Prediction System (IREPS) into the US Navy, fleet units now have the capability to evaluate accurately the performance of their EM systems when the refractive environment is known. However, these units may have to plan for operations thousands of miles away under different refractivity conditions. To assist in planning, a worldwide upper air and surface climatology has been developed for use through the IREPS programs. The IREPS concept is reviewed and a description of the tropospheric ducting data base is presented.

  4. PIV uncertainty propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciacchitano, Andrea; Wieneke, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the propagation of the instantaneous uncertainty of PIV measurements to statistical and instantaneous quantities of interest derived from the velocity field. The expression of the uncertainty of vorticity, velocity divergence, mean value and Reynolds stresses is derived. It is shown that the uncertainty of vorticity and velocity divergence requires the knowledge of the spatial correlation between the error of the x and y particle image displacement, which depends upon the measurement spatial resolution. The uncertainty of statistical quantities is often dominated by the random uncertainty due to the finite sample size and decreases with the square root of the effective number of independent samples. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to assess the accuracy of the uncertainty propagation formulae. Furthermore, three experimental assessments are carried out. In the first experiment, a turntable is used to simulate a rigid rotation flow field. The estimated uncertainty of the vorticity is compared with the actual vorticity error root-mean-square, with differences between the two quantities within 5–10% for different interrogation window sizes and overlap factors. A turbulent jet flow is investigated in the second experimental assessment. The reference velocity, which is used to compute the reference value of the instantaneous flow properties of interest, is obtained with an auxiliary PIV system, which features a higher dynamic range than the measurement system. Finally, the uncertainty quantification of statistical quantities is assessed via PIV measurements in a cavity flow. The comparison between estimated uncertainty and actual error demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed uncertainty propagation methodology.

  5. Pulse Propagation in Phaseonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Ashiqur; Eberly, J. H.

    1996-05-01

    Phaseonium [1] is a medium where the quantum atomic phase is held fixed for long times compared with various relaxation processes. In inhomogeneously broadened two-level phaseonium, we have found a new area theorem (similar to self-induced transparency [2]) for pulse propagation, where pulses of arbitrary area can be stable instead of 2π area. We will also report results for inhomogeneously broadened three-level phaseonium. Research partially supported by NSF grant PHY94-08733. [1] M.O. Scully, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2802 (1985), also Quant. Opt. 6, 203 (1994). [2] S. L. McCall and E. L. Hahn, Phys. Rev. 183, 457 (1969).

  6. Transport with Feynman propagators

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H.

    1990-11-06

    Richard Feynman's formulation of quantum electrodynamics suggests a Monte Carlo algorithm for calculating wave propagation. We call this the Sum Over All Paths (SOAP) method. The method is applied to calculate diffraction by double slits of finite width and by a reflection grating. Calculations of reflection by plane and parabolic mirrors of finite aperture and from several figured surfaces are shown. An application to a one-dimensional scattering problem is discussed. A variation of SOAP can be applied to the diffusion equation. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-01-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers. PMID:24939414

  8. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  9. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  10. An analysis of rumor propagation based on propagation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen-jun; Liu, Yong-mei; Wang, Ke-xi

    2016-02-01

    A propagation force is introduced into the analysis of rumor propagation to address uncertainty in the process. The propagation force is portrayed as a fuzzy variable, and a category of new parameters with fuzzy variables is defined. The classic susceptible, infected, recovered (SIR) model is modified using these parameters, a fuzzy reproductive number is introduced into the modified model, and the rationality of the fuzzy reproductive number is illuminated through calculation and comparison. Rumor control strategies are also discussed.

  11. ACTS propagation experiment discussion: Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL and Space Communications Technology Center Florida propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Mueller, Eugene A.; Turk, Joseph; Beaver, John; Helmken, Henry F.; Henning, Rudy

    1993-01-01

    Papers on Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the Colorado State University CHILL multiparameter radar and on Space Communications Technology Center Florida Propagation Program are discussed. Topics covered include: microwave radiative transfer and propagation models; NASA propagation terminal status; ACTS channel characteristics; FAU receive only terminal; FAU terminal status; and propagation testbed.

  12. ACTS mobile propagation campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for three propagation measurement campaigns involving a mobile receiving laboratory and 20 GHz transmissions from the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four 1994 campaigns were executed during weekly periods in and around Austin, Texas in February and May, in Central Maryland during March, and in Fairbanks, Alaska and environs in June. Measurements tested the following effects at 20 GHz: (1) attenuation due to roadside trees with and without foliage, (2) multipath effects for scenarios in which line-of-sight paths were unshadowed, (3) fades due to terrain and roadside obstacles, (4) fades due to structures in urban environs, (5) single tree attenuation, and (6) effects of fading at low elevation angles (8 deg in Fairbanks, Alaska) and high elevation angles (55 deg in Austin, Texas). Results presented here cover sampled measurements in Austin, Texas for foliage and non-foliage cases and in Central Maryland for non-foliage runs.

  13. Research in LMSS propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barts, R. M.; Stutzman, W. L.; Pratt, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Satellite Communications Group has participated in the Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) program through JPL sponsorship since 1985. Involvement has mainly been in modeling and simulation of propagation characteristics and effects. Models developed to predict cummulative fade distributions for fading LMSS signals include LMSSMOD and the Simple Models which approximate LMSSMOD. Models to predict the mean and standard deviation of signal attenuation through roadside vegetation, namely the Average Path Model, were developed. In the area of simulation, efforts have centered around the development of a software simulator that uses data bases derived from experimental data to generate simulated data with arbitrary statistical behavior. This work has progressed to the development of an integrated analysis and simulation package, LIPS. The basic theory and results for the models and simulator have been previously documented in reports and papers. All LMSS activities are summarized and details of this year's efforts are given.

  14. The ACTS propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy; Davarian, Faramaz

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is to demonstrate the feasibility of the Ka-band (20 and 30 GHz) spectrum for satellite communications, as well as to help maintain U.S. leadership in satellite communications. ACTS incorporates such innovative schemes as time division multiple access (TDMA), microwave and baseband switching, onboard regeneration, and adaptive application of coding during rain-fade conditions. The success or failure of the ACTS experiment will depend on how accurately the rain-fade statistics and fade dynamics can be predicted in order to derive an appropriate algorithm that will combat weather vagaries, specifically for links with small terminals, such as very small aperture terminals (VSAT's) where the power margin is a premium. This article describes the planning process and hardware development program that will comply with the recommendations of the ACTS propagation study groups.

  15. Numerical propagator through PIAA optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Shaklan, Stuart; Give'On, Amir; Krist, John

    2009-08-01

    In this communication we address two outstanding issues pertaining the modeling of PIAA coronagraphs, accurate numerical propagation of edge effects and fast propagation of mid spatial frequencies for wavefront control. In order to solve them, we first derive a quadratic approximation of the Huygens wavelets that allows us to develop an angular spectrum propagator for pupil remapping. Using this result we introduce an independent method to verify the ultimate contrast floor, due to edge propagation effects, of PIAA units currently being tested in various testbeds. We then delve into the details of a novel fast algorithm, based on the recognition that angular spectrum computations with a pre-apodised system are computationally light. When used for the propagation of mid spatial frequencies, such a fast propagator will ultimately allow us to develop robust wavefront control algorithms with DMs located before the pupil remapping mirrors.

  16. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  17. Propagation into an unstable state

    SciTech Connect

    Dee, G.

    1985-06-01

    We describe propagating front solutions of the equations of motion of pattern-forming systems. We make a number of conjectures concerning the properties of such fronts in connection with pattern selection in these systems. We describe a calculation which can be used to calculate the velocity and state selected by certain types of propagating fronts. We investigate the propagating front solutions of the amplitude equation which provides a valid dynamical description of many pattern-forming systems near onset.

  18. Propagation Terminal Design and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James

    2015-01-01

    The NASA propagation terminal has been designed and developed by the Glenn Research Center and is presently deployed at over 5 NASA and partner ground stations worldwide collecting information on the effects of the atmosphere on Ka-band and millimeter wave communications links. This lecture provides an overview of the fundamentals and requirements of the measurement of atmospheric propagation effects and, specifically, the types of hardware and digital signal processing techniques employed by current state-of-the-art propagation terminal systems.

  19. Cascade dynamics of complex propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centola, Damon; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Macy, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Random links between otherwise distant nodes can greatly facilitate the propagation of disease or information, provided contagion can be transmitted by a single active node. However, we show that when the propagation requires simultaneous exposure to multiple sources of activation, called complex propagation, the effect of random links can be just the opposite; it can make the propagation more difficult to achieve. We numerically calculate critical points for a threshold model using several classes of complex networks, including an empirical social network. We also provide an estimation of the critical values in terms of vulnerable nodes.

  20. Seismic wave propagation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A hybrid, finite-difference technique was developed for modeling nonlinear soil amplification from three-dimensional, finite-fault radiation patters for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method was applied to the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Particle velocities were computed on a plane at 5-km depth, immediately above the causative fault. Time-series of the strike-perpendicular, lateral velocities then were propagated vertically in a soil column typical of the San Fernando Valley. Suitable material models were adapted from a suite used to model ground motions at the US Nevada Test Site. The effects of nonlinearity reduced relative spectral amplitudes by about 40% at frequencies above 1.5 Hz but only by 10% at lower frequencies. Runs made with source-depth amplitudes increased by a factor of two showed relative amplitudes above 1.5 Hz reduced by a total of 70% above 1.5 Hz and 20% at lower frequencies. Runs made with elastic-plastic material models showed similar behavior to runs made with Masing-Rule models.

  1. Directed HK propagator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocia, Lucas; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    We offer a more formal justification for the successes of our recently communicated "directed Heller-Herman-Kluk-Kay" (DHK) time propagator by examining its performance in one-dimensional bound systems which exhibit at least quasi-periodic motion. DHK is distinguished by its single one-dimensional integral—a vast simplification over the usual 2N-dimensional integral in full Heller-Herman-Kluk-Kay (for an N-dimensional system). We find that DHK accurately captures particular coherent state autocorrelations when its single integral is chosen to lie along these states' fastest growing manifold, as long as it is not perpendicular to their action gradient. Moreover, the larger the action gradient, the better DHK will perform. We numerically examine DHK's accuracy in a one-dimensional quartic oscillator and illustrate that these conditions are frequently satisfied such that the method performs well. This lends some explanation for why DHK frequently seems to work so well and suggests that it may be applicable to systems exhibiting quite strong anharmonicity.

  2. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  3. Join-Graph Propagation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Mateescu, Robert; Kask, Kalev; Gogate, Vibhav; Dechter, Rina

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates parameterized approximate message-passing schemes that are based on bounded inference and are inspired by Pearl's belief propagation algorithm (BP). We start with the bounded inference mini-clustering algorithm and then move to the iterative scheme called Iterative Join-Graph Propagation (IJGP), that combines both iteration and bounded inference. Algorithm IJGP belongs to the class of Generalized Belief Propagation algorithms, a framework that allowed connections with approximate algorithms from statistical physics and is shown empirically to surpass the performance of mini-clustering and belief propagation, as well as a number of other state-of-the-art algorithms on several classes of networks. We also provide insight into the accuracy of iterative BP and IJGP by relating these algorithms to well known classes of constraint propagation schemes. PMID:20740057

  4. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  5. Laser Propagation in Uranium Hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Danny

    1990-01-01

    Several researchers have simulated the laser pulse propagation through simple N-level systems; but, for UF _6 models, large CPU time and memory is required. In an attempt to efficiently yet accurately characterize laser pulse propagation through a UF _6 molecule, a model of UF_6 is created and analyzed by adiabatic excitation. A minimax numerical method is developed to solve the time -dependent Schrodinger equation and then applied to the study of laser excitation of UF_6 using various Gaussian pulses. The process of laser isotope separation is also discussed. The results from the laser excitation of UF_6 are used to simulate laser propagation through ^{235} UF_6.

  6. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani S.

    1992-01-01

    In June 1991, a paper at the fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) was presented outlining the development of a database for propagation models. The database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through any known and accepted propagation model. The architecture of the database also incorporates the possibility of changing the standard models in the database to fit the scientist's or the experimenter's needs. The database not only provides powerful software to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables, and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  7. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  8. The NASA radiowave propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA radiowave Propagation Program are to enable new satellite communication applications and to enhance existing satellite communication networks. These objectives are achieved by supporting radio wave propagation studies and disseminating the study results in a timely fashion. Studies initiated by this program in the 1980s enabled the infant concept of conducting mobile communications via satellite to reach a state of relative maturity in 1990. The program also supported the satellite communications community by publishing and revising two handbooks dealing with radio wave propagation effects for frequencies below and above 10 GHz, respectively. The program has served the international community through its support of the International Telecommunications Union. It supports state of the art work at universities. Currently, the program is focusing on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its propagation needs. An overview of the program's involvement in the ACTS project is given.

  9. Nonlinear competition in nematicon propagation.

    PubMed

    Laudyn, Urszula A; Kwasny, Michał; Piccardi, Armando; Karpierz, Mirosław A; Dabrowski, Roman; Chojnowska, Olga; Alberucci, Alessandro; Assanto, Gaetano

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the role of competing nonlinear responses in the formation and propagation of bright spatial solitons. We use nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) exhibiting both thermo-optic and reorientational nonlinearities with continuous-wave beams. In a suitably prepared dye-doped sample and dual beam collinear geometry, thermal heating in the visible affects reorientational self-focusing in the near infrared, altering light propagation and self-trapping. PMID:26565843

  10. Semiclassical propagation of Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, T.; Gomez, E. A.; Pachon, L. A.

    2010-06-07

    We present a comprehensive study of semiclassical phase-space propagation in the Wigner representation, emphasizing numerical applications, in particular as an initial-value representation. Two semiclassical approximation schemes are discussed. The propagator of the Wigner function based on van Vleck's approximation replaces the Liouville propagator by a quantum spot with an oscillatory pattern reflecting the interference between pairs of classical trajectories. Employing phase-space path integration instead, caustics in the quantum spot are resolved in terms of Airy functions. We apply both to two benchmark models of nonlinear molecular potentials, the Morse oscillator and the quartic double well, to test them in standard tasks such as computing autocorrelation functions and propagating coherent states. The performance of semiclassical Wigner propagation is very good even in the presence of marked quantum effects, e.g., in coherent tunneling and in propagating Schroedinger cat states, and of classical chaos in four-dimensional phase space. We suggest options for an effective numerical implementation of our method and for integrating it in Monte-Carlo-Metropolis algorithms suitable for high-dimensional systems.

  11. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  12. The geometry of propagating rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan

    1986-03-01

    The kinematics of two different processes are investigated, both of which have been described as rift propagation. Courtillot uses this term to describe the change from distributed to localised extension which occurs during the early development of an ocean basin. The term localisation is instead used here to describe this process, to distinguish it from Hey's type of propagation. Localisation generally leads to rotation of the direction of magnetisation. To Hey propagation means the extension of a rift into the undeformed plate beyond a transform fault. Detail surveys of the Galapagos rift have shown that the propagating and failing rifts are not connected by a single transform fault, but by a zone which is undergoing shear. The principal deformation is simple shear, and the kinematics of this deformation are investigated in some detail. The strike of most of the lineations observed in the area can be produced by such deformation. The mode of extension on the propagating rift appears to be localised for some periods but to be distributed for others. Neither simple kinematic arguments nor stretching of the lithosphere with conservation of crust can account for the observed variations in water depth.

  13. Wave propagation in isogrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    This work focuses on an analysis of wave propagation in isogrid structures as it relates to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods. Assembly, integration, and testing (AI&T) of satellite structures in preparation for launch includes significant time for testing and reworking any issues that may arise. SHM methods are being investigated as a means to validate the structure during assembly and truncate the number of tests needed to qualify the structure for the launch environment. The most promising of these SHM methods uses an active wave-based method in which an actuator propagates a Lamb wave through the structure; the Lamb wave is then received by a sensor and evaluated over time to detect structural changes. To date this method has proven effective in locating structural defects in a complex satellite panel; however, the attributes associated with the first wave arrival change significantly as the wave travels through ribs and joining features. Previous studies have been conducted in simplified ribbed structures, giving initial insight into the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this work, the study has been extended numerically to the isogrid plate case. Wave propagation was modeled using commercial finite element analysis software. The results of the analyses offer further insight into the complexities of wave propagation in isogrid structures.

  14. User needs for propagation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    New and refined models of radio signal propagation phenomena are needed to support studies of evolving satellite services and systems. Taking an engineering perspective, applications for propagation measurements and models in the context of various types of analyses that are of ongoing interest are reviewed. Problems that were encountered in the signal propagation aspects of these analyses are reviewed, and potential solutions to these problems are discussed. The focus is on propagation measurements and models needed to support design and performance analyses of systems in the Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS) operating in the 1-3 GHz range. These systems may use geostationary or non-geostationary satellites and Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access Digital (TDMA), or Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) techniques. Many of the propagation issues raised in relation to MSS are also pertinent to other services such as broadcasting-satellite (sound) at 2310-2360 MHz. In particular, services involving mobile terminals or terminals with low gain antennas are of concern.

  15. Propagated repolarization in heart muscle.

    PubMed

    CRANEFIELD, P F; HOFFMAN, B F

    1958-03-20

    The effect of current flow on the transmembrane action potential of single fibers of ventricular muscle has been examined. Pulses of repolarizing current applied during the plateau of the action potential displace membrane potential much more than do pulses of depolarizing current. The application of sufficiently strong pulses of repolarizing current initiates sustained repolarization which persists after the end of the pulse. This sustained repolarization appears to propagate throughout the length of the fiber. Demonstration of propagated repolarization is made difficult by appearance of break excitation at the end of the repolarizing pulse. The thresholds for sustained repolarization and break excitation are separated by reducing the concentration of Ca(++) in the environment of the fiber. In fibers in such an environment it is easier to demonstrate apparently propagated repolarization and also, by further increase of the strength of the repolarizing current, to demonstrate graded break excitation. PMID:13514000

  16. Modification of tropospheric propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, H.

    1990-10-01

    The propagation mechanisms of ultra-short radio waves and microwaves are governed by the composition of the troposphere and their space-time structure of the refractive index field. Useful effects are obtained by chaff clouds concerning communication channels, masking of targets or meteorological research. A wide field of posiibilities seems to be within the scope of weather modification experiments. But due to the huge variability of cloud and rain parameters only minor propagation changes are to be expected. A successful application of remotely determining atmospheric temperature profiles is the modulation of the atmospheric refractive index field by sound waves and tracking the acoustic wave fronts by a Doppler radar (Radio Acoustic Sounding System). Oil and alga slicks on water surfaces may change the reflection/scattering and emission properties for radar waves. They also suppress evaporation which may influence the development of tropical storms but just so evaporation duct propagation of microwaves.

  17. Dynamical Realism and Uncertainty Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inkwan

    In recent years, Space Situational Awareness (SSA) has become increasingly important as the number of tracked Resident Space Objects (RSOs) continues their growth. One of the most significant technical discussions in SSA is how to propagate state uncertainty in a consistent way with the highly nonlinear dynamical environment. In order to keep pace with this situation, various methods have been proposed to propagate uncertainty accurately by capturing the nonlinearity of the dynamical system. We notice that all of the methods commonly focus on a way to describe the dynamical system as precisely as possible based on a mathematical perspective. This study proposes a new perspective based on understanding dynamics of the evolution of uncertainty itself. We expect that profound insights of the dynamical system could present the possibility to develop a new method for accurate uncertainty propagation. These approaches are naturally concluded in goals of the study. At first, we investigate the most dominant factors in the evolution of uncertainty to realize the dynamical system more rigorously. Second, we aim at developing the new method based on the first investigation enabling orbit uncertainty propagation efficiently while maintaining accuracy. We eliminate the short-period variations from the dynamical system, called a simplified dynamical system (SDS), to investigate the most dominant factors. In order to achieve this goal, the Lie transformation method is introduced since this transformation can define the solutions for each variation separately. From the first investigation, we conclude that the secular variations, including the long-period variations, are dominant for the propagation of uncertainty, i.e., short-period variations are negligible. Then, we develop the new method by combining the SDS and the higher-order nonlinear expansion method, called state transition tensors (STTs). The new method retains advantages of the SDS and the STTs and propagates

  18. NASA Propagation Program Status and Propagation Needs of Satcom Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nassar

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite systems and services and to support NASA's programs by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals though the intervening environment. Provisions include new services, higher frequencies, higher data rates, different environments (mobile, indoors, fixed), and different orbits (geostationary, low earth orbit).

  19. SIS Epidemic Propagation on Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Bodó, Ágnes; Katona, Gyula Y; Simon, Péter L

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of epidemic propagation on networks is extended to hypergraphs in order to account for both the community structure and the nonlinear dependence of the infection pressure on the number of infected neighbours. The exact master equations of the propagation process are derived for an arbitrary hypergraph given by its incidence matrix. Based on these, moment closure approximation and mean-field models are introduced and compared to individual-based stochastic simulations. The simulation algorithm, developed for networks, is extended to hypergraphs. The effects of hypergraph structure and the model parameters are investigated via individual-based simulation results. PMID:27033348

  20. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  1. Near earth propagation: physics revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wert, R.; Goroch, A.; Worthington, E.; Wong, V.

    2007-04-01

    Both the military and consumer sectors are pursuing distributed networked systems and sensors. A major stumbling block to deployment of these sensors will be the radio frequency (RF) propagation environment within a few wavelengths of the earth. Increasing transmit power (battery consumption) is not a practical solution to the problem. This paper will discuss some of the physical phenomena related to the near earth propagation (NEP) problem. When radiating near the earth the communications link is subjected to a list of physical impairments. On the list are the expected Fresnel region encroachment and multipath reflections. Additionally, radiation pattern changes and near earth boundary layer perturbations exist. A significant amount of data has been collected on NEP. Disturbances in the NEP atmosphere can have a time varying attenuation related to the time of day and these discoveries will be discussed. Solutions, or workarounds, to the near earth propagation problem hinge on dynamic adaptive RF elements. Adaptive RF elements will allow the distributed sensor to direct energy, beam form, impedance correct, increase communication efficiency, and decrease battery consumption. Small electrically controllable elements are under development to enable antenna impedance matching in a dynamic environment. Additionally, small dynamic beam forming arrays are under development to focus RF energy in the direction of need. With an increased understanding of the near earth propagation problem, distributed autonomous networked sensors can become a reality within a few centimeters of the earth.

  2. Balloon atmospheric propagation experiment measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1973-01-01

    High altitude balloon measurements on laser beam fading during propagation through turbulent atmosphere show that a correlation between fading strength and stellar scintillation magnitudes exists. Graphs for stellar scintillation as a function of receiver aperture are used to predict fading bit error rates for neodymium-yag laser communication system.

  3. Analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The correlation between fatigue crack propagation and stress intensity factor is analyzed. When determining fatigue crack propagation rate, a crack increment, delta a, and its corresponding increment in load cycles, delta N, are measured. Fatigue crack propagation must be caused by a shear and/or a normal separation mode. Both of these two processes are discrete if one looks at the atomic level. If the average deformation and fracture properties over the crack increments, delta a, can be considered as homogeneous, if the characteristic discrete lengths of sigma a, if the plastic zone size is small, and if a plate is thick enough to insure a plane strain case, da/dN is proportional to delta K squared. Any deviation of empirical data from this relation must be caused by the fact that one or more of these conditions are not satisfied. The effects of plate thickness and material inhomogeneity are discussed in detail. A shear separation mode of fatigue crack propagation is described and is used to illustrate the effects of material inhomogeneity.

  4. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  5. Improved beam propagation method equations.

    PubMed

    Nichelatti, E; Pozzi, G

    1998-01-01

    Improved beam propagation method (BPM) equations are derived for the general case of arbitrary refractive-index spatial distributions. It is shown that in the paraxial approximation the discrete equations admit an analytical solution for the propagation of a paraxial spherical wave, which converges to the analytical solution of the paraxial Helmholtz equation. The generalized Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction integral between the object and the image planes can be derived, with its coefficients expressed in terms of the standard ABCD matrix. This result allows the substitution, in the case of an unaberrated system, of the many numerical steps with a single analytical step. We compared the predictions of the standard and improved BPM equations by considering the cases of a Maxwell fish-eye and of a Luneburg lens. PMID:18268554

  6. Fracture propagation, pipe deformation study

    SciTech Connect

    Aloe, A.; Di Candia, A.; Bramante, M.

    1983-04-15

    Shear fracture propagation has become an important research subject connected with design aspects of gas pipelines. Difficulties involved in predicting safe service conditions from pure theoretical studies require 1:1 scale experiments. Through these tests, semiempirical design criteria was formulated where the minimum level of material quality, indicated by Charpy V energy in the ductile range, is determined as a function of pipe geometry and hoop stress. Disagreements exist among these criteria. Different arrest energy predictions at high hoop stresses and different effects ascribed to the thickness have called for further research in the field. Some interesting indications were obtained about shape and size of the plastic zone ahead of the propagating crack. Burst tests have been conducted and are discussed.

  7. Propagation in multiscale random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2003-10-01

    Many studies consider media with microstructure, which has variations on some microscale, while the macroproperties are under investigation. Sometimes the medium has several microscales, all of them being much smaller than the macroscale. Sometimes the variations on the macroscale are also included, which are taken into account by some procedures, like WKB or geometric optics. What if the medium has variations on all scales from microscale to macroscale? This situation occurs in several practical problems. The talk is about such situations, in particular, passive tracer in a random velocity field, wave propagation in a random medium, Schrödinger equation with random potential. To treat such problems we have developed the statistical near-identity transformation. We find anomalous attenuation of the pulse propagating in a multiscale medium.

  8. Sound propagation in choked ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The linearized equations describing the propagation of sound in variable area ducts containing flow are shown to be singular when the duct mean flow is sonic. The singularity is removed when previously ignored nonlinear terms are retained. The results of a numerical study, for the case of plane waves propagating in a one-dimensional converging-diverging duct, show that the sound field is adequately described by the linearized equations only when the axial mean flow Mach number at the duct throat M sub th 0.6. For M sub th 0.6, the numerical results showed that acoustic energy flux was not conserved. An attempt was made to extend the study to include the nonlinear behavior of the sound field. Meaningful results were not obtained due, primarily, to numerical difficulties.

  9. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Propagator for finite range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown.

  11. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Chuong

    1995-01-01

    A database of various propagation phenomena models that can be used by telecommunications systems engineers to obtain parameter values for systems design is presented. This is an easy-to-use tool and is currently available for either a PC using Excel software under Windows environment or a Macintosh using Excel software for Macintosh. All the steps necessary to use the software are easy and many times self explanatory.

  12. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  13. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  14. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  15. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  16. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  17. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  18. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  19. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  20. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  1. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  2. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  3. A review of transhorizon propagation phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    Interference problems underlie the current interest in transhorizon propagation. In particular, statistics of the rare, high-level fields are of interest. This paper reviews the propagation mechanisms which produce the high-level fields and summarizes recent work in the modeling of the transhorizon propagation.

  4. Japanese propagation experiments with ETS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    Propagation experiments for maritime, aeronautical, and land mobile satellite communications were performed using Engineering Test Satellite-Five (ETS-5). The propagation experiments are one of major mission of Experimental Mobile Satellite System (EMSS) which is aimed for establishing basic technology for future general mobile satellite communication systems. A brief introduction is presented for the experimental results on propagation problems of ETS-5/EMSS.

  5. Cutting line determination for plant propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Li-Yun; Hsia, Chi-Chun; Sun, Hua-Hong; Chen, Hsiang-Ju; Wu, Xin-Ting; Hu, Min-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Investigating an efficient method for plant propagation can help not only prevent extinction of plants but also facilitate the development of botanical industries. In this paper, we propose to use image processing techniques to determine the cutting-line for the propagation of two kinds of plants, i.e. Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel and Cinnamomum kanehirai Hay, which have quite different characteristics in terms of shape, structure, and propagation way (e.g. propagation by seeding and rooting, respectively). The proposed cutting line determination methods can be further applied to develop an automatic control system to reduce labor cost and increase the effectiveness of plant propagation.

  6. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  7. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  8. Microwave propagation in chiral metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prybylski, Aida; Yon, Luis; Noginova, Natalia

    Chiral hyperbolic metamaterials are predicted to show interesting properties associated with possible topological photonic states in these materials, which present new opportunities for light control and manipulation. As prototypes, we consider two metal-dielectric systems designed for microwave range: a twisted wires array, where chirality is associated with shape of metal inclusions, and a rotated layer system, with parallel wires in each layer, and direction of the wires orientation rotated from layer to layer. Systems with different content of metal and layer-to-layer distance were fabricated and studied in the free space propagation experiment. The results were discussed in terms of effective media consideration.

  9. Continuous propagation of microalgae. III.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. T.; Fredrickson, A. G.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Data are presented which give the specific photosynthetic rate and the specific utilization rates of urea and carbon dioxide as functions of specific growth rate for Chlorella. A mathematical model expresses a set of mass balance relations between biotic and environmental materials. Criteria of validity are used to test this model. Predictive procedures are complemented by a particular model of microbial growth. Methods are demonstrated for predicting substrate utilization rates, production rates of extracellular metabolites, growth limiting conditions, and photosynthetic quotients from propagator variables.

  10. Energy propagation throughout chemical networks.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Thomas; Plasson, Raphaël; Jullien, Ludovic

    2014-06-14

    In order to maintain their metabolism from an energy source, living cells rely on chains of energy transfer involving functionally identified components and organizations. However, propagation of a sustained energy flux through a cascade of reaction cycles has only been recently reproduced at a steady state in simple chemical systems. As observed in living cells, the spontaneous onset of energy-transfer chains notably drives local generation of singular dissipative chemical structures: continuous matter fluxes are dynamically maintained at boundaries between spatially and chemically segregated zones but in the absence of any membrane or predetermined material structure. PMID:24681890

  11. ACTS and OLYMPUS propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, Charles W.; Baker, Kenneth R.

    1988-01-01

    The OLYMPUS and ACTS satellites both provide opportunities for 10 to 30 GHz propagation measurements. The spacecraft are sufficiently alike that OLYMPUS can be used to test some prototype ACTS equipment and experiments. Data are particularly needed on short term signal behavior and in support of uplink power control and adaptive forward error correction (FEC) techniques. The Virginia Tech Satellite Communications Group has proposed a set of OLYMPUS experiments including attenuation and fade rate measurements, data communications, uplink power control, rain scatter interference, and small-scale site diversity operation. A digital signal processing receiver for the OLYMPUS and ACTS beacon signals is being developed.

  12. Photon propagator in skewon electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Electrodynamics with a local and linear constitutive law is used as a framework for models violating Lorentz covariance. The constitutive tensor of such a construction is irreducibly decomposed into three independent pieces. The principal part is the anisotropic generalization of the standard electrodynamics. The two other parts, axion and skewon, represent nonclassical modifications of electrodynamics. We derive the expression for the photon propagator in the Minkowski spacetime endowed with a skewon field. For a relatively small (antisymmetric) skewon field, a modified Coulomb law is exhibited.

  13. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Olsen, Robert O.; Kennedy, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), performed under the auspices of NATO and the Acoustics Working Group, was conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of 220 trials using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannon, various types of military vehicles, helicopters, a 155mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of these tests was the intensive characterization of the atmosphere before and during the trials. Because of the wide range of interests on the part of the participants, JAPE was organized in such a manner to provide a broad cross section of test configurations. These included short and long range propagation from fixed and moving vehicles, terrain masking, and vehicle detection. A number of independent trials were also performed by individual participating agencies using the assets available during JAPE. These tests, while not documented in this report, provided substantial and important data to those groups. Perhaps the most significant feature of JAPE is the establishment of a permanent data base which can be used by not only the participants but by others interested in acoustics. A follow-on test was performed by NASA LaRC during the period 19-29 Aug. 1991 at the same location. These trials consisted of 59 overflights of supersonic aircraft in order to establish the relationship between atmospheric turbulence and the received sonic boom energy at the surface.

  14. Orbit propagation in Minkowskian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of hyperbolic orbits suggests that Minkowskian geometry, and not Euclidean, may provide the most adequate description of the motion. This idea is explored in order to derive a new regularized formulation for propagating arbitrarily perturbed hyperbolic orbits. The mathematical foundations underlying Minkowski space-time are exploited to describe hyperbolic orbits. Hypercomplex numbers are introduced to define the rotations, vectors, and metrics in the problem: the evolution of the eccentricity vector is described on the Minkowski plane in terms of hyperbolic numbers, and the orbital plane is described on the inertial reference using quaternions. A set of eight orbital elements is introduced, namely a time-element, the components of the eccentricity vector in , the semimajor axis, and the components of the quaternion defining the orbital plane. The resulting formulation provides a deep insight into the geometry of hyperbolic orbits. The performance of the formulation in long-term propagations is studied. The orbits of four hyperbolic comets are integrated and the accuracy of the solution is compared to other regularized formulations. The resulting formulation improves the stability of the integration process and it is not affected by the perihelion passage. It provides a level of accuracy that may not be reached by the compared formulations, at the cost of increasing the computational time.

  15. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  16. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  17. Supershells and propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclow, M. M.; Mccray, R.; Kafatos, M.

    1986-01-01

    Correlated supernovae from an OB association can carve large cavities (greater than 100 pc) in the interstellar medium (ISM), and can punch holes completely through the disk of a spiral galaxy. Supernova remnant energy within such a cavity is thermalized before the shock reaches the supershell. Thus stellar wind theory may be used to model these superbubbles. We describe how the evolution of the superbubble depends on the density distribution of the galactic disk gas and the rate of supernovae in the OB association. At a radius of 100 to 300 pc, the supershell becomes gravitationally unstable, forming giant molecular clouds which are the sites for new star formation. This gravitational instability of the supershells provides a physical mechanism for propagating star formation and may account for the observation of bursts of star formation in galaxies.

  18. Theory of directional pulse propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsler, P.; Radnor, S. B. P.; New, G. H. C.

    2005-12-15

    We construct combined electric and magnetic field variables which independently represent energy flows in the forward and backward directions, respectively, and use these to reformulate Maxwell's equations. These variables enable us to not only judge the effect and significance of backward-traveling field components, but also to discard them when appropriate. They thereby have the potential to simplify numerical simulations, leading to potential speed gains of up to 100% over standard finite difference time-domain (FDTD) or pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) simulations. We present results for various illustrative situations, including an example application to second harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate. These field variables are also used to derive both envelope equations useful for narrow-band pulse propagation, and a second order wave equation. Alternative definitions are also presented.

  19. Propagation Speed in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (H.H.) equations modified by Dodge for Rana pipiens myelinated nerve have been solved to determine how well the theory predicts the effects of changes of temperature and [Na+]0 on propagation. Conduction speed θ was found to have an approximately exponential dependence on temperature as was found experimentally, but the theoretical temperature coefficient (Q10) was low; 1.5 compared with the experimental finding of 2.95. θ was found to be a linear function of log ([Na+]0) in contrast to the experimental finding of a square root dependence on [Na+]0. θ is 50% greater at one-fourth normal [Na+]0 than the theory predicts. The difference between the theoretical θ([Na+]0) and the experimental θ([Na+]0) is probably due to an imprecisely known variation of parameters and not to a fundamental inadequacy of the theory. PMID:4542941

  20. Flame propagation through periodic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dold, J.W.; Kerr, O.S.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-02-01

    The discovery of a new class of Navier-Stokes solutions representing steady periodic stretched vortices offers a useful test-bed for examining interactions between flames and complex flow-fields. After briefly describing these vortex solutions and their wide-ranging parameterization in terms of wavelength and amplitude, this article examines their effect on flames of constant normal propagation speed as observed through numerical solutions of an eikonal equation. Over certain ranges of vortex amplitude and flame-speed, a corridor of enhanced flame passage is seen to be created as a leading flame-tip managers to leap-frog between successive vortices. However, for large enough amplitudes of vorticity or small enough flame-speeds, the flame fails to be able to benefit from the advection due to the vortices. It is shown that the leading tips of such flames are effectively trapped by the stretched vortices.

  1. Progress in front propagation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  2. Line of sight microwave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohbehn, J. W.

    1969-01-01

    A review of the uses of microwave line-of-sight propagation in remote atmospheric probing is given. The review concentrates on use of the following types of measurements: (1) the use of total electrical path length for measuring average density and water vapor content; (2) the use of amplitude and phase fluctuations over a single path for determining the form of the turbulence spectrum; (3) the use of angle-of-arrival data for measuring the decrease in refractivity; and (4) the use of multiple-element receiving antennas in determining wind speed, atmospheric parameters, and atmospheric models. A review is given of the connection between microwave measurements and meteorological parameters, and the basic electromagnetic theory on which the analyses are made. A few suggestions for future work in these areas is given.

  3. Probabilistic modeling of propagating explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    Weapons containing significant quantities of high explosives (HE) are sometimes located in close proximity to one another. If an explosion occurs in a weapon, the possibility of propagation to one or more additional weapons may exist, with severe consequences possibly resulting. In the general case, a system of concern consists of multiple weapons and various other objects in a complex, three-dimensional geometry. In each weapon, HE is enclosed by (casing) materials that function as protection in the event of a neighbor detonation but become a source of fragments if the HE is initiated. The protection afforded by the casing means that only high-momentum fragments, which occur rarely, are of concern. These fragments, generated in an initial donor weapon are transported to other weapons either directly or by ricochet. Interaction of a fragment with an acceptor weapon can produce a reaction in the acceptor HE and result in a second detonation. In this paper we describe a comprehensive methodology to estimate the probability of various consequences for fragment-induced propagating detonations in arrays of weapons containing HE. Analysis of this problem requires an approach that can both define the circumstances under which rare events can occur and calculate the probability of such occurrences. Our approach is based on combining process tree methodology with Monte Carlo transport simulation. Our Monte Carlo technique very effectively captures important features of these differences. Process tree methodology is described and its use is discussed for a simplified problem and to illustrate the power of Monte Carlo simulation in estimating fragment-induced detonation of an acceptor weapon.

  4. Overview of near millimeter wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, W. A.

    1981-02-01

    Near millimeter wave (NMMW) propagation problems are divided into three classes: propagation through homogeneous, turbid, and turbulent atmospheres. These classical forms include anomalous water vapor absorption in a homogeneous atmosphere as well as scintillation phenomena associated with propagation through severe weather and 'dirty battlefield' environments. Examples of the existing, inadequate, scintillation data base are given and the lack of supporting meteorological data noted. Carefully designed NMMW scintillation experiments with equally carefully designed micro-meteorological support are needed.

  5. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  6. GALPROP: New Developments in CR Propagation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, I. V.; Jones, F. C.; Mashnik, S. G.; Strong, A. W.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2003-01-01

    The numerical Galactic CR propagation code GALPROP has been shown to reproduce simultaneously observational data of many kinds related to CR origin and propagation. It has been validated on direct measurements of nuclei, antiprotons, electrons, positrons as well as on astronomical measurements of gamma rays and synchrotron radiation. Such data provide many independent constraints on model parameters while revealing some contradictions in the conventional view of Galactic CR propagation. Using a new version of GALPROP we study new effects such as processes of wave-particle interactions in the interstellar medium. We also report about other developments in the CR propagation code.

  7. Neural network construction via back-propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Burwick, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    A method is presented that combines back-propagation with multi-layer neural network construction. Back-propagation is used not only to adjust the weights but also the signal functions. Going from one network to an equivalent one that has additional linear units, the non-linearity of these units and thus their effective presence is then introduced via back-propagation (weight-splitting). The back-propagated error causes the network to include new units in order to minimize the error function. We also show how this formalism allows to escape local minima.

  8. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  9. Summary of the First ACTS Propagation Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David V.

    1990-01-01

    The first Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW I), organized by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to plan propagation experiments and studies with NASA's ACTS, convened in Santa Monica, California, during November 28 and 29, 1989. The objectives of APSW I were to identify general and ACTS-related propagation needs, and to prepare recommendations for a study plan incorporating scientific and systems requirements related to deployment of 8 to 10 propagation terminals in the USA in support of ACTS experimental activities. A summary of workshop activities is given.

  10. Energetic interplanetary nucleon flux anisotropies - The effect of earth's bow shock and magnetosheath on sunward flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the combined, average effects of the bow shock and magnetosheath on the diffusive flow of interplanetary nuclei. The observations presented show that differences between 'connected' and 'unconnected' data subsets are apparent from the beginning of the analysis. Through an investigation of the mean unconnected diffusive anisotropy (those fluxes least affected by the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath) it is confirmed that the cross-field transport of MeV energy nuclei in interplanetary space is statistically significant and in the direction expected from the large-scale particle flux gradients. The direction of particle flow relative to the IMF is then used to show that nucleon flow characteristics on connected IMF differ from those on unconnected IMF. A scenario for producing this difference is then presented. It is concluded that the inclusion of the bow shock connected information biases measurements of the flux anisotropies of MeV energy H.

  11. Explosion propagation in inert porous media.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, G

    2012-02-13

    Porous media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the porous media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through porous media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In porous media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In porous media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the porous media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity. PMID:22213663

  12. Propagation of almond rootstocks and trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of almond trees in production in California and elsewhere were propagated by nurseries using the grafting technique called budding. This gives a uniform orchard and allows the grower to select nut cultivar (scion) and rootstock combinations. Grafting is a form of clonal propagation and resu...

  13. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  14. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  15. Rapid vegetative propagation method for carob

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many fruit species are propagated by vegetative methods such as budding, grafting, cutting, suckering, layering etc. to avoid heterozygosity. Carob trees (Ceratonia siliqua L.) are of highly economical value and it is among the most difficult-to-propagate fruit species. In this study, air-layering p...

  16. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  17. Propagation modeling for land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barts, R. Michael; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified empirical model for predicting primary fade statistics for a vegetatively shadowed mobile satellite signal is presented, and predictions based on the model are presented using propagation parameter values from experimental data. Results from the empirical model are used to drive a propagation simulator to produce the secondary fade statistics of average fade duration.

  18. Managing Data From Signal-Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses system for management of data from Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) program, which consists of series of experiments on propagation of signals from transmitter at one fixed location to transponder on tower at another fixed location and from transponder to mobile receiver in van. Purpose of experiments to simulate signal-propagation conditions of land-mobile/satellite communication system.

  19. Steps toward quantitative infrasound propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle; Lalande, Jean-Marie; Velea, Doru

    2016-04-01

    Realistic propagation modeling requires propagation models capable of incorporating the relevant physical phenomena as well as sufficiently accurate atmospheric specifications. The wind speed and temperature gradients in the atmosphere provide multiple ducts in which low frequency sound, infrasound, can propagate efficiently. The winds in the atmosphere are quite variable, both temporally and spatially, causing the sound ducts to fluctuate. For ground to ground propagation the ducts can be borderline in that small perturbations can create or destroy a duct. In such cases the signal propagation is very sensitive to fluctuations in the wind, often producing highly dispersed signals. The accuracy of atmospheric specifications is constantly improving as sounding technology develops. There is, however, a disconnect between sound propagation and atmospheric specification in that atmospheric specifications are necessarily statistical in nature while sound propagates through a particular atmospheric state. In addition infrasonic signals can travel to great altitudes, on the order of 120 km, before refracting back to earth. At such altitudes the atmosphere becomes quite rare causing sound propagation to become highly non-linear and attenuating. Approaches to these problems will be presented.

  20. Propagation of a fluidization - combustion wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pron, G.P.; Gusachenko, L.K.; Zarko, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    A fluidization-combustion wave propagating through a fixed and initially cool bed was created by igniting coal at the top surface of the bed. The proposed physical interpretation of the phenomenon is in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the characteristics of the process on determining parameters. A kindling regime with forced wave propagation is suggested.

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of pyroshock propagation using hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juho; Hwang, Dae-Hyeon; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Pyroshock or pyrotechnic shock generated by explosive events of pyrotechnic devices can induce fatal failures in electronic payloads. Therefore, understanding and estimation of pyroshock propagation through complex structures are necessary. However, an experimental approach using real pyrotechnic devices is quite burdensome because pyrotechnic devices can damage test structures and newly manufactured test structures are necessary for each experiment. Besides, pyrotechnic experiments are quite expensive, time-consuming, and dangerous. Consequently, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of pyroshock propagation without using real pyrotechnic devices is necessary. In this study, nondestructive evaluation technique for pyroshock propagation estimation using hydrocodes is proposed. First, pyroshock propagation is numerically analyzed using AUTODYN, a commercial hydrocodes. Hydrocodes can handle stress wave propagation including elastic, plastic, and shock wave in the time domain. Test structures are modeled and pyroshock time history is applied to where the pyroshock propagation originates. Numerical NDE results of pyroshock propagation on test structures are analyzed in terms of acceleration time histories and acceleration shock response spectra (SRS) results. To verify the proposed numerical methodology, impact tests using airsoft gun are performed. The numerical analysis results for the impact tests are compared with experimental results and they show good agreements. The proposed numerical techniques enable us to nondestructively characterize pyroshock propagation.

  2. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  3. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    EPA Science Inventory

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  4. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set. PMID:20866473

  5. Topographic effects on infrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mihan H; Gibson, Robert G; Walker, Bob E; McKenna, Jason; Winslow, Nathan W; Kofford, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Infrasound data were collected using portable arrays in a region of variable terrain elevation to quantify the effects of topography on observed signal amplitude and waveform features at distances less than 25 km from partially contained explosive sources during the Frozen Rock Experiment (FRE) in 2006. Observed infrasound signals varied in amplitude and waveform complexity, indicating propagation effects that are due in part to repeated local maxima and minima in the topography on the scale of the dominant wavelengths of the observed data. Numerical simulations using an empirically derived pressure source function combining published FRE accelerometer data and historical data from Project ESSEX, a time-domain parabolic equation model that accounted for local terrain elevation through terrain-masking, and local meteorological atmospheric profiles were able to explain some but not all of the observed signal features. Specifically, the simulations matched the timing of the observed infrasound signals but underestimated the waveform amplitude observed behind terrain features, suggesting complex scattering and absorption of energy associated with variable topography influences infrasonic energy more than previously observed. PMID:22280569

  6. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  7. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba. PMID:23179687

  8. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  9. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  10. Propagation prediction for the North Sea environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieth, R.

    1989-09-01

    Evaporation ducting can have an important influence on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. The dependence of those ducting conditions on geographic location requires an estimate of occurrence and effects of ducting in various areas. Duct height statistics using long term statistical meteorological data in combination with propagation models are used for this purpose. Jeske's propagation measurements during 1961 at the German coast of the North Sea were taken and compared with the calculated results from the combination of the statistical weather data base and the propagation models, as well as another measurement program performed in Greece. A brief description of the models is followed by an example of the results of the Greek measurements. The German experimental data and duct height distributions for that region are described. Finally the results of measurements and calculations are discussed. A good agreement was found between measured propagation data and predictions based on climatological averages.

  11. Fluctuation-controlled front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Douglas Thacher

    1997-09-01

    the symmetry of the absorbing state, but which is unsuccessful at capturing the behavior of diffusion-limited growth. In an effort to find a simpler model system, we turned to modelling fitness increases in evolution. The work was motivated by an experiment on vesicular stomatitis virus, a short (˜9600bp) single-stranded RNA virus. A highly bottlenecked viral population increases in fitness rapidly until a certain point, after which the fitness increases at a slower rate. This is well modeled by a constant population reproducing and mutating on a smooth fitness landscape. Mean field theory of this system displays the same infinite propagation velocity blowup as mean field diffusion-limited aggregation. However, we have been able to make progress on a number of fronts. One is solving systems of moment equations, where a hierarchy of moments is truncated arbitrarily at some level. Good results for front propagation velocity are found with just two moments, corresponding to inclusion of the basic finite population clustering effect ignored by mean field theory. In addition, for small mutation rates, most of the population will be entirely on a single site or two adjacent sites, and the density of these cases can be described and solved. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Ensemble modeling of CME propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Millward, G. H.; Pizzo, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge(WSA)-Enlil-cone modeling system is used for making routine arrival time forecasts of the Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejections (CMEs), since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. A major objective of this work is to better understand the sensitivity of the WSA-Enlil modeling results to input model parameters and how these parameters contribute to the overall model uncertainty and performance. We present ensemble modeling results for a simple halo CME event that occurred on 15 February 2011 and a succession of three halo CME events that occurred on 2-4 August 2011. During this period the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft viewed the CMEs over the solar limb, thereby providing more reliable constraints on the initial CME geometries during the manual cone fitting process. To investigate the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to small variations in the input cone properties, for each CME event we create an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters. We find that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the reliable specification of the background solar wind, which is driven by the input maps of the photospheric magnetic field. As part of the modeling ensemble, we simulate the CME events using the traditional daily updated maps as well as those that are produced by the Air Force data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model, which provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the photospheric field distribution. For the August 2011 events, in particular, we find that the accuracy in the arrival time predictions also depends on whether the cone parameters for all three CMEs are specified in a single WSA-Enlil simulation. The inclusion/exclusion of one or two of the preceding CMEs affects the solar wind conditions through which the succeeding CME propagates.

  13. Electromagnetic Propagation Prediction Inside Aircraft Cabins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, Genevieve; Vahala, Linda; Beggs, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic propagation models for signal strength prediction within aircraft cabins are essential for evaluating and designing a wireless communication system to be implemented onboard aircraft. A model was developed using Wireless Valley's SitePlanner; which is commercial grade software intended for predictions within office buildings. The performance of the model was evaluated through a comparison with test data measurements taken on several aircraft. The comparison concluded that the model can accurately predict power propagation within the cabin. This model can enhance researchers understanding of power propagation within aircraft cabins and will aid in future research.

  14. Photon propagator in light-shell gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Kestin, Greg; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-05-01

    We derive the photon propagator in light-shell gauge (LSG) vμAμ=0 , where vμ=(1,r ^ ) μ . This gauge is an important ingredient of the light-shell effective theory—an effective theory for describing high energy jet processes on a 2-dimensional spherical shell expanding at the speed of light around the point of the initial collision producing the jets. Since LSG is a noncovariant gauge, we cannot calculate the LSG propagator by using the standard procedure for covariant gauges. We therefore employ a new technique for computing the propagator, which we hope may be of relevance in other gauges as well.

  15. Propagating confined states in phase dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Deissler, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical treatment is given to the possibility of the existence of propagating confined states in the nonlinear phase equation by generalizing stationary confined states. The nonlinear phase equation is set forth for the case of propagating patterns with long wavelengths and low-frequency modulation. A large range of parameter values is shown to exist for propagating confined states which have spatially localized regions which travel on a background with unique wavelengths. The theoretical phenomena are shown to correspond to such physical systems as spirals in Taylor instabilities, traveling waves in convective systems, and slot-convection phenomena for binary fluid mixtures.

  16. Propagation considerations in land mobile satellite transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Smith, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    It appears likely that the Land Mobile Satellite Services (LMSS) will be authorized by the FCC for operation in the 800 to 900 MHz (UHF) and possibly near 1500 MHz (L-band). Propagation problems are clearly an important factor in the effectiveness of this service, but useful measurements are few, and produced contradictory interpretations. A first order overview of existing measurements is presented with particular attention to the first two NASA balloon to mobile vehicle propagation experiments. Some physical insight into the interpretation of propagation effects in LMSS transmissions is provided.

  17. Computing Propagation Of Sound In Engine Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Silvia

    1995-01-01

    Frequency Domain Propagation Model (FREDOM) computer program accounts for acoustic loads applied to components of engines. Models propagation of noise through fluids in ducts between components and through passages within components. Used not only to analyze hardware problems, but also for design purposes. Updated version of FREQPL program easier to use. Devised specifically for use in analyzing acoustic loads in rocket engines. Underlying physical and mathematical concepts implemented also applicable to acoustic propagation in other enclosed spaces; analyzing process plumbing and ducts in industrial buildings with view toward reducing noise in work areas.

  18. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  19. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  20. Propagation of Light Elements in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A. W.; Mashnik, S. G.; Jones, F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The origin and evolution of isotopes of the lightest elements d, He-3, Li, Be, and B in the universe is a key problem in such fields as astrophysics of CR, Galactic evolution, non-thermal nucleosynthesis, and cosmological studies. One of the major sources of these species is spallation by CR nuclei in the interstellar medium. On the other hand, it is the Boron/Carbon ratio in CR and Be-10 abundance which are used to fix the propagation parameters and thus spallation rate. We study production and Galactic propagation of these species using the numerical propagation code GALPROP and updated production cross sections.

  1. Probabilistic Fatigue And Flaw-Propagation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Nicholas; Newlin, Laura; Ebbeler, Donald; Sutharshana, Sravan; Creager, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic Failure Assessment for Fatigue and Flaw Propagation (PFAFAT II) package of software utilizing probabilistic failure-assessment (PFA) methodology to model flaw-propagation and low-cycle-fatigue modes of failure of structural components. Comprises one program for performing probabilistic crack-growth analysis and two programs for performing probabilistic low-cycle-fatigue analysis. These programs perform probabilistic fatigue and crack-propagation analysis by means of Monte Carlo simulation. PFAFAT II is extension of, rather than replacement for, PFAFAT software (NPO-18965). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Ultrasound Propagation in Colloidal Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nigel E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes apparatus and techniques for making ultrasonic measurements in fluids and applications of them to measurements of ultrasonic parameters in colloidal dispersions. A brief description of the properties and uses of ultrasound propagation in dispersions is followed by an extensive review of theories which relate the particulate properties of the dispersions to the measurable ultrasonic parameters, velocity (c) and attenuation (alpha ). Measurement principles are outlined related to the design of near-field measurement methods and the development of three techniques is described. These are shown to give results which are both highly self-consistent and in excellent agreement with a far-field method. Measurements of alpha and c for model dispersions of glass spheres in Newtonian liquids are shown to be in good agreement with the relevant theory when particle polydispersity is taken into account. For structured fluids as the continuous phase, the alpha and c data for suspensions of spheres are used to obtain the continuous phase viscosity ( eta). The alpha data agree approximately with the macroscopic viscosity, but the velocity data requires the introduction of a shear elastic term and the revision of theory in order to obtain agreement. Attenuation as a function of barite concentration in Newtonian liquids was investigated and the ultrasonic particle radius was found to be systematically larger than expected. This is attributed to particle rugosity. Measurements of alpha and c using non-gelling aqueous kaolinite suspensions are shown to agree well with theory when the eccentricity and the interactions of particles are taken into account. For gelling aqueous bentonite suspensions, alpha and c were found to be time-dependent over a period of several days following initial dispersion. The observed increases in both alpha and c are interpreted in terms of a growth in gel fraction and shear

  3. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  4. Fick's Law Assisted Propagation for Semisupervised Learning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Fu, Keren; Yang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    How to propagate the label information from labeled examples to unlabeled examples is a critical problem for graph-based semisupervised learning. Many label propagation algorithms have been developed in recent years and have obtained promising performance on various applications. However, the eigenvalues of iteration matrices in these algorithms are usually distributed irregularly, which slow down the convergence rate and impair the learning performance. This paper proposes a novel label propagation method called Fick's law assisted propagation (FLAP). Unlike the existing algorithms that are directly derived from statistical learning, FLAP is deduced on the basis of the theory of Fick's First Law of Diffusion, which is widely known as the fundamental theory in fluid-spreading. We prove that FLAP will converge with linear rate and show that FLAP makes eigenvalues of the iteration matrix distributed regularly. Comprehensive experimental evaluations on synthetic and practical datasets reveal that FLAP obtains encouraging results in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. PMID:25532192

  5. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-23

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  6. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  7. Promoted Combustion Test Propagation Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borstorff, J.; Jones, P.; Lowery, F.

    2002-01-01

    Combustion propagation rate data were examined for potential use in benchmarking a thermal model of the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT), and also for potential use in measuring the repeatability of PCT results.

  8. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants. PMID:25582733

  9. ACTS Project and Propagation Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Spacecraft operations continue to be nominal and the sixth eclipse season completed. Battery reconditioning to be re-evaluated before the fall eclipse. Other topics covered include: Inclined orbit; Experiments program; Reorganizations; Program timeline; and propagation program status.

  10. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  11. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  12. Gram-Schmidt algorithms for covariance propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Bierman, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper addresses the time propagation of triangular covariance factors. Attention is focused on the square-root free factorization, P = UD(transpose of U), where U is unit upper triangular and D is diagonal. An efficient and reliable algorithm for U-D propagation is derived which employs Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Partitioning the state vector to distinguish bias and coloured process noise parameters increase mapping efficiency. Cost comparisons of the U-D, Schmidt square-root covariance and conventional covariance propagation methods are made using weighted arithmetic operation counts. The U-D time update is shown to be less costly than the Schmidt method; and, except in unusual circumstances, it is within 20% of the cost of conventional propagation.

  13. Gram-Schmidt algorithms for covariance propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Bierman, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper addresses the time propagation of triangular covariance factors. Attention is focused on the square-root free factorization, P = UDU/T/, where U is unit upper triangular and D is diagonal. An efficient and reliable algorithm for U-D propagation is derived which employs Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Partitioning the state vector to distinguish bias and colored process noise parameters increases mapping efficiency. Cost comparisons of the U-D, Schmidt square-root covariance and conventional covariance propagation methods are made using weighted arithmetic operation counts. The U-D time update is shown to be less costly than the Schmidt method; and, except in unusual circumstances, it is within 20% of the cost of conventional propagation.

  14. Managing Mobile/Satellite Propagation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1990-01-01

    "Data Management System for Mobile Satellite Propagation" software package collection of FORTRAN programs and UNIX shell scripts designed to handle huge amounts of data resulting from mobile/satellite radio-propagation experiments. Data from experiments converted into standard and more useful forms. Software package contains program to convert binary format of data into standard ASCII format suitable for use with wide variety of computing-machine architectures. Written in either FORTRAN 77 or UNIX shell scripts.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  16. Light propagation in Swiss-cheese cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybka, Sebastian J.

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneities on light propagation. The Sachs equations are solved numerically in the Swiss-cheese models with inhomogeneities modeled by the Lemaître-Tolman solutions. Our results imply that, within the models we study, inhomogeneities may partially mimic the accelerated expansion of the Universe provided the light propagates through regions with lower than the average density. The effect of inhomogeneities is small and full randomization of the photons’ trajectories reduces it to an insignificant level.

  17. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy-Racs, Adam

    1992-05-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) indicated that the leading edge of the pulse-modulated microwaves propagates with the velocity c/cos theta in a direction theta in open space. This is tantamount to a claim that their measurements indicate a propagation velocity faster than the speed of light. Giakos and Ishii reply to all technical points raised in the present comment and defend their experimental observations.

  18. Quark propagators in confinement and deconfinement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Masatoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Saito, Takuya

    2010-05-01

    We study quark propagators near the confinement/deconfinement phase transition temperature in quenched-lattice simulation of QCD. We find that there is no qualitative change for the quark propagators in both phases. In the confinement phase, those effective quark masses in units of the critical temperature behave as a constant as a function of the temperature, while above the critical temperature, the value of the effective quark mass drops to circa half value.

  19. Propagation measurements in Alaska using ACTS beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    The placement of an ACTS propagation terminal in Alaska has several distinct advantages. First is the inclusion of a new and important climatic zone to the global propagation model. Second is the low elevation look angle from Alaska to ACTS. These two unique opportunities also present problems unique to the location, such as extreme temperatures and lower power levels. These problems are examined and compensatory solutions are presented.

  20. POPPY: Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall; Long, Joseph; Douglas, Ewan; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Slocum, Christine

    2016-02-01

    POPPY (Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon) simulates physical optical propagation including diffraction. It implements a flexible framework for modeling Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and point spread function formation, particularly in the context of astronomical telescopes. POPPY provides the optical modeling framework for WebbPSF (ascl:1504.007) and was developed as part of a simulation package for JWST, but is available separately and is broadly applicable to many kinds of imaging simulations.

  1. Combustion front propagation in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, R.L. II; Krantz, W.B.

    1990-10-01

    Reverse Combustion (RC) enhances coal seam permeability prior to Underground Coal Gasification. Understanding RC is necessary to improve its reliability and economics. A curved RC front propagation model is developed, then solved by high activation energy asymptotics. It explicitly incorporates extinction (stoichiometric and thermal) and tangential heat transport (THT) (convection and conduction). THT arises from variation in combustion front temperature caused by tangential variation in the oxidant gas flux to the channel surface. Front temperature depends only weakly on THT; front velocity is strongly affected, with heat loss slowing propagation. The front propagation speed displays a maximum with respect to gas flux. Combustion promoters speed front propagation; inhibitors slow front propagation. The propagation model is incorporated into 2-D simulations of RC channel evolution utilizing the boundary element method with cubic hermetian elements to solve the flow from gas injection wells through the coal to the convoluted, temporally evolving, channel surface, and through the channel to a gas production well. RC channel propagation is studied using 17 cm diameter subbituminous horizontally drilled coal cores. Sixteen experiments at pressures between 2000 and 3600 kPa, injected gas oxygen contents between 21% and 75%, and flows between 1 and 4 standard liters per minute are described. Similarity analysis led to scaling-down of large RC ({approx}1 m) to laboratory scale ({approx}5 cm). Propagation velocity shows a strong synergistic increase at high levels of oxygen, pressure, and gas flow. Char combustion is observed, leaving ash-filled, irregularly shaped channels. Cracks are observed to penetrate the char zone surrounding the channel cores. 69 refs., 54 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Error Propagation in a System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloegel, Kirk (Inventor); Bhatt, Devesh (Inventor); Oglesby, David V. (Inventor); Madl, Gabor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present subject matter can enable the analysis of signal value errors for system models. In an example, signal value errors can be propagated through the functional blocks of a system model to analyze possible effects as the signal value errors impact incident functional blocks. This propagation of the errors can be applicable to many models of computation including avionics models, synchronous data flow, and Kahn process networks.

  3. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  4. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  5. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  6. Radiowave propagation measurements in Nigeria (preliminary reports)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falodun, S. E.; Okeke, P. N.

    2013-07-01

    International conferences on frequency coordination have, in recent years, required new information on radiowave propagation in tropical regions and, in particular, on propagation in Africa. The International Telecommunications Union (ITU-R) initiated `radio-wave propagation measurement campaign' in some African countries some years back. However, none of the ITU-initiated experiments were mounted in Nigeria, and hence, there is lack of adequate understanding of the propagation mechanisms associated with this region of the tropics. The Centre for Basic Space Science (CBSS) of NASRDA has therefore embarked on propagation data collection from the different climatic zones of Nigeria (namely Coastal, Guinea Savannah, Midland, and Sahelian) with the aim of making propagation data available to the ITU, for design and prediction purposes in order to ensure a qualitative and effective communication system in Nigeria. This paper focuses on the current status of propagation data from Nigeria (collected by CBSS), identifying other parameters that still need to be obtained. The centre has deployed weather stations to different locations in the country for refractivity measurements in clear atmosphere, at the ground surface and at an altitude of 100 m, being the average height of communication mast in Nigeria. Other equipments deployed are Micro Rain Radar and Nigerian Environmental and Climatic Observing Program equipments. Some of the locations of the measurement stations are Nsukka (7.4° E, 6.9° N), Akure (5.12° E, 7.15° N), Minna (6.5° E, 9.6° N), Sokoto (5.25° E, 13.08° N), Jos (8.9° E, 9.86° N), and Lagos (3.35° E, 6.6° N). The results obtained from the data analysis have shown that the refractivity values vary with climatic zones and seasons of the year. Also, the occurrence probability of abnormal propagation events, such as super refraction, sub-refraction, and ducting, depends on the location as well as the local time. We have also attempted to identify

  7. NLO error propagation exercise: statistical results

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, D.J.; Downing, D.J.

    1985-09-01

    Error propagation is the extrapolation and cumulation of uncertainty (variance) above total amounts of special nuclear material, for example, uranium or /sup 235/U, that are present in a defined location at a given time. The uncertainty results from the inevitable inexactness of individual measurements of weight, uranium concentration, /sup 235/U enrichment, etc. The extrapolated and cumulated uncertainty leads directly to quantified limits of error on inventory differences (LEIDs) for such material. The NLO error propagation exercise was planned as a field demonstration of the utilization of statistical error propagation methodology at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio from April 1 to July 1, 1983 in a single material balance area formed specially for the exercise. Major elements of the error propagation methodology were: variance approximation by Taylor Series expansion; variance cumulation by uncorrelated primary error sources as suggested by Jaech; random effects ANOVA model estimation of variance effects (systematic error); provision for inclusion of process variance in addition to measurement variance; and exclusion of static material. The methodology was applied to material balance area transactions from the indicated time period through a FORTRAN computer code developed specifically for this purpose on the NLO HP-3000 computer. This paper contains a complete description of the error propagation methodology and a full summary of the numerical results of applying the methodlogy in the field demonstration. The error propagation LEIDs did encompass the actual uranium and /sup 235/U inventory differences. Further, one can see that error propagation actually provides guidance for reducing inventory differences and LEIDs in future time periods.

  8. Accurate orbit propagation with planetary close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    We tackle the problem of accurately propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).

  9. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  10. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  12. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  13. Toward an improved understanding of MCS propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Processes that drive the propagation of elevated mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been the topic of a growing body of recent research. Elevated MCSs are responsible for a large percentage of warm season rainfall in the continental United States, and produce flash floods more frequently than other modes of convection. A comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of MCS propagation is important, since propagation sometimes opposes other environmental forces that influence MCS motion. This leads to nearly stationary MCSs that produce prolific local rainfall totals. The ingredients-based Propagation index (IPI) is introduced in this research. IPI is defined as the normalized product of horizontal warm thermal advection (a proxy for lifting), convective available potential energy (CAPE), and relative humidity. Horizontal plots of IPI are useful in identifying regions of probable convective initiation, including the intersections between potentially unstable flow and outflow boundaries, regions of mesoscale lift along the nose of the low-level jet, convectively induced gravity waves, and frontogenesis. Effective inflow-layer shear vectors are also introduced, and found to be useful for scenarios where IPI does yield predictive insight, such as the traditional "RKW" scenario where the forward propagation of an MCS is driven by thunderstorm outflow. It is argued that horizontal maps of IPI and EILS vectors will contribute significantly to short-term (e.g. 1-2 hr) predictions of the movement of MCSs, and to the subsequent assessment of their potential for flash flood production.

  14. Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation

    PubMed

    Wang; Kuzmich; Dogariu

    2000-07-20

    Einstein's theory of special relativity and the principle of causality imply that the speed of any moving object cannot exceed that of light in a vacuum (c). Nevertheless, there exist various proposals for observing faster-than-c propagation of light pulses, using anomalous dispersion near an absorption line, nonlinear and linear gain lines, or tunnelling barriers. However, in all previous experimental demonstrations, the light pulses experienced either very large absorption or severe reshaping, resulting in controversies over the interpretation. Here we use gain-assisted linear anomalous dispersion to demonstrate superluminal light propagation in atomic caesium gas. The group velocity of a laser pulse in this region exceeds c and can even become negative, while the shape of the pulse is preserved. We measure a group-velocity index of n(g) = -310(+/- 5); in practice, this means that a light pulse propagating through the atomic vapour cell appears at the exit side so much earlier than if it had propagated the same distance in a vacuum that the peak of the pulse appears to leave the cell before entering it. The observed superluminal light pulse propagation is not at odds with causality, being a direct consequence of classical interference between its different frequency components in an anomalous dispersion region. PMID:10917523

  15. Microdomain Effects on Transverse Cardiac Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joyce; Keener, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gap junctional coupling, sodium ion channel distribution, and extracellular conductivity on transverse conduction in cardiac tissue is explored using a microdomain model that incorporates aspects of the inhomogeneous cellular structure. The propagation velocities found in our model are compared to those in the classic bidomain model and indicate a strong ephaptic microdomain contribution to conduction depending on the parameter regime. We show that ephaptic effects can be quite significant in the junctional spaces between cells, and that the cell activation sequence is modified substantially by these effects. Further, we find that transverse propagation can be maintained by ephaptic effects, even in the absence of gap junctional coupling. The mechanism by which this occurs is found to be cablelike in that the junctional regions act like inverted cables. Our results provide insight into several recent experimental studies that indirectly indicate a mode of action potential propagation that does not rely exclusively on gap junctions. PMID:24559995

  16. Propagation of polarized waves in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    A parabolic equation for electromagnetic wave propagation in a random medium is extended to include the depolarization effects in the narrow-angle, forward-scattering setting. Closed-form parabolic equations for propagation of the coherence tensor are derived under a Markov approximation model. For a general partially coherent and partially polarized beam wave, this equation can be reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, allowing a simple numeric solution. An analytical solution exists for statistically homogeneous waves. Estimates based on the perturbation solution support the common knowledge that the depolarization at the optical frequencies is negligible for atmospheric turbulence propagation. These results indicate that the recently published theory [Opt. Lett.40, 3077 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.003077] is not valid for atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27409697

  17. Propagation of intense UV filaments and vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhinin, Alexey

    The goal of this dissertation is to investigate the propagation of ultrashort high intensity UV laser pulses of order of nanoseconds in atmosphere. It is believed that they have a potential for stable and diffractionless propagation over the extended distances. Consequently, it creates a new array of applications in areas of communication, sensing, energy transportation and others. The theoretical model derived from Maxwell's equations represents unidirectional envelope propagation and plasma creation equations. It was shown numerically through Newton's iterations that the stationary model permits the localized fundamental and vortex solutions. Discussion of the stability of steady states involves different approaches and their limitations. Finally, model equations are integrated numerically to study the dynamics of the beams in the stationary model as well as nanosecond pulses in the full (3+1)D model using parallel computation.

  18. Shock unsteadiness creation and propagation: experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benay, R.; Alaphilippe, M.; Severac, N.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of creating unsteady distortions of the tip shock by waves emitted from an aircraft is assessed experimentally. The model chosen is a cylindrical fore body equipped with a spike. This configuration is known for generating an important level of unsteadiness around the spike in supersonic regime. The wind tunnel Mach number is equal to 2. The experiments show that waves emitted from this source propagate along the tip shock and interact with it. It is then assessed that this interaction produces a periodic distortion of the shock that propagates to the external flow. Unsteady pressure sensors, high speed schlieren films, hot wire probing and laser Doppler velocimetry are used as complementary experimental means. The final result is a coherent representation of the complex mechanism of wave propagation that has been evidenced. The principle of creating unsteady shock deformation by onboard equipments could be examined as a possibly promising method of sonic boom control.

  19. Study of propagation along nonuniform excitable fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Two related reaction diffusion systems which support traveling wave solutions when parameters are constant are studied when there are jump discontinuities in the diffusion coefficient. The first system represents a classical axon model where the fiber has a jump in diameter at discrete locations, and the membrane dynamics represents that of barnacle muscle (which we call Morris-Lecar dynamics). The second model represents a passive cable with a uniform density of spines which have Morris-Lecar dynamics. Use of a conditional comparison principle establishes conditions where a traveling wave solution can be blocked from propagating beyond the change in fiber diameter. The authors then examine numerically for both models conditions on physical parameters which show that traveling wave solutions are blocked by changes in the fiber diameter, when propagation is successful, and when there is both forward propagation and the formation of a reflecting (echo) wave.

  20. Nonlinear Force Propagation During Granular Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abram H.; Petersen, Alec J.; Kondic, Lou; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-04-01

    We experimentally study nonlinear force propagation into granular material during impact from an intruder, and we explain our observations in terms of the nonlinear grain-scale force relation. Using high-speed video and photoelastic particles, we determine the speed and spatial structure of the force response just after impact. We show that these quantities depend on a dimensionless parameter, M'=tcv0/d , where v0 is the intruder speed at impact, d is the particle diameter, and tc is the collision time for a pair of grains impacting at relative speed v0. The experiments access a large range of M' by using particles of three different materials. When M'≪1 , force propagation is chainlike with a speed, vf, satisfying vf∝d /tc. For larger M', the force response becomes spatially dense and the force propagation speed departs from vf∝d /tc, corresponding to collective stiffening of a strongly compressed packing of grains.

  1. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  2. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Flame propagation in partially premixed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsch, G.; Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.

    1996-11-01

    Turbulent flame propagation is studied under inhomogenously premixed conditions via data from direct numerical simulations. Departures from the premixed case are studied using four different configurations, ranging from one dimensional unsteady flames to turbulent three-dimensional simulations. Simulations are performed in these cases with various values of the mean equivalence ratio, fluctuations about the mean equivlalence ratio, correlation length scales, and probability denisty functions of the mixture composition. Propagation characteristics are described in terms of the flamelet approach, where the the main contribution of partial premixing on flame propagation is due to flame wrinkling relative to modification of the mean flamelet structure. This behavior is consistent over a broad range of conditions, with the exception being extreme departures from stoichiometric conditions where flamability limits are exceeded and flame quenching is observed.

  4. Propagation studies using a theoretical ionosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.

    1973-01-01

    The mid-latitude ionospheric and neutral atmospheric models are coupled with an advanced three dimensional ray tracing program to see what success would be obtained in predicting the wave propagation conditions and to study to what extent the use of theoretical ionospheric models is practical. The Penn State MK 1 ionospheric model, the Mitra-Rowe D region model, and the Groves' neutral atmospheric model are used throughout this work to represent the real electron densities and collision frequencies. The Faraday rotation and differential Doppler velocities from satellites, the propagation modes for long distance high frequency propagation, the group delays for each mode, the ionospheric absorption, and the spatial loss are all predicted.

  5. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  6. Displacement of squeezed propagating microwave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, Ling; Pogorzalek, Stefan; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Wulschner, Friedrich; Xie, Edwar; Menzel, Edwin; Deppe, Frank; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    Displacement of propagating squeezed states is a fundamental operation for quantum communications. It can be applied to fundamental studies of macroscopic quantum coherence and has an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with propagating microwaves. We generate propagating squeezed states using a Josephson parametric amplifier and implement displacement using a cryogenic directional coupler. We study single- and two-mode displacement regimes. For the single-mode displacement we find that the squeezing level of the displaced squeezed state does not depend on the displacement amplitude. Also, we observe that quantum entanglement between two spatially separated channels stays constant across 4 orders of displacement power. We acknowledge support by the German Research Foundation through SFB 631 and FE 1564/1-1, the EU project PROMISCE, and Elite Network of Bavaria through the program ExQM.

  7. Wave propagation into the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observations of various types of waves propagating into the middle atmosphere are reviewed. Emphasis is made on the excitation processes in the lower atmosphere and their vertical propagation through the background flow as a function of the latitude, height and season. The following subjects are discussed: (1) Vertical propagation of quasi-stationary forced Rossby waves into the winter stratosphere in connection with the sudden warming; (2) Spectral distribution and seasonal characteristics of normal mode (free) Rossby waves and the asymmetry of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; and (3) Seasonal variation of internal gravity waves in the middle atmosphere. Further discussions are presented for future studies based on accumulated observational data during the MAP period.

  8. Satellite sound broadcast propagation studies and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Satellite Sound Broadcasting is an attractive satellite application. Before regulatory decisions can be made in 1992, the propagation effects encountered have to be characterized. The Electrical Engineering Research Laboratory has nearly completed a system which will allow amplitude measurements to be made over 10 MHz bandwidths in the 800 to 1800 MHz frequency range. The system uses transmission from a transportable tower, and reception inside buildings or in the shadow of trees or utility poles. The goal is to derive propagation models for use by systems engineers who are about to design satellite broadcast systems. The advance of fiber-optics technology has helped to focus future development of satellite services into areas where satellites are uniquely competitive. One of these preferred satellite applications is the broadcasting of high-quality sound for stationary or mobile reception by listeners using low-cost, consumer-grade receivers. Before such services can be provided, however, the political hurdles of spectrum allocation have to be surmounted and the technical questions of standardization for world-wide compatibility have to be resolved. In order to arrive at an optimal system design, efficient in the use of our scarce spectral resources, affordable both to the broadcaster and the listener, and providing predictable performance, the propagation effects to which the service is subjected have to be characterized. Consequently, the objective of the research project is to make basic propagation measurements for direct Satellite Sound Broadcasting Service (SSBS). The data obtained should allow the development of propagation models to be used by communications engineers designing the operational systems. Such models shall describe the effects of shadowing and multipath propagation on SSBS receivers operating in a specified environment, such as inside commercial or residential buildings of various construction and also in the shadow of trees or utility poles

  9. Complex singularities in the quark propagator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator is being studied in the rainbow approximation using a gluon propagator that incorporates asymptotic freedom and is an entire function. The gluon propagator has a number of parameters that may be varied in order to obtain a good description of low-energy pion observables; such as f{sub {pi}} and the {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths. This provides a direct means of relating hadronic observables to the form of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared and serves as an adjunct and extension of the separable Ansatz approach discussed above. It also provides a means of examining the pole structure of the quark propagator, which may hold the key to understanding quark confinement. The preliminary results are encouraging. It was demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a good description of pion observables in this approach. Further, when the strength of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared becomes larger than a given critical value, the pole in the quark propagator bifurcates into a pair of complex conjugate poles: m{sub q} = m{sub q}{sup R} {plus_minus} im{sub q}{sup I}, which is a signal of confinement. The interpretation in this case is of 1/m{sub q}{sup I} as the distance over which a quark may propagate before fragmenting. Further, there are indications from these studies that T{sub c}{sup D} < T{sub c}{sup {chi}}, where T{sub c}{sup D} is the critical temperature for deconfinement and T{sub c}{sup {chi}} is the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration; i.e., indications that deconfinement occurs at a lower temperature than chiral symmetry restoration. Available results from this work will be presented at the Washington meeting of the APS.

  10. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  11. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  12. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the activities during the fourth six month period of the investigation of acoustic propagation in the atmosphere with a realistic lapse temperature profile. A significant error was detected since the previous semi-annual report and has been corrected in both the plane wave and point source solutions. This report then describes both of these problems in some detail along with presenting some numerical results from the model. Work will begin this summer on the model of propagation in an inversion.

  13. Enhancement of in vitro Guayule propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method for stimulating in vitro propagation of Guayule from a nutrient medium containing Guayule tissue by adding a substituted trialkyl amine bioinducing agent to the nutrient medium is described. Selective or differentiated propagation of shoots or callus is obtained by varying the amounts of substituted trialky amine present in the nutrient medium. The luxuriant growth provided may be processed for its poly isoprene content or may be transferred to a rooting medium for production of whole plants as identical clones of the original tissue. The method also provides for the production of large numbers of Guayule plants having identical desirable properties such as high polyisoprene levels.

  14. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Kirill G; Zhong, L; Pogorzalek, S; Eder, P; Fischer, M; Goetz, J; Xie, E; Wulschner, F; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Di Candia, R; Las Heras, U; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Menzel, E P; Deppe, F; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power. PMID:27447495

  15. Atmospheric propagation effects relevant to optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. The effects of clear air turbulence are reviewed as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study. Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in relation to optical deep space communications to an earth based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  16. Optimization of directional elastic energy propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Erik; Chang, Hannah R.; Ruzzene, Massimo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how topology optimization can be used to design a periodically perforated plate, in order to obtain a tailored anisotropic group velocity profile. The main method is demonstrated on both low and high frequency bending wave propagation in an aluminum plate, but is general in the sense that it could be used to design periodic structures with frequency dependent group velocity profiles for any kind of elastic wave propagation. With the proposed method the resulting design is manufacturable. Measurements on an optimized design compare excellently with the numerical results.

  17. Flame propagation and extinction in particle clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Joshi, N. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two phase flame propagation and extinction theory required to support the corresponding experiments planned for the space shuttle is being developed. Also being planned are specialized collaborative, experimental and theoretical NASA UCSD studies needed to support the ongoing definition of needed experimental hardware, experimental procedures, data acquisition philosophy, and other ground based support activities required to assure the success of space shuttle based experiments concerned with combustion of clouds of particulates at reduced gravitational conditions. The further development of relations delineating premixed particle cloud and premixed gaseous systems as well as burner stabilized and freely propagating flame systems is considered.

  18. Laser propagation in underdense plasmas: Scaling arguments

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of an intense laser beam in the underdense plasma is modelled by treating the plasma as a relativistic, zero temperature, charged fluid. For paraxial propagation and a sufficiently underdense plasma ({omega}p/{omega} {much_lt} 1), a multiple-scales technique is used to expand the exact equations in powers of the small parameter {theta} {equivalent_to} {omega}p/{omega}. The zeroth order equations are used in a critical examination of previous work on this problem, and to derive a scaling law for the threshold power required for cavitation.

  19. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Rodrigue, George P.

    1992-01-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) claim conclusive experimental evidence that microwave pulse propagation in waveguides and in air occurs at velocities exceeding the free-space speed of light, and assert that it is possible to transmit both energy and information in a non-TEM waveguiding medium at the lightspeed-exceeding phase velocity. The present analysis of their results reveals several significant potential sources of error in both their laboratory findings and those findings' interpretation. Giakos and Ishii reply that the accuracy of the propagation measurements presented in their study exceeds 0.2 percent.

  20. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Rodrigue, George P.

    1992-05-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) claim conclusive experimental evidence that microwave pulse propagation in waveguides and in air occurs at velocities exceeding the free-space speed of light, and assert that it is possible to transmit both energy and information in a non-TEM waveguiding medium at the lightspeed-exceeding phase velocity. The present analysis of their results reveals several significant potential sources of error in both their laboratory findings and those findings' interpretation. Giakos and Ishii reply that the accuracy of the propagation measurements presented in their study exceeds 0.2 percent.

  1. Acceleration and propagation of solar cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar cosmic ray measurements on the Geostationary Orbital Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft indicated that the duration of solar flare relativistic proton large pulses is comparable with the solar wind propagation duration from the Sun to the Earth. The front of the proton flux from flares on the western solar disk approaches the Earth with a flight time along the Archimedean spiral magnetic field line of 15-20 min. The proton flux from eastern flares is registered in the Earth's orbit 3-5 h after the flare onset. These particles apparently propagate across IMF owing to diffusion.

  2. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  3. Atmospheric propagation issues relevant to optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churnside, James H.; Shaik, Kamran

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric propagation issues relevant to space-to-ground optical communications for near-earth applications are studied. Propagation effects, current optical communication activities, potential applications, and communication techniques are surveyed. It is concluded that a direct-detection space-to-ground link using redundant receiver sites and temporal encoding is likely to be employed to transmit earth-sensing satellite data to the ground some time in the future. Low-level, long-term studies of link availability, fading statistics, and turbulence climatology are recommended to support this type of application.

  4. Atmospheric Propagation Effects Relevant to Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. This article reviews the effects of clear-air turbulence as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study, Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in resolution to optical deep-space communications to an earth-based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  5. Propagation of polymer slugs through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Lecourtier, J.; Chauveteau, G.

    1984-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical study of the mechanisms governing polymer slug propagation through porous media. An analytical model taking into account the macromolecule exclusion from pore walls is proposed to predict rodlike polymer velocity in porous media and thus the spreading out of polydispersed polymer slugs. Under conditions where this wall exclusion is maximum, i.e. at low shear rates and polymer concentrations, the experiments show that xanthan propagation is effectively predicted by this model. At higher flow rates and polymer concentrations, the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion and viscous fingering are analyzed. A new fractionation method for determining molecular weight distribution of polymers used in EOR is proposed.

  6. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, L.; Pogorzalek, S.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Goetz, J.; Xie, E.; Wulschner, F.; Inomata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Di Candia, R.; Las Heras, U.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power.

  7. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. D.

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources propagators and sinks of energy mass and momentum A complete understanding of Space Weather would require specifying and an ability to predict each link in this web One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program One way to do this ranking is to identify the sources propagators and sinks and produce the simplest linked diagram of the components Such a diagram will be shown and used to discuss how longterm effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects

  8. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  9. Mean Element Propagations Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term evolution characteristics (and stability) of an orbit are best characterized using a mean element propagation of the perturbed two body variational equations of motion. The averaging process eliminates short period terms leaving only secular and long period effects. In this study, a non-traditional approach is taken that averages the variational equations using adaptive numerical techniques and then numerically integrating the resulting EOMs. Doing this avoids the Fourier series expansions and truncations required by the traditional analytic methods. The resultant numerical techniques can be easily adapted to propagations at most solar system bodies.

  10. Proceedings of the Thirteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions: the first focused on mobile satellite propagation; the second examined the propagation effects for frequencies above 10 GHz; and the third addressed studies devoted exclusively to the Olympus/Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Program.

  11. Effects of self-propagating synthesis reactant compact character on ignition, propagation, and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.W.; Richardson, G.Y.; Kunetz, J.M.; Schroeter, T.; McDonough, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    Studies of reactions involving Ti to produce TiC, TiB{sub 2}, TiC + TiB{sub 2}, or 3TiB{sub 2} + 5Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ignited at one end of test plates showed that reactant powder compact densities were a major factor in the reaction propagation rate along the plate, i.e., a maximum in propagation rate was observed at {approx}60 {plus minus} 10% of theoretical density. At higher densities, propagation rates not only decreased but terminated due to self extinction in some cases or failed to ignite and propagate, typically at {ge}90% of theoretical density. Both reactant particle size and shape can also affect results, i.e., compacts of large (200 {mu}m in diameter) Ti particles, Ti flakes or foil, or wires failed to ignite or had slower propagation rates. Also, the ignition and propagation rates of carbon fiber tows infiltrated with titanium metal powders depended significantly on the local thermal conductivity. However, overall propagation rates for a given range of reactant compact microstructures increased with the heat of the reaction involved.

  12. Propagation of Innovations in Networked Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Winter A.; Jones, Andy; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel paradigm was developed to study the behavior of groups of networked people searching a problem space. The authors examined how different network structures affect the propagation of information in laboratory-created groups. Participants made numerical guesses and received scores that were also made available to their neighbors in the…

  13. Aircraft noise and its nearfield propagation computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin

    2012-08-01

    Noise generated by civil transport aircraft during take-off and approach-to-land phases of operation is an environmental problem. The aircraft noise problem is firstly reviewed in this article. The review is followed by a description and assessment of a number of sound propagation methods suitable for applications with a background mean flow field pertinent to aircraft noise. Of the three main areas of the noise problem, i.e. generation, propagation, and radiation, propagation provides a vital link between near-field noise generation and far-field radiation. Its accurate assessment ensures the overall validity of a prediction model. Of the various classes of propagation equations, linearised Euler equations are often casted in either time domain or frequency domain. The equations are often solved numerically by computational aeroacoustics techniques, bur are subject to the onset of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability modes which may ruin the solutions. Other forms of linearised equations, e.g. acoustic perturbation equations have been proposed, with differing degrees of success.

  14. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  15. Optical system defect propagation in ABCD systems.

    PubMed

    McKinley, W G; Yura, H T; Hanson, S G

    1988-05-01

    We describe how optical system defects (tilt/jitter, decenter, and despace) propagate through an arbitrary paraxial optical system that can be described by an ABCD ray transfer matrix. A pedagogical example is given that demonstrates the effect of alignment errors on a typical optical system. PMID:19745889

  16. Effect-specific analysis of propagation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortgies, G.; Ruecker, F.; Dintelmann, F.; Jakoby, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of propagation measurements with the satellite OLYMPUS carried out at 12.5, 20, and 30 GHz at the Research Center of the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom are discussed. In particular, attenuation, scintillation, and depolarization measurements are analyzed with special emphasis on frequency scaling of the various effects.

  17. Propagating waves can explain irregular neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keane, Adam; Gong, Pulin

    2015-01-28

    Cortical neurons in vivo fire quite irregularly. Previous studies about the origin of such irregular neural dynamics have given rise to two major models: a balanced excitation and inhibition model, and a model of highly synchronized synaptic inputs. To elucidate the network mechanisms underlying synchronized synaptic inputs and account for irregular neural dynamics, we investigate a spatially extended, conductance-based spiking neural network model. We show that propagating wave patterns with complex dynamics emerge from the network model. These waves sweep past neurons, to which they provide highly synchronized synaptic inputs. On the other hand, these patterns only emerge from the network with balanced excitation and inhibition; our model therefore reconciles the two major models of irregular neural dynamics. We further demonstrate that the collective dynamics of propagating wave patterns provides a mechanistic explanation for a range of irregular neural dynamics, including the variability of spike timing, slow firing rate fluctuations, and correlated membrane potential fluctuations. In addition, in our model, the distributions of synaptic conductance and membrane potential are non-Gaussian, consistent with recent experimental data obtained using whole-cell recordings. Our work therefore relates the propagating waves that have been widely observed in the brain to irregular neural dynamics. These results demonstrate that neural firing activity, although appearing highly disordered at the single-neuron level, can form dynamical coherent structures, such as propagating waves at the population level. PMID:25632135

  18. Using Least Squares for Error Propagation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The method of least-squares (LS) has a built-in procedure for estimating the standard errors (SEs) of the adjustable parameters in the fit model: They are the square roots of the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. This means that one can use least-squares to obtain numerical values of propagated errors by defining the target quantities as…

  19. Propagation of coherent light pulses with PHASE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrdt, J.; Flechsig, U.; Grizzoli, W.; Siewert, F.

    2014-09-01

    The current status of the software package PHASE for the propagation of coherent light pulses along a synchrotron radiation beamline is presented. PHASE is based on an asymptotic expansion of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral (stationary phase approximation) which is usually truncated at the 2nd order. The limits of this approximation as well as possible extensions to higher orders are discussed. The accuracy is benchmarked against a direct integration of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral. Long range slope errors of optical elements can be included by means of 8th order polynomials in the optical element coordinates w and l. Only recently, a method for the description of short range slope errors has been implemented. The accuracy of this method is evaluated and examples for realistic slope errors are given. PHASE can be run either from a built-in graphical user interface or from any script language. The latter method provides substantial flexibility. Optical elements including apertures can be combined. Complete wave packages can be propagated, as well. Fourier propagators are included in the package, thus, the user may choose between a variety of propagators. Several means to speed up the computation time were tested - among them are the parallelization in a multi core environment and the parallelization on a cluster.

  20. LMSS propagation modeling at Virginia Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.; Barts, R. Michael; Bostian, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    Recent efforts in the modeling of land mobile satellite systems are reported. These include descriptions of a simple model for prediction of fading statistics, a propagation simulator, and results from studies using the simulator. Predictions are compared to available measured data.

  1. Cosmic Ray Origin, Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 sessions of the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Salt Lake City, which were devoted to issues of origin/composition, acceleration and propagation.

  2. ACTS propagation terminal prototype planning and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Pergal, F.; Chakraborty, D.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The planning and design of a prototype propagation receiving terminal for beacon signals at 27 and 20 GHz bands are examined. The developmental plan is discussed, followed by technical design considerations including, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system salient features and frequency plan, beacon signal parameters and specifications, system calculations, and terminal hardware design issues.

  3. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  4. Relativistic shock propagation in nonuniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatyk, B. I.

    1985-10-01

    Strong shocks will propagate in much the same way whether they are non- or ultrarelativistic. An approximate law is proposed to describe the motion of a strong, adiabatic, arbitrarily relativistic shock through an initially nonrelativistic medium having any desired density distribution.

  5. Rupture Propagation for Stochastic Fault Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, P.; Lavallee, D.; Archuleta, R.

    2003-12-01

    The inversion of strong motion data of large earhquakes give the spatial distribution of pre-stress on the ruptured faults and it can be partially reproduced by stochastic models, but a fundamental question remains: how rupture propagates, constrained by the presence of spatial heterogeneity? For this purpose we investigate how the underlying random variables, that control the pre-stress spatial variability, condition the propagation of the rupture. Two stochastic models of prestress distributions are considered, respectively based on Cauchy and Gaussian random variables. The parameters of the two stochastic models have values corresponding to the slip distribution of the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake. We use a finite difference code to simulate the spontaneous propagation of shear rupture on a flat fault in a 3D continuum elastic body. The friction law is the slip dependent friction law. The simulations show that the propagation of the rupture front is more complex, incoherent or snake-like for a prestress distribution based on Cauchy random variables. This may be related to the presence of a higher number of asperities in this case. These simulations suggest that directivity is stronger in the Cauchy scenario, compared to the smoother rupture of the Gauss scenario.

  6. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  7. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  8. Predicting clutter during anomalous propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Maurer, Donald E.; Musser, Keith L.

    1988-06-01

    Excessive clutter caused by anomalous propagation conditions severely degrades radar performance in many regions of the world. This article describes methods that can be used to predict anomalous clutter amplitude for site-specific radar parameters, terrain features, and atmospheric conditions and to predict the effects of radar Doppler processing on evaporation-ducted sea clutter.

  9. Virus isolation and propagation in embryonating eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The embryonating egg is one of the most versatile, easy to work with, and widely used host systems for the isolation and propagation of avian viruses. The embryonating chicken egg (ECE) is the most commonly available system that is both specific pathogen free and supports the replication of viruses...

  10. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…